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Sample records for spontaneous deposition methanol

  1. Palladium deposits spontaneously grown on nickel foam for electro-catalyzing methanol oxidation: Effect of precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiangheng; Zhao, Hongli; Lan, Minbo

    2016-02-01

    Methanol, a high-energy substance, is widely used for green fuel cells. However, the sluggish electrochemical methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) on state-of-the-art catalysts still requires for exploring high-performance and low-cost materials to further promote the reaction kinetics at low overpotentials. Here we carried out the first electrocatalytic comparison study of two Ni foam-supported Pd nanomaterials (Pd-2-Ni and Pd-4-Ni, respectively), obtained through the spontaneous galvanic replacement of Ni with different palladic precursors ([PdCl4]2- and [PdCl6]2-, respectively), toward MOR. With replacement, Pd deposits with discrepant arrangements and coverages were grown on the porous Ni support. Compared to commercial Pd/C, both Pd-2-Ni and Pd-4-Ni exhibited better mass activity and catalytic durability for MOR in alkaline media. More interestingly, different palladic precursors made a significant effect on the catalytic performance of the Ni foam-supported Pd deposits. In Pd-4-Ni, the 2:1 stoichiometric replacement of Ni with [PdCl6]2- enabled the incompact arrangement of Pd structures, with more exposure of Ni atoms adjoined to Pd atoms on the catalytic interface compared to Pd-2-Ni. As a result, with the favorable Ni-neighbor-Pd regime and the higher utilization efficiency of Pd atoms, the synthesized Pd-4-Ni catalyst provided a mass activity of approximately 1.5 times higher than Pd-2-Ni toward MOR.

  2. Carbon monoxide, methanol and ethanol electro-oxidation on Ru-decorated carbon-supported Pt nanoparticles prepared by spontaneous deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velázquez-Palenzuela, Amado; Brillas, Enric; Arias, Conchita; Centellas, Francesc; Garrido, José Antonio; Rodríguez, Rosa María; Cabot, Pere-Lluís

    2013-03-01

    Carbon-supported Pt nanoparticles (Pt/C) were modified by spontaneous deposition of Ru species in 0.1 M HClO4 solutions with different Ru concentrations and treatment duration. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) of thin-layer electrodes in 0.5 M H2SO4 allowed determining the coverage θ of Pt by the Ru deposits. The CO oxidation activity of the Ru-decorated Pt specimens (Ru(Pt)/C) was evaluated by CO stripping measurements in the same background electrolyte. The activity towards methanol and ethanol oxidation was tested using CV in 0.5 M H2SO4 with 1.0 M CH3OH or 1.0 M CH3CH2OH. A promotional effect of all the anodic reactions due to the introduction of Ru species was detected, with a significant reduction of the overpotential in all cases. The optimum coverage for achieving the best CO oxidation activity and the highest current for the oxidation of these alcohols was found around θ = 0.20-0.30, indicating the involvement of CO as intermediate in the oxidation pathway of both, methanol and ethanol. The observed activation was mainly assigned to the deposited hydrous Ru oxide (RuOxHy). The Tafel slopes were analyzed and discussed on the basis of the presence of Ru species and the proposed mechanism for each oxidation reaction.

  3. Atmospheric deposition of methanol over the Atlantic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mingxi; Nightingale, Philip D.; Beale, Rachael; Liss, Peter S.; Blomquist, Byron; Fairall, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    In the troposphere, methanol (CH3OH) is present ubiquitously and second in abundance among organic gases after methane. In the surface ocean, methanol represents a supply of energy and carbon for marine microbes. Here we report direct measurements of air–sea methanol transfer along a ∼10,000-km north–south transect of the Atlantic. The flux of methanol was consistently from the atmosphere to the ocean. Constrained by the aerodynamic limit and measured rate of air–sea sensible heat exchange, methanol transfer resembles a one-way depositional process, which suggests dissolved methanol concentrations near the water surface that are lower than what were measured at ∼5 m depth, for reasons currently unknown. We estimate the global oceanic uptake of methanol and examine the lifetimes of this compound in the lower atmosphere and upper ocean with respect to gas exchange. We also constrain the molecular diffusional resistance above the ocean surface—an important term for improving air–sea gas exchange models. PMID:24277830

  4. Palladium catalysts synthesized by atomic layer deposition for methanol decomposition.

    SciTech Connect

    Elam, J. W.; Feng, H.; Stair, P. C.; Libera, J. A.; Setthapun, W.; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-05-25

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) palladium films were deposited at 200 C on various ALD metal oxide surfaces using sequential exposures to Pd(II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate (Pd(hfac)2) and formalin. In situ quartz crystal microbalance measurements as well as ex situ measurements performed on planar substrates revealed that the Pd growth begins with a relatively slow nucleation process and accelerates once an adequate amount of Pd has deposited on the surface. Furthermore, the Pd nucleation is faster on ALD ZnO surfaces compared to ALD Al2O3 surfaces. ALD was utilized to synthesize highly dispersed, uniform Pd nanoparticles (1 to 2 nm in diameter) on ALD ZnO and Al2O3 coated mesoporous silica gel, and the catalytic performances of these samples were compared in the methanol decomposition reaction. The ALD Pd-Al2O3 showed high activity and hydrogen selectivity at relatively low temperatures while the ALD Pd-ZnO showed very low activity as well as quick deactivation. In situ extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurement revealed that the Pd supported on ZnO 'dissolves' into the substrate during the methanol decomposition reaction which accounts for the gradual disappearance of its catalytic activity. By applying one cycle of ALD Al2O3 on top of the Pd-ZnO catalyst, the activity was enhanced and the catalyst deactivation was mitigated. This Al2O3 overcoating method stabilizes the Pd-ZnO and effectively prevents the dissolution of Pd into the ZnO substrate.

  5. Methanol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methanol ; CASRN 67 - 56 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  6. Tuneable stability of nanoemulsions fabricated using spontaneous emulsification by biopolymer electrostatic deposition.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Amir Hossein; Zeeb, Benjamin; Weiss, Jochen; McClements, David Julian

    2015-10-01

    Nanoemulsions can be formed spontaneously from surfactant-oil-water systems using low energy methods. In this work, we showed that the droplets in oil-in-water nanoemulsions fabricated by spontaneous emulsification could be coated with an anionic biopolymer (beet pectin) using electrostatic deposition. Nanoemulsions were formed by titrating oil (medium chain triglycerides) and surfactant (polyoxyethylene sorbitan monostearate+lauric arginate) mixtures into an aqueous solution (10 mM citrate buffer, pH 4). Lauric arginate was used to generate a positive charge on the droplet surfaces, thereby enabling subsequent electrostatic deposition of anionic pectin. Extensive droplet aggregation occurred when intermediate pectin concentrations were used due to bridging flocculation. However, stable anionic pectin-coated lipid droplets could be formed at high pectin concentrations. These results demonstrate the possibility of tailoring the functionality of lipid nanodroplets produced by spontaneous emulsification. PMID:26070187

  7. Spontaneous deposition of polylysine on surfaces: role of the secondary structure to optimize noncovalent coating strategies.

    PubMed

    Di Mauro, Alessandro; Mirabella, Francesca; D'Urso, Alessandro; Randazzo, Rosalba; Purrello, Roberto; Fragalà, Maria Elena

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the factors that governs spontaneous molecular transfer from solution to solid surface is fundamental to control noncovalent surface functionalization strategies, both in term of robustness and reproducibility. The comprehension of the nature of interaction involved in the mechanism of spontaneous adsorption will allow for a fine modulation of the deposition process. Herein, we provide experimental evidences to demonstrate that poly-lysine secondary structure represents a crucial factor profoundly influencing the outcome of its spontaneous deposition on quartz surfaces. In particular, random coil to α-helix transition is required to drive an effective transfer of the poly-l-lysine at the liquid-solid interface. β-sheet deposition requires longer times to be accomplished, while random-coil deposition is highly unfavored. Accordingly, polylysine deposition on quartz and silicon is effective when α-helix is formed in solution (pH>10). This surface noncovalent functionalization represents a simple strategy to fabricate hybrid organic-inorganic or biocompatible materials. In fact, the proposed methodology is proven robust and repeatable and compatible for combination with solution or vapor phases (i.e. MOCVD) nanomaterial deposition approaches. PMID:25441360

  8. Beta amyloid deposition and neurofibrillary tangles spontaneously occur in the brains of captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Serizawa, S; Chambers, J K; Une, Y

    2012-03-01

    Alzheimer disease is a dementing disorder characterized pathologically by Aβ deposition, neurofibrillary tangles, and neuronal loss. Although aged animals of many species spontaneously develop Aβ deposits, only 2 species (chimpanzee and wolverine) have been reported to develop Aβ deposits and neurofibrillary tangles in the same individual. Here, the authors demonstrate the spontaneous occurrence of Aβ deposits and neurofibrillary tangles in captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus). Among 22 cheetahs examined in this study, Aβ deposits were observed in 13. Immunostaining (AT8) revealed abnormal intracellular tau immunoreactivity in 10 of the cheetahs with Aβ deposits, and they were mainly distributed in the parahippocampal cortex and CA1 in a fashion similar to that in human patients with Alzheimer disease. Ultrastructurally, bundles of straight filaments filled the neuronal somata and axons, consistent with tangles. Interestingly, 2 of the cheetahs with the most severe abnormal tau immunoreactivity showed clinical cognitive dysfunction. The authors conclude that cheetahs spontaneously develop age-related neurodegenerative disease with pathologic changes similar to Alzheimer disease. PMID:21712514

  9. Growth-surface-driven anisotropy and spontaneous layering in vapor-deposited alloy films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Alexander Leon

    Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) developed on the growth surface has been studied in a number of vapor-deposited alloy film systems. Epitaxial (100), (110), (100) and polycrystalline CoXPt1-X ,CoX Pt1-X 1-YSiY, and NiXPt1-X alloy films have been deposited by co-evaporation over a range of growth temperatures from -50°C to 800°C. Growth induced PMA is reported in samples deposited at temperatures between 200--400°C. This PMA is closely correlated with evidence for clustering of the magnetic species. A model of the magnetic species clustered into thin platelets, with the interfaces between the platelets and the Pt matrix providing the source of PMA, is presented. Magnetic moment and Magneto-Optic Kerr Effect (MOKE) results support an interpretation of interfaces, like spontaneous incoherent multilayer fragments, perpendicular to the growth direction. Deposition rate experiments show that surface atomic mobility plays an important role in the development of platelets and PMA. Results from annealing experiments indicate that anisotropy and clustering are not bulk equilibrium phenomena, but are trapped into the growing surface. The presence of surface atomic mobility then at intermediate deposition temperatures along with a lack of bulk atomic mobility allow platelets on the surface to be trapped into the bulk by succeeding deposition layers. Studies of ternary Co-Pt-Si alloys, in which Si acts to slow surface atomic mobility, confirm that the mobility of adatoms on the surface is critical to the formation of platelet structures and PMA. The clustering and PMA found in Ni-Pt alloys remove magnetic interaction as a source of platelet formation, leading to surface segregation and reconstruction as likely to be critical to the development of PMA. The lack of clustering and anisotropy seen in (100) oriented NiPt films is correlated with a non-flat surface reconstruction which disrupts the formation of platelets.

  10. The importance of acid digestion of urine prior to spontaneous deposition of 210Po.

    PubMed

    Fellman, A; Ralston, L; Hickman, D; Ayres, L; Cohen, N; Spitz, H; Robinson, B

    1989-10-01

    Historically, radiochemical analysis of 210Po in urine has used spontaneous deposition of the nuclide directly from raw urine onto a suitable metal disc. Consequently, the urinary excretion fraction for Po in some current metabolic and dosimetric models is based on studies which inherently assume that metabolized (i.e., filtered out of the blood by the kidneys) 210Po is plated with the same efficiency as tracer 210Po which has been added to urine samples. Urine samples collected after intravenous administration of 210Po citrate to two species of nonhuman primates were divided and simultaneously analyzed via two methods: the historical procedure of plating 210Po from raw urine for one sample and a method which includes the addition of 208Po tracer and sample digestion with concentrated HNO3 prior to 210Po deposition for the other sample. A more significant amount of 210Po was consistently recovered when the urine was wet ashed then when it was not wet ashed. A temporal relationship was found to describe the change in the ratio of the deposition recoveries for the two methods. Possible mechanisms for this phenomenon and its dosimetric implications are discussed. PMID:2507478

  11. Spontaneous wrinkling of soft matter by energetic deposition of Cr and Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, F. S.; Araújo, W. W. R.; Salvadori, M. C.

