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Sample records for splice donor site

  1. Thermodynamic Modeling of Donor Splice Site Recognition in pre-mRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalberts, Daniel P.; Garland, Jeffrey A.

    2004-03-01

    When eukaryotic genes are edited by the spliceosome, the first step in intron recognition is the binding of a U1 snRNA with the donor (5') splice site. We model this interaction thermodynamically to identify splice sites. Applied to a set of 65 annotated genes, our Finding with Binding method achieves a significant separation between real and false sites. Analyzing binding patterns allows us to discard a large number of decoy sites. Our results improve statistics-based methods for donor site recognition, demonstrating the promise of physical modeling to find functional elements in the genome.

  2. Thermodynamic modeling of donor splice site recognition in pre-mRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, Jeffrey A.; Aalberts, Daniel P.

    2004-04-01

    When eukaryotic genes are edited by the spliceosome, the first step in intron recognition is the binding of a U1 small nuclear RNA with the donor ( 5' ) splice site. We model this interaction thermodynamically to identify splice sites. Applied to a set of 65 annotated genes, our “finding with binding” method achieves a significant separation between real and false sites. Analyzing binding patterns allows us to discard a large number of decoy sites. Our results improve statistics-based methods for donor site recognition, demonstrating the promise of physical modeling to find functional elements in the genome.

  3. A computational approach for prediction of donor splice sites with improved accuracy.

    PubMed

    Meher, Prabina Kumar; Sahu, Tanmaya Kumar; Rao, A R; Wahi, S D

    2016-09-01

    Identification of splice sites is important due to their key role in predicting the exon-intron structure of protein coding genes. Though several approaches have been developed for the prediction of splice sites, further improvement in the prediction accuracy will help predict gene structure more accurately. This paper presents a computational approach for prediction of donor splice sites with higher accuracy. In this approach, true and false splice sites were first encoded into numeric vectors and then used as input in artificial neural network (ANN), support vector machine (SVM) and random forest (RF) for prediction. ANN and SVM were found to perform equally and better than RF, while tested on HS3D and NN269 datasets. Further, the performance of ANN, SVM and RF were analyzed by using an independent test set of 50 genes and found that the prediction accuracy of ANN was higher than that of SVM and RF. All the predictors achieved higher accuracy while compared with the existing methods like NNsplice, MEM, MDD, WMM, MM1, FSPLICE, GeneID and ASSP, using the independent test set. We have also developed an online prediction server (PreDOSS) available at http://cabgrid.res.in:8080/predoss, for prediction of donor splice sites using the proposed approach. PMID:27302911

  4. A novel donor splice-site mutation of major intrinsic protein gene associated with congenital cataract in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lu; Liu, Wenqiang; Feng, Wenguo; Wang, Xing; Dang, Hui; Gao, Luna; Yao, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To identify the disease-causing gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant congenital cataract. Methods Clinical and ophthalmologic examinations were performed on all members of a Chinese family with congenital cataract. Nine genes associated with congenital cataract were screened using direct DNA sequencing. Mutations were confirmed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The mutated major intrinsic protein (MIP) minigene, which carries the disease-causing splice-site mutation, and the wild-type (WT) MIP minigene were constructed using the pcDNA3.1 expression vector. Wild-type and mutant MIP minigene constructs were transiently transfected into HeLa cells. After 48 h of incubation at 37 °C, total RNA isolation and reverse transcription (RT)–PCR analysis were performed, and PCR products were separated and confirmed with sequencing. Results Direct DNA sequence analysis identified a novel splice-site mutation in intron 3 (c.606+1 G>A) of the MIP gene. To investigate the manner in which the splice donor mutation could affect mRNA splicing, WT and mutant MIP minigenes were inserted in the pcDNA3.1 (+) vector. Constructs were transfected into HeLa cells. RT–PCR analysis showed that the donor splice site mutation led to deletion of exon 3 in the mRNA encoded by the MIP gene. Conclusions The present study identified a novel donor splice-site mutation (c.606+1G>A) in the MIP gene in a Chinese family with congenital cataract. In vitro RT–PCR analysis showed that this splice-site mutation resulted in the deletion of exon 3 from mRNA encoded by the MIP gene. This is the first report to show that donor splice-site mutation in MIP gene can cause autosomal dominant congenital cataract. PMID:24319327

  5. A novel splice donor site mutation in EPHA2 caused congenital cataract in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Juan; He, Sijie; Wang, Lejin; Li, Jiankang; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Xiuqing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital cataract is a rare disorder characterized by crystallin denaturation, which becomes a major cause of childhood blindness. Although more than fifty pathogenic genes for congenital cataract have been reported, the genetic causes of many cataract patients remain unknown. In this study, the aim is to identify the genetic cause of a five-generation Chinese autosomal dominant congenital cataract family. Methods: Whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed on three affected and one unaffected member of the family, known causative genes were scanned first. Sanger sequencing was used to validate co-segregation of the candidate variant in the family. The impact on the transcript and amino acid sequences of the variant was further analyzed. Results: We identified a novel splice donor site mutation c. 2825+1G >A in EPHA2 that was absent in public and in-house databases and showed co-segregation in the family. This variant resulted in an altered splice that led to protein truncation. Conclusions: The mutation we identified was responsible for congenital cataract in our studied family. Our findings broaden the spectrum of causative mutations in EPHA2 gene for congenital cataract and suggest that WES is an efficient strategy to scan variants in known causative genes for genetically heterogeneous diseases. PMID:27380975

  6. A novel splice donor site at nt 1534 is required for long-term maintenance of HPV31 genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Poppelreuther, Sven; Iftner, Thomas; Stubenrauch, Frank

    2008-01-05

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are small double-stranded DNA viruses that replicate as low copy number nuclear plasmids during the persistent phase. HPV only possess nine open reading frames but extend their coding capabilities by alternative RNA splicing. We have identified in cell lines with replicating HPV31 genomes viral transcripts that connect the novel splice donor (SD) sites at nt 1426 and 1534 within the E1 replication gene to known splice acceptors at nt 3295 or 3332 within the E2/E4 region. These transcripts are polyadenylated and are present at low amounts in the non-productive and productive phase of the viral life cycle. Mutation of the novel splice sites in the context of HPV31 genomes revealed that the inactivation of SD1534 had only minor effects in short-term replication assays but displayed a low copy number phenotype in long-term cultures which might be due to the expression of alternative E1 circumflex E4 or yet unknown viral proteins. This suggests a regulatory role for minor splice sites within E1 for papillomavirus replication.

  7. Late-onset spastic paraplegia: Aberrant SPG11 transcripts generated by a novel splice site donor mutation.

    PubMed

    Kawarai, Toshitaka; Miyamoto, Ryosuke; Mori, Atsuko; Oki, Ryosuke; Tsukamoto-Miyashiro, Ai; Matsui, Naoko; Miyazaki, Yoshimichi; Orlacchio, Antonio; Izumi, Yuishin; Nishida, Yoshihiko; Kaji, Ryuji

    2015-12-15

    We identified a novel homozygous mutation in the splice site donor (SSD) of intron 30 (c.5866+1G>A) in consanguineous Japanese SPG11 siblings showing late-onset spastic paraplegia using the whole-exome sequencing. Phenotypic variability was observed, including age-at-onset, dysarthria and pes cavus. Coding DNA sequencing revealed that the mutation affected the recognition of the constitutive SSD of intron 30, splicing upstream onto a nearby cryptic SSD in exon 30. The use of constitutive splice sites of intron 29 was confirmed by sequencing. The mutant transcripts are mostly subject to degradation by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay system. SPG11 transcripts, escaping from the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway, would generate a truncated protein (p.Tyr1900Phefs5X) containing the first 1899 amino acids and followed by 4 aberrant amino acids. This study showed a successful clinical application of whole-exome sequencing in spastic paraplegia and demonstrated a further evidence of allelic heterogeneity in SPG11. The confirmation of aberrant transcript by splice site mutation is a prerequisite for a more precise molecular diagnosis. PMID:26671123

  8. Utilisation of a cryptic non-canonical donor splice site of the gene encoding PARAFIBROMIN is associated with familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, K; Cavaco, B; Bowl, M; Harding, B; Young, A; Thakker, R

    2005-01-01

    More than 99% of all splice sites conform to consensus sequences that usually include the invariant dinucleotides gt and ag at the 5' and 3' ends of the introns, respectively. We report on the utilisation of a non-consensus (non-canonical) donor splice site within exon 1 of the HRPT2 gene in familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism (FIHP). HRPT2 mutations are more frequently associated with the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome (HPT-JT). Patients with FIHP were identified to have a donor splice site mutation, IVS1+1 g→a, and the consequences of this for RNA processing were investigated. The mutant mRNA lacked 30 bp and DNA sequence analysis revealed this to result from utilisation of an alternative cryptic non-canonical donor splice site (gaatgt) in exon 1 together with the normally occurring acceptor splice site in intron 1. Translation of this mutant mRNA predicted the in-frame loss of 10 amino acids in the encoded protein, termed PARAFIBROMIN. Thus, these FIHP patients are utilising a ga-ag splice site pair, which until recently was considered to be incompatible with splicing but is now known to occur as a rare (<0.02%) normal splicing variant. PMID:16061557

  9. G to A substitution in 5{prime} donor splice site of introns 18 and 48 of COL1A1 gene of type I collagen results in different splicing alternatives in osteogenesis imperfecta type I cell strains

    SciTech Connect

    Willing, M.; Deschenes, S.

    1994-09-01

    We have identified a G to A substitution in the 5{prime} donor splice site of intron 18 of one COL1A1 allele in two unrelated families with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I. A third OI type I family has a G to A substitution at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele. Both mutations abolish normal splicing and lead to reduced steady-state levels of mRNA from the mutant COL1A1 allele. The intron 18 mutation leads to both exon 18 skipping in the mRNA and to utilization of a single alternative splice site near the 3{prime} end of exon 18. The latter results in deletion of the last 8 nucleotides of exon 18 from the mRNA, a shift in the translational reading-frame, and the creation of a premature termination codon in exon 19. Of the potential alternative 5{prime} splice sites in exon 18 and intron 18, the one utilized has a surrounding nucleotide sequence which most closely resembles that of the natural splice site. Although a G to A mutation was detected at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele in another OI type I family, nine complex alternative splicing patterns were identified by sequence analysis of cDNA clones derived from fibroblast mRNA from this cell strain. All result in partial or complete skipping of exon 48, with in-frame deletions of portions of exons 47 and/or 49. The different patterns of RNA splicing were not explained by their sequence homology with naturally occuring 5{prime} splice sites, but rather by recombination between highly homologous exon sequences, suggesting that we may not have identified the major splicing alternative(s) in this cell strain. Both G to A mutations result in decreased production of type I collagen, the common biochemical correlate of OI type I.

  10. Activation of c-myb by 5' retrovirus promoter insertion in myeloid neoplasms is dependent upon an intact alternative splice donor site (SD') in gag.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Jean Marie; Houzet, Laurent; Koller, Richard; Bies, Juraj; Wolff, Linda; Mougel, Marylène

    2004-12-20

    Alternative splicing in Mo-MuLV recruits a splice donor site, SD', within the gag that is required for optimal replication in vitro. Remarkably, this SD' site was also found to be utilized for production of oncogenic gag-myb fusion RNA in 100% of murine-induced myeloid leukemia (MML) in pristane-treated BALB/c mice. Therefore, we investigated the influence of silent mutations of SD' in this model. Although there was no decrease in the overall incidence of disease, there was a decrease in the incidence of myeloid leukemia with a concomitant increase in lymphoid leukemia. Importantly, there was a complete lack of myeloid tumors associated with 5' insertional mutagenic activation of c-myb, suggesting the specific requirement of the SD' site in this mechanism. PMID:15567434

  11. Activation of c-myb by 5' retrovirus promoter insertion in myeloid neoplasms is dependent upon an intact alternative splice donor site (SD') in gag

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, Jean Marie; Houzet, Laurent; Koller, Richard; Bies, Juraj; Wolff, Linda; Mougel, Marylene . E-mail: mmougel@univ-montp1.fr

    2004-12-20

    Alternative splicing in Mo-MuLV recruits a splice donor site, SD', within the gag that is required for optimal replication in vitro. Remarkably, this SD' site was also found to be utilized for production of oncogenic gag-myb fusion RNA in 100% of murine-induced myeloid leukemia (MML) in pristane-treated BALB/c mice. Therefore, we investigated the influence of silent mutations of SD' in this model. Although there was no decrease in the overall incidence of disease, there was a decrease in the incidence of myeloid leukemia with a concomitant increase in lymphoid leukemia. Importantly, there was a complete lack of myeloid tumors associated with 5' insertional mutagenic activation of c-myb, suggesting the specific requirement of the SD' site in this mechanism.

  12. Escape variants of the XPR1 gammaretrovirus receptor are rare due to reliance on a splice donor site and a short hypervariable loop

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoyu; Martin, Carrie; Bouchard, Christelle; Kozak, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Entry determinants in the XPR1 receptor for the xenotropic/polytropic mouse leukemia viruses (XP-MLVs) lie in its third and fourth putative extracellular loops (ECLs). The critical ECL3 receptor determinant overlies a splice donor and is evolutionarily conserved in vertebrate XPR1 genes; 2 of the 3 rare replacement mutations at this site destroy this receptor determinant. The 13 residue ECL4 is hypervariable, and replacement mutations carrying an intact ECL3 site alter but do not abolish receptor activity, including replacement of the entire loop with that of a jellyfish (Cnidaria) XPR1. Because ECL4 deletions are found in all X-MLV-infected Mus subspecies, we deleted each ECL4 residue to determine if deletion-associated restriction is residue-specific or is effected by loop size. All deletions influence receptor function, although different deletions affect different XP-MLVs. Thus, receptor usage of a constrained splice site and a loop that tolerates mutations severely limits the likelihood of host escape mutations. PMID:25151060

  13. Factor IXMadrid 2: a deletion/insertion in factor IX gene which abolishes the sequence of the donor junction at the exon IV-intron d splice site.

    PubMed Central

    Solera, J; Magallón, M; Martin-Villar, J; Coloma, A

    1992-01-01

    DNA from a patient with severe hemophilia B was evaluated by RFLP analysis, producing results which suggested the existence of a partial deletion within the factor IX gene. The deletion was further localized and characterized by PCR amplification and sequencing. The altered allele has a 4,442-bp deletion which removes both the donor splice site located at the 5' end of intron d and the two last coding nucleotides located at the 3' end of exon IV in the normal factor IX gene; this fragment has been replaced by a 47-bp sequence from the normal factor IX gene, although this fragment has been inserted in inverted orientation. Two homologous sequences have been discovered at the ends of the deleted DNA fragment. Images Figure 1 PMID:1346483

  14. A Polymorphism in the Splice Donor Site of ZNF419 Results in the Novel Renal Cell Carcinoma-Associated Minor Histocompatibility Antigen ZAPHIR

    PubMed Central

    Broen, Kelly; Levenga, Henriette; Vos, Johanna; van Bergen, Kees; Fredrix, Hanny; Greupink-Draaisma, Annelies; Kester, Michel; Falkenburg, J. H. Frederik; de Witte, Theo; Griffioen, Marieke; Dolstra, Harry

    2011-01-01

    Nonmyeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) can induce remission in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC), but this graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect is often accompanied by graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Here, we evaluated minor histocompatibility antigen (MiHA)-specific T cell responses in two patients with metastatic RCC who were treated with reduced-intensity conditioning SCT followed by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI). One patient had stable disease and emergence of SMCY.A2-specific CD8+ T cells was observed after DLI with the potential of targeting SMCY-expressing RCC tumor cells. The second patient experienced partial regression of lung metastases from whom we isolated a MiHA-specific CTL clone with the capability of targeting RCC cell lines. Whole genome association scanning revealed that this CTL recognizes a novel HLA-B7-restricted MiHA, designated ZAPHIR, resulting from a polymorphism in the splice donor site of the ZNF419 gene. Tetramer analysis showed that emergence of ZAPHIR-specific CD8+ T cells in peripheral blood occurred in the absence of GVHD. Furthermore, the expression of ZAPHIR in solid tumor cell lines indicates the involvement of ZAPHIR-specific CD8+ T cell responses in selective GVT immunity. These findings illustrate that the ZNF419-encoded MiHA ZAPHIR is an attractive target for specific immunotherapy after allogeneic SCT. PMID:21738768

  15. Splicing defects in the COL3A1 gene: marked preference for 5' (donor) spice-site mutations in patients with exon-skipping mutations and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV.

    PubMed Central

    Schwarze, U; Goldstein, J A; Byers, P H

    1997-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV results from mutations in the COL3A1 gene, which encodes the constituent chains of type III procollagen. We have identified, in 33 unrelated individuals or families with EDS type IV, mutations that affect splicing, of which 30 are point mutations at splice junctions and 3 are small deletions that remove splice-junction sequences and partial exon sequences. Except for one point mutation at a donor site, which leads to partial intron inclusion, and a single base-pair substitution at an acceptor site, which gives rise to inclusion of the complete upstream intron into the mature mRNA, all mutations result in deletion of a single exon as the only splice alteration. Of the exon-skipping mutations that are due to single base substitutions, which we have identified in 28 separate individuals, only two affect the splice-acceptor site. The underrepresentation of splice acceptor-site mutations suggests that the favored consequence of 3' mutations is the use of an alternative acceptor site that creates a null allele with a premature-termination codon. The phenotypes of those mutations may differ, with respect to either their severity or their symptomatic range, from the usual presentation of EDS type IV and thus have been excluded from analysis. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:9399899

  16. A novel point mutation (G-1 to T) in a 5' splice donor site of intron 13 of the dystrophin gene results in exon skipping and is responsible for Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, Y.; Nishio, H.; Kitoh, Y.; Takeshima, Y.; Narita, N.; Wada, H.; Yokoyama, M.; Nakamura, H.; Matsuo, M.

    1994-01-01

    The mutations in one-third of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients remain unknown, as they do not involve gross rearrangements of the dystrophin gene. We now report a defect in the splicing of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA), resulting from a maternally inherited mutation of the dystrophin gene in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. This defect results from a G-to-T transversion at the terminal nucleotide of exon 13, within the 5' splice site of intron 13, and causes complete skipping of exon 13 during processing of dystrophin pre-mRNA. The predicted polypeptide encoded by the aberrant mRNA is a truncated dystrophin lacking 40 amino acids from the amino-proximal end of the rod domain. This is the first report of an intraexon point mutation that completely inactivates a 5' splice donor site in dystrophin pre-mRNA. Analysis of the genomic context of the G-1-to-T mutation at the 5' splice site supports the exon-definition model of pre-mRNA splicing and contributes to the understanding of splice-site selection. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:8279470

  17. A novel point mutation (G-1 to T) in a 5' splice donor site of intron 13 of the dystrophin gene results in exon skipping and is responsible for Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Y; Nishio, H; Kitoh, Y; Takeshima, Y; Narita, N; Wada, H; Yokoyama, M; Nakamura, H; Matsuo, M

    1994-01-01

    The mutations in one-third of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients remain unknown, as they do not involve gross rearrangements of the dystrophin gene. We now report a defect in the splicing of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA), resulting from a maternally inherited mutation of the dystrophin gene in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. This defect results from a G-to-T transversion at the terminal nucleotide of exon 13, within the 5' splice site of intron 13, and causes complete skipping of exon 13 during processing of dystrophin pre-mRNA. The predicted polypeptide encoded by the aberrant mRNA is a truncated dystrophin lacking 40 amino acids from the amino-proximal end of the rod domain. This is the first report of an intraexon point mutation that completely inactivates a 5' splice donor site in dystrophin pre-mRNA. Analysis of the genomic context of the G-1-to-T mutation at the 5' splice site supports the exon-definition model of pre-mRNA splicing and contributes to the understanding of splice-site selection. PMID:8279470

  18. A novel point mutation (G[sup [minus]1] to T) in a 5[prime] splice donor site of intron 13 of the dystrophin gene results in exon skipping and is responsible for Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Yoko; Nishio, Hisahide; Kitoh, Yoshihiko; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Narita, Naoko; Wada, Hiroko; Yokoyama, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Hajime; Matsuo, Masafumi )

    1994-01-01

    The mutations in one-third of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients remain unknown, as they do not involve gross rearrangements of the dystrophin gene. The authors now report a defect in the splicing of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA), resulting from a maternally inherited mutation of the dystrophin gene in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. This defect results from a G-to-T transversion at the terminal nucleotide of exon 13, within the 5[prime] splice site of intron 13, and causes complete skipping of exon 13 during processing of dystrophin pre-mRNA. The predicted polypeptide encoded by the aberrant mRNA is a truncated dystrophin lacking 40 amino acids from the amino-proximal end of the rod domain. This is the first report of an intraexon point mutation that completely inactivates a 5[prime] splice donor site in dystrophin pre-mRNA. Analysis of the genomic context of the G[sup [minus]1]-to-T mutation at the 5[prime] splice site supports the exon-definition model of pre-mRNA splicing and contributes to the understanding of splice-site selection. 48 refs., 5 figs.

  19. ERISdb: a database of plant splice sites and splicing signals.

    PubMed

    Szcześniak, Michał Wojciech; Kabza, Michał; Pokrzywa, Rafał; Gudyś, Adam; Makałowska, Izabela

    2013-02-01

    Splicing is one of the major contributors to observed spatiotemporal diversification of transcripts and proteins in metazoans. There are numerous factors that affect the process, but splice sites themselves along with the adjacent splicing signals are critical here. Unfortunately, there is still little known about splicing in plants and, consequently, further research in some fields of plant molecular biology will encounter difficulties. Keeping this in mind, we performed a large-scale analysis of splice sites in eight plant species, using novel algorithms and tools developed by us. The analyses included identification of orthologous splice sites, polypyrimidine tracts and branch sites. Additionally we identified putative intronic and exonic cis-regulatory motifs, U12 introns as well as splice sites in 45 microRNA genes in five plant species. We also provide experimental evidence for plant splice sites in the form of expressed sequence tag and RNA-Seq data. All the data are stored in a novel database called ERISdb and are freely available at http://lemur.amu.edu.pl/share/ERISdb/. PMID:23299413

  20. Factor IX[sub Madrid 2]: A deletion/insertion in Facotr IX gene which abolishes the sequence of the donor junction at the exon IV-intron d splice site

    SciTech Connect

    Solera, J. ); Magallon, M.; Martin-Villar, J. ); Coloma, A. )

    1992-02-01

    DNA from a patient with severe hemophilia B was evaluated by RFLP analysis, producing results which suggested the existence of a partial deletion within the factor IX gene. The deletion was further localized and characterized by PCR amplification and sequencing. The altered allele has a 4,442-bp deletion which removes both the donor splice site located at the 5[prime] end of intron d and the two last coding nucleotides located at the 3[prime] end of exon IV in the normal factor IX gene; this fragment has been inserted in inverted orientation. Two homologous sequences have been discovered at the ends of the deleted DNA fragment.

  1. A novel donor splice site in intron 11 of the CFTR gene, created by mutation 1811 + 1.6kbA {yields} G, produces a new exon: High frequency in spanish cystic fibrosis chromosomes and association with severe phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Chillon, M.; Casals, T.; Gimenez, J.; Ramos, D.; Nunes, V.; Estivill, X.; Doerk, T.; Will, K.; Fonknechten, N.

    1995-03-01

    mRNA analysis of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene in tissues of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients has allowed us to detect a cryptic exon. The new exon involves 49 base pairs between exons 11 and 12 and is due to a point mutation (1811+1.6bA{yields}G) that creates a new donor splice site in intron 11. Semiquantitative mRNA analysis showed that 1811+1.6kbA{r_arrow}G-mRNA was 5-10-fold less abundant than {triangle}F508 mRNA. Mutations 1811+1.6kbA{yields}G was found in 21 Spanish and 1 German CF chromosome(s), making it the fourth-most-frequent mutation (2%) in the Spanish population. Individuals with genotype {triangle}F508/1811+1.6kbA{yields}G have only 1%-3% of normal CFTR mRNA. This loss of 97% of normal CFTR mRNA must be responsible for the pancreatic insufficiency and for the severe CF phenotype in these patients. 30 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. A novel donor splice site in intron 11 of the CFTR gene, created by mutation 1811+1.6kbA-->G, produces a new exon: high frequency in Spanish cystic fibrosis chromosomes and association with severe phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Chillón, M; Dörk, T; Casals, T; Giménez, J; Fonknechten, N; Will, K; Ramos, D; Nunes, V; Estivill, X

    1995-01-01

    mRNA analysis of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene in tissues of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients has allowed us to detect a cryptic exon. The new exon involves 49 base pairs between exons 11 and 12 and is due to a point mutation (1811+1.6kbA-->G) that creates a new donor splice site in intron 11. Semiquantitative mRNA analysis showed that 1811+1.6kbA-->G-mRNA was 5-10-fold less abundant than delta F508 mRNA. Mutation 1811+1.6kbA-->G was found in 21 Spanish and 1 German CF chromosomes, making it the fourth-most-frequent mutation (2%) in the Spanish population. Individuals with genotype delta F508/1811+1.6kbA-->G have only 1%-3% of normal CFTR mRNA. This loss of 97% of normal CFTR mRNA must be responsible for the pancreatic insufficiency and for the severe CF phenotype in these patients. Images Figure 3 PMID:7534040

  3. Splice junctions in adenovirus 2 early region 4 mRNAs: multiple splice sites produce 18 to 24 RNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Tigges, M A; Raskas, H J

    1984-01-01

    We localized the splice junctions in adenovirus 2 early region 4 (E4) mRNAs. Processing of the E4 precursor RNA positioned the donor splice site of the 5' leader sequence adjacent to acceptor sites near the 5' ends of five of the six open reading regions in the E4 transcription unit. Of particular interest among the E4 mRNAs is an extensively spliced class which includes multiple species with sizes ranging from 1.1 to 0.75 kilobases (kb). Purified 1.1- to 0.75-kb mRNAs specified at least 10 polypeptides in vitro. We detected eight acceptor and two donor splice sites utilized in the deletion of the intron from the 3' portion of these mRNAs. E4 RNAs were isolated from the cytoplasm of infected cells at 5, 9, 12, and 18 h after infection. The E4 mRNAs were present throughout infection, but different members of the 1.1- to 0.7-kb class were predominant at each time assayed. Alternate splicing of the 3.0-kb E4 precursor RNA can generate as many as 25 mRNAs that encode at least 16 polypeptides. Images PMID:6336328

  4. Role of the 3′ Splice Site in U12-Dependent Intron Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Rosemary C.; Peris, Marian J.; Seyboldt, Andrew S.; Padgett, Richard A.

    2001-01-01

    U12-dependent introns containing alterations of the 3′ splice site AC dinucleotide or alterations in the spacing between the branch site and the 3′ splice site were examined for their effects on splice site selection in vivo and in vitro. Using an intron with a 5′ splice site AU dinucleotide, any nucleotide could serve as the 3′-terminal nucleotide, although a C residue was most active, while a U residue was least active. The penultimate A residue, by contrast, was essential for 3′ splice site function. A branch site-to-3′ splice site spacing of less than 10 or more than 20 nucleotides strongly activated alternative 3′ splice sites. A strong preference for a spacing of about 12 nucleotides was observed. The combined in vivo and in vitro results suggest that the branch site is recognized in the absence of an active 3′ splice site but that formation of the prespliceosomal complex A requires an active 3′ splice site. Furthermore, the U12-type spliceosome appears to be unable to scan for a distal 3′ splice site. PMID:11238930

  5. Splice Sites Seldom Slide: Intron Evolution in Oomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Sêton Bocco, Steven; Csűrös, Miklós

    2016-01-01

    We examine exon junctions near apparent amino acid insertions and deletions in alignments of orthologous protein-coding genes. In 1,917 ortholog families across nine oomycete genomes, 10–20% of introns are near an alignment gap, indicating at first sight that splice-site displacements are frequent. We designed a robust algorithmic procedure for the delineation of intron-containing homologous regions, and combined it with a parsimony-based reconstruction of intron loss, gain, and splice-site shift events on a phylogeny. The reconstruction implies that 12% of introns underwent an acceptor-site shift, and 10% underwent a donor-site shift. In order to offset gene annotation problems, we amended the procedure with the reannotation of intron boundaries using alignment evidence. The corresponding reconstruction involves much fewer intron gain and splice-site shift events. The frequency of acceptor- and donor-side shifts drops to 4% and 3%, respectively, which are not much different from what one would expect by random codon insertions and deletions. In other words, gaps near exon junctions are mostly artifacts of gene annotation rather than evidence of sliding intron boundaries. Our study underscores the importance of using well-supported gene structure annotations in comparative studies. When transcription evidence is not available, we propose a robust ancestral reconstruction procedure that corrects misannotated intron boundaries using sequence alignments. The results corroborate the view that boundary shifts and complete intron sliding are only accidental in eukaryotic genome evolution and have a negligible impact on protein diversity. PMID:27412607

  6. Two novel splicing mutations in the SLC45A2 gene cause Oculocutaneous Albinism Type IV by unmasking cryptic splice sites.

    PubMed

    Straniero, Letizia; Rimoldi, Valeria; Soldà, Giulia; Mauri, Lucia; Manfredini, Emanuela; Andreucci, Elena; Bargiacchi, Sara; Penco, Silvana; Gesu, Giovanni P; Del Longo, Alessandra; Piozzi, Elena; Asselta, Rosanna; Primignani, Paola

    2015-09-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is characterized by hypopigmentation of the skin, hair and eye, and by ophthalmologic abnormalities caused by a deficiency in melanin biosynthesis. OCA type IV (OCA4) is one of the four commonly recognized forms of albinism, and is determined by mutation in the SLC45A2 gene. Here, we investigated the genetic basis of OCA4 in an Italian child. The mutational screening of the SLC45A2 gene identified two novel potentially pathogenic splicing mutations: a synonymous transition (c.888G>A) involving the last nucleotide of exon 3 and a single-nucleotide insertion (c.1156+2dupT) within the consensus sequence of the donor splice site of intron 5. As computer-assisted analysis for mutant splice-site prediction was not conclusive, we investigated the effects on pre-mRNA splicing of these two variants by using an in vitro minigene approach. Production of mutant transcripts in HeLa cells demonstrated that both mutations cause the almost complete abolishment of the physiologic donor splice site, with the concomitant unmasking of cryptic donor splice sites. To our knowledge, this work represents the first in-depth molecular characterization of splicing defects in a OCA4 patient. PMID:26016411

  7. Correlated Evolution of Nucleotide Positions within Splice Sites in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Denisov, Stepan; Bazykin, Georgii; Favorov, Alexander; Mironov, Andrey; Gelfand, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Splice sites (SSs)—short nucleotide sequences flanking introns—are under selection for spliceosome binding, and adhere to consensus sequences. However, non-consensus nucleotides, many of which probably reduce SS performance, are frequent. Little is known about the mechanisms maintaining such apparently suboptimal SSs. Here, we study the correlations between strengths of nucleotides occupying different positions of the same SS. Such correlations may arise due to epistatic interactions between positions (i.e., a situation when the fitness effect of a nucleotide in one position depends on the nucleotide in another position), their evolutionary history, or to other reasons. Within both the intronic and the exonic parts of donor SSs, nucleotides that increase (decrease) SS strength tend to co-occur with other nucleotides increasing (respectively, decreasing) it, consistent with positive epistasis. Between the intronic and exonic parts of donor SSs, the correlations of nucleotide strengths tend to be negative, consistent with negative epistasis. In the course of evolution, substitutions at a donor SS tend to decrease the strength of its exonic part, and either increase or do not change the strength of its intronic part. In acceptor SSs, the situation is more complicated; the correlations between adjacent positions appear to be driven mainly by avoidance of the AG dinucleotide which may cause aberrant splicing. In summary, both the content and the evolution of SSs is shaped by a complex network of interdependences between adjacent nucleotides that respond to a range of sometimes conflicting selective constraints. PMID:26642327

  8. Correlated Evolution of Nucleotide Positions within Splice Sites in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Denisov, Stepan; Bazykin, Georgii; Favorov, Alexander; Mironov, Andrey; Gelfand, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Splice sites (SSs)--short nucleotide sequences flanking introns--are under selection for spliceosome binding, and adhere to consensus sequences. However, non-consensus nucleotides, many of which probably reduce SS performance, are frequent. Little is known about the mechanisms maintaining such apparently suboptimal SSs. Here, we study the correlations between strengths of nucleotides occupying different positions of the same SS. Such correlations may arise due to epistatic interactions between positions (i.e., a situation when the fitness effect of a nucleotide in one position depends on the nucleotide in another position), their evolutionary history, or to other reasons. Within both the intronic and the exonic parts of donor SSs, nucleotides that increase (decrease) SS strength tend to co-occur with other nucleotides increasing (respectively, decreasing) it, consistent with positive epistasis. Between the intronic and exonic parts of donor SSs, the correlations of nucleotide strengths tend to be negative, consistent with negative epistasis. In the course of evolution, substitutions at a donor SS tend to decrease the strength of its exonic part, and either increase or do not change the strength of its intronic part. In acceptor SSs, the situation is more complicated; the correlations between adjacent positions appear to be driven mainly by avoidance of the AG dinucleotide which may cause aberrant splicing. In summary, both the content and the evolution of SSs is shaped by a complex network of interdependences between adjacent nucleotides that respond to a range of sometimes conflicting selective constraints. PMID:26642327

  9. A novel computational method for the identification of plant alternative splice sites.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ying; Han, Jiuqiang; Zhong, Dexing; Liu, Ruiling

    2013-02-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) increases protein diversity by generating multiple transcript isoforms from a single gene in higher eukaryotes. Up to 48% of plant genes exhibit alternative splicing, which has proven to be involved in some important plant functions such as the stress response. A hybrid feature extraction approach which combing the position weight matrix (PWM) with the increment of diversity (ID) was proposed to represent the base conservative level (BCL) near splice sites and the similarity level of two datasets, respectively. Using the extracted features, the support vector machine (SVM) was applied to classify alternative and constitutive splice sites. By the proposed algorithm, 80.8% of donor sites and 85.4% of acceptor sites were correctly classified. It is anticipated that the novel computational method is promising for the identification of AS sites in plants. PMID:23313482

  10. A 32-nucleotide exon-splicing enhancer regulates usage of competing 5' splice sites in a differential internal exon.

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, M B; Bryan, J; Cooper, T A; Berget, S M

    1995-01-01

    Large alternatively spliced internal exons are uncommon in vertebrate genes, and the mechanisms governing their usage are unknown. In this report, we examined alternative splicing of a 1-kb internal exon from the human caldesmon gene containing two regulated 5' splice sites that are 687 nucleotides apart. In cell lines normally splicing caldesmon RNA via utilization of the exon-internal 5' splice site, inclusion of the differential exon required a long purine-rich sequence located between the two competing 5' splice sites. This element consisted of four identical 32-nucleotide purine-rich repeats that resemble exon-splicing enhancers (ESE) identified in other genes. One 32-nucleotide repeat supported exon inclusion, repressed usage of the terminal 5' splice site, and functioned in a heterologous exon dependent on exon enhancers for inclusion, indicating that the caldesmon purine-rich sequence can be classified as an ESE. The ESE was required for utilization of the internal 5' splice site only in the presence of the competing 5' splice site and had no effect when placed downstream of the terminal 5' splice site. In the absence of the internal 5' splice site, the ESE activated a normally silent cryptic 5' splice site near the natural internal 5' splice site, indicating that the ESE stimulates upstream 5' splice site selection. We propose that the caldesmon ESE functions to regulate competition between two 5' splice sites within a differential internal exon. PMID:7623794

  11. A Phylogenetic Survey on the Structure of the HIV-1 Leader RNA Domain That Encodes the Splice Donor Signal

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Nancy; Das, Atze T.; Berkhout, Ben

    2016-01-01

    RNA splicing is a critical step in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication cycle because it controls the expression of the complex viral proteome. The major 5′ splice site (5′ss) that is positioned in the untranslated leader of the HIV-1 RNA transcript is of particular interest because it is used for the production of the more than 40 differentially spliced subgenomic mRNAs. HIV-1 splicing needs to be balanced tightly to ensure the proper levels of all viral proteins, including the Gag-Pol proteins that are translated from the unspliced RNA. We previously presented evidence that the major 5′ss is regulated by a repressive local RNA structure, the splice donor (SD) hairpin, that masks the 11 nucleotides (nts) of the 5′ss signal for recognition by U1 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) of the spliceosome machinery. A strikingly different multiple-hairpin RNA conformation was recently proposed for this part of the HIV-1 leader RNA. We therefore inspected the sequence of natural HIV-1 isolates in search for support, in the form of base pair (bp) co-variations, for the different RNA conformations. PMID:27455303

  12. A Phylogenetic Survey on the Structure of the HIV-1 Leader RNA Domain That Encodes the Splice Donor Signal.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Nancy; Das, Atze T; Berkhout, Ben

    2016-01-01

    RNA splicing is a critical step in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication cycle because it controls the expression of the complex viral proteome. The major 5' splice site (5'ss) that is positioned in the untranslated leader of the HIV-1 RNA transcript is of particular interest because it is used for the production of the more than 40 differentially spliced subgenomic mRNAs. HIV-1 splicing needs to be balanced tightly to ensure the proper levels of all viral proteins, including the Gag-Pol proteins that are translated from the unspliced RNA. We previously presented evidence that the major 5'ss is regulated by a repressive local RNA structure, the splice donor (SD) hairpin, that masks the 11 nucleotides (nts) of the 5'ss signal for recognition by U1 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) of the spliceosome machinery. A strikingly different multiple-hairpin RNA conformation was recently proposed for this part of the HIV-1 leader RNA. We therefore inspected the sequence of natural HIV-1 isolates in search for support, in the form of base pair (bp) co-variations, for the different RNA conformations. PMID:27455303

  13. SeeSite: Characterizing Relationships between Splice Junctions and Splicing Enhancers.

    PubMed

    Lo, Christine; Kakaradov, Boyko; Lokshtanov, Daniel; Boucher, Christina

    2014-01-01

    RNA splicing is a cellular process driven by the interaction between numerous regulatory sequences and binding sites, however, such interactions have been primarily explored by laboratory methods since computational tools largely ignore the relationship between different splicing elements. Current computational methods identify either splice sites or other regulatory sequences, such as enhancers and silencers. We present a novel approach for characterizing co-occurring relationships between splice site motifs and splicing enhancers. Our approach relies on an efficient algorithm for approximately solving Consensus Sequence with Outliers , an NP-complete string clustering problem. In particular, we give an algorithm for this problem that outputs near-optimal solutions in polynomial time. To our knowledge, this is the first formulation and computational attempt for detecting co-occurring sequence elements in RNA sequence data. Further, we demonstrate that SeeSite is capable of showing that certain ESEs are preferentially associated with weaker splice sites, and that there exists a co-occurrence relationship with splice site motifs. PMID:26356335

  14. Site-specific deletion in cauliflower mosaic virus DNA: possible involvement of RNA splicing and reverse transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hirochika, Hirohiko; Takatsuji, Hiroshi; Ubasawa, Aiko; Ikeda, Joh-E

    1985-01-01

    A frequent site-specific deletion was observed in the life cycle of cauliflower mosaic virus (S strain). Analysis of the sequence around the deletion site and the parental sequence implied that the deletion was promoted at sequences similar to the donor and acceptor consensus sequences of RNA splicing, designated as the deletion donor and acceptor sequences, respectively. To elucidate the mechanism of this site-specific deletion, point mutations were introduced into the deletion donor sequence (GT to GG or GA transversion). Deletion at the original deletion donor site did not occur in these mutants, instead, new (cryptic) donor sites were activated. All of these activated cryptic sites had sequences similar to the splicing consensus sequence. In all cases except one, the original deletion acceptor site was used. These results can be most readily explained by postulating that the site-specific deletion occurs by reverse transcription of spliced viral RNA. This frequent site-specific deletion was not observed in other strains. For a virus which replicates by reverse transcription, a mechanism to regulate the rate of splicing is required to ensure the intactness of the viral genome. We discuss the possibility that the S strain has a mutation in this regulatory mechanism. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 3.Fig. 5.Fig. 7. PMID:16453624

  15. Re-splicing of mature mRNA in cancer cells promotes activation of distant weak alternative splice sites

    PubMed Central

    Kameyama, Toshiki; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Mayeda, Akila

    2012-01-01

    Transcripts of the human tumor susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) are aberrantly spliced in many cancers. A major aberrant splicing event on the TSG101 pre-mRNA involves joining of distant alternative 5′ and 3′ splice sites within exon 2 and exon 9, respectively, resulting in the extensive elimination of the mRNA. The estimated strengths of the alternative splice sites are much lower than those of authentic splice sites. We observed that the equivalent aberrant mRNA could be generated from an intron-less TSG101 gene expressed ectopically in breast cancer cells. Remarkably, we identified a pathway-specific endogenous lariat RNA consisting solely of exonic sequences, predicted to be generated by a re-splicing between exon 2 and exon 9 on the spliced mRNA. Our results provide evidence for a two-step splicing pathway in which the initial constitutive splicing removes all 14 authentic splice sites, thereby bringing the weak alternative splice sites into close proximity. We also demonstrate that aberrant multiple-exon skipping of the fragile histidine triad (FHIT) pre-mRNA in cancer cells occurs via re-splicing of spliced FHIT mRNA. The re-splicing of mature mRNA can potentially generate mutation-independent diversity in cancer transcriptomes. Conversely, a mechanism may exist in normal cells to prevent potentially deleterious mRNA re-splicing events. PMID:22675076

  16. Splicing of many human genes involves sites embedded within introns

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Steven; Georgomanolis, Theodore; Zirkel, Anne; Diermeier, Sarah; O'Reilly, Dawn; Murphy, Shona; Längst, Gernot; Cook, Peter R.; Papantonis, Argyris

    2015-01-01

    The conventional model for splicing involves excision of each intron in one piece; we demonstrate this inaccurately describes splicing in many human genes. First, after switching on transcription of SAMD4A, a gene with a 134 kb-long first intron, splicing joins the 3′ end of exon 1 to successive points within intron 1 well before the acceptor site at exon 2 is made. Second, genome-wide analysis shows that >60% of active genes yield products generated by such intermediate intron splicing. These products are present at ∼15% the levels of primary transcripts, are encoded by conserved sequences similar to those found at canonical acceptors, and marked by distinctive structural and epigenetic features. Finally, using targeted genome editing, we demonstrate that inhibiting the formation of these splicing intermediates affects efficient exon–exon splicing. These findings greatly expand the functional and regulatory complexity of the human transcriptome. PMID:25897131

  17. Nucleotide sequence composition adjacent to intronic splice sites improves splicing efficiency via its effect on pre-mRNA local folding in fungi.

