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Sample records for spongiform encephalopathies memorandum

  1. Public health issues related to animal and human spongiform encephalopathies: memorandum from a WHO meeting.

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) include bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), which was first described in 1986 in the United Kingdom but has occurred subsequently in several other countries. This Memorandum reviews the existing state of knowledge on all the known spongiform encephalopathies, and evaluates the pathways of transmission and associated hazards. The possible implications of the animal diseases, especially BSE, with regard to the use of animal tissues as animal feed, human food, and in the preparation of medicinal and other products for human use are discussed, with recommendations to national health authorities on appropriate measures to minimize the consequences of BSE to public and animal health. PMID:1600580

  2. Medicinal and other products and human and animal transmissible spongiform encephalopathies: memorandum from a WHO meeting.

    PubMed Central

    1997-01-01

    The report in March 1996 of 10 human cases of a novel from of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the United Kingdom, and its possible link to the agent that causes bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), raises many questions about the safety of animal-derived products and by-products entering the food chain or being used in medicine. This Memorandum updates the preventive measures put forward in 1991 to minimize the risks associated with the use of bovine-derived materials in medicinal products and medical devices. PMID:9509622

  3. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also referred to as “mad cow disease” is a chronic, non-febrile, neuro-degenerative disease affecting the central nervous system. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) of domestic animals, of which BSE is a member includes scrapie of sheep...

  4. [Bovine spongiform encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Suárez Fernández, G

    2001-01-01

    An histórical and conceptual review is made about Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy or mad cows disease and an epidemiological analysis as a present and future health problem. This analysis of BSE should not be negative, considering the truths that we know today. PMID:11783042

  5. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies of livestock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases. TSEs have been described in several species including bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle, scrapie in sheep and goats, chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids, tr...

  6. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy: Atypical Pros and Cons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal neurologic diseases that affect several mammalian species including human beings. Four animal TSE agents have been reported: scrapie of sheep and goats; chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer, elk, and moose; transmissible mink encephalopath...

  7. Food Safety: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (Mad Cow Disease).

    PubMed

    Acheson, David W. K.

    2002-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy is just one of a group of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Only recently has it become recognized that transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are likely due to proteins known as prions. Although it has been recognized that transmissible spongiform encephalopathies may readily spread within species, the recent observations that bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle may have originated from another transmissible spongiform encephalopathy in sheep, known as scrapie, is cause for concern. Further, bovine spongiform encephalopathy has now been strongly linked with a universally fatal human neurologic disease known as new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Currently the only approach to preventing bovine spongiform encephalopathy, and subsequent new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, from ingestion of bovine spongiform encephalopathy-infected material is to avoid consumption of contaminated food. Little can be done to treat food that will destroy prions and leave a palatable product. At this stage we are continuing to learn about transmissible spongiform encephalopathies and their implications on human health. This is an ever-changing situation and has an unpredictable element in terms of the extent of the current outbreaks in England and other parts of Europe. PMID:11984426

  8. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies of livestock.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Justin J; Greenlee, M Heather West

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal protein-misfolding neurodegenerative diseases. TSEs have been described in several species, including bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle, scrapie in sheep and goats, chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids, transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) in mink, and Kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans. These diseases are associated with the accumulation of a protease-resistant, disease-associated isoform of the prion protein (called PrP(Sc)) in the central nervous system and other tissues, depending on the host species. Typically, TSEs are acquired through exposure to infectious material, but inherited and spontaneous TSEs also occur. All TSEs share pathologic features and infectious mechanisms but have distinct differences in transmission and epidemiology due to host factors and strain differences encoded within the structure of the misfolded prion protein. The possibility that BSE can be transmitted to humans as the cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease has brought attention to this family of diseases. This review is focused on the TSEs of livestock: bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle and scrapie in sheep and goats. PMID:25991695

  9. Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy and Meat Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Hester J. T.; Knight, Richard S. G.

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) comprise a wide-ranging group of neurodegenerative diseases found in animals and humans. They have diverse causes and geographical distributions, but have similar pathological features, transmissibility and, are ultimately, fatal. Central to all TSEs is the presence of an abnormal form of a normal host protein, namely the prion protein. Because of their potential transmissibility, these diseases have wide public health ramifications.

  10. Experimental Interspecies Transmission Studies of the Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies to Cattle: Comparison to Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy in Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) of animals include scrapie of sheep and goats; transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME); chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer, elk and moose; and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) of cattle. Since the emergence of BSE and its pr...

  11. Typical and atypical cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cattle, first detected in 1986 in the United Kingdom and subsequently in other countries. It is the most likely cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans, but the origin of BSE has not been eluci...

  12. Quantitative Risk Assessment of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Kasuga, Fumiko

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a progressive neurological disease of cattle affecting the central nervous system and was first diagnosed in the United Kingdom (UK) in 1986 (Wells et al., 1987). This disease is one of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) which includes Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans and scrapie in sheep. The causative agent of TSE is considered to be an abnormal form of prion protein. However, the details of its pathogenic mechanism have not been fully identified. Scrapie, which causes neurological symptoms in sheep and goats, has existed in the UK for 200 years (Hoinville, 1996) and spread across the rest of the world in the 1900s (Detwiler & Baylis, 2003). There has been no report so far that scrapie can be transmitted to humans. Initially, BSE was also considered as a disease affecting only animals. However, a variant type of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) was first reported in the UK, and exposure to a BSE agent was suspected (Collinge, Sidle, Meads, Ironside, & Hill, 1996). vCJD is clinically and pathologically different from the sporadic type of CJD, and age at clinical onset of vCJD is younger than sporadic type (Will et al., 1996). Since the UK government announced the possible association between BSE and vCJD in 1996, BSE has become a huge public health concern all over the world. Of particular concern about vCJD, the fatal disease in younger age, distorted consumer confidence in beef safety, and as a result reduced beef consumption has been seen in many BSE-affected countries.

  13. Prion biology relevant to bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Novakofski, J; Brewer, M S; Mateus-Pinilla, N; Killefer, J; McCusker, R H

    2005-06-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer and elk are a threat to agriculture and natural resources, as well as a human health concern. Both diseases are transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE), or prion diseases, caused by autocatalytic conversion of endogenously encoded prion protein (PrP) to an abnormal, neurotoxic conformation designated PrPsc. Most mammalian species are susceptible to TSE, which, despite a range of species-linked names, is caused by a single highly conserved protein, with no apparent normal function. In the simplest sense, TSE transmission can occur because PrPsc is resistant to both endogenous and environmental proteinases, although many details remain unclear. Questions about the transmission of TSE are central to practical issues such as livestock testing, access to international livestock markets, and wildlife management strategies, as well as intangible issues such as consumer confidence in the safety of the meat supply. The majority of BSE cases seem to have been transmitted by feed containing meat and bone meal from infected animals. In the United Kingdom, there was a dramatic decrease in BSE cases after neural tissue and, later, all ruminant tissues were banned from ruminant feed. However, probably because of heightened awareness and widespread testing, there is growing evidence that new variants of BSE are arising "spontaneously," suggesting ongoing surveillance will continue to find infected animals. Interspecies transmission is inefficient and depends on exposure, sequence homology, TSE donor strain, genetic polymorphism of the host, and architecture of the visceral nerves if exposure is by an oral route. Considering the low probability of interspecies transmission, the low efficiency of oral transmission, and the low prion levels in nonnervous tissues, consumption of conventional animal products represents minimal risk. However, detection of rare events is challenging, and TSE

  14. Fundamental immunological problems associated with "transmissible spongiform encephalopathies".

    PubMed

    Ebringer, Alan; Rashid, Taha; Wilson, Clyde

    2015-02-01

    "Bovine spongiform encephalopathy", "scrapie", as well as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and kuru belong to a group of related neurological conditions termed "transmissible spongiform encephalopathies". These diseases are based on the LD50 measurement whereby saline brain homogenates are injected into experimental animals and when 50% of them develop symptoms, this is considered as transmission of the disease, but the gold standard for diagnosis is autopsy examination. However, an untenable assumption is being made in that saline brain homogenates do not cause tissue damage but it is known since the time of Pasteur, that they give rise to "post-rabies vaccination allergic encephalomyelitis". This is the fundamental flaw in the diagnosis of these diseases. A way forward, however, is to examine infectious agents, such as Acinetobacter which show molecular mimicry with myelin and elevated levels of antibodies to this microbe are found in multiple sclerosis patients and animals affected by "bovine spongiform encephalopathy". PMID:25573495

  15. 70 FR 18251 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Minimal-Risk Regions and Importation of Commodities; Finding of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2005-04-08

    ... Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 93, et al. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy... Implementing Procedures (7 CFR part 372). Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Minimal-Risk Regions and... pointed to the four confirmed cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cows of Canadian...

  16. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy in Sweden: an H-type variant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) had never been detected in Sweden until 2006, when the active surveillance identified a case in a 12-year-old cow. The case was an unusual form since several molecular features of the protease-resistant prion protein (PrP**res) were different from classical BSE...

  17. Laboratory activities involving transmissible spongiform encephalopathy causing agents

    PubMed Central

    Leunda, Amaya; Van Vaerenbergh, Bernadette; Baldo, Aline; Roels, Stefan; Herman, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Since the appearance in 1986 of epidemic of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), a new form of neurological disease in cattle which also affected human beings, many diagnostic and research activities have been performed to develop detection and therapeutic tools. A lot of progress was made in better identifying, understanding and controlling the spread of the disease by appropriate monitoring and control programs in European countries. This paper reviews the recent knowledge on pathogenesis, transmission and persistence outside the host of prion, the causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) in mammals with a particular focus on risk (re)assessment and management of biosafety measures to be implemented in diagnostic and research laboratories in Belgium. Also, in response to the need of an increasing number of European diagnostic laboratories stopping TSE diagnosis due to a decreasing number of TSE cases reported in the last years, decontamination procedures and a protocol for decommissioning TSE diagnostic laboratories is proposed. PMID:24055928

  18. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Infectivity in Greater Kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros)

    PubMed Central

    Kirkwood, James K.; Dawson, Michael; Spencer, Yvonne I.; Green, Robert B.; Wells, Gerald A.H.

    2004-01-01

    Of all the species exposed naturally to the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent, the greater kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros), a nondomesticated bovine from Africa, appears to be the most susceptible to the disease. We present the results of mouse bioassay studies to show that, contrary to findings in cattle with BSE in which the tissue distribution of infectivity is the most limited recorded for any of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE), infectivity in greater kudu with BSE is distributed in as wide a range of tissues as occurs in any TSE. BSE agent was also detected in skin, conjunctiva, and salivary gland, tissues in which infectivity has not previously been reported in any naturally occurring TSE. The distribution of infectivity in greater kudu with BSE suggests possible routes for transmission of the disease and highlights the need for further research into the distribution of TSE infectious agents in other host species. PMID:15207051

  19. PRIONS AND THE TRANSMISSIBLE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter is an invited, scholarly review of the mechanism(s) of TSEs for the 2nd edition of Metabolic Encephalopathies. Each chapter in the book assumes a professional knowledge of neuroscience and biochemistry, and the focus of the book is on the metabolic basis of dise...

  20. A collaborative Canadian-United Kingdom evaluation of an immunohistochemistry protocol to diagnose bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of domestic cattle. The disorder was reported in the United Kingdom in the late 1980s and was associated with recycling of ruminant byproducts in cattle feed. In 1996, the bovine disease was reported to be the cause of a...

  1. Stability properties of PrPSc from cattle with experimental transmissible spongiform encephalopathies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs), including scrapie in sheep, chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), are fatal diseases of the nervous system associated with accumulation of misfolded prion protein (PrPSc). Different strains of BSE exist...

  2. Cattle traceability system in Japan for bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Katsuaki; Onodera, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    To promote consumer confidence in the safety of beef and to ensure the proper implementation of eradication measures against bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), the Cattle Traceability Law was approved by the Diet in June 2003 and a cattle traceability system has been in operation in Japan since December 2003. The system enables tracing the cohort and offspring animals of a BSE case within 24 h of its detection. The traceability database system also provides distributors, restaurants and consumers with information on the cattle from which the beef that they sell, serve and consume, originate. PMID:20405448

  3. Progress on low susceptibility mechanisms of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    QING, Li-Li; ZHAO, Hui; LIU, Lin-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), also known as prion diseases, are a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases detected in a wide range of mammalian species. The “protein-only” hypothesis of TSE suggests that prions are transmissible particles devoid of nucleic acid and the primary pathogenic event is thought to be the conversion of cellular prion protein (PrPC) into the disease-associated isoform (PrPSc). According to susceptibility to TSEs, animals can be classified into susceptible species and low susceptibility species. In this review we focus on several species with low susceptibility to TSEs: dogs, rabbits, horses and buffaloes. We summarize recent studies into the characteristics of low susceptibility regarding protein structure, and biochemical and genetic properties. PMID:25297084

  4. [Clinical findings in 50 cows with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)].

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Schicker, E; Pusterla, N; Schönmann, M

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this study was to describe the clinical findings in 50 cows with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). The most important abnormalities were disturbances in behaviour, sensitivity and locomotion. Of 48 cows with behavioural abnormalities, 33 were panic-stricken, 33 were fearful and 32 were restless and nervous. Other behavioural disturbances included bruxism (n = 23), salivation (n = 15), licking of the muzzle (n = 15) and flehmen (n = 8). Hypersensitivity to touching of the head and neck with a pen and reacted by throwing the head sideways, head shaking, curling the muzzle or flehmen and salivating. Hypersensitivity to sound was observed in 41 cows. Hypersensitivity to light was seen in 22 cows. disturbances in locomotion occurred in 44 cows. In 41, there was ataxia, which was generalized in 28 and restricted to the hindend in 13. PMID:9499623

  5. A potential role for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in Neanderthal extinction.

    PubMed

    Underdown, Simon

    2008-01-01

    The Neanderthals were a Eurasian human species of the genus Homo that disappeared approximately 30,000 years ago. The cause or causes of their extinction continues to intrigue specialists and non-specialists alike. Here a contributory role for Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs) is suggested. TSEs could have infected Neanderthal groups as a result of general cannibalistic activity and brain tissue consumption in particular. Further infection could then have taken place through continued cannibalistic activity or via shared used of infected stone tools. A modern human hunter-gatherer proxy has been developed and applied as a hypothetical model to the Neanderthals. This hypothesis suggests that the impact of TSEs on the Neanderthals could have been dramatic and have played a large part in contributing to the processes of Neanderthal extinction. PMID:18280671

  6. Transmission of sheep-bovine spongiform encephalopathy to pigs.

    PubMed

    Hedman, Carlos; Bolea, Rosa; Marín, Belén; Cobrière, Fabien; Filali, Hicham; Vazquez, Francisco; Pitarch, José Luis; Vargas, Antonia; Acín, Cristina; Moreno, Bernardino; Pumarola, Martí; Andreoletti, Olivier; Badiola, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    Experimental transmission of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent has been successfully reported in pigs inoculated via three simultaneous distinct routes (intracerebral, intraperitoneal and intravenous). Sheep derived BSE (Sh-BSE) is transmitted more efficiently than the original cattle-BSE isolate in a transgenic mouse model expressing porcine prion protein. However, the neuropathology and distribution of Sh-BSE in pigs as natural hosts, and susceptibility to this agent, is unknown. In the present study, seven pigs were intracerebrally inoculated with Sh-BSE prions. One pig was euthanized for analysis in the preclinical disease stage. The remaining six pigs developed neurological signs and histopathology revealed severe spongiform changes accompanied by astrogliosis and microgliosis throughout the central nervous system. Intracellular and neuropil-associated pathological prion protein (PrP(Sc)) deposition was consistently observed in different brain sections and corroborated by Western blot. PrP(Sc) was detected by immunohistochemistry and enzyme immunoassay in the following tissues in at least one animal: lymphoid tissues, peripheral nerves, gastrointestinal tract, skeletal muscle, adrenal gland and pancreas. PrP(Sc) deposition was revealed by immunohistochemistry alone in the retina, optic nerve and kidney. These results demonstrate the efficient transmission of Sh-BSE in pigs and show for the first time that in this species propagation of bovine PrP(Sc) in a wide range of peripheral tissues is possible. These results provide important insight into the distribution and detection of prions in non-ruminant animals. PMID:26742788

  7. 77 FR 20319 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 93 RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products Correction In proposed rule...

  8. 78 FR 73993 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, and 98 RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products Corrections In rule document 2013-28228 appearing...

  9. Molecular aspects of disease pathogenesis in the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Priola, Suzette A; Vorberg, Ina

    2004-01-01

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases are a group of rare, fatal, and transmissible neurodegenerative diseases that include kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans, scrapie in sheep, transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME), and chronic wasting disease (CWD) in mule deer and elk. Over the last 20 yr, they have gone from a fascinating but relatively obscure group of diseases to one that is a major agricultural and economic problem as well as a threat to human health. The shift in the relative impact of the TSE diseases began in the late 1970s when the United Kingdom altered the process by which animal carcasses were rendered to provide a protein supplement (i.e., meat and bone meal) to sheep, cattle, and other livestock. Several years later a new disease was recognized in the British cattle population. The pathological and immunohistochemical characteristics of the disease clearly placed it among the TSEs. The new disease was named bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) by the scientific community and "mad cow disease" by the less-than-scientific press. At its peak in the UK, several thousand cattle a year were diagnosed with BSE, and millions of cattle were slaughtered. Introduction of the specified offals ban as well as banning the practice of feeding ruminants to other ruminants has led to a drastic decrease in the number of yearly BSE cases in the UK (less than 500 in 2003), and the epidemic is clearly on the wane. However, BSE has now spread throughout the rest of Europe, as well as to Japan, Russia, Canada, and Israel and thus remains a worldwide problem.A primary concern following the identification of BSE in 1985 was that it might cross species barriers to infect humans. Initially, it was thought that transmission of BSE to humans was unlikely, given that humans appeared to be resistant to scrapie, an animal TSE that had been endemic in British sheep for centuries. However, a few years after BSE was first recognized, a

  10. Excretion of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy Infectivity in Urine

    PubMed Central

    Gregori, Luisa; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Alexeeva, Irina; Budka, Herbert

    2008-01-01

    The route of transmission of most naturally acquired transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) infections remains speculative. To investigate urine as a potential source of TSE exposure, we used a sensitive method for detection and quantitation of TSE infectivity. Pooled urine collected from 22 hamsters showing clinical signs of 263K scrapie contained 3.8 ± 0.9 infectious doses/mL of infectivity. Titration of homogenates of kidneys and urinary bladders from the same animals gave concentrations 20,000-fold greater. Histologic and immunohistochemical examination of these same tissues showed no indications of inflammatory or other pathologic changes except for occasional deposits of disease-associated prion protein in kidneys. Although the source of TSE infectivity in urine remains unresolved, these results establish that TSE infectivity is excreted in urine and may thereby play a role in the horizontal transmission of natural TSEs. The results also indicate potential risk for TSE transmission from human urine–derived hormones and other medicines. PMID:18760007

  11. Highly sensitive detection of small ruminant bovine spongiform encephalopathy within transmissible spongiform encephalopathy mixes by serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification.

    PubMed

    Gough, Kevin C; Bishop, Keith; Maddison, Ben C

    2014-11-01

    It is assumed that sheep and goats consumed the same bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)-contaminated meat and bone meal that was fed to cattle and precipitated the BSE epidemic in the United Kingdom that peaked more than 20 years ago. Despite intensive surveillance for cases of BSE within the small ruminant populations of the United Kingdom and European Union, no instances of BSE have been detected in sheep, and in only two instances has BSE been discovered in goats. If BSE is present within the small ruminant populations, it may be at subclinical levels, may manifest as scrapie, or may be masked by coinfection with scrapie. To determine whether BSE is potentially circulating at low levels within the European small ruminant populations, highly sensitive assays that can specifically detect BSE, even within the presence of scrapie prion protein, are required. Here, we present a novel assay based on the specific amplification of BSE PrP(Sc) using the serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification assay (sPMCA), which specifically amplified small amounts of ovine and caprine BSE agent which had been mixed into a range of scrapie-positive brain homogenates. We detected the BSE prion protein within a large excess of classical, atypical, and CH1641 scrapie isolates. In a blind trial, this sPMCA-based assay specifically amplified BSE PrP(Sc) within brain mixes with 100% specificity and 97% sensitivity when BSE agent was diluted into scrapie-infected brain homogenates at 1% (vol/vol). PMID:25143565

  12. Susceptibility of European red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus) to alimentary challenge with bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Dagleish, Mark P; Martin, Stuart; Steele, Philip; Finlayson, Jeanie; Eaton, Samantha L; Sisó, Sílvia; Stewart, Paula; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Hamilton, Scott; Pang, Yvonne; Chianini, Francesca; Reid, Hugh W; Goldmann, Wilfred; González, Lorenzo; Castilla, Joaquín; Jeffrey, Martin

    2015-01-01

    European red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus) are susceptible to the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, one of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, when challenged intracerebrally but their susceptibility to alimentary challenge, the presumed natural route of transmission, is unknown. To determine this, eighteen deer were challenged via stomach tube with a large dose of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent and clinical signs, gross and histological lesions, presence and distribution of abnormal prion protein and the attack rate recorded. Only a single animal developed clinical disease, and this was acute with both neurological and respiratory signs, at 1726 days post challenge although there was significant (27.6%) weight loss in the preceding 141 days. The clinically affected animal had histological lesions of vacuolation in the neuronal perikaryon and neuropil, typical of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Abnormal prion protein, the diagnostic marker of transmissible encephalopathies, was primarily restricted to the central and peripheral nervous systems although a very small amount was present in tingible body macrophages in the lymphoid patches of the caecum and colon. Serial protein misfolding cyclical amplification, an in vitro ultra-sensitive diagnostic technique, was positive for neurological tissue from the single clinically diseased deer. All other alimentary challenged deer failed to develop clinical disease and were negative for all other investigations. These findings show that transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy to European red deer via the alimentary route is possible but the transmission rate is low. Additionally, when deer carcases are subjected to the same regulations that ruminants in Europe with respect to the removal of specified offal from the human food chain, the zoonotic risk of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, the cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, from consumption of venison is probably

  13. Identification of a heritable polymorphism in the bovine prion gene associated with genetic transmissible spongiform encephalopathy: evidence of heritable BSE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) of cattle. Classical BSE is associated with ingestion of BSE-contaminated feedstuffs. H- and L-type BSE, collectively known as atypical BSE, differ from classical BSE by displaying a different di...

  14. Identification of a heritable polymorphism in bovine PRNP associated with genetic transmissible spongiform encephalopathy: evidence of heritable BSE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) of cattle. Classical BSE is associated with ingestion of BSE-contaminated feedstuffs. H- and L-type BSE, collectively known as atypical BSE, differ from classical BSE by displaying a different disease phenoty...

  15. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy: what is "Atypical BSE" and can we detect it?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) agents induce fatal neurodegenerative diseases in humans and in some other mammalian species. Human TSEs include Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD), Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome, Kuru and Fatal Familial Insomnia (FFI). In animals, several d...

  16. 76 FR 38667 - Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... blood and blood products and human cells, tissues and cellular and tissue-based products. FDA intends to... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies Advisory...

  17. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy: are the cows mad or full of carbohydrates?

    PubMed

    Frey, Jacques

    2002-02-01

    The non-forage feeding of dairy cows rich in fast absorption carbohydrates, the low value of their euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp suggest a dysregulation of carbohydrate metabolism able to produce neurodegenerative disorders. Comparisons between Alzheimer's disease developed in diabetes mellitus and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) direct the discussion of the origin of BSE not only towards a contamination by prion proteins. PMID:11939480

  18. 78 FR 72859 - Concurrence With OIE Risk Designations for Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ... spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) risk designations for 14 regions. The OIE recognizes these regions as being of either negligible risk for BSE or of controlled risk for BSE. We are taking this action based on... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Concurrence With OIE Risk Designations for Bovine...

  19. Comparative aspects of bovine spongiform encephalopathy isolates found in the U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) can be subdivided into at least three groups: classical, H-type, and L-type. The latter 2 designations are based on higher or lower apparent molecular mass profiles of the unglycosylated PrP**Sc band in a western blot and are collectively referred to as atypica...

  20. Pathobiology and diagnosis of animal transmissible spongiform encephalopathies: current knowledge, research gaps, and opportunities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal neurologic diseases that can affect several animal species and human beings. There are four animal TSE agents found in the United States: scrapie of sheep and goats; chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer, elk, and moose; transmissible mink ...

  1. Fluorescence Spectroscopy of the Retina for the Screening of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Ujjal; Graham, Catherine; Czub, Stefanie; Dudas, Sandor; Rasmussen, Mark A; Casey, Thomas A; Petrich, Jacob W

    2016-01-13

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) are progressive, neurodegenerative disorders, of which bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is of special concern because it is infectious and debilitating to humans. The possibility of using fluorescence spectroscopy to screen for BSE in cattle was explored. Fluorescence spectra from the retinas of experimentally infected BSE-positive cattle with clinical disease were compared with those from both sham-inoculated and non-inoculated BSE-negative cattle. The distinct intensity difference of about 4-10-fold between the spectra of the BSE-positive and the BSE-negative (sham-inoculated and non-inoculated) eyes suggests the basis for a means of developing a rapid, noninvasive examination of BSE in particular and TSEs in general. PMID:26623498

  2. Biochemical and immunohistochemical characterization of feline spongiform encephalopathy in a German captive cheetah.

    PubMed

    Eiden, Martin; Hoffmann, Christine; Balkema-Buschmann, Anne; Müller, Matthias; Baumgartner, Katrin; Groschup, Martin H

    2010-11-01

    Feline spongiform encephalopathy (FSE) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy that affects domestic cats (Felis catus) and captive wild members of the family Felidae. In this report we describe a case of FSE in a captive cheetah from the zoological garden of Nuremberg. The biochemical examination revealed a BSE-like pattern. Disease-associated scrapie prion protein (PrP(Sc)) was widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous system, as well as in the lymphoreticular system and in other tissues of the affected animal, as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and/or immunoblotting. Moreover, we report for the first time the use of the protein misfolding cyclic amplification technique for highly sensitive detection of PrP(Sc) in the family Felidae. The widespread PrP(Sc) deposition suggests a simultaneous lymphatic and neural spread of the FSE agent. The detection of PrP(Sc) in the spleen indicates a potential for prion infectivity of cheetah blood. PMID:20660146

  3. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: how safe is eating beef?

    PubMed

    Roma, Andres A; Prayson, Richard A

    2005-03-01

    Cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, mad cow disease) have been found in North American cattle. Its human counterpart, called variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (variant CJD), is rare but seems to be linked to eating diseased beef. Many questions remain about these diseases, such as why young people seem at greater risk of variant CJD. Also, are some people more genetically at risk for acquiring variant CJD than others? PMID:15825799

  4. Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies: a family of etiologically complex diseases--a review.