    2016-04-01

    Wrinkling of stiff thin films deposited on compliant substrates is an effect that has been broadly investigated. However, wrinkling consequent to metal ion implantation has been less studied. In the work described here, we have explored the sub-micron wrinkling phenomena that spontaneously occur when metal ions (Au and Cr) are implanted with energy of a few tens of electron volts (49 eV for Au and 72 eV for Cr) into a compliant material (PDMS). This very low energy ion implantation was performed using a Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc technique, a process often referred to as energetic deposition or energetic condensation. For comparison, Au and Cr depositions with similar doses were also done using a sputtering technique (with lower particle energy of approximately 2 eV), and no wrinkle formation was then observed. In this way, we can discuss the role of ion energy in wrinkle formation. Depth profiles of the implanted material were calculated using the Tridyn computer simulation code for each metal, for several implantation doses. UV-vis absorption spectroscopy analysis confirmed the presence of metal nanoparticles. Atomic Force Microscopy imaging with spectral processing was used to compare the wrinkle morphology for each case investigated.

  12. The synthesis of methanol and the reverse water-gas shift reaction over Zn-deposited Cu(100) and Cu(110) surfaces: comparison with Zn/Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, I.; Fujitani, T.; Uchijima, T.; Nakamura, J.

    1998-03-01

    The catalytic activity of Zn vapor-deposited Cu(100) and Cu(110) surfaces for methanol synthesis by the hydrogenation of CO 2 and the reverse water-gas shift reaction were studied using an XPS apparatus combined with a high-pressure flow reactor (18 atm). At a reaction temperature of 523 K, no promotional effect of Zn was observed for the methanol synthesis on both Zn/Cu(100) and Zn/Cu(110). The results were quite different from those for Zn/Cu(111), on which a significant promotion of methanol synthesis activity appeared to be due to the deposition of Zn, indicating that the promotional effect of Zn was sensitive to the surface structure of Cu. However, hysteresis was observed in the catalytic activity for methanol synthesis over the Zn/Cu(110) surface upon heating above 543 K in the reaction mixture. The activity became twice that measured before heating, which was close to the methanol synthesis activity of Zn/Cu(111) at the same Zn coverage. On the other hand, no such hysteresis was observed for the reverse water-gas shift reaction on Zn/Cu(110), indicating that the active site for methanol synthesis was not identical to that for the reverse water-gas shift reaction. In the post-reaction surface analysis, formate species was detected on both Zn/Cu(100) and Zn/Cu(110), whose coverage increased with increasing Zn coverage at 0< ΘZn<0.2. No correlation between the formate coverage and the methanol synthesis activity was obtained, which was in contrast to the results for Zn/Cu(111). Thus, the structure sensitivity observed in the catalytic activity of methanol synthesis over Zn-deposited Cu surfaces is ascribed to the significant difference in the reactivity of the formate intermediate.

  13. Method of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond using methanol-based solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzeng, Yonhua (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Briefly described, methods of forming diamond are described. A representative method, among others, includes: providing a substrate in a reaction chamber in a non-magnetic-field microwave plasma system; introducing, in the absence of a gas stream, a liquid precursor substantially free of water and containing methanol and at least one carbon and oxygen containing compound having a carbon to oxygen ratio greater than one, into an inlet of the reaction chamber; vaporizing the liquid precursor; and subjecting the vaporized precursor, in the absence of a carrier gas and in the absence in a reactive gas, to a plasma under conditions effective to disassociate the vaporized precursor and promote diamond growth on the substrate in a pressure range from about 70 to 130 Torr.

  14. Os layers spontaneously deposited on the Pt(111) electrode : XPS, STM and GIF-XAS study.

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, C. K.; Wakisaka, M.; Tolmachev, Y.; Johnston, C.; Haasch, R.; Attenkofer, K.; Lu, G. Q.; You, H.; Wieckowski, A.; Univ. of Illinois Champaigh-Urbana

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) characterized adlayers of spontaneously deposited osmium on a Pt(111) electrode were investigated using ex-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and in-situ grazing incidence fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy (GIF-XAS). After a single spontaneous deposition, monoatomic (or nearly monoatomic) nanoislands of osmium are formed. The island diameter varies from 2 to 5 nm depending on the Os coverage, which in turn is adjusted by varying the concentration of the Os precursor salt (OsCl3) in the deposition bath and/or by the deposition time. XPS reveals three oxidation states: a metallic Os (the 4f7/2 core level binding energy of 50.8 eV), Os(IV) (51.5 eV) and Os(VIII) (52.4 eV). The metallic osmium exists at potentials below 500 mV (vs. RHE) while above 500 mV osmium is oxidized to Os(IV). Electrodissolution of osmium begins above 900 mV and occurs simultaneously with platinum oxidation. At ca. 1200 mV V versus the RHE reference, the oxidation state of some small amounts of osmium that survive dissolution is the Os(VIII). We demonstrate, for the first time, that mixed or odd valencies of osmium exist on the platinum surface at potentials higher that 800 mV. In-situ GIF-XAS measurements of an Os LIII edge also reveal the presence of three Os oxidation states. Namely, below the electrode potential of 400 mV, the X-ray fluorescent energy at maximum absorption is 10.8765 keV, and is characteristic of the metallic Os. In the potential range between 500 and 1000 mV this energy is gradually shifted to higher values, assignable to higher valencies of osmium, like Os(IV). This tendency continues to higher potentials consistent with the third, highly oxidized osmium form present, most likely Os(VIII). The variation of the 'raw edge jump height' of Os with the electrode potential, which is equivalent to a drop in osmium surface concentration, demonstrates that the electrochemical stripping of Os begins below 1.0 V versus RHE, as

  15. The kinetics and mechanism of methanol synthesis by hydrogenation of CO 2 over a Zn-deposited Cu(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujitani, T.; Nakamura, I.; Uchijima, T.; Nakamura, J.

    1997-07-01

    The hydrogenation of CO 2 over a Zn-deposited Cu(111) surface has been studied using an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) apparatus combined with a high-pressure flow reactor. It was shown that the turnover frequency (TOF) for methanol formation linearly increased with Zn coverage below ϑZn=0.19 and decreased above ϑZn=0.20. The optimum TOF obtained at ϑZn=0.19 was thirteen-fold larger than that of the Zn-free Cu(111) surface. On the other hand, the TOF for CO formation started to decrease at ϑZn=0.10 and approached zero at ϑZn=0.5. No promotional effect of Zn was thus observed for the reverse water-gas shift (RWGS) reaction on Cu(111). Post-reaction surface analysis by XPS showed the formation of formate species (HCOO a) on the Cu(111) surfaces. The formate coverage linearly increased with the Zn coverage below ϑZn=0.15, suggesting that the formation of the formate species was stabilized by the Zn species. The relation between ϑHCOO and ϑZn is similar to that between TOF and ϑZn; thus, the formate species is considered to be the reaction intermediates during methanol formation, and the amount of the formate species should determine the rate of the reaction. It was found that the surface chemistry of the Zn-deposited Cu surface drastically changed at ϑZn=0.15. At higher Zn coverages ( ϑZn>0.15), Zn on Cu(111) was readily oxidized to ZnO during the CO 2 hydrogenation reaction. On the other hand, at low Zn coverages below ϑZn=0.15, Zn was partially oxidized in the absence of oxygen in ZnO or O a on the Cu surface under the reaction conditions. It was suggested that the Zn on Cu(111) was directly bound to the oxygen in the surface formate species as the role of the active sites.

  16. Atomic layer deposition of ZnO on Cu-nanoclusters for methanol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Ziyu; Patterson, Matthew; Ren Maoming; Wang Ying; Flake, John C.; Sprunger, Phillip T.; Kurtz, Richard L.

    2013-01-15

    The properties of ALD-grown ZnO thin films on Cu clusters supported on ZnO(1010) have been studied with scanning tunneling and scanning electron microscopy in combination with angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Deposition at room temperature of two monolayers of Cu on ZnO(1010) results in metallic Cu{sup 0} clusters {approx}8 nm wide by 1.4 nm high. Higher coverages of 15 ML results in a similar morphology, with slightly larger cluster sizes. Following air-exposure and ALD-growth of two cycles of ZnO, the Cu exhibits Cu{sup +} species characteristic of Cu{sub 2}O and the thin ZnO coating is hydroxylated. Electrochemical studies of ALD ZnO coatings on Cu suggest that they are more active for CO{sub 2} reduction.

  17. Methanol oxidation on Pd/Pt(poly) in alkaline solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksic, A.; Rakocevic, Z.; Smiljanic, M.; Nenadovic, M.; Strbac, S.

    2015-01-01

    Bimetallic electrodes prepared by Pd nanoislands spontaneously deposited on polycrystalline platinum, Pt(poly), at submonolayer coverage were explored for methanol oxidation in alkaline media. Characterization of obtained Pd/Pt(poly) nanostructures was performed ex situ by AFM imaging, spectroscopic ellipsometry and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In situ characterization of the obtained electrodes and subsequent methanol oxidation measurements were performed by cyclic voltammetry in 0.1 M KOH. Platinum surface with 35% Pd coverage exhibited the highest catalytic activity for methanol oxidation in alkaline media, exceeding those of bare Pt and Pd. Both synergistic and electronic effects are responsible for such enhanced catalysis. The origin of the synergistic effect and possible reaction pathways for methanol oxidation were discussed taking into account the activity of obtained bimetallic electrodes for the oxidation of CO and formaldehyde, as the most probable reaction intermediates.

  18. One-pot synthesis of single-crystal Pt nanoplates uniformly deposited on reduced graphene oxide, and their high activity and stability on the electrocalalytic oxidation of methanol.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yanfei; Wang, Xudan; Shen, Jianfeng; Yuan, Junhua; Wang, Ai-Jun; Niu, Li; Huang, Shengtang

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a one-pot thermoreduction approach towards the preparation of single-crystal Pt nanoplates, which were uniformly deposited on the reduced graphene oxide (RGO) using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a stabilizer. The size of Pt nanoplates can be tuned from 6.8 to 10.1 nm by controlling Pt loading. The as-prepared Pt/PVP/RGO catalysts show high stability and activity towards the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). Their MOR current can reach up to 401 mA mg(-1) Pt and MOR current can maintain 89.4% of its initial value after 10 000 potential cycles. PMID:26906081

  19. Enhanced formic acid oxidation on polycrystalline platinum modified by spontaneous deposition of gold. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellari, Paula S.; García, Gonzalo; Florez-Montaño, Jonathan; Barbero, Cesar A.; Pastor, Elena; Planes, Gabriel A.

    2015-11-01

    Formic acid and adsorbed carbon monoxide electrooxidation on polycrystalline Pt and Au-modified Pt surfaces were studied by cyclic voltammetry, lineal sweep voltammetry and in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. With this purpose, a polycrystalline Pt electrode was modified by spontaneous deposition of gold atoms, achieving a gold surface coverage (θ) in the range of 0 ≤ θ ≤ 0.47. Results indicate the existence of two main pathways during the formic acid oxidation reaction, i.e. dehydration and dehydrogenation routes. At higher potentials than 0.5 V the dehydrogenation pathway appears to be the operative at both Pt and Au electrodes. Meanwhile, the dehydration reaction is the main pathway for Pt at lower potentials than 0.5 V. It was found that reaction routes are easily tuned by Au deposition on the Pt sites responsible for the formic acid dehydration reaction, and hence for the catalytic formation of adsorbed carbon monoxide. Gold deposition on these Pt open sites produces an enhanced activity toward the HCOOH oxidation reaction. In general terms, the surface inhibition of the reaction by adsorbed intermediates (indirect pathway) is almost absent at gold-modified Pt electrodes, and therefore the direct pathway appears as the main route during the formic acid electrooxidation reaction.

  20. Multi-laminated copper nanoparticles deposited on conductive substrates for electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol in alkaline electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Lun-Peng; Guo, Peng; Wang, Yan; Ding, Shi-Qi; He, Jian-Bo

    2014-09-01

    A simple electrodeposition approach to grow multi-laminated copper particles on two conductive substrates is presented. Morphological and structural characterization was performed using SEM and XRD. The copper crystallites are preferentially oriented with {111} planes parallel to the substrate surfaces, providing an optimum interface for methanol oxidation. There are a large number of edges, corners, and atomic steps around individual multi-laminated nanostructured particles. The excellent electrocatalytic activity of the particles to methanol oxidation in alkaline solutions is demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and chronoamperometry. The presence of the conductive poly(2-amino-5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole) interlayer between the Cu particles and the carbon paste substrate results in larger specific surface areas of the particles and smaller charge-transfer resistances of methanol oxidation reaction in the lower potential range. Such an anisotropic laminated structure of non-noble metal nanomaterials deserves further investigation for finding a suitable alternative to noble metal-based anodic catalysts in fuel cells.