    PubMed

    Zafrir, Zohar; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-10-01

    RNA splicing is the central process of intron removal in eukaryotes known to regulate various cellular functions such as growth, development, and response to external signals. The canonical sequences indicating the splicing sites needed for intronic boundary recognition are well known. However, the roles and evolution of the local folding of intronic and exonic sequence features adjacent to splice sites has yet to be thoroughly studied. Here, focusing on four fungi (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Aspergillus nidulans, and Candida albicans), we performed for the first time a comprehensive high-resolution study aimed at characterizing the encoding of intronic splicing efficiency in pre-mRNA transcripts and its effect on intron evolution. Our analysis supports the conjecture that pre-mRNA local folding strength at intronic boundaries is under selective pressure, as it significantly affects splicing efficiency. Specifically, we show that in the immediate region of 12-30 nucleotides (nt) surrounding the intronic donor site there is a preference for weak pre-mRNA folding; similarly, in the region of 15-33 nt surrounding the acceptor and branch sites there is a preference for weak pre-mRNA folding. We also show that in most cases there is a preference for strong pre-mRNA folding further away from intronic splice sites. In addition, we demonstrate that these signals are not associated with gene-specific functions, and they correlate with splicing efficiency measurements (r = 0.77, P = 2.98 × 10(-21)) and with expression levels of the corresponding genes (P = 1.24 × 10(-19)). We suggest that pre-mRNA folding strength in the above-mentioned regions has a direct effect on splicing efficiency by improving the recognition of intronic boundaries. These new discoveries are contributory steps toward a broader understanding of splicing regulation and intronic/transcript evolution. PMID:26246046

  18. Inhibition of Splicing but not Cleavage at the 5' Splice Site by Truncating Human β -globin Pre-mRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furdon, Paul J.; Kole, Ryszard

    1986-02-01

    Human β -globin mRNAs truncated in the second exon or in the first intron have been processed in vitro in a HeLa cell nuclear extract. Transcripts containing a fragment of the second exon as short as 53 nucleotides are efficiently spliced, whereas transcripts truncated 24 or 14 nucleotides downstream from the 3' splice site are spliced inefficiently, if at all. All of these transcripts, however, are efficiently and accurately cleaved at the 5' splice site. In contrast, RNA truncated in the first intron, 54 nucleotides upstream from the 3' splice site, is not processed at all. These findings suggest that cleavage at the 5' splice site and subsequent splicing steps--i.e., cleavage at the 3' splice site and exon ligation--need not be coupled. Anti-Sm serum inhibits the complete splicing reaction and cleavage at the 5' splice site, suggesting involvement of certain ribonucleoprotein particles in the cleavage reaction. ATP and Mg2+ are required for cleavage at the 5' splice site at concentrations similar to those for the complete splicing reaction.

  19. Congenital contractural arachnodactyly due to a novel splice site mutation in the FBN2 gene

    PubMed Central

    Mehar, Virendra; Yadav, Dinesh; Kumar, Ravindra; Yadav, Summi; Singh, Kuldeep; Callewaert, Bert; Pathan, Shahnawaz; De Paepe, Anne; Coucke, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital contractural arachnodactyly is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by crumpled ears, congenital contractures, arachnodactyly and scoliosis. Only few cases have been described to date. Here we report a newborn with congenital contractures, crumpled ears and scoliosis. Molecular analysis revealed a novel fibrillin-2 mutation at the donor splice site of intron 28. We discuss the differential diagnosis of neonates with congenital contractures and review the current knowledge on congenital contractural arachnodactyly.

  20. Co-transcriptional commitment to alternative splice site selection.

    PubMed

    Roberts, G C; Gooding, C; Mak, H Y; Proudfoot, N J; Smith, C W

    1998-12-15

    Production of mRNA in eukaryotic cells involves not only transcription but also various processing reactions such as splicing. Recent experiments have indicated that there are direct physical connections between components of the transcription and processing machinery, supporting previous suggestions that pre-mRNA splicing occurs co-transcriptionally. Here we have used a novel functional approach to demonstrate co-transcriptional regulation of alternative splicing. Exon 3 of the alpha-tropomyosin gene is specifically repressed in smooth muscle cells. By delaying synthesis of an essential downstream inhibitory element, we show that the decision to splice or repress exon 3 occurs during a limited window of opportunity following transcription, indicating that splice site selection proceeds rapidly after transcription. PMID:9837984

  1. Novel splice site mutation in the growth hormone receptor gene in Turkish patients with Laron-type dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Arman, Ahmet; Ozon, Alev; Isguven, Pinar S; Coker, Ajda; Peker, Ismail; Yordam, Nursen

    2008-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is involved in growth, and fat and carbohydrate metabolism. Interaction of GH with the GH receptor (GHR) is necessary for systemic and local production of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) which mediates GH actions. Mutations in the GHR cause severe postnatal growth failure; the disorder is an autosomal recessive genetic disease resulting in GH insensitivity, called Laron syndrome. It is characterized by dwarfism with elevated serum GH and low levels of IGF-I. We analyzed the GHR gene for mutations and polymorphisms in eight patients with Laron-type dwarfism from six families. We found three missense mutations (S40L, V125A, I526L), one nonsense mutation (W157X), and one splice site mutation in the extracellular domain of GHR. Furthermore, G168G and exon 3 deletion polymorphisms were detected in patients with Laron syndrome. The splice site mutation, which is a novel mutation, was located at the donor splice site of exon 2/ intron 2 within GHR. Although this mutation changed the highly conserved donor splice site consensus sequence GT to GGT by insertion of a G residue, the intron splicing between exon 2 and exon 3 was detected in the patient. These results imply that the splicing occurs arthe GT site in intron 2, leaving the extra inserted G residue at the end of exon 2, thus changing the open reading frame of GHR resulting in a premature termination codon in exon 3. PMID:18404972

  2. Method of predicting Splice Sites based on signal interactions

    PubMed Central

    Churbanov, Alexander; Rogozin, Igor B; Deogun, Jitender S; Ali, Hesham

    2006-01-01

    Background Predicting and proper ranking of canonical splice sites (SSs) is a challenging problem in bioinformatics and machine learning communities. Any progress in SSs recognition will lead to better understanding of splicing mechanism. We introduce several new approaches of combining a priori knowledge for improved SS detection. First, we design our new Bayesian SS sensor based on oligonucleotide counting. To further enhance prediction quality, we applied our new de novo motif detection tool MHMMotif to intronic ends and exons. We combine elements found with sensor information using Naive Bayesian Network, as implemented in our new tool SpliceScan. Results According to our tests, the Bayesian sensor outperforms the contemporary Maximum Entropy sensor for 5' SS detection. We report a number of putative Exonic (ESE) and Intronic (ISE) Splicing Enhancers found by MHMMotif tool. T-test statistics on mouse/rat intronic alignments indicates, that detected elements are on average more conserved as compared to other oligos, which supports our assumption of their functional importance. The tool has been shown to outperform the SpliceView, GeneSplicer, NNSplice, Genio and NetUTR tools for the test set of human genes. SpliceScan outperforms all contemporary ab initio gene structural prediction tools on the set of 5' UTR gene fragments. Conclusion Designed methods have many attractive properties, compared to existing approaches. Bayesian sensor, MHMMotif program and SpliceScan tools are freely available on our web site. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Manyuan Long, Arcady Mushegian and Mikhail Gelfand. PMID:16584568

  3. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Novel PHEX Splice Site Mutations in Patients with Hypophosphatemic Rickets

    PubMed Central

    Gillies, Christopher; Sampson, Matthew G.; Kher, Vijay; Sethi, Sidharth K.; Otto, Edgar A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hypophosphatemic rickets (HR) is a heterogeneous genetic phosphate wasting disorder. The disease is most commonly caused by mutations in the PHEX gene located on the X-chromosome or by mutations in CLCN5, DMP1, ENPP1, FGF23, and SLC34A3. The aims of this study were to perform molecular diagnostics for four patients with HR of Indian origin (two independent families) and to describe their clinical features. Methods We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) for the affected mother of two boys who also displayed the typical features of HR, including bone malformations and phosphate wasting. B-lymphoblast cell lines were established by EBV transformation and subsequent RT-PCR to investigate an uncommon splice site variant found by WES. An in silico analysis was done to obtain accurate nucleotide frequency occurrences of consensus splice positions other than the canonical sites of all human exons. Additionally, we applied direct Sanger sequencing for all exons and exon/intron boundaries of the PHEX gene for an affected girl from an independent second Indian family. Results WES revealed a novel PHEX splice acceptor mutation in intron 9 (c.1080-3C>A) in a family with 3 affected individuals with HR. The effect on splicing of this mutation was further investigated by RT-PCR using RNA obtained from a patient’s EBV-transformed lymphoblast cell line. RT-PCR revealed an aberrant splice transcript skipping exons 10-14 which was not observed in control samples, confirming the diagnosis of X-linked dominant hypophosphatemia (XLH). The in silico analysis of all human splice sites adjacent to all 327,293 exons across 81,814 transcripts among 20,345 human genes revealed that cytosine is, with 64.3%, the most frequent nucleobase at the minus 3 splice acceptor position, followed by thymidine with 28.7%, adenine with 6.3%, and guanine with 0.8%. We generated frequency tables and pictograms for the extended donor and acceptor splice consensus regions by analyzing all human

  4. Molecular characterization of novel splice site mutation causing protein C deficiency.

    PubMed

    Al-Hamed, Mohamed H; AlBatniji, Fatma; AlDakheel, Ghadah A; El-Faraidi, Huda; Al-Zahrani, Azzah; Al-Abbass, Fahed; Imtiaz, Faiqa

    2016-07-01

    Congenital protein C deficiency is an inherited coagulation disorder associated with an elevated risk of venous thromboembolism. A Saudi Arabian male from a consanguineous family was admitted to neonatal intensive care unit in his first days of life because of transient tachypnea and hematuria. Laboratory investigations determined low platelet and protein C deficiency. Direct sequencing of PROC gene and RNA analysis were performed. Analysis of factor V Leiden (G1691A) and factor II (G20210A) mutations was also done. Novel homozygous splice site mutation c.796+3A>T was detected in the index case and segregation was confirmed in the family. RNA analysis revealed the pathogenicity of the mutation by skipping exon 8 of PROC gene and changing the donor splice site of the exon. Detection of the molecular cause of protein C deficiency reduces life threatening and facilitates inductive carrier testing, prenatal and preimplantation genetic diagnosis for families. PMID:26656900

  5. Characterization of a novel TYMP splice site mutation associated with mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE).

    PubMed

    Taanman, Jan-Willem; Daras, Mariza; Albrecht, Juliane; Davie, Charles A; Mallam, Elizabeth A; Muddle, John R; Weatherall, Mark; Warner, Thomas T; Schapira, Anthony H V; Ginsberg, Lionel

    2009-02-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the thymidine phosphorylase gene (TYMP). We report here a patient compound heterozygous for two TYMP mutations: a novel g.4009G>A transition affecting the consensus splice donor site of intron 9, and a previously reported g.675G>C splice site mutation. The novel mutation causes exon 9 skipping but leaves the reading frame intact; however, TYMP protein was not detected by immunoblot analysis, suggesting that neither mutant allele is expressed as protein. The patient's fibroblasts showed gradual loss of the mitochondrial DNA-encoded subunit I of cytochrome-c oxidase, suggesting a progressive mitochondrial DNA defect in culture. PMID:19056268

  6. Case 1: chronic infected donor site.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    Following a coronary bypass surgery, a vein donor site became infected and failed to heal despite use of antibiotics and a variety of topical treatments. Octenilin Wound Gel not only helped to promote healing, but also increased the patient's ability to tolerate dressing changes. PMID:26949845

  7. Spliceosomal DEAH-Box ATPases Remodel Pre-mRNA to Activate Alternative Splice Sites.

    PubMed

    Semlow, Daniel R; Blanco, Mario R; Walter, Nils G; Staley, Jonathan P

    2016-02-25

    During pre-mRNA splicing, a central step in the expression and regulation of eukaryotic genes, the spliceosome selects splice sites for intron excision and exon ligation. In doing so, the spliceosome must distinguish optimal from suboptimal splice sites. At the catalytic stage of splicing, suboptimal splice sites are repressed by the DEAH-box ATPases Prp16 and Prp22. Here, using budding yeast, we show that these ATPases function further by enabling the spliceosome to search for and utilize alternative branch sites and 3' splice sites. The ATPases facilitate this search by remodeling the splicing substrate to disengage candidate splice sites. Our data support a mechanism involving 3' to 5' translocation of the ATPases along substrate RNA and toward a candidate site, but, surprisingly, not across the site. Thus, our data implicate DEAH-box ATPases in acting at a distance by pulling substrate RNA from the catalytic core of the spliceosome. PMID:26919433

  8. Prp40 and early events in splice site definition.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Soraya; Andrés-León, Eduardo; Prieto-Sánchez, Silvia; Hernández-Munain, Cristina; Suñé, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The alternative splicing (AS) of precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) is a tightly regulated process through which introns are removed to leave the resulting exons in the mRNA appropriately aligned and ligated. The AS of pre-mRNA is a key mechanism for increasing the complexity of proteins encoded in the genome. In humans, more than 90% of genes undergo AS, underscoring the importance of this process in RNA biogenesis. As such, AS misregulation underlies multiple human diseases. The splicing reaction is catalyzed by the spliceosome, a highly dynamic complex that assembles at or near the intron/exon boundaries and undergoes sequential conformational and compositional changes during splicing. The initial recognition of splice sites defines the exons that are going to be removed, which is a critical step in the highly regulated splicing process. Although the available lines of evidence are increasing, the molecular mechanisms governing AS, including the initial interactions occurring at intron/exon boundaries, and the factors that modulate these critical connections by functioning as a scaffold for active-site RNAs or proteins, remain poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the major hallmarks of the initial steps in the splicing process and the role of auxiliary factors that contribute to the assembly of the spliceosomal complex. We also discuss the role of the essential yeast Prp40 protein and its mammalian homologs in the specificity of this pre-mRNA processing event. In addition, we provide the first exhaustive phylogenetic analysis of the molecular evolution of Prp40 family members. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:17-32. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1312 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26494226

  9. Coordinated tissue-specific regulation of adjacent alternative 3′ splice sites in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ragle, James Matthew; Katzman, Sol; Akers, Taylor F.; Barberan-Soler, Sergio; Zahler, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Adjacent alternative 3′ splice sites, those separated by ≤18 nucleotides, provide a unique problem in the study of alternative splicing regulation; there is overlap of the cis-elements that define the adjacent sites. Identification of the intron's 3′ end depends upon sequence elements that define the branchpoint, polypyrimidine tract, and terminal AG dinucleotide. Starting with RNA-seq data from germline-enriched and somatic cell-enriched Caenorhabditis elegans samples, we identify hundreds of introns with adjacent alternative 3′ splice sites. We identify 203 events that undergo tissue-specific alternative splicing. For these, the regulation is monodirectional, with somatic cells preferring to splice at the distal 3′ splice site (furthest from the 5′ end of the intron) and germline cells showing a distinct shift toward usage of the adjacent proximal 3′ splice site (closer to the 5′ end of the intron). Splicing patterns in somatic cells follow C. elegans consensus rules of 3′ splice site definition; a short stretch of pyrimidines preceding an AG dinucleotide. Splicing in germline cells occurs at proximal 3′ splice sites that lack a preceding polypyrimidine tract, and in three instances the germline-specific site lacks the AG dinucleotide. We provide evidence that use of germline-specific proximal 3′ splice sites is conserved across Caenorhabditis species. We propose that there are differences between germline and somatic cells in the way that the basal splicing machinery functions to determine the intron terminus. PMID:25922281

  10. Commitment of apolipoprotein B RNA to the splicing pathway regulates cytidine-to-uridine editing-site utilization.

    PubMed Central

    Sowden, M P; Smith, H C

    2001-01-01

    A tripartite motif located in the centre of the 7.5 kb exon 26 of apolipoprotein B (apoB) mRNA directs editosome assembly and site-specific cytidine-to-uridine editing at nucleotide 6666. apoB mRNA editing is a post-transcriptional event, occurring primarily at the time exon 26 is spliced or at a time after splicing, but before nuclear export. We show, through reporter RNA constructs, that RNA splice sites suppress editing of precursor RNAs when placed proximal or distal to the editing site. Processed RNAs were edited more efficiently than precursor RNAs. Mutation of both the splice donor and acceptor sites was necessary for RNAs to be edited efficiently. The results suggested that commitment of pre-mRNA to the splicing and/or nuclear-export pathways may play a role in regulating editing-site utilization. The HIV-1 Rev-Rev response element ('RRE') interaction was utilized to uncouple the commitment of precursor RNAs to the spliceosome assembly pathway and associated nuclear-export pathway. Under these conditions, unspliced reporter RNAs were edited efficiently. We propose that pre-mRNA passage through the temporal or spatial restriction point where they become committed to spliceosome assembly contributes regulatory information for subsequent editosome activity. PMID:11672445

  11. Successful Treatment of Chronic Donor Site Pain

    PubMed Central

    Yanow, Jennifer H; Lorenzo, Luigi Di; Worosilo, Sharon C; Pappagallo, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This is a case presentation of a 45-year-old male with chronic donor site pain following autologous iliac crest bone harvest successfully treated with superior cluneal nerve blockade. Donor site pain following autologous bone harvest is a common postoperative complication of lumbar fusion procedures that can cause significant morbidity and diminish quality of life, even in the context of an otherwise successful surgery. Dysfunction of the superior cluneal nerves is an etiology of this chronic pain. The patient’s medical history, attempted treatments, and literature were reviewed. Case Presentation: A 45-year-old male with a six year history of severe pain over the right iliac crest following an otherwise successful lumbar laminectomy and fusion underwent two sets of superior cluneal nerve blocks, with sustained relief of more than 80% at seven months follow up. Conclusions: Donor site pain following autologous iliac crest bone harvest is a common surgical complication that is often resistant to conservative treatments such as physical therapy and oral medications. Blockade of the superior cluneal nerves is a safe and technically simple procedure that may result in long-term pain relief, obviating the need to consider more invasive options. PMID:26587399

  12. Splice site consensus sequences are preferentially accessible to nucleases in isolated adenovirus RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, S H; Duthie, R S

    1986-01-01

    The conformation of RNA sequences spanning five 3' splice sites and two 5' splice sites in adenovirus mRNA was probed by partial digestion with single-strand specific nucleases. Although cleavage of nucleotides near both 3' and 5' splice sites was observed, most striking was the preferential digestion of sequences near the 3' splice site. At each 3' splice site a region of very strong cleavage is observed at low concentrations of enzyme near the splice site consensus sequence or the upstream branch point consensus sequence. Additional sites of moderately strong cutting near the branch point consensus sequence were observed in those sequences where the splice site was the preferred target. Since recognition of the 3' splice site and branch site appear to be early events in mRNA splicing these observations may indicate that the local conformation of the splice site sequences may play a direct or indirect role in enhancing the accessibility of sequences important for splicing. Images PMID:3024107

  13. Detection of Splice Sites Using Support Vector Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadwaj, Pritish; Purohit, Neetesh; Arora, Bhumika

    Automatic identification and annotation of exon and intron region of gene, from DNA sequences has been an important research area in field of computational biology. Several approaches viz. Hidden Markov Model (HMM), Artificial Intelligence (AI) based machine learning and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) techniques have extensively and independently been used by various researchers to cater this challenging task. In this work, we propose a Support Vector Machine based kernel learning approach for detection of splice sites (the exon-intron boundary) in a gene. Electron-Ion Interaction Potential (EIIP) values of nucleotides have been used for mapping character sequences to corresponding numeric sequences. Radial Basis Function (RBF) SVM kernel is trained using EIIP numeric sequences. Furthermore this was tested on test gene dataset for detection of splice site by window (of 12 residues) shifting. Optimum values of window size, various important parameters of SVM kernel have been optimized for a better accuracy. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves have been utilized for displaying the sensitivity rate of the classifier and results showed 94.82% accuracy for splice site detection on test dataset.

  14. Human GC-AG alternative intron isoforms with weak donor sites show enhanced consensus at acceptor exon positions

    PubMed Central

    Thanaraj, T. A.; Clark, Francis

    2001-01-01

    It has been previously observed that the intrinsically weak variant GC donor sites, in order to be recognized by the U2-type spliceosome, possess strong consensus sequences maximized for base pair formation with U1 and U5/U6 snRNAs. However, variability in signal strength is a fundamental mechanism for splice site selection in alternative splicing. Here we report human alternative GC-AG introns (for the first time from any species), and show that while constitutive GC-AG introns do possess strong signals at their donor sites, a large subset of alternative GC-AG introns possess weak consensus sequences at their donor sites. Surprisingly, this subset of alternative isoforms shows strong consensus at acceptor exon positions 1 and 2. The improved consensus at the acceptor exon can facilitate a strong interaction with U5 snRNA, which tethers the two exons for ligation during the second step of splicing. Further, these isoforms nearly always possess alternative acceptor sites and exhibit particularly weak polypyrimidine tracts characteristic of AG-dependent introns. The acceptor exon nucleotides are part of the consensus required for the U2AF35-mediated recognition of AG in such introns. Such improved consensus at acceptor exons is not found in either normal or alternative GT-AG introns having weak donor sites or weak polypyrimidine tracts. The changes probably reflect mechanisms that allow GC-AG alternative intron isoforms to cope with two conflicting requirements, namely an apparent need for differential splice strength to direct the choice of alternative sites and a need for improved donor signals to compensate for the central mismatch base pair (C-A) in the RNA duplex of U1 snRNA and the pre-mRNA. The other important findings include (i) one in every twenty alternative introns is a GC-AG intron, and (ii) three of every five observed GC-AG introns are alternative isoforms. PMID:11410667

  15. A Short Sequence within Two Purine-Rich Enhancers Determines 5′ Splice Site Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Elrick, Leslie L.; Humphrey, Mary Beth; Cooper, Thomas A.; Berget, Susan M.

    1998-01-01

    Purine-rich enhancers are exon sequences that promote inclusion of alternative exons, usually via activation of weak upstream 3′ splice sites. A recently described purine-rich enhancer from the caldesmon gene has an additional activity by which it directs selection of competing 5′ splice sites within an alternative exon. In this study, we have compared the caldesmon enhancer with another purine-rich enhancer from the chicken cardiac troponin T (cTNT) gene for the ability to regulate flanking splice sites. Although similar in sequence and length, the two enhancers demonstrated strikingly different specificities towards 5′ splice site choice when placed between competing 5′ splice sites in an internal exon. The 32-nucleotide caldesmon enhancer caused effective usage of the exon-internal 5′ splice site, whereas the 30-nucleotide cTNT enhancer caused effective usage of the exon-terminal 5′ splice site. Both enhancer-mediated splicing pathways represented modulation of the default pathway in which both 5′ splice sites were utilized. Each enhancer is multipartite, consisting of two purine-rich sequences of a simple (GAR)n repeat interdigitated with two enhancer-specific sequences. The entire enhancer was necessary for maximal splice site selectivity; however, a 5- to 7-nucleotide region from the 3′ end of each enhancer dictated splice site selectivity. Mutations that interchanged this short region of the two enhancers switched specificity. The portion of the cTNT enhancer determinative for 5′ splice site selectivity was different than that shown to be maximally important for activation of a 3′ splice site, suggesting that enhancer environment can have a major impact on activity. These results are the first indication that individual purine-rich enhancers can differentiate between flanking splice sites. Furthermore, localization of the specificity of splice site choice to a short region within both enhancers indicates that subtle differences in

  16. A case of mild CHARGE syndrome associated with a splice site mutation in CHD7.

    PubMed

    Wells, Constance; Loundon, Natalie; Garabedian, Noël; Wiener-Vacher, Sylvette; Cordier-Bouvier, Marie-Dominique; Goudeffroye, Géraldine; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Marlin, Sandrine

    2016-04-01

    CHARGE syndrome (MIM#214800) (Coloboma, Heart defect, Atresia of choanae, Retarded growth and development, Genital hypoplasia, Ear abnormalities/deafness) is caused by heterozygous mutation of CHD7 transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner. In this report, we describe a patient with bilateral hearing impairment, unusually-shaped ears, no intellectual disability and a patent ductus arteriosus. Further investigation showed abnormal semicircular canals and the presence of olfactory bulbs. He does not fulfill the Blake or the Verloes criteria for CHARGE. A de novo mutation at the donor splice site of intron 33 was identified (c.7164 + 1G > A). It is of importance to diagnose mildly affected patients for appropriate genetic counselling and to better understand the mild end of the phenotypic spectrum of CHARGE syndrome. PMID:26921530

  17. DBASS3 and DBASS5: databases of aberrant 3′- and 5′-splice sites

    PubMed Central

    Chivers, Martin; Hwang, Gyulin; Vorechovsky, Igor

    2011-01-01

    DBASS3 and DBASS5 provide comprehensive repositories of new exon boundaries that were induced by pathogenic mutations in human disease genes. Aberrant 5′- and 3′-splice sites were activated either by mutations in the consensus sequences of natural exon–intron junctions (cryptic sites) or elsewhere (‘de novo’ sites). DBASS3 and DBASS5 currently contain approximately 900 records of cryptic and de novo 3′- and 5′-splice sites that were produced by over a thousand different mutations in approximately 360 genes. DBASS3 and DBASS5 data can be searched by disease phenotype, gene, mutation, location of aberrant splice sites in introns and exons and their distance from authentic counterparts, by bibliographic references and by the splice-site strength estimated with several prediction algorithms. The user can also retrieve reference sequences of both aberrant and authentic splice sites with the underlying mutation. These data will facilitate identification of introns or exons frequently involved in aberrant splicing, mutation analysis of human disease genes and study of germline or somatic mutations that impair RNA processing. Finally, this resource will be useful for fine-tuning splice-site prediction algorithms, better definition of auxiliary splicing signals and design of new reporter assays. DBASS3 and DBASS5 are freely available at http://www.dbass.org.uk/. PMID:20929868

  18. Controlled trial of Biocol versus Jelonet on donor sites.

    PubMed

    Ebbehoj, J; Gavrilyuk, B K; Menzul, V A; Paklin, E L; Rochev YuA

    1996-11-01

    A controlled study of healing time in donor sites covered with Biocol, a new latex-based material, compared with donor sites covered with Jelonet showed a shorter healing time after treatment with Biocol (P < 0.001). No significant difference in cosmetic results 3 months post wounding was observed. No difference in discomfort was observed. PMID:8909760

  19. A 3' splice site mutation in the thyroglobulin gene responsible for congenital goiter with hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Ieiri, T; Cochaux, P; Targovnik, H M; Suzuki, M; Shimoda, S; Perret, J; Vassart, G

    1991-12-01

    A case of congenital goiter with defective thyroglobulin synthesis has been studied in molecular terms. The patient is the fifth of a kindred of six, three of which have a goiter. The parents are first cousins. Segregation of thyroglobulin alleles in the family was studied by Southern blotting with a probe revealing a diallelic restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The results demonstrated that the three affected siblings were homozygous for the RFLP. Northern blotting analysis of the goiter RNA with a thyroglobulin probe suggested that thyroglobulin mRNA size was slightly reduced. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of the 8.5-kb thyroglobulin mRNA as overlapping cDNA fragments demonstrated that a 200-bp segment was missing from the 5' region of the goiter mRNA. Subcloning and sequencing of the cDNA fragments, and of the patient genomic DNA amplified from this region, revealed that exon 4 is missing from the major thyroglobulin transcript in the goiter, and that this aberrant splicing is due to a C to G transversion at position minus 3 in the acceptor splice site of intron 3. The presence in exon 4 of a putative donor tyrosine residue (Tyrosine nr 130) involved in thyroid hormone formation provides a coherent explanation to the hypothyroid status of the patient. PMID:1752952

  20. Noncanonical registers and base pairs in human 5′ splice-site selection

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jiazi; Ho, Jia Xin Jessie; Zhong, Zhensheng; Luo, Shufang; Chen, Gang; Roca, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Accurate recognition of splice sites is essential for pre-messenger RNA splicing. Mammalian 5′ splice sites are mainly recognized by canonical base-pairing to the 5′ end of U1 small nuclear RNA, yet we described multiple noncanonical base-pairing registers by shifting base-pair positions or allowing one-nucleotide bulges. By systematic mutational and suppressor U1 analyses, we prove three registers involving asymmetric loops and show that two-nucleotide bulges but not longer can form in this context. Importantly, we established that a noncanonical uridine-pseudouridine interaction in the 5′ splice site/U1 helix contributes to the recognition of certain 5′ splice sites. Thermal melting experiments support the formation of noncanonical registers and uridine-pseudouridine interactions. Overall, we experimentally validated or discarded the majority of predicted noncanonical registers, to derive a list of 5′ splice sites using such alternative mechanisms that is much different from the original. This study allows not only the mechanistic understanding of the recognition of a wide diversity of mammalian 5′ splice sites, but also the future development of better splice-site scoring methods that reliably predict the effects of disease-causing mutations at these sequences. PMID:26969736

  1. Noncanonical registers and base pairs in human 5' splice-site selection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jiazi; Ho, Jia Xin Jessie; Zhong, Zhensheng; Luo, Shufang; Chen, Gang; Roca, Xavier

    2016-05-01

    Accurate recognition of splice sites is essential for pre-messenger RNA splicing. Mammalian 5' splice sites are mainly recognized by canonical base-pairing to the 5' end of U1 small nuclear RNA, yet we described multiple noncanonical base-pairing registers by shifting base-pair positions or allowing one-nucleotide bulges. By systematic mutational and suppressor U1 analyses, we prove three registers involving asymmetric loops and show that two-nucleotide bulges but not longer can form in this context. Importantly, we established that a noncanonical uridine-pseudouridine interaction in the 5' splice site/U1 helix contributes to the recognition of certain 5' splice sites. Thermal melting experiments support the formation of noncanonical registers and uridine-pseudouridine interactions. Overall, we experimentally validated or discarded the majority of predicted noncanonical registers, to derive a list of 5' splice sites using such alternative mechanisms that is much different from the original. This study allows not only the mechanistic understanding of the recognition of a wide diversity of mammalian 5' splice sites, but also the future development of better splice-site scoring methods that reliably predict the effects of disease-causing mutations at these sequences. PMID:26969736

  2. Intron Retention in the Alternatively Spliced Region of RON Results from Weak 3’ Splice Site Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lindsay D.; Lucas, Christian M.; Eperon, Ian C.

    2013-01-01

    The RON gene encodes a tyrosine kinase receptor for macrophage-stimulating protein. A constitutively active isoform that arises by skipping of exon 11 is expressed in carcinomas and contributes to an invasive phenotype. However, a high proportion of the mRNA expressed from the endogenous gene, or from transfected minigenes, appears to retain introns 10 and 11. It is not known whether this represents specific repression or the presence of weak splicing signals. We have used chimeric pre-mRNAs spliced in vitro to investigate the reason for intron retention. A systematic test showed that, surprisingly, the exon sequences known to modulate exon 11 skipping were not limiting, but the 3’ splice site regions adjacent to exons 11 and 12 were too weak to support splicing when inserted into a globin intron. UV-crosslinking experiments showed binding of hnRNP F/H just 5’ of these regions, but the hnRNP F/H target sequences did not mediate inhibition. Instead, the failure of splicing is linked to weak binding of U2AF65, and spliceosome assembly stalls prior to formation of any of the ATP-dependent complexes. We discuss mechanisms by which U2AF65 binding is facilitated in vivo. PMID:24155930

  3. The strength of the HIV-1 3' splice sites affects Rev function

    PubMed Central

    Kammler, Susanne; Otte, Marianne; Hauber, Ilona; Kjems, Jørgen; Hauber, Joachim; Schaal, Heiner

    2006-01-01

    Background The HIV-1 Rev protein is a key component in the early to late switch in HIV-1 splicing from early intronless (e.g. tat, rev) to late intron-containing Rev-dependent (e.g. gag, vif, env) transcripts. Previous results suggested that cis-acting sequences and inefficient 5' and 3' splice sites are a prerequisite for Rev function. However, we and other groups have shown that two of the HIV-1 5' splice sites, D1 and D4, are efficiently used in vitro and in vivo. Here, we focus on the efficiency of the HIV-1 3' splice sites taking into consideration to what extent their intrinsic efficiencies are modulated by their downstream cis-acting exonic sequences. Furthermore, we delineate their role in RNA stabilization and Rev function. Results In the presence of an efficient upstream 5' splice site the integrity of the 3' splice site is not essential for Rev function whereas an efficient 3' splice site impairs Rev function. The detrimental effect of a strong 3' splice site on the amount of Rev-dependent intron-containing HIV-1 glycoprotein coding (env) mRNA is not compensatable by weakening the strength of the upstream 5' splice site. Swapping the HIV-1 3' splice sites in an RRE-containing minigene, we found a 3' splice site usage which was variably dependent on the presence of the usual downstream exonic sequence. The most evident activation of 3' splice site usage by its usual downstream exonic sequence was observed for 3' splice site A1 which was turned from an intrinsic very weak 3' splice site into the most active 3' splice site, even abolishing Rev activity. Performing pull-down experiments with nuclear extracts of HeLa cells we identified a novel ASF/SF2-dependent exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) within HIV-1 exon 2 consisting of a heptameric sequence motif occurring twice (M1 and M2) within this short non-coding leader exon. Single point mutation of M1 within an infectious molecular clone is detrimental for HIV-1 exon 2 recognition without affecting Rev

  4. The DEAH-box ATPases Prp16 and Prp43 cooperate to proofread 5′ splice site cleavage during pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Koodathingal, Prakash; Novak, Thaddeus; Piccirilli, Joseph A.; Staley, Jonathan P.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY To investigate the mechanism of fidelity in pre-mRNA splicing, we developed an in vitro assay sensitive to proofreading of 5′ splice site cleavage. We inactivated spliceosomes by disrupting a critical metal-ligand interaction at the catalytic center and discovered that when the DEAH-box ATPase Prp16 was disabled these spliceosomes successfully catalyzed 5′ splice site cleavage but at a reduced rate. Although Prp16 does not promote splicing of a genuine substrate until after 5′ splice site cleavage, we found that Prp16 can associate with spliceosomes before 5′ splice site cleavage, consistent with a role for Prp16 in proofreading 5′ splice site cleavage. We established that Prp16-mediated rejection is reversible, necessitating a downstream discard pathway that we found requires the DEAH-box ATPase Prp43, a spliceosome disassembly factor. These data provide evidence that splicing fidelity mechanisms discriminate against slow substrates and that the mechanisms for establishing the fidelity of 5′ splice site cleavage and exon ligation share a common ATP-dependent framework. PMID:20705241

  5. On splice site prediction using weight array models: a comparison of smoothing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taher, Leila; Meinicke, Peter; Morgenstern, Burkhard

    2007-11-01

    In most eukaryotic genes, protein-coding exons are separated by non-coding introns which are removed from the primary transcript by a process called "splicing". The positions where introns are cut and exons are spliced together are called "splice sites". Thus, computational prediction of splice sites is crucial for gene finding in eukaryotes. Weight array models are a powerful probabilistic approach to splice site detection. Parameters for these models are usually derived from m-tuple frequencies in trusted training data and subsequently smoothed to avoid zero probabilities. In this study we compare three different ways of parameter estimation for m-tuple frequencies, namely (a) non-smoothed probability estimation, (b) standard pseudo counts and (c) a Gaussian smoothing procedure that we recently developed.

  6. Healing of Donor-site Buccal Mucosa Urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Alwaal, Amjad; Harris, Catherine R.; Enriquez, Anthony; McAninch, Jack W.; Breyer, Benjamin N.

    2016-01-01

    Buccal mucosal graft represents the gold standard graft material for urethroplasty because of its thick epithelium and a thin lamina propria for maximal graft uptake. There is an ongoing debate whether to close the buccal graft donor site. We show a unique look at buccal donor site healing through serial pictures over a 100-day period. In this patient, the anterior half of the buccal donor site was closed at the time of harvest, allowing real-time observation of wound healing from both the closed and open aspects of the wound. PMID:26151892

  7. A role for U2/U6 helix Ib in 5' splice site selection.

    PubMed Central

    Luukkonen, B G; Séraphin, B

    1998-01-01

    Selection of pre-mRNA splice sites is a highly accurate process involving many trans-acting factors. Recently, we described a role for U6 snRNA position G52 in selection of the first intron nucleotide (+1G). Because some U2 alleles suppress U6-G52 mutations, we investigated whether the corresponding U2 snRNA region also influenced 5' splice site selection. Our results demonstrate that U2 snRNAs mutated at position U23, but not adjacent nucleotides, specifically affect 5' splice site cleavage. Furthermore, all U2 position U23 mutations are synthetic lethal with the thermosensitive U6-G52U allele. Interestingly, the U2-U23C substitution has an unprecedented hyperaccurate splicing phenotype in which cleavage of introns with a +1G substitution is reduced, whereas the strain grows with wild-type kinetics. U2 position U23 forms the first base pair with U6 position A59 in U2/U6 helix Ib. Restoration of the helical structure suppresses 5' splice site cleavage defects, showing an important role for the helix Ib structure in 5' splice site selection. U2/U6 helix Ib and helix II have recently been described as being functionally redundant. This report demonstrates a unique role for helix Ib in 5' splice site selection that is not shared with helix II. PMID:9701283

  8. Computer-assisted selection of donor sites for autologous grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Zdzislaw; Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian U.; Sader, Robert; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Gerhardt, Paul; Horch, Hans-Henning

    1997-05-01

    A new method is proposed for a precise planning of autologous bone grafts in cranio- and maxillofacial surgery. In patients with defects of the facial skeleton, autologous bone transplants can be harvested from various donor sites in the body. The preselection of a donor site depends i.a. on the morphological fit of the available bone mass and the shape of the part that is to be transplanted. A thorough planning and simulation of the surgical intervention based on 3D CT studies leads to a geometrical description and the volumetric characterization of the bone part to be resected and transplanted. Both, an optimal fit and a minimal lesion of the donor site are guidelines in this process. We use surface similarity and voxel similarity measures in order to select the optimal donor region for an individually designed transplant.