    PubMed

    Bounias, Michel; Purdey, Mark

    2002-10-01

    The upsurge of 'mad cow disease' with its human implications has raised the problem of the etiological mechanisms and the similarities or differences underlying the family of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Structural properties of prions are reviewed in connection with their natural distribution and functions, factors of transmissibility and mechanisms of pathogenicity. Polymorphism is examined in relation to disease phenotype variants. The role of oxidative factors is emphasized, while raising complexity about the role of copper ions. Further investigation directions are suggested. PMID:12389776

  5. Public risk perception of relaxation of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) measures in Europe.

    PubMed

    Dressel, K; Perazzini, A; Ru, G; Van Wassenhove, W

    2011-01-01

    The so-called "TSE roadmap" was published by the European Commission on July 15, 2005. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) roadmap suggests relaxation of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle and other animal transmissible spongiform encephalopathies measures in the short, medium, and long term. According to the TSE roadmap, "Any relaxation of BSE measures following the scientific assessment should be initiated by an open discussion with all stakeholders and supported by a strong communication strategy" ( European Commission 2005 , 5). Bearing this in mind, a social scientific project was designed to (1) involve different stakeholder groups, governmental risk managers, and their scientific advisors and (2) obtain their perception of the TSE roadmap and of its implications for precautionary consumer protection in five European Union (EU) Member States. This study describes the risk perception and risk management of TSE in Europe as exemplified by the TSE roadmap. The following query guided the international comparative study: How is TSE risk perceived by four interviewed stakeholder groups in five studied countries? The risk perceptions of TSE of risk managers from the ministries in charge in Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, and the United Kingdom, as well as their scientific advisors and stakeholder groups, were determined. The stakeholder groups were from three different areas involved with TSE, including farmers, consumers, and the meat/food industry. The issue to be addressed is roadmapping an adequate instrument for stakeholder involvement and for risk decision making. PMID:22043919

  6. Epidemiological observations on spongiform encephalopathies in captive wild animals in the British Isles.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, J K; Cunningham, A A

    1994-09-24

    Since 1986, scrapie-like spongiform encephalopathy has been diagnosed in 19 captive wild animals of eight species at or from eight zoological collections in the British Isles. The affected animals have comprised members of the family Bovidae: one nyala (Tragelaphus angasi), four eland (Taurotragus oryx), and six greater kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros), one gemsbok (Oryx gazella), one Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx), and one scimitar-horned oryx (Oryx dammah), and members of the family Felidae: four cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) and one puma (Felis concolor). In addition, three cases of a spongiform encephalopathy of unknown aetiology have been reported in ostriches (Struthio camellus) from two zoos in north west Germany. Three features suggest that some of these cases may have been caused by the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). First, they have been temporally and geographically coincident with the BSE epidemic. Secondly, in all the ungulates for which details are available, it is possible that either the affected animal itself, or the herd into which it was born or moved, had been exposed to proprietary feeds containing ruminant-derived protein or other potentially contaminated material, and all the carnivores had been fed parts of cattle carcases judged unfit for human consumption. Thirdly, the pathological results of inoculating mice with a homogenate of fixed brain tissue from the nyala and from one greater kudu were similar to the results of inoculating mice with BSE brain tissue. PMID:7817514

  7. Autoantibodies to Brain Components and Antibodies to Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Are Present in Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tiwana, Harmale; Wilson, Clyde; Pirt, John; Cartmell, William; Ebringer, Alan

    1999-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a neurological disorder, predominantly of British cattle, which belongs to the group of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies together with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), kuru, and scrapie. Autoantibodies to brain neurofilaments have been previously described in patients with CJD and kuru and in sheep affected by scrapie. Spongiform-like changes have also been observed in chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, at least in rabbits and guinea pigs, and in these conditions autoantibodies to myelin occur. We report here that animals with BSE have elevated levels of immunoglobulin A autoantibodies to brain components, i.e., neurofilaments (P < 0.001) and myelin (P < 0.001), as well as to Acinetobacter calcoaceticus (P < 0.001), saprophytic microbes found in soil which have sequences cross-reacting with bovine neurofilaments and myelin, but there were no antibody elevations against Agrobacterium tumefaciens or Escherichia coli. The relevance of such mucosal autoantibodies or antibacterial antibodies to the pathology of BSE and its possible link to prions requires further evaluation. PMID:10569779

  8. Assessing the Susceptibility of Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Deer Prion Protein to Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vickery, Christopher M.; Lockey, Richard; Holder, Thomas M.; Thorne, Leigh; Beck, Katy E.; Wilson, Christina; Denyer, Margaret; Sheehan, John; Marsh, Sarah; Webb, Paul R.; Dexter, Ian; Norman, Angela; Popescu, Emma; Schneider, Amanda; Holden, Paul; Griffiths, Peter C.; Plater, Jane M.; Dagleish, Mark P.; Martin, Stuart; Telling, Glenn C.; Simmons, Marion M.

    2014-01-01

    Several transgenic mouse models have been developed which facilitate the transmission of chronic wasting disease (CWD) of cervids and allow prion strain discrimination. The present study was designed to assess the susceptibility of the prototypic mouse line, Tg(CerPrP)1536+/−, to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prions, which have the ability to overcome species barriers. Tg(CerPrP)1536+/− mice challenged with red deer-adapted BSE resulted in 90% to 100% attack rates, and BSE from cattle failed to transmit, indicating agent adaptation in the deer. PMID:24257620

  9. Generation of a Persistently Infected MDBK Cell Line with Natural Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE)

    PubMed Central

    Tark, Dongseob; Kim, Hyojin; Neale, Michael H.; Kim, Minjeong; Sohn, Hyunjoo; Lee, Yoonhee; Cho, Insoo; Joo, Yiseok; Windl, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a zoonotic transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) thought to be caused by the same prion strain as variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). Unlike scrapie and chronic wasting disease there is no cell culture model allowing the replication of proteinase K resistant BSE (PrPBSE) and the further in vitro study of this disease. We have generated a cell line based on the Madin-Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK) cell line over-expressing the bovine prion protein. After exposure to naturally BSE-infected bovine brain homogenate this cell line has shown to replicate and accumulate PrPBSE and maintain infection up to passage 83 after initial challenge. Collectively, we demonstrate, for the first time, that the BSE agent can infect cell lines over-expressing the bovine prion protein similar to other prion diseases. These BSE infected cells will provide a useful tool to facilitate the study of potential therapeutic agents and the diagnosis of BSE. PMID:25647616

  10. Atypical transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in ruminants: a challenge for disease surveillance and control.

    PubMed

    Seuberlich, Torsten; Heim, Dagmar; Zurbriggen, Andreas

    2010-11-01

    Since 1987, when bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) emerged as a novel disease in cattle, enormous efforts were undertaken to monitor and control the disease in ruminants worldwide. The driving force was its high economic impact, which resulted from trade restrictions and the loss of consumer confidence in beef products, the latter because BSE turned out to be a fatal zoonosis, causing variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in human beings. The ban on meat and bone meal in livestock feed and the removal of specified risk materials from the food chain were the main measures to successfully prevent infection in cattle and to protect human beings from BSE exposure. However, although BSE is now under control, previously unknown, so-called atypical transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) in cattle and small ruminants have been identified by enhanced disease surveillance. This report briefly reviews and summarizes the current level of knowledge on the spectrum of TSEs in cattle and small ruminants and addresses the question of the extent to which such atypical TSEs have an effect on disease surveillance and control strategies. PMID:21088166

  11. Central nervous system gene expression changes in a transgenic mouse model for bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression analysis has proven to be a very useful tool to gain knowledge of the factors involved in the pathogenesis of diseases, particularly in the initial or preclinical stages. With the aim of finding new data on the events occurring in the Central Nervous System in animals affected with Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, a comprehensive genome wide gene expression study was conducted at different time points of the disease on mice genetically modified to model the bovine species brain in terms of cellular prion protein. An accurate analysis of the information generated by microarray technique was the key point to assess the biological relevance of the data obtained in terms of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy pathogenesis. Validation of the microarray technique was achieved by RT-PCR confirming the RNA change and immunohistochemistry techniques that verified that expression changes were translated into variable levels of protein for selected genes. Our study reveals changes in the expression of genes, some of them not previously associated with prion diseases, at early stages of the disease previous to the detection of the pathological prion protein, that might have a role in neuronal degeneration and several transcriptional changes showing an important imbalance in the Central Nervous System homeostasis in advanced stages of the disease. Genes whose expression is altered at early stages of the disease should be considered as possible therapeutic targets and potential disease markers in preclinical diagnostic tool development. Genes non-previously related to prion diseases should be taken into consideration for further investigations. PMID:22035425

  12. Detection of PrP(Sc) in peripheral tissues of clinically affected cattle after oral challenge with bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a fatal neurodegenerative prion disease that affects cattle and can be transmitted to human beings as new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). A protease-resistant, disease-associated isoform of the prion protein (PrP**Sc) accumulates in the central ner...

  13. [Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: the most frequent spongiform encephalopathy in humans].

    PubMed

    Kulczycki, J

    2001-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) which for many years was interpreted as one of degenerative brain processes is the most frequent spongiform encephalopathy caused by prions--molecules of erroneously conformed protein. In only few percent ill people occurrence of this pathogenic factor occurs as a result of mutation in gene PrP. Because transmissibility of prions was proved it should be supposed that in other cases CJD is a result of "infection" Susceptibility to prions depends in large part on specificity of host proteins. It creates certain individual and species specific barriers. At the present time we witness, fortunately only in single cases, occurrence in people variant CJD caused by prions originated from animals affected by "mad cow disease". Prognosis for human population is dependent on the effectiveness of between species barrier for prions. PMID:11556078

  14. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: background, evolution, and current concerns.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, P.; Will, R. G.; Bradley, R.; Asher, D. M.; Detwiler, L.

    2001-01-01

    The epidemic of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in the United Kingdom, which began in 1986 and has affected nearly 200,000 cattle, is waning to a conclusion, but leaves in its wake an outbreak of human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, most probably resulting from the consumption of beef products contaminated by central nervous system tissue. Although averaging only 10-15 cases a year since its first appearance in 1994, its future magnitude and geographic distribution (in countries that have imported infected British cattle or cattle products, or have endogenous BSE) cannot yet be predicted. The possibility that large numbers of apparently healthy persons might be incubating the disease raises concerns about iatrogenic transmissions through instrumentation (surgery and medical diagnostic procedures) and blood and organ donations. Government agencies in many countries continue to implement new measures to minimize this risk. PMID:11266289

  15. Decontamination studies with the agents of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and scrapie.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D M; Fraser, H; McConnell, I; Brown, D A; Brown, K L; Lamza, K A; Smith, G R

    1994-01-01

    Macerates of bovine brain infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent, and rodent brain infected with the 263K or ME7 strains of scrapie agent, were subjected to porous-load autoclaving at temperatures between 134 and 138 degrees C for < or = 60 min. Bioassay in rodents showed that none of the regimens produced complete inactivation. Homogenates of BSE-infected bovine brain were exposed for < or = 120 min to solutions of sodium hypochlorite or sodium dichloroisocyanurate containing < or = 16,500 ppm available chlorine. There was no detectable survival of infectivity after the hypochlorite treatments but none of the dichloroisocyanurate solutions produced complete inactivation. Homogenates of BSE-infected bovine brain, and rodent brain infected with the 263K and ME7 strains of scrapie agent, were exposed for < or = 120 min to 1M or 2M sodium hydroxide but no procedure produced complete inactivation of all agents tested. PMID:7832638

  16. Prion Diseases: Update on Mad Cow Disease, Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, and the Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Janka, Jacqueline; Maldarelli, Frank

    2004-08-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disorders that share a common spongiform histopathology. TSEs may be transmitted in a sporadic, familial, iatrogenic, or zoonotic fashion. The putative infectious agent of TSE, the prion, represents a novel paradigm of infectious disease with disease transmission in the absence of nucleic acid. Several small but spectacular epidemics of TSEs in man have prompted widespread public health and food safety concerns. Although TSEs affect a comparatively small number of individuals, prion research has revealed fascinating insights of direct relevance to common illnesses. This paper reviews recent advances that have shed new light on the nature of prions and TSEs. PMID:15265460

  17. [Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and other human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Part I].

    PubMed

    Zaborowski, Adam

    2004-01-01

    In the first part of this work the main problems of prion diseases--also called transmissible cerebral amyloidoses (TCA) or subacute (transmissible) encephalopathies (SSE, TSE)--and clinical symptoms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are presented. Some problems of neuropathology of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and basic informations about other human prion diseases will be presented in the second part. The growth of the interest in prion diseases during last years is caused by the problem of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or "mad cow disease") and its transmission into a human. The new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (nvCJD) has appeared. Prion diseases: Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS), kuru, fatal familial insomnia (FFI) and particularly the most frequent of them--Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)--have nonspecific, sometimes variable clinical (psychopathological and neurological) symptoms. The imaging, EEG, cerebrospinal fluid tests and other laboratory tests are not specific either and their diagnostic value is limited. Neuropathological studies are needed but their interpretation is often difficult. The only certain diagnostic marker for TSE is the presence of PrP(Sc), the prion protein, which is presently believed to be a direct cause for all transmissible cerebral amyloidoses (TCA). PMID:15307293

  18. Post-translational changes to PrP alter transmissible spongiform encephalopathy strain properties

    PubMed Central

    Cancellotti, Enrico; Mahal, Sukhvir P; Somerville, Robert; Diack, Abigail; Brown, Deborah; Piccardo, Pedro; Weissmann, Charles; Manson, Jean C

    2013-01-01

    The agents responsible for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), or prion diseases, contain as a major component PrPSc, an abnormal conformer of the host glycoprotein PrPC. TSE agents are distinguished by differences in phenotypic properties in the host, which nevertheless can contain PrPSc with the same amino-acid sequence. If PrP alone carries information defining strain properties, these must be encoded by post-translational events. Here we investigated whether the glycosylation status of host PrP affects TSE strain characteristics. We inoculated wild-type mice with three TSE strains passaged through transgenic mice with PrP devoid of glycans at the first, second or both N-glycosylation sites. We compared the infectious properties of the emerging isolates with TSE strains passaged in wild-type mice by in vivo strain typing and by the standard scrapie cell assay in vitro. Strain-specific characteristics of the 79A TSE strain changed when PrPSc was devoid of one or both glycans. Thus infectious properties of a TSE strain can be altered by post-translational changes to PrP which we propose result in the selection of mutant TSE strains. PMID:23395905

  19. A stochastic model of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy epidemic in Canada.

    PubMed

    Oraby, Tamer; Al-Zoughool, Mustafa; Elsaadany, Susie; Krewski, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) appeared in the United Kingdom in the mid 1980s, and has been attributed to the use of meat and bone meal (MBM) in cattle feed contaminated with a scrapie-like agent. Import of infectious materials from a country where BSE has occurred is believed to be the major factor underlying the spread of the BSE epidemic to other countries. This study presents a new stochastic model developed to estimate risk of BSE from importation of cattle infected with the BSE agent. The model describes the propagation of the BSE agent through the Canadian cattle herd through rendering and feeding processes, following importation of cattle with infectious prions. This model was used estimate the annual number of newly infected animals each year over the period 1980-2019. Model predictions suggested that the number of BSE infections in Canada might have been approximately 40-fold greater than the actual number of clinically diagnosed cases. Under complete compliance with the 2007 ban on feeding MBM, this model further predicts that BSE is disappearing from the Canadian cattle system. A series of sensitivity analyses was also conducted to test the robustness of model predictions to alternative assumptions about factors affecting the evolution of the Canadian BSE epidemic. PMID:27556562

  20. Emergence of a novel bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prion from an atypical H-type BSE

    PubMed Central

    Masujin, Kentaro; Okada, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Matsuura, Yuichi; Imamura, Morikazu; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Murayama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The H-type of atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (H-BSE) was serially passaged in bovinized transgenic (TgBoPrP) mice. At the fourth passage, most challenged mice showed a typical H-BSE phenotype with incubation periods of 223 ± 7.8 days. However, a different phenotype of BSE prion with shorter incubation periods of 109 ± 4 days emerged in a minor subset of the inoculated mice. The latter showed distinct clinical signs, brain pathology, and abnormal prion protein profiles as compared to H-BSE and other known BSE strains in mice. This novel prion was transmitted intracerebrally to cattle, with incubation periods of 14.8 ± 1.5 months, with phenotypes that differed from those of other bovine prion strains. These data suggest that intraspecies transmission of H-BSE in cattle allows the emergence of a novel BSE strain. Therefore, the continuation of feed ban programs may be necessary to exclude the recycling of H-BSE prions, which appear to arise spontaneously, in livestock. Such measures should help to reduce the risks from both novel and known strains of BSE. PMID:26948374

  1. Emergence of a novel bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prion from an atypical H-type BSE.

    PubMed

    Masujin, Kentaro; Okada, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Matsuura, Yuichi; Imamura, Morikazu; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Murayama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The H-type of atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (H-BSE) was serially passaged in bovinized transgenic (TgBoPrP) mice. At the fourth passage, most challenged mice showed a typical H-BSE phenotype with incubation periods of 223 ± 7.8 days. However, a different phenotype of BSE prion with shorter incubation periods of 109 ± 4 days emerged in a minor subset of the inoculated mice. The latter showed distinct clinical signs, brain pathology, and abnormal prion protein profiles as compared to H-BSE and other known BSE strains in mice. This novel prion was transmitted intracerebrally to cattle, with incubation periods of 14.8 ± 1.5 months, with phenotypes that differed from those of other bovine prion strains. These data suggest that intraspecies transmission of H-BSE in cattle allows the emergence of a novel BSE strain. Therefore, the continuation of feed ban programs may be necessary to exclude the recycling of H-BSE prions, which appear to arise spontaneously, in livestock. Such measures should help to reduce the risks from both novel and known strains of BSE. PMID:26948374

  2. Assessing transmissible spongiform encephalopathy species barriers with an in vitro prion protein conversion assay.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christopher J; Carlson, Christina M; Morawski, Aaron R; Manthei, Alyson; Cashman, Neil R

    2015-01-01

    Studies to understanding interspecies transmission of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs, prion diseases) are challenging in that they typically rely upon lengthy and costly in vivo animal challenge studies. A number of in vitro assays have been developed to aid in measuring prion species barriers, thereby reducing animal use and providing quicker results than animal bioassays. Here, we present the protocol for a rapid in vitro prion conversion assay called the conversion efficiency ratio (CER) assay. In this assay cellular prion protein (PrPC) from an uninfected host brain is denatured at both pH 7.4 and 3.5 to produce two substrates. When the pH 7.4 substrate is incubated with TSE agent, the amount of PrPC that converts to a proteinase K (PK)-resistant state is modulated by the original host's species barrier to the TSE agent. In contrast, PrPC in the pH 3.5 substrate is misfolded by any TSE agent. By comparing the amount of PK-resistant prion protein in the two substrates, an assessment of the host's species barrier can be made. We show that the CER assay correctly predicts known prion species barriers of laboratory mice and, as an example, show some preliminary results suggesting that bobcats (Lynx rufus) may be susceptible to white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) chronic wasting disease agent. PMID:25867521

  3. Assessing transmissible spongiform encephalopathy species barriers with an in vitro prion protein conversion assay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Carlson, Christina M.; Morawski, Aaron R.; Manthei, Alyson; Cashman, Neil R.

    2015-01-01

    Studies to understanding interspecies transmission of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs, prion diseases) are challenging in that they typically rely upon lengthy and costly in vivo animal challenge studies. A number of in vitro assays have been developed to aid in measuring prion species barriers, thereby reducing animal use and providing quicker results than animal bioassays. Here, we present the protocol for a rapid in vitroprion conversion assay called the conversion efficiency ratio (CER) assay. In this assay cellular prion protein (PrPC) from an uninfected host brain is denatured at both pH 7.4 and 3.5 to produce two substrates. When the pH 7.4 substrate is incubated with TSE agent, the amount of PrPC that converts to a proteinase K (PK)-resistant state is modulated by the original host’s species barrier to the TSE agent. In contrast, PrPC in the pH 3.5 substrate is misfolded by any TSE agent. By comparing the amount of PK-resistant prion protein in the two substrates, an assessment of the host’s species barrier can be made. We show that the CER assay correctly predicts known prion species barriers of laboratory mice and, as an example, show some preliminary results suggesting that bobcats (Lynx rufus) may be susceptible to white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) chronic wasting disease agent.

  4. Comparative studies on the thermostability of five strains of transmissible-spongiform-encephalopathy agent.

    PubMed

    Fernie, Karen; Steele, Philip J; Taylor, David M; Somerville, Robert A

    2007-08-01

    The causal infectious agents of TSEs (transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases) are renowned for their resistance to complete inactivation. Survival of TSE infectivity after autoclaving potentially compromises many procedures where TSE infectivity may be present, including surgical instrument sterilization. In the present study, the heat inactivation properties of five different TSE agents were tested in a variety of experiments by exposing them to a range of heat inactivation conditions. Although TSE infectivity was reduced after heating to 200 degrees C in a hot air oven, substantial amounts of infectivity remained. Unlike wet heat inactivation, no TSE strain-dependent differences were observed in the reduction in the amounts of infectivity produced by dry heat inactivation. However, the incubation periods of mice infected with one dry heated TSE strain, ME7, were substantially prolonged, whereas there was little or no effect for two other TSE models. Varying autoclaving conditions for three TSE strains between 132 and 138 degrees C, and times of exposure between 30 and 120 min, had little or no effect on the recovery of TSE infectivity. The results illustrate the limitations of TSE agent inactivation using heat-based methods. The results support the hypothesis that the structures of TSE agents are stabilized during heat-inactivation procedures, rendering them much more refractory to inactivation. This may occur through dehydration of the causal agents, specifically through the removal of the water of solvation from agent structures and hence stabilize interactions between prion protein and TSE agent-specific ligands. PMID:17331068

  5. The evolution of risk perceptions related to bovine spongiform encephalopathy--Canadian consumer and producer behavior.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Goddard, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    In this study the dynamics of risk perceptions related to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) held by Canadian consumers and cow-calf producers were evaluated. Since the first domestic case of BSE in 2003, Canadian consumers and cow-calf producers have needed to make decisions on whether or not their purchasing/production behavior should change. Such changes in their behavior may relate to their levels of risk perceptions about BSE, risk perceptions that may be evolving over time and be affected by BSE media information available. An econometric analysis of the behavior of consumers and cow-calf producers might identify the impacts of evolving BSE risk perceptions. Risk perceptions related to BSE are evaluated through observed market behavior, an approach that differs from traditional stated preference approaches to eliciting risk perceptions at a particular point in time. BSE risk perceptions may be specified following a Social Amplification of Risk Framework (SARF) derived from sociology, psychology, and economics. Based on the SARF, various quality and quantity indices related to BSE media information are used as explanatory variables in risk perception equations. Risk perceptions are approximated using a predictive difference approach as defined by Liu et al. (1998). Results showed that Canadian consumer and cow-calf producer risk perceptions related to BSE have been amplified or attenuated by both quantity and quality of BSE media information. Government policies on risk communications need to address the different roles of BSE information in Canadian consumers' and cow-calf producers' behavior. PMID:21218347

  6. Slow virus disease: deciphering conflicting data on the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) also called prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Frank O; Fermin, Cesar D

    2005-11-01

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) that manifest as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, as scrapie in sheep and goats, mad cow disease in cattle, or chronic wasting disease in cervids (deer) represent a serious human health crisis and a significant economical problem. Despite much research, the nature of the elusive pathogen directly involved with TSE is currently unresolved. This article reviews current pathogen-cell plasma membrane properties, showing that the primary biochemical marker of the prion disease is used as a receptor by the intracellular bacterium Brucella abortus. Such observation makes plausible the role for the prion in the pathogenesis of TSE, and supports the concept that Spiroplasma, a wall-less bacterium, may be a transmissible agent of TSE. Over the past three decades, we have published convincing evidence that Spiroplasma infection is associated with TSE. The bacterial-prion-receptor concept by other laboratories support a model for TSE wherein a Spiroplasma bacterium can bind to prion receptors (alone or with anchors) on the cell surface lipid raft, allowing entry of the microbe into the cell to initiate infection. The relevance of this new concept is that it offers a new window for future research involving a bacterium in the pathogenesis of TSE. Data from the bacterial-prion-receptor model will aid in the development diagnostic tests and/or treatment protocols for TSE. PMID:16276518

  7. The Canadian Management of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy in Historical and Scientific Perspective, 1990-2014.

    PubMed

    Quimby, Alexandra E; Shamy, Michel C F

    2015-11-01

    On February 11, 2015, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency announced that a cow born and raised in Alberta had tested positive for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly known as mad cow disease. BSE is a prion disease of cattle that, when transmitted to humans, produces a fatal neurodegenerative disease known as variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. We believe that this latest case of BSE in Canadian cattle suggests the timeliness of a review of the management of BSE in Canada from a historically and scientifically informed perspective. In this article, we ask: how did the Canadian management of BSE between 1990 and 2014 engage with the contemporary understanding of BSE's human health implications? We propose that Canadian policies largely ignored the implicit medical nature of BSE, treating it as a purely agricultural and veterinary issue. In this way, policies to protect Canadians were often delayed and incomplete, in a manner disturbingly reminiscent of Britain's failed management of BSE. Despite assurances to the contrary, it is premature to conclude that BSE (and with it the risk of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease) is a thing of Canada's past: BSE remains very much an issue in Canada's present. PMID:26357946

  8. Identification of a prion protein epitope modulating transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy prions to transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Michael R.; Safar, Jiri; Telling, Glenn; Nguyen, Oanh; Groth, Darlene; Torchia, Marilyn; Koehler, Ruth; Tremblay, Patrick; Walther, Dirk; Cohen, Fred E.; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    1997-01-01

    There is considerable concern that bovine prions from cattle with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) may have been passed to humans (Hu), resulting in a new form of Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD). We report here the transmission of bovine (Bo) prions to transgenic (Tg) mice expressing BoPrP; one Tg line exhibited incubation times of ≈200 days. Like most cattle with BSE, vacuolation and astrocytic gliosis were confined in the brainstems of these Tg mice. Unexpectedly, mice expressing a chimeric Bo/Mo PrP transgene were resistant to BSE prions whereas mice expressing Hu or Hu/Mo PrP transgenes were susceptible to Hu prions. A comparison of differences in Mo, Bo, and Hu residues within the C terminus of PrP defines an epitope that modulates conversion of PrPC into PrPSc and, as such, controls prion transmission across species. Development of susceptible Tg(BoPrP) mice provides a means of measuring bovine prions that may prove critical in minimizing future human exposure. PMID:9405603

  9. Microarray analysis in caudal medulla of cattle orally challenged with bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Almeida, L M; Basu, U; Williams, J L; Moore, S S; Guan, L L

    2011-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a fatal disorder in cattle characterized by progressive neurodegeneration of the central nervous system. We investigated the molecular mechanisms involved in neurodegeneration during prion infection through the identification of genes that are differentially expressed (DE) between experimentally infected and non-challenged cattle. Gene expression of caudal medulla from control and orally infected animals was compared by microarray analysis using 24,000 bovine oligonucleotides representing 16,846 different genes to identify DE genes associated with BSE disease. In total, 182 DE genes were identified between normal and BSE-infected tissues (>2.0-fold change, P < 0.01); 81 DE genes had gene ontology functions, which included synapse function, calcium ion regulation, immune and inflammatory response, apoptosis, and cytoskeleton organization; 13 of these genes were found to be involved in 26 different Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. The expression of five DE genes associated with synapse function (tachykinin, synuclein, neuropeptide Y, cocaine, amphetamine-responsive transcript, and synaptosomal-associated protein 25 kDa) and three DE genes associated with calcium ion regulation (parvalbumin, visinin-like, and cadherin) was further validated in the medulla tissue of cattle at different infection times (6, 12, 42, and 45 months post-infection) by qRT-PCR. These data will contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of neuropathology in bovine species. PMID:22033911

  10. Cow-calf producers need to blame exchange rates, not bovine spongiform encephalopathy, for lost wealth.

    PubMed

    Schaufele, Brandon; Komirenko, Zoia; Unterschultz, James R

    2009-01-01

    Several studies examined the impacts of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) crisis on the Canadian agricultural sector. However, few investigations determined the on-farm financial repercussions arising from the crisis. This study examined impacts at farm level attributed to the BSE crisis. Cash flow and hedonic price models were used to examine changes in farm wealth for the years 2002 through 2007. While BSE received substantial media coverage, little attention was given to exchange rates and land values. Data demonstrated that exchange-rate fluctuations exerted a much greater impact on producer wealth than did the BSE crisis. Both farm equity and land values temporarily dipped following the BSE crisis but have since followed their previous trend. If the United States had not closed its borders to Canadian beef and cattle exports, producers would have an additional 0.65% growth in wealth. However, had exchange rates remained constant, farmers would have an additional 10.75% increase in equity. Consequently, the BSE crisis produced a smaller impact on farmer wealth than factors that received less media attention. PMID:19697244

  11. Defining and Assessing Analytical Performance Criteria for Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy-Detecting Amyloid Seeding Assays.

    PubMed

    Gray, John G; Graham, Catherine; Dudas, Sandor; Paxman, Eric; Vuong, Ben; Czub, Stefanie

    2016-05-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are infectious, fatal neurodegenerative diseases that affect production animal health, and thus human food safety. Enhanced TSE detection methods mimic the conjectured basis for prion replication, in vitro; biological matrices can be tested for prion activity via their ability to convert recombinant cellular prion protein (PrP) into amyloid fibrils; fluorescent spectra changes of amyloid-binding fluorophores in the reaction vessel detect fibril formation. In vitro PrP conversion techniques have high analytical sensitivity for prions, comparable with that of bioassays, yet no such protocol has gained regulatory approval for use in animal TSE surveillance programs. This study describes a timed in vitro PrP conversion protocol with accurate, well-defined analytical criteria based on probability density and mass functions of TSE(+) and TSE(-) associated thioflavin T signal times, a new approach within this field. The prion detection model used is elk chronic wasting disease (CWD) in brain tissues. The protocol and analytical criteria proved as sensitive for elk CWD as two bioassay models, and upward of approximately 1.2 log10 more sensitive than the most sensitive TSE rapid test we assessed. Furthermore, we substantiate that timing in vitro PrP conversion may be used to titrate TSE infectivity, and, as a result, provide a comprehensive extrapolation of analytical sensitivity differences between bioassay, TSE rapid tests, and in vitro PrP conversion for elk CWD. PMID:27068712

  12. Mechanism of PrP-amyloid formation in mice without transmissible spongiform encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jeffrey, Martin; McGovern, Gillian; Chambers, Emily V.; King, Declan; González, Lorenzo; Manson, Jean C.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Piccardo, Pedro; Barron, Rona M.