  1. Bimetallic Pt-Au nanocatalysts electrochemically deposited on graphene and their electrocatalytic characteristics towards oxygen reduction and methanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yaojuan; Zhang, Hua; Wu, Ping; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Bo; Cai, Chenxin

    2011-03-01

    The burgeoning demand for clean and energy-efficient fuel cell system requires electrocatalysts to deliver greater activity and selectivity. Bimetallic catalysts have proven superior to single metal catalysts in this respect. This work reports the preparation, characterization, and electrocatalytic characteristics of a new bimetallic nanocatalyst. The catalyst, Pt-Au-graphene, was synthesized by electrodeposition of Pt-Au nanostructures on the surface of graphene sheets, and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and voltammetry. The morphology and composition of the nanocatalyst can be easily controlled by adjusting the molar ratio between Pt and Au precursors. The electrocatalytic characteristics of the nanocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) were systematically investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The Pt-Au-graphene catalysts exhibits higher catalytic activity than Au-graphene and Pt-graphene catalysts for both the ORR and the MOR, and the highest activity is obtained at a Pt/Au molar ratio of 2:1. Moreover, graphene can significantly enhance the long-term stability of the nanocatalyst toward the MOR by effectively removing the accumulated carbonaceous species formed in the oxidation of methanol from the surface of the catalyst. Therefore, this work has demonstrated that a higher performance of ORR and the MOR could be realized at the Pt-Au-graphene electrocatalyst while Pt utilization also could be greatly diminished. This method may open a general approach for the morphology-controlled synthesis of bimetallic Pt-M nanocatalysts, which can be expected to have promising applications in fuel cells. PMID:21229152

  2. Chemical and structural analyses of subsurface crevices formed during spontaneous deposition of cerium-based conversion coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, Daimon K Fahrenholtz, William G. O'Keefe, Matthew J.

    2011-11-15

    Subsurface crevices formed during the deposition of cerium-based conversion coatings were analyzed in cross-section to assess the effect of deposition and post-treatment on the structure and chemistry of phases present. An Al-O containing phase, believed to be amorphous Al(OH){sub 3}, was formed in crevices during coating deposition. Analysis by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed the presence of up to 1.6 at.% chlorine within the Al-O phase, which was likely a product of soluble chlorides that were present in the coating solution. Cerium was not detected within crevices. After post-treatment in an 85 deg. C aqueous phosphate solution, the chloride concentration was reduced to {<=} 0.30 at.% and electron diffraction of the Al-O phase produced ring patterns, indicating it had crystallized. Some diffraction patterns could be indexed to gibbsite (Al(OH){sub 3}), but others are believed to be a combination of hydrated aluminum hydroxides and/or oxides. Aluminum phosphate was not identified. Separately from its effect on cerium-based conversion coatings, phosphate post-treatment improved the corrosion resistance of Al 2024-T3 substrates by acting to crystallize Al(OH){sub 3} present on interior surfaces of crevices and by reducing the chloride concentration in this phase. - Highlights: {yields} Analysis of subsurface crevices formed during deposition of Ce-based conversion coatings. {yields} Phosphate post-treatment improved corrosion protection in salt spray testing. {yields} Post-treatment affected the composition and structure of regions within crevices. {yields} Crystallized Al(OH){sub 3} within crevices acted as a more effective barrier to chloride ions.

  3. Correlating the chemical composition and size of various metal oxide substrates with the catalytic activity and stability of as-deposited Pt nanoparticles for the methanol oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Megan E. Scofield; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Bobb-Semple, Dara; Tao, Jing; Tong, Xiao; Wang, Lei; Lewis, Crystal S.; Vuklmirovic, Miomir; Zhu, Yimei; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2015-12-09

    The performance of electrode materials in conventional direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFC) is constrained by (i) the low activity of the catalyst materials relative to their overall cost, (ii) the poisoning of the active sites due to the presence of partially oxidized carbon species (such as but not limited to CO, formate, and acetate) produced during small molecule oxidation, and (iii) the lack of catalytic stability and durability on the underlying commercial carbon support. Therefore, as a viable alternative, we have synthesized various metal oxide and perovskite materials of different sizes and chemical compositions as supports for Pt nanoparticles (NPs). Our results including unique mechanistic studies demonstrate that the SrRuO3 substrate with immobilized Pt NPs at its surface evinces the best methanol oxidation performance as compared with all of the other substrate materials tested herein, including commercial carbon itself. In addition, data from electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the presence of electron transfer from bound Pt NPs to surface Ru species within the SrRuO3 substrate itself, thereby suggesting that favorable metal support interactions are responsible for the increased methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) activity of Pt species with respect to the underlying SrRuO3 composite catalyst material.

  4. Correlating the chemical composition and size of various metal oxide substrates with the catalytic activity and stability of as-deposited Pt nanoparticles for the methanol oxidation reaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Megan E. Scofield; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Bobb-Semple, Dara; Tao, Jing; Tong, Xiao; Wang, Lei; Lewis, Crystal S.; Vuklmirovic, Miomir; Zhu, Yimei; et al

    2015-12-09

    The performance of electrode materials in conventional direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFC) is constrained by (i) the low activity of the catalyst materials relative to their overall cost, (ii) the poisoning of the active sites due to the presence of partially oxidized carbon species (such as but not limited to CO, formate, and acetate) produced during small molecule oxidation, and (iii) the lack of catalytic stability and durability on the underlying commercial carbon support. Therefore, as a viable alternative, we have synthesized various metal oxide and perovskite materials of different sizes and chemical compositions as supports for Pt nanoparticles (NPs).more » Our results including unique mechanistic studies demonstrate that the SrRuO3 substrate with immobilized Pt NPs at its surface evinces the best methanol oxidation performance as compared with all of the other substrate materials tested herein, including commercial carbon itself. In addition, data from electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the presence of electron transfer from bound Pt NPs to surface Ru species within the SrRuO3 substrate itself, thereby suggesting that favorable metal support interactions are responsible for the increased methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) activity of Pt species with respect to the underlying SrRuO3 composite catalyst material.« less

  5. Enhanced photoluminescence and Raman properties of Al-Doped ZnO nanostructures prepared using thermal chemical vapor deposition of methanol assisted with heated brass.

    PubMed

    Thandavan, Tamil Many K; Gani, Siti Meriam Abdul; San Wong, Chiow; Md Nor, Roslan

    2015-01-01

    Vapor phase transport (VPT) assisted by mixture of methanol and acetone via thermal evaporation of brass (CuZn) was used to prepare un-doped and Al-doped zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures (NSs). The structure and morphology were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Photoluminescence (PL) properties of un-doped and Al-doped ZnO showed significant changes in the optical properties providing evidence for several types of defects such as zinc interstitials (Zni), oxygen interstitials (Oi), zinc vacancy (Vzn), singly charged zinc vacancy (VZn-), oxygen vacancy (Vo), singly charged oxygen vacancy (Vo+) and oxygen anti-site defects (OZn) in the grown NSs. The Al-doped ZnO NSs have exhibited shifted PL peaks at near band edge (NBE) and red luminescence compared to the un-doped ZnO. The Raman scattering results provided evidence of Al doping into the ZnO NSs due to peak shift from 145 cm-1 to an anomalous peak at 138 cm-1. Presence of enhanced Raman signal at around 274 and 743 cm-1 further confirmed Al in ZnO NSs. The enhanced D and G band in all Al-doped ZnO NSs shows possible functionalization and doping process in ZnO NSs. PMID:25756598

  6. Enhanced Photoluminescence and Raman Properties of Al-Doped ZnO Nanostructures Prepared Using Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition of Methanol Assisted with Heated Brass

    PubMed Central

    Thandavan, Tamil Many K.; Gani, Siti Meriam Abdul; San Wong, Chiow; Md. Nor, Roslan

    2015-01-01

    Vapor phase transport (VPT) assisted by mixture of methanol and acetone via thermal evaporation of brass (CuZn) was used to prepare un-doped and Al-doped zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures (NSs). The structure and morphology were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Photoluminescence (PL) properties of un-doped and Al-doped ZnO showed significant changes in the optical properties providing evidence for several types of defects such as zinc interstitials (Zni), oxygen interstitials (Oi), zinc vacancy (Vzn), singly charged zinc vacancy (VZn-), oxygen vacancy (Vo), singly charged oxygen vacancy (Vo+) and oxygen anti-site defects (OZn) in the grown NSs. The Al-doped ZnO NSs have exhibited shifted PL peaks at near band edge (NBE) and red luminescence compared to the un-doped ZnO. The Raman scattering results provided evidence of Al doping into the ZnO NSs due to peak shift from 145 cm-1 to an anomalous peak at 138 cm-1. Presence of enhanced Raman signal at around 274 and 743 cm-1 further confirmed Al in ZnO NSs. The enhanced D and G band in all Al-doped ZnO NSs shows possible functionalization and doping process in ZnO NSs. PMID:25756598

  7. Spontaneous Fission

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Segre, Emilio

    1950-11-22

    The first attempt to discover spontaneous fission in uranium was made by [Willard] Libby, who, however, failed to detect it on account of the smallness of effect. In 1940, [K. A.] Petrzhak and [G. N.] Flerov, using more sensitive methods, discovered spontaneous fission in uranium and gave some rough estimates of the spontaneous fission decay constant of this substance. Subsequently, extensive experimental work on the subject has been performed by several investigators and will be quoted in the various sections. [N.] Bohr and [A.] Wheeler have given a theory of the effect based on the usual ideas of penetration of potential barriers. On this project spontaneous fission has been studied for the past several years in an effort to obtain a complete picture of the phenomenon. For this purpose the spontaneous fission decay constants {lambda} have been measured for separated isotopes of the heavy elements wherever possible. Moreover, the number {nu} of neutrons emitted per fission has been measured wherever feasible, and other characteristics of the spontaneous fission process have been studied. This report summarizes the spontaneous fission work done at Los Alamos up to January 1, 1945. A chronological record of the work is contained in the Los Alamos monthly reports.

  8. The Methanol Economy Project

    SciTech Connect

    Olah, George; Prakash, G. K.

    2014-02-01

    The Methanol Economy Project is based on the concept of replacing fossil fuels with methanol generated either from renewable resources or abundant natural (shale) gas. The full methanol cycle was investigated in this project, from production of methanol through bromination of methane, bireforming of methane to syngas, CO2 capture using supported amines, co-electrolysis of CO2 and water to formate and syngas, decomposition of formate to CO2 and H2, and use of formic acid in a direct formic acid fuel cell. Each of these projects achieved milestones and provided new insights into their respective fields.

  9. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-17

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  10. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  11. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  12. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-24

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  13. Peritonitis - spontaneous

    MedlinePlus

    ... a catheter used in peritoneal dialysis. Antibiotics may control infection in cases of spontaneous peritonitis with liver or kidney disease. Intravenous therapy can treat dehydration . You may need to stay in the hospital so health care providers can rule out conditions ...

  14. Biofiltration of methanol vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Shareefdeen, Z.; Baltzis, B.C. ); Oh, Youngsook; Bartha, R. )

    1993-03-05

    Biofiltration of solvent and fuel vapors may offer a cost-effective way to comply with increasingly strict air emission standards. An important step in the development of this technology is to derive and validate mathematical models of the biofiltration process for predictive and scaleup calculations. For the study of methanol vapor biofiltration, an 8-membered bacterial consortium was obtained from methanol-exposed soil. The bacteria were immobilized on solid support and packed into a 5-cm diameter, 60-cm-high column provided with appropriate flowmeters and sampling ports. The solid support was prepared by mixing two volumes of peat with three volumes of perlite particles. Two series of experiments were performed. In the first, the inlet methanol concentration was kept constant while the superficial air velocity was varied from run to run. In the second series, the air flow rate (velocity) was kept constant while the inlet methanol concentration was varied. The unit proved effective in removing methanol at rates up to 112.8 g h[sup [minus]1] m[sup [minus]3] packing. A mathematical model has been derived and validated. The model described and predicted experimental results closely. Both experimental data and model predictions suggest that the methanol biofiltration process was limited by oxygen diffusion and methanol degradation kinetics.