  9. Sequence Analysis of In Vivo-Expressed HIV-1 Spliced RNAs Reveals the Usage of New and Unusual Splice Sites by Viruses of Different Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Yolanda; Delgado, Elena; de la Barrera, Jorge; Carrera, Cristina; Zaballos, Ángel; Cuesta, Isabel; Mariño, Ana; Ocampo, Antonio; Miralles, Celia; Pérez-Castro, Sonia; Álvarez, Hortensia; López-Miragaya, Isabel; García-Bodas, Elena; Díez-Fuertes, Francisco; Thomson, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 RNAs are generated through a complex splicing mechanism, resulting in a great diversity of transcripts, which are classified in three major categories: unspliced, singly spliced (SS), and doubly spliced (DS). Knowledge on HIV-1 RNA splicing in vivo and by non-subtype B viruses is scarce. Here we analyze HIV-1 RNA splice site usage in CD4+CD25+ lymphocytes from HIV-1-infected individuals through pyrosequencing. HIV-1 DS and SS RNAs were amplified by RT-PCR in 19 and 12 samples, respectively. 13,108 sequences from HIV-1 spliced RNAs, derived from viruses of five subtypes (A, B, C, F, G), were identified. In four samples, three of non-B subtypes, five 3’ splice sites (3’ss) mapping to unreported positions in the HIV-1 genome were identified. Two, designated A4i and A4j, were used in 22% and 25% of rev RNAs in two viruses of subtypes B and A, respectively. Given their close proximity (one or two nucleotides) to A4c and A4d, respectively, they could be viewed as variants of these sites. Three 3’ss, designated A7g, A7h, and A7i, located 20, 32, and 18 nucleotides downstream of A7, respectively, were identified in a subtype C (A7g, A7h) and a subtype G (A7i) viruses, each in around 2% of nef RNAs. The new splice sites or variants of splice sites were associated with the usual sequence features of 3’ss. Usage of unusual 3’ss A4d, A4e, A5a, A7a, and A7b was also detected. A4f, previously identified in two subtype C viruses, was preferentially used by rev RNAs of a subtype C virus. These results highlight the great diversity of in vivo splice site usage by HIV-1 RNAs. The fact that four of five newly identified splice sites or variants of splice sites were detected in non-subtype B viruses allows anticipating an even greater diversity of HIV-1 splice site usage than currently known. PMID:27355361

  10. Cauliflower mosaic virus Transcriptome Reveals a Complex Alternative Splicing Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Bouton, Clément; Geldreich, Angèle; Ramel, Laëtitia; Ryabova, Lyubov A.; Dimitrova, Maria; Keller, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The plant pararetrovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) uses alternative splic-ing to generate several isoforms from its polycistronic pregenomic 35S RNA. This pro-cess has been shown to be essential for infectivity. Previous works have identified four splice donor sites and a single splice acceptor site in the 35S RNA 5’ region and sug-gested that the main role of CaMV splicing is to downregulate expression of open read-ing frames (ORFs) I and II. In this study, we show that alternative splicing is a conserved process among CaMV isolates. In Cabb B-JI and Cabb-S isolates, splicing frequently leads to different fusion between ORFs, particularly between ORF I and II. The corresponding P1P2 fusion proteins expressed in E. coli interact with viral proteins P2 and P3 in vitro. However, they are detected neither during infection nor upon transient expression in planta, which suggests rapid degradation after synthesis and no important biological role in the CaMV infectious cycle. To gain a better understanding of the functional relevance of 35S RNA alternative splicing in CaMV infectivity, we inactivated the previously described splice sites. All the splicing mutants were as pathogenic as the corresponding wild-type isolate. Through RT-PCR-based analysis we demonstrate that CaMV 35S RNA exhibits a complex splicing pattern, as we identify new splice donor and acceptor sites whose selection leads to more than thirteen 35S RNA isoforms in infected turnip plants. Inactivating splice donor or acceptor sites is not lethal for the virus, since disrupted sites are systematically rescued by the activation of cryptic and/or seldom used splice sites. Taken together, our data depict a conserved, complex and flexible process, involving multiple sites, that ensures splicing of 35S RNA. PMID:26162084

  11. Secondary structure of splice sites in adenovirus mRNA precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, S H

    1984-01-01

    In order to investigate the possible role of RNA secondary structure in determining the efficiency and specificity of mRNA splicing, the structures of sequences at three acceptor splice sites in adenovirus were studied. Transcripts spanning intron-exon junctions were synthesized using SP6 RNA polymerase and analyzed using single and double-strand specific nucleases. Distinctive patterns of nuclease cleavage were observed for each of the 3 sites examined. At both sites in the E2a region sequences adjacent to the splice sites were particularly susceptible to digestion with T1 and S1 nucleases. In contrast, a splice site for hexon mRNA was largely resistant to these nucleases. The results obtained suggest that the conformation of the RNA at some, but not all, acceptor sites may enhance the accessibility of these sites to factors involved in splicing nuclear RNA and confirm the presence of a large, previously predicted hairpin structure centered on the acceptor site at 67 map units. Images PMID:6095200

  12. Virus deletion mutants that affect a 3' splice site in the E3 transcription unit of adenovirus 2.

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, B M; Brady, H A; Wold, W S

    1985-01-01

    Five viable virus mutants were constructed with deletions near a 3' splice site located at nucleotide 2157 in the E3 transcription unit of adenovirus 2. The mutants were examined for splicing activity at the 2157 3' splice site in vivo by nuclease-gel analysis of steady-state cytoplasmic mRNA. Splicing was not prevented by an exon deletion (dl719) that leaves 16 5'-proximal exon nucleotides intact or by intron deletions that leave 34 (dl717, dl712) or 18 (dl716) 3'-proximal intron nucleotides intact. The sequences deleted in one of these intron mutants (dl716) include the putative branchpoint site used in lariat formation during splicing. Thus, a surrogate branchpoint site apparently can be used for splicing. Another intron mutant (dl714) has a deletion that leaves 15 3'-proximal intron nucleotides intact; remarkably, this deletion virtually abolished splicing, even though the deletion is only 3 nucleotides closer to the splice site than is the deletion in dl716 which splices normally. The three nucleotides deleted in dl714 that are retained by dl716 are the sequence TGT. The TGT sequence is located on the 5' boundary of the pyrimidine-rich region upstream of the nucleotide 2157 3' splice site. Such pyrimidine-rich regions are ubiquitous at 3' splice sites. Most likely, the TGT is required for splicing at the nucleotide 2157 3' splice site. The TGT may be important because of its specific sequence or because it forms the 5' boundary of the pyrimidine-rich region. Images PMID:3879768

  13. Structural Features of a 3′ Splice Site in Influenza A

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A is an RNA virus with a genome of eight negative sense segments. Segment 7 mRNA contains a 3′ splice site for alternative splicing to encode the essential M2 protein. On the basis of sequence alignment and chemical mapping experiments, the secondary structure surrounding the 3′ splice site has an internal loop, adenine bulge, and hairpin loop when it is in the hairpin conformation that exposes the 3′ splice site. We report structural features of a three-dimensional model of the hairpin derived from nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and simulated annealing with restrained molecular dynamics. Additional insight was provided by modeling based on 1H chemical shifts. The internal loop containing the 3′ splice site has a dynamic guanosine and a stable imino (cis Watson–Crick/Watson–Crick) GA pair. The adenine bulge also appears to be dynamic with the A either stacked in the stem or forming a base triple with a Watson–Crick GC pair. The hairpin loop is a GAAA tetraloop closed by an AC pair. PMID:25909229

  14. SplicingTypesAnno: annotating and quantifying alternative splicing events for RNA-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoyong; Zuo, Fenghua; Ru, Yuanbin; Guo, Jiqiang; Yan, Xiaoyan; Sablok, Gaurav

    2015-04-01

    Alternative splicing plays a key role in the regulation of the central dogma. Four major types of alternative splicing have been classified as intron retention, exon skipping, alternative 5 splice sites or alternative donor sites, and alternative 3 splice sites or alternative acceptor sites. A few algorithms have been developed to detect splice junctions from RNA-Seq reads. However, there are few tools targeting at the major alternative splicing types at the exon/intron level. This type of analysis may reveal subtle, yet important events of alternative splicing, and thus help gain deeper understanding of the mechanism of alternative splicing. This paper describes a user-friendly R package, extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. SplicingTypesAnno can: (1) provide annotation for major alternative splicing at exon/intron level. By comparing the annotation from GTF/GFF file, it identifies the novel alternative splicing sites; (2) offer a convenient two-level analysis: genome-scale annotation for users with high performance computing environment, and gene-scale annotation for users with personal computers; (3) generate a user-friendly web report and additional BED files for IGV visualization. SplicingTypesAnno is a user-friendly R package for extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types at exon/intron level for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. It is publically available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/splicingtypes/files/ or http://genome.sdau.edu.cn/research/software/SplicingTypesAnno.html. PMID:25720307

  15. Deep intron elements mediate nested splicing events at consecutive AG dinucleotides to regulate alternative 3' splice site choice in vertebrate 4.1 genes.

    PubMed

    Parra, Marilyn K; Gallagher, Thomas L; Amacher, Sharon L; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G

    2012-06-01

    Distal intraexon (iE) regulatory elements in 4.1R pre-mRNA govern 3' splice site choice at exon 2 (E2) via nested splicing events, ultimately modulating expression of N-terminal isoforms of cytoskeletal 4.1R protein. Here we explored intrasplicing in other normal and disease gene contexts and found conservation of intrasplicing through vertebrate evolution. In the paralogous 4.1B gene, we identified ∼120 kb upstream of E2 an ultradistal intraexon, iE(B), that mediates intrasplicing by promoting two intricately coupled splicing events that ensure selection of a weak distal acceptor at E2 (E2dis) by prior excision of the competing proximal acceptor (E2prox). Mutating iE(B) in minigene splicing reporters abrogated intrasplicing, as did blocking endogenous iE(B) function with antisense morpholinos in live mouse and zebrafish animal models. In a human elliptocytosis patient with a mutant 4.1R gene lacking E2 through E4, we showed that aberrant splicing is consistent with iE(R)-mediated intrasplicing at the first available exons downstream of iE(R), namely, alternative E5 and constitutive E6. Finally, analysis of heterologous acceptor contexts revealed a strong preference for nested 3' splice events at consecutive pairs of AG dinucleotides. Distal regulatory elements may control intrasplicing at a subset of alternative 3' splice sites in vertebrate pre-mRNAs to generate proteins with functional diversity. PMID:22473990

  16. A novel splice site mutation in SMARCAL1 results in aberrant exon definition in a child with schimke immunoosseous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Clinton; Hunley, Tracy E; Guo, Yan; Cortez, David

    2015-10-01

    Schimke Immunoosseous Dysplasia (SIOD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder of childhood characterized by spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and renal failure, T-cell immunodeficiency, and cancer in certain instances. Approximately half of patients with SIOD are reported to have biallelic mutations in SMARCAL1 (SWI/SNF-related matrix-associated actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a-like 1), which encodes a DNA translocase that localizes to sites of DNA replication and repairs damaged replication forks. We present a novel mutation (NM_014140.3:c.2070+2insT) that results in defective SMARCAL1 mRNA splicing in a child with SIOD. This mutation, within the donor site of intron 12, results in the skipping of exon 12, which encodes part of a critical hinge region connecting the two lobes of the ATPase domain. This mutation was not recognized as deleterious by diagnostic SMARCAL1 sequencing, but discovered through next generation sequencing and found to result in absent SMARCAL1 expression in patient-derived lymphoblasts. The splicing defect caused by this mutation supports the concept of exon definition. Furthermore, it illustrates the need to broaden the search for SMARCAL1 mutations in patients with SIOD lacking coding sequence variants. PMID:25943327

  17. Compensatory signals associated with the activation of human GC 5′ splice sites

    PubMed Central

    Kralovicova, Jana; Hwang, Gyulin; Asplund, A. Charlotta; Churbanov, Alexander; Smith, C. I. Edvard; Vorechovsky, Igor

    2011-01-01

    GC 5′ splice sites (5′ss) are present in ∼1% of human introns, but factors promoting their efficient selection are poorly understood. Here, we describe a case of X-linked agammaglobulinemia resulting from a GC 5′ss activated by a mutation in BTK intron 3. This GC 5′ss was intrinsically weak, yet it was selected in >90% primary transcripts in the presence of a strong and intact natural GT counterpart. We show that efficient selection of this GC 5′ss required a high density of GAA/CAA-containing splicing enhancers in the exonized segment and was promoted by SR proteins 9G8, Tra2β and SC35. The GC 5′ss was efficiently inhibited by splice-switching oligonucleotides targeting either the GC 5′ss itself or the enhancer. Comprehensive analysis of natural GC-AG introns and previously reported pathogenic GC 5′ss showed that their efficient activation was facilitated by higher densities of splicing enhancers and lower densities of silencers than their GT 5′ss equivalents. Removal of the GC-AG introns was promoted to a minor extent by the splice-site strength of adjacent exons and inhibited by flanking Alu repeats, with the first downstream Alus located on average at a longer distance from the GC 5′ss than other transposable elements. These results provide new insights into the splicing code that governs selection of noncanonical splice sites. PMID:21609956

  18. A novel biallelic splice site mutation of TECTA causes moderate to severe hearing impairment in an Algerian family.

    PubMed

    Behlouli, Asma; Bonnet, Crystel; Abdi, Samia; Hasbellaoui, Mokhtar; Boudjenah, Farid; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Louha, Malek; Makrelouf, Mohamed; Ammar-Khodja, Fatima; Zenati, Akila; Petit, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Congenital deafness is certainly one of the most common monogenic diseases in humans, but it is also one of the most genetically heterogeneous, which makes molecular diagnosis challenging in most cases. Whole-exome sequencing in two out of three Algerian siblings affected by recessively-inherited, moderate to severe sensorineural deafness allowed us to identify a novel splice donor site mutation (c.5272+1G > A) in the gene encoding α-tectorin, a major component of the cochlear tectorial membrane. The mutation was present at the homozygous state in the three affected siblings, and at the heterozygous state in their unaffected, consanguineous parents. To our knowledge, this is the first reported TECTA mutation leading to the DFNB21 form of hearing impairment among Maghrebian individuals suffering from congenital hearing impairment, which further illustrates the diversity of the genes involved in congenital deafness in the Maghreb. PMID:27368438

  19. Familial glucocorticoid resistance caused by a splice site deletion in the human glucocorticoid receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, M.; Lamberts, S.W.J.; Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Encio, I.J.; Stratakis, C.A.; Hurley, D.M.; Accili, D.; Chrousos, G.P. Erasmus Univ. of Rotterdam )

    1993-03-01

    The clinical syndrome of generalized, compensated glucocorticoid resistance is characterized by increased cortisol secretion without clinical evidence of hyper- or hypocortisolism, and manifestations of androgen and/or mineralocorticoid excess. This condition results from partial failure of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to modulate transcription of its target genes. The authors studied the molecular mechanisms of this syndrome in a Dutch kindred, whose affected members had hypercortisolism and approximately half of normal GRs, and whose proband was a young woman with manifestations of hyperandrogenism. Using the polymerase chain reaction to amplify and sequence each of the nine exons of the GR gene [alpha], along with their 5[prime]- and 3[prime]-flanking regions, the authors identified a 4-base deletion at the 3[prime]-boundary of exon 6 in one GR allele ([Delta][sub 4]), which removed a donor splice site in all three affected members studied. In contrast, the sequence of exon 6 in the two unaffected siblings was normal. A single nucleotide substitution causing an amino acid substitution in the amino terminal domain of the GR (asparagine to serine, codon 363) was also discovered in exon 2 of the other allele (G[sub 1220]) in the proband, in one of her affected brothers and in her unaffected sister. This deletion in the glucocorticoid receptor gene was associated with the expression of only one allele and a decrease of GR protein by 50% in affected members of this glucocorticoid resistant family. The mutation identified in exon 2 did not segregate with the disease and appears to be of no functional significance. The presence of the null allele was apparently compensated for by increased cortisol production at the expense of concurrent hyperandrogenism. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Dinoflagellate Gene Structure and Intron Splice Sites in a Genomic Tandem Array.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Gregory S; Delwiche, Charles F; Apt, Kirk E; Lippmeier, J Casey

    2015-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are one of the last major lineages of eukaryotes for which little is known about genome structure and organization. We report here the sequence and gene structure of a clone isolated from a cosmid library which, to our knowledge, represents the largest contiguously sequenced, dinoflagellate genomic, tandem gene array. These data, combined with information from a large transcriptomic library, allowed a high level of confidence of every base pair call. This degree of confidence is not possible with PCR-based contigs. The sequence contains an intron-rich set of five highly expressed gene repeats arranged in tandem. One of the tandem repeat gene members contains an intron 26,372 bp long. This study characterizes a splice site consensus sequence for dinoflagellate introns. Two to nine base pairs around the 3' splice site are repeated by an identical two to nine base pairs around the 5' splice site. The 5' and 3' splice sites are in the same locations within each repeat so that the repeat is found only once in the mature mRNA. This identically repeated intron boundary sequence might be useful in gene modeling and annotation of genomes. PMID:25963315

  1. Evaluation of Bioinformatic Programmes for the Analysis of Variants within Splice Site Consensus Regions

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rongying; Prosser, Debra O.; Love, Donald R.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing diagnostic use of gene sequencing has led to an expanding dataset of novel variants that lie within consensus splice junctions. The challenge for diagnostic laboratories is the evaluation of these variants in order to determine if they affect splicing or are merely benign. A common evaluation strategy is to use in silico analysis, and it is here that a number of programmes are available online; however, currently, there are no consensus guidelines on the selection of programmes or protocols to interpret the prediction results. Using a collection of 222 pathogenic mutations and 50 benign polymorphisms, we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of four in silico programmes in predicting the effect of each variant on splicing. The programmes comprised Human Splice Finder (HSF), Max Entropy Scan (MES), NNSplice, and ASSP. The MES and ASSP programmes gave the highest performance based on Receiver Operator Curve analysis, with an optimal cut-off of score reduction of 10%. The study also showed that the sensitivity of prediction is affected by the level of conservation of individual positions, with in silico predictions for variants at positions −4 and +7 within consensus splice sites being largely uninformative. PMID:27313609

  2. Correction of a splice-site mutation in the beta-globin gene stimulated by triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Chin, Joanna Y; Kuan, Jean Y; Lonkar, Pallavi S; Krause, Diane S; Seidman, Michael M; Peterson, Kenneth R; Nielsen, Peter E; Kole, Ryszard; Glazer, Peter M

    2008-09-01

    Splice-site mutations in the beta-globin gene can lead to aberrant transcripts and decreased functional beta-globin, causing beta-thalassemia. Triplex-forming DNA oligonucleotides (TFOs) and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been shown to stimulate recombination in reporter gene loci in mammalian cells via site-specific binding and creation of altered helical structures that provoke DNA repair. We have designed a series of triplex-forming PNAs that can specifically bind to sequences in the human beta-globin gene. We demonstrate here that these PNAs, when cotransfected with recombinatory donor DNA fragments, can promote single base-pair modification at the start of the second intron of the beta-globin gene, the site of a common thalassemia-associated mutation. This single base pair change was detected by the restoration of proper splicing of transcripts produced from a green fluorescent protein-beta-globin fusion gene. The ability of these PNAs to induce recombination was dependent on dose, sequence, cell-cycle stage, and the presence of a homologous donor DNA molecule. Enhanced recombination, with frequencies up to 0.4%, was observed with use of the lysomotropic agent chloroquine. Finally, we demonstrate that these PNAs were effective in stimulating the modification of the endogenous beta-globin locus in human cells, including primary hematopoietic progenitor cells. This work suggests that PNAs can be effective tools to induce heritable, site-specific modification of disease-related genes in human cells. PMID:18757759

  3. Inhibitory activity of the equine infectious anemia virus major 5' splice site in the absence of Rev.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, W; Schalling, M; Zhao, C; Luukkonen, M; Nilsson, M; Fenyö, E M; Pavlakis, G N; Schwartz, S

    1996-01-01

    The major 5' splice site of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) conforms to the consensus 5' splice site in eight consecutive positions and is located immediately upstream of the gag AUG. Our results show that the presence of this 5' splice site on the EIAV gag mRNA decreases Gag production 30- to 60-fold. This is caused by inefficient nuclear mRNA export and inefficient mRNA utilization. Inhibition could be overcome by providing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev/Rev-responsive element, human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Rex/Rex-responsive element, or simian retrovirus type 1 constitutive transport element. In addition, inhibition could be abolished by introducing single point mutations in the 5' splice site or by moving the 5' splice site away from its natural position immediately upstream of the gag AUG. This demonstrates that both maintenance of a perfect consensus 5' splice site and its proper location on the mRNA are important for inhibitory activity of the EIAV major 5' splice site. PMID:8648699

  4. Extensive interactions of PRP8 protein with the 5' and 3' splice sites during splicing suggest a role in stabilization of exon alignment by U5 snRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Teigelkamp, S; Newman, A J; Beggs, J D

    1995-01-01

    Precursor RNAs containing 4-thiouridine at specific sites were used with UV-crosslinking to map the binding sites of the yeast protein splicing factor PRP8. PRP8 protein interacts with a region of at least eight exon nucleotides at the 5' splice site and a minimum of 13 exon nucleotides and part of the polypyrimidine tract in the 3' splice site region. Crosslinking of PRP8 to mutant and duplicated 3' splice sites indicated that the interaction is not sequence specific, nor does it depend on the splice site being functional. Binding of PRP8 to the 5' exon was established before step 1 and to the 3' splice site region after step 1 of splicing. These interactions place PRP8 close to the proposed catalytic core of the spliceosome during both transesterification reactions. To date, this represents the most extensive mapping of the binding site(s) of a splicing factor on the substrate RNA. We propose that the large binding sites of PRP8 stabilize the intrinsically weaker interactions of U5 snRNA with both exons at the splice sites for exon alignment by the U5 snRNP. Images PMID:7781612

  5. Splicing defects in the ataxia-telangiectasia gene, ATM: underlying mutations and consequences.

    PubMed Central

    Teraoka, S N; Telatar, M; Becker-Catania, S; Liang, T; Onengüt, S; Tolun, A; Chessa, L; Sanal, O; Bernatowska, E; Gatti, R A; Concannon, P

    1999-01-01

    Mutations resulting in defective splicing constitute a significant proportion (30/62 [48%]) of a new series of mutations in the ATM gene in patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) that were detected by the protein-truncation assay followed by sequence analysis of genomic DNA. Fewer than half of the splicing mutations involved the canonical AG splice-acceptor site or GT splice-donor site. A higher percentage of mutations occurred at less stringently conserved sites, including silent mutations of the last nucleotide of exons, mutations in nucleotides other than the conserved AG and GT in the consensus splice sites, and creation of splice-acceptor or splice-donor sites in either introns or exons. These splicing mutations led to a variety of consequences, including exon skipping and, to a lesser degree, intron retention, activation of cryptic splice sites, or creation of new splice sites. In addition, 5 of 12 nonsense mutations and 1 missense mutation were associated with deletion in the cDNA of the exons in which the mutations occurred. No ATM protein was detected by western blotting in any AT cell line in which splicing mutations were identified. Several cases of exon skipping in both normal controls and patients for whom no underlying defect could be found in genomic DNA were also observed, suggesting caution in the interpretation of exon deletions observed in ATM cDNA when there is no accompanying identification of genomic mutations. PMID:10330348

  6. Splicing fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Koodathingal, Prakash; Staley, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    The spliceosome discriminates against suboptimal substrates, both during assembly and catalysis, thereby enhancing specificity during pre-mRNA splicing. Central to such fidelity mechanisms are a conserved subset of the DEAD- and DEAH-box ATPases, which belong to a superfamily of proteins that mediate RNP rearrangements in almost all RNA-dependent processes in the cell. Through an investigation of the mechanisms contributing to the specificity of 5′ splice site cleavage, two related reports, one from our lab and the other from the Cheng lab, have provided insights into fidelity mechanisms utilized by the spliceosome. In our work, we found evidence for a kinetic proofreading mechanism in splicing in which the DEAH-box ATPase Prp16 discriminates against substrates undergoing slow 5′ splice site cleavage. Additionally, our study revealed that discriminated substrates are discarded through a general spliceosome disassembly pathway, mediated by another DEAH-box ATPase Prp43. In their work, Tseng et al. described the underlying molecular events through which Prp16 discriminates against a splicing substrate during 5′ splice site cleavage. Here, we present a synthesis of these two studies and, additionally, provide the first biochemical evidence for discrimination of a suboptimal splicing substrate just prior to 5′ splice site cleavage. Together, these findings support a general mechanism for a ubiquitous superfamily of ATPases in enhancing specificity during RNA-dependent processes in the cell. PMID:23770752

  7. ATP-dependent interaction of yeast U5 snRNA loop 1 with the 5' splice site.

    PubMed Central

    Alvi, R K; Lund, M; Okeefe, R T

    2001-01-01

    Pre-messenger RNA splicing is a two-step process by which introns are removed and exons joined together. In yeast, the U5 snRNA loop 1 interacts with the 5' exon before the first step of splicing and with the 5' and 3' exons before the second step. In vitro studies revealed that yeast U5 loop 1 is not required for the first step of splicing but is essential for holding the 5' and 3' exons for ligation during the second step. It is critical, therefore, that loop 1 contacts the 5' exon before the first step of splicing to hold this exon following cleavage from the pre-mRNA. At present it is not known how U5 loop 1 is positioned on the 5' exon prior to the first step of splicing. To address this question, we have used site-specific photoactivated crosslinking in yeast spliceosomes to investigate the interaction of U5 loop 1 with the pre-mRNA prior to the first step of splicing. We have found that the highly conserved uridines in loop 1 make ATP-dependent contacts with an approximately 8-nt region at the 5' splice site that includes the invariant GU. These interactions are dependent on functional U2 and U6 snRNAs. Our results support a model where U5 snRNA loop 1 interacts with the 5' exon in two steps during its targeting to the 5' splice site. PMID:11453062

  8. [An optimum donor site for venous grafting for microsurgery].

    PubMed

    Grimaud, O; Delpit, X; Hardy, P

    2011-06-01

    We report the results of an anatomic study based on 10 cadavers. The aim of this work is to find an optimum donor site for venous grafts which is safe, reproducible, and suitable for microsurgery stitches especially in finger reimplantation, when a long and small calibre graft is needed. This study describes the deep venous network of the radial artery, an original donor site for microsurgical venous grafts. The second aim is to describe our technique of harvesting. Dissections always show two satellite veins, that can be harvested with optimal average diameter of 1.8mm constant over the whole length. The maximum length available is about 126.5mm for the radial satellite vein, and 125 mm for the ulnar one, with a few number of collateral ligatures needed. No tying is required in 60% cases for radial satellite vein, and one ligature for the other 40%, whereas in the ulnar satellite vein, no tying is needed in 80% and just one in the other 20%. This original site is advantageous in microsurgery of the upper limb, offering an easy, quick, safe and reproducible option in an emergency situation. PMID:21621446

  9. Splice-acceptor site mutation in p53 gene of hu888 zebrafish line.

    PubMed

    Piasecka, Alicja; Brzuzan, Paweł; Woźny, Maciej; Ciesielski, Sławomir; Kaczmarczyk, Dariusz

    2015-02-01

    The p53 transcription factor is a key tumor suppressor and a central regulator of the stress response, which has been a subject of intense research for over 30 years. Recently, a zebrafish line which carries splice site mutation (G>T) in intron 8 of p53 gene (p53 (hu888) ), encoding the p53 paralogue, was developed (The Zebrafish Mutation Project). To uncover molecular effects of the mutation, we raised hu888 zebrafish line to adulthood and analyzed DNA, mRNA data, and protein levels of p53 to assess their potential contribution in molecular mechanisms of the mutant fish. To obtain zebrafish individuals homozygous for the point mutation, p53 (hu888) carriers were repeatedly incrossed but only heterozygous mutants (p53 (hu888/+) ) or p53-wild type hu888 zebrafish (p53 (+/+) ) were identified in their progeny. By evaluation of p53 expression changes in the liver of mutant and wild type hu888 zebrafish as well as of Tübingen reference strain, we demonstrated that two types of splicing occurred in each case: a classical one and the alternative splicing which involves the activation of cryptic splice-acceptor site in the exon 9 of zebrafish p53 pre-mRNA. The alternative splicing event results in a deletion 12 nucleotides in the mature mRNA, and produces a shortened variant of p53 protein. Interestingly, expression of p53 protein in liver of both heterozygous and wild type hu888 zebrafish was highly reduced compared to that in the reference strain. PMID:25183022

  10. The Consensus 5' Splice Site Motif Inhibits mRNA Nuclear Export

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eliza S.; Akef, Abdalla; Mahadevan, Kohila; Palazzo, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, mRNAs are synthesized in the nucleus and then exported to the cytoplasm where they are translated into proteins. We have mapped an element, which when present in the 3’terminal exon or in an unspliced mRNA, inhibits mRNA nuclear export. This element has the same sequence as the consensus 5’splice site motif that is used to define the start of introns. Previously it was shown that when this motif is retained in the mRNA, it causes defects in 3’cleavage and polyadenylation and promotes mRNA decay. Our new data indicates that this motif also inhibits nuclear export and promotes the targeting of transcripts to nuclear speckles, foci within the nucleus which have been linked to splicing. The motif, however, does not disrupt splicing or the recruitment of UAP56 or TAP/Nxf1 to the RNA, which are normally required for nuclear export. Genome wide analysis of human mRNAs, lncRNA and eRNAs indicates that this motif is depleted from naturally intronless mRNAs and eRNAs, but less so in lncRNAs. This motif is also depleted from the beginning and ends of the 3’terminal exons of spliced mRNAs, but less so for lncRNAs. Our data suggests that the presence of the 5’splice site motif in mature RNAs promotes their nuclear retention and may help to distinguish mRNAs from misprocessed transcripts and transcriptional noise. PMID:25826302

  11. Achieving ideal donor site aesthetics with autologous breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The appearance of the donor site following breast reconstruction with abdominal flaps has become an important topic for study. Given the variety of flaps that are derived from the abdomen, decisions are often based on how much muscle and fascia will be harvested. Comparisons between muscle sparing and non-muscle sparing techniques have been performed with outcomes related to function and contour. Closure techniques will vary and include primary fascial closure, mesh reinforcement and additional fascial plication all of which can produce natural and sometimes improved abdominal contours. Proper patient selection however is important. This manuscript will describe various techniques in order to achieve ideal abdominal contour following autologous reconstruction. PMID:26005646

  12. Quantitation of normal CFTR mRNA in CF patients with splice-site mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Z.; Olsen, J.C.; Silverman, L.M.

    1994-09-01

    Previously we identified two mutations in introns of the CFTR gene associated with partially active splice sites and unusual clinical phenotypes. One mutation in intron 19 (3849+10 kb C to T) is common in CF patients with normal sweat chloride values; an 84 bp sequence from intron 19, which contains a stop codon, is inserted between exon 19 and exon 20 in most nasal CFTR transcripts. The other mutation in intron 14B (2789+5 G to A) is associated with elevated sweat chloride levels, but mild pulmonary disease; exon 14B (38 bp) is spliced out of most nasal CFTR transcipts. The remaining CFTR cDNA sequences, other than the 84 bp insertion of exon 14B deletion, are identical to the published sequence. To correlate genotype and phenotype, we used quantitative RT-PCR to determine the levels of normally-spliced CFTR mRNA in nasal epithelia from these patients. CFTR cDNA was amplified (25 cycles) by using primers specific for normally-spliced species, {gamma}-actin cDNA was amplified as a standard.

  13. Association of Carney Complex with an Intronic Splice Site Mutation in the PRKAR1A Gene.

    PubMed

    Guo, H; Xiong, H; Li, Z; Xu, J; Zhang, H; Chen, X; Hu, S

    2016-06-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the clinical features and mutations in the PRKAR1A gene of a multigenerational kindred including 17 individuals at risk for Carney complex. Eight patients were diagnosed with Carney complex among the 17 individuals (47.1%). Among the 8 affected patients, 4 had cardiac myxomas, 8 had skin pigmentation, and 3 had diabetes. Genomic DNA sequencing in 14 surviving patients showed 6 had the same germline mutation in the sixth intron and affected the splice site. cDNA sequencing and DNAMAN software showed 159 bases were absent, resulting in the absence of the amino acids 249 to 301 from the protein. All 6 patients with this PRKAR1A gene mutation had skin pigmentation. In conclusion, the present study reported for the first time an intronic splice site mutation in the PRKAR1A gene of a Chinese family with Carney complex, which probably caused skin pigmentation observed in affected family members. PMID:26788925

  14. A splice donor mutation in NAA10 results in the dysregulation of the retinoic acid signaling pathway and causes Lenz microphthalmia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Esmailpour, Taraneh; Riazifar, Hamidreza; Liu, Linan; Donkervoort, Sandra; Huang, Vincent H; Madaan, Shreshtha; Shoucri, Bassem M; Busch, Anke; Wu, Jie; Towbin, Alexander; Chadwick, Robert B; Sequeira, Adolfo; Vawter, Marquis P; Sun, Guoli; Johnston, Jennifer J; Biesecker, Leslie G; Kawaguchi, Riki; Sun, Hui; Kimonis, Virginia; Huang, Taosheng

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Lenz microphthalmia syndrome (LMS) is a genetically heterogeneous X-linked disorder characterised by microphthalmia/anophthalmia, skeletal abnormalities, genitourinary malformations, and anomalies of the digits, ears, and teeth. Intellectual disability and seizure disorders are seen in about 60% of affected males. To date, no gene has been identified for LMS in the microphthalmia syndrome 1 locus (MCOPS1). In this study, we aim to find the disease-causing gene for this condition. Methods and results Using exome sequencing in a family with three affected brothers, we identified a mutation in the intron 7 splice donor site (c.471+2T→A) of the N-acetyltransferase NAA10 gene. NAA10 has been previously shown to be mutated in patients with Ogden syndrome, which is clinically distinct from LMS. Linkage studies for this family mapped the disease locus to Xq27-Xq28, which was consistent with the locus of NAA10. The mutation co-segregated with the phenotype and cDNA analysis showed aberrant transcripts. Patient fibroblasts lacked expression of full length NAA10 protein and displayed cell proliferation defects. Expression array studies showed significant dysregulation of genes associated with genetic forms of anophthalmia such as BMP4, STRA6, and downstream targets of BCOR and the canonical WNT pathway. In particular, STRA6 is a retinol binding protein receptor that mediates cellular uptake of retinol/vitamin A and plays a major role in regulating the retinoic acid signalling pathway. A retinol uptake assay showed that retinol uptake was decreased in patient cells. Conclusions We conclude that the NAA10 mutation is the cause of LMS in this family, likely through the dysregulation of the retinoic acid signalling pathway. PMID:24431331

  15. A Novel Splice-Site Mutation in the GJB2 Gene Causing Mild Postlingual Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Gandía, Marta; del Castillo, Francisco J.; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Francisco J.; Garrido, Gema; Villamar, Manuela; Calderón, Manuela; Moreno-Pelayo, Miguel A.; Moreno, Felipe; del Castillo, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    The DFNB1 subtype of autosomal recessive, nonsyndromic hearing impairment, caused by mutations affecting the GJB2 (connection-26) gene, is highly prevalent in most populations worldwide. DFNB1 hearing impairment is mostly severe or profound and usually appears before the acquisition of speech (prelingual onset), though a small number of hypomorphic missense mutations result in mild or moderate deafness of postlingual onset. We identified a novel GJB2 splice-site mutation, c. -22-2A>C, in three siblings with mild postlingual hearing impairment that were compound heterozygous for c. -22-2A>C and c.35delG. Reverse transcriptase-PCR experiments performed on total RNA extracted from saliva samples from one of these siblings confirmed that c. -22-2A>C abolished the acceptor splice site of the single GJB2 intron, resulting in the absence of normally processed transcripts from this allele. However, we did isolate transcripts from the c. -22-2A>C allele that keep an intact GJB2 coding region and that were generated by use of an alternative acceptor splice site previously unknown. The residual expression of wild-type connection-26 encoded by these transcripts probably underlies the mild severity and late onset of the hearing impairment of these subjects. PMID:24039984

  16. Feature selection for splice site prediction: A new method using EDA-based feature ranking

    PubMed Central

    Saeys, Yvan; Degroeve, Sven; Aeyels, Dirk; Rouzé, Pierre; Van de Peer, Yves

    2004-01-01

    Background The identification of relevant biological features in large and complex datasets is an important step towards gaining insight in the processes underlying the data. Other advantages of feature selection include the ability of the classification system to attain good or even better solutions using a restricted subset of features, and a faster classification. Thus, robust methods for fast feature selection are of key importance in extracting knowledge from complex biological data. Results In this paper we present a novel method for feature subset selection applied to splice site prediction, based on estimation of distribution algorithms, a more general framework of genetic algorithms. From the estimated distribution of the algorithm, a feature ranking is derived. Afterwards this ranking is used to iteratively discard features. We apply this technique to the problem of splice site prediction, and show how it can be used to gain insight into the underlying biological process of splicing. Conclusion We show that this technique proves to be more robust than the traditional use of estimation of distribution algorithms for feature selection: instead of returning a single best subset of features (as they normally do) this method provides a dynamical view of the feature selection process, like the traditional sequential wrapper methods. However, the method is faster than the traditional techniques, and scales better to datasets described by a large number of features. PMID:15154966

  17. Revealing the function of a novel splice-site mutation of CHD7 in CHARGE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeonghyeon; Duz, Mehmet Bugrahan; Sagong, Borum; Koparir, Asuman; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Choi, Jae Young; Seven, Mehmet; Yuksel, Adnan; Kim, Un-Kyung; Ozen, Mustafa

    2016-02-01

    Most cases of CHARGE syndrome are sporadic and autosomal dominant. CHD7 is a major causative gene of CHARGE syndrome. In this study, we screened CHD7 in two Turkish patients demonstrating symptoms of CHARGE syndrome such as coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retarded growth, genital abnomalities and ear anomalies. Two mutations of CHD7 were identified including a novel splice-site mutation (c.2443-2A>G) and a previously known frameshift mutation (c.2504_2508delATCTT). We performed exon trapping analysis to determine the effect of the c.2443-2A>G mutation at the transcriptional level, and found that it caused a complete skip of exon 7 and splicing at a cryptic splice acceptor site. Our current study is the second study demonstrating an exon 7 deficit in CHD7. Results of previous studies suggest that the c.2443-2A>G mutation affects the formation of nasal tissues and the neural retina during early development, resulting in choanal atresia and coloboma, respectively. The findings of the present study will improve our understanding of the genetic causes of CHARGE syndrome. PMID:26551301

  18. Splicing of cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA is essential for viral infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Kiss-László, Z; Blanc, S; Hohn, T

    1995-01-01

    A splicing event essential for the infectivity of a plant pararetrovirus has been characterized. Transient expression experiments using reporter constructs revealed a splice donor site in the leader sequence of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S RNA and three additional splice donor sites within open reading frame (ORF) I. All four donors use the same splice acceptor within ORF II. Splicing between the leader and ORF II produces an mRNA from which ORF III and, in the presence of the CaMV translational transactivator, ORF IV can be translated efficiently. The other three splicing events produce RNAs encoding ORF I-II in-frame fusions. All four spliced CaMV RNAs were detected in CaMV-infected plants. Virus mutants in which the splice acceptor site in ORF II is inactivated are not infectious, indicating that splicing plays an essential role in the CaMV life cycle. The results presented here suggest a model for viral gene expression in which RNA splicing is required to provide appropriate substrate mRNAs for the specialized translation mechanisms of CaMV. Images PMID:7628455

  19. A 5' splice site mutation affecting the pre-mRNA splicing of two upstream exons in the collagen COL1A1 gene. Exon 8 skipping and altered definition of exon 7 generates truncated pro alpha 1(I) chains with a non-collagenous insertion destabilizing the triple helix.

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, J F; Chan, D; Moeller, I; Hannagan, M; Cole, W G

    1994-01-01

    A heterozygous de novo G to A point mutation in intron 8 at the +5 position of the splice donor site of the gene for the pro alpha 1(I) chain of type I procollagen, COL1A1, was defined in a patient with type IV osteogenesis imperfecta. The splice donor site mutation resulted not only in the skipping of the upstream exon 8 but also unexpectedly had the secondary effect of activating a cryptic splice site in the next upstream intron, intron 7, leading to re-definition of the 3' limit of exon 7. These pre-mRNA splicing aberrations cause the deletion of exon 8 sequences from the mature mRNA and the inclusion of 96 bp of intron 7 sequence. Since the mis-splicing of the mutant allele product resulted in the maintenance of the correct codon reading frame, the resultant pro alpha 1(I) chain contained a short non-collagenous 32-amino-acid sequence insertion within the repetitive Gly-Xaa-Yaa collagen sequence motif. At the protein level, the mutant alpha 1(I) chain was revealed by digestion with pepsin, which cleaved the mutant procollagen within the protease-sensitive non-collagenous insertion, producing a truncated alpha 1(I). This protease sensitivity demonstrated the structural distortion to the helical structure caused by the insertion. In long-term culture with ascorbic acid, which stimulates the formation of a mature crosslinked collagen matrix, and in tissues, there was no evidence of the mutant chain, suggesting that during matrix formation the mutant chain was unable to stably incorporated into the matrix and was degraded proteolytically. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7945197

  20. Control of adenovirus E1B mRNA synthesis by a shift in the activities of RNA splice sites.

    PubMed Central

    Montell, C; Fisher, E F; Caruthers, M H; Berk, A J

    1984-01-01

    The primary transcript from adenovirus 2 early region 1B (E1B) is processed by differential RNA splicing into two overlapping mRNAs, 13S and 22S. The 22S mRNA is the major E1B mRNA during the early phase of infection, whereas the 13S mRNA predominates during the late phase. In previous work, it has been shown that this shift in proportions of the E1B mRNAs is influenced by increased cytoplasmic stability of the 13S mRNA at late times in infection. Two observations presented here demonstrate that the increase in proportion of the 13S mRNA at late times is also regulated by a change in the specificity of RNA splicing. First, the relative concentrations of the 13S to 22S nuclear RNAs were not constant throughout infection but increased at late times. Secondly, studies with the mutant, adenovirus 2 pm2250 , provided evidence that there was an increased propensity to utilize a 5' splice in the region of the 13S 5' splice site at late times in infection. Adenovirus 2 pm2250 has a G----C transversion in the first base of E1B 13S mRNA intron preventing splicing of the 13S mRNA but not of the 22S mRNA. During the early phase of a pm2250 infection, the E1B primary transcripts were processed into the 22S mRNA only. However, during the late phase, when the 13S mRNA normally predominates, E1B primary transcripts were also processed by RNA splicing at two formerly unused or cryptic 5' splice sites. Both cryptic splice sites were located much closer to the disrupted 13S 5' splice site than to the 22S 5' splice site. Thus, the temporal increase in proportion of the 13S mRNA to the 22S mRNA is regulated by two processes, an increase in cytoplasmic stability of the 13S mRNA and an increased propensity to utilize the 13S 5' splice site during the late phase of infection. Adenovirus 2 pm2250 was not defective for productive infection of HeLa cells or for transformation of rat cells. Images PMID:6727875

  1. Alternative splicing of HLA-DQB transcripts and secretion of HLA-DQ beta-chain proteins: allelic polymorphism in splicing and polyadenylylation sites.

    PubMed Central

    Briata, P; Radka, S F; Sartoris, S; Lee, J S

    1989-01-01

    HLA class II antigens are highly polymorphic cell-surface proteins involved in initiation and regulation of the immune response. Allelic sequence variation primarily affects the structure of the first external domains of alpha and beta component chains. Here we provide evidence for other types of allelic polymorphism for the genes encoding these chains. Sequences of two cDNA clones corresponding to HLA-DQB mRNAs from an HLA-homozygous cell line exhibit both alternative splicing and read-through of polyadenylylation. Furthermore, alternative splicing that deletes the transmembrane exon is associated with only a subset of HLA-DQB alleles, while the polyadenylylation-site read-through is found in a larger subset. This suggest that polymorphic cis-acting elements within the HLA-DQB gene control both processing steps. Proteins, presumably encoded by alternatively spliced mRNAs lacking transmembrane exons, are immunoprecipitated with a monomorphic monoclonal antibody directed against HLA-DQ. These proteins are found in supernatants of cultured cell lines for which secretion is predicted, but not in those of cell lines that do not contain alternatively spliced mRNAs. Images PMID:2464826

  2. The human XPG gene: gene architecture, alternative splicing and single nucleotide polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Emmert, Steffen; Schneider, Thomas D.; Khan, Sikandar G.; Kraemer, Kenneth H.

    2001-01-01

    Defects in the XPG DNA repair endonuclease gene can result in the cancer-prone disorders xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or the XP–Cockayne syndrome complex. While the XPG cDNA sequence was known, determination of the genomic sequence was required to understand its different functions. In cells from normal donors, we found that the genomic sequence of the human XPG gene spans 30 kb, contains 15 exons that range from 61 to 1074 bp and 14 introns that range from 250 to 5763 bp. Analysis of the splice donor and acceptor sites using an information theory-based approach revealed three splice sites with low information content, which are components of the minor (U12) spliceosome. We identified six alternatively spliced XPG mRNA isoforms in cells from normal donors and from XPG patients: partial deletion of exon 8, partial retention of intron 8, two with alternative exons (in introns 1 and 6) and two that retained complete introns (introns 3 and 9). The amount of alternatively spliced XPG mRNA isoforms varied in different tissues. Most alternative splice donor and acceptor sites had a relatively high information content, but one has the U12 spliceosome sequence. A single nucleotide polymorphism has allele frequencies of 0.74 for 3507G and 0.26 for 3507C in 91 donors. The human XPG gene contains multiple splice sites with low information content in association with multiple alternatively spliced isoforms of XPG mRNA. PMID:11266544

  3. Dysferlin rescue by spliceosome-mediated pre-mRNA trans-splicing targeting introns harbouring weakly defined 3' splice sites.