    2011-01-01

    Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) P102L disease is a familial form of a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) that can present with or without vacuolation of neuropil. Inefficient disease transmission into 101LL transgenic mice was previously observed from GSS P102L without vacuolation. However several aged, healthy mice had large plaques composed of abnormal prion protein (PrPd). Here we perform the ultrastructural characterisation of such plaques and compare them with PrPd aggregates found in TSE caused by an infectious mechanism. PrPd plaques in 101LL mice varied in maturity with some being composed of deposits without visible amyloid fibrils. PrPd was present on cell membranes in the vicinity of all types of plaques. In contrast to the unicentric plaques seen in infectious murine scrapie the plaques seen in the current model were multi-centric and were initiated by proto-fibrillar forms of PrPd situated on oligodendroglia, astrocytes and neuritic cell membranes. We speculate that the initial conversion process leading to plaque formation begins with membrane-bound PrPC but that subsequent fibrillisation does not require membrane attachment. We also observed that the membrane alterations consistently seen in murine scrapie and other infectious TSEs were not observed in 101LL mice with plaques suggesting differences in the pathogenesis of these conditions. PMID:21645162

  13. In vitro prion protein conversion suggests risk of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) to transmissible spongiform encephalopathies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Morawski, A.R.; Carlson, C.M.; Chang, H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) affect both domestic sheep (scrapie) and captive and free-ranging cervids (chronic wasting disease; CWD). The geographical range of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis; BHS) overlaps with states or provinces that have contained scrapie-positive sheep or goats and areas with present epizootics of CWD in cervids. No TSEs have been documented in BHS, but the susceptibility of this species to TSEs remains unknown. Results: We acquired a library of BHS tissues and found no evidence of preexisting TSEs in these animals. The prion protein gene (Prnp) in all BHS in our library was identical to scrapie-susceptible domestic sheep (A136R 154Q171). Using an in vitro prion protein conversion assay, which has been previously used to assess TSE species barriers and, in our study appears to recollect known species barriers in mice, we assessed the potential transmissibility of TSEs to BHS. As expected based upon Prnp genotype, we observed BHS prion protein conversion by classical scrapie agent and evidence for a species barrier between transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) and BHS. Interestingly, our data suggest that the species barrier of BHS to white-tailed deer or wapiti CWD agents is likely low. We also used protein misfolding cyclic amplification to confirm that CWD, but not TME, can template prion protein misfolding in A136R 154Q171genotype sheep. Conclusions: Our results indicate the in vitro conversion assay used in our study does mimic the species barrier of mice to the TSE agents that we tested. Based on Prnp genotype and results from conversion assays, BHS are likely to be susceptible to infection by classical scrapie. Despite mismatches in amino acids thought to modulate prion protein conversion, our data indicate that A136R154Q171 genotype sheep prion protein is misfolded by CWD agent, suggesting that these animals could be susceptible to CWD. Further investigation of TSE transmissibility to BHS, including

  14. Infectivity in skeletal muscle of cattle with atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Suardi, Silvia; Vimercati, Chiara; Casalone, Cristina; Gelmetti, Daniela; Corona, Cristiano; Iulini, Barbara; Mazza, Maria; Lombardi, Guerino; Moda, Fabio; Ruggerone, Margherita; Campagnani, Ilaria; Piccoli, Elena; Catania, Marcella; Groschup, Martin H; Balkema-Buschmann, Anne; Caramelli, Maria; Monaco, Salvatore; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    The amyloidotic form of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) termed BASE is caused by a prion strain whose biological properties differ from those of typical BSE, resulting in a clinically and pathologically distinct phenotype. Whether peripheral tissues of BASE-affected cattle contain infectivity is unknown. This is a critical issue since the BASE prion is readily transmissible to a variety of hosts including primates, suggesting that humans may be susceptible. We carried out bioassays in transgenic mice overexpressing bovine PrP (Tgbov XV) and found infectivity in a variety of skeletal muscles from cattle with natural and experimental BASE. Noteworthy, all BASE muscles used for inoculation transmitted disease, although the attack rate differed between experimental and natural cases (∼70% versus ∼10%, respectively). This difference was likely related to different prion titers, possibly due to different stages of disease in the two conditions, i.e. terminal stage in experimental BASE and pre-symptomatic stage in natural BASE. The neuropathological phenotype and PrP(res) type were consistent in all affected mice and matched those of Tgbov XV mice infected with brain homogenate from natural BASE. The immunohistochemical analysis of skeletal muscles from cattle with natural and experimental BASE showed the presence of abnormal prion protein deposits within muscle fibers. Conversely, Tgbov XV mice challenged with lymphoid tissue and kidney from natural and experimental BASE did not develop disease. The novel information on the neuromuscular tropism of the BASE strain, efficiently overcoming species barriers, underlines the relevance of maintaining an active surveillance. PMID:22363650

  15. Dynamics of the natural transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy within an intensively managed sheep flock.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, Martin; Witz, Janey P; Martin, Stuart; Hawkins, Steve A C; Bellworthy, Sue J; Dexter, Glenda E; Thurston, Lisa; González, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Sheep are susceptible to the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent and in the UK they may have been exposed to BSE via contaminated meat and bone meal. An experimental sheep flock was established to determine whether ovine BSE could be naturally transmitted under conditions of intensive husbandry. The flock consisted of 113 sheep of different breeds and susceptible PRNP genotypes orally dosed with BSE, 159 sheep subsequently born to them and 125 unchallenged sentinel controls. BSE was confirmed in 104 (92%) orally dosed sheep and natural transmission was recorded for 14 of 79 (18%) lambs born to BSE infected dams, with rates varying according to PRNP genotype. The likelihood of natural BSE transmission was linked to stage of incubation period of the dam: the attack rate for lambs born within 100 days of the death of BSE infected dams was significantly higher (9/22, 41%) than for the rest (5/57, 9%). Within the group of ewes lambing close to death, those rearing infected progeny (n = 8, for 9/12 infected lambs) showed a significantly greater involvement of lymphoid tissues than those rearing non-infected offspring (n = 8, for 0/10 infected lambs). Horizontal transmission to the progeny of non-infected mothers was recorded only once (1/205, 0.5%). This low rate of lateral transmission was attributed, at least partly, to an almost complete absence of infected placentas. We conclude that, although BSE can be naturally transmitted through dam-lamb close contact, the infection in this study flock would not have persisted due to low-efficiency maternal and lateral transmissions. PMID:26511838

  16. Quantitative analysis of wet-heat inactivation in bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, Yuichi; Ishikawa, Yukiko; Bo, Xiao; Murayama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi; Somerville, Robert A.; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Mohri, Shirou

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► We quantitatively analyzed wet-heat inactivation of the BSE agent. ► Infectivity of the BSE macerate did not survive 155 °C wet-heat treatment. ► Once the sample was dehydrated, infectivity was observed even at 170 °C. ► A quantitative PMCA assay was used to evaluate the degree of BSE inactivation. - Abstract: The bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent is resistant to conventional microbial inactivation procedures and thus threatens the safety of cattle products and by-products. To obtain information necessary to assess BSE inactivation, we performed quantitative analysis of wet-heat inactivation of infectivity in BSE-infected cattle spinal cords. Using a highly sensitive bioassay, we found that infectivity in BSE cattle macerates fell with increase in temperatures from 133 °C to 150 °C and was not detected in the samples subjected to temperatures above 155 °C. In dry cattle tissues, infectivity was detected even at 170 °C. Thus, BSE infectivity reduces with increase in wet-heat temperatures but is less affected when tissues are dehydrated prior to the wet-heat treatment. The results of the quantitative protein misfolding cyclic amplification assay also demonstrated that the level of the protease-resistant prion protein fell below the bioassay detection limit by wet-heat at 155 °C and higher and could help assess BSE inactivation. Our results show that BSE infectivity is strongly resistant to wet-heat inactivation and that it is necessary to pay attention to BSE decontamination in recycled cattle by-products.

  17. Immunohistochemical distinction between preclinical bovine spongiform encephalopathy and scrapie infection in sheep.

    PubMed

    Thuring, C M A; van Keulen, L J M; Langeveld, J P M; Vromans, M E W; van Zijderveld, F G; Sweeney, T

    2005-01-01

    Sheep are susceptible experimentally to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), the clinical signs being indistinguishable from those of scrapie. Because of the possibility of natural ovine BSE infection, laboratory tests are needed to distinguish between scrapie and BSE infection. The objectives of this study were to determine whether (1) PrPSc accumulates in biopsy samples of the tonsil or third eyelid, or both, of BSE-infected sheep before the appearance of clinical disease, and (2) such samples from BSE- and scrapie-infected sheep differ in respect of PrPSc accumulations. Homozygous ARQ sheep (n = 10) were dosed orally at 4-5 months of age with a brain homogenate from BSE-infected cattle. Third eyelid and tonsillar biopsy samples were taken at < or = 6 monthly intervals post-infection and examined immunohistochemically for PrPSc. Third eyelid protuberances were difficult to identify, resulting in many unsuitable samples; however, third eyelid samples shown to contain lymphoid follicles were invariably negative for PrPSc. In contrast, tonsillar biopsy samples became positive for PrPSc from 11 to 20 months post-infection. Consistent differences in the morphology of PrPSc granules in tingible body macrophages (TBMs) between BSE- and scrapie-infected sheep were detected with anti-peptide antibodies directed towards amino acids 93-106 of the ovine prion protein: thus, PrPSc appeared as single granules in TBMs of tonsillar sections from BSE-infected sheep, whereas clusters of PrPSc granules were observed within TBMs in the tonsils of scrapie-infected sheep. In contrast, antibodies against epitopes situated N- and C-terminally from the 93-106 region of the ovine prion protein revealed no differences between BSE- and scrapie-infected sheep in terms of PrPSc granules in TBMs. PMID:15629480

  18. Whole Blood Gene Expression Profiling in Preclinical and Clinical Cattle Infected with Atypical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Xerxa, Elena; Barbisin, Maura; Chieppa, Maria Novella; Krmac, Helena; Vallino Costassa, Elena; Vatta, Paolo; Simmons, Marion; Caramelli, Maria; Casalone, Cristina; Corona, Cristiano; Legname, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases, such as bovine spongiform encephalopathies (BSE), are transmissible neurodegenerative disorders affecting humans and a wide variety of mammals. Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), a prion disease in humans, has been linked to exposure to BSE prions. This classical BSE (cBSE) is now rapidly disappearing as a result of appropriate measures to control animal feeding. Besides cBSE, two atypical forms (named H- and L-type BSE) have recently been described in Europe, Japan, and North America. Here we describe the first wide-spectrum microarray analysis in whole blood of atypical BSE-infected cattle. Transcriptome changes in infected animals were analyzed prior to and after the onset of clinical signs. The microarray analysis revealed gene expression changes in blood prior to the appearance of the clinical signs and during the progression of the disease. A set of 32 differentially expressed genes was found to be in common between clinical and preclinical stages and showed a very similar expression pattern in the two phases. A 22-gene signature showed an oscillating pattern of expression, being differentially expressed in the preclinical stage and then going back to control levels in the symptomatic phase. One gene, SEL1L3, was downregulated during the progression of the disease. Most of the studies performed up to date utilized various tissues, which are not suitable for a rapid analysis of infected animals and patients. Our findings suggest the intriguing possibility to take advantage of whole blood RNA transcriptional profiling for the preclinical identification of prion infection. Further, this study highlighted several pathways, such as immune response and metabolism that may play an important role in peripheral prion pathogenesis. Finally, the gene expression changes identified in the present study may be further investigated as a fingerprint for monitoring the progression of disease and for developing targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID

  19. Whole Blood Gene Expression Profiling in Preclinical and Clinical Cattle Infected with Atypical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Xerxa, Elena; Barbisin, Maura; Chieppa, Maria Novella; Krmac, Helena; Vallino Costassa, Elena; Vatta, Paolo; Simmons, Marion; Caramelli, Maria; Casalone, Cristina; Corona, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases, such as bovine spongiform encephalopathies (BSE), are transmissible neurodegenerative disorders affecting humans and a wide variety of mammals. Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), a prion disease in humans, has been linked to exposure to BSE prions. This classical BSE (cBSE) is now rapidly disappearing as a result of appropriate measures to control animal feeding. Besides cBSE, two atypical forms (named H- and L-type BSE) have recently been described in Europe, Japan, and North America. Here we describe the first wide-spectrum microarray analysis in whole blood of atypical BSE-infected cattle. Transcriptome changes in infected animals were analyzed prior to and after the onset of clinical signs. The microarray analysis revealed gene expression changes in blood prior to the appearance of the clinical signs and during the progression of the disease. A set of 32 differentially expressed genes was found to be in common between clinical and preclinical stages and showed a very similar expression pattern in the two phases. A 22-gene signature showed an oscillating pattern of expression, being differentially expressed in the preclinical stage and then going back to control levels in the symptomatic phase. One gene, SEL1L3, was downregulated during the progression of the disease. Most of the studies performed up to date utilized various tissues, which are not suitable for a rapid analysis of infected animals and patients. Our findings suggest the intriguing possibility to take advantage of whole blood RNA transcriptional profiling for the preclinical identification of prion infection. Further, this study highlighted several pathways, such as immune response and metabolism that may play an important role in peripheral prion pathogenesis. Finally, the gene expression changes identified in the present study may be further investigated as a fingerprint for monitoring the progression of disease and for developing targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID

  20. Modeling of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in a two-species feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Richard; Lehman, Clarence

    2013-06-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy, otherwise known as mad cow disease, can spread when an individual cow consumes feed containing the infected tissues of another individual, forming a one-species feedback loop. Such feedback is the primary means of transmission for BSE during epidemic conditions. Following outbreaks in the European Union and elsewhere, many governments enacted legislation designed to limit the spread of such diseases via elimination or reduction of one-species feedback loops in agricultural systems. However, two-species feedback loops-those in which infectious material from one-species is consumed by a secondary species whose tissue is then consumed by the first species-were not universally prohibited and have not been studied before. Here we present a basic ecological disease model which examines the rôle feedback loops may play in the spread of BSE and related diseases. Our model shows that there are critical thresholds between the infection's expansion and decrease related to the lifespan of the hosts, the growth rate of the prions, and the amount of prions circulating between hosts. The ecological disease dynamics can be intrinsically oscillatory, having outbreaks as well as refractory periods which can make it appear that the disease is under control while it is still increasing. We show that non-susceptible species that have been intentionally inserted into a feedback loop to stop the spread of disease do not, strictly by themselves, guarantee its control, though they may give that appearance by increasing the refractory period of an epidemic's oscillations. We suggest ways in which age-related dynamics and cross-species coupling should be considered in continuing evaluations aimed at maintaining a safe food supply. PMID:23746801

  1. A pilot study for targeted surveillance of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Nwankiti, O O; Ikeh, E I; Asala, O; Seuberlich, T

    2013-06-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), popularly known as 'mad cow disease', led to an epidemic in Europe that peaked in the mid-1990s. Its impact on developing countries, such as Nigeria, has not been fully established as information on livestock and surveillance has eluded those in charge of this task. The BSE risk to Nigeria's cattle population currently remains undetermined, which has resulted in international trade restrictions on commodities from the cattle population. This is mainly because of a lack of updated BSE risk assessments and disease surveillance data. To evaluate the feasibility of BSE surveillance in Nigeria, we carried out a pilot study targeting cattle that were presented for emergency or casualty slaughter. In total, 1551 cattle of local breeds, aged 24 months and above were clinically examined. Ataxia, recumbency and other neurological signs were topmost on our list of criteria. A total of 96 cattle, which correspond to 6.2%, presented clinical signs that supported a suspect of BSE. The caudal brainstem tissues of these animals were collected post-mortem and analysed for the disease-specific form of the prion protein using a rapid test approved by the International Animal Health Organization (OIE). None of the samples were positive for BSE. Although our findings do not exclude the presence of BSE in Nigeria, they do demonstrate that targeted sampling of clinically suspected cases of BSE is feasible in developing countries. In addition, these findings point to the possibility of implementing clinical monitoring schemes for BSE and potentially other diseases with grave economic and public health consequences. PMID:22594841

  2. Studies of the transmissibility of the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy to the domestic chicken

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Transmission of the prion disease bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) occurred accidentally to cattle and several other mammalian species via feed supplemented with meat and bone meal contaminated with infected bovine tissue. Prior to United Kingdom controls in 1996 on the feeding of mammalian meat and bone meal to farmed animals, the domestic chicken was potentially exposed to feed contaminated with the causal agent of BSE. Although confirmed prion diseases are unrecorded in avian species a study was undertaken to transmit BSE to the domestic chicken by parenteral and oral inoculations. Transmissibility was assessed by clinical monitoring, histopathological examinations, detection of a putative disease form of an avian prion protein (PrP) in recipient tissues and by mouse bioassay of tissues. Occurrence of a progressive neurological syndrome in the primary transmission study was investigated by sub-passage experiments. Results No clinical, pathological or bioassay evidence of transmission of BSE to the chicken was obtained in the primary or sub-passage experiments. Survival data showed no significant differences between control and treatment groups. Neurological signs observed, not previously described in the domestic chicken, were not associated with significant pathology. The diagnostic techniques applied failed to detect a disease associated form of PrP. Conclusion Important from a risk assessment perspective, the present study has established that the domestic chicken does not develop a prion disease after large parenteral exposures to the BSE agent or after oral exposures equivalent to previous exposures via commercial diets. Future investigations into the potential susceptibility of avian species to mammalian prion diseases require species-specific immunochemical techniques and more refined experimental models. PMID:22093239

  3. Consumers' understanding and concerns about bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE): comparison among Canadian, American, and Japanese consumers.

    PubMed

    Muringai, Violet; Goddard, Ellen; Aubeeluck, Ashwina

    2011-01-01

    In spite of much analysis of the impact of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) on consumer perceptions and meat purchases, there has been little explicit analysis of the level of BSE knowledge. In this study the role of knowledge about BSE was examined in Canada, the United States, and Japan. In addition, the level of knowledge was linked to human health concerns regarding BSE and whether there is agreement with paying a premium for beef with BSE animal tests. From a public policy perspective, understanding whether higher or lower knowledge is linked to public concern and desire for market intervention might help in the design of risk communication in any future animal disease outbreak. Should lack of knowledge about the disease be related to a public desire for market intervention (animal testing, for example), then an increase in detailed information about how humans might contract the disease might change public pressure for intervention. As compared to U.S. and Canadian respondents, Japanese respondents are more knowledgeable regarding the ways in which humans might be exposed to the human variant of BSE (variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, vCJD) and are more concerned about the disease. However, U.S. respondents are more willing to pay a premium for beef tested to ensure that it will not result in vCJD. Japanese respondents who are more knowledgeable about BSE are more concerned about the risk of BSE to human health. In Canada, subjects who are more knowledgeable about the ways in which humans attain vCJD are less concerned about the risk of BSE to human health. Knowledge of the ways in which humans develop vCJD does not significantly influence concerns about the risk of BSE to human health in the United States or willingness to pay for BSE-tested beef in any of the three countries. The links between knowledge and concerns about BSE and between knowledge and agreement with paying premiums for BSE-tested beef were estimated for each country using ordered

  4. Transmissibility of H-Type Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy to Hamster PrP Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Masujin, Kentaro; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Two distinct forms of atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathies (H-BSE and L-BSE) can be distinguished from classical (C-) BSE found in cattle based on biochemical signatures of disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc). H-BSE is transmissible to wild-type mice—with infected mice showing a long survival period that is close to their normal lifespan—but not to hamsters. Therefore, rodent-adapted H-BSE with a short survival period would be useful for analyzing H-BSE characteristics. In this study, we investigated the transmissibility of H-BSE to hamster prion protein transgenic (TgHaNSE) mice with long survival periods. Although none of the TgHaNSE mice manifested the disease during their lifespan, PrPSc accumulation was observed in some areas of the brain after the first passage. With subsequent passages, TgHaNSE mice developed the disease with a mean survival period of 220 days. The molecular characteristics of proteinase K-resistant PrPSc (PrPres) in the brain were identical to those observed in first-passage mice. The distribution of immunolabeled PrPSc in the brains of TgHaNSE mice differed between those infected with H-BSE as compared to C-BSE or L-BSE, and the molecular properties of PrPres in TgHaNSE mice infected with H-BSE differed from those of the original isolate. The strain-specific electromobility, glycoform profiles, and proteolytic cleavage sites of H-BSE in TgHaNSE mice were indistinguishable from those of C-BSE, in which the diglycosylated form was predominant. These findings indicate that strain-specific pathogenic characteristics and molecular features of PrPres in the brain are altered during cross-species transmission. Typical H-BSE features were restored after back passage from TgHaNSE to bovinized transgenic mice, indicating that the H-BSE strain was propagated in TgHaNSE mice. This could result from the overexpression of the hamster prion protein. PMID:26466381

  5. Surveillance for Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy in Scavengers of White-Tailed Deer Carcasses in the Chronic Wasting Disease Area of Wisconsin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD), a class of neurodegenerative transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) occurring in cervids, is found in a number of states and provinces across North America. Misfolded prions, the infectious agents of CWD, are deposited in the environment via carcass remains an...

  6. Human and animal spongiform encephalopathies are the result of chronic autoimmune attack in the CNS: a novel medical theory supported by overwhelming experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Zhu, B T

    2005-04-01

    Spongiform encephalopathies, also called "prion diseases", are fatal degenerative diseases of the central nervous system which can occur in animals (such as the "mad cow disease" in cattle) and also in humans. This paper presents a novel medical theory concerning the pathogenic mechanisms for various human and animal spongiform encephalopathies. It is hypothesized that various forms of prion diseases are essentially autoimmune diseases, resulting from chronic autoimmune attack of the central nervous system. A key step in the pathogenic process leading towards the development of spongiform encephalopathies involves the production of specific autoimmune antibodies against the disease-causing prion protein (PrPsc) and possibly other immunogenic macromolecules present in the brain. As precisely explained in this paper, the autoimmune antibodies produced against PrPsc are responsible for the conversion of the normal cellular prion protein (PrPc) to PrPsc, for the accumulation of PrPsc in the brain and other peripheral tissues, and also for the initiation of an antibody-mediated chronic autoimmune attack of the central nervous system neurons, which would contribute to the development of characteristic pathological changes and clinical symptoms associated with spongiform encephalopathies. The validity and correctness of the proposed theory is supported by an overwhelming body of experimental observations that are scattered in the biomedical literature. In addition, the theory also offers practical new strategies for early diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of various human and animal prion diseases. PMID:15736062

  7. Atypical H-Type Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy in a Cow Born after the Reinforced Feed Ban on Meat-and-Bone Meal in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Guldimann, Claudia; Gsponer, Michaela; Drögemüller, Cord; Oevermann, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The significance of atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathies (BSE) in cattle for controlling the BSE epidemic is poorly understood. Here we report a case of atypical H-type BSE in a cow born after the implementation of the reinforced feed ban in Europe. This supports an etiology of H-type BSE unrelated to that of classical BSE. PMID:23035195

  8. Insights into Chronic Wasting Disease and Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Species Barriers by Use of Real-Time Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Kristen A.; Henderson, Davin M.; Bian, Jifeng; Telling, Glenn C.; Mathiason, Candace K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The propensity for transspecies prion transmission is related to the structural characteristics of the enciphering and new host PrP, although the exact mechanism remains incompletely understood. The effects of variability in prion protein on cross-species prion transmission have been studied with animal bioassays, but the influence of prion protein structure versus that of host cofactors (e.g., cellular constituents, trafficking, and innate immune interactions) remains difficult to dissect. To isolate the effects of protein-protein interactions on transspecies conversion, we used recombinant PrPC and real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) and compared chronic wasting disease (CWD) and classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (cBSE) prions. To assess the impact of transmission to a new species, we studied feline CWD (fCWD) and feline BSE (i.e., feline spongiform encephalopathy [FSE]). We cross-seeded fCWD and FSE into each species' full-length, recombinant PrPC and measured the time required for conversion to the amyloid (PrPRes) form, which we describe here as the rate of amyloid conversion. These studies revealed the following: (i) CWD and BSE seeded their homologous species' PrP best; (ii) fCWD was a more efficient seed for feline rPrP than for white-tailed deer rPrP; (iii) conversely, FSE more efficiently converted bovine than feline rPrP; (iv) and CWD, fCWD, BSE, and FSE all converted human rPrP, although not as efficiently as homologous sCJD prions. These results suggest that (i) at the level of protein-protein interactions, CWD adapts to a new species more readily than does BSE and (ii) the barrier preventing transmission of CWD to humans may be less robust than estimated. IMPORTANCE We demonstrate that bovine spongiform encephalopathy prions maintain their transspecies conversion characteristics upon passage to cats but that chronic wasting disease prions adapt to the cat and are distinguishable from the original prion. Additionally, we

  9. The economic impacts of chronic wasting disease and bovine spongiform encephalopathy in alberta and the rest of Canada.

    PubMed

    Petigara, Milap; Dridi, Chokri; Unterschultz, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Input-output analysis was used to calculate the economic impacts from potential prion diseases outbreaks in Alberta and the rest of Canada. Both chronic wasting disease (CWD) and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) have the capacity not only to affect the farmed cervid and cattle industries, but also to impact all industries with direct and indirect links to these sectors. Cervid sector shocks yield small spillover effects on the economies of Alberta as well as that of all of Canada. In contrast, the cattle sector generates larger multiplier effects in both specifically Alberta region and all of Canada. The industries that consistently experience the largest impacts from prion disease outbreaks in both Alberta and remainder of Canada economic regions are agricultural sectors, mining and energy sectors, and industries dedicated to trade, transportation, and warehousing. PMID:22043917

  10. Trends in scientific activity addressing transmissible spongiform encephalopathies: a bibliometric study covering the period 1973–2002

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Casado, Elías; Ramírez-de Santa Pau, Margarita; Suárez-Balseiro, Carlos A; Iribarren-Maestro, Isabel; de Pedro-Cuesta, Jesús

    2006-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to analyse the trends in scientific research on transmissible spongiform encephalopathies by applying bibliometric tools to the scientific literature published between 1973 and 2002. Methods The data for the study were obtained from Medline database, in order to determine the volume of scientific output in the above period, the countries involved, the type of document and the trends in the subject matters addressed. The period 1973–2002 was divided in three sub-periods. Results We observed a significant growth in scientific production. The percentage of increase is 871.7 from 1973 to 2002. This is more evident since 1991 and particularly in the 1996–2001 period. The countries found to have the highest output were the United States, the United Kingdom, Japan, France and Germany. The evolution in the subject matters was almost constant in the three sub-periods in which the study was divided. In the first and second sub-periods, the subject matters of greatest interest were more general, i.e Nervous system or Nervous system diseases, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Scrapie, and Chemicals and Drugs, but in the last sub-period, some changes were observed because the Prion-related matters had the greatest presence. Collaboration among authors is small from 1973 to 1992, but increases notably in the third sub-period, and also the number of authors and clusters formed. Some of the authors, like Gajdusek or Prusiner, appear in the whole period. Conclusion The study reveals a very high increase in scientific production. It is related also with the beginnings of research on bovine spongiform encephalopathy and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, with the establishment of progressive collaboration relationships and a reflection of public health concerns about this problem. PMID:17026743

  11. The prion protein gene polymorphisms associated with bovine spongiform encephalopathy susceptibility differ significantly between cattle and buffalo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui; Du, Yanli; Chen, Shunmei; Qing, Lili; Wang, Xiaoyan; Huang, Jingfei; Wu, Dongdong; Zhang, Yaping

    2015-12-01

    Prion protein, encoded by the prion protein gene (PRNP), plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Several polymorphisms within the PRNP are known to be associated with influencing bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) susceptibility in cattle, namely two insertion/deletion (indel) polymorphisms (a 23-bp indel in the putative promoter and a 12-bp indel in intron 1), the number of octapeptide repeats (octarepeats) present in coding sequence (CDS) and amino acid polymorphisms. The domestic buffaloes, Bubalus bubalis, are a ruminant involved in various aspects of agriculture. It is of interest to ask whether the PRNP polymorphisms differ between cattle and buffalo. In this study, we analyzed the previously reported polymorphisms associated with BSE susceptibility in Chinese buffalo breeds, and compared these polymorphisms in cattle with BSE, healthy cattle and buffalo by pooling data from the literature. Our analysis revealed three significant findings in buffalo: 1) extraordinarily low deletion allele frequencies of the 23- and 12-bp indel polymorphisms; 2) significantly low allelic frequencies of six octarepeats in CDS and 3) the presence of S4R, A16V, P54S, G108S, V123M, S154N and F257L substitutions in buffalo CDSs. Sequence alignments comparing the buffalo coding sequence to other species were analyzed using the McDonald-Kreitman test to reveal five groups (Bison bonasus, Bos indicus, Bos gaurus, Boselaphus tragocamelus, Syncerus caffer caffer) with significantly divergent non-synonymous substitutions from buffalo, suggesting potential divergence of buffalo PRNP and others. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study of PRNP polymorphisms associated with BSE susceptibility in Chinese buffalo. Our findings have provided evidence that buffaloes have a unique genetic background in the PRNP gene in comparison with cattle. PMID:26319996

  12. Chronic wasting disease and atypical forms of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and scrapie are not transmissible to mice expressing wild-type levels of human prion protein.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rona; Plinston, Chris; Hunter, Nora; Casalone, Cristina; Corona, Cristiano; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Suardi, Silvia; Ruggerone, Margherita; Moda, Fabio; Graziano, Silvia; Sbriccoli, Marco; Cardone, Franco; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Ingrosso, Loredana; Baron, Thierry; Richt, Juergen; Andreoletti, Olivier; Simmons, Marion; Lockey, Richard; Manson, Jean C; Barron, Rona M

    2012-07-01

    The association between bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) has demonstrated that cattle transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) can pose a risk to human health and raises the possibility that other ruminant TSEs may be transmissible to humans. In recent years, several novel TSEs in sheep, cattle and deer have been described and the risk posed to humans by these agents is currently unknown. In this study, we inoculated two forms of atypical BSE (BASE and H-type BSE), a chronic wasting disease (CWD) isolate and seven isolates of atypical scrapie into gene-targeted transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the human prion protein (PrP). Upon challenge with these ruminant TSEs, gene-targeted Tg mice expressing human PrP did not show any signs of disease pathology. These data strongly suggest the presence of a substantial transmission barrier between these recently identified ruminant TSEs and humans. PMID:22495232

  13. Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE): minimizing the risk of transmission by biological/biopharmaceutical products: an industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Kozak, R W; Golker, C F; Stadler, P

    1996-01-01

    Several guidelines and recommendations have been published on assessing the potential risk of a biological product being contaminated with an agent causing a Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE). Basic principles which can be used during the manufacturing of biological products to minimize the risk of transmission of TSE agents include the following: (i) obtaining animals, tissues or animal-derived raw materials from countries in which the relevant TSE agent is reported to be absent; (ii) screening animal-derived material for appropriate animal husbandry, feeding practices, health certification, tissue procurement and processing practices, and human-derived material for appropriate medical history information and, if relevant, plasma donor exclusion criteria; (iii) selection of tissue source of raw material with reference to potential risk for harbouring or amplifying TSE agents; (IV) human tropism of TSE agent of concern; (v) quantity of raw material used to manufacture a dose of product; (vi) number of daily doses required for indication; (vii) route of administration; (viii) indication and age of patient; and (ix) clearance capabilities by the product purification scheme. A risk evaluation will be represented for Trasylol (Aprotinin) which is manufactured from bovine lung tissue. Trasylol is a protease inhibitor used in the control of blood loss during open heart surgery. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) is a concern when a product is derived from a bovine source. Even though only bovine lung tissue from BSE-free countries is used to manufacture Trasylol, it was decided, based on the primary tissue source selection, to evaluate the potential of the purification process to clear a TSE agent. Duplicate "spiking experiments" were performed using a mouse-adapted strain of scrapie as the model for BSE. Four steps in the purification process were evaluated. Titration of "spiked" loading material and output samples was performed at dilutions of 10(-4) to

  14. Abnormalities in Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials in Sheep with Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies and Lack of a Clear Pathological Relationship.