  15. Molecular Active Sites in Heterogeneous Ir-La/C-Catalyzed Carbonylation of Methanol to Acetates.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Dagle, Robert; Tustin, Gerald C; Zoeller, Joseph R; Allard, Lawrence F; Wang, Yong

    2014-02-01

    We report that when Ir and La halides are deposited on carbon, exposure to CO spontaneously generates a discrete molecular heterobimetallic structure, containing an Ir-La covalent bond that acts as a highly active, selective, and stable heterogeneous catalyst for the carbonylation of methanol to produce acetic acid. This catalyst exhibits a very high productivity of ∼1.5 mol acetyl/mol Ir·s with >99% selectivity to acetyl (acetic acid and methyl acetate) without detectable loss in activity or selectivity for more than 1 month of continuous operation. The enhanced activity can be mechanistically rationalized by the presence of La within the ligand sphere of the discrete molecular Ir-La heterobimetallic structure, which acts as a Lewis acid to accelerate the normally rate-limiting CO insertion in Ir-catalyzed carbonylation. Similar approaches may provide opportunities for attaining molecular (single site) behavior similar to homogeneous catalysis on heterogeneous surfaces for other industrial applications. PMID:26276610

  16. The Methanol Multibeam Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, James A.; Cohen, R. J.; Caswell, J. L.; Fuller, G. A.; Brooks, K.; Burton, M. G.; Chrysostomou, A.; Diamond, P. J.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Gray, M. D.; Hoare, M. G.; Masheder, M. R. W.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; Pestalozzi, M.; Phillips, C.; Quinn, L.; Thompson, M. A.; Voronkov, M.; Walsh, A.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Wong-McSweeney, D.; Yates, J. A.; Cox, J.

    2007-03-01

    A new 7-beam methanol multibeam receiver is being used to survey the Galaxy for newly forming massive stars, that are pinpointed by strong methanol maser emission at 6.668 GHz. The receiver, jointly constructed by Jodrell Bank Observatory (JBO) and the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF), was successfully commissioned at Parkes in January 2006. The Parkes-Jodrell survey of the Milky Way for methanol masers is two orders of magnitude faster than previous systematic surveys using 30-m class dishes, and is the first systematic survey of the entire Galactic plane. The first 53 days of observations with the Parkes telescope have yielded 518 methanol sources, of which 218 are new discoveries. We present the survey methodology as well as preliminary results and analysis.

  17. Methanol Cannon Demonstrations Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes two variations on the traditional methanol cannon demonstration. The first variation is a chain reaction using real metal chains. The second example involves using easily available components to produce sequential explosions that can be musical in nature. (AIM)

  18. The Asian methanol market

    SciTech Connect

    Nagase, Hideki

    1995-12-31

    For the purpose of this presentation, Asia has been broadly defined as a total of 15 countries, namely Japan, Korea, Taiwan, China, Hong Kong, the Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Myanmar, India, Vietnam, Australia and New Zealand. In 1994 and the first half of 1995, the methanol industry and its derivative industries experienced hard time, because of extraordinarily high methanol prices. In spite of this circumstance, methanol demand in Asian countries has been growing steadily and remarkably, following Asian high economic growth. Most of this growth in demand has been and will continue to be met by outside supply. However, even with increased import of methanol from outside of Asia, as a result of this growth, Asian trade volume will be much larger in the coming years. Asian countries must turn their collective attention to making logistics and transportation for methanol and its derivatives more efficient in the Asian region to make better use of existing supply resources. The author reviews current economic growth as his main topic, and explains the forecast of the growth of methanol demand and supply in Asian countries in the near future.

  19. Methanol in dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friberg, P.; Hjalmarson, A.; Madden, S. C.; Irvine, W. M.

    1988-01-01

    The first observation of methanol in cold dark clouds TMC 1, L 134 N, and B 335 is reported. In all three clouds, the relative abundance of methanol was found to be in the range of 10 to the -9th (i.e., almost an order of magnitude more abundant than acetaldehyde), with no observable variation between the clouds. Methanol emission showed a complex velocity structure; in TMC 1, clear indications of non-LTE were observed. Dimethyl ether was searched for in L 134 N; the upper limit of the column density of dimethyl ether in L 134 N was estimated to be 4 x 10 to the 12th/sq cm, assuming 5 K rotation temperature and LTE. This limit makes the abundance ratio (CH3)2O/CH3OH not higher than 1/5, indicating that dimethyl ether is not overabundant in this dark cloud.

  20. Methanol from coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Economic feasibility of methanol or methyl fuel produced from coal using existing technology is discussed. Other factors considered include environmental, safety, toxicity, transportation, so storage, ease of burning, and retrofitting of present boilers. Demonstrations of its uses as a boiler fuel and as a turbine fuel are cited.

  1. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

    2015-01-01

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model, and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land–atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on the production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, and stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem-level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; they are however neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow taking full advantage of the rich

  2. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

    2015-01-01

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model, and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land-atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on the production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, and stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem-level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; they are however neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow taking full advantage of the rich

  3. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

    2015-07-01

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates, reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land-atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, as well as stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; however, they are neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow for full advantage to be taken of

  4. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux. Synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

    2015-07-09

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates, reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land–atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, as well as stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; however, they are neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow for full advantage to be taken of

  5. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux. Synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; et al

    2015-07-09

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates, reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis ofmore » the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land–atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, as well as stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; however, they are neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow for full advantage to be

  6. California methanol assessment. Volume 2: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoole, R.; Dutzi, E.; Gershman, R.; Heft, R.; Kalema, W.; Maynard, D.

    1983-01-01

    Energy feedstock sources for methanol; methanol and other synfuels; transport, storage, and distribution; air quality impact of methanol use in vehicles, chemical methanol production and use; methanol utilization in vehicles; methanol utilization in stationary applications; and environmental and regulatory constraints are discussed.

  7. Methanol in dark clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friberg, P.; Hjalmarson, A.; Madden, S. C.; Irvine, W. M.

    1988-04-01

    The authors report observations, for the first time, of the 20 - 10A+ and E, 2-1 - 1-1 E, and 10 - 00A+ lines of methanol (CH3OH) in three dark cold clouds, TMC 1, L 134N, and B 335. The CH3OH emission is extended in these clouds and shows a complex velocity structure. Clear indications of non LTE excitation are observed in TMC 1. Estimated column densities are a few×1013cm-2. Although less abundant than formaldehyde (H2CO), methanol is almost an order of magnitude more abundant than acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), in these clouds. Dimethyl ether was searched for in L 134N, to an upper limit of 4×1012cm-2 (3σ). Implications for dark cloud excitation and chemistry are discussed.

  8. Eucomic acid methanol monosolvate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo-Qiang; Li, Yao-Lan; Wang, Guo-Cai; Liang, Zhi-Hong; Jiang, Ren-Wang

    2011-01-01

    In the crystal structure of the title compound [systematic name: 2-hy­droxy-2-(4-hy­droxy­benz­yl)butane­dioic acid methanol monosolvate], C11H12O6·CH3OH, the dihedral angles between the planes of the carboxyl groups and the benzene ring are 51.23 (9) and 87.97 (9)°. Inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter­actions involving the hy­droxy and carb­oxy­lic acid groups and the methanol solvent mol­ecule give a three-dimensional structure. PMID:22091200

  9. The toxicity of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Tephly, T.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Methanol toxicity in humans and monkeys is characterized by a latent period of many hours followed by a metabolic acidosis and ocular toxicity. This is not observed in most lower animals. The metabolic acidosis and blindness is apparently due to formic acid accumulation in humans and monkeys, a feature not seen in lower animals. The accumulation of formate is due to a deficiency in formate metabolism which is, in turn, related, in part, to low hepatic tetrahydrofolate (H{sub 4}folate). An excellent correlation between hepatic H{sub 4} folate and formate oxidation rates has been shown within and across species. Thus, humans and monkeys possess low hepatic H{sub 4}folate levels, low rates of formate oxidation and accumulation of formate after methanol. Formate, itself, produces blindness in monkeys in the absence of metabolic acidosis. In addition to low hepatic H{sub 4}folate concentrations, monkeys and humans also have low hepatic 10-formyl H{sub 4}folate dehydrogenase levels, the enzyme which is the ultimate catalyst for conversion of formate to carbon dioxide. This review presents the basis for the role of folic acid-dependent reactions in the regulation of methanol toxicity.

  10. Methanol shutdowns cause anxiety

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, N.

    1996-10-23

    European methanol players face an anxious few weeks as unscheduled outages combine with planned turnarounds to make an increasingly tight market. Global markets are also described as tightening, with production problems widely reported in North America. Several European producers were in the middle of shutdown periods when problems at Condea`s 400,000-m.t./year unit at Wesseling, Germany reportedly caused production to run at only 50% of capacity. In addition, the methanol plant at the Leuna refinery is said to be operating at only 60% of capacity, and one producer has had to extend a turnaround period. River levels in Germany are also low, putting pressure on shipments from Rotterdam. {open_quotes}This is a very difficult situation and we`re living hand to mouth,{close_quotes} says one producer. Producer sources report bids from consumers up to DM280/m.t. T2 fob Rotterdam, but they are unable to obtain extra product. Derivatives makers may also face problems: One methyl tert-butyl ether producer predicts prices {open_quotes}may hit the roof{close_quotes} once feedstock sourcing problems hit home.

  11. Methanol simplifies gas processing

    SciTech Connect

    Minkkinen, A.; Jonchere, J.P.

    1997-12-31

    Recent development of a simple single solvent technology goes far to meet the complete gas processing needs. The use of methanol, as practiced in the IPFEXOL process, where it is used not only as a hydrate inhibitor and antifreeze agent but as an acid gas extraction solvent makes the complete gas processing scheme simple and probably the most cost effective as well. This paper presents several gas processing applications where water, hydrocarbon liquids and acid gases are removed from natural wellhead production gases. Water and hydrocarbon liquids removal is achieved to the extent necessary to make a pipeline transportable gas or meet downstream cryogenic processing demands. These are illustrated with recent applications of the IFPEX-1 process successfully operating today in North America and the Far East. A recent North Sea offshore project is highlighted showing the particular advantages in offshore applications. For the removal of water and hydrocarbon liquids together with a substantial quantity of not only CO{sub 2} but H{sub 2}S, the most complete methanol use scheme is presented. This is illustrated with the development of an advanced version of the IFPEX-2 process containing some innovative but simple equipment concepts which yields high pressure dry acid gases for reinjection or a high quality acid gas destined to Claus type sulfur recovery.

  12. Development of methanol evaporation plate to reduce methanol crossover in a direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruiming

    This research focuses on methanol crossover reduction in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) through separating the methanol vapor from its liquid phase and feeding the vapor passively at low temperature range. Membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were fabricated by using commercial available membrane with different thickness at different anode catalyst loading levels, and tested under the operating conditions below 100°C in cell temperature and cathode exit open to ambient pressure. Liquid methanol transport from the anode through the membrane into cathode ("methanol crossover") is identified as one of the major efficiency losses in a DMFC. It is known that the methanol crossover rate in the vapor phase is much lower than in liquid phase. Vapor feed can be achieved by heating the liquid methanol to elevated temperatures (>100°C), but other issues limit the performance of the cell when operating above 100°C. High temperature membranes and much more active cathode catalyst structures are required, and a complex temperature control system must be employed. However, methanol vapor feed can also occur at a lower temperature range (<100°C) by separating its vapor from the liquid phase by evaporation through a porous body. The methanol crossover with this vapor feed mode is lower compared with the direct liquid methanol feed. A new method of using a methanol evaporation plate (MEP) to separate the vapor from its liquid phase to reduce the liquid methanol crossover at low temperature range is developed. A MEP plays the roles of liquid/vapor methanol phase separation and evaporation in a DMFC. The goal of this study is to develop a MEP with the proper properties to achieve high methanol phase separation efficiency and fast methanol evaporation rate over a wide range of temperature, i.e., from room temperature up to near boiling temperature (100°C). MEP materials were selected and characterized. MEPs made from three different types were tested extensively with different

  13. California methanol assessment. Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoole, R.; Dutzi, E.; Gershman, R.; Heft, R.; Kalema, W.; Maynard, D.

    1983-01-01

    The near term methanol industry, the competitive environment, long term methanol market, the transition period, air quality impacts of methanol, roles of the public and private sectors are considered.

  14. A simple preparation of very high methanol tolerant cathode electrocatalyst for direct methanol fuel cell based on polymer-coated carbon nanotube/platinum

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zehui; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-01-01

    The development of a durable and methanol tolerant electrocatalyst with a high oxygen reduction reaction activity is highly important for the cathode side of direct methanol fuel cells. Here, we describe a simple and novel methodology to fabricate a practically applicable electrocatalyst with a high methanol tolerance based on poly[2,2′-(2,6-pyridine)-5,5′-bibenzimidazole]-wrapped multi-walled carbon nanotubes, on which Pt nanoparticles have been deposited, then coated with poly(vinylphosphonic acid) (PVPA). The polymer coated electrocatalyst showed an ~3.3 times higher oxygen reduction reaction activity compared to that of the commercial CB/Pt and methanol tolerance in the presence of methanol to the electrolyte due to a 50% decreased methanol adsorption on the Pt after coating with the PVPA. Meanwhile, the peroxide generation of the PVPA coated electrocatalyst was as low as 0.8% with 2 M methanol added to the electrolyte, which was much lower than those of the non-PVPA-coated electrocatalyst (7.5%) and conventional CB/Pt (20.5%). Such a high methanol tolerance is very important for the design of a direct methanol fuel cell cathode electrocatalyst with a high performance. PMID:26192397

  15. Early Mars may have had a methanol ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yan; Chen, Qianwang; Huang, Yujie

    2006-01-01

    The detection of gray crystalline hematite deposits on Mars by Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) has been used to argue for the presence of liquid water on Mars in the distant past. By methanol-thermal treatment of anhydrous FeCl 3 at low temperatures (70-160 °C), crystalline gray hematite with layered structure was synthesized, based on this result an alternative explanation for the origin of martian hematite deposits is suggested. Methane could be abundant in the early martian atmosphere; process such as photochemical oxidation of methane could result in the formation of ocean or pool of organic compounds such as methanol, which provides an environment for the formation of large-scale hematite deposits on Mars.