    PubMed

    Philippi, Susanne; Lorain, Stéphanie; Beley, Cyriaque; Peccate, Cécile; Précigout, Guillaume; Spuler, Simone; Garcia, Luis

    2015-07-15

    The modification of the pre-mRNA cis-splicing process employing a pre-mRNA trans-splicing molecule (PTM) is an attractive strategy for the in situ correction of genes whose careful transcription regulation and full-length expression is determinative for protein function, as it is the case for the dysferlin (DYSF, Dysf) gene. Loss-of-function mutations of DYSF result in different types of muscular dystrophy mainly manifesting as limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B (LGMD2B) and Miyoshi muscular dystrophy 1 (MMD1). We established a 3' replacement strategy for mutated DYSF pre-mRNAs induced by spliceosome-mediated pre-mRNA trans-splicing (SmaRT) by the use of a PTM. In contrast to previously established SmaRT strategies, we particularly focused on the identification of a suitable pre-mRNA target intron other than the optimization of the PTM design. By targeting DYSF pre-mRNA introns harbouring differentially defined 3' splice sites (3' SS), we found that target introns encoding weakly defined 3' SSs were trans-spliced successfully in vitro in human LGMD2B myoblasts as well as in vivo in skeletal muscle of wild-type and Dysf(-/-) mice. For the first time, we demonstrate rescue of Dysf protein by SmaRT in vivo. Moreover, we identified concordant qualities among the successfully targeted Dysf introns and targeted endogenous introns in previously reported SmaRT approaches that might facilitate a selective choice of target introns in future SmaRT strategies. PMID:25904108

  4. A prospective comparison of a new, synthetic donor site dressing versus an impregnated gauze dressing.

    PubMed

    Hickerson, W L; Kealey, G P; Smith, D J; Thomson, P D

    1994-01-01

    Three institutions enrolled 38 patients who required bilateral skin graft donor sites into a safety and efficacy study of a new synthetic donor site dressing. Bilateral donor sites were randomized to receive either a new, synthetic donor site dressing or an impregnated gauze dressing. Wounds were assessed by time to healing, pain, and patient preference. Synthetic dressing wounds were treated 7.9 days compared with 10.2 days for gauze dressing wounds (p < 0.001), and synthetic dressing wounds were more completely epithelialized. Visual analogue pain analysis revealed significantly less donor site pain with synthetic dressing (2.94) versus gauze dressing (4.64) (p < 0.001). Synthetic dressing had fewer treatment-related adverse experiences than gauze dressing (2 vs 7) and was judged by recipients to be superior to gauze dressing in comfort, pain relief, cosmetic appeal, ease of ambulation, and overall acceptance. PMID:7929519

  5. Germinal HPRT splice donor site mutation results in multiple RNA splicing products in T-lymphocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, T.C.; Albertini, R.J.; O`Neill, J.P.

    1996-03-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by birth defects, progressive bone marrow failure and increased risk for leukemia. FA cells display chromosome breakage and increased cell killing in response to DNA crosslinking agents. At least 5 genes have been defined by cell complementation studies, but only one of these, FAC has been cloned to date. Efforts to map and isolate new FA genes by functional complementation have been hampered by the lack of immortalized FA fibroblast cell lines. Here we report the use of a novel immortalization strategy to create 4 new immortalized FA fibroblast lines, including one from the rare complementation group D. 16 refs., 3 tabs.

  6. A splice site mutation in a gene encoding for PDK4, a mitochondrial protein, is associated with the development of dilated cardiomyopathy in the Doberman pinscher.

    PubMed

    Meurs, Kathryn M; Lahmers, Sunshine; Keene, Bruce W; White, Stephen N; Oyama, Mark A; Mauceli, Evan; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2012-08-01

    Familial dilated cardiomyopathy is a primary myocardial disease that can result in the development of congestive heart failure and sudden cardiac death. Spontaneous animal models of familial dilated cardiomyopathy exist and the Doberman pinscher dog is one of the most commonly reported canine breeds. The objective of this study was to evaluate familial dilated cardiomyopathy in the Doberman pinscher dog using a genome-wide association study for a genetic alteration(s) associated with the development of this disease in this canine model. Genome-wide association analysis identified an area of statistical significance on canine chromosome 14 (p(raw) = 9.999e-05 corrected for genome-wide significance), fine-mapping of additional SNPs flanking this region localized a signal to 23,774,190-23,781,919 (p = 0.001) and DNA sequencing identified a 16-base pair deletion in the 5' donor splice site of intron 10 of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 gene in affected dogs (p < 0.0001). Electron microscopy of myocardium from affected dogs demonstrated disorganization of the Z line, mild to moderate T tubule and sarcoplasmic reticulum dilation, marked pleomorphic mitochondrial alterations with megamitochondria, scattered mitochondria with whorling and vacuolization and mild aggregates of lipofuscin granules. In conclusion, we report the identification of a splice site deletion in the PDK4 gene that is associated with the development of familial dilated cardiomyopathy in the Doberman pinscher dog. PMID:22447147

  7. Ice application to minimize pain in the split-thickness skin graft donor site.

    PubMed

    Akan, Mithat; Misirlioğlu, Aykut; Yildirim, Serkan; Cakir, Bariş; Taylan, Gaye; Aköz, Tayfun

    2003-01-01

    Reconstruction of tissue defects with skin grafts is one of the most used processes in soft tissue defects. While any part of the body can be used as a donor site of split-thickness skin grafts, the posterolateral thigh is the most used one. Pain in the graft donor site may be the primary concern of patients in the postoperative period. Various kinds of donor site dressings and procedures have been described for this purpose. The main goal of this practice is the fast recovery of the donor site. Nevertheless, avoiding infection, decreasing the pain in the donor site, and minimizing the cost should be considered. To minimize pain in the graft donor site, ice pack application, used for its local anesthetic effect, was utilized for patients postoperatively in our clinic. Thirty-six patients were included in this study between June 2001 and May 2002. Patients were divided into two groups, with 18 patients in-group I, to whom ice was applied, and 18 patients in group II, which was specified as the control group. The patients were evaluated according to the pain in the graft donor site. The visual analog scale (VAS) was used to evaluate the pain of the patients. The data were statistically evaluated with the Mann-Whitney U test procedure. In addition to this, infections, recovery periods, and cost benefit effects were also determined. The mean pain scores in the graft donor site were found to be quite low in patients in the group with ice application (p < 0.05). No significant difference was determined between the two groups when their pain scales were compared on the fourth and the fifth days (p > 0.05). Ice can be safely used in patients for whom donor site pain is the primary concern, with advantages such as ease of application, low cost (almost free), and a significant decrease in pain in the donor site. PMID:15058555

  8. Biased exon/intron distribution of cryptic and de novo 3′ splice sites

    PubMed Central

    Královičová, Jana; Christensen, Mikkel B.; Vořechovský, Igor

    2005-01-01

    We compiled sequences of previously published aberrant 3′ splice sites (3′ss) that were generated by mutations in human disease genes. Cryptic 3′ss, defined here as those resulting from a mutation of the 3′YAG consensus, were more frequent in exons than in introns. They clustered in ∼20 nt region adjacent to authentic 3′ss, suggesting that their under-representation in introns is due to a depletion of AG dinucleotides in the polypyrimidine tract (PPT). In contrast, most aberrant 3′ss that were induced by mutations outside the 3′YAG consensus (designated ‘de novo’) were in introns. The activation of intronic de novo 3′ss was largely due to AG-creating mutations in the PPT. In contrast, exonic de novo 3′ss were more often induced by mutations improving the PPT, branchpoint sequence (BPS) or distant auxiliary signals, rather than by direct AG creation. The Shapiro–Senapathy matrix scores had a good prognostic value for cryptic, but not de novo 3′ss. Finally, AG-creating mutations in the PPT that produced aberrant 3′ss upstream of the predicted BPS in vivo shared a similar ‘BPS-new AG’ distance. Reduction of this distance and/or the strength of the new AG PPT in splicing reporter pre-mRNAs improved utilization of authentic 3′ss, suggesting that AG-creating mutations that are located closer to the BPS and are preceded by weaker PPT may result in less severe splicing defects. PMID:16141195

  9. Constant splice-isoform ratios in human lymphoblastoid cells support the concept of a splico-stat.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Marcel; Huse, Klaus; Menzel, Uwe; Backhaus, Oliver; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schreiber, Stefan; Hampe, Jochen; Platzer, Matthias

    2011-03-01

    Splicing generates mature transcripts from genes in pieces in eukaryotic cells. Overwhelming evidence has accumulated that alternative routes in splicing are possible for most human and mammalian genes, thereby allowing formation of different transcripts from one gene. No function has been assigned to the majority of identified alternative splice forms, and it has been assumed that they compose inert or tolerated waste from aberrant or noisy splicing. Here we demonstrate that five human transcription units (WT1, NOD2, GNAS, RABL2A, RABL2B) have constant splice-isoform ratios in genetically diverse lymphoblastoid cell lines independent of the type of alternative splicing (exon skipping, alternative donor/acceptor, tandem splice sites) and gene expression level. Even splice events that create premature stop codons and potentially trigger nonsense-mediated mRNA decay are found at constant fractions. The analyzed alternative splicing events were qualitatively but not quantitatively conserved in corresponding chimpanzee cell lines. Additionally, subtle splicing at tandem acceptor splice sites (GNAS, RABL2A/B) was highly constrained and strongly depends on the upstream donor sequence content. These results also demonstrate that unusual and unproductive splice variants are produced in a regulated manner. PMID:21220357

  10. Human papillomavirus type 16 E2 and E6 are RNA-binding proteins and inhibit in vitro splicing of pre-mRNAs with suboptimal splice sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bodaghi, Sohrab; Jia Rong; Zheng Zhiming

    2009-03-30

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) genome expresses six regulatory proteins (E1, E2, E4, E5, E6, and E7) which regulate viral DNA replication, gene expression, and cell function. We expressed HPV16 E2, E4, E6, and E7 from bacteria as GST fusion proteins and examined their possible functions in RNA splicing. Both HPV16 E2, a viral transactivator protein, and E6, a viral oncoprotein, inhibited splicing of pre-mRNAs containing an intron with suboptimal splice sites, whereas HPV5 E2 did not. The N-terminal half and the hinge region of HPV16 E2 as well as the N-terminal and central portions of HPV16 E6 are responsible for the suppression. HPV16 E2 interacts with pre-mRNAs through its C-terminal DNA-binding domain. HPV16 E6 binds pre-mRNAs via nuclear localization signal (NLS3) in its C-terminal half. Low-risk HPV6 E6, a cytoplasmic protein, does not bind RNA. Notably, both HPV16 E2 and E6 selectively bind to the intron region of pre-mRNAs and interact with a subset of cellular SR proteins. Together, these findings suggest that HPV16 E2 and E6 are RNA binding proteins and might play roles in posttranscriptional regulation during virus infection.

  11. A novel splice site mutation in EYA4 causes DFNA10 hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Michael S; Coman, David; Yang, Tao; Gardner, R J McKinlay; Rose, Elizabeth; Smith, Richard J H; Bahlo, Melanie; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M

    2007-07-15

    Nonsyndromic autosomal dominant sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) at the DFNA10 locus was described in two families in 2001. Causative mutations that affect the EyaHR domain of the 'Eyes absent 4' (EYA4) protein were identified. We report on the clinical and genetic analyses of an Australian family with nonsyndromic SNHL. Screening of the EYA4 gene showed the novel polypyrimidine tract variation ca. 1,282-12T > A that introduces a new 3' splice acceptor site. This is the first report of a point mutation in EYA4 that is hypothesized to lead to aberrant pre-mRNA splicing and human disease. The DFNA10 family described is only the fourth to be identified. One individual presented with apparently the same phenotype as other affected members of the family. However, genotyping illustrated that he did not share the DFNA10 disease haplotype. Detailed clinical investigation showed differences in the onset and severity of his hearing loss and thus he is presumed to represent a phenocopy, perhaps resulting from long-term exposure to loud noise. PMID:17568404

  12. Altered PLP1 splicing causes hypomyelination of early myelinating structures

    PubMed Central

    Kevelam, Sietske H; Taube, Jennifer R; van Spaendonk, Rosalina M L; Bertini, Enrico; Sperle, Karen; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Tonduti, Davide; Valente, Enza Maria; Travaglini, Lorena; Sistermans, Erik A; Bernard, Geneviève; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene E; van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Østergaard, John R; Friederich, Richard L; Fawzi Elsaid, Mahmoud; Schieving, Jolanda H; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; Orcesi, Simona; Steenweg, Marjan E; van Berkel, Carola G M; Waisfisz, Quinten; Abbink, Truus E M; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Hobson, Grace M; Wolf, Nicole I

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic etiology of the X-linked disorder “Hypomyelination of Early Myelinating Structures” (HEMS). Methods We included 16 patients from 10 families diagnosed with HEMS by brain MRI criteria. Exome sequencing was used to search for causal mutations. In silico analysis of effects of the mutations on splicing and RNA folding was performed. In vitro gene splicing was examined in RNA from patients’ fibroblasts and an immortalized immature oligodendrocyte cell line after transfection with mutant minigene splicing constructs. Results All patients had unusual hemizygous mutations of PLP1 located in exon 3B (one deletion, one missense and two silent), which is spliced out in isoform DM20, or in intron 3 (five mutations). The deletion led to truncation of PLP1, but not DM20. Four mutations were predicted to affect PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing by creating exonic splicing silencer motifs or new splice donor sites or by affecting the local RNA structure of the PLP1 splice donor site. Four deep intronic mutations were predicted to destabilize a long-distance interaction structure in the secondary PLP1 RNA fragment involved in regulating PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing. Splicing studies in fibroblasts and transfected cells confirmed a decreased PLP1/DM20 ratio. Interpretation Brain structures that normally myelinate early are poorly myelinated in HEMS, while they are the best myelinated structures in Pelizaeus–Merzbacher disease, also caused by PLP1 alterations. Our data extend the phenotypic spectrum of PLP1-related disorders indicating that normal PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing is essential for early myelination and support the need to include intron 3 in diagnostic sequencing. PMID:26125040

  13. An Alu-derived intronic splicing enhancer facilitates intronic processing and modulates aberrant splicing in ATM

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Tibor; Talotti, Gabriele; Lewandowska, Marzena Anna; Pagani, Franco

    2009-01-01

    We have previously reported a natural GTAA deletion within an intronic splicing processing element (ISPE) of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene that disrupts a non-canonical U1 snRNP interaction and activates the excision of the upstream portion of the intron. The resulting pre-mRNA splicing intermediate is then processed to a cryptic exon, whose aberrant inclusion in the final mRNA is responsible for ataxia telangiectasia. We show here that the last 40 bases of a downstream intronic antisense Alu repeat are required for the activation of the cryptic exon by the ISPE deletion. Evaluation of the pre-mRNA splicing intermediate by a hybrid minigene assay indicates that the identified intronic splicing enhancer represents a novel class of enhancers that facilitates processing of splicing intermediates possibly by recruiting U1 snRNP to defective donor sites. In the absence of this element, the splicing intermediate accumulates and is not further processed to generate the cryptic exon. Our results indicate that Alu-derived sequences can provide intronic splicing regulatory elements that facilitate pre-mRNA processing and potentially affect the severity of disease-causing splicing mutations. PMID:19773425

  14. A novel 3′ splice site recognition by the two zinc fingers in the U2AF small subunit

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Hisashi; Park, Sam-Yong; Oda, Takashi; Akiyoshi, Taeko; Sato, Mamoru; Shirouzu, Mikako; Tsuda, Kengo; Kuwasako, Kanako; Unzai, Satoru; Muto, Yutaka; Urano, Takeshi; Obayashi, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    The pre-mRNA splicing reaction of eukaryotic cells has to be carried out extremely accurately, as failure to recognize the splice sites correctly causes serious disease. The small subunit of the U2AF heterodimer is essential for the determination of 3′ splice sites in pre-mRNA splicing, and several single-residue mutations of the U2AF small subunit cause severe disorders such as myelodysplastic syndromes. However, the mechanism of RNA recognition is poorly understood. Here we solved the crystal structure of the U2AF small subunit (U2AF23) from fission yeast, consisting of an RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain flanked by two conserved CCCH-type zinc fingers (ZFs). The two ZFs are positioned side by side on the β sheet of the RRM domain. Further mutational analysis revealed that the ZFs bind cooperatively to the target RNA sequence, but the RRM domain acts simply as a scaffold to organize the ZFs and does not itself contact the RNA directly. This completely novel and unexpected mode of RNA-binding mechanism by the U2AF small subunit sheds light on splicing errors caused by mutations of this highly conserved protein. PMID:26215567

  15. Permanent Neonatal Diabetes Caused by Creation of an Ectopic Splice Site within the INS Gene

    PubMed Central

    Gastaldo, Elena; Harries, Lorna W.; Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Castaño, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to characterize the genetic etiology in a patient who presented with permanent neonatal diabetes at 2 months of age. Methodology/Principal Findings Regulatory elements and coding exons 2 and 3 of the INS gene were amplified and sequenced from genomic and complementary DNA samples. A novel heterozygous INS mutation within the terminal intron of the gene was identified in the proband and her affected father. This mutation introduces an ectopic splice site leading to the insertion of 29 nucleotides from the intronic sequence into the mature mRNA, which results in a longer and abnormal transcript. Conclusions/Significance This study highlights the importance of routinely sequencing the exon-intron boundaries and the need to carry out additional studies to confirm the pathogenicity of any identified intronic genetic variants. PMID:22235272

  16. MNGIE with lack of skeletal muscle involvement and a novel TP splice site mutation.

    PubMed

    Szigeti, K; Wong, L-J C; Perng, C-L; Saifi, G M; Eldin, K; Adesina, A M; Cass, D L; Hirano, M; Lupski, J R; Scaglia, F

    2004-02-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder caused by thymidine phosphorylase (TP) deficiency, resulting in severe gastrointestinal dysmotility and skeletal muscle abnormalities. A patient is reported with a classical MNGIE clinical presentation but without skeletal muscle involvement at morphological, enzymatic, or mitochondrial DNA level, though gastrointestinal myopathy was present. MNGIE was diagnosed by markedly raised plasma thymidine and reduced thymidine phosphorylase activity. Molecular genetic analysis showed a homozygous novel splice site mutation in TP. On immunohistochemical studies there was marked TP expression in the CNS, in contrast to what has been observed in rodents. It is important to examine the most significantly affected tissue and to measure TP activity and plasma thymidine in order to arrive at an accurate diagnosis in this condition. PMID:14757860

  17. PCR differentiation of commercial yeast strains using intron splice site primers.

    PubMed Central

    de Barros Lopes, M; Soden, A; Henschke, P A; Langridge, P

    1996-01-01

    The increased use of pure starter cultures in the wine industry has made it necessary to develop a rapid and simple identification system for yeast strains. A method based upon the PCR using oligonucleotide primers that are complementary to intron splice sites has been developed. Since most introns are not essential for gene function, introns have evolved with minimal constraint. By targeting these highly variable sequences, the PCR has proved to be very effective in uncovering polymorphisms in commercial yeast strains. The speed of the method and the ability to analyze many samples in a single day permit the monitoring of specific yeast strains during fermentations. Furthermore, the simplicity of the technique, which does not require the isolation of DNA, makes it accessible to industrial laboratories that have limited molecular expertise and resources. PMID:8953723

  18. Clinical and genetic studies in a family with a new splice-site mutation in the choroideremia gene

    PubMed Central

    Piane, Maria; Cascone, Nikhil C.; Pasquale, Nadia; Ciarnella, Angela; Recupero, Santi M.; Chessa, Luciana

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical and molecular findings of an Italian family with a new mutation in the choroideremia (CHM) gene. Methods We performed a comprehensive ophthalmologic examination, fundus photography, macular optical coherence tomography, perimetry, electroretinography, and fluorescein angiography in an Italian family. The clinical diagnosis was supported by western blot analysis of lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with CHM and carriers, using a monoclonal antibody against the 415 C-terminal amino acids of Rab escort protein-1 (REP-1). Sequencing of the CHM gene was undertaken on genomic DNA from affected men and carriers; the RNA transcript was analyzed with reverse transcriptase-PCR. Results The affected men showed a variability in the rate of visual change and in the degree of clinical and functional ophthalmologic involvement, mainly age-related, while the women displayed aspecific areas of chorioretinal degeneration. Western blot did not show a detectable amount of normal REP-1 protein in affected men who were hemizygous for a novel mutation, c.819+2T>A at the donor splicing site of intron 6 of the CHM gene; the mutation was confirmed in heterozygosity in the carriers. Conclusions Western blot of the REP-1 protein confirmed the clinical diagnosis, and molecular analysis showed the new in-frame mutation, c.819+2T>A, leading to loss of function of the REP-1 protein. These results emphasize the value of a diagnostic approach that correlates genetic and ophthalmologic data for identifying carriers in families with CHM. An early diagnosis might be crucial for genetic counseling of this type of progressive and still untreatable disease. PMID:24672218

  19. Dominant Splice Site Mutations in PIK3R1 Cause Hyper IgM Syndrome, Lymphadenopathy and Short Stature.

    PubMed

    Petrovski, Slavé; Parrott, Roberta E; Roberts, Joseph L; Huang, Hongxiang; Yang, Jialong; Gorentla, Balachandra; Mousallem, Talal; Wang, Endi; Armstrong, Martin; McHale, Duncan; MacIver, Nancie J; Goldstein, David B; Zhong, Xiao-Ping; Buckley, Rebecca H

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this research was to use next generation sequencing to identify mutations in patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases whose pathogenic gene mutations had not been identified. Remarkably, four unrelated patients were found by next generation sequencing to have the same heterozygous mutation in an essential donor splice site of PIK3R1 (NM_181523.2:c.1425 + 1G > A) found in three prior reports. All four had the Hyper IgM syndrome, lymphadenopathy and short stature, and one also had SHORT syndrome. They were investigated with in vitro immune studies, RT-PCR, and immunoblotting studies of the mutation's effect on mTOR pathway signaling. All patients had very low percentages of memory B cells and class-switched memory B cells and reduced numbers of naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. RT-PCR confirmed the presence of both an abnormal 273 base-pair (bp) size and a normal 399 bp size band in the patient and only the normal band was present in the parents. Following anti-CD40 stimulation, patient's EBV-B cells displayed higher levels of S6 phosphorylation (mTOR complex 1 dependent event), Akt phosphorylation at serine 473 (mTOR complex 2 dependent event), and Akt phosphorylation at threonine 308 (PI3K/PDK1 dependent event) than controls, suggesting elevated mTOR signaling downstream of CD40. These observations suggest that amino acids 435-474 in PIK3R1 are important for its stability and also its ability to restrain PI3K activity. Deletion of Exon 11 leads to constitutive activation of PI3K signaling. This is the first report of this mutation and immunologic abnormalities in SHORT syndrome. PMID:27076228

  20. A Novel SLC27A4 Splice Acceptor Site Mutation in Great Danes with Ichthyosis

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Julia; Wöhlke, Anne; Mischke, Reinhard; Hoffmann, Annalena; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Küch, Eva-Maria; Naim, Hassan Y.; Distl, Ottmar

    2015-01-01

    Ichthyoses are a group of various different types of hereditary disorders affecting skin cornification. They are characterized by hyperkeratoses of different severity levels and are associated with a dry and scaling skin. Genome-wide association analysis of nine affected and 13 unaffected Great Danes revealed a genome-wide significant peak on chromosome 9 at 57–58 Mb in the region of SLC27A4. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA of SLC27A4 revealed the non-synonymous SNV SLC27A4:g.8684G>A in perfect association with ichthyosis-affection in Great Danes. The mutant transcript of SLC27A4 showed an in-frame loss of 54 base pairs in exon 8 probably induced by a new splice acceptor site motif created by the mutated A- allele of the SNV. Genotyping 413 controls from 35 different breeds of dogs and seven wolves revealed that this mutation could not be found in other populations except in Great Danes. Affected dogs revealed high amounts of mutant transcript but only low levels of the wild type transcript. Targeted analyses of SLC27A4 protein from skin tissues of three affected and two unaffected Great Danes indicated a markedly reduced or not detectable wild type and truncated protein levels in affected dogs but a high expression of wild type SLC27A4 protein in unaffected controls. Our data provide evidence of a new splice acceptor site creating SNV that results in a reduction or loss of intact SLC27A4 protein and probably explains the severe skin phenotype in Great Danes. Genetic testing will allow selective breeding to prevent ichthyosis-affected puppies in the future. PMID:26506231

  1. Fractional Skin Harvesting: Autologous Skin Grafting without Donor-site Morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Farinelli, William A.; Jiménez-Lozano, Joel; Franco, Walfre; Sakamoto, Fernanda H.; Cheung, Evelyn J.; Purschke, Martin; Doukas, Apostolos G.; Anderson, R. Rox

    2013-01-01

    Background: Conventional autologous skin grafts are associated with significant donor-site morbidity. This study was conducted to determine feasibility, safety, and efficacy of a new strategy for skin grafting based on harvesting small columns of full-thickness skin with minimal donor-site morbidity. Methods: The swine model was used for this study. Hundreds of full-thickness columns of skin tissue (~700 µm diameter) were harvested using a custom-made harvesting device, and then applied directly to excisional skin wounds. Healing in donor and graft sites was evaluated over 3 months by digital photographic measurement of wound size and blinded, computer-aided evaluation of histological features and compared with control wounds that healed by secondary intention or with conventional split-thickness skin grafts (STSG). Results: After harvesting hundreds of skin columns, the donor sites healed rapidly without scarring. These sites reepithelialized within days and were grossly and histologically indistinguishable from normal skin within 7 weeks. By contrast, STSG donor sites required 2 weeks for reepithelialization and retained scar-like characteristics in epidermal and dermal architecture throughout the experiment. Wounds grafted with skin columns resulted in accelerated reepithelialization compared with ungrafted wounds while avoiding the “fish-net” patterning caused by STSG. Conclusion: Full-thickness columns of skin can be harvested in large quantities with negligible long-term donor-site morbidity, and these columns can be applied directly to skin wounds to enhance wound healing. PMID:25289241

  2. The ideal split-thickness skin graft donor site dressing: rediscovery of polyurethane film.

    PubMed

    Dornseifer, Ulf; Fichter, Andreas M; Herter, Frank; Sturtz, Gustavo; Ninkovic, Milomir

    2009-08-01

    The almost single disadvantage of polyurethane film dressings, an uncontrolled leakage, is probably as often described as its numerous advantages for split-thickness skin graft donor sites. We solved this problem by perforating the polyurethane film, which permits a controlled leakage into a secondary absorbent dressing. The study included 30 adult patients. Skin graft donor sites at the proximal thigh were dressed with the modified film dressing. Our results indicate that this dressing concept is associated with a reliable, rapid rate of epithelization. Both, controlled leakage and minimal pain caused particular comfort for patients and ward staff. Furthermore, this dressing was also suited for differently shaped and large donor sites. We conclude that the modification results in a more practicable, comfortable, and cost-effective film dressing, which requalifies the polyurethane film as an ideal dressing material for split-thickness skin graft donor sites. PMID:19571740

  3. Alteration of splice site selection in the LMNA gene and inhibition of progerin production via AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Finley, Jahahreeh

    2014-11-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic condition characterized by an accelerated aging phenotype and an average life span of 13years. Patients typically exhibit extensive pathophysiological vascular alterations, eventually resulting in death from stroke or myocardial infarction. A silent point mutation at position 1824 (C1824T) of the LMNA gene, generating a truncated form of lamin A (progerin), has been shown to be the cause of most cases of HGPS. Interestingly, this mutation induces the use of an internal 5' cryptic splice site within exon 11 of the LMNA pre-mRNA, leading to the generation of progerin via aberrant alternative splicing. The serine-arginine rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1 or ASF/SF2) has been shown to function as an oncoprotein and is upregulated in many cancers and other age-related disorders. Indeed, SRSF1 inhibition results in a splicing ratio in the LMNA pre-mRNA favoring lamin A production over that of progerin. It is our hypothesis that activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a master regulator of cellular metabolism, may lead to a reduction in SRSF1 and thus a decrease in the use of the LMNA 5' cryptic splice site in exon 11 through upregulation of p32, a splicing factor-associated protein and putative mitochondrial chaperone that has been shown to inhibit SRSF1 and enhance mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and oxidative phosphorylation. AMPK activation by currently available compounds such as metformin, resveratrol, and berberine may thus have wide-ranging implications for disorders associated with increased production and accumulation of progerin. PMID:25216752

  4. Founder Effect of a c.828+3A>T Splice Site Mutation in Peripherin 2 (PRPH2) Causing Autosomal Dominant Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Suma P.; Birch, David G.; Ruiz, Richard S.; Hughbanks-Wheaton, Dianna K.; Sullivan, Lori S.; Bowne, Sara J.; Stone, Edwin M.; Daiger, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Screening for splice site mutation c.828+3A>T in the peripherin 2 (PRPH2) gene should be a high priority in families with highly variable retinal dystrophies. The correction of missplicing is a potential therapeutic target. Objective To determine the prevalence, genetic origin, and molecular mechanism of a donor c.828+3A>T mutation in the PRPH2 (peripherin 2, retinal degeneration slow) gene in individuals with retinal dystrophies. Design, Setting, and Participants Case-control study that took place at the University of Texas Health Science Center, the University of Iowa, and the Retina Foundation of the Southwest, from January 1, 1987, to August 1, 2014, including affected individuals from 200 families with a diagnosis of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, 35 families with unspecified macular dystrophies, and 116 families with pattern dystrophy. Participants were screened for the c.828+3A>T mutation by restriction-enzyme digest, single-strand conformational polymorphism screening, or bidirectional sequencing. Haplotypes of polymorphic markers flanking the PRPH2 locus and sequence variants within the gene were determined by denaturing gel electrophoresis or automated capillary-based cycle sequencing. The effect of the splice site mutation on the PRPH2 transcript was analyzed using NetGene2, a splice prediction program and by the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction of illegitimate transcripts from peripheral white blood cells. Main Outcomes and Measures Results of testing for splice site mutation, haplotypes, and alternate transcripts. Results The PRPH2 mutation was found in 97 individuals of 19 independently ascertained families with a clinical diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa, macular dystrophy, and/or pattern dystrophy. All affected individuals also shared a rare haplotype of approximately 644 kilobase pairs containing the c.828+3A>T mutation, which extends from the short tandem repeat polymorphism D6S282 to c.1013G>A (rs434102, a

  5. Stabilizing Morbidity and Predicting the Aesthetic Results of Radial Forearm Free Flap Donor Sites

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Tae Kyoung; Ahn, Duck Sun; Park, Seung Ha; Lee, Byung Il; Kim, Hyon Surk; You, Hi Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background The radial forearm flap is a versatile, widely used flap. However, the possibility of donor site complications has led to concern over its use. Some surgeons prefer using other flaps whose donor sites can be closed primarily with less morbidity, including avoiding unpleasant scarring. However, in our experience, donor site stability of the radial forearm flap can be reliably achieved by using well-implemented specific procedures. Here, we present a collection of donor site cases of the radial forearm flap and investigate factors that affect the aesthetic results as the basis for a reference for selecting a radial forearm flap. Methods In this retrospective study, we reviewed 171 cases in which a radial forearm flap was used for free tissue transfer after resecting head and neck cancer. We focused on donor site morbidity rates. Each operation involved a detailed procedure designed to minimize donor site morbidity. Moreover, statistical investigations were conducted for 22 cases to determine factors affecting the scar appearance. Results Only one case developed total skin graft necrosis as a major complication. Scar-related aesthetic results were acceptable, and the body-mass index, body weight, diabetes, and cardiac problems were significant factors related to the appearance of scars. Conclusions Performing the radial forearm flap using a well-implemented detailed technique helps achieve acceptable donor site morbidity results. The aesthetic results were more promising for patients without excess body weight, diabetes, or cardiac problems. Therefore, anxiety about donor site morbidity should not be a reason to avoid selecting the radial forearm flap in suitable patients. PMID:26618126

  6. N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea (ENU) Mutagenesis Reveals an Intronic Residue Critical for Caenorhabditis elegans 3' Splice Site Function in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Itani, Omar A; Flibotte, Stephane; Dumas, Kathleen J; Guo, Chunfang; Blumenthal, Thomas; Hu, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Metazoan introns contain a polypyrimidine tract immediately upstream of the AG dinucleotide that defines the 3' splice site. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, 3' splice sites are characterized by a highly conserved UUUUCAG/R octamer motif. While the conservation of pyrimidines in this motif is strongly suggestive of their importance in pre-mRNA splicing, in vivo evidence in support of this is lacking. In an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen in Caenorhabditis elegans, we have isolated a strain containing a point mutation in the octamer motif of a 3' splice site in the daf-12 gene. This mutation, a single base T-to-G transversion at the -5 position relative to the splice site, causes a strong daf-12 loss-of-function phenotype by abrogating splicing. The resulting transcript is predicted to encode a truncated DAF-12 protein generated by translation into the retained intron, which contains an in-frame stop codon. Other than the perfectly conserved AG dinucleotide at the site of splicing, G at the -5 position of the octamer motif is the most uncommon base in C. elegans 3' splice sites, occurring at closely paired sites where the better match to the splicing consensus is a few bases downstream. Our results highlight both the biological importance of the highly conserved -5 uridine residue in the C. elegans 3' splice site octamer motif as well as the utility of using ENU as a mutagen to study the function of polypyrimidine tracts and other AU- or AT-rich motifs in vivo. PMID:27172199

  7. N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea (ENU) Mutagenesis Reveals an Intronic Residue Critical for Caenorhabditis elegans 3′ Splice Site Function in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Itani, Omar A.; Flibotte, Stephane; Dumas, Kathleen J.; Guo, Chunfang; Blumenthal, Thomas; Hu, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Metazoan introns contain a polypyrimidine tract immediately upstream of the AG dinucleotide that defines the 3′ splice site. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, 3′ splice sites are characterized by a highly conserved UUUUCAG/R octamer motif. While the conservation of pyrimidines in this motif is strongly suggestive of their importance in pre-mRNA splicing, in vivo evidence in support of this is lacking. In an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen in Caenorhabditis elegans, we have isolated a strain containing a point mutation in the octamer motif of a 3′ splice site in the daf-12 gene. This mutation, a single base T-to-G transversion at the -5 position relative to the splice site, causes a strong daf-12 loss-of-function phenotype by abrogating splicing. The resulting transcript is predicted to encode a truncated DAF-12 protein generated by translation into the retained intron, which contains an in-frame stop codon. Other than the perfectly conserved AG dinucleotide at the site of splicing, G at the –5 position of the octamer motif is the most uncommon base in C. elegans 3′ splice sites, occurring at closely paired sites where the better match to the splicing consensus is a few bases downstream. Our results highlight both the biological importance of the highly conserved –5 uridine residue in the C. elegans 3′ splice site octamer motif as well as the utility of using ENU as a mutagen to study the function of polypyrimidine tracts and other AU- or AT-rich motifs in vivo. PMID:27172199

  8. Splice-site mutations identified in PDE6A responsible for retinitis pigmentosa in consanguineous Pakistani families

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahid Y.; Ali, Shahbaz; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Khan, Shaheen N.; Husnain, Tayyab; Butt, Nadeem H.; Qazi, Zaheeruddin A.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to localize and identify causal mutations associated with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in consanguineous familial cases of Pakistani origin. Methods Ophthalmic examinations that included funduscopy and electroretinography (ERG) were performed to confirm the affectation status. Blood samples were collected from all participating individuals, and genomic DNA was extracted. A genome-wide scan was performed, and two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. Sanger sequencing was performed to identify the causative variants. Subsequently, we performed whole exome sequencing to rule out the possibility of a second causal variant within the linkage interval. Sequence conservation was performed with alignment analyses of PDE6A orthologs, and in silico splicing analysis was completed with Human Splicing Finder version 2.4.1. Results A large multigenerational consanguineous family diagnosed with early-onset RP was ascertained. An ophthalmic clinical examination consisting of fundus photography and electroretinography confirmed the diagnosis of RP. A genome-wide scan was performed, and suggestive two-point LOD scores were observed with markers on chromosome 5q. Haplotype analyses identified the region; however, the region did not segregate with the disease phenotype in the family. Subsequently, we performed a second genome-wide scan that excluded the entire genome except the chromosome 5q region harboring PDE6A. Next-generation whole exome sequencing identified a splice acceptor site mutation in intron 16: c.2028–1G>A, which was completely conserved in PDE6A orthologs and was absent in ethnically matched 350 control chromosomes, the 1000 Genomes database, and the NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project. Subsequently, we investigated our entire cohort of RP familial cases and identified a second family who harbored a splice acceptor site mutation in intron 10: c.1408–2A>G. In silico analysis suggested that these

  9. The Peculiarities of Large Intron Splicing in Animals

    PubMed Central

    Fedorov, Alexei

    2009-01-01

    In mammals a considerable 92% of genes contain introns, with hundreds and hundreds of these introns reaching the incredible size of over 50,000 nucleotides. These “large introns” must be spliced out of the pre-mRNA in a timely fashion, which involves bringing together distant 5′ and 3′ acceptor and donor splice sites. In invertebrates, especially Drosophila, it has been shown that larger introns can be spliced efficiently through a process known as recursive splicing—a consecutive splicing from the 5′-end at a series of combined donor-acceptor splice sites called RP-sites. Using a computational analysis of the genomic sequences, we show that vertebrates lack the proper enrichment of RP-sites in their large introns, and, therefore, require some other method to aid splicing. We analyzed over 15,000 non-redundant, large introns from six mammals, 1,600 from chicken and zebrafish, and 560 non-redundant large introns from five invertebrates. Our bioinformatic investigation demonstrates that, unlike the studied invertebrates, the studied vertebrate genomes contain consistently abundant amounts of direct and complementary strand interspersed repetitive elements (mainly SINEs and LINEs) that may form stems with each other in large introns. This examination showed that predicted stems are indeed abundant and stable in the large introns of mammals. We hypothesize that such stems with long loops within large introns allow intron splice sites to find each other more quickly by folding the intronic RNA upon itself at smaller intervals and, thus, reducing the distance between donor and acceptor sites. PMID:19924226

  10. Probabilistic simple splicing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvarajoo, Mathuri; Heng, Fong Wan; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Turaev, Sherzod

    2014-06-01

    A splicing system, one of the early theoretical models for DNA computing was introduced by Head in 1987. Splicing systems are based on the splicing operation which, informally, cuts two strings of DNA molecules at the specific recognition sites and attaches the prefix of the first string to the suffix of the second string, and the prefix of the second string to the suffix of the first string, thus yielding the new strings. For a specific type of splicing systems, namely the simple splicing systems, the recognition sites are the same for both strings of DNA molecules. It is known that splicing systems with finite sets of axioms and splicing rules only generate regular languages. Hence, different types of restrictions have been considered for splicing systems in order to increase their computational power. Recently, probabilistic splicing systems have been introduced where the probabilities are initially associated with the axioms, and the probabilities of the generated strings are computed from the probabilities of the initial strings. In this paper, some properties of probabilistic simple splicing systems are investigated. We prove that probabilistic simple splicing systems can also increase the computational power of the splicing languages generated.

  11. An extended U2AF65–RNA-binding domain recognizes the 3′ splice site signal

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Anant A.; Salsi, Enea; Chatrikhi, Rakesh; Henderson, Steven; Jenkins, Jermaine L.; Green, Michael R.; Ermolenko, Dmitri N.; Kielkopf, Clara L.

    2016-01-01

    How the essential pre-mRNA splicing factor U2AF65 recognizes the polypyrimidine (Py) signals of the major class of 3′ splice sites in human gene transcripts remains incompletely understood. We determined four structures of an extended U2AF65–RNA-binding domain bound to Py-tract oligonucleotides at resolutions between 2.0 and 1.5 Å. These structures together with RNA binding and splicing assays reveal unforeseen roles for U2AF65 inter-domain residues in recognizing a contiguous, nine-nucleotide Py tract. The U2AF65 linker residues between the dual RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) recognize the central nucleotide, whereas the N- and C-terminal RRM extensions recognize the 3′ terminus and third nucleotide. Single-molecule FRET experiments suggest that conformational selection and induced fit of the U2AF65 RRMs are complementary mechanisms for Py-tract association. Altogether, these results advance the mechanistic understanding of molecular recognition for a major class of splice site signals. PMID:26952537

  12. Functional and esthetic assessment of radial forearm flap donor site repaired with split thickness skin graft.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Ho; Alrashdan, Mohammad S; Kim, Su-Gon; Rim, Jae-Seok; Jabaiti, Samir; Kim, Myung-Jin; Kim, Soung-Min

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term functional and esthetic outcomes of radial forearm flap (RFF) donor site repaired with split thickness skin graft (STSG). Nineteen patients underwent surgical reconstruction of oro-facial defects by the use of RFF and their donor sites were reconstructed with STSG. The patients were followed up at least for 12 months postoperatively and the left hand was the non-dominant hand in all of them. Objective methods including pinch strength, grip strength, range of motion, current perception threshold (CPT) and two-point discrimination, and subjective methods including patients interview, visual analogue score (VAS) about function, sensitivity, pain and color match, were collectively employed for donor site assessment. Our data revealed some degree of reduction in motor function and sensation compared to the non-donor hand. The difference of pinch strength means was 9.81% and of the grip strength was 12.6%. The difference of wrist flexion means was 17.6% and of wrist extension was 13.4%. However, none of the patients had functional defects of forearm supination and pronation, wrist ulnar deviation or wrist radial deviation. Subjective evaluation showed that the donor site repaired with STSG was well accepted by the patients particularly from a functional point of view. These results demonstrate that STSG represents a favorable choice for RFF donor site repair. PMID:20589506

  13. Intensive insulin treatment increases donor site wound protein synthesis in burn patients

    PubMed Central

    Tuvdendorj, Demidmaa; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Chinkes, David L.; Aarsland, Asle; Kulp, Gabriela A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Herndon, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Background In the treatment of burns, patients’ own skin is the preferred material to cover burn wounds, resulting in the need to create a donor site wound. Enhancement of healing of the donor site wound would be beneficial in burn patients. Insulin, an anabolic agent, is routinely used to treat hyperglycemia after injury. We investigated whether intensive insulin treatment (INS) increases fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of the donor site wound protein and decreases the length of hospitalization normalized for total body surface area burned (LOS/TBSA). Methods FSR of the donor site wound protein was measured in pediatric patients randomized to control (CNT) (n = 13) and INS (n = 10) treatments. Depending on the postoperative day when the tracer study was done studies were divided into “Early” (days < 5) and “Late” (days >=5) periods. Results FSR of the donor site wound protein was greater in the INS group at the “Early” period of wound healing (CNT vs. INS, 8.2±3.8 vs. 13.1±6.9 %/day, p: < 0.05); but not at the “Late” (CNT vs. INS, 19.7±4.6 vs. 16.6±4.0 %/day, p > 0.05). Despite these differences LOS/TBSA was not decreased in the INS group. Correlation analyses demonstrated that independently of the treatment regimen FSR positively correlated (p < 0.05) with time post creation of the donor site and negatively correlated (p < 0.05) with LOS/TBSA. Conclusions Insulin treatment increased FSR of the donor site wound protein in the early period of wound healing; FSR correlated with LOS/TBSA independently of the treatment regimen. PMID:21236451

  14. The Choice of Alternative 5' Splice Sites in Influenza Virus M1 mRNA is Regulated by the Viral Polymerase Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Shin-Ru; Nemeroff, Martin E.; Krug, Robert M.