    PubMed

    Konold, Timm; Phelan, Laura J; Cawthraw, Saira; Simmons, Marion M; Chaplin, Melanie J; González, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Scrapie is transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE), which causes neurological signs in sheep, but confirmatory diagnosis is usually made postmortem on examination of the brain for TSE-associated markers like vacuolar changes and disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)). The objective of this study was to evaluate whether testing of brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) at two different sound levels could aid in the clinical diagnosis of TSEs in sheep naturally or experimentally infected with different TSE strains [classical and atypical scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)] and whether any BAEP abnormalities were associated with TSE-associated markers in the auditory pathways. BAEPs were recorded from 141 clinically healthy sheep of different breeds and ages that tested negative for TSEs on postmortem tests to establish a reference range and to allow comparison with 30 sheep clinically affected or exposed to classical scrapie (CS) without disease confirmation (test group 1) and 182 clinically affected sheep with disease confirmation (test group 2). Abnormal BAEPs were found in 7 sheep (23%) of group 1 and 42 sheep (23%) of group 2. The proportion of sheep with abnormalities did not appear to be influenced by TSE strain or PrP(Sc) gene polymorphisms. When the magnitude of TSE-associated markers in the auditory pathways was compared between a subset of 12 sheep with and 12 sheep without BAEP abnormalities in group 2, no significant differences in the total PrP(Sc) or vacuolation scores in the auditory pathways could be found. However, the data suggested that there was a difference in the PrP(Sc) scores depending on the TSE strain because PrP(Sc) scores were significantly higher in sheep with BAEP abnormalities infected with classical and L-type BSE, but not with CS. The results indicated that BAEPs may be abnormal in sheep infected with TSEs but the test is not specific for TSEs and that neither vacuolation nor PrP(Sc) accumulation

  15. Abnormalities in Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials in Sheep with Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies and Lack of a Clear Pathological Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Konold, Timm; Phelan, Laura J.; Cawthraw, Saira; Simmons, Marion M.; Chaplin, Melanie J.; González, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Scrapie is transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE), which causes neurological signs in sheep, but confirmatory diagnosis is usually made postmortem on examination of the brain for TSE-associated markers like vacuolar changes and disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc). The objective of this study was to evaluate whether testing of brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) at two different sound levels could aid in the clinical diagnosis of TSEs in sheep naturally or experimentally infected with different TSE strains [classical and atypical scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)] and whether any BAEP abnormalities were associated with TSE-associated markers in the auditory pathways. BAEPs were recorded from 141 clinically healthy sheep of different breeds and ages that tested negative for TSEs on postmortem tests to establish a reference range and to allow comparison with 30 sheep clinically affected or exposed to classical scrapie (CS) without disease confirmation (test group 1) and 182 clinically affected sheep with disease confirmation (test group 2). Abnormal BAEPs were found in 7 sheep (23%) of group 1 and 42 sheep (23%) of group 2. The proportion of sheep with abnormalities did not appear to be influenced by TSE strain or PrPSc gene polymorphisms. When the magnitude of TSE-associated markers in the auditory pathways was compared between a subset of 12 sheep with and 12 sheep without BAEP abnormalities in group 2, no significant differences in the total PrPSc or vacuolation scores in the auditory pathways could be found. However, the data suggested that there was a difference in the PrPSc scores depending on the TSE strain because PrPSc scores were significantly higher in sheep with BAEP abnormalities infected with classical and L-type BSE, but not with CS. The results indicated that BAEPs may be abnormal in sheep infected with TSEs but the test is not specific for TSEs and that neither vacuolation nor PrPSc accumulation appears to be

  16. The epidemics of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Peter G.

    2003-01-01

    The large epidemic of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in the United Kingdom has been in decline since 1992, but has spread to other countries. The extensive control measures that have been put in place across the European Union and also in Switzerland should have brought the transmission of BSE under control in these countries, provided that the measures were properly enforced. Postmortem tests on brain tissue enable infected animals to be detected during the late stages of the incubation period, but tests that can be performed on live animals (including humans) and that will detect infections early are urgently needed. The number of infected animals currently entering the food chain is probably small, and the controls placed on bovine tissues in the European Union and Switzerland should ensure that any risks to human health are small and diminishing. Vigilance is required in all countries, especially in those in which there has been within-species recycling of ruminant feed. Fewer than 150 people, globally, have been diagnosed with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), but there are many uncertainties about the future course of the epidemic because of the long and variable incubation period. Better control measures are necessary to guard against the possibility of iatrogenic transmission through blood transfusion or contaminated surgical instruments. These measures will required sensitive and specific, diagnostic tests and improved decontamination methods. PMID:12751420

  17. Elimination of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy infectivity and decontamination of surgical instruments by using radio-frequency gas-plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Baxter, H C; Campbell, G A; Whittaker, A G; Jones, A C; Aitken, A; Simpson, A H; Casey, M; Bountiff, L; Gibbard, L; Baxter, R L

    2005-08-01

    It has now been established that transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) infectivity, which is highly resistant to conventional methods of deactivation, can be transmitted iatrogenically by contaminated stainless steel. It is important that new methods are evaluated for effective removal of protein residues from surgical instruments. Here, radio-frequency (RF) gas-plasma treatment was investigated as a method of removing both the protein debris and TSE infectivity. Stainless-steel spheres contaminated with the 263K strain of scrapie and a variety of used surgical instruments, which had been cleaned by a hospital sterile-services department, were examined both before and after treatment by RF gas plasma, using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis. Transmission of scrapie from the contaminated spheres was examined in hamsters by the peripheral route of infection. RF gas-plasma treatment effectively removed residual organic residues on reprocessed surgical instruments and gross contamination both from orthopaedic blades and from the experimentally contaminated spheres. In vivo testing showed that RF gas-plasma treatment of scrapie-infected spheres eliminated transmission of infectivity. The infectivity of the TSE agent adsorbed on metal spheres could be removed effectively by gas-plasma cleaning with argon/oxygen mixtures. This treatment can effectively remove 'stubborn' residual contamination on surgical instruments. PMID:16033987

  18. Acquired transmissibility of sheep-passaged L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy prion to wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Masujin, Kentaro; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (L-BSE) is an atypical form of BSE that is transmissible to cattle and several lines of prion protein (PrP) transgenic mice, but not to wild-type mice. In this study, we examined the transmissibility of sheep-passaged L-BSE prions to wild-type mice. Disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) was detected in the brain and/or lymphoid tissues during the lifespan of mice that were asymptomatic subclinical carriers, indicating that wild-type mice were susceptible to sheep-passaged L-BSE. The morphological characteristics of the PrP(Sc) of sheep-passaged L-BSE included florid plaques that were distributed mainly in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of subsequent passaged mice. The PrP(Sc) glycoform profiles of wild-type mice infected with sheep-passaged L-BSE were similar to those of the original isolate. The data indicate that sheep-passaged L-BSE has an altered host range and acquired transmissibility to wild-type mice. PMID:26169916

  19. Multivariate feature selection and hierarchical classification for infrared spectroscopy: serum-based detection of bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Menze, Bjoern H; Petrich, Wolfgang; Hamprecht, Fred A

    2007-03-01

    A hierarchical scheme has been developed for detection of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in serum on the basis of its infrared spectral signature. In the first stage, binary subsets between samples originating from diseased and non-diseased cattle are defined along known covariates within the data set. Random forests are then used to select spectral channels on each subset, on the basis of a multivariate measure of variable importance, the Gini importance. The selected features are then used to establish binary discriminations within each subset by means of ridge regression. In the second stage of the hierarchical procedure the predictions from all linear classifiers are used as input to another random forest that provides the final classification. When applied to an independent, blinded validation set of 160 further spectra (84 BSE-positives, 76 BSE-negatives), the hierarchical classifier achieves a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 95%. Compared with results from an earlier study based on the same data, the hierarchical scheme performs better than linear discriminant analysis with features selected by genetic optimization and robust linear discriminant analysis, and performs as well as a neural network and a support vector machine. PMID:17237926

  20. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy induces misfolding of alleged prion-resistant species cellular prion protein without altering its pathobiological features.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Enric; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Pintado, Belén; Ordóñez, Montserrat; Márquez, Mercedes; Fondevila, Dolors; Torres, Juan María; Pumarola, Martí; Castilla, Joaquín

    2013-05-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prions were responsible for an unforeseen epizootic in cattle which had a vast social, economic, and public health impact. This was primarily because BSE prions were found to be transmissible to humans. Other species were also susceptible to BSE either by natural infection (e.g., felids, caprids) or in experimental settings (e.g., sheep, mice). However, certain species closely related to humans, such as canids and leporids, were apparently resistant to BSE. In vitro prion amplification techniques (saPMCA) were used to successfully misfold the cellular prion protein (PrP(c)) of these allegedly resistant species into a BSE-type prion protein. The biochemical and biological properties of the new prions generated in vitro after seeding rabbit and dog brain homogenates with classical BSE were studied. Pathobiological features of the resultant prion strains were determined after their inoculation into transgenic mice expressing bovine and human PrP(C). Strain characteristics of the in vitro-adapted rabbit and dog BSE agent remained invariable with respect to the original cattle BSE prion, suggesting that the naturally low susceptibility of rabbits and dogs to prion infections should not alter their zoonotic potential if these animals became infected with BSE. This study provides a sound basis for risk assessment regarding prion diseases in purportedly resistant species. PMID:23637170

  1. Long-term impacts of bovine spongiform encephalopathy on beef risk perceptions and risk attitudes in Canada.

    PubMed

    Muringai, Violet; Goddard, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the objective was to examine whether or not changes in bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) concerns exert an effect on people's risk perceptions and risk attitudes regarding consuming beef in Canada, 8 years after finding the first domestic animal with BSE. Data were collected from two surveys (2071 respondents) conducted with the same respondents in 2008 and 2011 in Canada. Data on meat consumption for the same households were also available from the Nielsen Homescan panel over the period 2002 to 2009. Based on census data, the current sample is generally not representative of the Canadian population, but the sample is unique in that the same individuals responded to two surveys and there is an ability to track their evolving household purchases of beef before the first survey and between the two surveys. In essence, alterations in beef risk perceptions are significantly influenced by changes in concerns regarding (1) feed given to livestock, (2) animal diseases and BSE, (3) trust in manufacturers, the government, and farmers, and (4) demographic characteristics. There were significant differences in beef purchases across households, with alterations to their risk perceptions and risk attitudes. In conclusion, although the first domestic incident of BSE was in 2003, concerns regarding BSE are still contributing to consumers' risk perceptions but not to their risk attitudes with respect to consumption of beef in 2011. PMID:27556567

  2. Impact of potential changes to the current bovine spongiform encephalopathy surveillance programs for slaughter cattle and fallen stock in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Katsuaki; Murray, Noel; Shinoda, Naoki; Onodera, Takashi

    2009-07-01

    Cattle slaughtered in Japan for human consumption, regardless of their age, have been tested for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) since October 2001. Beginning in April 2004, all fallen stock from 24 months of age also have been tested. We evaluated the impact of potential changes to the current BSE surveillance programs for both slaughter cattle and fallen stock using a simple stochastic model. We calculated the probability that a BSE-infected dairy cow, Wagyu beef animal, Wagyu-Holstein cross steer or heifer, or Holstein steer slaughtered for human consumption or arising as fallen stock would be tested and detected. Four surveillance strategies were explored for cattle slaughtered for human consumption, with the minimum age at testing set at 0, 21, 31, or 41 months. Three surveillance strategies were explored for fallen stock, with the minimum age at testing set at 24, 31, or 41 months. Increasing the minimum age of testing from 0 to 21 months for both dairy cattle and Wagyu beef cattle had very little impact on the probability that a BSE-infected animal slaughtered for human consumption would be detected. Although increasing the minimum age at testing from 21 to 31 or 41 months would lead to fewer slaughtered animals being tested, the impact on the probability of detecting infected animals would be insignificant. The probability of infected Wagyu-Holstein crosses and Holstein steers being detected at slaughter or as fallen stock would be very low under all surveillance strategies. PMID:19681270

  3. Pathogenesis of experimental bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE): estimation of tissue infectivity according to incubation period§

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Mark Edward; Hawkins, Stephen Anthony Charles; Green, Robert; Dexter, Ian; Wells, Gerald Arthur Henry

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the results of tissue infectivity assays of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent in orally exposed cattle at stages during the incubation period. Estimations of the titre of infectivity in central nervous system (CNS), certain peripheral nerve ganglia and distal ileum tissue were made according to time post exposure from the relationship between incubation period and dose for RIII mice and C57bl mice using data from titrations of brain material from cases of BSE. The rate of increase of infectivity in the bovine CNS was then estimated, taking into account these tissue infectivity titres, the variability of the brain titre of clinical field cases of BSE, and the probability density of the expected number of months before clinical onset of each infected bovine. The doubling time for CNS was shown to equal 1.2 months. The titre in the thoracic dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was, on average, approximately 1 log units less than CNS, and cervical DRG approximately 0.5 log less than thoracic DRG. The pattern of increase of infectivity in the distal ileum is that of an initial increase up to 14–18 months post exposure, followed by a decrease, which is likely to be highly variable between animals. These results will be informative for future risk assessments of BSE, especially in relation to reviewing current control measures. PMID:18950589

  4. Detection and discrimination of classical and atypical L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy by real-time quaking-induced conversion.

    PubMed

    Orrú, Christina D; Favole, Alessandra; Corona, Cristiano; Mazza, Maria; Manca, Matteo; Groveman, Bradley R; Hughson, Andrew G; Acutis, Pier Luigi; Caramelli, Maria; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Casalone, Cristina; Caughey, Byron

    2015-04-01

    Statutory surveillance of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) indicates that cattle are susceptible to both classical BSE (C-BSE) and atypical forms of BSE. Atypical forms of BSE appear to be sporadic and thus may never be eradicated. A major challenge for prion surveillance is the lack of sufficiently practical and sensitive tests for routine BSE detection and strain discrimination. The real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) test, which is based on prion-seeded fibrillization of recombinant prion protein (rPrPSen), is known to be highly specific and sensitive for the detection of multiple human and animal prion diseases but not BSE. Here, we tested brain tissue from cattle affected by C-BSE and atypical L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (L-type BSE or L-BSE) with the RT-QuIC assay and found that both BSE forms can be detected and distinguished using particular rPrPSen substrates. Specifically, L-BSE was detected using multiple rPrPSen substrates, while C-BSE was much more selective. This substrate-based approach suggests a diagnostic strategy for specific, sensitive, and rapid detection and discrimination of at least some BSE forms. PMID:25609728

  5. Complex proteinopathy with accumulations of prion protein, hyperphosphorylated tau, α-synuclein and ubiquitin in experimental bovine spongiform encephalopathy of monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Cervenak, Juraj; Bu, Ming; Miller, Lindsay; Asher, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Proteins aggregate in several slowly progressive neurodegenerative diseases called ‘proteinopathies’. Studies with cell cultures and transgenic mice overexpressing mutated proteins suggested that aggregates of one protein induced misfolding and aggregation of other proteins as well – a possible common mechanism for some neurodegenerative diseases. However, most proteinopathies are ‘sporadic’, without gene mutation or overexpression. Thus, proteinopathies in WT animals genetically close to humans might be informative. Squirrel monkeys infected with the classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent developed an encephalopathy resembling variant Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease with accumulations not only of abnormal prion protein (PrPTSE), but also three other proteins: hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau), α-synuclein and ubiquitin; β-amyloid protein (Aβ) did not accumulate. Severity of brain lesions correlated with spongiform degeneration. No amyloid was detected. These results suggested that PrPTSE enhanced formation of p-tau and aggregation of α-synuclein and ubiquitin, but not Aβ, providing a new experimental model for neurodegenerative diseases associated with complex proteinopathies. PMID:24769839

  6. Analysis of risk to biomedical products developed from animal sources (with special emphasis on the spongiform encephalopathy agents, scrapie and BSE).

    PubMed

    Rohwer, R G

    1996-01-01

    Factors that must be considered in estimations of risk from exposure to adventitious contaminants of animal derived biologicals include: (i) the use of the product; (ii) the routes of administration and exposure to potential pathogens; (iii) the source of animal(s) and their history and maintenance; (iv) the tissue(s) used in the product and their likelihood of harbouring or being contaminated by an agent; (v) the methods by which the animal is slaughtered and the tissue(s) collected; (vi) the production process including steps that remove an agent either by inactivation or physical separation; (vii) the disposal of an agent that is sequestered but not inactivated; (viii) flow control, barriers, and between-batch cleaning; (ix) batch size; and (x) validations and quality assurance monitoring. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) agents, scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) are among the most difficult to detect and remove from animal tissues. As such they constitute an especially stringent challenge for viral clearance. PMID:9119146

  7. H-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy associated with E211K prion protein polymorphism: clinical and pathologic features in wild-type and E211K cattle following intracranial inoculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2006 an H-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) case was reported in an animal with an unusual polymorphism (E211K) in the prion protein gene. Although the prevalence of this polymorphism is low, cattle carrying the K211 allele are predisposed to rapid onset of H-type BSE when exposed. The ...

  8. Progressive accumulation of the abnormal conformer of the prion protein and spongiform encephalopathy in the obex of nonsymptomatic and symptomatic Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) with chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD), a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, has been reported in captive and free-ranging cervids. An abnormal isoform of a prion protein (PrP-CWD) has been associated with CWD in Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) and this prion protein can be detected with i...

  9. A comparison of classical and H-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy associated with E211K prion protein polymorphism in wild type and EK211 cattle following intracranial inoculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2006, a case of H-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE-H) was diagnosed in a cow that was associated with a heritable polymorphism in the bovine prion protein gene (PRNP) resulting in a lysine for glutamine amino acid substitution at codon 211 (called E211K) of the prion protein. Although t...

  10. Coexistence of two forms of disease-associated prion protein in extracerebral tissues of cattle infected with H-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Masujin, Kentaro; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    H-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (H-BSE) is an atypical form of BSE in aged cattle. H-BSE is characterized by the presence of two proteinase K-resistant forms of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)), identified as PrP(Sc) #1 and PrP(Sc) #2, in the brain. To investigate the coexistence of different PrP(Sc) forms in the extracerebral tissues of cattle experimentally infected with H-BSE, immunohistochemical and molecular analyses were performed by using N-terminal-, core-region- and C-terminal-specific anti-prion protein antibodies. Our results demonstrated that two distinct forms of PrP(Sc) coexisted in the various extracerebral tissues. PMID:27010466

  11. Coexistence of two forms of disease-associated prion protein in extracerebral tissues of cattle infected with H-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    OKADA, Hiroyuki; MIYAZAWA, Kohtaro; MASUJIN, Kentaro; YOKOYAMA, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    H-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (H-BSE) is an atypical form of BSE in aged cattle. H-BSE is characterized by the presence of two proteinase K-resistant forms of disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc), identified as PrPSc #1 and PrPSc #2, in the brain. To investigate the coexistence of different PrPSc forms in the extracerebral tissues of cattle experimentally infected with H-BSE, immunohistochemical and molecular analyses were performed by using N-terminal-, core-region- and C-terminal-specific anti-prion protein antibodies. Our results demonstrated that two distinct forms of PrPSc coexisted in the various extracerebral tissues. PMID:27010466

  12. Does the Presence of Scrapie Affect the Ability of Current Statutory Discriminatory Tests To Detect the Presence of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy?

    PubMed

    Simmons, M M; Chaplin, M J; Vickery, C M; Simon, S; Davis, L; Denyer, M; Lockey, R; Stack, M J; O'Connor, M J; Bishop, K; Gough, K C; Maddison, B C; Thorne, L; Spiropoulos, J

    2015-08-01

    Current European Commission (EC) surveillance regulations require discriminatory testing of all transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE)-positive small ruminant (SR) samples in order to classify them as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) or non-BSE. This requires a range of tests, including characterization by bioassay in mouse models. Since 2005, naturally occurring BSE has been identified in two goats. It has also been demonstrated that more than one distinct TSE strain can coinfect a single animal in natural field situations. This study assesses the ability of the statutory methods as listed in the regulation to identify BSE in a blinded series of brain samples, in which ovine BSE and distinct isolates of scrapie are mixed at various ratios ranging from 99% to 1%. Additionally, these current statutory tests were compared with a new in vitro discriminatory method, which uses serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA). Western blotting consistently detected 50% BSE within a mixture, but at higher dilutions it had variable success. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method consistently detected BSE only when it was present as 99% of the mixture, with variable success at higher dilutions. Bioassay and sPMCA reported BSE in all samples where it was present, down to 1%. sPMCA also consistently detected the presence of BSE in mixtures at 0.1%. While bioassay is the only validated method that allows comprehensive phenotypic characterization of an unknown TSE isolate, the sPMCA assay appears to offer a fast and cost-effective alternative for the screening of unknown isolates when the purpose of the investigation was solely to determine the presence or absence of BSE. PMID:26041899

  13. Rapid assessment of bovine spongiform encephalopathy prion inactivation by heat treatment in yellow grease produced in the industrial manufacturing process of meat and bone meals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prions, infectious agents associated with transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, are primarily composed of the misfolded and pathogenic form (PrPSc) of the host-encoded prion protein. Because PrPSc retains infectivity after undergoing routine sterilizing processes, the cause of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) outbreaks are suspected to be feeding cattle meat and bone meals (MBMs) contaminated with the prion. To assess the validity of prion inactivation by heat treatment in yellow grease, which is produced in the industrial manufacturing process of MBMs, we pooled, homogenized, and heat treated the spinal cords of BSE-infected cows under various experimental conditions. Results Prion inactivation was analyzed quantitatively in terms of the infectivity and PrPSc of the treated samples. Following treatment at 140°C for 1 h, infectivity was reduced to 1/35 of that of the untreated samples. Treatment at 180°C for 3 h was required to reduce infectivity. However, PrPSc was detected in all heat-treated samples by using the protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) technique, which amplifies PrPScin vitro. Quantitative analysis of the inactivation efficiency of BSE PrPSc was possible with the introduction of the PMCA50, which is the dilution ratio of 10% homogenate needed to yield 50% positivity for PrPSc in amplified samples. Conclusions Log PMCA50 exhibited a strong linear correlation with the transmission rate in the bioassay; infectivity was no longer detected when the log PMCA50 of the inoculated sample was reduced to 1.75. The quantitative PMCA assay may be useful for safety evaluation for recycling and effective utilization of MBMs as an organic resource. PMID:23835086

  14. Population-Level Retrospective Study of Neurologically Expressed Disorders in Ruminants before the Onset of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) in Belgium, a BSE Risk III Country

    PubMed Central

    Saegerman, C.; Berkvens, D.; Claes, L.; Dewaele, A.; Coignoul, F.; Ducatelle, R.; Cassart, D.; Brochier, B.; Costy, F.; Roels, S.; Deluyker, H.; Vanopdenbosch, E.; Thiry, E.

    2005-01-01

    A retrospective epidemiological study (n = 7,875) of neurologically expressed disorders (NED) in ruminants before the onset of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy epidemic (years studied, 1980 to 1997) was carried out in Belgium. The archives of all veterinary laboratories and rabies and transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) epidemiosurveillance networks were consulted. For all species, a significantly higher number of NED with virological causes (rabies) was reported south of the Sambre-Meuse Valley. During the period 1992 to 1997, for which the data were complete, (i) the predicted annual incidence of NED varied significantly as a function of species and area (higher numbers in areas where rabies was present) but was always above 100 cases per million, and (ii) the mean incidence of suspected TSE cases and, among them, those investigated by histopathological examination varied significantly as a function of species and area. The positive predictive value of a presumptive clinical diagnosis of NED ranged from 0.13 (game) to 0.63 (sheep). Knowledge of the positive predictive value permits the definition of a reference point before certain actions (e.g., awareness and training campaigns) are undertaken. It also shows the usefulness of a systematic necropsy or complementary laboratory tests to establish an etiological diagnosis. TSE analysis of a small, targeted historical sampling (n = 48) permitted the confirmation of one case and uncovered another case of scrapie. The results of the present study help to develop and maintain the quality of the worldwide clinical epidemiological networks for TSE, especially in countries that in the past imported live animals, animal products, and feedstuffs from countries with TSE cases. PMID:15695693

  15. In-situ spectroscopic investigation of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies: application of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy to a scrapie-hamster model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneipp, Janina; Lasch, Peter; Beekes, Michael; Naumann, Dieter

    2002-03-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE), such as BSE in cattle, scrapie in sheep and goats, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in man are a group of fatal infectious diseases of the central nervous system that are far from being fully understood. Presuming the pathological changes to originate from small disease-specific compositional and structural modifications at the molecular level, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy can be used to achieve insight into biochemical parameters underlying pathogenesis. We have developed an FTIR microspectroscopy-based strategy which, as a combination of image reconstruction and multivariate pattern recognition methods, permitted the comparison of identical substructures in the cerebellum of healthy and TSE-infected Syrian hamsters in the terminal stage of the disease. Here we present FTIR data about the pathological changes of scrapie-infected and normal tissue of the gray matter structures stratum granulosum and stratum moleculare. IR spectroscopy was also applied to tissue pieces of the medulla oblongata of infected and control Syrian hamsters. Mapping data were analyzed with cluster analysis and imaging methods. We found variations in the spectra of the infected tissue, which are due to changes in carbohydrates, nucleic acids, phospholipids, and proteins.