  16. A bottom-up perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of global eddy covariance flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Amelynck, Crist; Ammann, Christof; Arneth, Almut; Bamberger, Ines; Goldstein, Allen; Hansel, Armin; Heinesch, Bernhard; Holst, Thomas; Hörtnagl, Lukas; Karl, Thomas; Neftel, Albrecht; McKinney, Karena; Munger, William; Schade, Gunnar; Schoon, Niels

    2014-05-01

    Methanol (CH3OH) is, after methane, the second most abundant VOC in the troposphere and globally represents nearly 20% of the total biospheric VOC emissions. With typical concentrations of 1-10 ppb in the continental boundary layer, methanol plays a crucial role in atmospheric chemistry, which needs to be evaluated in the light of ongoing changes in land use and climate. Previous global methanol budgets have approached the net land flux by summing up the various emission terms (namely primary biogenic and anthropogenic emissions, plant decay and biomass burning) and by subtracting dry and wet deposition, resulting in a net land flux in the range of 75-245 Tg y-1. The data underlying these budget calculations largely stem from small-scale leaf gas exchange measurements and while recently column-integrated remotely sensed methanol concentrations have become available for constraining budget calculations, there have been few attempts to contrast model calculations with direct net ecosystem-scale methanol flux measurements. Here we use eddy covariance methanol flux measurements from 8 sites in Europe and North America to study the magnitude of and controls on the diurnal and seasonal variability in the net ecosystem methanol flux. In correspondence with leaf-level literature, our data show that methanol emission and its strong environmental and biotic control (by temperature and stomatal conductance) prevailed at the more productive (agricultural) sites and at a perturbed forest site. In contrast, at more natural, less productive sites substantial deposition of methanol occurred, in particular during periods of surface wetness. These deposition processes are poorly represented by currently available temperature/light and/or production-driven modelling algorithms. A new framework for modelling the bi-directional land-atmosphere methanol exchange is proposed which accounts for the production of methanol in leaves, the regulation of leaf methanol emission by stomatal

  17. Methanol crossover in direct methanol fuel cell systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovar, B. S.; Bender, G.; Davey, J. R.; Zelenay, P.

    2003-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are currently being investigated for a number of different applications from several milliwatts to near kilowatt size scales (cell phones, laptops, auxiliary power units, etc .). Because methanol has a very high energy density, over 6000 W hr/kg, a DMFC can possibly have greatly extended lifetimes compared to the batteries, doesn't present the storage problems associated with hydrogen fuel cells and can possibly operate more efficiently and cleanly than internal combustion engines.

  18. Methanol Oxidation on Pt3Sn(111) for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells: Methanol Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoqing; Deng, Zhigang; Guo, Chen; Wang, Weili; Wei, Shuxian; Ng, Siu-Pang; Chen, Xiangfeng; Ding, Ning; Guo, Wenyue; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence

    2016-05-18

    PtSn alloy, which is a potential material for use in direct methanol fuel cells, can efficiently promote methanol oxidation and alleviate the CO poisoning problem. Herein, methanol decomposition on Pt3Sn(111) was systematically investigated using periodic density functional theory and microkinetic modeling. The geometries and energies of all of the involved species were analyzed, and the decomposition network was mapped out to elaborate the reaction mechanisms. Our results indicated that methanol and formaldehyde were weakly adsorbed, and the other derivatives (CHxOHy, x = 1-3, y = 0-1) were strongly adsorbed and preferred decomposition rather than desorption on Pt3Sn(111). The competitive methanol decomposition started with the initial O-H bond scission followed by successive C-H bond scissions, (i.e., CH3OH → CH3O → CH2O → CHO → CO). The Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relations and energy barrier decomposition analyses identified the C-H and O-H bond scissions as being more competitive than the C-O bond scission. Microkinetic modeling confirmed that the vast majority of the intermediates and products from methanol decomposition would escape from the Pt3Sn(111) surface at a relatively low temperature, and the coverage of the CO residue decreased with an increase in the temperature and decrease in partial methanol pressure. PMID:27119198

  19. Competitive adsorption-driven separation of water/methanol mixtures using hydrogen as a third competitor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Wook; Yu, Chang-Yeol; Lee, Kew-Ho

    2009-12-01

    In this study, we report competitive adsorption-driven separation of a water/methanol mixture in Pd-deposited silica membranes, which is induced by introducing hydrogen carrier gas as a third competitor. After replacing helium carrier gas by hydrogen carrier gas, water vapor permeance showed a slight decrease, whereas methanol vapor permeance significantly decreased. The water/methanol separation factor remarkably increased from 1.7-16.5 to 6.8-58.2 in the feed water content of 5.8-83.0 wt.%. From single vapor permeation tests in the presence of carrier gas (hydrogen or helium), it was confirmed that those permeation behavior was derived from stronger effect of the competitive adsorption between hydrogen and methanol vapor than that between hydrogen and water vapor. That is, hydrogen carrier gas dominantly inhibits adsorption of methanol vapor on the membrane surface, and the partial pressure of methanol on the membrane surface decreases, which leads to a decrease in methanol permeance with reduced driving force. In addition, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) results of water and methanol from Pd/silica particles also demonstrated that hydrogen carrier gas suppresses methanol adsorption on Pd/silica surface more dominantly than water adsorption. PMID:19772967

  20. Unusual case of methanol poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, L.; Henderson, M. . Dept. of Chemical Pathology); Madi, S.; Mellor, L. . Dept. of Medicine, and Pharmacy)

    1993-01-09

    A 31-year-old man with a history of alcohol abuse presented to the accident and emergency department complaining of blurred vision. 4 h previously he had drunk 300 mL de-icer fluid. Electrolytes, urea, creatinine, glucose, and blood-gas analysis were normal. Measured osmolality, however, was 368 mosmol/kg with a calculated osmolality of 300 mosmol/kg, which indicated a greatly increased osmolar gap. He was therefore given 150 mL whisky and admitted. Methanol was later reported as 200 mg/dL. Ethylene glycol was not detected, but another glycol, propylene glycol, was present at 47 mg/dL. 10 h after ingestion an intravenous infusion of ethanol was started and he was hemodialysed for 7 h. After dialysis he was given a further 100 mL whisky and the rate of ethanol infusion was reduced to 11 g per h. Methanol and ethanol were measured twice daily until methanol was under 10/mg/dL: The recommendation is that blood ethanol be maintained between 100 and 200 mg/dL during treatment of methanol poisoning. This concentration was not achieved, presumably because of the high rate of ethanol metabolism often found in alcoholics. Antifreeze solutions commonly contain methanol and ethylene glycol. Sometimes propylene glycol is substituted because it has properties similar to those of ethylene glycol but is less toxic. The authors postulate that propylene glycol inhibited the metabolism of methanol in the patient, thus sparing him from the toxic effects of methanol.

  1. Rapid starting methanol reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Chludzinski, Paul J.; Dantowitz, Philip; McElroy, James F.

    1984-01-01

    The invention relates to a methanol-to-hydrogen cracking reactor for use with a fuel cell vehicular power plant. The system is particularly designed for rapid start-up of the catalytic methanol cracking reactor after an extended shut-down period, i.e., after the vehicular fuel cell power plant has been inoperative overnight. Rapid system start-up is accomplished by a combination of direct and indirect heating of the cracking catalyst. Initially, liquid methanol is burned with a stoichiometric or slightly lean air mixture in the combustion chamber of the reactor assembly. The hot combustion gas travels down a flue gas chamber in heat exchange relationship with the catalytic cracking chamber transferring heat across the catalyst chamber wall to heat the catalyst indirectly. The combustion gas is then diverted back through the catalyst bed to heat the catalyst pellets directly. When the cracking reactor temperature reaches operating temperature, methanol combustion is stopped and a hot gas valve is switched to route the flue gas overboard, with methanol being fed directly to the catalytic cracking reactor. Thereafter, the burner operates on excess hydrogen from the fuel cells.

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF EMISSIONS FROM VEHICLES USING METHANOL AND METHANOL-GASOLINE BLENDED FUELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exhaust and evaporative emissions were examined from vehicles fueled with methanol or a gasoline-methanol blend. Regulated automobile pollutants, as well as detailed hydrocarbons, methanol, and aldehydes were measured, and exhaust emission trends were obtained for vehicle operati...

  3. Fabrication and Characterization of a Micro Methanol Sensor Using the CMOS-MEMS Technique

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Chien-Fu; Dai, Ching-Liang; Wu, Chyan-Chyi

    2015-01-01

    A methanol microsensor integrated with a micro heater manufactured using the complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technique was presented. The sensor has a capability of detecting low concentration methanol gas. Structure of the sensor is composed of interdigitated electrodes, a sensitive film and a heater. The heater located under the interdigitated electrodes is utilized to provide a working temperature to the sensitive film. The sensitive film prepared by the sol-gel method is tin dioxide doped cadmium sulfide, which is deposited on the interdigitated electrodes. To obtain the suspended structure and deposit the sensitive film, the sensor needs a post-CMOS process to etch the sacrificial silicon dioxide layer and silicon substrate. The methanol senor is a resistive type. A readout circuit converts the resistance variation of the sensor into the output voltage. The experimental results show that the methanol sensor has a sensitivity of 0.18 V/ppm. PMID:26512671

  4. Fabrication and Characterization of a Micro Methanol Sensor Using the CMOS-MEMS Technique.

    PubMed

    Fong, Chien-Fu; Dai, Ching-Liang; Wu, Chyan-Chyi

    2015-01-01

    A methanol microsensor integrated with a micro heater manufactured using the complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technique was presented. The sensor has a capability of detecting low concentration methanol gas. Structure of the sensor is composed of interdigitated electrodes, a sensitive film and a heater. The heater located under the interdigitated electrodes is utilized to provide a working temperature to the sensitive film. The sensitive film prepared by the sol-gel method is tin dioxide doped cadmium sulfide, which is deposited on the interdigitated electrodes. To obtain the suspended structure and deposit the sensitive film, the sensor needs a post-CMOS process to etch the sacrificial silicon dioxide layer and silicon substrate. The methanol senor is a resistive type. A readout circuit converts the resistance variation of the sensor into the output voltage. The experimental results show that the methanol sensor has a sensitivity of 0.18 V/ppm. PMID:26512671

  5. Photoionization of methanol and formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warneck, P.

    1971-01-01

    Photoions produced in methanol and formaldehyde by radiation in the spectral region 450-1150 A were analyzed mass spectrometrically, and their relative yields were determined as a function of wavelength. First ionization potentials were determined, and the ion yield curves were interpreted in terms of ionization processes in conjunction with other data. Fragment ions were detected on mass numbers of 31, 30, 29, 15, and 14 for methanol, and 29, 2, and 1 for formaldehyde. The associated appearance potentials were determined and were used to calculate heats of formation of the ions CH2OH(+) and HCO(+), and the radicals CH3, CH2, and HCO.

  6. ACUTE METHANOL TOXICITY IN MINIPIGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pig hos been proposed as a potential animal model for methanol-induced neuro-ocular toxicosis in humans because of its reported low liver tetrahydro folate levels and therefore, slower formate metabolism as compared to humans. o determine the validity of the animal model, min...

  7. Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren; Xiaoming

    2003-07-22

    A method for activating a membrane electrode assembly for a direct methanol fuel cell is disclosed. The method comprises operating the fuel cell with humidified hydrogen as the fuel followed by running the fuel cell with methanol as the fuel.

  8. Spontaneous combustion of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nusselt, Wilhelm; Pothmann, PH

    1923-01-01

    It is shown by the author's experiments that hydrogen which escapes to the atmosphere through openings in the system may burn spontaneously if it contains dust. Purely thermal reasoning can not account for the combustion. It seems to be rather an electrical ignition. In order to determine whether the cause of the spontaneous ignition was thermo-chemical, thermo-mechanical, or thermo-electrical, the experiments in this paper were performed.

  9. Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming

    2002-01-01

    An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source.