    1995-07-01

    The influenza virus M1 mRNA has two alternative 5' splice sites: a distal 5' splice site producing mRNA_3 that has the coding potential for 9 amino acids and a proximal 5' splice site producing M2 mRNA encoding the essential M2 ion-channel protein. Only mRNA_3 was made in uninfected cells transfected with DNA expressing M1 mRNA. Similarly, using nuclear extracts from uninfected cells, in vitro splicing of M1 mRNA yielded only mRNA_3. Only when the mRNA_3 5' splice site was inactivated by mutation was M2 mRNA made in uninfected cells and in uninfected cell extracts. In influenza virus-infected cells, M2 mRNA was made, but only after a delay, suggesting that newly synthesized viral gene product(s) were needed to activate the M2 5' splice site. We present strong evidence that these gene products are the complex of the three polymerase proteins, the same complex that functions in the transcription and replication of the viral genome. Gel shift experiments showed that the viral polymerase complex bound to the 5' end of the viral M1 mRNA in a sequence-specific and cap-dependent manner. During in vitro splicing catalyzed by uninfected cell extracts, the binding of the viral polymerase complex blocked the mRNA_3 5' splice site, resulting in the switch to the M2 mRNA 5' splice site and the production of M2 mRNA.

  15. An exon splice enhancer primes IGF2:IGF2R binding site structure and function evolution.

    PubMed

    Williams, Christopher; Hoppe, Hans-Jürgen; Rezgui, Dellel; Strickland, Madeleine; Forbes, Briony E; Grutzner, Frank; Frago, Susana; Ellis, Rosamund Z; Wattana-Amorn, Pakorn; Prince, Stuart N; Zaccheo, Oliver J; Nolan, Catherine M; Mungall, Andrew J; Jones, E Yvonne; Crump, Matthew P; Hassan, A Bassim

    2012-11-30

    Placental development and genomic imprinting coevolved with parental conflict over resource distribution to mammalian offspring. The imprinted genes IGF2 and IGF2R code for the growth promoter insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) and its inhibitor, mannose 6-phosphate (M6P)/IGF2 receptor (IGF2R), respectively. M6P/IGF2R of birds and fish do not recognize IGF2. In monotremes, which lack imprinting, IGF2 specifically bound M6P/IGF2R via a hydrophobic CD loop. We show that the DNA coding the CD loop in monotremes functions as an exon splice enhancer (ESE) and that structural evolution of binding site loops (AB, HI, FG) improved therian IGF2 affinity. We propose that ESE evolution led to the fortuitous acquisition of IGF2 binding by M6P/IGF2R that drew IGF2R into parental conflict; subsequent imprinting may then have accelerated affinity maturation. PMID:23197533

  16. The USH1C 216G-->A splice-site mutation results in a 35-base-pair deletion.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Jennifer; Savas, Sevtap; Ng, San-San; Athas, Grace; Deininger, Prescott; Keats, Bronya

    2005-02-01

    Usher syndrome is characterized by profound hearing loss and retinal degeneration. A splice-site mutation, 216G-->A, in exon 3 of USH1C is associated with Acadian Usher type IC. This mutation was reported to create an in-frame deletion of 39 base pairs (bp), resulting in an unstable transcript. By RT-PCR analysis of 216A and 216G constructs transfected into HeLa cells and also of patient cell lines, we have demonstrated a frame-shift deletion of 35 bp, not 39 bp. Thus, the instability of the USH1C mRNA is explained by the 216G-->A out-of-frame splice site mutation. PMID:15578223

  17. An empirical study of ensemble-based semi-supervised learning approaches for imbalanced splice site datasets

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent biochemical advances have led to inexpensive, time-efficient production of massive volumes of raw genomic data. Traditional machine learning approaches to genome annotation typically rely on large amounts of labeled data. The process of labeling data can be expensive, as it requires domain knowledge and expert involvement. Semi-supervised learning approaches that can make use of unlabeled data, in addition to small amounts of labeled data, can help reduce the costs associated with labeling. In this context, we focus on the problem of predicting splice sites in a genome using semi-supervised learning approaches. This is a challenging problem, due to the highly imbalanced distribution of the data, i.e., small number of splice sites as compared to the number of non-splice sites. To address this challenge, we propose to use ensembles of semi-supervised classifiers, specifically self-training and co-training classifiers. Results Our experiments on five highly imbalanced splice site datasets, with positive to negative ratios of 1-to-99, showed that the ensemble-based semi-supervised approaches represent a good choice, even when the amount of labeled data consists of less than 1% of all training data. In particular, we found that ensembles of co-training and self-training classifiers that dynamically balance the set of labeled instances during the semi-supervised iterations show improvements over the corresponding supervised ensemble baselines. Conclusions In the presence of limited amounts of labeled data, ensemble-based semi-supervised approaches can successfully leverage the unlabeled data to enhance supervised ensembles learned from highly imbalanced data distributions. Given that such distributions are common for many biological sequence classification problems, our work can be seen as a stepping stone towards more sophisticated ensemble-based approaches to biological sequence annotation in a semi-supervised framework. PMID:26356316

  18. Eight nucleotide substitutions inhibit splicing to HPV-16 3'-splice site SA3358 and reduce the efficiency by which HPV-16 increases the life span of primary human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoze; Johansson, Cecilia; Cardoso Palacios, Carlos; Mossberg, Anki; Dhanjal, Soniya; Bergvall, Monika; Schwartz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The most commonly used 3'-splice site on the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) genome named SA3358 is used to produce HPV-16 early mRNAs encoding E4, E5, E6 and E7, and late mRNAs encoding L1 and L2. We have previously shown that SA3358 is suboptimal and is totally dependent on a downstream splicing enhancer containingmultiple potential ASF/SF2 binding sites. Here weshow that only one of the predicted ASF/SF2 sites accounts for the majority of the enhancer activity. We demonstrate that single nucleotide substitutions in this predicted ASF/SF2 site impair enhancer function and that this correlates with less efficient binding to ASF/SF2 in vitro. We provide evidence that HPV-16 mRNAs that arespliced to SA3358 interact with ASF/SF2 in living cells. In addition,mutational inactivation of the ASF/SF2 site weakened the enhancer at SA3358 in episomal forms of the HPV-16 genome, indicating that the enhancer is active in the context of the full HPV-16 genome.This resulted in induction of HPV-16 late gene expression as a result of competition from late splice site SA5639. Furthermore, inactivation of the ASF/SF2 site of the SA3358 splicing enhancer reduced the ability of E6- and E7-encoding HPV-16 plasmids to increase the life span of primary keratinocytes in vitro, demonstrating arequirement for an intact splicing enhancer of SA3358 forefficient production of the E6 and E7 mRNAs. These results link the strength of the HPV-16 SA3358 splicing enhancer to expression of E6 and E7 and to the pathogenic properties of HPV-16. PMID:24039800

  19. Eight Nucleotide Substitutions Inhibit Splicing to HPV-16 3′-Splice Site SA3358 and Reduce the Efficiency by which HPV-16 Increases the Life Span of Primary Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoze; Johansson, Cecilia; Cardoso Palacios, Carlos; Mossberg, Anki; Dhanjal, Soniya; Bergvall, Monika; Schwartz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The most commonly used 3′-splice site on the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) genome named SA3358 is used to produce HPV-16 early mRNAs encoding E4, E5, E6 and E7, and late mRNAs encoding L1 and L2. We have previously shown that SA3358 is suboptimal and is totally dependent on a downstream splicing enhancer containingmultiple potential ASF/SF2 binding sites. Here weshow that only one of the predicted ASF/SF2 sites accounts for the majority of the enhancer activity. We demonstrate that single nucleotide substitutions in this predicted ASF/SF2 site impair enhancer function and that this correlates with less efficient binding to ASF/SF2 in vitro. We provide evidence that HPV-16 mRNAs that arespliced to SA3358 interact with ASF/SF2 in living cells. In addition,mutational inactivation of the ASF/SF2 site weakened the enhancer at SA3358 in episomal forms of the HPV-16 genome, indicating that the enhancer is active in the context of the full HPV-16 genome.This resulted in induction of HPV-16 late gene expression as a result of competition from late splice site SA5639. Furthermore, inactivation of the ASF/SF2 site of the SA3358 splicing enhancer reduced the ability of E6- and E7-encoding HPV-16 plasmids to increase the life span of primary keratinocytes in vitro, demonstrating arequirement for an intact splicing enhancer of SA3358 forefficient production of the E6 and E7 mRNAs. These results link the strength of the HPV-16 SA3358 splicing enhancer to expression of E6 and E7 and to the pathogenic properties of HPV-16. PMID:24039800

  20. Splice-site mutation of the p53 gene in a family with hereditary breast-ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Jolly, K W; Malkin, D; Douglass, E C; Brown, T F; Sinclair, A E; Look, A T

    1994-01-01

    Germline mutations within evolutionary conserved exons of the p53 gene predispose to tumor development in several familial cancer syndromes. We now report identification of a novel p53 mutation affecting the splice acceptor site of exon 6 in the germline DNA of a family with hereditary breast-ovarian cancer. This splice-site mutation, which results in omission of exon 6 and creates a frame-shift and premature stop codon in transcripts from the mutant allele, was found in seven family members--four of whom have developed breast, ovarian or choroid plexus tumors before age 35. Our finding suggests the need to examine the entire p53 gene for splice-site, frame-shift, and nonsense (as well as missense) mutations in families with early-onset hereditary breast and breast-ovarian cancers not linked to the BRCA1 gene on chromosome 17q. We propose that the term 'p53 familial cancer syndrome' be applied to clusters of tumors in families with documented germline p53 mutations, regardless of the histopathologic findings or pattern of tumor development. PMID:8302608

  1. Reconstruction of complex defects of the parotid region using a lateral thoracic wall donor site.

    PubMed

    Biglioli, Federico; Pedrazzoli, Marco; Rabbiosi, Dimitri; Colletti, Giacomo; Colombo, Valeria; Frigerio, Alice; Autelitano, Luca

    2013-04-01

    Radical treatment of parotid neoplasms may lead to complex parotid defects that present functional and aesthetic reconstructive challenges. We report our experience using the lateral thoracic wall as a single donor site. Between 2003 and 2009, four patients with malignant tumours in the parotid gland underwent radical parotidectomy and simultaneous reconstruction using a perforator latissimus dorsi cutaneous free flap (de-epithelialized and entire skin paddle in two cases each). A thoracodorsal nerve graft was used in all cases to replace the intraglandular branches of the facial nerve. Costal grafts were used for mandibular reconstruction in two patients. All patients underwent postoperative physiotherapy. No donor-site complication occurred and all treatments achieved good aesthetic results. All patients recovered nearly complete symmetry at rest and partial facial mimetic function. The lateral thoracic wall is a good donor site for the reconstruction of complex parotid defects. PMID:23245945

  2. Cryptic splice site usage in exon 7 of the human fibrinogen Bβ-chain gene is regulated by a naturally silent SF2/ASF binding site within this exon

    PubMed Central

    Spena, Silvia; Tenchini, Maria Luisa; Buratti, Emanuele

    2006-01-01

    In this work we report the identification of a strong SF2/ASF binding site within exon 7 of the human fibrinogen Bβ-chain gene (FGB). Its disruption in the wild-type context has no effect on exon recognition. However, when the mutation IVS7 + 1G>T—initially described in a patient suffering from congenital afibrinogenemia—is present, this SF2/ASF binding site is critical for cryptic 5′ss (splice site) definition. These findings, besides confirming and extending previous results regarding the effect of SF2/ASF on cryptic splice site activation, identify for the first time an enhancer sequence in the FGB gene specific for cryptic splice site usage. Taken together, they suggest the existence of a splicing-regulatory network that is normally silent in the FGB natural splicing environment but which can nonetheless influence splicing decisions when local contexts allow. On a more general note, our conclusions have implications for the evolution of alternative splicing processes and for the development of methods to control aberrant splicing in the context of disease-causing mutations. PMID:16611940

  3. Identification of Promotor and Exonic Variations, and Functional Characterization of a Splice Site Mutation in Indian Patients with Unconjugated Hyperbilirubinemia

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Anjana; Munjal, Sachin Dev; Sarangi, Aditya N.; Dalal, Ashwin; Aggarwal, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Background Mild unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia (UH), due to reduced activity of the enzyme uridine diphosphoglucuronate-glucuronosyltransferase family, polypeptide 1 (UGT1A1), is a common clinical condition. Most cases are caused by presence in homozygous form of an A(TA)7TAA nucleotide sequence instead of the usual A(TA)6TAA sequence in promoter region of the UGT1A1 gene. In some cases, other genetic variations have been identified which differ between populations. There is need for more data on such genetic variations from India. Methods DNA from subjects with unexplained persistent or recurrent UH was tested for the presence of TA promoter insertions. In addition, all five exons and splicing site regions of UGT1A1 gene were sequenced. Several bioinformatics tools were used to determine the biological significance of the observed genetic changes. Functional analysis was done to look for effect of a splice site mutation in UGT1A1. Results Of 71 subjects with UH (68 male; median age [range], 26 [16–63] years; serum bilirubin 56 [26–219] μM/L, predominantly unconjugated) studied, 65 (91.5%) subjects were homozygous for A(TA)7TAA allele, five (7.0%) were heterozygous, and one (1.4%) lacked this change. Fifteen subjects with UH had missense exonic single nucleotide changes (14 heterozygous, 1 homozygous), including one subject with a novel nucleotide change (p.Thr205Asn). Bioinformatics tools predicted some of these variations (p.Arg108Cys, p.Ile159Thr and p.Glu463Val) to be deleterious. Functional characterization of an exonic variation (c.1084G>A) located at a splice site revealed that it results in frameshift deletion of 31 nucleotides and premature truncation of the protein. Conclusion Our study revealed several single nucleotide variations in UGT1A1 gene in Indian subjects with UH. Functional characterization of a splice site variation indicated that it leads to disordered splicing. These variations may explain UH in subjects who lacked homozygous A(TA)7TAA

  4. Developmental regulation of tau splicing is disrupted in stem cell-derived neurons from frontotemporal dementia patients with the 10 + 16 splice-site mutation in MAPT.

    PubMed

    Sposito, Teresa; Preza, Elisavet; Mahoney, Colin J; Setó-Salvia, Núria; Ryan, Natalie S; Morris, Huw R; Arber, Charles; Devine, Michael J; Houlden, Henry; Warner, Thomas T; Bushell, Trevor J; Zagnoni, Michele; Kunath, Tilo; Livesey, Frederick J; Fox, Nick C; Rossor, Martin N; Hardy, John; Wray, Selina

    2015-09-15

    The alternative splicing of the tau gene, MAPT, generates six protein isoforms in the adult human central nervous system (CNS). Tau splicing is developmentally regulated and dysregulated in disease. Mutations in MAPT that alter tau splicing cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD) with tau pathology, providing evidence for a causal link between altered tau splicing and disease. The use of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons has revolutionized the way we model neurological disease in vitro. However, as most tau mutations are located within or around the alternatively spliced exon 10, it is important that iPSC-neurons splice tau appropriately in order to be used as disease models. To address this issue, we analyzed the expression and splicing of tau in iPSC-derived cortical neurons from control patients and FTD patients with the 10 + 16 intronic mutation in MAPT. We show that control neurons only express the fetal tau isoform (0N3R), even at extended time points of 100 days in vitro. Neurons from FTD patients with the 10 + 16 mutation in MAPT express both 0N3R and 0N4R tau isoforms, demonstrating that this mutation overrides the developmental regulation of exon 10 inclusion in our in vitro model. Further, at extended time points of 365 days in vitro, we observe a switch in tau splicing to include six tau isoforms as seen in the adult human CNS. Our results demonstrate the importance of neuronal maturity for use in in vitro modeling and provide a system that will be important for understanding the functional consequences of altered tau splicing. PMID:26136155

  5. Developmental regulation of tau splicing is disrupted in stem cell-derived neurons from frontotemporal dementia patients with the 10 + 16 splice-site mutation in MAPT

    PubMed Central

    Sposito, Teresa; Preza, Elisavet; Mahoney, Colin J.; Setó-Salvia, Núria; Ryan, Natalie S.; Morris, Huw R.; Arber, Charles; Devine, Michael J.; Houlden, Henry; Warner, Thomas T.; Bushell, Trevor J.; Zagnoni, Michele; Kunath, Tilo; Livesey, Frederick J.; Fox, Nick C.; Rossor, Martin N.; Hardy, John; Wray, Selina

    2015-01-01

    The alternative splicing of the tau gene, MAPT, generates six protein isoforms in the adult human central nervous system (CNS). Tau splicing is developmentally regulated and dysregulated in disease. Mutations in MAPT that alter tau splicing cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD) with tau pathology, providing evidence for a causal link between altered tau splicing and disease. The use of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons has revolutionized the way we model neurological disease in vitro. However, as most tau mutations are located within or around the alternatively spliced exon 10, it is important that iPSC–neurons splice tau appropriately in order to be used as disease models. To address this issue, we analyzed the expression and splicing of tau in iPSC-derived cortical neurons from control patients and FTD patients with the 10 + 16 intronic mutation in MAPT. We show that control neurons only express the fetal tau isoform (0N3R), even at extended time points of 100 days in vitro. Neurons from FTD patients with the 10 + 16 mutation in MAPT express both 0N3R and 0N4R tau isoforms, demonstrating that this mutation overrides the developmental regulation of exon 10 inclusion in our in vitro model. Further, at extended time points of 365 days in vitro, we observe a switch in tau splicing to include six tau isoforms as seen in the adult human CNS. Our results demonstrate the importance of neuronal maturity for use in in vitro modeling and provide a system that will be important for understanding the functional consequences of altered tau splicing. PMID:26136155

  6. Aberrant 5′ splice sites in human disease genes: mutation pattern, nucleotide structure and comparison of computational tools that predict their utilization

    PubMed Central

    Buratti, Emanuele; Chivers, Martin; Královičová, Jana; Romano, Maurizio; Baralle, Marco; Krainer, Adrian R.; Vořechovský, Igor

    2007-01-01

    Despite a growing number of splicing mutations found in hereditary diseases, utilization of aberrant splice sites and their effects on gene expression remain challenging to predict. We compiled sequences of 346 aberrant 5′splice sites (5′ss) that were activated by mutations in 166 human disease genes. Mutations within the 5′ss consensus accounted for 254 cryptic 5′ss and mutations elsewhere activated 92 de novo 5′ss. Point mutations leading to cryptic 5′ss activation were most common in the first intron nucleotide, followed by the fifth nucleotide. Substitutions at position +5 were exclusively G>A transitions, which was largely attributable to high mutability rates of C/G>T/A. However, the frequency of point mutations at position +5 was significantly higher than that observed in the Human Gene Mutation Database, suggesting that alterations of this position are particularly prone to aberrant splicing, possibly due to a requirement for sequential interactions with U1 and U6 snRNAs. Cryptic 5′ss were best predicted by computational algorithms that accommodate nucleotide dependencies and not by weight-matrix models. Discrimination of intronic 5′ss from their authentic counterparts was less effective than for exonic sites, as the former were intrinsically stronger than the latter. Computational prediction of exonic de novo 5′ss was poor, suggesting that their activation critically depends on exonic splicing enhancers or silencers. The authentic counterparts of aberrant 5′ss were significantly weaker than the average human 5′ss. The development of an online database of aberrant 5′ss will be useful for studying basic mechanisms of splice-site selection, identifying splicing mutations and optimizing splice-site prediction algorithms. PMID:17576681

  7. Reduction of Donor Site Morbidity of Free Radial Forearm Flaps: What Level of Evidence Is Available?

    PubMed Central

    Loeffelbein, Denys J.; Al-Benna, Sammy; Steinsträßer, Lars; Satanovskij, Robin M.; Rohleder, Nils H.; Mücke, Thomas; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Kesting, Marco R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The radial forearm free flap (RFFF) is the most commonly used free flap in head and neck reconstructive surgery. However, despite excellent results with respect to the site of reconstruction, donor site morbidity cannot be neglected. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge and analyzes the level of evidence with regard to perioperative management of the reduction of RFFF donor site morbidity. Methods: The medical Internet source PubMed was screened for relevant articles. All relevant articles were tabulated according to the levels of scientific evidence, and the available methods for reduction of donor site morbidity are discussed. Results: Classification into levels of evidence reveals 3 publications (1.5%) with level I (randomized controlled trials), 29 (14.0%) with level II (experimental studies with no randomization, cohort studies, or outcome research), 3 (1.5%) with level III (systematic review of case-control studies or individual case-control studies), 121 (58.7%) with level IV (nonexperimental studies, such as cross-sectional trials, case series, case reports), and 15 (7.3%) with level V (narrative review or expert opinion without explicit critical appraisal). Thirty-five (17.0%) articles could not be classified, because they focused on a topic other than donor site morbidity of the RFFF. Conclusions: Although great interest has been expressed with regard to reducing the donor site morbidity of the workhorse flap in microvascular reconstruction procedures, most publications fail to provide the hard facts and solid evidence characteristic of high-quality research. PMID:22331991

  8. A Splice-Site Mutation in a Retina-Specific Exon of BBS8 Causes Nonsyndromic Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Riazuddin, S. Amer; Iqbal, Muhammad; Wang, Yue; Masuda, Tomohiro; Chen, Yuhng; Bowne, Sara; Sullivan, Lori S.; Waseem, Naushin H.; Bhattacharya, Shomi; Daiger, Stephen P.; Zhang, Kang; Khan, Shaheen N.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding; Sieving, Paul A.; Zack, Donald J.; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Tissue-specific alternative splicing is an important mechanism for providing spatiotemporal protein diversity. Here we show that an in-frame splice mutation in BBS8, one of the genes involved in pleiotropic Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), is sufficient to cause nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP). A genome-wide scan of a consanguineous RP pedigree mapped the trait to a 5.6 Mb region; subsequent systematic sequencing of candidate transcripts identified a homozygous splice-site mutation in a previously unknown BBS8 exon. The allele segregated with the disorder, was absent from controls, was completely invariant across evolution, and was predicted to lead to the elimination of a 10 amino acid sequence from the protein. Subsequent studies showed the exon to be expressed exclusively in the retina and enriched significantly in the photoreceptor layer. Importantly, we found this exon to represent the major BBS8 mRNA species in the mammalian photoreceptor, suggesting that the encoded 10 amino acids play a pivotal role in the function of BBS8 in this organ. Understanding the role of this additional sequence might therefore inform the mechanism of retinal degeneration in patients with syndromic BBS or other related ciliopathies. PMID:20451172

  9. Compound heterozygous DUOX2 gene mutations (c.2335-1G>C/c.3264_3267delCAGC) associated with congenital hypothyroidism. Characterization of complex cryptic splice sites by minigene analysis.

    PubMed

    Belforte, Fiorella S; Citterio, Cintia E; Testa, Graciela; Olcese, María Cecilia; Sobrero, Gabriela; Miras, Mirta B; Targovnik, Héctor M; Rivolta, Carina M

    2016-01-01

    Iodide Organification defects (IOD) represent 10% of cases of congenital hypothyroidism (CH) being the main genes affected that of TPO (thyroid peroxidase) and DUOX2 (dual oxidasa 2). From a patient with clinical and biochemical criteria suggestive with CH associated with IOD, TPO and DUOX2 genes were analyzed by means of PCR-Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism analysis and sequencing. A novel heterozygous compound to the mutations c.2335-1G>C (paternal mutation, intron 17) and c.3264_3267delCAGC (maternal mutation, exon 24) was identified in the DUOX2 gene. Ex-vivo splicing assays and subsequent RT-PCR and sequencing analyses were performed on mRNA isolated from the HeLa cells transfected with wild-type and mutant pSPL3 expression vectors. The wild-type and c.2335-1G>C mutant alleles result in the complete inclusion or exclusion of exon 18, or in the activation of an exonic cryptic 5' ss with the consequent deletion of 169 bp at the end of this exon. However, we observed only a band of the expected size in normal thyroid tissue by RT-PCR. Additionally, the c.2335-1G>C mutation activates an unusual cryptic donor splice site in intron 17, located at position -14 of the authentic intron 17/exon 18 junction site, with an insertion of the last 14 nucleotides of the intron 17 in mutant transcripts with complete and partial inclusion of exon 18. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutation, predicted with the bioinformatics NNSplice, Fsplice, SPL, SPLM and MaxEntScan programs were investigated and evaluated in relation with the experimental evidence. These analyses confirm that c.2335-1G>C mutant allele would result in the abolition of the authentic splice acceptor site. The results suggest the coexistence in our patient of four putative truncated proteins of 786, 805, 806 and 1105 amino acids, with conservation of peroxidase-like domain and loss of gp91(phox)/NOX2-like domain. In conclusion a novel heterozygous compound was identified being responsible of

  10. An in vitro-selected RNA-binding site for the KH domain protein PSI acts as a splicing inhibitor element.

    PubMed Central

    Amarasinghe, A K; MacDiarmid, R; Adams, M D; Rio, D C

    2001-01-01

    P element somatic inhibitor (PSI) is a 97-kDa RNA-binding protein with four KH motifs that is involved in the inhibition of splicing of the Drosophila P element third intron (IVS3) in somatic cells. PSI interacts with a negative regulatory element in the IVS3 5' exon. This element contains two pseudo-5' splice sites, termed F1 and F2. To identify high affinity binding sites for the PSI protein, in vitro selection (SELEX) was performed using a random RNA oligonucleotide pool. Alignment of high affinity PSI-binding RNAs revealed a degenerate consensus sequence consisting of a short core motif of CUU flanked by alternative purines and pyrimidines. Interestingly, this sequence resembles the F2 pseudo-5' splice site in the P element negative regulatory element. Additionally, a negative in vitro selection of PCR-mutagenized P element 5' exon regulatory element RNAs identified two U residues in the F1 and F2 pseudo-5' splice sites as important nucleotides for PSI binding and the U residue in the F2 region is a nearly invariant nucleotide in the consensus SELEX motif. The high affinity PSI SELEX sequence acted as a splicing inhibitor when placed in the context of a P element splicing pre-mRNA in vitro. Data from in vitro splicing assays, UV crosslinking and RNA-binding competition experiments indicates a strong correlation between the binding affinities of PSI for the SELEX sequences and their ability to modulate splicing of P element IVS3 in vitro. PMID:11565747

  11. Donor site healing dynamics: molecular, histological, and noninvasive imaging assessment in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Mauskar, Neil A; Sood, Subeena; Travis, Taryn E; Matt, Sarah E; Mino, Matthew J; Burnett, Mary-Susan; Moffatt, Lauren T; Fidler, Philip; Epstein, Stephen E; Jordan, Marion H; Shupp, Jeffrey W

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the physiology of donor site healing will lead to advances in how these wounds are treated and may ultimately allow faster healing, more frequent autografting, and more effective care of the burn-injured patient. Unfortunately, a paucity of data exists regarding perfusion metrics over the course of donor site healing. Furthermore, there are no studies that interrelate indices of perfusion with the molecular and cellular processes of donor site healing. Male Duroc pigs were anesthetized and donor site wounds were created using a Zimmer dermatome at a depth of 0.060 inch (1.52 mm). Digital photographs, laser Doppler images, and punch biopsies were obtained before and after excision and on days 2, 4, 7, 9, 11, 14, and 16 until wounds were healed. RNA isolation was performed and quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to examine differential gene expression over the time course. Formalin-fixed biopsies were embedded in paraffin, sectioned, stained, and examined. Wound surfaces were 83% re-epithelialized by day 16. Perfusion peaked on day 2 then declined, but it remained significantly elevated compared to before excision (P < .05). From day 9 onward, mean perfusion units were not significantly different from baseline (P < .05). Twenty-two representative genes were selected for examination. RNA expression of collagen, tenascin-cytoactin, inflammatory cytokines, remodeling enzymes, growth factors, and Wnt was increased. Inflammatory cells and cytokines were demonstrated histologically. Nuclei per high powered field peaked at day 7 and neodermal thickness increased daily to day 14. A novel porcine model for donor site wound healing that interrelates re-epithelilaizationand perfusion with molecular and cellular indices has been demonstrated. PMID:23511287

  12. Tumour Transfer to Bone Graft Donor Site: A Case Report and Review of the Literature of the Mechanism of Seeding

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Richard G.; Carter, Simon R.; Grimer, Robert J.; Tillman, Roger M.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose. Transmission of malignant tumour cells to a bone graft donor site is a rare complication of bone grafting.We report a case of seeding of malignant fibrous histiocytoma from the femur to a pelvic bone graft donor site. Discussion. We review the literature, discuss the possible mechanism of tumour transfer and offer advice aimed at avoiding this complication. PMID:18521435

  13. Regulation of mRNA Abundance by Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein-Controlled Alternate 5′ Splice Site Choice

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Fursham M.; Makeyev, Eugene V.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) provides a potent mechanism for increasing protein diversity and modulating gene expression levels. How alternate splice sites are selected by the splicing machinery and how AS is integrated into gene regulation networks remain important questions of eukaryotic biology. Here we report that polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (Ptbp1/PTB/hnRNP-I) controls alternate 5′ and 3′ splice site (5′ss and 3′ss) usage in a large set of mammalian transcripts. A top scoring event identified by our analysis was the choice between competing upstream and downstream 5′ss (u5′ss and d5′ss) in the exon 18 of the Hps1 gene. Hps1 is essential for proper biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles and loss of its function leads to a disease called type 1 Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome (HPS). We show that Ptbp1 promotes preferential utilization of the u5′ss giving rise to stable mRNAs encoding a full-length Hps1 protein, whereas bias towards d5′ss triggered by Ptbp1 down-regulation generates transcripts susceptible to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). We further demonstrate that Ptbp1 binds to pyrimidine-rich sequences between the u5′ss and d5′ss and activates the former site rather than repressing the latter. Consistent with this mechanism, u5′ss is intrinsically weaker than d5′ss, with a similar tendency observed for other genes with Ptbp1-induced u5′ss bias. Interestingly, the brain-enriched Ptbp1 paralog Ptbp2/nPTB/brPTB stimulated the u5′ss utilization but with a considerably lower efficiency than Ptbp1. This may account for the tight correlation between Hps1 with Ptbp1 expression levels observed across mammalian tissues. More generally, these data expand our understanding of AS regulation and uncover a post-transcriptional strategy ensuring co-expression of a subordinate gene with its master regulator through an AS-NMD tracking mechanism. PMID:25375251

  14. Structure, Dynamics, and Interaction of p54(nrb)/NonO RRM1 with 5' Splice Site RNA Sequence.

    PubMed

    Duvignaud, Jean-Baptiste; Bédard, Mikaël; Nagata, Takashi; Muto, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Gagné, Stéphane M; Vincent, Michel

    2016-05-10

    p54(nrb)/NonO is a nuclear RNA-binding protein involved in many cellular events such as pre-mRNA processing, transcription, and nuclear retention of hyper-edited RNAs. In particular, it participates in the splicing process by directly binding the 5' splice site of pre-mRNAs. The protein also concentrates in a nuclear body called paraspeckle by binding a G-rich segment of the ncRNA NEAT1. The N-terminal section of p54(nrb)/NonO contains tandem RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) preceded by an HQ-rich region including a threonine residue (Thr15) whose phosphorylation inhibits its RNA binding ability, except for G-rich RNAs. In this work, our goal was to understand the rules that characterize the binding of the p54(nrb)/NonO RRMs to their RNA target. We have done in vitro RNA binding experiments which revealed that only the first RRM of p54(nrb)/NonO binds to the 5' splice site RNA. We have then determined the structure of the p54(nrb)/NonO RRM1 by liquid-state NMR which revealed the presence of a canonical fold (β1α1β2β3α2β4) and the conservation of aromatic amino acids at the protein surface. We also investigated the dynamics of this domain by NMR. The p54(nrb)/NonO RRM1 displays some motional properties that are typical of a well-folded protein with some regions exhibiting more flexibility (loops and β-strands). Furthermore, we determined the affinity of p54(nrb)/NonO RRM1 interaction to the 5' splice site RNA by NMR and fluorescence quenching and mapped its binding interface by NMR, concluding in a classical nucleic acid interaction. This study provides an improved understanding of the molecular basis (structure and dynamics) that governs the binding of the p54(nrb)/NonO RRM1 to one of its target RNAs. PMID:27064654

  15. The properties of the "ideal" donor site dressing: results of a worldwide online survey.

    PubMed

    Lars, P Kamolz L P; Giretzlehner, M; Trop, M; Parvizi, D; Spendel, S; Schintler, M; Justich, I; Wiedner, M; Laback, C; Lumenta, D B

    2013-09-30

    Split skin grafting is a widely used technique for reconstructing skin defects. Although a vast number of different coverage options for donor sites have become available in daily clinical practice, no optimum dressing material has been found to date. For this reason, we conducted a globally-distributed online survey to poll for the properties of such an "ideal" donor site dressing, possibly leading to an improved clinically-driven direction of future wound dressing developments. A total of 69 respondents from 34 countries took part in the questionnaire, resulting in a response rate of 13.8% (69/500) over a 1-month period. The majority of respondents rated the characteristics of an "ideal" donor site dressing to be either "essential" or "desirable" as follows: lack of adhesion to the wound bed ("essential": 31/69, 44.9%; "desirable": 30/69, 43.5%); pain-free dressing changes ("essential": 38/69, 55.1%; "desirable": 30/69, 43.5%); absorbency ("essential": 27/69, 39.1%; "desirable": 33/69, 47.8%); ease of removal ("essential": 37/69, 53.6%; "desirable": 27/69, 39.13%). With regard to the desired frequency of dressing changes, respondents preferred "no dressing change until the donor site has healed" (51/69, 73.9%) in the majority of cases, followed by "twice weekly" (10/69, 14.5%), "alternate days" (5/69, 7.2%) and "daily" (3/69, 4.3%). With regard to the design of the dressing material, the majority of participants preferred a one-piece (composite) dressing product (44/69, 63.8%). The majority of respondents also denied the current availability of an "ideal" donor site dressing (49/69, 71%). The strength of this study was the remarkable geographic distribution of responses; all parts of the world were included and participated. We believe that this globally conducted online survey has polled for the properties of the "ideal" donor site dressing and possibly will lead to an improved clinically-driven direction of future wound dressing development. PMID:24563639

  16. Which dressing do donor site wounds need?: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Donor site wounds after split-skin grafting are rather 'standard' wounds. At present, lots of dressings and topical agents for donor site wounds are commercially available. This causes large variation in the local care of these wounds, while the optimum 'standard' dressing for local wound care is unclear. This protocol describes a trial in which we investigate the effectiveness of various treatment options for these donor site wounds. Methods A 14-center, six-armed randomized clinical trial is being carried out in the Netherlands. An a-priori power analysis and an anticipated dropout rate of 15% indicates that 50 patients per group are necessary, totaling 300 patients, to be able to detect a 25% quicker mean time to complete wound healing. Randomization has been computerized to ensure allocation concealment. Adult patients who need a split-skin grafting operation for any reason, leaving a donor site wound of at least 10 cm2 are included and receive one of the following dressings: hydrocolloid, alginate, film, hydrofiber, silicone dressing, or paraffin gauze. No combinations of products from other intervention groups in this trial are allowed. Optimum application and changes of these dressings are pursued according to the protocol as supplied by the dressing manufacturers. Primary outcomes are days to complete wound healing and pain (using a Visual Analogue Scale). Secondary outcomes are adverse effects, scarring, patient satisfaction, and costs. Outcome assessors unaware of the treatment allocation will assess whether or not an outcome has occurred. Results will be analyzed according to the intention to treat principle. The first patient was randomized October 1, 2009. Discussion This study will provide comprehensive data on the effectiveness of different treatment options for donor site wounds. The dressing(s) that will prevail in effectiveness, satisfaction and costs will be promoted among clinicians dealing with such patients. Thus, we aim to

  17. Alternative Splicing in CKD.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Megan; Oltean, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) has emerged in the postgenomic era as one of the main drivers of proteome diversity, with ≥94% of multiexon genes alternatively spliced in humans. AS is therefore one of the main control mechanisms for cell phenotype, and is a process deregulated in disease. Numerous reports describe pathogenic mutations in splice factors, splice sites, or regulatory sequences. Additionally, compared with the physiologic state, disease often associates with an abnormal proportion of splice isoforms (or novel isoforms), without an apparent driver mutation. It is therefore essential to study how AS is regulated in physiology, how it contributes to pathogenesis, and whether we can manipulate faulty splicing for therapeutic advantage. Although the disease most commonly linked to deregulation of AS in several genes is cancer, many reports detail pathogenic splice variants in diseases ranging from neuromuscular disorders to diabetes or cardiomyopathies. A plethora of splice variants have been implicated in CKDs as well. In this review, we describe examples of these CKD-associated splice variants and ideas on how to manipulate them for therapeutic benefit. PMID:26763787

  18. Alternative splicing of the maize Ac transposase transcript in transgenic sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Lisson, Ralph; Hellert, Jan; Ringleb, Malte; Machens, Fabian; Kraus, Josef

    2010-01-01

    The maize Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) transposable element system was introduced into sugar beet. The autonomous Ac and non-autonomous Ds element excise from the T-DNA vector and integrate at novel positions in the sugar beet genome. Ac and Ds excisions generate footprints in the donor T-DNA that support the hairpin model for transposon excision. Two complete integration events into genomic sugar beet DNA were obtained by IPCR. Integration of Ac leads to an eight bp duplication, while integration of Ds in a homologue of a sugar beet flowering locus gene did not induce a duplication. The molecular structure of the target site indicates Ds integration into a double strand break. Analyses of transposase transcription using RT–PCR revealed low amounts of alternatively spliced mRNAs. The fourth intron of the transposase was found to be partially misspliced. Four different splice products were identified. In addition, the second and third exon were found to harbour two and three novel introns, respectively. These utilize each the same splice donor but several alternative splice acceptor sites. Using the SplicePredictor online tool, one of the two introns within exon two is predicted to be efficiently spliced in maize. Most interestingly, splicing of this intron together with the four major introns of Ac would generate a transposase that lacks the DNA binding domain and two of its three nuclear localization signals, but still harbours the dimerization domain. PMID:20512402

  19. Alternative splicing of the maize Ac transposase transcript in transgenic sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Lisson, Ralph; Hellert, Jan; Ringleb, Malte; Machens, Fabian; Kraus, Josef; Hehl, Reinhard

    2010-09-01

    The maize Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) transposable element system was introduced into sugar beet. The autonomous Ac and non-autonomous Ds element excise from the T-DNA vector and integrate at novel positions in the sugar beet genome. Ac and Ds excisions generate footprints in the donor T-DNA that support the hairpin model for transposon excision. Two complete integration events into genomic sugar beet DNA were obtained by IPCR. Integration of Ac leads to an eight bp duplication, while integration of Ds in a homologue of a sugar beet flowering locus gene did not induce a duplication. The molecular structure of the target site indicates Ds integration into a double strand break. Analyses of transposase transcription using RT-PCR revealed low amounts of alternatively spliced mRNAs. The fourth intron of the transposase was found to be partially misspliced. Four different splice products were identified. In addition, the second and third exon were found to harbour two and three novel introns, respectively. These utilize each the same splice donor but several alternative splice acceptor sites. Using the SplicePredictor online tool, one of the two introns within exon two is predicted to be efficiently spliced in maize. Most interestingly, splicing of this intron together with the four major introns of Ac would generate a transposase that lacks the DNA binding domain and two of its three nuclear localization signals, but still harbours the dimerization domain. PMID:20512402

  20. Comparison of scalp and abdomen as split-thickness skin graft donor sites for aural stenosis repair.

    PubMed

    Du, Qiang; Zhang, Tianyu

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate and compare the scalp and the abdomen as split-thickness skin graft donor sites for aural stenosis repair. A total of 34 patients with aural stenosis were included in the study. All the patients underwent meatoplasty using split-thickness skin grafts. Among them, the skin graft donor site was the scalp in 11 patients and the abdomen in the other 23 patients. The surgical team followed the patients in the outpatient department for at least 6 months after surgery. Evaluations concerned healing of the donor site, hair regeneration of the donor site, survival of split-thickness skin grafts, reoccurrence of aural stenosis and hair growth in the ear canal. The incidences of reoccurrence of aural stenosis in the two groups were compared. Subjective scar evaluation of the donor sites was performed using the Patient Scar Assessment Scale (PASA). The scale items were pain, itching, color, stiffness, thickness and irregularity. All the scalp and abdominal donor sites healed well with no sign of infection. Hair regrowth and reepithelialization was observed at all the scalp donor sites. Pink discoloration was observed at the scalp donor sites in six patients 2-3 months after surgery and disappeared 6-9 months after surgery. Scars were observed at the scalp donor sites in two patients 6 months after surgery. No alopecia was observed at the scalp donor sites. The scars and pink discoloration were hidden in the hair. Scars and/or discoloration were observed at all the abdominal donor sites 12 months after surgery. All the scalp and abdominal skin grafts survived with no sign of infection. Hair growth was observed in the ear canals in two patients in the scalp group. The incidences of reoccurrence of aural stenosis were 0 % (0/23) in the abdominal group and 9.1 % (1/11) in the scalp group, respectively (Chi square test, p > 0.05). The PASA values about color, stiffness, thickness and irregularity were higher in the abdominal group than in the scalp group (Mann-Whitney U