  16. Molecular Analysis of Cases of Italian Sheep Scrapie and Comparison with Cases of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) and Experimental BSE in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Nonno, Romolo; Esposito, Elena; Vaccari, Gabriele; Conte, Michela; Marcon, Stefano; Di Bari, Michele; Ligios, Ciriaco; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Agrimi, Umberto

    2003-01-01

    Concerns have been raised about the possibility that the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent could have been transmitted to sheep populations via contaminated feedstuffs. The objective of our study was to investigate the suitability of molecular strain typing methods as a surveillance tool for studying scrapie strain variations and for differentiating PrPSc from sheep scrapie, BSE, and sheep BSE. We studied 38 Italian sheep scrapie cases from 13 outbreaks, along with a British scrapie case, an experimental ovine BSE, and 3 BSE cases, by analyzing the glycoform patterns and the apparent molecular masses of the nonglycosylated forms of semipurified, proteinase-treated PrPSc. Both criteria were able to clearly differentiate sheep scrapie from BSE and ovine experimental BSE. PrPSc from BSE and sheep BSE showed a higher glycoform ratio and a lower molecular mass of the nonglycosylated form compared to scrapie PrPSc. Scrapie cases displayed homogeneous PrPSc features regardless of breed, flock, and geographic origin. The glycoform patterns observed varied with the antibody used, but either a monoclonal antibody (MAb) (F99/97.6.1) or a polyclonal antibody (P7-7) was able to distinguish scrapie from BSE PrPSc. While more extensive surveys are needed to further corroborate these findings, our results suggest that large-scale molecular screening of sheep populations for BSE surveillance may be eventually possible. PMID:12958236

  17. Detection of Atypical H-Type Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy and Discrimination of Bovine Prion Strains by Real-Time Quaking-Induced Conversion.

    PubMed

    Masujin, Kentaro; Orrú, Christina D; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Groveman, Bradley R; Raymond, Lynne D; Hughson, Andrew G; Caughey, Byron

    2016-03-01

    Prion diseases of cattle include the classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (C-BSE) and the atypical H-type BSE (H-BSE) and L-type BSE (L-BSE) strains. Although the C- and L-BSE strains can be detected and discriminated by ultrasensitive real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) assays, no such test has yet been described for the detection of H-BSE or the discrimination of each of the major bovine prion strains. Here, we demonstrate an RT-QuIC assay for H-BSE that can detect as little as 10(-9) dilutions of brain tissue and neat cerebrospinal fluid samples from clinically affected cattle. Moreover, comparisons of the reactivities with different recombinant prion protein substrates and/or immunoblot band profiles of proteinase K-treated RT-QuIC reaction products indicated that H-, L-, and C-BSE have distinctive prion seeding activities and can be discriminated by RT-QuIC on this basis. PMID:26739160

  18. [Epidemics of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. Most recent findings on prion disease].

    PubMed

    Calza, L; Manfredi, R; Chiodo, F

    2001-02-01

    Prion diseases have been popularized by extensive media coverage of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) or "mad cow disease" epidemic, observed in Great Britain since 1986, and new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (nvCJD), reported for the first time in 1996. In contrast to the classical form of the disease, nvCJD affects younger patients, presents a relatively longer duration of illness and is caused by the same agent as BSE. Evidence from laboratory studies now strongly supports the hypothesis that new variant represents human form of animal disease, linked to exposure, probably through food, to bovine prions. Number of BSE reports in the United Kingdom began to decline in 1993, and has continuously decreased year by year since then, but a great worry spread in European countries in association with new BSE reported cases outside of the Great Britain, and increasing incidence of nvCJD. New epidemiological, clinical, histopathological and experimental data on prion diseases are reviewed, focusing our attention on the possible transmission of prion proteins from animals to humans. PMID:11294108

  19. Detection of disease-associated prion protein in the optic nerve and the adrenal gland of cattle with bovine spongiform encephalopathy by using highly sensitive immunolabeling procedures.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Fukuda, Shigeo; Yokoyama, Takashi; Mohri, Shirou

    2012-04-01

    A sensitive immunohistochemical procedure, the tyramide signal amplification (TSA) system, was applied to detect the localization of immunolabeled disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in cattle affected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). In this procedure, immunolabeling could be visualized in the optic nerve and the adrenal medulla. In the optic nerve, the dual immunofluorescent technique showed that the granular PrP(Sc) was occasionally detected in the astrocytes, microglia, and myelin sheath adjacent to the axon. Clustered PrP(Sc) was also scattered in association with microglial cells and astrocytes of the optic nerve. In the adrenal gland, PrP(Sc) immunolabeling was confined within the sympathetic nerve fibers and endings. The results suggest that (1) PrP(Sc) might centrifugally spread within and between glial cells and/or the non-axonal (also known as ad-axonal) region of nerve fibers, rather than the axonal and/or extracellular space pathway in the optic nerve, and (2) the sympathetic innervations might be important for the trafficking of BSE agent in the adrenal glands of cattle. This study also suggests that tyramide-based immunochemical analysis should be performed to detect immunolabeled PrP(Sc) in the extracerebral tissues of BSE-affected cattle. PMID:22260993

  20. Surveillance for transmissible spongiform encephalopathy in scavengers of white-tailed deer carcasses in the chronic wasting disease area of wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennelle, C.S.; Samuel, M.D.; Nolden, C.A.; Keane, D.P.; Barr, D.J.; Johnson, Chad; Vanderloo, J.P.; Aiken, Judd M.; Hamir, A.N.; Hoover, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD), a class of neurodegenerative transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) occurring in cervids, is found in a number of states and provinces across North America. Misfolded prions, the infectious agents of CWD, are deposited in the environment via carcass remains and excreta, and pose a threat of cross-species transmission. In this study tissues were tested from 812 representative mammalian scavengers, collected in the CWD-affected area of Wisconsin, for TSE infection using the IDEXX HerdChek enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Only four of the collected mammals tested positive using the ELISA, but these were negative when tested by Western blot. While our sample sizes permitted high probabilities of detecting TSE assuming 1% population prevalence in several common scavengers (93%, 87%, and 87% for raccoons, opossums, and coyotes, respectively), insufficient sample sizes for other species precluded similar conclusions. One cannot rule out successful cross-species TSE transmission to scavengers, but the results suggest that such transmission is not frequent in the CWD-affected area of Wisconsin. The need for further surveillance of scavenger species, especially those known to be susceptible to TSE (e.g., cat, American mink, raccoon), is highlighted in both a field and laboratory setting.

  1. A Bayesian back-calculation method to estimate the risk of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in Canada during the period 1996-2011.

    PubMed

    Al-Zoughool, Mustafa; Oraby, Tamer; Krewski, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Seventeen typical cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) were detected in Canada the period of 2003-2011. The clinical incidence of BSE was censored by early slaughter, death, or exportation of infected cattle due to the long incubation period of BSE disease. The aim of this study was to estimate the infection incidence of BSE in birth cohorts during 1996-2004 and project infection frequency through to 2007. An estimate of the number of asymptomatic infected cattle slaughtered for human consumption is also provided. The number of incident, asymptomatic cases was assumed to follow a Poisson process. A Bayesian back-calculation approach was used to project the risk of contracting BSE in those birth cohorts. Model parameters and inputs were taken from scientific literature and governmental data sources. The projected number of infected cattle in birth cohorts spanning the period 1996-2007 was 492, with median 95% credible interval 258-830. If the requirement to remove specified risk material (SRM) from cattle prior to entering the food chain was not in place, the predicted number of slaughtered infected in the human food chain from 1996-2010 was 298, with a 95% credible interval 156-500. The magnitude of the BSE epidemic in Canada for 1996-2007 birth cohorts was estimated to be approximately 28-fold higher than the number of clinical cases detected through to October 2011. Although some of those cattle were slaughtered for human consumption, the requirement of SRM removal may have prevented most of the infectious material from entering the food chain. PMID:27556564

  2. Removal of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy Prion from Large Volumes of Cell Culture Media Supplemented with Fetal Bovine Serum by Using Hollow Fiber Anion-Exchange Membrane Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ming Li; Bailey, Andy; Avory, Tiffany; Tanimoto, Junji; Burnouf, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Cases of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in people who had consumed contaminated meat products from cattle with bovine spongiform encephalopathy emphasize the need for measures aimed at preventing the transmission of the pathogenic prion protein (PrPSc) from materials derived from cattle. Highly stringent scrutiny is required for fetal bovine serum (FBS), a growth-medium supplement used in the production of parenteral vaccines and therapeutic recombinant proteins and in the ex vivo expansion of stem cells for transplantation. One such approach is the implementation of manufacturing steps dedicated to removing PrPSc from materials containing FBS. We evaluated the use of the QyuSpeed D (QSD) adsorbent hollow-fiber anion-exchange chromatographic column (Asahi Kasei Medical, Tokyo, Japan) for the removal of PrPSc from cell culture media supplemented with FBS. We first established that QSD filtration had no adverse effect on the chemical composition of various types of culture media supplemented with 10% FBS or the growth and viability characteristics of human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells, baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells, African green monkey kidney (Vero) cells, and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-k1) cells propagated in the various culture-medium filtrates. We used a 0.6-mL QSD column for removing PrPSc from up to 1000 mL of Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium containing 10% FBS previously spiked with the 263K strain of hamster-adapted scrapie. The Western blot analysis, validated alongside an infectivity assay, revealed that the level of PrPSc in the initial 200mL flow-through was reduced by 2.5 to > 3 log10, compared with that of the starting material. These results indicate that QSD filtration removes PrPSc from cell culture media containing 10% FBS, and demonstrate the ease with which QSD filtration can be implemented in at industrial-scale to improve the safety of vaccines, therapeutic recombinant proteins, and ex vivo expanded stem cells produced using

  3. Estimation of the Exposure of the UK Population to the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Agent through Dietary Intake During the Period 1980 to 1996

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chu-Chih; Wang, Yin-Han

    2014-01-01

    Although the incidence of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) has declined to 1 since 2012 in the UK, uncertainty remains regarding possible future cases and the size of the subclinical population that may cause secondary transmission of the disease through blood transfusion. Estimating the number of individuals who were exposed to the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) infectious agent and may be susceptible to vCJD will help to clarify related public health concerns and plan strategies. In this paper, we explore this estimate by describing the probability of potential exposure due to dietary intake throughout the BSE epidemic period from 1980 to 1996 as a stochastic Poisson process. We estimate the age- and gender-specific exposure intensities in food categories of beef and beef-containing dishes, burgers and kebabs, pies, and sausages, separating the two periods of 1980–1989 and 1990–1996 due to the specified bovine offal legislation of 1989. The estimated total number of (living) exposed individuals during each period is 5,089,027 (95% confidence interval [CI] 4,514,963–6,410,317), which was obtained by multiplying the population size of different birth cohorts by the probability of exposure via dietary intake and the probability of survival until the end of 2013. The estimated number is approximately doubled, assuming a contamination rate of . Among those individuals estimated, 31,855 (95% CI 26,849–42,541) are susceptible to infection. We also examined the threshold hypothesis by fitting an extreme-value distribution to the estimated infectious dose of the exposed individuals and obtained a threshold estimate of 13.7 bID50 (95% CI 6.6–26.2 bID50) (Weibull). The results provide useful information on potential carriers of prion disease who may pose a threat of infection via blood transfusion and thus provide insight into the likelihood of new incidents of vCJD occurring in the future. PMID:24736322

  4. Subcritical Water Hydrolysis Effectively Reduces the In Vitro Seeding Activity of PrPSc but Fails to Inactivate the Infectivity of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Prions

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Yuichi; Yoshioka, Miyako; Okada, Hiroyuki; Takata, Eri; Masujin, Kentaro; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Shimozaki, Noriko; Yamamura, Tomoaki; Yokoyama, Takashi; Mohri, Shirou; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The global outbreak of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) has been attributed to the recycling of contaminated meat and bone meals (MBMs) as feed supplements. The use of MBMs has been prohibited in many countries; however, the development of a method for inactivating BSE prions could enable the efficient and safe use of these products as an organic resource. Subcritical water (SCW), which is water heated under pressure to maintain a liquid state at temperatures below the critical temperature (374°C), exhibits strong hydrolytic activity against organic compounds. In this study, we examined the residual in vitro seeding activity of protease-resistant prion protein (PrPSc) and the infectivity of BSE prions after SCW treatments. Spinal cord homogenates prepared from BSE-infected cows were treated with SCW at 230–280°C for 5–7.5 min and used to intracerebrally inoculate transgenic mice overexpressing bovine prion protein. Serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA) analysis detected no PrPSc in the SCW-treated homogenates, and the mice treated with these samples survived for more than 700 days without any signs of disease. However, sPMCA analyses detected PrPSc accumulation in the brains of all inoculated mice. Furthermore, secondary passage mice, which inoculated with brain homogenates derived from a western blotting (WB)-positive primary passage mouse, died after an average of 240 days, similar to mice inoculated with untreated BSE-infected spinal cord homogenates. The PrPSc accumulation and vacuolation typically observed in the brains of BSE-infected mice were confirmed in these secondary passage mice, suggesting that the BSE prions maintained their infectivity after SCW treatment. One late-onset case, as well as asymptomatic but sPMCA-positive cases, were also recognized in secondary passage mice inoculated with brain homogenates from WB-negative but sPMCA-positive primary passage mice. These results indicated that SCW-mediated hydrolysis was

  5. Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (Prion Diseases)

    MedlinePlus

    ... when brain tissue is viewed under a microscope. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is the most well-known of the ... and Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) Foundation Inc. 341 W. 38th Street, Suite ...

  6. First Demonstration of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy-associated Prion Protein (PrPTSE) in Extracellular Vesicles from Plasma of Mice Infected with Mouse-adapted Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease by in Vitro Amplification*

    PubMed Central

    Saá, Paula; Yakovleva, Oksana; de Castro, Jorge; Vasilyeva, Irina; De Paoli, Silvia H.; Simak, Jan; Cervenakova, Larisa

    2014-01-01

    The development of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in three recipients of non-leukoreduced red blood cells from asymptomatic donors who subsequently developed the disease has confirmed existing concerns about the possible spread of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) via blood products. In addition, the presence of disease-associated misfolded prion protein (PrPTSE), generally associated with infectivity, has been demonstrated in the blood of vCJD patients. However, its origin and distribution in this biological fluid are still unknown. Various studies have identified cellular prion protein (PrPC) among the protein cargo in human blood-circulating extracellular vesicles released from endothelial cells and platelets, and exosomes isolated from the conditioned media of TSE-infected cells have caused the disease when injected into experimental mice. In this study, we demonstrate the detection of PrPTSE in extracellular vesicles isolated from plasma samples collected during the preclinical and clinical phases of the disease from mice infected with mouse-adapted vCJD and confirm the presence of the exosomal marker Hsp70 in these preparations. PMID:25157106

  7. L-Arginine ethylester enhances in vitro amplification of PrP(Sc) in macaques with atypical L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy and enables presymptomatic detection of PrP(Sc) in the bodily fluids.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Y; Ono, F; Shimozaki, N; Shibata, H

    2016-02-12

    Protease-resistant, misfolded isoforms (PrP(Sc)) of a normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) in the bodily fluids, including blood, urine, and saliva, are expected to be useful diagnostic markers of prion diseases, and nonhuman primate models are suited for performing valid diagnostic tests for human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). We developed an effective amplification method for PrP(Sc) derived from macaques infected with the atypical L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (L-BSE) prion by using mouse brain homogenate as a substrate in the presence of polyanions and L-arginine ethylester. This method was highly sensitive and detected PrP(Sc) in infected brain homogenate diluted up to 10(10) by sequential amplification. This method in combination with PrP(Sc) precipitation by sodium phosphotungstic acid is capable of amplifying very small amounts of PrP(Sc) contained in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), saliva, urine, and plasma of macaques that have been intracerebrally inoculated with the L-BSE prion. Furthermore, PrP(Sc) was detectable in the saliva or urine samples as well as CSF samples obtained at the preclinical phases of the disease. Thus, our novel method may be useful for furthering the understanding of bodily fluid leakage of PrP(Sc) in nonhuman primate models. PMID:26802462

  8. Detection of disease-associated prion protein in the posterior portion of the small intestine involving the continuous Peyer's patch in cattle orally infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent.

    PubMed

    Okada, H; Iwamaru, Y; Imamura, M; Masujin, K; Matsuura, Y; Murayama, Y; Mohri, S; Yokoyama, T

    2011-08-01

    Twenty-eight calves were exposed to 5 g of homogenized brainstems confirmed as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agents. Two to five animals were sequentially killed for post-mortem analyses 20 months post-inoculation (MPI) at intervals of 6 or 12 months. Samples from animals challenged orally with BSE agents were examined by Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. Immunolabelled, disease-associated prion protein (PrPsc) was detected in a small portion of follicles in the continuous Peyer's patch from the posterior portion of the small intestine involving the entire ileum and the posterior jejunum but not in the discrete Peyer's patches in the remaining jejunum in preclinical animals at 20, 36, and 48 MPI. The PrPsc-positive cells corresponded to tingible body macrophages on double immunofluorescence labelling. In addition, PrPsc accumulated in 7 of 14 animals in the central nervous system (CNS) after 34 MPI, and five of them developed clinical signs and were killed at 34, 46, 58, and 66 MPI. Two preclinical animals killed at 36 and 48 MPI presented the earliest detectable and smallest deposition of immunolabelled PrPsc in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve, the spinal trigeminal nucleus of the medulla oblongata at the obex region, and/or the intermediolateral nucleus of the 13th thoracic segment of the spinal cord. Based on serial killing, no PrPsc was detectable in the CNS, including the medulla oblongata at the obex level, before 30 MPI, by Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. These results are important for understanding the pathogenesis of BSE. PMID:21320296

  9. Influence of breed and genotype on the onset and distribution of infectivity and disease-associated prion protein in sheep following oral infection with the bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent.

    PubMed

    McGovern, G; Martin, S; Jeffrey, M; Bellworthy, S J; Spiropoulos, J; Green, R; Lockey, R; Vickery, C M; Thurston, L; Dexter, G; Hawkins, S A C; González, L

    2015-01-01

    The onset and distribution of infectivity and disease-specific prion protein (PrP(d)) accumulation was studied in Romney and Suffolk sheep of the ARQ/ARQ, ARQ/ARR and ARR/ARR prion protein gene (Prnp) genotypes (where A stands for alanine, R for arginine and Q for glutamine at codons 136, 154 and 171 of PrP), following experimental oral infection with cattle-derived bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent. Groups of sheep were killed at regular intervals and a wide range of tissues taken for mouse bioassay or immunohistochemistry (IHC), or both. Bioassay results for infectivity were mostly coincident with those of PrP(d) detection by IHC both in terms of tissues and time post infection. Neither PrP(d) nor infectivity was detected in any tissues of BSE-dosed ARQ/ARR or ARR/ARR sheep or of undosed controls. Moreover, four ARQ/ARQ Suffolk sheep, which were methionine (M)/threonine heterozygous at codon 112 of the Prnp gene, did not show any biological or immunohistochemical evidence of infection, while those homozygous for methionine (MARQ/MARQ) did. In MARQ/MARQ sheep of both breeds, initial PrP(d) accumulation was identified in lymphoreticular system (LRS) tissues followed by the central nervous system (CNS) and enteric nervous system (ENS) and finally by the autonomic nervous system and peripheral nervous system and other organs. Detection of infectivity closely mimicked this sequence. No PrP(d) was observed in the ENS prior to its accumulation in the CNS, suggesting that ENS involvement occurred simultaneously to that of, or followed centrifugal spread from, the CNS. The distribution of PrP(d) within the ENS further suggested a progressive spread from the ileal plexus to other ENS segments via neuronal connections of the gut wall. Differences between the two breeds were noted in terms of involvement of LRS and ENS tissues, with Romney sheep showing a more delayed and less consistent PrP(d) accumulation than Suffolk sheep in such tissues. Whether this

  10. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy: Production and Inspection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Education / Get Answers / Food Safety Fact Sheets / Production and Inspection / FSIS Further Strengthens Protections Against BSE / ... bone of carcasses under high pressure. The AMR process cannot be operated in a manner to incorporate ...

  11. Progressive accumulation of the abnormal conformer of the prion protein and spongiform encephalopathy in the obex of nonsymptomatic and symptomatic Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) with chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Spraker, Terry R; Gidlewski, Thomas; Powers, Jenny G; Nichols, Tracy; Balachandran, Aru; Cummings, Bruce; Wild, Margaret A; VerCauteren, Kurt; O'Rourke, Katherine I

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of our study was to describe the progressive accumulation of the abnormal conformer of the prion protein (PrP(CWD)) and spongiform degeneration in a single section of brain stem in Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) with chronic wasting disease (CWD). A section of obex from 85 CWD-positive elk was scored using the presence and abundance of PrP(CWD) immunoreactivity and spongiform degeneration in 10 nuclear regions and the presence and abundance of PrP(CWD) in 10 axonal tracts, the subependymal area of the fourth ventricle, and the thin subpial astrocytic layer (glial limitans). Data was placed in a formula to generate an overall obex score. Data suggests that PrP(CWD) immunoreactivity and spongiform degeneration has a unique and relatively consistent pattern of progression throughout a section of obex. This scoring technique utilizing a single section of obex may prove useful in future work for estimating the presence and abundance of PrP(CWD) in peripheral tissues and the nervous system in elk with CWD. PMID:26185123

  12. Comparison of Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy Isolates in Raccoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Owing to its susceptibility to various transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) and relatively short incubation times, the raccoon (Procyon lotor) has been suggested as a model for TSE strain differentiation. Transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) is a prion disease of undetermined origin in...

  13. Evaluation of the zoonotic potential of transmissible mink encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Successful transmission of Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy (TME) to cattle supports the bovine hypothesis to the still controversial origin of TME outbreaks. Human and primate susceptibility to classical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (c-BSE) and the transmissibility of L-type BSE to macaques as...

  14. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy or PSE, is a condition that ... medical care is an important factor in staying as healthy as possible. The American Liver Foundation is ...

  15. 76 FR 35185 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Bovine Spongiform...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Animals and Animal Products AGENCY: Animal and... the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service's intention to request an extension of approval of...

  16. SPONGIFORM DISEASE: Experts Downplay New vCJD Fears.

    PubMed

    Balter, M

    2000-09-01

    The chilling scenario of getting "mad cow disease" from eating products of other animals besides just cows was splashed across the mainstream British press last week based on a report from a leading U.K. lab that prions--abnormal proteins linked to bovine spongiform encephalopathy and its human form, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease--can jump from one species to another more easily than previously believed. Although some experts say the findings raise concern about a threat to human health, others decry the media frenzy and contend that the new research adds little to what is known about the mysterious, fatal diseases. PMID:17811144

  17. Experimental Inoculation of Spiroplasma mirum and Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy (TME) into Raccoons (Procyon lotor)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine if Spiroplasma mirum would be capable of producing lesions of spongiform encephalopathy in raccoons (Procyon lotor), 5 groups (n = 5) of raccoon kits were inoculated intracerebrally with either S. mirum and/or transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME). Two other groups (n = 5) of raccoon...

  18. Abnormal regulation of TSG101 in mice with spongiform neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Jian; Sun, Kaihua; Walker, Will P.; Bagher, Pooneh; Cota, Christina D.; Gunn, Teresa M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Spongiform neurodegeneration is characterized by the appearance of vacuoles throughout the central nervous system. It has many potential causes, but the underlying cellular mechanisms are not well understood. Mice lacking the E3 ubiquitin ligase Mahogunin Ring Finger-1 (MGRN1) develop age-dependent spongiform encephalopathy. We identified an interaction between a “PSAP” motif in MGRN1 and the ubiquitin E2 variant (UEV) domain of TSG101, a component of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport I (ESCRT-I), and demonstrate that MGRN1 multimonoubiquitinates TSG101. We examined the in vivo consequences of loss of MGRN1 on TSG101 expression and function in the mouse brain. The pattern of TSG101 ubiquitination differed in the brains of wild-type mice and Mgrn1 null mutant mice: at 1 month of age, null mutant mice had less ubiquitinated TSG101, while in adults, mutant mice had more ubiquitinated, insoluble TSG101 than wild-type mice. There was an associated increase in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) levels in mutant brains. These results suggest that loss of MGRN1 promotes ubiquitination of TSG101 by other E3s and may prevent its disassociation from endosomal membranes or cause it to form insoluble aggregates. Our data implicate loss of normal TSG101 function in endo-lysosomal trafficking in the pathogenesis of spongiform neurodegeneration in Mgrn1 null mutant mice. PMID:19703557

  19. 9 CFR 94.18 - Restrictions on importation of meat and edible products from ruminants due to bovine spongiform...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...: For Federal Register citations affecting § 94.18, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears... DISEASE, NEWCASTLE DISEASE, HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY: PROHIBITED AND RESTRICTED...

  20. Toxic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Woo

    2012-01-01

    This article schematically reviews the clinical features, diagnostic approaches to, and toxicological implications of toxic encephalopathy. The review will focus on the most significant occupational causes of toxic encephalopathy. Chronic toxic encephalopathy, cerebellar syndrome, parkinsonism, and vascular encephalopathy are commonly encountered clinical syndromes of toxic encephalopathy. Few neurotoxins cause patients to present with pathognomonic neurological syndromes. The symptoms and signs of toxic encephalopathy may be mimicked by many psychiatric, metabolic, inflammatory, neoplastic, and degenerative diseases of the nervous system. Thus, the importance of good history-taking that considers exposure and a comprehensive neurological examination cannot be overemphasized in the diagnosis of toxic encephalopathy. Neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging typically play ancillary roles. The recognition of toxic encephalopathy is important because the correct diagnosis of occupational disease can prevent others (e.g., workers at the same worksite) from further harm by reducing their exposure to the toxin, and also often provides some indication of prognosis. Physicians must therefore be aware of the typical signs and symptoms of toxic encephalopathy, and close collaborations between neurologists and occupational physicians are needed to determine whether neurological disorders are related to occupational neurotoxin exposure. PMID:23251840

  1. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bleibel, Wissam; Al-Osaimi, Abdullah M. S.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis affect hundreds of millions of patients all over the world. The majority of patients with cirrhosis will eventually develop complications related to portal hypertension. One of these recurrent and difficult to treat complications is hepatic encephalopathy. Studies have indicated that overt hepatic encephalopathy affects 30 to 45% of patients with cirrhosis and a higher percentage may be affected by minimal degree of encephalopathy. All of these factors add to the impact of hepatic encephalopathy on the healthcare system and presents a major challenge to the gastroenterologist, hospitalist and primary care physician. PMID:23006457

  2. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), or Mad Cow Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... BSE BSE in North America Control Measures Feed Bans Prevalence Prevention Strains of BSE Resources News and ... Identified in Canadian-born Cattle Control Measures Feed Bans News and Highlights Prevalence Prevention of BSE Strains ...

  3. Retinal Fluorescence Spectroscopy for Diagnosis of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Central nervous system (CNS) tissue provides optical signatures that can be detected with great sensitivity. The fundamental hypothesis proposed in this study was that diseased or damaged central nervous system (CNS) tissue produces optical signals that can be detected and made useful for diagnosti...

  4. Instability of familial spongiform encephalopathy-related prion mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Yasuko; Hiraoka, Wakako; Shimoyama, Yuhei; Horiuchi, Motohiro; Kuwabara, Mikinori; Inanami, Osamu

    2008-02-01

    We examined the influence of D177N (D178N in humans) mutation on the conformational stability of the S2 region of moPrP{sup C} with varying pHs by using the SDSL-ESR technique. The ESR spectrum of D177N at pH 7.5 was narrower than that of Y161R1, referred to as WT{sup *}. The ESR spectrum of D177N did not change when pH in the solution decreased to pH 4.0. Our results suggested that the disappearance of a salt bridge (D177-R163) induced the increase in the instability of S2 region. Moreover, the line shape of the ESR spectrum obtained from H176S neighboring the salt bridge linked to the S2 region was similar to D177N. These results indicate that the protonation of H176 is strongly associated with the stability of S2 region. These findings are important for understanding the mechanism by which the disruption of the salt bridge in the S2 region forms the pathogenic PrP{sup Sc} structure in hereditary prion disease.

  5. Disease-associated prion protein in neural and lymphoid tissues of mink (Mustela vison) inoculated with transmissible mink encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) is a prion disorder of farmed raised mink. As with the other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, the disorder is associated with accumulation of the misfolded prion protein in the brain and an invariably fatal outcome. TME outbreaks have been rare but...

  6. Hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Juan; Mínguez, Beatriz

    2008-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a severe complication of cirrhosis that is related to the effects of ammonia. Analysis of interorgan ammonia trafficking has identified an important role of skeletal muscle in ammonia removal and has highlighted the importance of the nutritional status. Ammonia causes neurotransmitter abnormalities and induces injury to astrocytes that is partially mediated by oxidative stress. These disturbances lead to astrocyte swelling and brain edema, which appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of neurological manifestations. Inflammatory mediators worsen brain disturbances. New methods for assessing hepatic encephalopathy include clinical scales, neuropsychological tests, imaging of portal-systemic circulation, and magnetic resonance of the brain. Reappraisal of current therapy indicates the need for performing placebo-controlled trials and the lack of evidence for administering diets with restricted protein content. Liver transplant should be considered in selected patients with hepatic encephalopathy. Future prospects include new drugs that decrease plasma ammonia, measures to reduce brain edema, and liver-support devices. PMID:18293278

  7. Experimental transmission of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (scrapie, chronic wasting disease, transmissible mink encephalopathy) to cattle and their differentiation from bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Experimental cross-species transmission of TSE agents provides valuable information for identification of potential host ranges of known TSEs. This report provides a synopsis of TSE (scrapie, CWD, TME) transmission studies that have been conducted in cattle and compares these findings to...