  10. Enhanced methanol utilization in direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2001-10-02

    The fuel utilization of a direct methanol fuel cell is enhanced for improved cell efficiency. Distribution plates at the anode and cathode of the fuel cell are configured to distribute reactants vertically and laterally uniformly over a catalyzed membrane surface of the fuel cell. A conductive sheet between the anode distribution plate and the anodic membrane surface forms a mass transport barrier to the methanol fuel that is large relative to a mass transport barrier for a gaseous hydrogen fuel cell. In a preferred embodiment, the distribution plate is a perforated corrugated sheet. The mass transport barrier may be conveniently increased by increasing the thickness of an anode conductive sheet adjacent the membrane surface of the fuel cell.

  11. Heterogeneous Chemistry Involving Methanol in Tropospheric Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, A.; Yokelson, R. J.; Singh, H. B.; Hobbs, P. V.; Crawford, J. H.; Iraci, L. T.

    2004-01-01

    In this report we analyze airborne measurements to suggest that methanol in biomass burning smoke is lost heterogeneously in clouds. When a smoke plume intersected a cumulus cloud during the SAFARI 2000 field project, the observed methanol gas phase concentration rapidly declined. Current understanding of gas and aqueous phase chemistry cannot explain the loss of methanol documented by these measurements. Two plausible heterogeneous reactions are proposed to explain the observed simultaneous loss and production of methanol and formaldehyde, respectively. If the rapid heterogeneous processing of methanol, seen in a cloud impacted by smoke, occurs in more pristine clouds, it could affect the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere on a global scale.

  12. The direct methanol fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Halpert, G.; Narayanan, S.R.; Frank, H.

    1995-08-01

    This presentation describes the approach and progress in the ARPA-sponsored effort to develop a Direct Methanol, Liquid-Feed Fuel Cell (DMLFFC) with a solid Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) for battery replacement in small portable applications. Using Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEAs) developed by JPL and Giner, significant voltage was demonstrated at relatively high current densities. The DMLFFC utilizes a 3 percent aqueous solution of methanol that is oxidized directly in the anode (fuel) chamber and oxygen (air) in the cathode chamber to produce water and significant power. The only products are water and CO{sub 2}. The ARPA effort is aimed at replacing the battery in the BA 5590 military radio.

  13. Methanol production method and system

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Michael J.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    1984-01-01

    Ethanol is selectively produced from the reaction of methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen in the presence of a transition metal carbonyl catalyst. Methanol serves as a solvent and may be accompanied by a less volatile co-solvent. The solution includes the transition metal carbonyl catalysts and a basic metal salt such as an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal formate, carbonate or bicarbonate. A gas containing a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio, as is present in a typical gasifer product, is contacted with the solution for the preferential production of ethanol with minimal water as a byproduct. Fractionation of the reaction solution provides substantially pure ethanol product and allows return of the catalysts for reuse.

  14. Stevioside methanol tetra-solvate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yunshan; Rodenburg, Douglas L; Ibrahim, Mohamed A; McChesney, James D; Avery, Mitchell A

    2013-03-01

    Stevioside is a naturally occurring diterpenoid glycoside in Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni. The title compound, C38H60O18·4CH3OH, crystallized as its methanol tetrasolvate. Stevioside consists of an aglycone steviol (a tetra-cyclic diterpene in which the four-fused-ring system consists of three six-membered rings and one five-membered ring) and a sugar part (three glucose units). A weak intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond occurs. In the crystal, the methanol mol-ecules participate in a two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network parallel to b axis with the sugars and together they form a hydrophilic tunnel which encloses the lipophilic part of the molecule. PMID:23476589

  15. The toxicity of inhaled methanol vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Kavet, R.; Nauss, K.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Methanol could become a major automotive fuel in the U.S., and its use may result in increased exposure of the public to methanol vapor. Nearly all of the available information on methanol toxicity in humans relates to the consequences of acute, rather than chronic, exposures. Acute methanol toxicity evolves in a well-understood pattern and consists of an uncompensated metabolic acidosis with superimposed toxicity to the visual system. The toxic properties of methanol are rooted in the factors that govern both the conversion of methanol to formic acid and the subsequent metabolism of formate to carbon dioxide in the folate pathway. In short, the toxic syndrome sets in if formate generation continues at a rate that exceeds its rate of metabolism. Current evidence indicates that formate accumulation will not challenge the metabolic capacity of the folate pathway at the anticipated levels of exposure to automotive methanol vapor.117 references.

  16. The toxicity of inhaled methanol vapors.

    PubMed

    Kavet, R; Nauss, K M

    1990-01-01

    Methanol could become a major automotive fuel in the U.S., and its use may result in increased exposure of the public to methanol vapor. Nearly all of the available information on methanol toxicity in humans relates to the consequences of acute, rather than chronic, exposures. Acute methanol toxicity evolves in a well-understood pattern and consists of an uncompensated metabolic acidosis with superimposed toxicity to the visual system. The toxic properties of methanol are rooted in the factors that govern both the conversion of methanol to formic acid and the subsequent metabolism of formate to carbon dioxide in the folate pathway. In short, the toxic syndrome sets in if formate generation continues at a rate that exceeds its rate of metabolism. Current evidence indicates that formate accumulation will not challenge the metabolic capacity of the folate pathway at the anticipated levels of exposure to automotive methanol vapor. PMID:2264926

  17. Direct methanol fuel cell and system

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    2004-10-26

    A fuel cell having an anode and a cathode and a polymer electrolyte membrane located between anode and cathode gas diffusion backings uses a methanol vapor fuel supply. A permeable polymer electrolyte membrane having a permeability effective to sustain a carbon dioxide flux equivalent to at least 10 mA/cm.sup.2 provides for removal of carbon dioxide produced at the anode by reaction of methanol with water. Another aspect of the present invention includes a superabsorpent polymer material placed in proximity to the anode gas diffusion backing to hold liquid methanol or liquid methanol solution without wetting the anode gas diffusion backing so that methanol vapor from the liquid methanol or liquid methanol-water solution is supplied to the membrane.

  18. Biomodal spontaneous fission

    SciTech Connect

    Hulet, E.K. )

    1989-09-26

    Investigations of mass and kinetic-energy distributions from spontaneous fission have been extended in recent years to an isotope of element 104 and, for half-lives, to an isotope of element 108. The results have been surprising in that spontaneous fission half-lives have turned out to be much longer than expected and mass and kinetic- energy distributions were found to abruptly shift away from those of the lighter actinides, showing two modes of fission. These new developments have caused a re-evaluation of our understanding of the fission process, bringing an even deeper appreciation of the role played by nuclear shell effects upon spontaneous fission properties. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Sol-gel based silica electrodes for inorganic membrane direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyea; Kohl, Paul A.

    Inorganic glass electrodes are of interest for use with inorganic proton exchange membranes for direct methanol fuel cells. Platinum-ruthenium glass electrodes (PtRu/C-SiO 2) have been prepared by incorporating the PtRu/C nanoparticles into a silica-based matrix. The SiO 2 matrix was synthesized through the sol-gel reaction of 3-(trihydroxysilyl)-1-propanesulfonic acid (3TPS) and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS). The distribution of the PtRu/C particles can be controlled by changing the properties of the gel matrix. The effect of gelation time, mole fraction of reactants within the sol, curing temperature, and glass ionomer content were investigated. The adhesion of the catalyst layer on the membrane, catalytic activity for methanol oxidation, and inhibition of methanol permeation through the membrane have been characterized and optimized. The electroless deposition of PtRu onto the PtRu/C nanoparticles was performed to increase the sheet conductivity of the electrode. It was found that the electrolessly deposited metal improved the catalytic activity for methanol oxidation and decreased the methanol cross-over. The methanol fuel cell performance using the inorganic membrane electrode assembly was 236 μA cm -2 at 0.4 V and was stable for more than 10 days.

  20. Spontaneous sarcomere dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Stefan; Kruse, Karsten

    2010-12-01

    Sarcomeres are the basic force generating units of striated muscles and consist of an interdigitating arrangement of actin and myosin filaments. While muscle contraction is usually triggered by neural signals, which eventually set myosin motors into motion, isolated sarcomeres can oscillate spontaneously between a contracted and a relaxed state. We analyze a model for sarcomere dynamics, which is based on a force-dependent detachment rate of myosin from actin. Our numerical bifurcation analysis of the spontaneous sarcomere dynamics reveals notably Hopf bifurcations, canard explosions, and gluing bifurcations. We discuss possible implications for experiments.

  1. [Spontaneous mediastinal emphysema].

    PubMed

    Svedbrand, Charlotte; Lange, Peter; Nielsen, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous mediastinal emphysema, also known as spontaneous pneumomediastinum, is defined as radiologically detected free air in the mediastinum, without preceding trauma. It is a rare condition, mainly affecting young adults. It can be caused by coughing, strenuous sports or cocaine inhalation, however, 40% are idiopatic. Common symptoms are chest pain and dyspnoea. 75-90% can be diagnosed with a chest X-ray, and 100% with a computed tomography. Treatment is symptomatic and complications are rare, however, pneumothorax and pneumorrachis have been reported. PMID:26750190

  2. Metabolic methanol: molecular pathways and physiological roles.

    PubMed

    Dorokhov, Yuri L; Shindyapina, Anastasia V; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V; Komarova, Tatiana V

    2015-04-01

    Methanol has been historically considered an exogenous product that leads only to pathological changes in the human body when consumed. However, in normal, healthy individuals, methanol and its short-lived oxidized product, formaldehyde, are naturally occurring compounds whose functions and origins have received limited attention. There are several sources of human physiological methanol. Fruits, vegetables, and alcoholic beverages are likely the main sources of exogenous methanol in the healthy human body. Metabolic methanol may occur as a result of fermentation by gut bacteria and metabolic processes involving S-adenosyl methionine. Regardless of its source, low levels of methanol in the body are maintained by physiological and metabolic clearance mechanisms. Although human blood contains small amounts of methanol and formaldehyde, the content of these molecules increases sharply after receiving even methanol-free ethanol, indicating an endogenous source of the metabolic methanol present at low levels in the blood regulated by a cluster of genes. Recent studies of the pathogenesis of neurological disorders indicate metabolic formaldehyde as a putative causative agent. The detection of increased formaldehyde content in the blood of both neurological patients and the elderly indicates the important role of genetic and biochemical mechanisms of maintaining low levels of methanol and formaldehyde. PMID:25834233

  3. Endogenous Methanol Regulates Mammalian Gene Activity

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Petrunia, Igor V.; Shindyapina, Anastasia V.; Silachev, Denis N.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that methanol emitted by wounded plants might function as a signaling molecule for plant-to-plant and plant-to-animal communications. In mammals, methanol is considered a poison because the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) converts methanol into toxic formaldehyde. However, the detection of methanol in the blood and exhaled air of healthy volunteers suggests that methanol may be a chemical with specific functions rather than a metabolic waste product. Using a genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain, we demonstrated that an increase in blood methanol concentration led to a change in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes primarily involved in detoxification processes and regulation of the alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenases gene cluster. To test the role of ADH in the maintenance of low methanol concentration in the plasma, we used the specific ADH inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP) and showed that intraperitoneal administration of 4-MP resulted in a significant increase in the plasma methanol, ethanol and formaldehyde concentrations. Removal of the intestine significantly decreased the rate of methanol addition to the plasma and suggested that the gut flora may be involved in the endogenous production of methanol. ADH in the liver was identified as the main enzyme for metabolizing methanol because an increase in the methanol and ethanol contents in the liver homogenate was observed after 4-MP administration into the portal vein. Liver mRNA quantification showed changes in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes involved in cell signalling and detoxification processes. We hypothesized that endogenous methanol acts as a regulator of homeostasis by controlling the mRNA synthesis. PMID:24587296

  4. Recent Studies on Methanol Crossover in Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    In this work, the effects of methanol crossover and airflow rates on the cathode potential of an operating direct methanol fuel cell are explored. Techniques for quantifying methanol crossover in a fuel cell and for separating the electrical performance of each electrode in a fuel cell are discussed. The effect of methanol concentration on cathode potential has been determined to be significant. The cathode is found to be mass transfer limited when operating on low flow rate air and high concentrations of methanol. Improvements in cathode structure and operation at low methanol concentration have been shown to result in improved cell performance.

  5. Spontaneous otogenic pneumocephalus.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, El Romyssa; Profant, Milan

    2011-06-01

    The diagnosis and management of spontaneous otogenic pneumocephalus with literature review is described. A young sportsman experienced headache and fluctuating mass in his occiput during increased physical activity. A large extradural intracranial pneumocephalus with corresponding emphysema was imaged on a CT scan. Transmastoid identification and plugging of temporal bone defect solved the problem with complete pneumocephalus and emphysema resorption. PMID:21254960

  6. The Effects Of Methanol On The Trapping Of Volatile Ice Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Wendy; Burke, D.