  1. Use of continuous local anesthetic infusion in the management of postoperative split-thickness skin graft donor site pain.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Jorge L Reguero; Savetamal, Alisa; Crombie, Roselle E; Cholewczynski, Walter; Atweh, Nabil; Possenti, Paul; Schulz, John T

    2013-01-01

    Donor sites from split-thickness skin grafts (STSG) impose significant pain on patients in the early postoperative period. We report the use of continuous local anesthetic infusion as a method for the management of postoperative STSG donor site pain. Patients undergoing single or dual, adjacent STSG harvest from the thigh (eight patients) or back (one patient) were included in this study. Immediately after STSG harvest, subcutaneous catheters were placed for continuous infusion of local anesthetic. Daily donor site-specific pain severity scores were prospectively recorded in nine patients receiving local anesthetic infusion. Patient characteristics, technical aspects, and postoperative complications were identified in the study. The thigh was the anatomic location chosen for most donor sites. A single catheter was placed for donor sites limited to 4 inches in width or less. A dual catheter system was used for those wider than 4 inches. An elastomeric pump delivered continuously a total of 4 ml/hr of a solution of 0.5% bupivacaine. The average anesthetic infusion duration was 3.1 days. A substantial decrease in worst, least, and average donor site pain scores was found from the first 24 hours to the second postoperative day in our patients, a treatment trend that continued through postoperative day 3. One patient developed minor anesthetic leakage from the catheter insertion site; and in three cases, accidental dislodgement of the catheters occurred. There were no cases of donor site secondary infection. All donor sites were completely epithelialized at 1-month follow-up. Continuous local anesthetic infusion is technically feasible and may represent an option for postoperative donor site pain control after STSG harvesting. Relative cost-benefit of the technique remains to be determined. PMID:23271060

  2. Prospective biomechanical evaluation of donor site morbidity after radial forearm free flap.

    PubMed

    Riecke, Björn; Kohlmeier, Carsten; Assaf, Alexandre T; Wikner, Johannes; Drabik, Anna; Catalá-Lehnen, Philip; Heiland, Max; Rendenbach, Carsten

    2016-02-01

    Although the radial forearm free flap (RFF) is a commonly-used microvascular flap for orofacial reconstruction, we are aware of few prospective biomechanical studies of the donor site. We have therefore evaluated the donor site morbidity biomechanically of 30 consecutive RFF for orofacial reconstruction preoperatively and three months postoperatively. This included the Mayo wrist score, the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score, grip strength, followed by tip pinch, key pinch, palmar pinch, and range of movement of the wrist. Primary defects were all closed with local full-thickness skin grafts from the donor site forearm, thereby circumventing the need for a second defect. Postoperative functional results showed that there was a reduction in hand strength measured by (grip strength: -24.1%, in tip pinch: -23.3%, in key pinch: -16.5, and in palmar pinch: -19.3%); and wrist movement measured by extension (active=14.3% / passive= -11.5%) and flexion = -14.8% / -8.9%), and radial (-9.8% / -9.8%) and ulnar (-11.0% / -9.3%) abduction. The Mayo wrist score was reduced by 9.4 points (-12.9%) and the DASH score increased by 16.1 points (+35.5%) compared with the same forearm preoperatively. The local skin graft resulted in a robust wound cover with a good functional result. Our results show that the reduction in hand strength and wrist movement after harvest of a RFF is objectively evaluable, and did not reflect the subjectively noticed extent and restrictions in activities of daily living. Use of a local skin graft avoids a second donor site and the disadvantages of a split-thickness skin graft. PMID:26708799

  3. Intravitreal Injection of Splice-switching Oligonucleotides to Manipulate Splicing in Retinal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Xavier; Perrault, Isabelle; Munnich, Arnold; Kaplan, Josseline; Rozet, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis is a severe hereditary retinal dystrophy responsible for neonatal blindness. The most common disease-causing mutation (c.2991+1655A>G; 10–15%) creates a strong splice donor site that leads to insertion of a cryptic exon encoding a premature stop codon. Recently, we reported that splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSO) allow skipping of the mutant cryptic exon and the restoration of ciliation in fibroblasts of affected patients, supporting the feasibility of a SSO-mediated exon skipping strategy to correct the aberrant splicing. Here, we present data in the wild-type mouse, which demonstrate that intravitreal administration of 2'-OMePS-SSO allows selective alteration of Cep290 splicing in retinal cells, including photoreceptors as shown by successful alteration of Abca4 splicing using the same approach. We show that both SSOs and Cep290 skipped mRNA were detectable for at least 1 month and that intravitreal administration of oligonucleotides did not provoke any serious adverse event. These data suggest that intravitreal injections of SSO should be considered to bypass protein truncation resulting from the c.2991+1655A>G mutation as well as other truncating mutations in genes which like CEP290 or ABCA4 have a mRNA size that exceed cargo capacities of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved adeno-associated virus (AAV)-vectors, thus hampering gene augmentation therapy. PMID:26325627

  4. Donor site wound protein synthesis correlates with length of acute hospitalization in severely burned children: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Tuvdendorj, Demidmaa; Chinkes, David L.; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Aarsland, Asle; Herndon, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Autografting of burn wounds results in generation of donor site wounds. Here we measured donor site wound protein Fractional Synthesis Rate (FSR) in a burn pediatric population and showed that FSR increases over time postsurgery and correlates with the length of hospital stay (LOS) normalized for total body surface area (TBSA) burn size. 3.9±1.1 days after the grafting surgery patients participated in a metabolic study consisting of continuous infusion of L-[ring-2H5]-phenylalanine and donor site wound punch biopsies. Donor site wound protein FSR was 10.4±7.5 %/day. Wound FSR demonstrated linear correlation with the time postsurgery (p < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis showed that LOS/TBSA correlated with donor site wound protein FSR and time postsurgery (p < 0.001) and the following equation describes the relationship: Estimated LOS/TBSA = (FSR - 12.95 – 1.414 × Postsurgery day)/(−17.8). This equation predicted that FSR corrected for the postsurgery day when the metabolic study was conducted accounted for 67 % of the variability (r2 = 0.673) in the LOS/TBSA. Donor site wound protein FSR correlated to LOS/TBSA of burn patients admitted to the intensive care unit. Measurement of protein deposition in regenerating donor site wound using stable isotope technique provides a quantitative measure of wound healing. PMID:20412556

  5. Free Flap Donor Site Reconstruction: A Prospective Case Series Using an Optimized Polyurethane Biodegradable Temporizing Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Wagstaff, Marcus J. D.; Schmitt, Bradley J.; Caplash, Yugesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We recently published a 10-patient case series where free flap donor site reconstruction was performed as a 2-stage procedure using an integrating biodegradable polyurethane matrix (to form a neodermis), followed by definitive closure with an autologous split-skin graft. Two issues were revealed by this pilot study that led to further modification of the biodegradable temporizing matrix. This involved alterations to the seal thickness and bonding to the foam matrix and the introduction of fenestrations to the seal. Objective: This article documents a second cohort of patients requiring free flap (fibular and radial forearm) donor site reconstruction with this optimized material. Methods: The biodegradable temporizing matrix was implanted when the free flap was detached from its donor site. Subsequent integration was monitored closely. Five weeks was the usual time of integration before delamination (seal removal), dermabrasion, and definitive closure with autograft. Results: Integration was complete and uncomplicated in every case, delamination occurred in 1 piece in 1 action, and subsequent graft take was 100% for every patient. Long-term scar outcomes improved compared with the pilot group. Degradation is complete by 12 months, other than occasional microscopic remnants undergoing phagocytosis. Conclusion: This study has reiterated that the biodegradable temporizing matrix can be implanted into humans, followed by neovascularization and integration. No infection was observed, and split-skin overgrafting was successful and uncomplicated. PMID:26171099

  6. Solid phase electron donors control denitrification in groundwater at agricultural sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, C. T.; Liao, L.; Bekins, B. A.; Bohlke, J. K.

    2011-12-01

    Increased concentrations of nitrate in groundwater caused by agricultural use of chemical and organic fertilizers are a concern because of possible risks to environmental and human health. At many sites, these problems are mitigated by natural attenuation of nitrate as a result of microbially mediated denitrification of nitrate to nitrogen gas. Recent studies have clarified the factors affecting the rates and extents of denitrification in groundwater in agricultural areas. Intensive studies were conducted by the US Geological Survey to study agricultural chemicals in California, Nebraska, Washington, and Maryland using laboratory analyses, field measurements, and flow and transport modeling for monitoring well transects (0.5 to 2.5 km in length) and vertical profiles (0 to 50 m in depth). Groundwater analyses included major ion chemistry, dissolved gases, nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopes, and atmospheric age-tracers. Sediments were analyzed for concentrations of potential electron donors for denitrification, including reduced iron and sulfur, and organic carbon. Geochemical data and mass balance calculations indicated that solid-phase electron donors were an important factor controlling denitrification at these sites. To examine the generality of this result, a mathematical model of vertical flux of water, oxygen, and nitrate was developed and applied at these study sites along with 2 new study sites in Iowa and Mississippi and 8 additional sites from previous studies in Nebraska, Texas, Minnesota, Wisconsin, North Carolina, Maryland (2 sites), and New York. Model results confirmed the importance of solid phase electron donors. The normalized reaction rates on an electron flux basis tended to increase with depth from the shallow oxygen reduction zone to the underlying nitrate reduction zone. The pattern of higher rates at depth is consistent with a reaction rate controlled by solid phase donors that are depleted under oxidizing conditions near the surface and in

  7. Characterization of growth hormone enhanced donor site healing in patients with large cutaneous burns.

    PubMed Central

    Herndon, D N; Hawkins, H K; Nguyen, T T; Pierre, E; Cox, R; Barrow, R E

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human growth hormone is an anabolic agent that attenuates injury-induced catabolism and stimulates protein synthesis. Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) administered therapeutically to patients with massive burns has been shown to increase the rate of skin graft donor site healing. It has been postulated that growth hormone affects wound healing and tissue repair by stimulating the production of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) by the liver to increase circulating IGF-1 concentrations. The mechanism by which it improves wound healing, however, remains in question. The authors hypothesize that rhGH up-regulates IGF-1 receptors and IGF-1 levels both systemically and locally in the wound site to stimulate cell mitosis and increase synthesis of laminin, collagen types IV and VII, and cytokeratin. This hypothesis was tested in nine patients with burns covering > 40% of total body surface area. OBJECTIVE: The authors assessed the efficacy of rhGH in promoting several major building materials in the donor site of patients with massive burns. METHODS: Ten massively burned patients with full-thickness burns covering more than 40% of total body surface area were participants in a placebo-controlled prospective study to determine the efficacy of 0.2 mg/kg/day rhGH on donor site wound healing and to identify some of the major components involved in wound healing and its integrity. RESULTS: Donor sites in burn patients receiving rhGH showed an increased coverage by the basal lamina of 26% for placebo to 68% coverage of the dermal-epidermal junction. Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptors and laminin, types IV and VII collagen, and cytokeratin-14 all increased significantly. Healing times of the donor sites were significantly decreased compared with patients receiving placebo. CONCLUSION: Results indicate that growth hormone or its secondary mediators may directly stimulate the cells of the epidermis and dermis during wound healing to produce the structural

  8. Crystal structure of human U1 snRNP, a small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle, reveals the mechanism of 5′ splice site recognition

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Yasushi; Oubridge, Chris; van Roon, Anne-Marie M; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    U1 snRNP binds to the 5′ exon-intron junction of pre-mRNA and thus plays a crucial role at an early stage of pre-mRNA splicing. We present two crystal structures of engineered U1 sub-structures, which together reveal at atomic resolution an almost complete network of protein–protein and RNA-protein interactions within U1 snRNP, and show how the 5′ splice site of pre-mRNA is recognised by U1 snRNP. The zinc-finger of U1-C interacts with the duplex between pre-mRNA and the 5′-end of U1 snRNA. The binding of the RNA duplex is stabilized by hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions between U1-C and the RNA backbone around the splice junction but U1-C makes no base-specific contacts with pre-mRNA. The structure, together with RNA binding assays, shows that the selection of 5′-splice site nucleotides by U1 snRNP is achieved predominantly through basepairing with U1 snRNA whilst U1-C fine-tunes relative affinities of mismatched 5′-splice sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04986.001 PMID:25555158

  9. Identification of conserved RNA secondary structures at influenza B and C splice sites reveals similarities and differences between influenza A, B, and C

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Influenza B and C are single-stranded RNA viruses that cause yearly epidemics and infections. Knowledge of RNA secondary structure generated by influenza B and C will be helpful in further understanding the role of RNA structure in the progression of influenza infection. Findings All available protein-coding sequences for influenza B and C were analyzed for regions with high potential for functional RNA secondary structure. On the basis of conserved RNA secondary structure with predicted high thermodynamic stability, putative structures were identified that contain splice sites in segment 8 of influenza B and segments 6 and 7 of influenza C. The sequence in segment 6 also contains three unused AUG start codon sites that are sequestered within a hairpin structure. Conclusions When added to previous studies on influenza A, the results suggest that influenza splicing may share common structural strategies for regulation of splicing. In particular, influenza 3′ splice sites are predicted to form secondary structures that can switch conformation to regulate splicing. Thus, these RNA structures present attractive targets for therapeutics aimed at targeting one or the other conformation. PMID:24405943

  10. Crystal structure of human U1 snRNP, a small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle, reveals the mechanism of 5' splice site recognition.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yasushi; Oubridge, Chris; van Roon, Anne-Marie M; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    U1 snRNP binds to the 5' exon-intron junction of pre-mRNA and thus plays a crucial role at an early stage of pre-mRNA splicing. We present two crystal structures of engineered U1 sub-structures, which together reveal at atomic resolution an almost complete network of protein-protein and RNA-protein interactions within U1 snRNP, and show how the 5' splice site of pre-mRNA is recognised by U1 snRNP. The zinc-finger of U1-C interacts with the duplex between pre-mRNA and the 5'-end of U1 snRNA. The binding of the RNA duplex is stabilized by hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions between U1-C and the RNA backbone around the splice junction but U1-C makes no base-specific contacts with pre-mRNA. The structure, together with RNA binding assays, shows that the selection of 5'-splice site nucleotides by U1 snRNP is achieved predominantly through basepairing with U1 snRNA whilst U1-C fine-tunes relative affinities of mismatched 5'-splice sites. PMID:25555158

  11. A splice site mutation in HERC1 leads to syndromic intellectual disability with macrocephaly and facial dysmorphism: Further delineation of the phenotypic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Shagun; Bhowmik, Aneek Das; Ramprasad, Vedam L; Murugan, Sakthivel; Dalal, Ashwin

    2016-07-01

    We report on a sib pair of Indian origin presenting with intellectual disability, dysmorphism, and macrocephaly. Exome sequencing revealed a homozygous splice site HERC1 mutation in both probands. Functional analysis revealed use of an alternate splice site resulting in formation of a downstream stop codon and nonsense mediated decay. In the light of recent reports of HERC1 mutations in two families with a similar phenotypic presentation, this report reiterates the pathogenic nature and clinical consequences of HERC1 disruption. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27108999

  12. Intrasplicing coordinates alternative first exons with alternative splicing in the protein 4.1R gene

    SciTech Connect

    Conboy, John G.; Parra, Marilyn K.; Tan, Jeff S.; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G.

    2008-11-07

    In the protein 4.1R gene, alternative first exons splice differentially to alternative 3' splice sites far downstream in exon 2'/2 (E2'/2). We describe a novel intrasplicing mechanism by which exon 1A (E1A) splices exclusively to the distal E2'/2 acceptor via two nested splicing reactions regulated by novel properties of exon 1B (E1B). E1B behaves as an exon in the first step, using its consensus 5' donor to splice to the proximal E2'/2 acceptor. A long region of downstream intron is excised, juxtaposing E1B with E2'/2 to generate a new composite acceptor containing the E1B branchpoint/pyrimidine tract and E2 distal 3' AG-dinucleotide. Next, the upstream E1A splices over E1B to this distal acceptor, excising the remaining intron plus E1B and E2' to form mature E1A/E2 product. We mapped branch points for both intrasplicing reactions and demonstrated that mutation of the E1B 5' splice site or branchpoint abrogates intrasplicing. In the 4.1R gene, intrasplicing ultimately determines N-terminal protein structure and function. More generally, intrasplicing represents a new mechanism whereby alternative promoters can be coordinated with downstream alternative splicing.

  13. A Novel Local Autologous Bone Graft Donor Site After Scalp Tissue Expansion in Aplasia Cutis Congenita.

    PubMed

    Hadad, Ivan; Meara, John G; Rogers-Vizena, Carolyn R

    2016-06-01

    Aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) is a rare condition often presenting as an absent area of cutaneous scalp. The calvarium and dura may also be affected. Scalp reconstruction with tissue expansion is often needed for large defects. Patients involving deficient calvarial bone present a dilemma for the reconstructive surgeon, because bone graft donor sites are limited in young children.A thick, bony rim has been noted to form around the periphery of scalp tissue expanders. The authors present a series of 3 patients with ACC for whom this bony hyperostosis was used as donor particulate bone graft at the time of scalp tissue expansion. There was 85 to 100% graft ossification on postoperative computed tomography scan. There were no bone graft-related complications.In conclusion, the hyperostotic rim that forms after scalp tissue expansion can be successfully used as particulate bone graft, decreasing the number of procedures needed for patient with ACC and obviating the need for other donor sites. PMID:27192637

  14. U2AF65 adapts to diverse pre-mRNA splice sites through conformational selection of specific and promiscuous RNA recognition motifs.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Jermaine L; Agrawal, Anant A; Gupta, Ankit; Green, Michael R; Kielkopf, Clara L

    2013-04-01

    Degenerate splice site sequences mark the intron boundaries of pre-mRNA transcripts in multicellular eukaryotes. The essential pre-mRNA splicing factor U2AF(65) is faced with the paradoxical tasks of accurately targeting polypyrimidine (Py) tracts preceding 3' splice sites while adapting to both cytidine and uridine nucleotides with nearly equivalent frequencies. To understand how U2AF(65) recognizes degenerate Py tracts, we determined six crystal structures of human U2AF(65) bound to cytidine-containing Py tracts. As deoxy-ribose backbones were required for co-crystallization with these Py tracts, we also determined two baseline structures of U2AF(65) bound to the deoxy-uridine counterparts and compared the original, RNA-bound structure. Local structural changes suggest that the N-terminal RNA recognition motif 1 (RRM1) is more promiscuous for cytosine-containing Py tracts than the C-terminal RRM2. These structural differences between the RRMs were reinforced by the specificities of wild-type and site-directed mutant U2AF(65) for region-dependent cytosine- and uracil-containing RNA sites. Small-angle X-ray scattering analyses further demonstrated that Py tract variations select distinct inter-RRM spacings from a pre-existing ensemble of U2AF(65) conformations. Our results highlight both local and global conformational selection as a means for universal 3' splice site recognition by U2AF(65). PMID:23376934

  15. Iliac Crest Donor Site for Children With Cleft Lip and Palate Undergoing Alveolar Bone Grafting: A Long-term Assessment.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Jonathan; Sanders, Megan; Loo, Stanley; Moaveni, Zac; Bartlett, Glenn; Keall, Heather; Pinkerton, Mark

    2016-05-01

    The authors aimed to accurately assess the donor site morbidity from iliac crest bone grafts for secondary bone grafting in patients with cleft lip and palate alveolar defects. Fifty patients between 3 months and 10 years following alveolar bone grafting for cleft lip and palate were entered into the study. Two-thirds of patients had no significant concerns about the donor site. The remaining third had some concerns about the appearance of their hips and less than 10% of patients expressing strong agreement with statements about concerns with shape, appearance, and self-consciousness about the iliac crest donor site. Examination findings showed the average length of scar being 5.4 cm and a third of patients having some minor palpable boney irregularities of the iliac crest. The authors found that the alveolar crest donor site is well tolerated by patients long term but has a measurable morbidity long term. PMID:27035602

  16. The missing puzzle piece: splicing mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowska, Marzena A

    2013-01-01

    Proper gene splicing is highly dependent on the correct recognition of exons. Among the elements allowing this process are the “cis” (conserved sequences) and “trans” (snRNP, splicing factors) elements. Splicing mutations are related with a number of genetic disorders and usually induce exon skipping, form new exon/intron boundaries or activate new cryptic exons as a result of alterations at donor/acceptor sites. They constitute more than 9% of the currently published mutations, but this value is highly underestimated as many of the potential mutations are located in the “cis” elements and should be confirmed experimentally. The most commonly detected splicing mutations are located at donor (5’) and acceptor (3’) sites. Mutations at the branch point are rare (only over a dozen are known to date), and are mostly searched and detected when no alteration has been detected in the sequenced exons and UTRs. Polypyrimidine tract mutations are equally rare. High throughput technologies, as well as traditional Sanger sequencing, allow detection of many changes in intronic sequences and intron/exon boundaries. However, the assessment whether a mutation affects exon recognition and results in a genetic disorder has to be conducted using molecular biology methods: in vitro transcription of the sequence of interest cloned into a plasmid, with and without alterations, or mutation analysis via a hybrid minigene system. Even though microarrays and new generation sequencing methods pose difficulties in detecting novel branch point mutations, these tools seem appropriate to expand the mutation detection panel especially for diagnostic purposes. PMID:24294354

  17. Rhodopsin mutations in a Scottish retinitis pigmentosa population, including a novel splice site mutation in intron four.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, C; Converse, C A; Hammer, H M; Osborne, A; Haites, N E

    1994-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the name given to a group of disorders, both clinically and genetically heterogeneous, that primarily affect the photoreceptor function of the eye. Mutations in the genes encoding for rhodopsin, RDS-peripherin, or the beta subunit of the cGMP phosphodiesterase enzyme can be responsible for the phenotype. In this study the rhodopsin gene has been screened for mutations in a panel of RP individuals and five different sequence changes have been detected to date in three dominantly inherited and two unclassified families. One of these, a base substitution in the 3'UTR, has not yet been confirmed as disease specific, while three missense substitutions have previously been reported and are likely to be responsible for the phenotype. The fifth change, a base substitution at the intron 4 acceptor splice site, represents a novel mutation and is assumed to be the causative mutation. Images PMID:7819178

  18. A novel BTK gene mutation creates a de-novo splice site in an X-linked agammaglobulinemia patient.

    PubMed

    Chear, Chai Teng; Ripen, Adiratna Mat; Mohamed, Sharifah Adlena Syed; Dhaliwal, Jasbir Singh

    2015-04-15

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), encoded by the BTK gene, is a cytoplasmic protein critical in B cell development. Mutations in the BTK gene cause X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA), a primary immunodeficiency with characteristically low or absent B cells and antibodies. This report describes a five year-old boy who presented with otitis externa, arthritis, reduced immunoglobulins and no B cells. Flow cytometry showed undetectable monocyte BTK expression. Sequencing revealed a novel mutation at exon 13 of the BTK gene which created a de novo splice site with a proximal 5 nucleotide loss resulting in a truncated BTK protein. The patient still suffered from ear infection despite intravenous immunoglobulin replacement therapy. In this study, mosaicism was seen only in the mother's genomic DNA. These results suggest that a combination of flow cytometry and BTK gene analysis is important for XLA diagnosis and carrier screening. PMID:25680287

  19. Activation of a cryptic splice site in the growth hormone receptor associated with growth hormone insensitivity syndrome in a genetic isolate of Laron Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Schiavi, A.; Bartlett, R.; Brown, M.

    1994-09-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) is a rare, autosomal recessive disease found worldwide. Despite various ethnic differences, all patients with LS described display classic dysmorphic features and extreme short stature due to defects in the growth hormone receptor (GHR). The vast majority of these patients are sporadic occurrences resulting from consanguineous matings; however, an Ecuadorian genetic isolate of LS has been reported. Our investigations have identified a genetic isolate of LS of Anglo Saxon origin. Seven individuals, by all clinical and biochemical criteria, have LS. As a result of extensive review of family and medical histories we have constructed a pedigree tracing the lineage of our affected patients through the 17th century. No GHR gross deletions were detected using an exon-specific PCR assay developed in our laboratory. Previous molecular analyses have identified mutations in exons 2-7 in numerous patients with classical LS. Single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis was performed on GHR exons 2-7, and a marked conformational shift was noted in exon 7. Cycle sequencing of exon 7 from three affected individuals, and from four first-degree relatives, revealed a C{r_arrow}T transition at position 766 of the cDNA, and a heterozygous C{r_arrow}T transition at the identical position in the obligate carriers studied. This mutation is predicted to activate a cryptic donor splice site 63 base pairs upstream from the 3{prime} end of exon 7, effectively truncating the GHR cDNA without changing the reading frame. The resultant GHR protein is shortened by a proposed 21 amino acids. The identification and conformation of this mutation not only identifies a novel mutation in the GHR, and the first to be described in LS patients of English descent, but also allows for comparisons between genotypes and phenotypes in an inbred population.

  20. Identification of novel splice site mutation IVS9 + 1(G > A) and novel complex allele G355R/R359X in Type 1 Gaucher patients heterozygous for mutation N370S.

    PubMed

    Hoitsema, Kourtnee; Amato, Dominick; Khan, Aneal; Sirrs, Sandra; Choy, Francis Y M

    2016-09-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from deficient glucocerebrosidase activity. More than 350 mutations that cause Gaucher disease have been described to date. Novel mutations can potentially provide insight into the glucocerebrosidase structure-function relationship and biochemical basis of the disease. Here, we report the identification of two novel mutations in two unrelated patients with type I (non-neuronopathic) Gaucher disease: 1) a splice site mutation IVS9 + 1G > A; and (2) a complex allele (cis) G355R/R359X. Both patients have a common N370S mutation in the other allele. The splice site mutation results from an intronic base substitution (G to A, c.1328 + 1, g.5005) at the donor splice site of exon and intron 9. The complex allele results from two point mutations in exon 8 of glucocerebrosidase (G to C at c.1180, g.4396, and T to C at c. 1192, g.4408) substituting glycine by arginine (G355R) and arginine by a premature termination (R359X), respectively. In order to demonstrate that G355R/R359X are in cis arrangement, PCR-amplified glucocerebrosidase exon 8 genomic DNA from the patient was cloned into the vector pJET1.2 in Escherichia coli TOP10® strain. Out of the 15 clones that were sequence analyzed, 10 contained the normal allele sequence and 5 contained the complex allele G355R/R359X sequence showing both mutations in cis arrangement. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis using Hph1 restriction endonuclease digest was established for the IVS9 + 1G > A mutation for confirmation and efficient identification of this mutation in future patients. Past literature suggests that mutations affecting splicing patterns of the glucocerebrosidase transcript as well as mutations in Gaucher complex alleles are detrimental to enzyme activity. However, compound heterozygosity with N370S, a mild mutation, will lead to a mild phenotype. The cases reported here support these past findings. PMID:27222815

  1. Identification of novel splice site mutation IVS9 + 1(G > A) and novel complex allele G355R/R359X in Type 1 Gaucher patients heterozygous for mutation N370S☆

    PubMed Central

    Hoitsema, Kourtnee; Amato, Dominick; Khan, Aneal; Sirrs, Sandra; Choy, Francis Y.M.

    2016-01-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from deficient glucocerebrosidase activity. More than 350 mutations that cause Gaucher disease have been described to date. Novel mutations can potentially provide insight into the glucocerebrosidase structure–function relationship and biochemical basis of the disease. Here, we report the identification of two novel mutations in two unrelated patients with type I (non-neuronopathic) Gaucher disease: 1) a splice site mutation IVS9 + 1G > A; and (2) a complex allele (cis) G355R/R359X. Both patients have a common N370S mutation in the other allele. The splice site mutation results from an intronic base substitution (G to A, c.1328 + 1, g.5005) at the donor splice site of exon and intron 9. The complex allele results from two point mutations in exon 8 of glucocerebrosidase (G to C at c.1180, g.4396, and T to C at c. 1192, g.4408) substituting glycine by arginine (G355R) and arginine by a premature termination (R359X), respectively. In order to demonstrate that G355R/R359X are in cis arrangement, PCR-amplified glucocerebrosidase exon 8 genomic DNA from the patient was cloned into the vector pJET1.2 in Escherichia coli TOP10® strain. Out of the 15 clones that were sequence analyzed, 10 contained the normal allele sequence and 5 contained the complex allele G355R/R359X sequence showing both mutations in cis arrangement. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis using Hph1 restriction endonuclease digest was established for the IVS9 + 1G > A mutation for confirmation and efficient identification of this mutation in future patients. Past literature suggests that mutations affecting splicing patterns of the glucocerebrosidase transcript as well as mutations in Gaucher complex alleles are detrimental to enzyme activity. However, compound heterozygosity with N370S, a mild mutation, will lead to a mild phenotype. The cases reported here support these past findings. PMID:27222815

  2. Novel compound heterozygous Thyroglobulin mutations c.745+1G>A/c.7036+2T>A associated with congenital goiter and hypothyroidism in a Vietnamese family. Identification of a new cryptic 5' splice site in the exon 6.

    PubMed

    Citterio, Cintia E; Morales, Cecilia M; Bouhours-Nouet, Natacha; Machiavelli, Gloria A; Bueno, Elena; Gatelais, Frédérique; Coutant, Regis; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Rivolta, Carina M; Targovnik, Héctor M

    2015-03-15

    Several patients were identified with dyshormonogenesis caused by mutations in the thyroglobulin (TG) gene. These defects are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner and affected individuals are either homozygous or compound heterozygous for the mutations. The aim of the present study was to identify new TG mutations in a patient of Vietnamese origin affected by congenital hypothyroidism, goiter and low levels of serum TG. DNA sequencing identified the presence of compound heterozygous mutations in the TG gene: the maternal mutation consists of a novel c.745+1G>A (g.IVS6 + 1G>A), whereas the hypothetical paternal mutation consists of a novel c.7036+2T>A (g.IVS40 + 2T>A). The father was not available for segregation analysis. Ex-vivo splicing assays and subsequent RT-PCR analyses were performed on mRNA isolated from the eukaryotic-cells transfected with normal and mutant expression vectors. Minigene analysis of the c.745+1G>A mutant showed that the exon 6 is skipped during pre-mRNA splicing or partially included by use of a cryptic 5' splice site located to 55 nucleotides upstream of the authentic exon 6/intron 6 junction site. The functional analysis of c.7036+2T>A mutation showed a complete skipping of exon 40. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutations, predicted with the bioinformatics tool NNSplice, Fsplice, SPL, SPLM and MaxEntScan programs were investigated and evaluated in relation with the experimental evidence. These analyses predicted that both mutant alleles would result in the abolition of the authentic splice donor sites. The c.745+1G>A mutation originates two putative truncated proteins of 200 and 1142 amino acids, whereas c.7036+2T>A mutation results in a putative truncated protein of 2277 amino acids. In conclusion, we show that the c.745+1G>A mutation promotes the activation of a new cryptic donor splice site in the exon 6 of the TG gene. The functional consequences of these mutations could be structural changes in the protein

  3. Functional correction by antisense therapy of a splicing mutation in the GALT gene.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Ana I; Lourenço, Sílvia; Trabuco, Matilde; Silva, Maria João; Oliveira, Anabela; Gaspar, Ana; Diogo, Luísa; Tavares de Almeida, Isabel; Vicente, João B; Rivera, Isabel

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, antisense therapy has emerged as an increasingly important therapeutic approach to tackle several genetic disorders, including inborn errors of metabolism. Intronic mutations activating cryptic splice sites are particularly amenable to antisense therapy, as the canonical splice sites remain intact, thus retaining the potential for restoring constitutive splicing. Mutational analysis of Portuguese galactosemic patients revealed the intronic variation c.820+13A>G as the second most prevalent mutation, strongly suggesting its pathogenicity. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize this intronic variation, to elucidate its pathogenic molecular mechanism(s) and, ultimately, to correct it by antisense therapy. Minigene splicing assays in two distinct cell lines and patients' transcript analyses showed that the mutation activates a cryptic donor splice site, inducing an aberrant splicing of the GALT pre-mRNA, which in turn leads to a frameshift with inclusion of a premature stop codon (p.D274Gfs*17). Functional-structural studies of the recombinant wild-type and truncated GALT showed that the latter is devoid of enzymatic activity and prone to aggregation. Finally, two locked nucleic acid oligonucleotides, designed to specifically recognize the mutation, successfully restored the constitutive splicing, thus establishing a proof of concept for the application of antisense therapy as an alternative strategy for the clearly insufficient dietary treatment in classic galactosemia. PMID:25052314

  4. Mutations that alter RNA splicing of the human HPRT gene: a review of the spectrum.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, J P; Rogan, P K; Cariello, N; Nicklas, J A

    1998-11-01

    The human HPRT gene contains spans approximately 42,000 base pairs in genomic DNA, has a mRNA of approximately 900 bases and a protein coding sequence of 657 bases (initiation codon AUG to termination codon UAA). This coding sequence is distributed into 9 exons ranging from 18 (exon 5) to 184 (exon 3) base pairs. Intron sizes range from 170 (intron 7) to 13,075 (intron 1) base pairs. In a database of human HPRT mutations, 277 of 2224 (12.5%) mutations result in alterations in splicing of the mRNA as analyzed by both reverse transcriptase mediated production of a cDNA followed by PCR amplification and cDNA sequencing and by genomic DNA PCR amplification and sequencing. Mutations have been found in all eight 5' (donor) and 3' (acceptor) splice sequences. Mutations in the 5' splice sequences of introns 1 and 5 result in intron inclusion in the cDNA due to the use of cryptic donor splice sequences within the introns; mutations in the other six 5' sites result in simple exon exclusion. Mutations in the 3' splice sequences of introns 1, 3, 7 and 8 result in partial exon exclusion due to the use of cryptic acceptor splice sequences within the exons; mutations in the other four 3' sites result in simple exon exclusion. A base substitution in exon 3 (209G-->T) creates a new 5' (donor) splice site which results in the exclusion of 110 bases of exon 3 from the cDNA. Two base substitutions in intron 8 (IVS8-16G-->A and IVS8-3T-->G) result in the inclusion of intron 8 sequences in the cDNA due to the creation of new 3' (acceptor) splice sites. Base substitution within exons 1, 3, 4, 6 and 8 also result in splice alterations in cDNA. Those in exons 1 and 6 are at the 3' end of the exon and may directly affect splicing. Those within exons 3 and 4 may be the result of the creation of nonsense codons, while those in exon 8 cannot be explained by this mechanism. Lastly, many mutations that affect splicing of the HPRT mRNA have pleiotropic effects in that multiple cDNA products are

  5. The zinc fingers of the SR-like protein ZRANB2 are single-stranded RNA-binding domains that recognize 5′ splice site-like sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Loughlin, Fionna E.; Mansfield, Robyn E.; Vaz, Paula M.; McGrath, Aaron P.; Setiyaputra, Surya; Gamsjaeger, Roland; Chen, Eva S.; Morris, Brian J.; Guss, J. Mitchell; Mackay, Joel P.

    2009-09-02

    The alternative splicing of mRNA is a critical process in higher eukaryotes that generates substantial proteomic diversity. Many of the proteins that are essential to this process contain arginine/serine-rich (RS) domains. ZRANB2 is a widely-expressed and highly-conserved RS-domain protein that can regulate alternative splicing but lacks canonical RNA-binding domains. Instead, it contains 2 RanBP2-type zinc finger (ZnF) domains. We demonstrate that these ZnFs recognize ssRNA with high affinity and specificity. Each ZnF binds to a single AGGUAA motif and the 2 domains combine to recognize AGGUAA(N{sub x})AGGUAA double sites, suggesting that ZRANB2 regulates alternative splicing via a direct interaction with pre-mRNA at sites that resemble the consensus 5{prime} splice site. We show using X-ray crystallography that recognition of an AGGUAA motif by a single ZnF is dominated by side-chain hydrogen bonds to the bases and formation of a guanine-tryptophan-guanine 'ladder.' A number of other human proteins that function in RNA processing also contain RanBP2 ZnFs in which the RNA-binding residues of ZRANB2 are conserved. The ZnFs of ZRANB2 therefore define another class of RNA-binding domain, advancing our understanding of RNA recognition and emphasizing the versatility of ZnF domains in molecular recognition.

  6. Rapid generation of splicing reporters with pSpliceExpress

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Shivendra; Khanna, Amit; Stamm, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Almost all human protein-coding transcripts undergo pre-mRNA splicing and a majority of them is alternatively spliced. The most common technique used to analyze the regulation of an alternative exon is through reporter minigene constructs. However, their construction is time-consuming and is often complicated by the limited availability of appropriate restriction sites. Here, we report a fast and simple recombination-based method to generate splicing reporter genes, using a new vector, pSpliceExpress. The system allows generation of minigenes within one week. Minigenes generated with pSpliceExpress show the same regulation as displayed by conventionally cloned reporter constructs and provide an alternate avenue to study splice site selection in vivo. PMID:18930792

  7. Analysis of a splice-site mutation in the sap-precursor gene of a patient with metachromatic leukodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Henseler, M.; Klein, A.; Reber, M.

    1996-01-01

    Sphingolipid activator proteins (SAPs) are small, nonenzymatic glycoproteins required for the lysosomal degradation of various sphingolipids with a short oligosaccharide chain by their exohydrolases. Four of the five known activator proteins (sap-A-sap-D), also called {open_quotes}saposins,{close_quotes} are derived from a common precursor by proteolytic processing. sap-B stimulates hydrolysis of sulfatides by arylsulfatase A in vivo. Its recessively inherited deficiency results in a metabolic disorder similar to classical metachromatic leukodystrophy, which is caused by a defect of arylsulfatase A. Here we report on a patient with sap-B deficiency. Reverse-transcription-PCR studies on the patient`s mRNA revealed the occurrence of two distinct mutant species: one with an in-frame deletion of the first 21 bases of exon 6, the other with a complete in-frame deletion of this exon. The patient was homozygous for the underlying mutation, which was found to be a G-{yields}T transversion within the acceptor splice site between intron e and exon 6, abolishing normal RNA splicing. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization revealed that the parents and both grandfathers of the patient were carriers of this mutation. In order to analyze the fate of the mutant precursor proteins, both abnormal cDNAs were stably expressed in baby hamster kidney cells. Pulse-chase experiments showed that the deletion of 21 bp had no effect on the transport and the maturation of the encoded precursor. All sap forms except sap-B were detectable by immunochemical methods. The cDNA bearing a complete deletion of exon 6 encoded a shortened precursor of only 60 kD, and no mature SAPs were detectable. The carbohydrate chains of this polypeptide were of the high-mannose and hybrid type, indicating no transport of the mutant precursor beyond early Golgi apparatus. An endoplasmic-reticulum localization of this polypeptide was supported by indirect immunofluorescence analysis. 31 refs., 8 figs.

  8. The sequence complementarity between HIV-1 5' splice site SD4 and U1 snRNA determines the steady-state level of an unstable env pre-mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kammler, S; Leurs, C; Freund, M; Krummheuer, J; Seidel, K; Tange, T O; Lund, M K; Kjems, J; Scheid, A; Schaal, H

    2001-01-01

    HIV-1 env expression from certain subgenomic vectors requires the viral regulatory protein Rev, its target sequence RRE, and a 5' splice site upstream of the env open reading frame. To determine the role of this splice site in the 5'-splice-site-dependent Rev-mediated env gene expression, we have subjected the HIV-1 5' splice site, SD4, to a mutational analysis and have analyzed the effect of those mutations on env expression. The results demonstrate that the overall strength of hydrogen bonding between the 5' splice site, SD4, and the free 5' end of the U1 snRNA correlates with env expression efficiency, as long as env expression is suboptimal, and that a continuous stretch of 14 hydrogen bonds can lead to full env expression, as a result of stabilizing the pre-mRNA. The U1 snRNA-mediated stabilization is independent of functional splicing, as a mismatch in position +1 of the 5' splice site that led to loss of detectable amounts of spliced transcripts did not preclude stabilization and expression of the unspliced env mRNA, provided that Rev enables its nuclear export. The nucleotides capable of participating in U1 snRNA:pre-mRNA interaction include positions -3 to +8 of the 5' splice site and all 11 nt constituting the single-stranded 5' end of U1 snRNA. Moreover, env gene expression is significantly decreased upon the introduction of point mutations in several upstream GAR nucleotide motifs, which are mediating SF2/ASF responsiveness in an in vitro splicing assay. This suggests that the GAR sequences may play a role in stabilizing the pre-mRNA by sequestering U1 snRNP to SD4. PMID:11333022

  9. Diverse alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing landscape of circular RNAs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ou; Dong, Rui; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Jia-Lin; Luo, Zheng; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Ling-Ling; Yang, Li

    2016-09-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) derived from back-spliced exons have been widely identified as being co-expressed with their linear counterparts. A single gene locus can produce multiple circRNAs through alternative back-splice site selection and/or alternative splice site selection; however, a detailed map of alternative back-splicing/splicing in circRNAs is lacking. Here, with the upgraded CIRCexplorer2 pipeline, we systematically annotated different types of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing events in circRNAs from various cell lines. Compared with their linear cognate RNAs, circRNAs exhibited distinct patterns of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing. Alternative back-splice site selection was correlated with the competition of putative RNA pairs across introns that bracket alternative back-splice sites. In addition, all four basic types of alternative splicing that have been identified in the (linear) mRNA process were found within circRNAs, and many exons were predominantly spliced in circRNAs. Unexpectedly, thousands of previously unannotated exons were detected in circRNAs from the examined cell lines. Although these novel exons had similar splice site strength, they were much less conserved than known exons in sequences. Finally, both alternative back-splicing and circRNA-predominant alternative splicing were highly diverse among the examined cell lines. All of the identified alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing in circRNAs are available in the CIRCpedia database (http://www.picb.ac.cn/rnomics/circpedia). Collectively, the annotation of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing in circRNAs provides a valuable resource for depicting the complexity of circRNA biogenesis and for studying the potential functions of circRNAs in different cells. PMID:27365365

  10. Phylogenetic comparison of the pre-mRNA adenosine deaminase ADAR2 genes and transcripts: conservation and diversity in editing site sequence and alternative splicing patterns.