  8. Experimental transmission of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (scrapie, chronic wasting disease, transmissible mink encephalopathy) to cattle and their differentiation from bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Experimental cross-species transmission of TSE agents provides valuable information for identification of potential host ranges of known TSEs. This report provides a synopsis of TSE (scrapie, CWD, TME) transmission studies that have been conducted in cattle and compares these findings...

  9. Experimental transmission of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (scrapie, chronic wasting disease, transmissible mink encephalopathy) to cattle and their differentiation from bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experimental cross-species transmission of TSE agents provides valuable information for identification of potential host ranges of known TSEs. This report provides a synopsis of TSE (scrapie, CWD, TME) transmission studies that have been conducted in cattle and compares these findings to those seen ...

  10. Solvent encephalopathy.

    PubMed Central

    King, M D; Day, R E; Oliver, J S; Lush, M; Watson, J M

    1981-01-01

    Nineteen children aged 8-14 years were admitted over a six-year period with an acute encephalopathy due to toluene intoxication. Seven had a history of euphoria and hallucinations. The remainder presented with coma (4), ataxia (3), convulsions (3), and behaviour disturbance with diplopia (2), A history of glue sniffing was elicited in 14, but in the remainder toluene assay confirmed the diagnosis. Thirteen children recovered completely; five still had psychological impairment and personality change on discharge from hospital but were lost to follow-up, and one has a persistent cerebellar ataxia one year after the acute episode, despite absence of further exposure. Toluene inhalation is an important cause of encephalopathy in children and may lead to permanent neurological damage. Diagnosis is most important if further damage due to continued abuse is to be prevented, and toluene assay is a valuable aid to diagnosis. PMID:6790121

  11. [Hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Jacques, Jérémie; Carrier, Paul; Debette-Gratien, Marilyne; Sobesky, Rodolphe; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a severe complication of liver cirrhosis and is an important therapeutic challenge, with a social and economic issue. If, now, the pathophysiology is not totally understood (main role of ammonia, but a better understanding of cerebral mechanisms), the clinical presentation is well-known. Some treatments are useful (disaccharides, treatment of the trigger) but their efficiency is limited. Nevertheless, the emergence of new treatments, such as non-absorbable antibiotics (rifaximin essentially), is an interesting therapeutic tool. PMID:26597584

  12. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Is a Determinant of Retrovirus-Induced Spongiform Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Dimcheff, Derek E.; Askovic, Srdjan; Baker, Audrey H.; Johnson-Fowler, Cedar; Portis, John L.

    2003-01-01

    FrCasE is a mouse retrovirus that causes a fatal noninflammatory spongiform neurodegenerative disease with pathological features strikingly similar to those induced by transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) agents. Neurovirulence is determined by the sequence of the viral envelope protein, though the specific role of this protein in disease pathogenesis is not known. In the present study, we compared host gene expression in the brain stems of mice infected with either FrCasE or the avirulent virus F43, differing from FrCasE in the sequence of the envelope gene. Four of the 12 disease-specific transcripts up-regulated during the preclinical period represent responses linked to the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Among these genes was CHOP/GADD153, which is induced in response to conditions that perturb endoplasmic reticulum function. In vitro studies with NIH 3T3 cells revealed up-regulation of CHOP as well as BiP, calreticulin, and Grp58/ERp57 in cells infected with FrCasE but not with F43. Immunoblot analysis of infected NIH 3T3 cells demonstrated the accumulation of uncleaved envelope precursor protein in FrCasE- but not F43-infected cells, consistent with ER retention. These results suggest that retrovirus-induced spongiform neurodegeneration represents a protein-folding disease and thus may provide a useful tool for exploring the causal link between protein misfolding and the cytopathology that it causes. PMID:14610184

  13. Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Schiess, Nicoline; Pardo, Carlos A

    2008-10-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a controversial neurological disorder that comprises a heterogenous group of neurological symptoms that manifest in patients with high titers of antithyroid antibodies. Clinical manifestations of HE may include encephalopathic features such as seizures, behavioral and psychiatric manifestations, movement disorders, and coma. Although it has been linked to cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis or thyroid dysfunction, the most common immunological feature of HE is the presence of high titers of antithyroglobulin or anti-TPO (antimicrosomal) antibodies. At present, it is unclear whether antithyroid antibodies represent an immune epiphenomenon in a subset of patients with encephalopathic processes or they are really associated with pathogenic mechanisms of the disorder. The significance of classifying encephalopathies under the term HE will be determined in the future once the relevance of the role of antithyroid antibodies is demonstrated or dismissed by more detailed experimental and immunopathological studies. The responsiveness of HE to steroids or other therapies such as plasmapheresis supports the hypothesis that this is a disorder that involves immune pathogenic mechanisms. Further controlled studies of the use of steroids, plasmapheresis, or immunosuppressant medications are needed in the future to prove the concept of the pathogenic role of antithyroid antibodies in HE. PMID:18990131

  14. Clinical features in prion protein-deficient and wild-type cattle inoculated with transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases are caused by the propagation of a misfolded form (PrP**d) of the normal cellular prion protein, PrP**c. Recently, we have reported the generation and characterization of PrP**C-deficient cattle (PrP-/-) produced by a seq...

  15. [Hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Juan; Mur, Rafael Esteban

    2014-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (EH) is a severe complication of hepatic cirrhosis that is characterized by multiple neuropsychiatric manifestations. EH is usually triggered by a precipitating factor and occurs in patients with severely impaired hepatic function. Minimal EH is characterized by minor cognitive impairments that are difficult to specify but represent a risk for the patients. The primary pathophysiological mechanism of EH is considered to be an increase in blood ammonia with an impairment in the patency of the blood-brainbarrier and its metabolism to glutamine in astrocytes. The diagnosis is clinical and neuroimaging techniques can be complementary. The diagnosis of minimal EH requires specific neurocognitive tests. The clinical evaluation should be directed towards identifying the trigger. Nonabsorbable disaccharides and rifaximin constitute the treatment of choice, along with prophylaxis for new episodes. PMID:25087716

  16. [Hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Festi, Davide; Marasco, Giovanni; Ravaioli, Federico; Colecchia, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of liver cirrhosis and it can manifest with a broad spectrum of neuropsychiatric abnormalities of varying severity, acuity and time course with important clinical implications. According to recent guidelines, HE has been classified into different types, depending on the severity of hepatic dysfunction, the presence of porto-systemic shunts and the number of previous episodes or persistent manifestations. From a clinical point of view, HE can be recognized as unimpaired, covert (that deals with minimal and grade 1 according to the grading of mental state), and overt (that is categorized from grade 2 to grade 4). Different and only partially known pathogenic mechanisms have been identified, comprising ammonia, inflammatory cytokines, benzodiazepine-like compounds and manganese deposition. Different therapeutic strategies are available for treating HE, in particular the overt HE, since covert HE needs to be managed case by case. Recognition and treatment of precipitating factors represent fundamental part of the management. The more effective treatments, which can be performed separately or combined, are represented by non-absorbable disaccharides (lactulose and lactitol) and the topic antibiotic rifaximin; other possible therapies, mainly used in patients non responders to previous treatments, are represented by branched chain amino acids and metabolic ammonia scavengers. PMID:27571468

  17. Autoimmune encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, Frank; Armangue, Thaís; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 10 years the continual discovery of novel forms of encephalitis associated with antibodies to cell-surface or synaptic proteins has changed the paradigms for diagnosing and treating disorders that were previously unknown or mischaracterized. We review here the process of discovery, the symptoms, and the target antigens of twelve autoimmune encephatilic disorders, grouped by syndromes and approached from a clinical perspective. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis, several subtypes of limbic encephalitis, stiff-person spectrum disorders, and other autoimmune encephalitides that result in psychosis, seizures, or abnormal movements are described in detail. We include a novel encephalopathy with prominent sleep dysfunction that provides an intriguing link between chronic neurodegeneration and cell-surface autoimmunity (IgLON5). Some of the caveats of limited serum testing are outlined. In addition, we review the underlying cellular and synaptic mechanisms that for some disorders confirm the antibody pathogenicity. The multidisciplinary impact of autoimmune encephalitis has been expanded recently by the discovery that herpes simplex encephalitis is a robust trigger of synaptic autoimmunity, and that some patients may develop overlapping syndromes, including anti-NMDAR encephalitis and neuromyelitis optica or other demyelinating diseases. PMID:25315420

  18. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ciećko-Michalska, Irena; Szczepanek, Małgorzata; Słowik, Agnieszka; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:23316223

  19. Scientific integrity memorandum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-03-01

    U.S. President Barack Obama signed a presidential memorandum on 9 March to help restore scientific integrity in government decision making. The memorandum directs the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy to develop a strategy within 120 days that ensures that "the selection of scientists and technology professionals for science and technology positions in the executive branch is based on those individuals' scientific and technological knowledge, credentials, and experience; agencies make available to the public the scientific or technological findings or conclusions considered or relied upon in policy decisions; agencies use scientific and technological information that has been subject to well-established scientific processes such as peer review; and agencies have appropriate rules and procedures to ensure the integrity of the scientific process within the agency, including whistleblower protection."

  20. Hepatic encephalopathy: a review.

    PubMed

    Lizardi-Cervera, Javier; Almeda, Paloma; Guevara, Luis; Uribe, Misael

    2003-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complication that presents in as many as 28% of patients with cirrhosis, and reported up to ten years after the diagnosis of cirrhosis. Commonly, it is observed in patients with severe hepatic failure and is characterized by neuropsychiatric manifestations that can range in severity from a mild alteration in mental state to a coma; additionally, some neuromuscular symptoms can be observed. This complication of either acute or chronic hepatic disease is the result of a diminished hepatic reservoir and inability to detoxify some toxins that originate in the bowel. Today, the role of astrocytes, specifically the Alzheimer type II cells, is known to be very important in the pathogenesis of the hepatic encephalopathy, and will be reviewed later. In conclusion, the objectives of this review are: To understand the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy, To recognize the precipitating factors, as well as preventive measures for the development of the hepatic encephalopathy, To describe the new classification of hepatic encephalopathy and its clinical implications, To recognize the clinical manifestations and stages of the disease, To understand the main diagnostic tests used to detect the hepatic encephalopathy, To describe the main therapeutic treatments of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:15115963

  1. Antibiotic-associated encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Shamik; Darby, R Ryan; Raibagkar, Pooja; Gonzalez Castro, L Nicolas; Berkowitz, Aaron L

    2016-03-01

    Delirium is a common and costly complication of hospitalization. Although medications are a known cause of delirium, antibiotics are an underrecognized class of medications associated with delirium. In this article, we comprehensively review the clinical, radiologic, and electrophysiologic features of antibiotic-associated encephalopathy (AAE). AAE can be divided into 3 unique clinical phenotypes: encephalopathy commonly accompanied by seizures or myoclonus arising within days after antibiotic administration (caused by cephalosporins and penicillin); encephalopathy characterized by psychosis arising within days of antibiotic administration (caused by quinolones, macrolides, and procaine penicillin); and encephalopathy accompanied by cerebellar signs and MRI abnormalities emerging weeks after initiation of antibiotics (caused by metronidazole). We correlate these 3 clinical phenotypes with underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of antibiotic neurotoxicity. Familiarity with these types of antibiotic toxicity can improve timely diagnosis of AAE and prompt antibiotic discontinuation, reducing the time patients spend in the delirious state. PMID:26888997

  2. Current pathogenetic aspects of hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cichoż-Lach, Halina; Michalak, Agata

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a medical phenomenon that is described as a neuropsychiatric manifestation of chronic or acute liver disease that is characterized by psychomotor, intellectual and cognitive abnormalities with emotional/affective and behavioral disturbances. This article focuses on the underlying mechanisms of the condition and the differences between hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy. Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious condition that can cause neurological death with brain edema and intracranial hypertension. It is assumed that approximately 60%-80% of patients with liver cirrhosis develop hepatic encephalopathy. This review explores the complex mechanisms that lead to hepatic encephalopathy. However, noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy is not associated with hepatic diseases and has a completely different etiology. Noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a severe occurrence that is connected with multiple pathogeneses. PMID:23326159

  3. Frequently Asked Questions on BSE (Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy or Mad Cow Disease)

    MedlinePlus

      Topics Animal Health Biotechnology Climate Solutions Conservation Disaster and Emergency Preparedness Employee Services Energy Environment and Natural Resources Ethics Farm Bill Food and Nutrition ...

  4. Animal Meal: Production and Determination in Feedstuffs and the Origin of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Heinz

    This contribution examines what animal meal is, how it is produced in rendering plants, and means of investigating feedstuff constituents. In addition to animal meal, numerous other products of animal origin are also on the market (e.g., blood meal, bone meal, feather meal, gelatin). Constituents of animal origin can be detected in feedstuffs by microscopy, but determining the animal species from which the constituents are derived, as required by law in Germany, requires methods such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and polymerase chain reaction. We consider the problem of trace contamination being introduced accidentally during the production of ruminants' feedstuffs containing constituents of animal origin. The future of animal meal is discussed together with alternatives for disposing of animal carcasses and slaughtery offal, i.e., composting and incineration.

  5. 77 FR 29914 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On March 16, 2012, we published in the Federal Register (77 FR 15848-15913, Docket No...: For information concerning live ruminants, contact Dr. Betzaida Lopez, Import Animal Staff... information regarding ruminant products and for other information regarding this proposed rule, contact...

  6. 78 FR 11207 - Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... to discuss FDA's draft risk assessment model for potential exposure to the variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) agent in Red Blood Cells for transfusion in the United States. FDA intends to...

  7. 77 FR 15847 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ... Commodities,'' published in the Federal Register on January 4, 2005 (70 FR 460-553). The delay of... September 18, 2007 (72 FR 53314-53379). DATES: We will consider all comments that we receive on or before... published in the Federal Register on September 18, 2007 (72 FR 53314-53379, Docket No. APHIS-2006-0041)...

  8. 78 FR 72979 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ..., 2012, we published in the Federal Register (77 FR 15848-15913, Docket No. APHIS-2008-0010) a proposal... January 4, 2005 (70 FR 460-553, Docket No. 03-080-3). The delay of applicability was removed in a final... Products Derived from Bovines,'' published in the Federal Register on September 18, 2007 (72 FR...

  9. A model (BSurvE) for evaluating national surveillance programs for bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Prattley, D J; Morris, R S; Cannon, R M; Wilesmith, J W; Stevenson, M A

    2007-10-16

    Our BSurvE spreadsheet model estimates the BSE prevalence in a national cattle population, and can be used to evaluate and compare alternative strategies for a national surveillance program. Each individual surveillance test has a point value (based on demographic and epidemiological information) that reflects the likelihood of detecting BSE in an animal of a given age leaving the population via the stated surveillance stream. A target sum point value for the country is calculated according to a user-defined design prevalence and confidence level, the number of cases detected in animals born after the selected starting date and the national adult-herd size. Surveillance tests carried out on different sub-populations of animals are ranked according to the number of points gained per unit cost, and the results can be used in designing alternative surveillance programs. PMID:17517443

  10. 75 FR 55803 - Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... agents from blood components and chronic wasting disease. FDA intends to make background material... the variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) agent in U.S.-licensed plasma-derived Factor VIII and...

  11. Retinal function and morphology are altered in cattle infected with the prion disease transmissible mink encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Smith, J D; Greenlee, J J; Hamir, A N; Richt, J A; Greenlee, M H West

    2009-09-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of diseases that result in progressive and invariably fatal neurologic disease in both animals and humans. TSEs are characterized by the accumulation of an abnormal protease-resistant form of the prion protein in the central nervous system. Transmission of infectious TSEs is believed to occur via ingestion of prion protein-contaminated material. This material is also involved in the transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy ("mad cow disease") to humans, which resulted in the variant form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Abnormal prion protein has been reported in the retina of TSE-affected cattle, but despite these observations, the specific effect of abnormal prion protein on retinal morphology and function has not been assessed. The objective of this study was to identify and characterize potential functional and morphologic abnormalities in the retinas of cattle infected with a bovine-adapted isolate of transmissible mink encephalopathy. We used electroretinography and immunohistochemistry to examine retinas from 10 noninoculated and 5 transmissible mink encephalopathy-inoculated adult Holstein steers. Here we show altered retinal function, as evidenced by prolonged implicit time of the electroretinogram b-wave, in transmissible mink encephalopathy-infected cattle before the onset of clinical illness. We also demonstrate disruption of rod bipolar cell synaptic terminals, indicated by decreased immunoreactivity for the alpha isoform of protein kinase C and vesicular glutamate transporter 1, and activation of Müller glia, as evidenced by increased glial fibrillary acidic protein and glutamine synthetase expression, in the retinas of these cattle at the time of euthanasia due to clinical deterioration. This is the first study to identify both functional and morphologic alterations in the retinas of TSE-infected cattle. Our results support future efforts to focus on the retina for the development of

  12. [Hashimoto's encephalopathy and autoantibodies].

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    Encephalopathy occasionally occurs in association with thyroid disorders, but most of these are treatable. These encephalopathies include a neuropsychiatric disorder associated with hypothyroidism, called myxedema encephalopathy. Moreover, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) has been recognized as a new clinical disease based on an autoimmune mechanism associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Steroid treatment was successfully administered to these patients. Recently, we discovered that the serum autoantibodies against the NH2-terminal of α-enolase (NAE) are highly specific diagnostic biomarkers for HE. Further, we analyzed serum anti-NAE autoantibodies and the clinical features in many cases of HE from institutions throughout Japan and other countries. Approximately half of assessed HE patients carry anti-NAE antibodies. The age was widely distributed with 2 peaks (20-30 years and 50-70 years). Most HE patients were in euthyroid states, and all patients had anti-thyroid (TG) antibodies and anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies. Anti-TSH receptor (TSH-R) antibodies were observed in some cases. The common neuropsychiatry features are consciousness disturbance and psychosis, followed by cognitive dysfunction, involuntary movements, seizures, and ataxia. Abnormalities on electroencephalography (EEG) and decreased cerebral blood flow on brain SPECT were common findings, whereas abnormal findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were rare. HE patients have various clinical phenotypes such as the acute encephalopathy form, the chronic psychiatric form, and other particular clinical forms, including limbic encephalitis, progressive cerebellar ataxia, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)-like form. The cerebellar ataxic form of HE clinically mimics spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and is characterized by the absence of nystagmus, absent or mild cerebellar atrophy, and lazy background activities on EEG. Taken together, these data suggest that the possibility of

  13. Spatial correlation between the prevalence of transmissible spongiform diseases and British soil geochemistry.

    PubMed

    Imrie, C E; Korre, A; Munoz-Melendez, G

    2009-02-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of fatal neurological conditions affecting a number of mammals, including sheep and goats (scrapie), cows (BSE), and humans (Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease). The diseases are widely believed to be caused by the misfolding of the normal prion protein to a pathological isoform, which is thought to act as an infectious agent. Outbreaks of the disease are commonly attributed to contaminated feed and genetic susceptibility. However, the implication of copper and manganese in the pathology of the disease, and its apparent geographical clustering, have prompted suggestions of a link with trace elements in the environment. Nevertheless, studies of soils at regional scales have failed to provide evidence of an environmental risk factor. This study uses geostatistical techniques to investigate the correlations between the distribution of TSE prevalence and soil geochemical variables across the UK according to different spatial scales. A similar spatial pattern in scrapie and BSE occurrence is identified, which may be linked with increasing pH and total organic carbon, and decreasing iodine concentration. However, the pattern also resembles that of the density of dairy farming. Nevertheless, despite the low spatial resolution of the TSE data available for this study, the fact that significant correlations are detected indicates there is a possibility of a link between soil geochemistry, scrapie, and BSE. It is suggested that further investigations of the prevalence of TSE and environmental exposure to trace metals should take into account the factors affecting their bioavailability. PMID:18427934

  14. Nonalcoholic Wernicke's encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Amanda; Rogers, Peter; Clift, Fraser

    2016-07-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a serious neurologic condition resulting from thiamine deficiency. The majority of cases involve alcoholism; however, nonalcohol-associated WE does occur and is under-recognized. We discuss a case of a 22-year-old man with a history of Crohn's disease who presented to our emergency department with multiple neurologic complaints related to WE. PMID:25985980

  15. Co-Distribution of Aβ Plaques and Spongiform Degeneration in Familial Creutzfeldt - Jakob Disease with E200K-129M Haplotype

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Nupur; Cali, Ignazio; Perrin, Richard Justin; Josephson, Scott Andrew; Sun, Ning; Gambetti, Pierluigi; Morris, John Carl

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Dominantly inherited Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) comprises 5–15% of all CJD cases. The E200K mutation in the prion protein (PrP) gene (PRNP) is the most frequent cause of familial CJD. Co-existent amyloid-beta (Aβ) pathology has been reported in some transmissible spongiform encephalopathies but not in familial CJD with the E200K mutation. OBJECTIVE To characterize a CJD family in which Aβ pathology co-distributes with spongiform degeneration. DESIGN Clinicopathological and molecular study of a family with CJD with the E200K-129M haplotype. SETTING Alzheimer’s disease research center MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Clinical, biochemical, and neuropathological observations of 2 generations of a family. RESULTS In this kindred, three autopsied individuals showed pathological changes typical for this haplotype: spongiform degeneration, gliosis, neuronal loss, and PrP deposition. Moreover, two of these cases (ages 57 and 63) showed numerous Aβ plaques co-distributed with the spongiform degeneration. APOE genotyping in 2 cases revealed that Aβ plaques were present in the APOE4 carrier but not in the APOE4 noncarrier. Two additional individuals exhibited incomplete penetrance as they had no clinical evidence of CJD at death after age 80 and yet had affected siblings and children. CONCLUSION This is the first description of Aβ pathology in familial CJD with the E200K mutation. The co-distribution of plaques and CJD-associated changes suggests that PrP plays a central role in Aβ formation and that Aβ pathology and prion disease likely influence each other. The kindred described here provides support that PrPE200K may also result in increased Aβ deposition. PMID:19822779

  16. KCNQ2 encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Millichap, John J.; Park, Kristen L.; Tsuchida, Tammy; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Carmant, Lionel; Flamini, Robert; Joshi, Nishtha; Levisohn, Paul M.; Marsh, Eric; Nangia, Srishti; Narayanan, Vinodh; Ortiz-Gonzalez, Xilma R.; Patterson, Marc C.; Pearl, Phillip L.; Porter, Brenda; Ramsey, Keri; McGinnis, Emily L.; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Tracy, Molly; Tran, Baouyen; Venkatesan, Charu; Weckhuysen, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To advance the understanding of KCNQ2 encephalopathy genotype–phenotype relationships and to begin to assess the potential of selective KCNQ channel openers as targeted treatments. Methods: We retrospectively studied 23 patients with KCNQ2 encephalopathy, including 11 treated with ezogabine (EZO). We analyzed the genotype–phenotype relationships in these and 70 previously described patients. Results: The mean seizure onset age was 1.8 ± 1.6 (SD) days. Of the 20 EEGs obtained within a week of birth, 11 showed burst suppression. When new seizure types appeared in infancy (15 patients), the most common were epileptic spasms (n = 8). At last follow-up, seizures persisted in 9 patients. Development was delayed in all, severely in 14. The KCNQ2 variants identified introduced amino acid missense changes or, in one instance, a single residue deletion. They were clustered in 4 protein subdomains predicted to poison tetrameric channel functions. EZO use (assessed by the treating physicians and parents) was associated with improvement in seizures and/or development in 3 of the 4 treated before 6 months of age, and 2 of the 7 treated later; no serious side effects were observed. Conclusions: KCNQ2 variants cause neonatal-onset epileptic encephalopathy of widely varying severity. Pathogenic variants in epileptic encephalopathy are clustered in “hot spots” known to be critical for channel activity. For variants causing KCNQ2 channel loss of function, EZO appeared well tolerated and potentially beneficial against refractory seizures when started early. Larger, prospective studies are needed to enable better definition of prognostic categories and more robust testing of novel interventions. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that EZO is effective for refractory seizures in patients with epilepsy due to KCNQ2 encephalopathy. PMID:27602407

  17. [EEG manifestations in metabolic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chou-Ching K

    2005-09-01

    Normal brain function depends on normal neuronal metabolism, which is closely related to systemic homeostasis of metabolites, such as glucose, electrolytes, amino acids and ammonia. "Metabolic encephalopathy" indicates diffuse brain dysfunction caused by various systemic derangements. Electroencephalogram (EEG) is widely used to evaluate metabolic encephalopathy since 1937, when Berger first observed slow brain activity induced by hypoglycemia. EEG is most useful in differentiating organic from psychiatric conditions, identifying epileptogenicity, and providing information about the degree of cortical or subcortical dysfunction. In metabolic encephalopathy, EEG evolution generally correlates well with the severity of encephalopathy. However, EEG has little specificity in differentiating etiologies in metabolic encephalopathy. For example, though triphasic waves are most frequently mentioned in hepatic encephalopathy, they can also be seen in uremic encephalopathy, or even in aged psychiatric patients treated with lithium. Spike-and-waves may appear in hyper- or hypo-glycemia, uremic encephalopathy, or vitamin deficiencies, etc. Common principles of EEG changes in metabolic encephalopathy are (1) varied degrees of slowing, (2) assorted mixtures of epileptic discharge, (3) high incidence of triphasic waves, and (4), as a rule, reversibility after treatment of underlying causes. There are some exceptions to the above descriptions in specific metabolic disorders and EEG manifestations are highly individualized. PMID:16252619

  18. Diets in Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Abdelsayed, George G

    2015-08-01

    As many as 80% of patients with end-stage liver disease and hepatic encephalopathy have significant protein-calorie malnutrition. Because of the severe hypercatabolic state of cirrhosis, the provision of liberal amounts of carbohydrate (at least 35 to 40 kcal/kg per day), and between 1.2 and 1.6 g/kg of protein is necessary. Protein restriction is not recommended. Branched-chain amino acid supplementation and vegetable protein are associated with improved outcomes. Dietary supplementation with vitamins, minerals (with the notable exception of zinc) and probiotics should be decided on a case-by-case basis. PMID:26195204

  19. Treatment of epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    McTague, Amy; Cross, J Helen

    2013-03-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy is defined as a condition where the epileptic activity itself may contribute to the severe neurological and cognitive impairment seen, over and above that which would be expected from the underlying pathology alone. The epilepsy syndromes at high risk of this are a disparate group of conditions characterized by epileptic seizures that are difficult to treat and developmental delay. In this review, we discuss the ongoing debate regarding the significance of inter-ictal discharges and the impact of the seizures themselves on the cognitive delay or regression that is a common feature of these syndromes. The syndromes also differ in many ways and we provide a summary of the key features of the early-onset epileptic encephalopathies including Ohtahara and West syndromes in addition to later childhood-onset syndromes such as Lennox Gastaut and Doose syndromes. An understanding of the various severe epilepsy syndromes is vital to understanding the rationale for treatment. For example, the resolution of hypsarrhythmia in West syndrome is associated with an improvement in cognitive outcome and drives treatment choice, but the same cannot be applied to frequent inter-ictal discharges in Lennox Gastaut syndrome. We discuss the evidence base for treatment where it is available and describe current practice where it is not. For example, in West syndrome there is some evidence for preference of hormonal treatments over vigabatrin, although the choice and duration of hormonal treatment remains unclear. We describe the use of conventional and newer anti-epileptic medications in the various syndromes and discuss which medications should be avoided. Older possibly forgotten treatments such as sulthiame and potassium bromide also have a role in the severe epilepsies of childhood. We discuss hormonal treatment with particular focus on the treatment of West syndrome, continuous spike wave in slow wave sleep (CSWS)/electrical status epilepticus in slow wave

  20. [Prevention of hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Morillas, Rosa M; Sala, Marga; Planas, Ramon

    2014-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a frequent complication of cirrhosis which, in addition to producing a great social impact, deteriorates the quality of life of patients and is considered a sign of advanced liver disease and therefore a clinical indication for liver transplant evaluation. Patients who have had episodes of HE have a high risk of recurrence. Thus, after the HE episode resolves, it is recommended: control and prevention of precipitating factors (gastrointestinal bleeding, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, use of diuretics with caution, avoid nervous system depressant medications), continued administration of non-absorbable disaccharides such as lactulose or lactitol, few or non-absorbable antibiotics such as rifaximin and assess the need for a liver transplant as the presence of a HE episode carries a poor prognosis in cirrhosis. PMID:24480288

  1. 32 CFR 536.62 - Action memorandums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Action memorandums. 536.62 Section 536.62... AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Investigation and Processing of Claims § 536.62 Action memorandums. (a) When... claims on which suit is filed before final action, see § 536.66. A settlement authority may deny or...