    2012-05-01

    Icy mantle evaporation gives the rich chemistry observed around hot cores. Water ice is the dominant component of many astrophysical ices and this has motivated studies to identify the sublimation of volatile ice components when water-rich ices are heated. Most investigations focus on binary ices, with water as the main component. To understand thermal processing of real astrophysical ices, the current laboratory definition of these ices needs to be extended. Methanol is important in this regard, due to its close association with water. It is typically the second most abundant species and the most abundant organic molecule detected in cometary comae, interstellar ices and on a variety of bodies at the edge of our solar system. Methanol abundance varies depending on the environment, ranging from as low as 5% with respect to water in dark clouds, to approximately 30% near low and high mass proto-stars. With this in mind, we present an investigation of the adsorption and desorption of interstellar ices, showing the effect of methanol on the trapping and release of volatiles from water-rich ices. OCS and CO2 are used as probe molecules since they reside in water and methanol-rich environments. Experiments show that OCS thermal desorption depends on ice morphology and composition. Data suggest that OCS is incorporated into amorphous water ice during heating, as a result of morphological changes in the ice, and it then explosively desorbs as the water crystallises. Similar effects are observed for OCS deposited on/within methanol ice. In contrast, OCS desorption from mixed water/methanol ices is complex. Desorption occurs at the onset of methanol desorption, in addition to co-desorption with crystalline water. Hence co-depositing impurities, e.g. methanol, with water ice significantly alters the desorption dynamics of volatiles. These results are of interest as they can be used to model star formation.

  7. Propane Clathrate Hydrate Formation Accelerated by Methanol.

    PubMed

    Amtawong, Jaruwan; Guo, Jin; Hale, Jared S; Sengupta, Suvrajit; Fleischer, Everly B; Martin, Rachel W; Janda, Kenneth C

    2016-07-01

    The role of methanol as both an inhibitor and a catalyst for the formation of clathrate hydrates (CHs) has been a topic of intense study. We report a new quantitative study of the kinetics of propane CH formation at 253 K from the reaction of propane gas with <75 μm ice particles that have been doped with varying amounts of methanol. We find that methanol significantly accelerates the formation reaction with quite small doping quantities. Even for only 1 methanol molecule per 10 000 water molecules, the maximum uptake rate of propane into CHs is enhanced and the initiation pressure is reduced. These results enable more efficient production of CHs for gas storage. This remarkable acceleration of the CH formation reaction by small quantities of methanol may place constraints on the mechanism of the inhibition effect observed under other conditions, usually employing much larger quantities of methanol. PMID:27275862

  8. Methods of conditioning direct methanol fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Cynthia; Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2005-11-08

    Methods for conditioning the membrane electrode assembly of a direct methanol fuel cell ("DMFC") are disclosed. In a first method, an electrical current of polarity opposite to that used in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is passed through the anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly. In a second method, methanol is supplied to an anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, allowed to cross over the polymer electrolyte membrane of the membrane electrode assembly to a cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, and an electrical current of polarity opposite to that in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is drawn through the membrane electrode assembly, wherein methanol is oxidized at the cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly while the catalyst on the anode surface is reduced. Surface oxides on the direct methanol fuel cell anode catalyst of the membrane electrode assembly are thereby reduced.

  9. Methanol incorporation in clathrate hydrates and the implications for oil and gas pipeline flow assurance and icy planetary bodies

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Kyuchul; Udachin, Konstantin A.; Moudrakovski, Igor L.; Leek, Donald M.; Alavi, Saman; Ratcliffe, Christopher I.; Ripmeester, John A.

    2013-01-01

    One of the best-known uses of methanol is as antifreeze. Methanol is used in large quantities in industrial applications to prevent methane clathrate hydrate blockages from forming in oil and gas pipelines. Methanol is also assigned a major role as antifreeze in giving icy planetary bodies (e.g., Titan) a liquid subsurface ocean and/or an atmosphere containing significant quantities of methane. In this work, we reveal a previously unverified role for methanol as a guest in clathrate hydrate cages. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and NMR experiments showed that at temperatures near 273 K, methanol is incorporated in the hydrate lattice along with other guest molecules. The amount of included methanol depends on the preparative method used. For instance, single-crystal XRD shows that at low temperatures, the methanol molecules are hydrogen-bonded in 4.4% of the small cages of tetrahydrofuran cubic structure II hydrate. At higher temperatures, NMR spectroscopy reveals a number of methanol species incorporated in hydrocarbon hydrate lattices. At temperatures characteristic of icy planetary bodies, vapor deposits of methanol, water, and methane or xenon show that the presence of methanol accelerates hydrate formation on annealing and that there is unusually complex phase behavior as revealed by powder XRD and NMR spectroscopy. The presence of cubic structure I hydrate was confirmed and a unique hydrate phase was postulated to account for the data. Molecular dynamics calculations confirmed the possibility of methanol incorporation into the hydrate lattice and show that methanol can favorably replace a number of methane guests. PMID:23661058

  10. Methanol incorporation in clathrate hydrates and the implications for oil and gas pipeline flow assurance and icy planetary bodies.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyuchul; Udachin, Konstantin A; Moudrakovski, Igor L; Leek, Donald M; Alavi, Saman; Ratcliffe, Christopher I; Ripmeester, John A

    2013-05-21

    One of the best-known uses of methanol is as antifreeze. Methanol is used in large quantities in industrial applications to prevent methane clathrate hydrate blockages from forming in oil and gas pipelines. Methanol is also assigned a major role as antifreeze in giving icy planetary bodies (e.g., Titan) a liquid subsurface ocean and/or an atmosphere containing significant quantities of methane. In this work, we reveal a previously unverified role for methanol as a guest in clathrate hydrate cages. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and NMR experiments showed that at temperatures near 273 K, methanol is incorporated in the hydrate lattice along with other guest molecules. The amount of included methanol depends on the preparative method used. For instance, single-crystal XRD shows that at low temperatures, the methanol molecules are hydrogen-bonded in 4.4% of the small cages of tetrahydrofuran cubic structure II hydrate. At higher temperatures, NMR spectroscopy reveals a number of methanol species incorporated in hydrocarbon hydrate lattices. At temperatures characteristic of icy planetary bodies, vapor deposits of methanol, water, and methane or xenon show that the presence of methanol accelerates hydrate formation on annealing and that there is unusually complex phase behavior as revealed by powder XRD and NMR spectroscopy. The presence of cubic structure I hydrate was confirmed and a unique hydrate phase was postulated to account for the data. Molecular dynamics calculations confirmed the possibility of methanol incorporation into the hydrate lattice and show that methanol can favorably replace a number of methane guests. PMID:23661058

  11. Method of steam reforming methanol to hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Beshty, Bahjat S.

    1990-01-01

    The production of hydrogen by the catalyzed steam reforming of methanol is accomplished using a reformer of greatly reduced size and cost wherein a mixture of water and methanol is superheated to the gaseous state at temperatures of about 800.degree. to about 1,100.degree. F. and then fed to a reformer in direct contact with the catalyst bed contained therein, whereby the heat for the endothermic steam reforming reaction is derived directly from the superheated steam/methanol mixture.

  12. Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2002-01-01

    An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source. Water loss from the cell is minimized by making the conductive cathode assembly hydrophobic and the conductive anode assembly hydrophilic.

  13. Negligible photodesorption of methanol ice and active photon-induced desorption of its irradiation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Diaz, G. A.; Martín-Doménech, R.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Chen, Y.-J.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Methanol is a common component of interstellar and circumstellar ice mantles and is often used as an evolution indicator in star-forming regions. The observations of gas-phase methanol in the interiors of dense molecular clouds at temperatures as low as 10 K suggest that non-thermal ice desorption must be active. Ice photodesorption has been proposed to explain the abundances of gas-phase molecules toward the coldest regions. Aims: Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the potential photodesorption of methanol toward the coldest regions. Methods: Solid methanol was deposited at 8 K and UV-irradiated at various temperatures starting from 8 K. The irradiation of the ice was monitored by means of infrared spectroscopy and the molecules in the gas phase were detected using quadrupole mass spectroscopy. Fully deuterated methanol was used for confirmation of the results. Results: The photodesorption of methanol to the gas phase was not observed in the mass spectra at different irradiation temperatures. We estimate an upper limit of 3 × 10-5 molecules per incident photon. On the other hand, photon-induced desorption of the main photoproducts was clearly observed. Conclusions: The negligible photodesorption of methanol could be explained by the ability of UV-photons in the 114-180 nm (10.87-6.88 eV) range to dissociate this molecule efficiently. Therefore, the presence of gas-phase methanol in the absence of thermal desorption remains unexplained. On the other hand, we find CH4 to desorb from irradiated methanol ice, which was not found to desorb in the pure CH4 ice irradiation experiments.

  14. Methanol optic neuropathy: a histopathological study.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, J A; Hostovsky, M; Bilbao, J M; Rewcastle, N B

    1982-10-01

    The histopathologic effects of methanol on the optic nerve were studied in four patients. Circumscribed myelin damage occurred behind the lamina cribrosa in each nerve. Axons were preserved. Demyelination also occurred in cerebral hemispheric white matter in one patient. This selective myelinoclastic effect of methanol metabolism is probably caused by histotoxic anoxia in watershed areas of the cerebral and distal optic nerve circulations. Juxtabulbar demyelination may cause optic disk edema in methanol poisoning by compressive obstruction of orthograde axoplasmic flow. Visual loss may be due to disruption of saltatory conduction. Retrolaminar demyelinating optic neuropathy is an early morphologic correlate of visual loss in methanol intoxication. PMID:6889696

  15. The degree and effect of methanol crossover in the direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruickshank, John; Scott, Keith

    A simple model is presented to describe the permeation of methanol from the anode to the cathode in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Measured permeation rates of water and methanol through Nafion ® 117 under varied pressure differentials across the membrane are used to determine key parameters in the model. This model is able to explain the effect of oxygen pressure at the cathode and methanol concentration at the anode on the measured cell voltage-current response of the DMFC.

  16. Density functional theory study of O-H and C-H bond scission of methanol catalyzed by a chemisorbed oxygen layer on Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jonathan; Zhou, Guangwen

    2016-04-01

    Using the density-functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation, we have studied the partial oxidation of methanol on a Cu(111) surface covered with a chemisorbed oxygen layer that resembles a Cu2O layer. Adsorption energies and geometries were computed for methanol, methoxy, hydroxymethyl and formaldehyde on both clean Cu(111) and Cu2O/Cu(111) and electronic structures were computed for the reaction intermediates on Cu2O/Cu(111). We also calculated the energy barrier for partial oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde on Cu2O/Cu(111). These results show that the Cu2O monolayer slightly lowers the stability of each of the surface adsorbates and the oxygen strongly promotes hydrogen dissociation by lowering the energy barrier of methanol decomposition and causing the spontaneous dissociation of methanol into methoxy.

  17. Biogeochemical Cycle of Methanol in Anoxic Deep-Sea Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Yanagawa, Katsunori; Tani, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Naoya; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Kano, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Ryo; Suzuki, Yohey

    2016-01-01

    The biological flux and lifetime of methanol in anoxic marine sediments are largely unknown. We herein reported, for the first time, quantitative methanol removal rates in subsurface sediments. Anaerobic incubation experiments with radiotracers showed high rates of microbial methanol consumption. Notably, methanol oxidation to CO2 surpassed methanol assimilation and methanogenesis from CO2/H2 and methanol. Nevertheless, a significant decrease in methanol was not observed after the incubation, and this was attributed to the microbial production of methanol in parallel with its consumption. These results suggest that microbial reactions play an important role in the sources and sinks of methanol in subseafloor sediments. PMID:27301420

  18. Breakdown in vapors of alcohols: methanol and ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovic, Zoran Lj.; Sivos, Jelena; Skoro, Nikola; Maric, Dragana; Malovic, Gordana

    2014-10-01

    Breakdown data for vapors of the two simplest alcohols - methanol and ethanol - are presented. The breakdown is achieved between plan-parallel electrodes, where cathode is made of copper and anode is a thin film of platinum deposited on quartz window. Diameter of electrodes is 5.4 cm and electrode gap 1.1 cm. We compare breakdown voltages (Paschen curves) for methyl and ethyl alcohol in the pressure range 0.1--2 Torr. In both vapors, the pressure is kept well below the vapor pressure, to prevent formation of liquid droplets. For each point of Paschen curves corresponding axial profiles of emission are recorded by ICCD camera in visual part of the spectra. Axial intensity distributions reveal important processes of excitation. Both vapors show strong emission peak near the cathode at all pd values covered by measurements, which indicates that excitation by ions and fast neutrals play important role in the discharge. Preliminary spectrally resolved measurements of the discharge structure with optical filters show that dominantly emission comes from CH band at 431 nm. There is a very low intensity of H α emission detected in ethanol vapor at high E/N, while it is much stronger in methanol even at lower E/N. It is interesting to note that H α emission in methanol exhibits exponential increase of intensity from the cathode to the anode, so it comes mainly from excitation by electrons, not heavy particles. Supported by MESTD Projects ON171037 and III41011.