    PubMed

    Slavov, D; Gardiner, K

    2002-10-16

    Adenosine deaminase that acts on RNA -2 (ADAR2) is a member of a family of vertebrate genes that encode adenosine (A)-to-inosine (I) RNA deaminases, enzymes that deaminate specific A residues in specific pre-mRNAs to produce I. Known substrates of ADAR2 include sites within the coding regions of pre-mRNAs of the ionotropic glutamate receptors, GluR2-6, and the serotonin receptor, 5HT2C. Mammalian ADAR2 expression is itself regulated by A-to-I editing and by several alternative splicing events. Because the biological consequences of ADAR2 function are significant, we have undertaken a phylogenetic comparison of these features. Here we report a comparison of cDNA sequences, genomic organization, editing site sequences and patterns of alternative splicing of ADAR2 genes from human, mouse, chicken, pufferfish and zebrafish. Coding sequences and intron/exon organization are highly conserved. All ADAR2 genes show evidence of transcript editing with required sequences and predicted secondary structures very highly conserved. Patterns and levels of editing and alternative splicing vary among organisms, and include novel N-terminal exons and splicing events. PMID:12459255

  11. MapSplice: Accurate mapping of RNA-seq reads for splice junction discovery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Singh, Darshan; Zeng, Zheng; Coleman, Stephen J.; Huang, Yan; Savich, Gleb L.; He, Xiaping; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Grimm, Sara A.; Perou, Charles M.; MacLeod, James N.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Prins, Jan F.; Liu, Jinze

    2010-01-01

    The accurate mapping of reads that span splice junctions is a critical component of all analytic techniques that work with RNA-seq data. We introduce a second generation splice detection algorithm, MapSplice, whose focus is high sensitivity and specificity in the detection of splices as well as CPU and memory efficiency. MapSplice can be applied to both short (<75 bp) and long reads (≥75 bp). MapSplice is not dependent on splice site features or intron length, consequently it can detect novel canonical as well as non-canonical splices. MapSplice leverages the quality and diversity of read alignments of a given splice to increase accuracy. We demonstrate that MapSplice achieves higher sensitivity and specificity than TopHat and SpliceMap on a set of simulated RNA-seq data. Experimental studies also support the accuracy of the algorithm. Splice junctions derived from eight breast cancer RNA-seq datasets recapitulated the extensiveness of alternative splicing on a global level as well as the differences between molecular subtypes of breast cancer. These combined results indicate that MapSplice is a highly accurate algorithm for the alignment of RNA-seq reads to splice junctions. Software download URL: http://www.netlab.uky.edu/p/bioinfo/MapSplice. PMID:20802226

  12. MapSplice: accurate mapping of RNA-seq reads for splice junction discovery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Singh, Darshan; Zeng, Zheng; Coleman, Stephen J; Huang, Yan; Savich, Gleb L; He, Xiaping; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Grimm, Sara A; Perou, Charles M; MacLeod, James N; Chiang, Derek Y; Prins, Jan F; Liu, Jinze

    2010-10-01

    The accurate mapping of reads that span splice junctions is a critical component of all analytic techniques that work with RNA-seq data. We introduce a second generation splice detection algorithm, MapSplice, whose focus is high sensitivity and specificity in the detection of splices as well as CPU and memory efficiency. MapSplice can be applied to both short (<75 bp) and long reads (≥ 75 bp). MapSplice is not dependent on splice site features or intron length, consequently it can detect novel canonical as well as non-canonical splices. MapSplice leverages the quality and diversity of read alignments of a given splice to increase accuracy. We demonstrate that MapSplice achieves higher sensitivity and specificity than TopHat and SpliceMap on a set of simulated RNA-seq data. Experimental studies also support the accuracy of the algorithm. Splice junctions derived from eight breast cancer RNA-seq datasets recapitulated the extensiveness of alternative splicing on a global level as well as the differences between molecular subtypes of breast cancer. These combined results indicate that MapSplice is a highly accurate algorithm for the alignment of RNA-seq reads to splice junctions. Software download URL: http://www.netlab.uky.edu/p/bioinfo/MapSplice. PMID:20802226

  13. An anatomic comparison of the skin of five donor sites for dermal fat graft.

    PubMed

    Hwang, K; Kim, D J; Lee, I J

    2001-03-01

    Kim performed more than 3,000 augmentation rhinoplasties using the dermal fat graft. He preferred the sacral area as the donor site over other areas because the dermis is thick and the fat is more compact. The authors conducted a comparative study of the thickness of the epidermis and dermis, and the numbers of fibroblasts and fibrocytes in the dermis of the abdominal wall, groin, lateral gluteal area, gluteal fold, and sacrum of 7 adult cadavers. The sacrum had the thickest epidermis (86.1 +/- 7.8 microm) and dermis (1,510.7 +/- 201.7 microm), and the groin had the thinnest epidermis (57.3 +/- 22.9 microm) and dermis (783.3 +/- 244.5 microm). The dermal thickness of the abdomen, lateral gluteal area, and gluteal fold was 913.3 +/- 271.7 microm, 1,018.7 +/- 305.6 microm, and 1,107.0 +/- 272.6 microm respectively. The sacral dermis was significantly thicker than the other four sites (p < 0.008), and the groin dermis was the thinnest (p < 0.039). The number of fibroblasts and fibrocytes in the sacral area and the gluteal skin folds was significantly higher than the other areas (p < 0.05). The sacral area, gluteal fold, and lateral gluteal region had relatively thicker panniculus adiposus than the abdomen and groin. The panniculus adiposus of the sacral skin was especially well developed and was comprised of several compact layers that were connected by parallel, thick collagen fibers. The authors conclude that the sacral skin is a suitable donor site for dermal grafting because its dermis has more fibroblasts and fibrocytes than the other areas studied, and its dermis is more viable and durable. PMID:11293528

  14. Identification of alternatively spliced mRNAs encoding potential new regulatory proteins in cattle infected with bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandersen, S; Carpenter, S; Christensen, J; Storgaard, T; Viuff, B; Wannemuehler, Y; Belousov, J; Roth, J A

    1993-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction was used to detect and characterize low-abundance bovine leukemia virus (BLV) mRNAs. In infected cattle we could detect spliced mRNA with a splice pattern consistent with a Tax/Rex mRNA, as well as at least four alternatively spliced RNAs. Two of the alternatively spliced mRNAs encoded hitherto unrecognized BLV proteins, designated RIII and GIV. The Tax/Rex and alternatively spliced mRNAs could be detected at their highest levels in BLV-infected cell cultures; the next highest levels were found in samples from calves experimentally infected at 6 weeks postinoculation. Alternatively spliced mRNAs were also expressed, albeit at lower levels, in naturally infected animals; they were detected by a nested polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, the GIV mRNA was specifically detected in naturally infected cows with persistent lymphocytosis and in two of five calves at 6 months after experimental infection with BLV. Furthermore, the calf with the strongest signal for GIV had the highest lymphocyte counts. These data may suggest a correlation between expression of the GIV product and development of persistent lymphocytosis. Some of the donor and acceptor sites in the alternatively spliced mRNAs were highly unusual. The biological mechanisms and significance of such a choice of unexpected splice sites are currently unknown. Images PMID:8380084

  15. Lipoaugmentation of the vocal folds: a survey on alternative donor sites for graft harvesting.

    PubMed

    Prodinger, Peter Michael; Windisch, Gunther; Hammer, Georg Philipp; Anderhuber, Friedrich; Friedrich, Gerhard

    2009-09-01

    Lipoaugmentation is a treatment option for patients suffering from glottic insufficiency. Autologous fat is a nearly ideal material for vocal-fold augmentation from the view of biocompatibility and viscoelasticity, but there is still the problem of high graft resorption. As distribution and biological behavior of fatty tissue is very different in the human body, the aim of the study was to elucidate possible donor sites with respect to the quantity of harvested fat, the surgical accessibility to the region, the donor site morbidity and possibility of aesthetic defects and the quality of harvested tissue. Possible donor sites for harvesting were examined by magnetic resonance imaging in thirty-five patients with special emphasis to the buccal fat pad, the neck, the dorsolateral side of the proximal upper extremity, the subcutaneous layer of the abdominal wall, the superficial trochanteric region, the medial thigh, and the infrapatellar fat pad. Identified regions that failed to be chosen into consideration because of an elaborate surgical approach (superficial axillary's space, ischio-anal fossa, subcutaneous layer of buttock, popliteal fossa) were not taken into consideration. The mean volume of the buccal fat was 3.994 cm(3); the average thickness of the fat at the level of C7 was 1.721 cm, the mean value in the upper extremities was 1.913 cm laterally and 1.275 cm dorsally. The subcutaneous fat of the abdominal wall was divided into a superficial compartment (mean: 1.527 cm) and a deep one (average: 3.545 cm). In the superficial trochanteric region, the mean thickness was 2.536 cm, in the medial thigh 2.127 cm; the mean volume of the infrapatellar fat pad was 20.198 cm(3). All regions of interest showed reproducible and sufficient amounts of harvestable tissue, we found significant intersexual differences in dorsolateral side of the upper arm, subcutaneous layer of the abdominal wall and superficial trochanteric region. When harvesting subcutaneous tissue of the

  16. [Cosmesis and Body Image after Laparo-Endoscopic Single Site Donor Nephrectomy].

    PubMed

    Yanishi, Masaaki; Kinoshita, Hidefumi; Yoshida, Takashi; Takayasu, Kenta; Mishima, Takao; Yoshida, Kenji; Sugi, Motohiko; Kawa, Gen; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2015-07-01

    Using a questionnaire, we objectively assessed the body image of donors who underwent conventional laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (L-DN) or laparoscopic single-site donor nephrectomy (LESS-DN). Subjects were 15 patients who underwent an L-DN and 15 who underwent an LESS-DN. The questionnaire consisted of the Body Image Questionnaire (BIQ), including a Body Image Scale (BIS) and Cosmetic Scale (CS), and a Photo-Series Questionnaire (PSQ). A higher score indicated a more favorable assessment, and patient scores were compared. Subjects were also asked which procedure they preferred if they had to undergo donor nephrectomy again. Pain was assessed by comparing the number of times an analgesic was administered during hospitalization. The average BIS score was 18.7 points (out of 20) for patients who underwent an L-DN and 19.5 points for patients who underwent an LESS-DN ; those who underwent an LESS-DN had a significantly higher score (p=0.03). Patients who underwent an L-DN had a median CS score of 17.5 points (out of 24) while patients who underwent an LESS-DN had a median CS score of 19.1 points ; those who underwent an LESS-DN had a higher score, but the difference in average CS scores was not significant (p=0.123). The average PSQ score was 7.1 points for patients who underwent an L-DN and 8.8 points for patients who underwent an LESS-DN ; the higher score for LESS-patients was statistically significant (p=0.01). Patients who underwent an L-DN were administered an analgesic a median of 4 times during hospitalization (range : 3-10 times) while patients who underwent an LESS-DN were administered an analgesic a median of 2 times (range : 0-4 times), which was significantly less (p=0.01). Patients who underwent LESS-DN had a better body image and better cosmetic appearance than those who underwent LDN, thus indicating the usefulness of LESS-DN. However, a more prospective larger study needs to be performed. PMID:26278210

  17. Novel method of laparoendoscopic single-site and natural orifice specimen extraction for live donor nephrectomy: single-port laparoscopic donor nephrectomy and transvaginal graft extraction

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Won Jun; Choi, Byung Jo; Hwang, Jeong Kye; Yuk, Seung Mo; Song, Min Jong

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic live donor nephrectomy (DN) has been established as a useful alternative to the traditional open methods of procuring kidneys. To maximize the advantages of the laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) method, we applied natural orifice specimen extraction to LESS-DN. A 46-year-old woman with no previous abdominal surgery history volunteered to donate her left kidney to her husband and underwent single-port laparoscopic DN with transvaginal extraction. The procedure was completed without intraoperative complications. The kidney functioned well immediately after transplantation, and the donor and recipient were respectively discharged 2 days and 2 weeks postoperatively. Single-port laparoscopic DN and transvaginal graft extraction is feasible and safe. PMID:26878020

  18. Identification of a novel exonic mutation at -13 from 5' splice site causing exon skipping in a girl with mitochondrial acetoacetyl-coenzyme A thiolase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Fukao, T; Yamaguchi, S; Wakazono, A; Orii, T; Hoganson, G; Hashimoto, T

    1994-01-01

    We identified a novel exonic mutation which causes exon skipping in the mitochondrial acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (T2) gene from a girl with T2 deficiency (GK07). GK07 is a compound heterozygote; the maternal allele has a novel G to T transversion at position 1136 causing Gly379 to Val substitution (G379V) of the T2 precursor. In case of in vivo expression analysis, cells transfected with this mutant cDNA showed no evidence of restored T2 activity. The paternal allele was associated with exon 8 skipping at the cDNA level. At the gene level, a C to T transition causing Gln272 to termination codon (Q272STOP) was identified within exon 8, 13 bp from the 5' splice site of intron 8 in the paternal allele. The mRNA with Q272STOP could not be detected in GK07 fibroblasts, presumably because pre-mRNA with Q272STOP was unstable because of the premature termination. In vivo splicing experiments revealed that the exonic mutation caused partial skipping of exon 8. This substitution was thought to alter the secondary structure of T2 pre-mRNA around exon 8 and thus impede normal splicing. The role of exon sequences in the splicing mechanism is indicated by the exon skipping which occurred with an exonic mutation. Images PMID:7907600

  19. A biodegradable polyurethane dermal matrix in reconstruction of free flap donor sites: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Marcus J D; Schmitt, Bradley J; Coghlan, Patrick; Finkemeyer, James P; Caplash, Yugesh; Greenwood, John E

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a biodegradable temporizing matrix (BTM) capable of supporting secondary split-skin graft-take in animal studies. We report its first long-term implantation and use as a dermal scaffold in humans. This preliminary study assesses its ability to integrate, its ease of delamination, its ability to sustain split-skin graft in complex wounds, the degree of wound contraction, and ultimately the quality of the scar at 1 year postimplantation. Ten patients were recruited, each requiring elective free flap reconstruction. Free flap donor sites created were anterolateral thigh flaps, fibular osseocutaneous flaps, or radial/ulnar forearm (RF/UF) flaps. The BTM was implanted when the flap was detached from its donor site. Dressing changes were performed twice weekly. The time elapsed between implantation and delamination depended on the type of flap and thus the wound bed left. Once integrated, the BTMs were delaminated in theatre, and the surface of the "neodermis" was refreshed by dermabrasion, prior to application of a split-skin graft. The BTM integration occurred in all patients (100% in 6 patients, with 90%, 84%, 76%, and 60% integration in the remainder). Integrated BTM sustained successful graft-take in all patients. Complete take was marred in 2 patients, over areas of BTM that had not integrated and graft application was performed too early. The BTM can be applied into wounds in humans and can integrate, persist in the presence of infection, and sustain split-skin overgrafting, despite the trial group presenting with significant comorbidities. PMID:25987938

  20. A Biodegradable Polyurethane Dermal Matrix in Reconstruction of Free Flap Donor Sites: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Wagstaff, Marcus J.D.; Schmitt, Bradley J.; Coghlan, Patrick; Finkemeyer, James P.; Caplash, Yugesh

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a biodegradable temporizing matrix (BTM) capable of supporting secondary split-skin graft-take in animal studies. We report its first long-term implantation and use as a dermal scaffold in humans. This preliminary study assesses its ability to integrate, its ease of delamination, its ability to sustain split-skin graft in complex wounds, the degree of wound contraction, and ultimately the quality of the scar at 1 year postimplantation. Ten patients were recruited, each requiring elective free flap reconstruction. Free flap donor sites created were anterolateral thigh flaps, fibular osseocutaneous flaps, or radial/ulnar forearm (RF/UF) flaps. The BTM was implanted when the flap was detached from its donor site. Dressing changes were performed twice weekly. The time elapsed between implantation and delamination depended on the type of flap and thus the wound bed left. Once integrated, the BTMs were delaminated in theatre, and the surface of the “neodermis” was refreshed by dermabrasion, prior to application of a split-skin graft. The BTM integration occurred in all patients (100% in 6 patients, with 90%, 84%, 76%, and 60% integration in the remainder). Integrated BTM sustained successful graft-take in all patients. Complete take was marred in 2 patients, over areas of BTM that had not integrated and graft application was performed too early. The BTM can be applied into wounds in humans and can integrate, persist in the presence of infection, and sustain split-skin overgrafting, despite the trial group presenting with significant comorbidities. PMID:25987938

  1. Erythema persists longer than one year in split-thickness skin graft donor sites.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, Patricia L; Jorgensen, Lars N; Jørgensen, Bo; Karlsmark, Tonny; Agren, Magnus S

    2013-05-01

    The recovery of skin function and appearance after harvest of split-thickness skin autografts is incompletely described. We followed the kinetics of skin restoration after a partial-thickness skin excision relative to adjacent normal skin over 12 months. Standardized donor site wounds were made on the thigh using a pneumatic dermatome in 19 consecutive Caucasian patients, median age 70 years, age range 44-86 years, who were undergoing skin graft surgery for leg ulcers. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), erythema and pigmentation were measured quantitatively using non-invasive devices. The macroscopically healed wound was compared with adjacent normal skin at 1, 3 and 12 months. At 1 month postoperatively, TEWL was 108% (p = 0.003), erythema 145% (p < 0.0005) and pigmentation 24% (p < 0.001) higher in the wounds compared with adjacent uninjured skin. The corresponding values at 3 months were 48% (p = 0.015), 89% (p < 0.0005) and 15% (p < 0.0005). After 12 months, erythema was elevated by 36% (p < 0.0005), while TEWL (p = 0.246) and pigmentation (p = 0.211) had returned to same levels as in the surrounding normal skin. Diabetes mellitus (p = 0.024) and smoking (p = 0.017) were associated with increased TEWL of normal skin, and erythema decreased with age (rs = -0.53, p = 0.020). In conclusion, erythema appears to be the significant component contributing to long-term postoperative donor site appearance. We hypothesize that this is due to increased microvasculature. PMID:22987230

  2. No-drain DIEP Flap Donor-site Closure Using Barbed Progressive Tension Sutures

    PubMed Central

    Nagarkar, Purushottam; Lakhiani, Chrisovalantis; Cheng, Angela; Lee, Michael; Teotia, Sumeet

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of progressive tension sutures has been shown to be comparable to the use of abdominal drains in abdominoplasty. However, the use of barbed progressive tension sutures (B-PTSs) in deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap donor-site closure has not been investigated. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed on patients with DIEP flap reconstruction in a 3-year period at 2 institutions by 2 surgeons. Patients were compared by method of DIEP donor-site closure. Group 1 had barbed running progressive tension sutures without drain placement. Group 2 had interrupted progressive tension closure with abdominal drain placement (PTS-AD). Group 3 had closure with only abdominal drain placement (AD). Data collected included demographics, perioperative data, and postoperative outcomes. Results: Seventy-five patients underwent DIEP reconstruction (25 B-PTS, 25 PTS-AD, and 25 AD). Patient characteristics—age, body mass index, comorbidities, smoking status, and chemotherapy—were not significantly different between groups. Rate of seroma was 1.3% (B-PTS = 0%, PTS-AD = 4%, AD = 0%), wound dehiscence 16% (B-PTS = 8%, PTS-AD = 16%, AD = 24%), and umbilical necrosis 5.3% (B-PTS = 0%, PTS-AD = 0%, AD = 16%). No hematomas were observed in any patients. No statistically significant difference was found between complication rates across groups. Conclusions: Use of B-PTSs for abdominal closure after DIEP flap harvest can obviate the need for abdominal drains. Complication rates following this technique are not significantly different from closure using progressive tension suture and abdominal drain placement. This practice can prevent the use of abdominal drains, which can promote patient mobility, increase independence upon discharge, and contribute to patient satisfaction. PMID:27200234

  3. Genome-wide meta-analysis reveals common splice site acceptor variant in CHRNA4 associated with nicotine dependence.

    PubMed

    Hancock, D B; Reginsson, G W; Gaddis, N C; Chen, X; Saccone, N L; Lutz, S M; Qaiser, B; Sherva, R; Steinberg, S; Zink, F; Stacey, S N; Glasheen, C; Chen, J; Gu, F; Frederiksen, B N; Loukola, A; Gudbjartsson, D F; Brüske, I; Landi, M T; Bickeböller, H; Madden, P; Farrer, L; Kaprio, J; Kranzler, H R; Gelernter, J; Baker, T B; Kraft, P; Amos, C I; Caporaso, N E; Hokanson, J E; Bierut, L J; Thorgeirsson, T E; Johnson, E O; Stefansson, K

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a 1000 Genomes-imputed genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis for nicotine dependence, defined by the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence in 17 074 ever smokers from five European-ancestry samples. We followed up novel variants in 7469 ever smokers from five independent European-ancestry samples. We identified genome-wide significant association in the alpha-4 nicotinic receptor subunit (CHRNA4) gene on chromosome 20q13: lowest P=8.0 × 10(-9) across all the samples for rs2273500-C (frequency=0.15; odds ratio=1.12 and 95% confidence interval=1.08-1.17 for severe vs mild dependence). rs2273500-C, a splice site acceptor variant resulting in an alternate CHRNA4 transcript predicted to be targeted for nonsense-mediated decay, was associated with decreased CHRNA4 expression in physiologically normal human brains (lowest P=7.3 × 10(-4)). Importantly, rs2273500-C was associated with increased lung cancer risk (N=28 998, odds ratio=1.06 and 95% confidence interval=1.00-1.12), likely through its effect on smoking, as rs2273500-C was no longer associated with lung cancer after adjustment for smoking. Using criteria for smoking behavior that encompass more than the single 'cigarettes per day' item, we identified a common CHRNA4 variant with important regulatory properties that contributes to nicotine dependence and smoking-related consequences. PMID:26440539

  4. A novel splice site mutation in the GNPTAB gene in an Iranian patient with mucolipidosis II α/β.

    PubMed

    Hashemi-Gorji, Feyzollah; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Salehpour, Shadab; Yassaee, Vahid Reza; Miryounesi, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    Mucolipidosis type II α/β (ML II α/β) and mucolipidosis type III α/β (ML III α/β) have been shown to be caused by an absence or reduced level of uridine diphosphate (UDP)-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase enzyme (EC 2.7.8.17) activity, respectively. Both disorders are caused by mutations in the GNPTAB gene and are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Here we report a 2-year-old female patient being diagnosed as a case of ML II α/β due to coarse face, severe developmental delay, multiple dysostosis, noticeable increase of multiple lysosomal enzymes activity in plasma and normal acid mucopolysaccharides in urine. Mutational analysis of the GNPTAB gene has revealed a novel homozygous mutation in the patient (c.3250-2A>G) with both parents being heterozygote. Transcript analyses showed that this novel splice site mutation leads to exon 17 skipping and a frameshift afterwards (p.P1084_R1112del F1113Vfs*1). Consequently, we confirmed the association of this mutation with ML II α/β. Our finding expands the number of reported cases of this rare metabolic disorder and adds to the GNPTAB mutation database. PMID:27180337

  5. Donor-Site Morbidity Following Free Tissue Harvest from the Thigh: A Systematic Review and Pooled Analysis of Complications.

    PubMed

    Lakhiani, Chrisovalantis; DeFazio, Michael V; Han, Kevin; Falola, Reuben; Evans, Karen

    2016-06-01

    Background Donor-site morbidity significantly influences patient satisfaction and quality of life following reconstructive surgery. The relevant donor-site morbidities associated with more commonly utilized thigh-based flaps are reviewed. Methods A systematic search of the MEDLINE and Cochrane databases from 1994 to 2014 was conducted to identify all reports of "anterolateral thigh (ALT)," "vastus lateralis (VL)," "anteromedial thigh (AMT)," "transverse upper gracilis (TUG)," tensor fascia latae (TFL)," "gracilis," and "rectus femoris (RF)," flaps. Only studies that investigated donor-site outcomes related to pain, paresthesia, wound dehiscence, infection, hematoma, seroma, contour deformity, and/or objective functional performance were included. Case series or anecdotal reports with less than five flaps, non-English, and animal studies were excluded. Results A total of 116 articles representing 4,554 flaps were reviewed, including 2,922 ALT/VL, 148 AMT, 436 TUG, 278 TFL, 527 gracilis, and 243 RF flaps. The most frequently cited donor-site complication was paresthesia (range: 0-36.4%), followed by wound dehiscence (range: 0.9-8.3%), contour deformity (range: 0-5.2%), pain (range: 0-6.3%), and seroma (range: 0.4-2.0%). Despite mixed results regarding functional performance, pooled-analysis of dynamometric studies demonstrated a significant reduction in strength only after RF flap harvest (21%). Conclusions Donor-site morbidity for thigh-flaps is minimal and appears to be well-tolerated by the majority of patients. Nevertheless, the appropriate flap selection is highly individualized, and patients must be informed of potential complications and morbidities specific to each flap. We have established the most current review of donor-site morbidity for thigh-based flaps to aid the surgeon in this important discussion. PMID:27144952

  6. A mammalian germ cell-specific RNA-binding protein interacts with ubiquitously expressed proteins involved in splice site selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, David J.; Bourgeois, Cyril F.; Klink, Albrecht; Stévenin, James; Cooke, Howard J.

    2000-05-01

    RNA-binding motif (RBM) genes are found on all mammalian Y chromosomes and are implicated in spermatogenesis. Within human germ cells, RBM protein shows a similar nuclear distribution to components of the pre-mRNA splicing machinery. To address the function of RBM, we have used protein-protein interaction assays to test for possible physical interactions between these proteins. We find that RBM protein directly interacts with members of the SR family of splicing factors and, in addition, strongly interacts with itself. We have mapped the protein domains responsible for mediating these interactions and expressed the mouse RBM interaction region as a bacterial fusion protein. This fusion protein can pull-down several functionally active SR protein species from cell extracts. Depletion and add-back experiments indicate that these SR proteins are the only splicing factors bound by RBM which are required for the splicing of a panel of pre-mRNAs. Our results suggest that RBM protein is an evolutionarily conserved mammalian splicing regulator which operates as a germ cell-specific cofactor for more ubiquitously expressed pre-mRNA splicing activators.

  7. In vitro genetic analysis of the structural features of the pre-tRNA required for determination of the 3' splice site in the intron excision reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Bufardeci, E; Fabbri, S; Baldi, M I; Mattoccia, E; Tocchini-Valentini, G P

    1993-01-01

    During processing of intron-containing pre-tRNAs, the Xenopus laevis splicing endonuclease binds the precursor and cleaves it at both the 5' and 3' splice sites. In vitro selection was used to determine structural features characteristic of precursor tRNA molecules that are active in this reaction. We performed two types of selection, one for molecules that are not cut, the other for molecules that are cut at only one site. The results shed light on various aspects of the intron excision reaction, including the importance of the three-dimensional structure of the mature domain for recognition and binding of the enzyme, the active role played by the single-stranded region of the intron, and the importance of the cardinal positions which, although not necessarily occupied by the same base in all precursors, nevertheless play a fundamental role in the splicing reaction. A precursor can be cut at the 3' site if a base in the single-stranded loop of the intron is allowed to pair (A-I pair) with the base of the 5' exon situated at the position immediately following the anticodon stem [first cardinal position (CP1)]. The nature of the bases involved in the A-I pair is important, as is the position of the base in the single-stranded loop of the intron. We discuss the role of the cardinal positions in the reaction. Images PMID:8223479

  8. HS3D, A Dataset of Homo Sapiens Splice Regions, and its Extraction Procedure from a Major Public Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollastro, Pasquale; Rampone, Salvatore

    The aim of this work is to describe a cleaning procedure of GenBank data, producing material to train and to assess the prediction accuracy of computational approaches for gene characterization. A procedure (GenBank2HS3D) has been defined, producing a dataset (HS3D - Homo Sapiens Splice Sites Dataset) of Homo Sapiens Splice regions extracted from GenBank (Rel.123 at this time). It selects, from the complete GenBank Primate Division, entries of Human Nuclear DNA according with several assessed criteria; then it extracts exons and introns from these entries (actually 4523 + 3802). Donor and acceptor sites are then extracted as windows of 140 nucleotides around each splice site (3799 + 3799). After discarding windows not including canonical GT-AG junctions (65 + 74), including insufficient data (not enough material for a 140 nucleotide window) (686 + 589), including not AGCT bases (29 + 30), and redundant (218 + 226), the remaining windows (2796 + 2880) are reported in the dataset. Finally, windows of false splice sites are selected by searching canonical GT-AG pairs in not splicing positions (271 937 + 332 296). The false sites in a range +/- 60 from a true splice site are marked as proximal. HS3D, release 1.2 at this time, is available at the Web server of the University of Sannio: http://www.sci.unisannio.it/docenti/rampone/.

  9. Molecular analysis of mutations affecting hprt mRNA splicing in human T-lymphocytes in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, A.M. Pisa Univ. ); Tates, A.D.; van Zeeland, A.A.; Vrieling, H. )

    1992-01-01

    Molecular analysis of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) cDNA from 6-thioguanine-resistant T-lymphocytes cloned from smoking and non-smoking adult donors showed that 35% of these mutants were defective in splicing of hprt mRNA. Among a set of 42 hprt splice mutants, the authors observed (1) complete loss of one or more exons, (2) partial loss of one exon, or (3) inclusion of part of an intron sequence between adjacent exons. Loss of exon 4 was significantly more frequent than of the other exons, suggesting that the sequences that regulate splicing of this exon are either larger than those of the other exons or especially prone to mutation. In order to identify the molecular nature of DNA alterations causing aberrant splicing of hprt mRNA, 17 splice mutants were analyzed in more detail by sequencing the genomic regions flanking the mis-spliced exon. Base pair substitutions or small deletions causing defective splicing were either detected in exon sequences or in splice site consensus sequences of introns.

  10. Position-dependent splicing activation and repression by SR and hnRNP proteins rely on common mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Erkelenz, Steffen; Mueller, William F.; Evans, Melanie S.; Busch, Anke; Schöneweis, Katrin; Hertel, Klemens J.; Schaal, Heiner

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing is regulated by splicing factors that modulate splice site selection. In some cases, however, splicing factors show antagonistic activities by either activating or repressing splicing. Here, we show that these opposing outcomes are based on their binding location relative to regulated 5′ splice sites. SR proteins enhance splicing only when they are recruited to the exon. However, they interfere with splicing by simply relocating them to the opposite intronic side of the splice site. hnRNP splicing factors display analogous opposing activities, but in a reversed position dependence. Activation by SR or hnRNP proteins increases splice site recognition at the earliest steps of exon definition, whereas splicing repression promotes the assembly of nonproductive complexes that arrest spliceosome assembly prior to splice site pairing. Thus, SR and hnRNP splicing factors exploit similar mechanisms to positively or negatively influence splice site selection. PMID:23175589

  11. A Randomized, Prospective, Parallel Group Study of Laparoscopic vs. Laparoendoscopic Single Site Donor Nephrectomy for Kidney Donation

    PubMed Central

    Aull, Meredith J.; Afaneh, Cheguevara; Charlton, Marian; Serur, David; Douglas, Melissa; Christos, Paul J.; Kapur, Sandip; Del Pizzo, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Few prospective, randomized studies have assessed benefits of laparoendoscopic single site donor nephrectomy (LESS-DN) over laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (LDN). Our center initiated such a trial in January 2011, following subjects randomized to LESS-DN vs. LDN from surgery through 5 years post-donation. Subjects complete recovery/satisfaction questionnaires at 2, 6, and 12 months post-donation; transplant recipient outcomes are also recorded. 100 subjects (49 LESS-DN, 51 LDN) underwent surgery; donor demographics were similar between groups, and included a predominance of female, living unrelated donors, mean age of 47 years who underwent left donor nephrectomy. Operative parameters (overall time, time to extraction, warm ischemia time, blood loss) were similar between groups. Conversion to hand-assist laparoscopy was required in 3 LESS-DN (6.1%) vs. 2 LDN (3.9%; P=0.67). Questionnaires revealed 97.2% of LESS-DN vs. 79.5% of LDN (P=0.03) were 100% recovered by two months after donation. No significant difference was seen in satisfaction scores between the groups. Recipient outcomes were similar between groups. Our randomized trial comparing LESS donor nephrectomy to LDN confirms that LESS-DN offers a safe alternative to conventional LDN in terms of intra- and post-operative complications. LDN and LESS-DN offer similar recovery and satisfaction after donation. PMID:24934732

  12. Does distance matter? Variations in alternative 3' splicing regulation.

    PubMed

    Akerman, Martin; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing constitutes a major mechanism creating protein diversity in humans. This diversity can result from the alternative skipping of entire exons or by alternative selection of the 5' or 3' splice sites that define the exon boundaries. In this study, we analyze the sequence and evolutionary characteristics of alternative 3' splice sites conserved between human and mouse genomes for distances ranging from 3 to 100 nucleotides. We show that alternative splicing events can be distinguished from constitutive splicing by a combination of properties which vary depending on the distance between the splice sites. Among the unique features of alternative 3' splice sites, we observed an unexpectedly high occurrence of events in which a polypyrimidine tract was found to overlap the upstream splice site. By applying a machine-learning approach, we show that we can successfully discriminate true alternative 3' splice sites from constitutive 3' splice sites. Finally, we propose that the unique features of the intron flanking alternative splice sites are indicative of a regulatory mechanism that is involved in splice site selection. We postulate that the process of splice site selection is influenced by the distance between the competitive splice sites. PMID:17704130

  13. Pinpointing retrovirus entry sites in cells expressing alternatively spliced receptor isoforms by single virus imaging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of viruses enter host cells via endocytosis. Current knowledge of viral entry pathways is largely based upon infectivity measurements following genetic and/or pharmacological interventions that disrupt vesicular trafficking and maturation. Imaging of single virus entry in living cells provides a powerful means to delineate viral trafficking pathways and entry sites under physiological conditions. Results Here, we visualized single avian retrovirus co-trafficking with markers for early (Rab5) and late (Rab7) endosomes, acidification of endosomal lumen and the resulting viral fusion measured by the viral content release into the cytoplasm. Virus-carrying vesicles either merged with the existing Rab5-positive early endosomes or slowly accumulated Rab5. The Rab5 recruitment to virus-carrying endosomes correlated with acidification of their lumen. Viral fusion occurred either in early (Rab5-positive) or intermediate (Rab5- and Rab7-positive) compartments. Interestingly, different isoforms of the cognate receptor directed virus entry from distinct endosomes. In cells expressing the transmembrane receptor, viruses preferentially entered and fused with slowly maturing early endosomes prior to accumulation of Rab7. By comparison, in cells expressing the GPI-anchored receptor, viruses entered both slowly and quickly maturing endosomes and fused with early (Rab5-positive) and intermediate (Rab5- and Rab7-positive) compartments. Conclusions Since the rate of low pH-triggered fusion was independent of the receptor isoform, we concluded that the sites of virus entry are determined by the kinetic competition between endosome maturation and viral fusion. Our findings demonstrate the ability of this retrovirus to enter cells via alternative endocytic pathways and establish infection by releasing its content from distinct endosomal compartments. PMID:24935247

  14. Acticoat versus Allevyn as a split-thickness skin graft donor-site dressing: a prospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Argirova, Maya; Hadjiski, Ognjan; Victorova, Anastasija

    2007-10-01

    The study comprises 27 operated patients with similar burns. Fifteen donor sites treated with Acticoat (Smith & Nephew) and 12 donor sites treated with Allevyn (Smith & Nephew) have been analyzed with respect to epithelization time, antibacterial effect, ease of dressing change, pain, and pharmacologic and cost-effective characteristics. All donor sites after the reepithelization were evaluated using the Vancouver Scar Scale for the assessment of scars at the fourth, eighth, and 12th weeks. The obtained results demonstrate statistically significant faster epithelization (P = 0.012 on the eighth day and P = 0.0081 on the 10th day) and better comfort for the patient with the Acticoat dressing (P < 0.05). With regard to bacterial growth (P > 0.05) there is no statistically significant difference in the application of Acticoat and Allevyn. The Vancouver Scar Scale assessment shows no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05) in the application of both Acticoat and Allevyn. There is no considerable difference in the cost of treatment between both dressings. The results obtained determine both dressings as suitable for application on donor sites. If there is a possibility of choice, the Acticoat dressing is preferable. PMID:17901734

  15. The scalp as a donor site for split-thickness skin graft: a rare complication case report.

    PubMed

    Robert, N; May, P; Binder, J P; Revol, M; Servant, J M

    2011-05-01

    The scalp is a useful and reliable donor site for the paediatric burn population that can be harvested several times with minimal morbidity. However, the scalp cannot be used as skin graft donor site with impunity. Scalp alopecia and chronic folliculitis can be observed among the complications. In these cases, the reconstruction phase offers different surgical procedures such as primary closure, staged excision or tissue expansion. We report the case of a patient (29-years-old), treated 20 years ago for second-degree burns covering up to 20% total body surface area (TBSA) by using thin split-thickness skin grafts of his scalp. As a teenager, he developed multiple episodes of folliculitis at the donor site of the scalp and then of recurrent abscesses, resistant to all existing medical treatments. Surgical treatment consisted in the skin excision of his scalp donor site which was immediately covered by a thin split-thickness skin graft. Four months after surgery, the patient was satisfied with the functional and aesthetic result. PMID:21300581

  16. A noncoding melanophilin gene (MLPH) SNP at the splice donor of exon 1 represents a candidate causal mutation for coat color dilution in dogs.

    PubMed

    Drögemüller, Cord; Philipp, Ute; Haase, Bianca; Günzel-Apel, Anne-Rose; Leeb, Tosso

    2007-01-01

    Coat color dilution in several breeds of dog is characterized by a specific pigmentation phenotype and sometimes accompanied by hair loss and recurrent skin inflammation, the so-called color dilution alopecia or black hair follicular dysplasia. Coat color dilution (d) is inherited as a Mendelian autosomal recessive trait. In a previous study, MLPH polymorphisms showed perfect cosegregation with the dilute phenotype within breeds. However, different dilute haplotypes were found in different breeds, and no single polymorphism was identified in the coding sequence that was likely to be causative for the dilute phenotype. We resequenced the 5'-region of the canine MLPH gene and identified a strong candidate single nucleotide polymorphism within the nontranslated exon 1, which showed perfect association to the dilute phenotype in 65 dilute dogs from 7 different breeds. The A/G polymorphism is located at the last nucleotide of exon 1 and the mutant A-allele is predicted to reduce splicing efficiency 8-fold. An MLPH mRNA expression study using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction confirmed that dd animals had only about approximately 25% of the MLPH transcript compared with DD animals. These results provide preliminary evidence that the reported regulatory MLPH mutation might represent a causal mutation for coat color dilution in dogs. PMID:17519392

  17. Characterization of an Additional Splice Acceptor Site Introduced into CYP4B1 in Hominoidae during Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Oliver T.; Roellecke, Katharina; Freund, Marcel; Gombert, Michael; Lottmann, Nadine; Steward, Charles A.; Kramm, Christof M.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Rettie, Allan E.; Hanenberg, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    CYP4B1 belongs to the cytochrome P450 family 4, one of the oldest P450 families whose members have been highly conserved throughout evolution. The CYP4 monooxygenases typically oxidize fatty acids to both inactive and active lipid mediators, although the endogenous ligand(s) is largely unknown. During evolution, at the transition of great apes to humanoids, the CYP4B1 protein acquired a serine instead of a proline at the canonical position 427 in the meander region. Although this alteration impairs P450 function related to the processing of naturally occurring lung toxins, a study in transgenic mice suggested that an additional serine insertion at position 207 in human CYP4B1 can rescue the enzyme stability and activity. Here, we report that the genomic insertion of a CAG triplet at the intron 5–exon 6 boundary in human CYP4B1 introduced an additional splice acceptor site in frame. During evolution, this change occurred presumably at the stage of Hominoidae and leads to two major isoforms of the CYP4B1 enzymes of humans and great apes, either with or without a serine 207 insertion (insSer207). We further demonstrated that the CYP4B1 enzyme with insSer207 is the dominant isoform (76%) in humans. Importantly, this amino acid insertion did not affect the 4-ipomeanol metabolizing activities or stabilities of the native rabbit or human CYP4B1 enzymes, when introduced as transgenes in human primary cells and cell lines. In our 3D modeling, this functional neutrality of insSer207 is compatible with its predicted location on the exterior surface of CYP4B1 in a flexible side chain. Therefore, the Ser207 insertion does not rescue the P450 functional activity of human CYP4B1 that has been lost during evolution. PMID:26355749

  18. Genome-wide meta-analysis reveals common splice site acceptor variant in CHRNA4 associated with nicotine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, D B; Reginsson, G W; Gaddis, N C; Chen, X; Saccone, N L; Lutz, S M; Qaiser, B; Sherva, R; Steinberg, S; Zink, F; Stacey, S N; Glasheen, C; Chen, J; Gu, F; Frederiksen, B N; Loukola, A; Gudbjartsson, D F; Brüske, I; Landi, M T; Bickeböller, H; Madden, P; Farrer, L; Kaprio, J; Kranzler, H R; Gelernter, J; Baker, T B; Kraft, P; Amos, C I; Caporaso, N E; Hokanson, J E; Bierut, L J; Thorgeirsson, T E; Johnson, E O; Stefansson, K

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a 1000 Genomes–imputed genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis for nicotine dependence, defined by the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence in 17 074 ever smokers from five European-ancestry samples. We followed up novel variants in 7469 ever smokers from five independent European-ancestry samples. We identified genome-wide significant association in the alpha-4 nicotinic receptor subunit (CHRNA4) gene on chromosome 20q13: lowest P=8.0 × 10−9 across all the samples for rs2273500-C (frequency=0.15; odds ratio=1.12 and 95% confidence interval=1.08–1.17 for severe vs mild dependence). rs2273500-C, a splice site acceptor variant resulting in an alternate CHRNA4 transcript predicted to be targeted for nonsense-mediated decay, was associated with decreased CHRNA4 expression in physiologically normal human brains (lowest P=7.3 × 10−4). Importantly, rs2273500-C was associated with increased lung cancer risk (N=28 998, odds ratio=1.06 and 95% confidence interval=1.00–1.12), likely through its effect on smoking, as rs2273500-C was no longer associated with lung cancer after adjustment for smoking. Using criteria for smoking behavior that encompass more than the single ‘cigarettes per day' item, we identified a common CHRNA4 variant with important regulatory properties that contributes to nicotine dependence and smoking-related consequences. PMID:26440539

  19. The Maturation of Synthetic Scaffolds for Osteochondral Donor Sites of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Asheesh; Foo, Li Foong; Williams, Riley J.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze the morphological imaging characteristics and incorporation of TruFit bone graft substitute (BGS) plugs using cartilage-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and quantitative T2 mapping. Design: Twenty-six patients (mean age, 28.72 years; range, 11-56 years) underwent osteochondral autologous transplantation (OATS) for chondral defects with filling of the knee joint donor sites using Trufit BGS plugs. The mean follow-up interval between implantation and MRI analysis was 21.3 months (range, 6-39 months). During this period, 43 cartilage-sensitive and 25 quantitative T2-mapping MRI studies were performed. The donor sites were assessed for plug and interface morphology, displacement, hypertrophy, subchondral edema, presence of bony overgrowth, percentage fill, and degree of incorporation. T2 relaxation times were measured for the superficial and deep layers of the repair tissue. A linear regression and correlational analysis was performed with Bonferroni correction, and P < 0.05 was defined as significant. Results: Longitudinal analysis revealed favorable plug appearance at early follow-up (≤6 months), with 75% of plugs demonstrating flush morphology and 78% demonstrating near complete to complete fill. Plug appearance deteriorated at intermediate follow-up (~12 months), with only 26% of plugs demonstrating flush morphology and 52% with near complete or complete fill. Plug appearance substantially improved with longer follow-up (≥16 months), with 70% of plugs demonstrating flush morphology and 90% demonstrating near complete or complete fill. Interface resorption was common at ~12 months (P < 0.0001) and was associated with older age (P = 0.01) or a single-plug configuration (P = 0.04). T2 values for the repair cartilage approached that of normal cartilage with increasing duration after surgery (P < 0.004), more so for single- compared with multiple-plug configurations (P = 0.03). Conclusions: The Trufit BGS

  20. Traceless protein splicing utilizing evolved split inteins

    PubMed Central

    Lockless, Steve W.; Muir, Tom W.