  2. Sepsis Associated Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Neera; Duggal, Ashish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a common but poorly understood neurological complication of sepsis. It is characterized by diffuse brain dysfunction secondary to infection elsewhere in the body without overt CNS infection. The pathophysiology of SAE is complex and multifactorial including a number of intertwined mechanisms such as vascular damage, endothelial activation, breakdown of the blood brain barrier, altered brain signaling, brain inflammation, and apoptosis. Clinical presentation of SAE may range from mild symptoms such as malaise and concentration deficits to deep coma. The evaluation of cognitive dysfunction is made difficult by the absence of any specific investigations or biomarkers and the common use of sedation in critically ill patients. SAE thus remains diagnosis of exclusion which can only be made after ruling out other causes of altered mentation in a febrile, critically ill patient by appropriate investigations. In spite of high mortality rate, management of SAE is limited to treatment of the underlying infection and symptomatic treatment for delirium and seizures. It is important to be aware of this condition because SAE may present in early stages of sepsis, even before the diagnostic criteria for sepsis can be met. This review discusses the diagnostic approach to patients with SAE along with its epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis. PMID:26556425

  3. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome].

    PubMed

    Fischer, M; Schmutzhard, E

    2016-06-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome refers to a neurological disorder characterized by headache, disorders of consciousness, visual disturbances, epileptic seizures, and subcortical vasogenic edema. About two thirds of patients develop neurological symptoms, which are associated with blood pressure fluctuations. One hypothesis is that hypertensive episodes cause autoregulatory failure, and values above the upper limit of cerebral autoregulation result in a breakthrough followed by hyperperfusion and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. In another hypothesis, endothelial dysfunction triggered by numerous factors including preeclampsia, immunosuppressive agents, chemotherapeutics, sepsis, or autoimmune disorders is thought to be the key pathomechanism. Endo- or exogenic toxic agents including pharmacological substances, cytokines, or bacterial toxins are supposed to trigger endothelial activation and dysfunction resulting in the release of vasoconstrictors, pro-inflammatory mediators, and vascular leakage. Diagnosis is usually based on clinical and neuroimaging findings that frequently show a bilateral, symmetric, and parietooccipital pattern. However, the diagnosis can often only be confirmed during the course of disease after excluding important differential diagnoses. Currently, there is no specific treatment available. Lowering of arterial blood pressure and eliminating the underlying cause usually leads to an improvement of clinical and neuroradiological findings. Admission to a critical care unit is required in about 40 % of patients due to complicating conditions including status epilepticus, cerebral vasoconstriction, ischemia, or intracerebral hemorrhage. Prognosis is favorable; in the majority of patients neurological deficits and imaging findings resolve completely. PMID:27272329

  4. [Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy disease].

    PubMed

    Benureau, A; Meyer, P; Maillet, O; Leboucq, N; Legras, S; Jeziorski, E; Fournier-Favre, S; Jeandel, C; Gaignard, P; Slama, A; Rivier, F; Roubertie, A; Carneiro, M

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy disease (MNGIE) is a rare autosomal-recessive syndrome, resulting from mutations in the TYMP gene, located at 22q13. The mutation induces a thymidine phosphorylase (TP) deficit, which leads to a nucleotide pool imbalance and to instability of the mitochondrial DNA. The clinical picture regroups gastrointestinal dysmotility, cachexia, ptosis, ophthalmoplegia, peripheral neuropathy, and asymptomatic leukoencephalopathy. The prognosis is unfavorable. We present the case of a 14-year-old Caucasian female whose symptoms started in early childhood. The diagnosis was suspected after magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), performed given the atypical features of mental anorexia, which revealed white matter abnormalities. She presented chronic vomiting, postprandial abdominal pain, and problems gaining weight accompanied by cachexia. This diagnosis led to establishing proper care, in particular an enteral and parenteral nutrition program. There is no known specific effective treatment, but numerous studies are in progress. In this article, after reviewing the existing studies, we discuss the main diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of the disease. We argue for the necessity of performing a cerebral MRI given the atypical features of a patient with suspected mental anorexia (or when the clinical pattern of a patient with mental anorexia seems atypical), so that MNGIE can be ruled out. PMID:25282463

  5. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Juneyoung; Padalino, David J; Chin, Lawrence S; Montenegro, Philip; Cantu, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Sports-related concussion has gained increased prominence, in part due to media coverage of several well-known athletes who have died from consequences of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE was first described by Martland in 1928 as a syndrome seen in boxers who had experienced significant head trauma from repeated blows. The classic symptoms of impaired cognition, mood, behavior, and motor skills also have been reported in professional football players, and in 2005, the histopathological findings of CTE were first reported in a former National Football League (NFL) player. These finding were similar to Alzheimer's disease in some ways but differed in critical areas such as a predominance of tau protein deposition over amyloid. The pathophysiology is still unknown but involves a history of repeated concussive and subconcussive blows and then a lag period before CTE symptoms become evident. The involvement of excitotoxic amino acids and abnormal microglial activation remain speculative. Early identification and prevention of this disease by reducing repeated blows to the head has become a critical focus of current research. PMID:23314081

  6. Sepsis-Associated Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cotena, Simona; Piazza, Ornella

    2012-01-01

    Summary Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is defined as a diffuse or multifocal cerebral dysfunction induced by the systemic response to the infection without clinical or laboratory evidence of direct brain infection. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial. SAE generally occurs early during severe sepsis and precedes multiple-organ failure. The most common clinical feature of SAE is the consciousness alteration which ranges from mildly reduced awareness to unresponsiveness and coma. Diagnosis of SAE is primarily clinical and depends on the exclusion of other possible causes of brain deterioration. Electroencephalography (EEG) is almost sensitive, but it is not specific for SAE. Computed Tomography (CT) head scan generally is negative in case of SAE, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can show brain abnormalities in case of SAE, but they are not specific for this condition. Somatosensitive Evoked Potentials (SEPs) are sensitive markers of developing cerebral dysfunction in sepsis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CBF) analysis is generally normal, a part an inconstant elevation of proteins concentration. S100B and NSE have been proposed like biomarkers for diagnosis of SAE, but the existing data are controversial. SAE is reversible even if survivors of severe sepsis have often long lasting or irreversible cognitive and behavioral sequel; however the presence of SAE can have a negative influence on survival. A specific therapy of SAE does not exist and the outcome depends on a prompt and appropriate treatment of sepsis as whole. PMID:23905041

  7. Non-Hyperammonemic valproate encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Omar; Zunga, Pervaiz M; Dar, Mohd I; Rather, Abdul Q; Rashid, Samia; Basu, Javid; Dar, Ishrat H; Ashraf, Mohd

    2014-04-01

    A 21-year-old male known case of primary hypothyroidism, Seizure disorder sequelae of an old trauma receiving sodium valproate, clobazam and phenobarbitone for control of Generalized tonic clonic seizures reported to neurology OPD with history of altered sensorium and gait unsteadiness for 1 week with history of hike in valproate dose 2 weeks before. On examination he was drowsy. Neurological examination was unremarkable except for gait unsteadiness and ataxia. Patient was admitted and evaluated for acute worsening. All (the) biochemical parameters including complete blood count, liver function tests, kidney function tests, routine urine examination, arterial blood gas analysis, blood and urine culture tests were normal. CSF analysis was also normal. Repeat MRI brain was also done which depicted all old changes with no fresh changes which will account for worsening of his sensorium. EEG was suggestive of diffuse encephalopathy. Thyroid function tests were also normal. Valproate encephalopathy was suspected and Valproate was empirically stopped and he was put on levetiracetam and phenytoin. His sensorium improved rapidly after stoppage of valproate with normalization of EEG. Serum valproate Levels were high with serum ammonia levels were in the normal range. We made the inference of nonhyperammoneamic valproate encephalopathy. This case highlights the existence of non-hyperammonemic valproate induced encephalopathy, suggesting mechanisms other than hyperammonemia responsible for this encephalopathy. PMID:25206067

  8. Diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Weissenborn, Karin

    2015-03-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (mHE) has significant impact upon a liver patient's daily living and health related quality of life. Therefore a majority of clinicians agree that mHE should be diagnosed and treated. The optimal means for diagnosing mHE, however, is controversial. This paper describes the currently most frequently used methods-EEG, critical flicker frequency, Continuous Reaction time Test, Inhibitory Control Test, computerized test batteries such as the Cognitive Drug Research test battery, the psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score (PHES) and the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS)-and their pros and cons. PMID:26041959

  9. Hashimoto's Encephalopathy Presenting with Chorea.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Abhijeet; Sengupta, Sarbani; Mukhopadhyay, Sarmishtha; Ghosh, Bhaskar

    2015-09-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a steroid-responsive relapsing neuropsychiatric disorder associated with high titers of antithyroid antibody with or without thyroid dysfunction. We report a case of HE in a 78 year old female who developed sudden onset behavioral abnormalities associated with choreiform movement of extremities. All causes of vascular, infective, metabolic, autoimmune, paraneoplastic and toxic encephalopathy were excluded. Anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) antibody was found to be raised with very high titre. A diagnosis of HE was made. Prompt treatment with high dose steroid led to dramatic improvement of symptoms including choreiform movement. PMID:27608878

  10. 9 CFR 96.2 - Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Meat Inspection Act (21 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) and regulations under the Act (9 CFR, chapter III, part 327... Drug Administration at 21 CFR 589.2000 may be imported. (2) Casings that are derived from bovines that... Safety and Inspection Service at 9 CFR 310.22 and the Food and Drug Administration at 21 CFR 189.5....

  11. 9 CFR 96.2 - Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... et seq.) and regulations under the Act (9 CFR, chapter III, part 327), including requirements that... Drug Administration at 21 CFR 589.2000 may be imported. (2) Casings that are derived from bovines that... Safety and Inspection Service at 9 CFR 310.22 and the Food and Drug Administration at 21 CFR 189.5....

  12. 9 CFR 96.2 - Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Meat Inspection Act (21 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) and regulations under the Act (9 CFR, chapter III, part 327... Drug Administration at 21 CFR 589.2000 may be imported. (2) Casings that are derived from bovines that... Safety and Inspection Service at 9 CFR 310.22 and the Food and Drug Administration at 21 CFR 189.5....

  13. 9 CFR 96.2 - Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... et seq.) and regulations under the Act (9 CFR, chapter III, part 327), including requirements that... Drug Administration at 21 CFR 589.2000 may be imported. (2) Casings that are derived from bovines that... Safety and Inspection Service at 9 CFR 310.22 and the Food and Drug Administration at 21 CFR 189.5....

  14. 9 CFR 96.2 - Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... et seq.) and regulations under the Act (9 CFR, chapter III, part 327), including requirements that... Drug Administration at 21 CFR 589.2000 may be imported. (2) Casings that are derived from bovines that... Safety and Inspection Service at 9 CFR 310.22 and the Food and Drug Administration at 21 CFR 189.5....

  15. Prussian blue caged in spongiform adsorbents using diatomite and carbon nanotubes for elimination of cesium.

    PubMed

    Hu, Baiyang; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Yu, Hongwen; Abe, Yoshiteru

    2012-05-30

    We developed a spongiform adsorbent that contains Prussian blue, which showed a high capacity for eliminating cesium. An in situ synthesizing approach was used to synthesize Prussian blue inside diatomite cavities. Highly dispersed carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were used to form CNT networks that coated the diatomite to seal in the Prussian blue particles. These ternary (CNT/diatomite/Prussian-blue) composites were mixed with polyurethane (PU) prepolymers to produce a quaternary (PU/CNT/diatomite/Prussian-blue), spongiform adsorbent with an in situ foaming procedure. Prussian blue was permanently immobilized in the cell walls of the spongiform matrix and preferentially adsorbed cesium with a theoretical capacity of 167 mg/g cesium. Cesium was absorbed primarily by an ion-exchange mechanism, and the absorption was accomplished by self-uptake of radioactive water by the quaternary spongiform adsorbent. PMID:22464752

  16. Pharmacotherapy for hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Phongsamran, Paula V; Kim, Jiwon W; Cupo Abbott, Jennifer; Rosenblatt, Angela

    2010-06-18

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a challenging clinical complication of liver dysfunction with a wide spectrum of neuropsychiatric abnormalities that range from mild disturbances in cognitive function and consciousness to coma and death. The pathogenesis of HE in cirrhosis is complex and multifactorial, but a key role is thought to be played by circulating gut-derived toxins of the nitrogenous compounds, most notably ammonia. Therapeutic treatment options for HE are currently limited and have appreciable risks and benefits associated with their use. Management of HE primarily involves avoidance of precipitating factors, limitation of dietary protein intake, and administration of various ammonia-lowering therapies such as non-absorbable disaccharides and select antimicrobial agents. Non-absorbable disaccharides, such as lactulose, have traditionally been regarded as first-line pharmacotherapy for patients with HE. However, multiple adverse events have been associated with their use. In addition, recent literature has questioned the true efficacy of the disaccharides for this indication. Neomycin, metronidazole and vancomycin may be used as alternative treatments for patients intolerant or unresponsive to non-absorbable disaccharides. Antimicrobials reduce bacterial production of ammonia and other bacteria-derived toxins through suppression of intestinal flora. Neomycin has been reported to be as effective as lactulose, and similar efficacy has been reported with vancomycin and metronidazole for the management of HE. However, the adverse effects frequently associated with these antimicrobials limit their use as first-line pharmacological agents. Neomycin is the most commonly used antimicrobial for HE and, although poorly absorbed, systemic exposure to the drug in sufficient amounts causes hearing loss and renal toxicity. Long-term neomycin therapy requires annual auditory testing and continuous monitoring of renal function. Long-term use of metronidazole has been

  17. 36 CFR 223.242 - Supplemental guidance, Memorandum of Agreements and Memorandums of Understanding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Supplemental guidance, Memorandum of Agreements and Memorandums of Understanding. 223.242 Section 223.242 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM...

  18. [Wernicke encephalopathy accompanying linitis plastica].

    PubMed

    Soós, Zsuzsanna; Salamon, Mónika; Oláh, Roland; Czégeni, Anna; Salamon, Ferenc; Folyovich, András; Winkler, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (or Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy) is a rarely diagnosed neurological disorder, which is caused by vitamin B1 deficiency. In the classical form it is characterized by a typical triad (confusion, oculomotor disturbance and ataxia), however, in the majority of the cases only confusion is present. It can be frequently observed in subjects with chronic alcohol consumption, but it may accompany different pathological states of which end stage malignant diseases are the most importants, where confusion may have different backgrounds. The authors present the case of an old male patient with advanced gastric cancer recognised and treated vitamin B1 deficiency, and they draw attention to difficulties of the diagnosis of Wernicke's disease. PMID:24379094

  19. [CLINICAL ASPECTS OF SEPTIC ENCEPHALOPATHY].

    PubMed

    Fesenko, O V; Sinopal'nikov, A I; Filatov, V V; Danishevsky, S V; Styrt, E A

    2016-01-01

    Septic encephalopathy is a form of general cerebral dysfunction caused by a systemic inflammatory reaction. Its investigation encounters enormous difficulties for the lack of reliable biological markers of neuronal lesions and methods for the evaluation of consciousness in severely ill patients. Hence, the importance of correct clinical interpretation of the character and magnitude of CNS activity. Examples are presented demonstrating the difficulty of interpreting disorders in CNS activity associated with evere community-acquired pneumonia. PMID:27172727

  20. [Imaging in acute toxic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Dietemann, J-L; Botelho, C; Nogueira, T; Vargas, M I; Audibert, C; Abu Eid, M; Bogorin, A; Bernardo, R; Jacques, C; Kremer, S; Zöllner, G

    2004-09-01

    Neuroimaging, particularly MR imaging, plays a major role for the diagnosis of many acute toxic encephalopathies. Toxic disorders are related to drugs (immunosuppressive agents, chemotherapeutic agents, anti-epileptic drugs, heroin...), to metals (lead, manganese, mercury...), and to industrial and environmental chemicals (solvent, carbon monoxide...). MR imaging with diffusion and perfusion imaging provides information regarding brain lesions induced by the toxic agents (vasogenic edema, cytotoxic edema, infarction, hemorrhage, demyelination...). PMID:15545943

  1. Metabolic Causes of Epileptic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pearl, Phillip L.

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy can be induced by inborn metabolic defects that may be rare individually but in aggregate represent a substantial clinical portion of child neurology. These may present with various epilepsy phenotypes including refractory neonatal seizures, early myoclonic encephalopathy, early infantile epileptic encephalopathy, infantile spasms, and generalized epilepsies which in particular include myoclonic seizures. There are varying degrees of treatability, but the outcome if untreated can often be catastrophic. The importance of early recognition cannot be overemphasized. This paper provides an overview of inborn metabolic errors associated with persistent brain disturbances due to highly active clinical or electrographic ictal activity. Selected diseases are organized by the defective molecule or mechanism and categorized as small molecule disorders (involving amino and organic acids, fatty acids, neurotransmitters, urea cycle, vitamers and cofactors, and mitochondria) and large molecule disorders (including lysosomal storage disorders, peroxisomal disorders, glycosylation disorders, and leukodystrophies). Details including key clinical features, salient electrophysiological and neuroradiological findings, biochemical findings, and treatment options are summarized for prominent disorders in each category. PMID:23762547

  2. 48 CFR 249.110 - Settlement negotiation memorandum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Settlement negotiation... Settlement negotiation memorandum. Follow the procedures at PGI 249.110 for preparation of a settlement negotiation memorandum....

  3. 48 CFR 249.110 - Settlement negotiation memorandum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Settlement negotiation... Settlement negotiation memorandum. Follow the procedures at PGI 249.110 for preparation of a settlement negotiation memorandum....

  4. 4 CFR Appendix I to Part 83 - Memorandum of Understanding

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Memorandum of Understanding I Appendix I to Part 83 Accounts GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE RECORDS PRIVACY PROCEDURES FOR PERSONNEL RECORDS Pt. 83, App. I Appendix I to Part 83—Memorandum of Understanding This memorandum of understanding constitutes an...

  5. Rifaximin in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Iadevaia, Maddalena Diana; Prete, Anna Del; Cesaro, Claudia; Gaeta, Laura; Zulli, Claudio; Loguercio, Carmelina

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a challenging complication in patients with advanced liver disease. It can be defined as a neuropsychiatric syndrome caused by portosystemic venous shunting, ranging from minimal to overt hepatic encephalopathy or coma. Its pathophysiology is still unclear, although increased levels of ammonia play a key role. Diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy is currently based on specific tests evaluating the neuropsychiatric state of patients and their quality of life; the severity of hepatic encephalopathy is measured by the West Haven criteria. Treatment of hepatic encephalopathy consists of pharmacological and corrective measures, as well as nutritional interventions. Rifaximin received approval for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in 2010 because of its few side effects and pharmacological benefits. The aim of this work is to review the use and efficacy of rifaximin both in acute and long-term management of hepatic encephalopathy. Treatment of overt hepatic encephalopathy involves management of the acute episode as well as maintenance of remission in those patients who have previously experienced an episode, in order to improve their quality of life. The positive effect of rifaximin in reducing health care costs is also discussed. PMID:24367227

  6. Rifaximin in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Iadevaia, Maddalena Diana; Prete, Anna Del; Cesaro, Claudia; Gaeta, Laura; Zulli, Claudio; Loguercio, Carmelina

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a challenging complication in patients with advanced liver disease. It can be defined as a neuropsychiatric syndrome caused by portosystemic venous shunting, ranging from minimal to overt hepatic encephalopathy or coma. Its pathophysiology is still unclear, although increased levels of ammonia play a key role. Diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy is currently based on specific tests evaluating the neuropsychiatric state of patients and their quality of life; the severity of hepatic encephalopathy is measured by the West Haven criteria. Treatment of hepatic encephalopathy consists of pharmacological and corrective measures, as well as nutritional interventions. Rifaximin received approval for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in 2010 because of its few side effects and pharmacological benefits. The aim of this work is to review the use and efficacy of rifaximin both in acute and long-term management of hepatic encephalopathy. Treatment of overt hepatic encephalopathy involves management of the acute episode as well as maintenance of remission in those patients who have previously experienced an episode, in order to improve their quality of life. The positive effect of rifaximin in reducing health care costs is also discussed. PMID:24367227

  7. [Memorandum - research funding of prevention].

    PubMed

    Walter, U; Gold, C; Hoffmann, W; Jahn, I; Töppich, J; Wildner, M; Dubben, S; Franze, M; John, J; Kliche, T; Lehmann, H; Naegele, G; Nöcker, G; Plaumann, M; Pott, E; Robra, B-P

    2012-08-01

    The memorandum of the research funding of prevention has been devised within the framework of the Prevention Research Funding Programme of the Federal Ministry of Education and Research. It consists not only of the obtained findings of the research-practice co-operation but also of recommendations for the implementation of prospective, innovational, effective, practice-oriented and sustainable research. The respective knowledge has been acquired from quantitative surveys on the experiences of scientists and practice partners within the prevention research funding project as well as from extensive qualitative methods of structured group evaluation. A participatory co-operation between research and practice based on mutual respect, trust and recognition is seen as mandatory for the further development of both prevention and health promotion research. Research and practice partners are required to engage in an ab initio collaboration starting from the conception phase, whereby it is advisable to encourage and fortify the communication between research, practice and funding partners by systematic surveillance in form of a meta-project. In addition, the inclusion of the target population from the outset and on a collaborative basis is considered as beneficial in order to ensure the practical application of the research findings. Furthermore, innovatory research designs which are able to provide a framework for internal flexibility, continuous re-assessment and adjustment are fundamental for the implementation of practice-oriented research. Moreover, a dynamic co-operation between different groups of interest not only depends on sharing responsibility but also on sufficient funding for both research and practice, which is particularly important for the transfer and communication of the attained findings. With regard to the evaluation of both effectiveness and sustainability of interventions, a research funding project is required which makes long-term results possible

  8. Child Abuse and Neglect. A Legal Memorandum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Secondary School Principals, Reston, VA.

    According to this memorandum, from 1963-1967 all 50 states adopted laws that required certain groups of people to notify public authorities of suspected child maltreatment. In all but a few states, a child is defined as anyone under the age of 18. By May of 1980, all states but Vermont had reporting statutes that mandate reporting by teachers,…

  9. Measuring Racial Balance. Research Memorandum No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefkowitz, Ben; D'Esopo, Tony

    The purpose of this research memorandum is to describe a means of measuring racial balance and to apply the measure to the distribution of public school population in San Francisco. The measure is derived from the definition that full integration would be achieved if each school had exactly the citywide racial mixture of students. The racial…

  10. Research needs in taeniasis—cysticercosis (Memorandum)*

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    This Memorandum discusses the epidemiology of taeniasis—cysticercosis, particularly the survival of taeniid eggs in nature, and goes on to consider diagnostic procedures (parasitological and serological), resistance to infection, pathogenesis and clinical pathology, chemotherapy, and the economic and social consequences of infection. Topics requiring further research are listed, and recommendations are made concerning the approach to the problem. PMID:1085668

  11. Satellite-Based Educational Services. Technical Memorandum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Operations Research, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    This memorandum contains engineering information relevant to the use of communication satellites for educational purposes. Information is provided for ground terminals as well as satellites. Satellite related issues addressed include: (1) expected life of service of various satellites, (2) constraints on the availability of the satellites, (3)…

  12. Current understanding and neurobiology of epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Auvin, Stéphane; Cilio, Maria Roberta; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2016-08-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a group of diseases in which epileptic activity itself contributes to severe cognitive and behavioral impairments above and beyond what might be expected from the underlying pathology alone. These impairments can worsen over time. This concept has been continually redefined since its introduction. A few syndromes are considered epileptic encephalopathies: early myoclonic encephalopathy and Ohtahara syndrome in the neonatal period, epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures, West syndrome or infantile spasms, Dravet syndrome during infancy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes-and-waves during sleep, and Landau-Kleffner syndrome during childhood. The inappropriate use of this term to refer to all severe epilepsy syndromes with intractable seizures and severe cognitive dysfunction has led to confusion regarding the concept of epileptic encephalopathy. Here, we review our current understanding of those epilepsy syndromes considered to be epileptic encephalopathies. Genetic studies have provided a better knowledge of neonatal and infantile epilepsy syndromes, while neuroimaging studies have shed light on the underlying causes of childhood-onset epileptic encephalopathies such as Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Apart from infantile spasm models, we lack animal models to explain the neurobiological mechanisms at work in these conditions. Experimental studies suggest that neuroinflammation may be a common neurobiological pathway that contributes to seizure refractoriness and cognitive involvement in the developing brain. PMID:26992889

  13. Paroxysmal Amnesia Attacks due to Hashimoto's Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nar Senol, Pelin; Bican Demir, Aylin; Bora, Ibrahim; Bakar, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a rare disease which is thought to be autoimmune and steroid responsive. The syndrome is characterized by cognitive impairment, encephalopathy, psychiatric symptoms, and seizures associated with increased level of anti-thyroid antibodies. The exact pathophysiology underlying cerebral involvement is still lesser known. Although symptoms suggest a nonlesional encephalopathy in most of the cases, sometimes the clinical appearance can be subtle and may not respond to immunosuppressants or immunomodulatory agents. Here we report a case who presented with drowsiness and amnestic complaints associated with paroxysmal electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities which could be treated only with an antiepileptic drug. PMID:27034679

  14. Encephalopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure in the skull, prolonged exposure to toxic elements (including solvents, drugs, radiation, paints, industrial chemicals, and certain metals), chronic progressive trauma, poor nutrition, ...

  15. Treatment of Overt Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Norman L

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is defined by an altered mental status in the setting of portosystemic shunting, with or without cirrhosis. The basis of HE is probably multi-factorial, but increased ammonia delivery to the brain is thought to play a pivotal role. Medical therapies have typically focused on reducing blood ammonia concentrations. These measures are moderately effective, but further improvements will require identification of new therapeutic targets. Two medications, lactulose and rifaximin, are currently approved for the treatment of HE in the USA - new compounds are available off-label, and are in clinical trials. The presence of HE is associated with a higher risk of death in cirrhotic patients. Liver transplantation typically cures HE, but HE does not increase the MELD score, and therefore does not contribute to the likelihood of liver transplantation. PMID:26195208

  16. Suicide and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Grant L

    2016-01-01

    For nearly 80 years, suicidality was not considered to be a core clinical feature of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In recent years, suicide has been widely cited as being associated with CTE, and now depression has been proposed to be one of three core diagnostic features alongside cognitive impairment and anger control problems. This evolution of the clinical features has been reinforced by thousands of media stories reporting a connection between mental health problems in former athletes and military veterans, repetitive neurotrauma, and CTE. At present, the science underlying the causal assumption between repetitive neurotrauma, depression, suicide, and the neuropathology believed to be unique to CTE is inconclusive. Epidemiological evidence indicates that former National Football League players, for example, are at lower, not greater, risk for suicide than men in the general population. This article aims to discuss the critical issues and literature relating to these possible relationships. PMID:26449269

  17. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in ALL.

    PubMed

    Millichap, J Gordon

    2015-07-01

    Investigators from Soochow University, Suzhou, China, studied the possible pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) observed in 11 cases of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) after induction chemotherapy. PMID:26933594

  18. Neuroimaging in Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Pradeep; Shroff, Manohar

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is emerging as one of the most important tools in identifying the etiology of neonatal encephalopathy as well as in predicting long-term outcomes. This makes it imperative to have a broader understanding of normal myelination of the neonatal brain on MR imaging and to be familiar with the spectrum of imaging features in ischemic and non-ischemic neonatal encephalopathy. Hypoxic ischemic injury (HIE) is one of the most common causes of neonatal encephalopathy and imaging appearances are influenced by factors such as the stage of maturation of the neonatal brain and severity as well as duration of ischemic insult. Other common causes of neonatal encephalopathy include infectious diseases, congenital disorders and inborn errors of metabolism. PMID:26909496

  19. 77 FR 43127 - Further Amendment to Memorandum Describing Authority and Assigned Responsibilities of the General...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... BOARD Further Amendment to Memorandum Describing Authority and Assigned Responsibilities of the General... Relations Board is amending the memorandum describing the authority and assigned responsibilities of the... amendment to Board memorandum describing the authority and assigned responsibilities of the General...