    2009-01-01

    Split inteins are parasitic genetic elements frequently found inserted into reading frames of essential proteins. Their association and excision restore host protein function through a protein self-splicing reaction. They have gained an increasingly important role in the chemical modification of proteins to create cyclical, segmentally labeled, and fluorescently tagged proteins. Ideally, inteins would seamlessly splice polypeptides together with no remnant sequences and at high efficiency. Here, we describe experiments that identify the branched intermediate, a transient step in the overall splicing reaction, as a key determinant of the splicing efficiency at different splice-site junctions. To alter intein specificity, we developed a cell-based selection scheme to evolve split inteins that splice with high efficiency at different splice junctions and at higher temperatures. Mutations within these evolved inteins occur at sites distant from the active site. We present a hypothesis that a network of conserved coevolving amino acids in inteins mediates these long-range effects. PMID:19541616

  1. Recursive splicing in long vertebrate genes

    PubMed Central

    Blazquez, Lorea; Faro, Ana; Haberman, Nejc; Briese, Michael; Trabzuni, Daniah; Ryten, Mina; Weale, Michael E; Hardy, John; Modic, Miha; Curk, Tomaž; Wilson, Stephen W; Plagnol, Vincent; Ule, Jernej

    2015-01-01

    It is generally believed that splicing removes introns as single units from pre-mRNA transcripts. However, some long D. melanogaster introns contain a cryptic site, called a recursive splice site (RS-site), that enables a multi-step process of intron removal termed recursive splicing1,2. The extent to which recursive splicing occurs in other species and its mechanistic basis remain unclear. Here we identify highly conserved RS-sites in genes expressed in the mammalian brain that encode proteins functioning in neuronal development. Moreover, the RS-sites are found in some of the longest introns across vertebrates. We find that vertebrate recursive splicing requires initial definition of a “RS-exon” that follows the RS-site. The RS-exon is then excluded from the dominant mRNA isoform due to competition with a reconstituted 5′ splice site formed at the RS-site after the first splicing step. Conversely, the RS-exon is included when preceded by cryptic exons or promoters that are prevalent in long introns, but which fail to reconstitute an efficient 5′ splice site. Most RS-exons contain a premature stop codon such that their inclusion may decrease mRNA stability. Thus, by establishing a binary splicing switch, RS-sites demarcate different mRNA isoforms emerging from long genes by coupling inclusion of cryptic elements with RS-exons. PMID:25970246

  2. Recursive splicing in long vertebrate genes.

    PubMed

    Sibley, Christopher R; Emmett, Warren; Blazquez, Lorea; Faro, Ana; Haberman, Nejc; Briese, Michael; Trabzuni, Daniah; Ryten, Mina; Weale, Michael E; Hardy, John; Modic, Miha; Curk, Tomaž; Wilson, Stephen W; Plagnol, Vincent; Ule, Jernej

    2015-05-21

    It is generally believed that splicing removes introns as single units from precursor messenger RNA transcripts. However, some long Drosophila melanogaster introns contain a cryptic site, known as a recursive splice site (RS-site), that enables a multi-step process of intron removal termed recursive splicing. The extent to which recursive splicing occurs in other species and its mechanistic basis have not been examined. Here we identify highly conserved RS-sites in genes expressed in the mammalian brain that encode proteins functioning in neuronal development. Moreover, the RS-sites are found in some of the longest introns across vertebrates. We find that vertebrate recursive splicing requires initial definition of an 'RS-exon' that follows the RS-site. The RS-exon is then excluded from the dominant mRNA isoform owing to competition with a reconstituted 5' splice site formed at the RS-site after the first splicing step. Conversely, the RS-exon is included when preceded by cryptic promoters or exons that fail to reconstitute an efficient 5' splice site. Most RS-exons contain a premature stop codon such that their inclusion can decrease mRNA stability. Thus, by establishing a binary splicing switch, RS-sites demarcate different mRNA isoforms emerging from long genes by coupling cryptic elements with inclusion of RS-exons. PMID:25970246

  3. Donor Site Evaluation: Anterior Iliac Crest Following Secondary Alveolar Bone Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Vura, Nandagopal; Reddy K., Rajiv; R., Sudhir; G., Rajasekhar; Kaluvala, Varun Raja

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The use of autogenous bone graft for Secondary alveolar bone grafting is well established in the treatment of cleft lip and palate patients. Aims and Objectives: To evaluate post-operative morbidity of anterior iliac crest graft after secondary alveolar bone grafting in cleft patients. Material and Methods: Forty patients during the period from July 2008 to March 2013, who underwent secondary alveolar bone grafting by harvesting graft from anterior iliac crest in Mamata Dental Hospital, Khammam, Andhra Pradesh, India are included in the present study. Unilateral and bilateral cleft patients who had undergone secondary alveolar bone grafting (SABG) with anterior iliac crest as their donor site have been selected and post- operative complications from the surgery were evaluated with the help of a questionnaire which included pain, gait disturbances, numbness and scar problems (infection, irritation). Results: Patients who were operated gave maximum score for pain as 8 on visual analogue scale. No pain was observed in any of the cases after 8 days, gait disturbances were seen in all patients (limping) for 2-6 days, there was no post-operative numbness with all the patients returning to their routine in 6- 15 days and 90% of the patients gave a satisfied response towards scar. Conclusion: From the results in our study the morbidity after harvesting bone from iliac crest was found to be moderate to low, which had minimal complications and were well tolerated and greater acceptance from the patient. PMID:24392424

  4. The dark matter of the cancer genome: aberrations in regulatory elements, untranslated regions, splice sites, non-coding RNA and synonymous mutations.

    PubMed

    Diederichs, Sven; Bartsch, Lorenz; Berkmann, Julia C; Fröse, Karin; Heitmann, Jana; Hoppe, Caroline; Iggena, Deetje; Jazmati, Danny; Karschnia, Philipp; Linsenmeier, Miriam; Maulhardt, Thomas; Möhrmann, Lino; Morstein, Johannes; Paffenholz, Stella V; Röpenack, Paula; Rückert, Timo; Sandig, Ludger; Schell, Maximilian; Steinmann, Anna; Voss, Gjendine; Wasmuth, Jacqueline; Weinberger, Maria E; Wullenkord, Ramona

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a disease of the genome caused by oncogene activation and tumor suppressor gene inhibition. Deep sequencing studies including large consortia such as TCGA and ICGC identified numerous tumor-specific mutations not only in protein-coding sequences but also in non-coding sequences. Although 98% of the genome is not translated into proteins, most studies have neglected the information hidden in this "dark matter" of the genome. Malignancy-driving mutations can occur in all genetic elements outside the coding region, namely in enhancer, silencer, insulator, and promoter as well as in 5'-UTR and 3'-UTR Intron or splice site mutations can alter the splicing pattern. Moreover, cancer genomes contain mutations within non-coding RNA, such as microRNA, lncRNA, and lincRNA A synonymous mutation changes the coding region in the DNA and RNA but not the protein sequence. Importantly, oncogenes such as TERT or miR-21 as well as tumor suppressor genes such as TP53/p53, APC, BRCA1, or RB1 can be affected by these alterations. In summary, coding-independent mutations can affect gene regulation from transcription, splicing, mRNA stability to translation, and hence, this largely neglected area needs functional studies to elucidate the mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis. This review will focus on the important role and novel mechanisms of these non-coding or allegedly silent mutations in tumorigenesis. PMID:26992833

  5. The spfash mouse: a missense mutation in the ornithine transcarbamylase gene also causes aberrant mRNA splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, P E; Rosenberg, L E

    1989-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase (ornithine carbamoyltransferase; carbamoyl-phosphate:L-ornithine carbamoyltransferase, EC 2.1.3.3) is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme of the mammalian urea cycle. The X chromosome-linked spfash mutation in the mouse causes partial ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency and has served as a model for the human disease. We show here that the spfash mutation is a guanine to adenine transition of the last nucleotide of the fourth exon of the ornithine transcarbamylase gene. This nucleotide change produces two remarkably different effects. First, this transition causes ornithine transcarbamylase mRNA deficiency because the involved exon nucleotide plays a part in the recognition of the adjacent splice donor site. As a result of the mutation, ornithine transcarbamylase pre-mRNA is spliced inefficiently both at this site and at a cryptic splice donor site 48 bases into the adjacent intron. Second, two mutant proteins are translated from these mRNAs. From the correctly spliced mRNA, the transition results in a change of amino acid 129 from arginine to histidine. This missense substitution has no discernable effect on mitochondrial import, subunit assembly, or enzyme activity. On the other hand, the elongated mRNA resulting from mis-splicing is translated into a dysfunctional ornithine transcarbamylase subunit elongated by the insertion of 16 amino acid residues. Images PMID:2471197

  6. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging. PMID:26529031

  7. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging. PMID:26529031

  8. Functional characterization of two novel splicing mutations in the OCA2 gene associated with oculocutaneous albinism type II.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Valeria; Straniero, Letizia; Asselta, Rosanna; Mauri, Lucia; Manfredini, Emanuela; Penco, Silvana; Gesu, Giovanni P; Del Longo, Alessandra; Piozzi, Elena; Soldà, Giulia; Primignani, Paola

    2014-03-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is characterized by hypopigmentation of the skin, hair and eye, and by ophthalmologic abnormalities caused by a deficiency in melanin biosynthesis. OCA type II (OCA2) is one of the four commonly-recognized forms of albinism, and is determined by mutation in the OCA2 gene. In the present study, we investigated the molecular basis of OCA2 in two siblings and one unrelated patient. The mutational screening of the OCA2 gene identified two hitherto-unknown putative splicing mutations. The first one (c.1503+5G>A), identified in an Italian proband and her affected sibling, lies in the consensus sequence of the donor splice site of OCA2 intron 14 (IVS14+5G>A), in compound heterozygosity with a frameshift mutation, c.1450_1451insCTGCCCTGACA, which is predicted to determine the premature termination of the polypeptide chain (p.I484Tfs*19). In-silico prediction of the effect of the IVS14+5G>A mutation on splicing showed a score reduction for the mutant splice site and indicated the possible activation of a newly-created deep-intronic acceptor splice site. The second mutation is a synonymous transition (c.2139G>A, p.K713K) involving the last nucleotide of exon 20. This mutation was found in a young African albino patient in compound heterozygosity with a previously-reported OCA2 missense mutation (p.T404M). In-silico analysis predicted that the mutant c.2139G>A allele would result in the abolition of the splice donor site. The effects on splicing of these two novel mutations were investigated using an in-vitro hybrid-minigene approach that led to the demonstration of the causal role of the two mutations and to the identification of aberrant transcript variants. PMID:24361966

  9. Hemostatic effect of Vivostat patient-derived fibrin sealant on split-thickness skin graft donor sites.

    PubMed

    Drake, David B; Wong, Lesley G

    2003-04-01

    Topical hemostatic agents are used frequently to control bleeding of skin graft donor sites. In this study, the hemostatic properties of Vivostat (Vivolution A/S, Birkerød, Denmark) patient-derived fibrin sealant were compared with a control group of spray thrombin solution, which is considered an industry standard for topical hemostasis. Treatments were applied simultaneously to two randomly chosen halves of a single split-thickness single donor site in patients in five United States surgical centers. The time to achieve satisfactory hemostasis (< or =10 min) was estimated on each half of the wound as the time at which active bleeding had stopped and the wound was suitable for application of a surgical dressing. The time to hemostasis of wounds treated with Vivostat (Vivolution A/S) patient-derived sealant was significantly shorter in comparison with wounds treated with thrombin solution (medians: Vivostat, 31 seconds; thrombin, 58 seconds; p=0.0012). No abnormalities in wound healing were reported for either treatment site 1 week after the operation. Vivostat (Vivolution A/S) sealant is a more rapidly effective topical hemostatic agent than thrombin on split-thickness skin graft donor sites. PMID:12671377

  10. Evaluation of Six Split-thickness Skin Graft Donor-site Dressing Materials in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Masella, Pamela C.; Balent, Eric M.; Carlson, Terri L.; Lee, Karen W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Numerous dressings for split-thickness skin graft donor sites are commercially available with no conclusive evidence-based consensus regarding the optimal dressing choice. This study was conducted to identify which of 5 commonly used materials promotes wound healing most effectively for use on split-thickness donor sites in comparison with our standard dressing, Xeroform (petrolatum gauze). Methods: Twenty-four partial-thickness wounds were created on the backs of 4 pigs using a dermatome. Wounds (n = 4 per dressing type per pig) were treated with Xeroform, Opsite (polyurethane film), Kaltostat ( calcium sodium alginate), DuoDERM (hydrocolloid), Aquacel (hydrofiber), and Mepilex (silicone foam). Full-thickness skin samples were excised at 3 or 5 days and evaluated histologically for reepithelialization and inflammation. Comparisons also included incidence of infection, ease of use, and cost analyses. Results: DuoDERM elicited the greatest percent reepithelialization (81%) and Mepilex the lowest (33%) after 3 days (P = 0.004). All dressings demonstrated complete reepithelialization except Mepilex (85%) at 5 days. There were no infections and inflammation was mild among all treatments. Mepilex was easiest to use, whereas Aquacel, Kaltostat, and Opsite were most difficult (P = 0.03). Xeroform was most cost-effective and Aquacel most expensive. Combined scoring revealed DuoDERM = Xeroform > Opsite = Mepilex > Kaltostat > Aquacel. Conclusions: DuoDERM and Xeroform were most effective overall. DuoDERM tended to outperform all dressings in reepithelialization at 3 days, while Xeroform was least expensive, easy to use, and demonstrated rapid reepithelialization. These findings suggest that Xeroform may be preferred for use on large donor-site areas. DuoDERM may be more appropriate for small donor sites when healing time is a priority. PMID:25289278

  11. Evaluation of human amniotic membrane as a wound dressing for split-thickness skin-graft donor sites.

    PubMed

    Loeffelbein, Denys J; Rohleder, Nils H; Eddicks, Matthias; Baumann, Claudia M; Stoeckelhuber, Mechthild; Wolff, Klaus-D; Drecoll, Enken; Steinstraesser, Lars; Hennerbichler, Simone; Kesting, Marco R

    2014-01-01

    Human amniotic membrane (HAM) has been used as a biomaterial in various surgical procedures and exceeds some qualities of common materials. We evaluated HAM as wound dressing for split-thickness skin-graft (STSG) donor sites in a swine model (Part A) and a clinical trial (Part B). Part A: STSG donor sites in 4 piglets were treated with HAM or a clinically used conventional polyurethane (PU) foil (n = 8 each). Biopsies were taken on days 5, 7, 10, 20, 40, and 60 and investigated immunohistochemically for alpha-smooth muscle actin (αSMA: wound contraction marker), von Willebrand factor (vWF: angiogenesis), Ki-67 (cell proliferation), and laminin (basement membrane integrity). Part B: STSG donor sites in 45 adult patients (16 female/29 male) were treated with HAM covered by PU foam, solely by PU foam, or PU foil/paraffin gauze (n = 15 each). Part A revealed no difference in the rate of wound closure between groups. HAM showed improved esthetic results and inhibitory effects on cicatrization. Angioneogenesis was reduced, and basement membrane formation was accelerated in HAM group. Part B: no difference in re-epithelialization/infection rate was found. HAM caused less ichor exudation and less pruritus. HAM has no relevant advantage over conventional dressings but might be a cost-effective alternative. PMID:25003117

  12. Donor site morbidity following iliac crest bone harvesting for cervical fusion: a comparison between minimally invasive and open techniques

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Raymond; Bhatia, Chandra; Chuter, Graham; Lingutla, Kiran; Budithi, Chakravarty; Krishna, Manoj

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the occurrence of donor site morbidity, cosmesis and overall satisfaction with graft procedure in 76 patients who had undergone iliac crest bone harvesting for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Totally 24 patients underwent an open procedure and 52 a minimally invasive trephine harvesting method. Although our study demonstrated substantial donor site pain and its effect on ambulation in both groups, this was of limited duration. Two patients, one in each group, suffered long-term pain that was eventually resolved. Totally 8.3% of patients in the open group suffered minor complications and 11.5% in the trephine group. There were two cases of meralgia parasthetica. There were no major complications in either group. There was no statistically significant difference in morbidity between the open and trephine groups. There was a trend towards significance (P = 0.076) for pain at the donor site, with less pain reported by patients who underwent the trephine procedure for harvesting. PMID:18389294

  13. Reversion of the Arabidopsis rpn12a-1 exon-trap mutation by an intragenic suppressor that weakens the chimeric 5’ splice site

    PubMed Central

    Smalle, Jan A

    2013-01-01

    Background: In the Arabidopsis 26S proteasome mutant rpn12a-1, an exon-trap T-DNA is inserted 531 base pairs downstream of the RPN12a STOP codon. We have previously shown that this insertion activates a STOP codon-associated latent 5' splice site that competes with the polyadenylation signal during processing of the pre-mRNA. As a result of this dual input from splicing and polyadenylation in the rpn12a-1 mutant, two RPN12a transcripts are produced and they encode the wild-type RPN12a and a chimeric RPN12a-NPTII protein. Both proteins form complexes with other proteasome subunits leading to the formation of wild-type and mutant proteasome versions. The net result of this heterogeneity of proteasome particles is a reduction of total cellular proteasome activity. One of the consequences of reduced proteasomal activity is decreased sensitivity to the major plant hormone cytokinin. Methods: We performed ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis of rpn12a-1 and isolated revertants with wild-type cytokinin sensitivity. Results: We describe the isolation and analyses of suppressor of rpn12a-1 ( sor1). The sor1 mutation is intragenic and located at the fifth position of the chimeric intron. This mutation weakens the activated 5' splice site associated with the STOP codon and tilts the processing of the RPN12a mRNA back towards polyadenylation. Conclusions: These results validate our earlier interpretation of the unusual nature of the rpn12a-1 mutation. Furthermore, the data show that optimal 26S proteasome activity requires RPN12a accumulation beyond a critical threshold. Finally, this finding reinforces our previous conclusion that proteasome function is critical for the cytokinin-dependent regulation of plant growth. PMID:24358894

  14. Splicing in action: assessing disease causing sequence changes

    PubMed Central

    Baralle, D; Baralle, M

    2005-01-01

    Variations in new splicing regulatory elements are difficult to identify exclusively by sequence inspection and may result in deleterious effects on precursor (pre) mRNA splicing. These mutations can result in either complete skipping of the exon, retention of the intron, or the introduction of a new splice site within an exon or intron. Sometimes mutations that do not disrupt or create a splice site activate pre-existing pseudo splice sites, consistent with the proposal that introns contain splicing inhibitory sequences. These variants can also affect the fine balance of isoforms produced by alternatively spliced exons and in consequence cause disease. Available genomic pathology data reveal that we are still partly ignorant of the basic mechanisms that underlie the pre-mRNA splicing process. The fact that human pathology can provide pointers to new modulatory elements of splicing should be exploited. PMID:16199547

  15. The genetics of splicing in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Justin; Hackett, Christopher S.; Zhang, Shile; Song, Young K.; Bell, Robert J.A.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Quigley, David A.; Balmain, Allan; Song, Jun S.; Costello, Joseph F.; Gustafson, W. Clay; Dyke, Terry Van; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Khan, Javed; Weiss, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of mRNA splicing, a critical and tightly regulated cellular function, underlies the majority of proteomic diversity, and is frequently disrupted in disease. Using an integrative genomics approach, we combined both genome and exon level transcriptome data in two somatic tissues (cerebella and peripheral ganglia) from a transgenic mouse model of neuroblastoma, a tumor that arises from peripheral neural crest. Here we describe splicing quantitative trait loci (sQTL) associated with differential splicing across the genome that we use to identify genes with previously unknown functions within the splicing pathway and to define de novo intronic splicing motifs that influence splicing from hundreds of bases away. Our results show that these splicing motifs represent sites for functional recurrent mutations and highlight novel candidate genes in human cancers, including childhood neuroblastoma. PMID:25637275

  16. Investigation of the low-affinity oxidation site for exogenous electron donors in the Mn-depleted photosystem II complexes.

    PubMed

    Kurashov, V N; Lovyagina, E R; Shkolnikov, D Yu; Solntsev, M K; Mamedov, M D; Semin, B K

    2009-12-01

    In the manganese-depleted photosystem II (PSII[-Mn]) preparations, oxidation of exogenous electron donors is carried out through the high-affinity (HA) and the low-affinity (LA) sites. This paper investigates the LA oxidation site in the PSII(-Mn) preparations where the HA, Mn-binding site was blocked with ferric cations [[11] B.K. Semin, M.L. Ghirardi, M. Seibert, Blocking of electron donation by Mn(II) to Y(Z)(*) following incubation of Mn-depleted photosystem II membranes with Fe(II) in the light, Biochemistry 41 (2002) 5854-5864.]. In blocked (PSII[-Mn,+Fe]) preparations electron donation by Mn(II) cations to Y(Z)(*) was not detected at Mn(II) concentration 10 microM (corresponds to K(m) for Mn(II) oxidation at the HA site), but detected at Mn concentration 100 microM (corresponds to K(m) for the LA site) by fluorescence measurements. Comparison of pH-dependencies of electron donation by Mn(II) through the HA and the LA sites revealed the similar pK(a) equal to 6.8. Comparison of K(m) for diphenylcarbazide (DPC) oxidation at the LA site and K(d) for A(T) thermoluminescence band suppression by DPC in PSII(-Mn,+Fe) samples suggests that there is relationship between the LA site and A(T) band formation. The role of D1-His190 as an oxidant of exogenous electron donors at the LA site is discussed. In contrast to electrogenic electron transfer from Mn(II) at the HA site to Y(Z)(*), photovoltage due to Mn(II) oxidation in iron-blocked PSII(-Mn) core particles was not detected. PMID:19616503

  17. Long-term vascular, motor, and sensory donor site outcomes after ulnar forearm flap harvest.

    PubMed

    Brown, Emile N; Chaudhry, Arif; Mithani, Suhail K; Bluebond-Langner, Rachel O; Feiner, Jeffrey M; Shaffer, Cynthia K; Call, Diana; Rodriguez, Eduardo D

    2014-02-01

    Use of the ulnar forearm flap (UFF) is limited by concerns for ulnar nerve injury and impaired perfusion in the donor extremity. Twenty UFFs were performed over a 6-year period. All patients underwent postoperative bilateral upper extremity arterial duplex studies. A subset of postoperative patients (n = 10) also had bilateral upper extremity sensory and motor evaluations, and functional evaluation via the Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH). Motor function was tested by digital and key grip dynamometry. Ulnar nerve sensation was tested by evaluation of one- and two-point perceived pressure thresholds and two-point discrimination using the Pressure-Specified Sensory Device (Sensory Management Services, LLC, Baltimore, MD). All UFFs were viable postoperatively. Mean follow-up was 28.8 months for vascular studies and 45.3 months for motor, sensory, and QuickDASH evaluations. Although mid and distal radial artery flow velocities were significantly higher in donor versus control extremities evaluated at less than 1 year postoperatively, there was no significant difference in extremities evaluated at later time points. Digital pressures, grip strength, key pinch strength, and ulnar sensation were equivalent between donor and control extremities. The mean QuickDASH score was 17.4 ± 23.8. The UFF can be harvested reliably and long-term follow-up shows no evidence of impaired vascular, motor, or sensory function in the donor extremity. PMID:24163222

  18. PRKN, DJ-1, and PINK1 screening identifies novel splice site mutation in PRKN and two novel DJ-1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Ghazavi, Farzaneh; Fazlali, Zeinab; Banihosseini, Setareh Sadat; Hosseini, Sayed-Rzgar; Kazemi, Mohammad Hossein; Shojaee, Seyedmehdi; Parsa, Khosro; Sadeghi, Homa; Sina, Farzad; Rohani, Mohammad; Shahidi, Gholam-Ali; Ghaemi, Nasser; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Elahi, Elahe

    2011-01-01

    We present results of mutation screening of PRKN gene in 93 Iranian Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with average age at onset (AAO) of 42.2 years. The gene was screened by direct sequencing and by a semi-quantitative PCR protocol for detection of sequence rearrangements. Heterozygous rearrangements were tested by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Nine different PRKN mutations were found. One of these, IVS9+1G>A, affects splicing and is novel. Two mutated PRKN alleles were observed in each of 6 patients whose average AAO was 25.7 years. Only 1 patient carried a single mutated allele and his AAO was 41 years. Among patients with AAO of <30 years, 31.3% had two mutated alleles, while only 2.6% with AAO of >30 years carried a PRKN mutation. Analysis of PRKN by RT-PCR led to identification of a novel exon expressed in leukocytes of control and PD individuals. The alternatively spliced transcript if translated would code a protein without a RING Finger 2 domain. Its functional relevance remains to be shown. DJ-I and PINK1 were also screened. Two novel DJ-1 mutations, c.91-2A>G affecting splicing and c.319G>C causing Ala107Pro, were observed among patients with AAO of <31 years, suggesting that PD in a high fraction (>12%) of this group of Iranian patients may be due to mutations in DJ-1. Mutations in PINK1 were not observed. Our results complement previous findings on LRRK2 mutations among Iranian PD patients. PMID:21322020

  19. Novel splice site mutation in the caveolin-3 gene leading to autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Müller, Juliane S; Piko, Henriett; Schoser, Benedikt G H; Schlotter-Weigel, Beate; Reilich, Peter; Gürster, Stefanie; Born, Christine; Karcagi, Veronika; Pongratz, Dieter; Lochmüller, Hanns; Walter, Maggie C

    2006-07-01

    Mutations in CAV3 gene encoding the protein caveolin-3 are associated with autosomal dominant limb girdle muscular dystrophy 1C, rippling muscle disease, hyperCKemia, distal myopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and rare autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy phenotypes. In a 57-year-old patient with asymmetric limb girdle weakness, we detected a novel homozygous intronic mutation (IVS1 + 2T > C) of the CAV3 gene. This is the first splicing mutation reported for CAV3. These findings add to the clinical and genetic variability of CAV3 mutations. PMID:16730439

  20. Flexibility in the site of exon junction complex deposition revealed by functional group and RNA secondary structure alterations in the splicing substrate

    PubMed Central

    Mishler, Dennis M.; Christ, Alexander B.; Steitz, Joan A.

    2008-01-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC) is critical for mammalian nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and translational regulation, but the mechanism of its stable deposition on mRNA is unknown. To examine requirements for EJC deposition, we created splicing substrates containing either DNA nucleotides or RNA secondary structure in the 5′ exon. Using RNase H protection, toeprinting, and coimmunoprecipitation assays, we found that EJC location shifts upstream when a stretch of DNA or RNA secondary structure appears at the canonical deposition site. These upstream shifts occur prior to exon ligation and are often accompanied by decreases in deposition efficiency. Although the EJC core protein eIF4AIII contacts four ribose 2′OH groups in crystal structures, we demonstrate that three 2′OH groups are sufficient for deposition. Thus, the site of EJC deposition is more flexible than previously appreciated and efficient deposition appears spatially limited. PMID:18952819

  1. An ENU Mutagenesis Screen in Zebrafish for Visual System Mutants Identifies a Novel Splice-Acceptor Site Mutation in patched2 that Results in Colobomas

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiwoon; Cox, Ben D.; Daly, Christina M. S.; Lee, Chanjae; Nuckels, Richard J.; Tittle, Rachel K.; Uribe, Rosa A.; Gross, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To identify recessive mutations affecting development and/or maintenance of the zebrafish visual system. Methods. A three-generation ENU (N-Nitroso-N-ethylurea)-based forward genetic screen was performed. F3 embryos were screened visually from 1 to 5 days postfertilization (dpf) for ocular abnormalities, and 5 dpf embryos were fixed and processed for cryosectioning, after which eye sections were screened for defects in cellular organization within the retina, lens, and cornea. A combination of PCR and DNA sequencing, in situ hybridization, and pharmacological treatments were used to clone and characterize a coloboma mutant. Results. A total of 126 F2 families were screened, and, from these, 18 recessive mutations were identified that affected eye development. Phenotypes included lens malformations and cataracts, photoreceptor defects, oculocutaneous albinism, microphthalmia, and colobomas. Analysis of one such coloboma mutant, uta1, identified a splice-acceptor mutation in the patched2 gene that resulted in an in-frame deletion of 19 amino acids that are predicted to contribute to the first extracellular loop of Patched2. ptch2uta1 mutants possessed elevated Hedgehog (Hh) pathway activity, and blocking the Hh pathway with cyclopamine prevented colobomas in ptch2uta1 mutant embryos. Conclusions. We have identified 18 recessive mutations affecting development of the zebrafish visual system and we have characterized a novel splice-acceptor site mutation in patched2 that results in enhanced Hh pathway activity and colobomas. PMID:23150614

  2. Splicing of Retrotransposon Insertions from Transcripts of the Drosophila Melanogaster Vermilion Gene in a Revertant

    PubMed Central

    Pret, A. M.; Searles, L. L.

    1991-01-01

    A mutation of the Drosophila melanogaster vermilion (v) gene known as v(1) is caused by the insertion of a 412 retrotransposon into the 5' untranslated region of the first exon. Mutants carrying this insertion accumulate a low level of mRNA from which most of the transposon sequences have been eliminated by splicing at cryptic sites within transposon sequences. Here, we demonstrate that a revertant of the v(1) allele called v(+37) is caused by the insertion of a second retrotransposon, the B104/roo element, into a site near one end of the 412 element. The revertant strain accumulates a higher level of mRNA from which most of both transposons have been removed by splicing at new donor sites introduced by the B104/roo insertion and the same acceptor site within 412. Mutations at suppressor of sable [su(s)], which increase the accumulation of v(1) transcripts, slightly elevate the level of v(+37) RNA. In addition, we show that the first v intron downstream of the 412 insertion is not efficiently removed in the v(1) mutant, and suppressor and reversion mutations increase the proportion of transcripts that are properly spliced at that downstream intron. Thus, it appears that both the suppressor and reversion mutations exert an effect at the level of pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:1664404

  3. Splicing factor SRSF1 negatively regulates alternative splicing of MDM2 under damage

    PubMed Central

    Comiskey, Daniel F.; Jacob, Aishwarya G.; Singh, Ravi K.; Tapia-Santos, Aixa S.; Chandler, Dawn S.

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic stress induces alternative splicing of the oncogene MDM2 generating MDM2-ALT1, an isoform attributed with tumorigenic properties. However, the mechanisms underlying this event remain unclear. Here we explore MDM2 splicing regulation by utilizing a novel minigene that mimics endogenous MDM2 splicing in response to UV and cisplatinum-induced DNA damage. We report that exon 11 is necessary and sufficient for the damage-specific alternative splicing of the MDM2 minigene and that the splicing factor SRSF1 binds exon 11 at evolutionarily conserved sites. Interestingly, mutations disrupting this interaction proved sufficient to abolish the stress-induced alternative splicing of the MDM2 minigene. Furthermore, SRSF1 overexpression promoted exclusion of exon 11, while its siRNA-mediated knockdown prevented the stress-induced alternative splicing of endogenous MDM2. Additionally, we observed elevated SRSF1 levels under stress and in tumors correlating with the expression of MDM2-ALT1. Notably, we demonstrate that MDM2-ALT1 splicing can be blocked by targeting SRSF1 sites on exon 11 using antisense oligonucleotides. These results present conclusive evidence supporting a negative role for SRSF1 in MDM2 alternative splicing. Importantly, we define for the first time, a clear-cut mechanism for the regulation of damage-induced MDM2 splicing and present potential strategies for manipulating MDM2 expression via splicing modulation. PMID:25845590

  4. Functional selection of splicing enhancers that stimulate trans-splicing in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Boukis, L A; Bruzik, J P

    2001-01-01

    The role of exonic sequences in naturally occurring trans-splicing has not been explored in detail. Here, we have identified trans-splicing enhancers through the use of an iterative selection scheme. Several classes of enhancer sequences were identified that led to dramatic increases in trans-splicing efficiency. Two sequence families were investigated in detail. These include motifs containing the element (G/C)GAC(G/C) and also 5' splice site-like sequences. Distinct elements were tested for their ability to function as splicing enhancers and in competition experiments. In addition, discrete trans-acting factors were identified. This work demonstrates that splicing enhancers are able to effect a large increase in trans-splicing efficiency and that the process of exon definition is able to positively enhance trans-splicing even though the reaction itself is independent of the need for the 5' end of U1 snRNA. Due to the presence of internal introns in messages that are trans-spliced, the natural arrangement of 5' splice sites downstream of trans-splicing acceptors may lead to a general promotion of this unusual reaction. PMID:11421358

  5. Split-thickness skin graft donor site management: a randomized controlled trial comparing polyurethane with calcium alginate dressings.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Louise; Wasiak, Jason; Spinks, Anneliese; Cleland, Heather

    2012-04-01

    Split-thickness skin grafting (SSG) is a common reconstructive technique for the treatment of patients with deep burns and other traumatic injuries. The management of the donor site after harvesting an SSG remains controversial because of a variety of dressings available for use. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to compare the effectiveness of a polyurethane dressing, Allevyn™, to a calcium alginate, Kaltostat®. From August 2009 to April 2010, 36 patients were randomized to Allevyn™ or Kaltostat® for donor site management following split skin graft surgery. Pain intensity and adverse events were the primary outcomes assessed. Secondary outcome measures included time for wound healing, ease of application and removal and overall patient satisfaction. Time to first dressing change was earlier in those randomized to Allevyn™ compared with Kaltostat® (5·5 days versus 8·11 days, P = 0·014). In patients randomized to Allevyn™, excessive exudate lead to a significantly increased number of dressing changes before day 10 (14 days versus 7 days, P = 0·018). The total number of dressing changes applied was also greater in those with Allevyn™ compared with Kaltstat® (P = 0·007). There were no significant differences between the two treatment groups with respect to time to wound healing, level of pain intensity, length of stay, staff and patient satisfaction levels. This trial showed Allevyn™ to be associated with increase demands on nursing time, increased cost of dressing products, medical consumables and wastes. Kaltostat® remains the dressing of choice for initial donor site dressing in this burns unit. PMID:22051247

  6. Management of pediatric skin-graft donor sites: a randomized controlled trial of three wound care products.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Maria; Hilliard, Carol; Peel, Glynis; Crispino, Gloria; Geraghty, Ruth; OʼCallaghan, Gill

    2015-01-01

    Skin grafts are used to treat many types of skin defects in children, including burns, traumatic wounds, and revision of scars. The objective of this prospective randomized controlled trial was to compare the effectiveness of three dressing types for pediatric donor sites: foam, hydrofiber, and calcium alginate. Children attending a pediatric Burns & Plastics Service from October 2010 to March 2013, who required a split-skin graft, were recruited to the trial. Patients were randomly assigned to the two experimental groups, foam or hydrofiber, and to the control group, calcium alginate. Data were gathered on the management of exudate, assessment of pain, time to healing, and infection. Fifty-seven children aged 1 to 16 years (mean = 4.9 years) were recruited to the trial. Fifty-six patients had evaluable data and one participant from the control group was lost to follow-up. Most children required skin grafting for a burn injury (78%). The median size of the donor site was 63.50 cm (8-600 cm). There was a statistically significant difference in time to healing across the three dressing groups (x [2, n = 56] = 6.59, P = .037). The calcium alginate group recorded a lower median value of days to healing (median = 7.5 days) compared to the other two groups, which recorded median values of 8 days (hydrofiber) and 9.5 days (foam). The greatest leakage of exudate, regardless of dressing type, occurred on day 2 after grafting. No statistically significant difference was found in leakage of exudate, pain scores, or infection rates across the three groups. Calcium alginate emerged as the optimum dressing for pediatric donor site healing in this trial. PMID:25185932

  7. dbNSFP v3.0: A One-Stop Database of Functional Predictions and Annotations for Human Nonsynonymous and Splice-Site SNVs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoming; Wu, Chunlei; Li, Chang; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the dbNSFP is to provide a one-stop resource for functional predictions and annotations for human nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variants (nsSNVs) and splice-site variants (ssSNVs), and to facilitate the steps of filtering and prioritizing SNVs from a large list of SNVs discovered in an exome-sequencing study. A list of all potential nsSNVs and ssSNVs based on the human reference sequence were created and functional predictions and annotations were curated and compiled for each SNV. Here, we report a recent major update of the database to version 3.0. The SNV list has been rebuilt based on GENCODE 22 and currently the database includes 82,832,027 nsSNVs and ssSNVs. An attached database dbscSNV, which compiled all potential human SNVs within splicing consensus regions and their deleteriousness predictions, add another 15,030,459 potentially functional SNVs. Eleven prediction scores (MetaSVM, MetaLR, CADD, VEST3, PROVEAN, 4× fitCons, fathmm-MKL, and DANN) and allele frequencies from the UK10K cohorts and the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC), among others, have been added. The original seven prediction scores in v2.0 (SIFT, 2× Polyphen2, LRT, MutationTaster, MutationAssessor, and FATHMM) as well as many SNV and gene functional annotations have been updated. dbNSFP v3.0 is freely available at http://sites.google.com/site/jpopgen/dbNSFP. PMID:26555599

  8. Splicing Programs and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Germann, Sophie; Gratadou, Lise; Dutertre, Martin; Auboeuf, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies report splicing alterations in a multitude of cancers by using gene-by-gene analysis. However, understanding of the role of alternative splicing in cancer is now reaching a new level, thanks to the use of novel technologies allowing the analysis of splicing at a large-scale level. Genome-wide analyses of alternative splicing indicate that splicing alterations can affect the products of gene networks involved in key cellular programs. In addition, many splicing variants identified as being misregulated in cancer are expressed in normal tissues. These observations suggest that splicing programs contribute to specific cellular programs that are altered during cancer initiation and progression. Supporting this model, recent studies have identified splicing factors controlling cancer-associated splicing programs. The characterization of splicing programs and their regulation by splicing factors will allow a better understanding of the genetic mechanisms involved in cancer initiation and progression and the development of new therapeutic targets. PMID:22132318

  9. A Splice Site Variant in the Bovine RNF11 Gene Compromises Growth and Regulation of the Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Sartelet, Arnaud; Druet, Tom; Michaux, Charles; Fasquelle, Corinne; Géron, Sarah; Tamma, Nico; Zhang, Zhiyan; Coppieters, Wouter; Georges, Michel; Charlier, Carole

    2012-01-01

    We report association mapping of a locus on bovine chromosome 3 that underlies a Mendelian form of stunted growth in Belgian Blue Cattle (BBC). By resequencing positional candidates, we identify the causative c124-2A>G splice variant in intron 1 of the RNF11 gene, for which all affected animals are homozygous. We make the remarkable observation that 26% of healthy Belgian Blue animals carry the corresponding variant. We demonstrate in a prospective study design that approximately one third of homozygous mutants die prematurely with major inflammatory lesions, hence explaining the rarity of growth-stunted animals despite the high frequency of carriers. We provide preliminary evidence that heterozygous advantage for an as of yet unidentified phenotype may have caused a selective sweep accounting for the high frequency of the RNF11 c124-2A>G mutation in Belgian Blue Cattle. PMID:22438830

  10. SKIP Is a Component of the Spliceosome Linking Alternative Splicing and the Circadian Clock in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Fangming; Xie, Qiguang; Wang, Huamei; Wang, Ying; Yue, Yanling; Gahura, Ondrej; Ma, Shuangshuang; Liu, Lei; Cao, Ying; Jiao, Yuling; Puta, Frantisek; McClung, C. Robertson; Xu, Xiaodong; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-01-01

    Circadian clocks generate endogenous rhythms in most organisms from cyanobacteria to humans and facilitate entrainment to environmental diurnal cycles, thus conferring a fitness advantage. Both transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms are prominent in the basic network architecture of circadian systems. Posttranscriptional regulation, including mRNA processing, is emerging as a critical step for clock function. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms linking RNA metabolism to the circadian clock network. Here, we report that a conserved SNW/Ski-interacting protein (SKIP) domain protein, SKIP, a splicing factor and component of the spliceosome, is involved in posttranscriptional regulation of circadian clock genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutation in SKIP lengthens the circadian period in a temperature-sensitive manner and affects light input and the sensitivity of the clock to light resetting. SKIP physically interacts with the spliceosomal splicing factor Ser/Arg-rich protein45 and associates with the pre-mRNA of clock genes, such as PSEUDORESPONSE REGULATOR7 (PRR7) and PRR9, and is necessary for the regulation of their alternative splicing and mRNA maturation. Genome-wide investigations reveal that SKIP functions in regulating alternative splicing of many genes, presumably through modulating recognition or cleavage of 5′ and 3′ splice donor and acceptor sites. Our study addresses a fundamental question on how the mRNA splicing machinery contributes to circadian clock function at a posttranscriptional level. PMID:22942380