  20. Gut microbiota and hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, Radha K

    2013-06-01

    There is a strong relationship between liver and gut; while the portal venous system receives blood from the gut, and its contents may affect liver functions, liver in turn, affects intestinal functions through bile secretion. There is robust evidence that the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is linked to alterations in gut microbiota and their by-products such as ammonia, indoles, oxindoles, endotoxins, etc. In the setting of intestinal barrier and immune dysfunction, these by-products are involved in the pathogenesis of complications of liver cirrhosis including HE and systemic inflammation plays an important role. Prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics may exhibit efficacy in the treatment of HE by modulating the gut flora. They improve derangement in flora by decreasing the counts of pathogenic bacteria and thus improving the endotoxemia, HE and the liver disease. Current evidence suggest that the trials evaluating the role of probiotics in the treatment of HE are of not high quality and all trials had high risk of bias and high risk of random errors. Therefore, the use of probiotics for patients with HE cannot be currently recommended. Further RCTs are required. This review summarizes the main literature findings about the relationships between gut flora and HE, both in terms of the pathogenesis and the treatment of HE. PMID:23463489

  1. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saulle, Michael; Greenwald, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is a long-term consequence of single or repetitive closed head injuries for which there is no treatment and no definitive pre-mortem diagnosis. It has been closely tied to athletes who participate in contact sports like boxing, American football, soccer, professional wrestling and hockey. Risk factors include head trauma, presence of ApoE3 or ApoE4 allele, military service, and old age. It is histologically identified by the presence of tau-immunoreactive NFTs and NTs with some cases having a TDP-43 proteinopathy or beta-amyloid plaques. It has an insidious clinical presentation that begins with cognitive and emotional disturbances and can progress to Parkinsonian symptoms. The exact mechanism for CTE has not been precisely defined however, research suggest it is due to an ongoing metabolic and immunologic cascade called immunoexcitiotoxicity. Prevention and education are currently the most compelling way to combat CTE and will be an emphasis of both physicians and athletes. Further research is needed to aid in pre-mortem diagnosis, therapies, and support for individuals and their families living with CTE. PMID:22567320

  2. Clinical Neurophysiology of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Amodio, Piero; Montagnese, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) has relevant impact on the quality of life of patients and their caregivers and causes relevant costs because of hospitalizations and work days lost. Its quantification is important to perform adequate clinical trials on this relevant complication of cirrhosis and portal-systemic shunting. Clinical neurophysiology, which detects functional alterations of the nervous system, has been applied to the study of HE for over 60 years. This review aims at summarizing and clarifying the role of neurophysiologic techniques in the study of HE. Methods A narrative review was performed aiming at interpreting the cited papers and the techniques on the basis of their physiological and pathophysiological meaning. Results The potential role of EEG, quantified EEG, evoked potentials—both exogenous, endogenous and motor—have been clarified to the reader that may be unfamiliar with neurophysiology. Conclusions The EEG, reflecting the oscillatory changes of neural network is the preferable tool to detect and monitor HE, with the exception of its most severe stage, when EEG flattens. SSEP and MEP have indication to detect and monitor transmission alterations that are likely related to myelin changes and microedema. PMID:26041960

  3. Hereditary endotheliopathy with retinopathy and encephalopathy: pathological and genetic studies of a family

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yu-Hua; Sun, Jian; Yuan, Yun; Chen, Ling; Pei, Zhong; Xing, Shi-Hui; Liao, Bing; Zeng, Jin-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to examine the clinical, pathological and genetic features of a family suffering from hereditary endotheliopathy with retinopathy and encephalopathy. Methods: The index case was male, and his symptoms were detected at 18 years of age. The clinical manifestation included recurrent headache, fever, consciousness disturbances and haemiplegia. Bilateral cerebral hemispheric lesions were detected via MRI as low signals on T1 and high signals on T2 and FLAIR, with moderate enhancement. Video EEG revealed an increase in the slow wave frequency. An EMG displayed neurogenic atrophy. Similar clinical and imaging characteristics were detected in his mother and his uncle. Pathological examinations of the brain, muscle and sural nerve were performed on the index case. Sequence analysis of the TREX1 gene was performed on the index case, his sister and his father. Results: A brain biopsy revealed spongiform alterations as well as inflammatory cell infiltration in a few small vessels. Neurogenic muscular atrophy was detected based on a biopsy of the muscle. Demyelination was detected based on a biopsy of the sural nerve. Electron microscopic examination of the sural nerve revealed thickening and delamination of the basement membrane. No reported TREX1 gene mutation was detected for any of the patients. Conclusion: Hereditary endotheliopathy presented with peripheral nerve involvement. Multi-laminar thickening of the basement membrane of the capillaries also appeared in the extracerebral tissue. The involvement of a novel gene should be further examined. PMID:26464653

  4. Malaria diagnosis: Memorandum from a WHO Meeting*

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    This Memorandum reviews (1) the diagnostic requirements for malaria control within the primary health care system; (2) the current methods of malaria diagnosis used both in the clinic and in epidemiological studies; (3) the status of research on alternative methods to microscopy for the diagnosis of malaria; and (4) the application of new diagnostic methods in individual cases, in the community, and in the mosquito and their possible integration into existing epidemiological studies and control programmes. It also identifies priorities for the development and validation of new and reliable diagnostic techniques, and makes recommendations for the improvement, standardization, and utilization of current methodology. PMID:3061674

  5. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Complicating Hyperemesis during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Berdai, Mohamed Adnane; Labib, Smael; Harandou, Mustapha

    2016-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is caused by severe thiamine deficiency; it is mostly observed in alcoholic patients. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman, at 17 weeks of gestational age, with severe hyperemesis gravidarum. She presented with disturbance of consciousness, nystagmus, ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. The resonance magnetic imagery showed bilaterally symmetrical hyperintensities of thalamus and periaqueductal area. The case was managed with very large doses of thiamine. The diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy was confirmed later by a low thiamine serum level. The patient was discharged home on day 46 with mild ataxia and persistent nystagmus. Wernicke's encephalopathy is a rare complication of hyperemesis gravidarum. It should be diagnosed as early as possible to prevent long-term neurological sequela or death. Thiamine supplementation in pregnant women with prolonged vomiting should be initiated, especially before parenteral dextrose infusion. Early thiamine replacement will reduce maternal morbidity and fetal loss rate. PMID:26989522

  6. Pediatric Epileptic Encephalopathies: Pathophysiology and Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Shao, Li-Rong; Stafstrom, Carl E

    2016-05-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are syndromes in which seizures or interictal epileptiform activity contribute to or exacerbate brain function, beyond that caused by the underlying pathology. These severe epilepsies begin early in life, are associated with poor lifelong outcome, and are resistant to most treatments. Therefore, they represent an immense challenge for families and the medical care system. Furthermore, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the epileptic encephalopathies are poorly understood, hampering attempts to devise novel treatments. This article reviews animal models of the three classic epileptic encephalopathies-West syndrome (infantile spasms), Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, and continuous spike waves during sleep or Landau-Kleffner syndrome-with discussion of how animal models are revealing underlying pathophysiological mechanisms that might be amenable to targeted therapy. PMID:27544466

  7. Why the confusion in Hashimoto's encephalopathy?

    PubMed

    Jayasekera, Bodiabaduge A P; McShane, Michael Anthony; Roy, Prem; Anand, Geetha

    2011-01-01

    A 13-year-old girl presented with an afebrile seizure followed by prolonged confusion and visual hallucinations. Initial investigations in the form of blood tests, cerebrospinal fluid analysis and head imaging by CT, were normal. She represented with two further episodes within a period of 3 weeks. Further investigations considering infective, metabolic and some autoimmune causes of encephalopathy were negative. An MRI head scan was normal. Thyroid function testing disclosed primary hypothyroidism and elevated antithyroid antibodies. She responded well to glucocorticoid therapy for presumed Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE). HE describes patients with various neurological manifestations with elevated titres of antithyroid antibodies. There are no clear criteria for diagnosis, with many cases labelled as HE. Responses to corticosteroid therapy are favourable. In patients with unexplained encephalopathy, HE should be considered given the favourable response to glucocorticoid therapy. PMID:22691944

  8. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Complicating Hyperemesis during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Berdai, Mohamed Adnane; Labib, Smael; Harandou, Mustapha

    2016-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is caused by severe thiamine deficiency; it is mostly observed in alcoholic patients. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman, at 17 weeks of gestational age, with severe hyperemesis gravidarum. She presented with disturbance of consciousness, nystagmus, ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. The resonance magnetic imagery showed bilaterally symmetrical hyperintensities of thalamus and periaqueductal area. The case was managed with very large doses of thiamine. The diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy was confirmed later by a low thiamine serum level. The patient was discharged home on day 46 with mild ataxia and persistent nystagmus. Wernicke's encephalopathy is a rare complication of hyperemesis gravidarum. It should be diagnosed as early as possible to prevent long-term neurological sequela or death. Thiamine supplementation in pregnant women with prolonged vomiting should be initiated, especially before parenteral dextrose infusion. Early thiamine replacement will reduce maternal morbidity and fetal loss rate. PMID:26989522

  9. Clinical review of genetic epileptic encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Grace J.; Asher, Y. Jane Tavyev; Graham, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Seizures are a frequently encountered finding in patients seen for clinical genetics evaluations. The differential diagnosis for the cause of seizures is quite diverse and complex, and more than half of all epilepsies have been attributed to a genetic cause. Given the complexity of such evaluations, we highlight the more common causes of genetic epileptic encephalopathies and emphasize the usefulness of recent technological advances. The purpose of this review is to serve as a practical guide for clinical geneticists in the evaluation and counseling of patients with genetic epileptic encephalopathies. Common syndromes will be discussed, in addition to specific seizure phenotypes, many of which are refractory to anti-epileptic agents. Divided by etiology, we overview the more common causes of infantile epileptic encephalopathies, channelopathies, syndromic, metabolic, and chromosomal entities. For each condition, we will outline the diagnostic evaluation and discuss effective treatment strategies that should be considered. PMID:22342633

  10. Hashimoto Encephalopathy or Neurosarcoidosis? A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Biggya L.; Pitiyanuvath, Nataria

    2015-01-01

    Hashimoto encephalopathy (HE) is a rare autoimmune disease characterized by symptoms of acute or subacute encephalopathy associated with increased antithyroid antibody levels. Neurosarcoidosis is also a rare entity that occurs in less than 5% of patients with systemic sarcoidosis. Neurosarcoidosis usually presents with cranial neuropathies, myelopathy, or new-onset seizure. We report a case of a 49-year-old caucasian woman, previously healthy, who initially presented for a workup of a new-onset seizure. She had a gradually progressive course with neurocognitive decline and recurrent partial seizures refractory to conventional antiepileptic drugs. Her seizures responded well to a course of intravenous immunoglobulin. She was subsequently diagnosed with HE and pulmonary sarcoidosis based on serological and pathological studies. She improved neurologically once the seizures were controlled. Hashimoto encephalopathy is a rare condition that is potentially treatable and presents with various neuropsychiatric manifestations. It is a diagnosis of exclusion that requires a strong clinical suspicion and is often underrecognized. PMID:25829987

  11. Concussion in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Stein, Thor D; Alvarez, Victor E; McKee, Ann C

    2015-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in association with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is associated with a variety of clinical symptoms in multiple domains, and there is a distinct pattern of pathological changes. The abnormal tau pathology in CTE occurs uniquely in those regions of the brain that are likely most susceptible to stress concentration during trauma. CTE has been associated with a variety of types of repetitive head trauma, most frequently contact sports. In cases published to date, the mean length of exposure to repetitive head trauma was 15.4 years. The clinical symptoms of the disease began after a mean latency of 14.5 years with a mean age of death of 59.3 years. Most subjects had a reported history of concussions with a mean of 20.3. However, 16 % of published CTE subjects did not have a history of concussion suggesting that subconcussive hits are sufficient to lead to the development of CTE. Overall, the number of years of exposure, not the number of concussions, was significantly associated with worse tau pathology in CTE. This suggests that it is the chronic and repetitive nature of head trauma, irrespective of concussive symptoms, that is the most important driver of disease. CTE and exposure to repetitive head trauma is also associated with a variety of other neurodegenerations, including Alzheimer disease. In fact, amyloid β peptide deposition is altered and accelerated in CTE and is associated with worse disease. Here, we review the current exposure, clinical, and pathological associations of CTE. PMID:26260277

  12. Concussion in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Thor D.; Alvarez, Victor E.; McKee, Ann C.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in association with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is associated with a variety of clinical symptoms in multiple domains, and there is a distinct pattern of pathological changes. The abnormal tau pathology in CTE occurs uniquely in those regions of the brain that are likely most susceptible to stress concentration during trauma. CTE has been associated with a variety of types of repetitive head trauma, most frequently contact sports. In cases published to date, the mean length of exposure to repetitive head trauma was 15.4 years. The clinical symptoms of the disease began after a mean latency of 14.5 years with a mean age of death of 59.3 years. Most subjects had a reported history of concussions with a mean of 20.3. However, 16 % of published CTE subjects did not have a history of concussion suggesting that subconcussive hits are sufficient to lead to the development of CTE. Overall, the number of years of exposure, not the number of concussions, was significantly associated with worse tau pathology in CTE. This suggests that it is the chronic and repetitive nature of head trauma, irrespective of concussive symptoms, that is the most important driver of disease. CTE and exposure to repetitive head trauma is also associated with a variety of other neurodegenerations, including Alzheimer disease. In fact, amyloid β peptide deposition is altered and accelerated in CTE and is associated with worse disease. Here, we review the current exposure, clinical, and pathological associations of CTE. PMID:26260277

  13. Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy Impairs Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Swastik; Umapathy, Sridharan; Dhiman, Radha K.

    2015-01-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the mildest form of the spectrum of neurocognitive impairment in cirrhosis. It is a frequent occurrence in patients of cirrhosis and is detectable only by specialized neurocognitive testing. MHE is a clinically significant disorder which impairs daily functioning, driving performance, work capability and learning ability. It also predisposes to the development of overt hepatic encephalopathy, increased falls and increased mortality. This results in impaired quality of life for the patient as well as significant social and economic burden for health providers and care givers. Early detection and treatment of MHE with ammonia lowering therapy can reverse MHE and improve quality of life. PMID:26041957

  14. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy impairs quality of life.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Swastik; Umapathy, Sridharan; Dhiman, Radha K

    2015-03-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the mildest form of the spectrum of neurocognitive impairment in cirrhosis. It is a frequent occurrence in patients of cirrhosis and is detectable only by specialized neurocognitive testing. MHE is a clinically significant disorder which impairs daily functioning, driving performance, work capability and learning ability. It also predisposes to the development of overt hepatic encephalopathy, increased falls and increased mortality. This results in impaired quality of life for the patient as well as significant social and economic burden for health providers and care givers. Early detection and treatment of MHE with ammonia lowering therapy can reverse MHE and improve quality of life. PMID:26041957

  15. Neuropsychological functioning in Wernicke's encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Behura, Sushree Sangita; Swain, Sarada Prasanna

    2015-01-01

    Context: Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is caused by thiamine (Vitamin B1) deficiency and most commonly found in chronic alcoholism and malnutrition. Clinically, the key features are mental status disturbances (global confusion), oculomotor abnormalities, and gait disturbances (ataxia). Apart from these clinical features, we can find deficits in neuropsychological functioning in patients with WE, which is more prominent after the improvement in the physical conditions. Neuropsychological functioning includes both basic cognitive processes (i.e., attention-concentration) as well as higher order cognitive processes (i.e., memory, executive functioning, reasoning), which is much vital for the maintenance of quality of life of an individual. However, unfortunately, in most of the cases, neuropsychological functioning is ignored by the clinicians. Materials and Methods: In this study four case reports of WE have been presented. The patients were taken from the outdoor department of Mental Health Institute, S.C.B. Medical College, Cuttack, Odisha. Neuropsychological functioning was measured by administration of PGIBBD and Quality of Life was measured by WHO-QOL BREF Odia Version. Discussion: As described in the literature, among the three cardinal signs (global confusion, ataxia, and ocular sings), the first two were present in all cases, but nystagmus was present in only two cases. Memory dysfunction was so disabling that the persons were unable to maintain a good Quality of Life and occupational impairment was prominent. There are disturbances in recent, remote memory, immediate recall, delayed recall, and attention and concentration, ultimately creating both physical and mental disability. PGI-BBD findings also suggest the overall impairment in neuropsychological functioning other than memory, that is, executive functioning, visual acuity, and depth perception. Findings of WHO-QOL BREF suggest the impairment of four domains of QOL in all the cases, but the severity

  16. Epileptic encephalopathies: new genes and new pathways.

    PubMed

    Nieh, Sahar Esmaeeli; Sherr, Elliott H

    2014-10-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies represent a group of devastating epileptic disorders that occur early in life and are often characterized by pharmaco-resistant epilepsy, persistent severe electroencephalographic abnormalities, and cognitive dysfunction or decline. Next generation sequencing technologies have increased the speed of gene discovery tremendously. Whereas ion channel genes were long considered to be the only significant group of genes implicated in the genetic epilepsies, a growing number of non-ion-channel genes are now being identified. As a subgroup of the genetically mediated epilepsies, epileptic encephalopathies are complex and heterogeneous disorders, making diagnosis and treatment decisions difficult. Recent exome sequencing data suggest that mutations causing epileptic encephalopathies are often sporadic, typically resulting from de novo dominant mutations in a single autosomal gene, although inherited autosomal recessive and X-linked forms also exist. In this review we provide a summary of the key features of several early- and mid-childhood onset epileptic encephalopathies including Ohtahara syndrome, Dravet syndrome, Infantile spasms and Lennox Gastaut syndrome. We review the recent next generation sequencing findings that may impact treatment choices. We also describe the use of conventional and newer anti-epileptic and hormonal medications in the various syndromes based on their genetic profile. At a biological level, developments in cellular reprogramming and genome editing represent a new direction in modeling these pediatric epilepsies and could be used in the development of novel and repurposed therapies. PMID:25266964

  17. Intermediate dose 5-fluorouracil-induced encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-A; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Choi, Hye Jin; Rha, Sun Young; Seong, Jin Sil; Jeung, Hei-Cheul

    2006-01-01

    As an acute neurotoxicity, high dose 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced encephalopathy is well-known, but encephalopathy associated with lower dose is rarely reported. Here, we report a case of a male with anal cancer who was treated with 5-FU 1000 mg/m(2), continuous infusion for 5 days q4 weeks. At the second and the fourth cycles of chemotherapy, sudden confusion, cognitive dysfunction and disorientation occurred during 5-FU infusion. They were accompanied by hyperammonemia in the absence of focal neurological deficits or structural abnormalities. These symptoms completely disappeared and the serum ammonia level returned to normal after discontinuation of 5-FU and conservative care. In order to investigate a possible deficit of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), we checked its mRNA level before and after treatment using real-time PCR. The patient's pre-treatment level was 80% compared with reference group, and it was elevated up to 187% of initial after 5-FU treatment, implying that that his encephalopathy may be 5-FU catabolite type rather than DPD deficiency. In conclusion, we report that encephalopathy can develop even with the dose of 5-FU lower than ever reported, and it should be considered as a differential diagnosis for proper management. PMID:16436463

  18. [Myoclonic encephalopathy associated with proton pump inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Boulliat, J; Polard, E; Colin, F; Bentué-Ferrer, D; Allain, H

    2004-03-01

    Two men (66 and 73 Years) with a cardiovascular history were hospitalized for rapid onset encephalopathy associated with myoclonia and an extrapyramidal syndrome. On the basis of the French Pharmacovigilance system, this symptomatology has been attributed to the coadministration of a proton pump inhibitor, lansoprazole (15mg/day) with levodopa. Lansoprazole withdrawal led to a normalisation of the situation. PMID:15037850

  19. [Memorandum prevention research - research areas and methods].

    PubMed

    Walter, U; Nöcker, G; Plaumann, M; Linden, S; Pott, E; Koch, U; Pawils, S; Altgeld, T; Dierks, M L; Frahsa, A; Jahn, I; Krauth, C; Pomp, M; Rehaag, R; Robra, B P; Süß, W; Töppich, J; Trojan, A; von Unger, H; Wildner, M; Wright, M

    2012-10-01

    From 2004 to 2012, the German Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) established its first funding programme for the promotion of prevention research. 60 projects on primary prevention and health promotion and the meta-project entitled "Cooperation for Sustainable Prevention Research" (KNP) received BMBF grants under this programme during this period. The experience and knowledge gained and recommendations arising from the research funded under this programme are compiled in memorandum format. The "Memorandum on Prevention Research - Research Areas and Methods" highlights 5 research areas that are considered to be especially relevant from the perspective of the involved scientists and practice partners.The promotion of structural development and sustainability enhancement in disease prevention and health promotion are central areas that should branch out from existing nuclei of crystallization. Improving the health competence of the population and of specific subpopulations is another major area. Research in these areas should contribute to the development of theoretical concepts and to the empirical testing of these concepts. The transfer of knowledge for effective use of developed disease prevention and health promotion programmes and measures is still a scarcely researched area. Among other things, studies of the transfer of programmes from one context to another, analyses of the coop-eration between politics and science, and the continued theoretical and conceptual development of transfer research are needed. Long-term data on the effects of intervention studies are also needed for proper evaluation of sustainability. The latter dem-onstrates the importance of method development in disease prevention and health promotion research as an area that should receive separate funding and support. This research should include, in particular, studies of the efficacy of complex interventions, health economic analyses, and participative health research. PMID:23165608

  20. Memorandum of Understanding with Northwest Food Processors Association

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-01

    The Northwest Food Processors Association (NWFPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy entered into this memorandum of understanding to work collaboratively to reduce energy intensity by 25% within ten years.

  1. Encephalopathy of infection and systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Young, G Bryan

    2013-10-01

    This review will discuss several intracranial infections and sepsis-associated encephalopathy. Intracranial infections and inflammation of interest to the neurologist and EEG technicians include viral and autoimmune encephalitides; bacterial, fungal, and other meningitides; cerebritis; and brain abscess and subdural empyema. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy refers to a diffuse brain dysfunction secondary to infection that is principally located outside of the central nervous system. It is much more common than all of the intracranial infections put together, at least for adults in Western society. It probably involves a number of mechanisms that are not mutually exclusive and likely vary from patient to patient. Morbidity and mortality are directly related to the severity of SAE. The earliest features of SAE are delirium and mild EEG slowing; it is crucial to recognize these early features and to search for and treat the underlying infection promptly to reduce mortality and morbidity. PMID:24084178

  2. Hashimoto's encephalopathy: A rare proteiform disorder.

    PubMed

    Montagna, Giacomo; Imperiali, Mauro; Agazzi, Pamela; D'Aurizio, Federica; Tozzoli, Renato; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Giovanella, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a rare not well understood, progressive and relapsing multiform disease, characterized by seizures, movement disorders, subacute cognitive dysfunction, psychiatric symptoms and responsiveness to steroid therapy. The disorder is generally associated with thyroid diseases and the most common feature is the presence of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb). Patients are usually euthyroid or mildly hypothyroid at presentation. All age groups can be affected. The pathophysiology is still unclear, especially the link between elevated serum TPOAb and the encephalopathy. Most reported cases occurred in women and girls. Unspecific symptoms, non-pathognomonic laboratory neurophysiology and neuroimaging features make its diagnosis a real challenge for clinicians. The case of a 16 year old boy, with a clinical picture of HE associated with hypothyroidism, demonstrating an excellent response to high dose steroids is presented together with a systematic review of the literature. PMID:26849953

  3. Disaccharides in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Praveen; Sharma, Barjesh Chander

    2013-06-01

    Management of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) primarily involves avoidance of precipitating factors and administration of various ammonia-lowering therapies such as nonabsorbable disaccharides and antimicrobial agents like rifaximin. The nonabsorbable disaccharides which include lactulose and lactitol are considered the first-line therapy for the treatment of HE and minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). Lactulose significantly improves cognitive function and health-related quality of life in patients with MHE. Lactitol is comparable to lactulose in the treatment of HE with fewer side effects. Lactulose has also shown to be effective in primary and secondary prophylaxis of HE. Disaccharides were found to be comparable to rifaximin in recent systemic reviews in the treatment of HE however conclusion was based on inclusion of some poor quality trials. Combination therapy of disaccharides either with rifaximin, L-ornithine L-aspartate,probiotics for the treatment of HE needs further validation in large studies. PMID:23456517

  4. Head stereotypies in STXBP1 encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ok; Korff, Christian M; Villaluz, Mel Michel G; Suls, Arvid; Weckhuysen, Sarah; De Jonghe, Peter; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2013-08-01

    STXBP1 encephalopathy is associated with a range of movement disorders. We observed head stereotypies in three patients. These comprised a slow (<1Hz), high-amplitude, horizontal, 'figure-of-eight' pattern, beginning at age 4-6 years and resulting in neck muscle hypertrophy, in two males; a faster (2-3Hz), side-to-side, 'no' movement, starting at the age of 9 years 6 months was observed in one female. Upper limb and truncal stereotypies and vocalization occurred intermittently with the head movements. The stereotypies increased with excitement but settled with concentration and sleep. Head and upper limb stereotypies are valuable clinical clues to the diagnosis of STXBP1 encephalopathy in patients with profound impairments. PMID:23763664

  5. Effects on instruments of the World Health Organization--recommended protocols for decontamination after possible exposure to transmissible spongiform encephalopathy-contaminated tissue.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stanley A; Merritt, Katharine; Woods, Terry O; Busick, Deanna N

    2005-01-15

    It has been recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that rigorous decontamination protocols be used on surgical instruments that have been exposed to tissue possibly contaminated with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). This study was designed to examine the effects of these protocols on various types of surgical instruments. The most important conclusions are: (1) autoclaving in 1N NaOH will cause darkening of some instruments; (2) soaking in 1N NaOH at room temperature damages carbon steel but not stainless steel or titanium; (3) soaking in chlorine bleach will badly corrode gold-plated instruments and will damage some, but not all, stainless-steel instruments, especially welded and soldered joints. Damage became apparent after the first exposure and therefore long tests are not necessary to establish which instruments will be damaged. PMID:15449256

  6. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects. PMID:27625729

  7. [Drug therapy of patients with dyscirculatory encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Macheret, Ie L; Khanenko, N V

    2002-01-01

    Results are submitted of treatment of discirculatory encephalopathy having developed against the background of arterial hypertension, with a combination of drugs aktovegin and captopril in 56 patients. The positive effect of the instituted monotherapy has been documented clinically, with correlation established with indices of additional methods of investigation. The secured results of treatment permit recommending actovegin and captopril for a wide use in practical medicine to treat patients in the above category. PMID:12145902

  8. Wernicke's encephalopathy induced by hyperemesis gravidarum

    PubMed Central

    Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Delgado-García, Silvia; Martín-Bayón, Tina; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a reversible neurological emergency caused by thiamine deficiency. Prolonged vomiting in pregnancy results in thiamine depletion. The early recognition of its clinical signs and symptoms is essential to establish the suspected diagnosis and can be confirmed by MRI. Prompt administration of thiamine is important for preventing the occurrence of sequelae in the mother and for improving the fetal prognostic. We report a case of WE induced by hyperemesis gravidarum with a good maternal and fetal outcome. PMID:22684836

  9. Ciprofloxacin-associated posterior reversible encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Al Bu Ali, Waleed Hammad

    2013-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-neuroradiological syndrome characterised by numerous symptoms and of no specific aetiology. Headache, confusion, seizures, cortical visual disturbances or blindness are the key symptoms. As this syndrome is reversible and readily treated by interrupting or discontinuing the aetiology, it should sharply be acknowledged. Ciprofloxacin was associated with PRES in an adolescent male treated from chest infection. It was managed in a hospital intensive care unit and was observed until disappearance. PMID:23585504

  10. Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy in the Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Leise, Michael D.; Poterucha, John J.; Kamath, Patrick S.; Kim, W. Ray

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) develops in about 50% of patients with cirrhosis and is one of the features of decompensated cirrhosis. The inpatient incidence of HE is approximately 23,000/year and management of these patients is common for internists and subspecialists. Treatment of the hospitalized patient with HE has changed in recent years. Treatment entails two phases, induction and maintenance of remission. Most cases of significant hepatic encephalopathy are precipitated by infection, gastrointestinal bleeding, medications or other culprits. All patients should be evaluated for secondary triggers of HE and treatment should be initiated with a non-absorbable disaccharide (i.e. lactulose) in most cases. Rifaximin (off-label) can be added in patients not responding to lactulose. Neomycin is a less preferable alternative to rifaximin, due to its side effect profile. Other therapies including zinc, LOLA, and branch chain amino acids can be considered for patients not responding to a disaccharide and non-absorbable antibiotic. Large portosystemic shunts may be embolized in patients with medically refractory recurrent or severe HE with otherwise well compensated cirrhosis. Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System is now available for patients with severe hepatic encephalopathy who do not respond to medical therapy. It is critically important that patients hospitalized with significant hepatic encephalopathy continue a maintenance medication(s) at the time of dismissal to prevent further episodes. Patients with a 1st time episode of HE can be placed on lactulose and careful instruction should be provided to patient and caregiver about titration of dose to achieve 3 bowel movements per day. Patients with recurrent HE episodes despite lactulose benefit from the addition of rifaximin which decreases the frequency of recurrent HE episodes and related hospitalizations. Lastly, patients and their families should be counselled about the risk of motor vehicle accidents which