  19. SnS2 Thin Film Deposition by Spray Pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahia Jaber, Abdallah; Noaiman Alamri, Saleh; Salah Aida, Mohammed

    2012-06-01

    Tin disulfide (SnS2) thin films have been synthesized using a simplified spray pyrolysis technique using a perfume atomizer. The films were deposited using two different solutions prepared by the dilution of SnCl2 and thiourea in distilled water and in methanol. The obtained films have a microcrystalline structure. The film deposited using methanol as the solvent is nearly stochiometric SnS2 with a spinel phase having a (001) preferential orientation. The film prepared with an aqueous solution is Sn-rich. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images reveal that the film deposited with the aqueous solution is rough and is formed with large wires. However, the film deposited with methanol is dense and smooth. Conductivity measurements indicate that the aqueous solution leads to an n-type semiconductor, while methanol leads to a p-type semiconductor.

  20. Spontaneous Quantum Hall Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan

    2012-02-01

    Driven by electron-electron interactions, bilayer graphene and its thicker cousins, chirally (ABC) stacked multilayers, exhibit a variety of distinct broken symmetry states in which each spin-valley flavor spontaneously transfers charge between layers, because of their flat touching bands and large pseudospin chiralities. These gapped states are accompanied by large momentum space Berry curvatures and different types of topological orders. These competing ground states are distinguished by their flavor Hall conductivities, orbital magnetizations, edge state properties, and response to external fields. These spontaneous quantum Hall (SQH) states at zero field smoothly evolve into quantum Hall ferromagnet states at finite field. Various phase transitions occur by tuning carrier densities, temperature, and external fields. Recently, SQH states have started to be observed and explored in transport and Hall experiments on suspended devices with dual gates.

  1. Arachnoid cyst spontaneous rupture.

    PubMed

    Marques, Inês Brás; Vieira Barbosa, José

    2014-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are benign congenital cerebrospinal fluid collections, usually asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally in children or adolescents. They may become symptomatic after enlargement or complications, frequently presenting with symptoms of intracranial hypertension. We report an unusual case of progressive refractory headache in an adult patient due to an arachnoid cyst spontaneous rupture. Although clinical improvement occurred with conservative treatment, the subdural hygroma progressively enlarged and surgical treatment was ultimately needed. Spontaneous rupture is a very rare complication of arachnoid cysts. Accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid accumulation in the subdural space causes sustained intracranial hypertension that may be life-threatening and frequently requires surgical treatment. Patients with arachnoid cysts must be informed on their small vulnerability to cyst rupture and be aware that a sudden and severe headache, especially if starting after minor trauma or a Valsalva manoeuvre, always requires medical evaluation. PMID:24581205

  2. Spontaneous ileostomy closure

    PubMed Central

    Alyami, Mohammad S.; Lundberg, Peter W.; Cotte, Eddy G.; Glehen, Olivier J.

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic ileostomies are routinely placed during colorectal surgery for the diversion of intestinal contents to permit healing of the distal anastomosis prior to elective reversal. We present an interesting case of spontaneous closure of a diverting ileostomy without any adverse effects to the patient. A 65-year-old woman, positive for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer type-I, with locally invasive cancer of the distal colon underwent en-bloc total colectomy, hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingoophorectomy with creation of a proximal loop ileostomy. The ostomy temporarily closed without reoperation at 10 weeks, after spontaneously reopening, it definitively closed, again without surgical intervention at 18 weeks following the original surgery. This rare phenomenon has occurred following variable colorectal pathology and is poorly understood, particularly in patients with aggressive disease and adjunct perioperative interventions. PMID:27279518

  3. Spontaneous Perforation of Pyometra.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nalini; Singh, Ahanthem Santa; Bhaphiralyne, Wankhar

    2016-04-01

    Pyometra is collection of purulent material which occurs when there is interference with its normal drainage. It is an uncommon condition with incidence of 0.1 to 0.5% of all gynecological patients. Spontaneous rupture of uterus is an extremely rare complication of pyometra. A 65-year-old lady presented with pain abdomen and purulent vaginal discharge. Preoperative diagnosis of pyometra was made by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Laparotomy followed by peritoneal lavage and repair of perforation was performed. Although spontaneously perforated pyometra is rare, the condition must be borne in mind with regard to elderly women with acute abdominal pain. Preoperative diagnosis of perforated pyometra is absolutely essential. Computed tomography (CT) and MRI are diagnostic tools. In selected cases conservative approach at surgery can be opted. PMID:27152313

  4. Spontaneous Perforation of Pyometra

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ahanthem Santa; Bhaphiralyne, Wankhar

    2016-01-01

    Pyometra is collection of purulent material which occurs when there is interference with its normal drainage. It is an uncommon condition with incidence of 0.1 to 0.5% of all gynecological patients. Spontaneous rupture of uterus is an extremely rare complication of pyometra. A 65-year-old lady presented with pain abdomen and purulent vaginal discharge. Preoperative diagnosis of pyometra was made by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Laparotomy followed by peritoneal lavage and repair of perforation was performed. Although spontaneously perforated pyometra is rare, the condition must be borne in mind with regard to elderly women with acute abdominal pain. Preoperative diagnosis of perforated pyometra is absolutely essential. Computed tomography (CT) and MRI are diagnostic tools. In selected cases conservative approach at surgery can be opted. PMID:27152313

  5. [Spontaneous intraperitoneal hemorrhage: etiology].

    PubMed

    Ksontini, R; Roulet, D; Cosendey, B A; Cavin, R

    2001-10-01

    Spontaneous intraperitoneal hemorrhage is a rare and sometime fatal condition. The clinical presentation may range from a non-specific abdominal pain to an acute abdomen with hemodynamic instability. Often, a preoperative diagnosis cannot be obtained. Immediate surgical exploration remains the treatment of choice. However, pre or postoperative diagnosis can sometime be confirmed and treated with interventional radiology. In rare cases, the site of bleeding remains unknown despite intraoperative exploration and radiographic studies. PMID:11715286

  6. Design of a stable and methanol resistant membrane with cross-linked multilayered polyelectrolyte complexes for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Zhao, Chengji; Lin, Haidan; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yang; Ni, Jing; Ma, Wenjia; Na, Hui

    Sulfonated poly (arylene ether ketone) bearing carboxyl groups (SPAEK-C) membranes have been prepared as proton exchange membranes for applications in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Multilayered polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) which applied as methanol barrier agents are prepared by alternate deposition of the oppositely charged amino-containing poly (ether ether ketone) (Am-PEEK) and the highly sulfonated SPAEK-C via a layer-by-layer method. The cross-linked PEC (c-PEC) is derived from a simple heat-induced cross-linking reaction between Am-PEEK and SPAEK-C. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms that Am-PEEK and SPAEK-C are assembled successfully in the multilayers. The morphology of the membranes is studied by scanning electron microscopy, which shows the presence of the thin layers coated on the SPAEK-C membrane. After PEC and c-PEC modification, the methanol permeability decreases obviously when compared to that of the pristine membrane. Notably, improved proton conductivities are obtained for the PEC modified membranes in comparison with the pristine membrane. Moreover, the selectivity of these modified membranes is one order of magnitude higher than that of Nafion 117. The thermal stability, oxidative stability, water uptake and swelling of PEC and c-PEC modified membranes are also investigated.

  7. Methanol Steam Reforming for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Palo, Daniel R.; Dagle, Robert A.; Holladay, Jamie D.

    2007-09-11

    Review article covering developments in methanol steam reforming in the context of PEM fuel cell power systems. Subjects covered include methanol background, use, and production, comparison to other fuels, power system considerations, militrary requirements, competing technologies, catalyst development, and reactor and system development and demonstration.

  8. Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology of Methanol

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methanol is a high production volume chemical used as a feedstock for chemical syntheses and as a solvent and fuel additive. Methanol is acutely toxic to humans, causing acidosis, blindness in death at high dosages, but its developmental and reproductive toxicity in humans is poo...

  9. Alternative resources for the methanol economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reschetilowski, W.

    2013-07-01

    Generally, methanol produced for chemical applications is made predominantly via fossil resources. But it can also be obtained from any carbon-containing feedstock, including biomass, biogas, forest residues, and municipal or other waste products. Perspective viewing and critical assessment show the possibilities and constraints of such alternative resources for the realization of the methanol economy with high sustainability. The bibliography includes 57 references.

  10. [Spontaneous abortion. Etiologic survey. Results].

    PubMed

    Baaklini, N; Anguenot, J L; Boulanger, J C; Vitse, M

    1990-12-01

    The definition of repeated spontaneous abortions is subject to caution. For some, it corresponds to at least three repeated spontaneous abortions with no normal previous pregnancy; for others, it comprises the repeated spontaneous abortions occurring after a normal pregnancy. It is a frequent problem, especially if one tries to give a wider definition. The authors studied the frequency of repeated spontaneous abortions in a continuous series of 14,857 pregnancies which took place between January 1982 and December 1988. In the study of the aetiology of the repeated spontaneous abortions in the various groups of women defined according to the number of previous pregnancies and abortions, they find the classical causes of repeated spontaneous abortions in all the categories: therefore, it seems legitimate to them that a wider definition be given for repeated spontaneous abortions. PMID:2291048

  11. Identification of interstellar methanol lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, E. C.; Herbst, Eric

    1988-10-01

    The extended internal axis method Hamiltonian of Herbst et al. has been employed to study the rotational spectrum of methanol out to high values of the rotational quantum number J. For 12CH3OH the available laboratory data, consisting of 783 lines out to J = 22, have been fitted with a Hamiltonian containing 32 free parameters. For 13CH3OH a Hamiltonian with 23 free parameters is sufficient for fitting 455 lines, also out to J = 22. Frequency predictions based on these fits have permitted the identification of a number of previously unidentified interstellar lines from OMC-1. The majority of these are b-type R-branch transitions of 12CH3OH.

  12. The detection of extragalactic methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, C.; Jacq, T.; Mauersberger, R.; Menten, K. M.; Steppe, H.

    1987-12-01

    The detection of emission in the 96 GHz 2(kappa)-1(kappa) lines of methanol is reported toward the central regions of NGC253 and IC342. A possible detection is also obtained toward NGC6946, while no emission is seen toward M82. (CH3OH)/(H2) abundance ratios appear to be consistent with those determined for galactic sources. The strength of the CH3OH emission, however, is not found to be correlated with infrared or CO luminosities. Toward NGC253, two distinct clouds are identified. One of these appears to be directly associated with the nucleus and remains spatially unresolved. The recently detected H2O maser at 100-150 km/s does not originate from this centrally located cloud.

  13. Look what you can make from methanol

    SciTech Connect

    King, D.L.; Grate, J.H.

    1985-04-01

    In a synthetic gas based chemicals industry there are many advantages in using an indirect methanol-based route for producing two carbon or higher oxygenated chemicals. Because of poor product selectivity and low production rates, direct syngas mechanisms are not commercially viable. Specific examples of indirect methanol-based routes and also routes from formaldehyde are given. These include the production of ethanol by reductive carbonylation of methanol and the production of vinyl acetate, although more work needs to be done on the methanol-syngas route to vinyl acetate. The chemistry of ethylene glycol from formaldehyde is discussed. It is concluded that the success of syngas-based technologies will be linked to the economics of ethylene production and new methanol-based processes will contribute to this success. 35 references.

  14. Methanol Conversion for the Production of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.E.; Howard, B.H.; Myers, C.R.

    2007-12-19

    The production of methanol from a variety of biomass sources is gaining favor. Several facilities exist or are under construction throughout the world to convert biogenerated methane from the decomposition of biomass into methanol using conventional steam reforming. Methanol is an excellent liquid-hydrogen-transport medium. When powered by hydrogen, fuel cells have the potential to be the cleanest and most efficient source of electricity for use by the automotive industry. On-board reforming of liquid hydrocarbon fuels is a viable alternative to the storage of compressed hydrogen. A problem in current reforming processes is the quantity of carbon monoxide (CO) produced. Our research is geared toward circumventing the production of carbon monoxide in methanol reforming through the development of novel reforming catalysts. By modifying a copper-based catalyst, we have produced several catalysts that retain their activity and high surface area after extended methanol reforming runs both with and without the addition of steam.

  15. Spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Alajoulin, Omar A.; Alsbou, Mohammed S.; Ja’afreh, Somayya O.; Kalbouneh, Heba M.

    2015-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare inborn metabolic disease characterized by accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA). Excretion of HGA in urine causes darkening of urine and its deposition in connective tissues causes dark pigmentation (ochronosis), early degeneration of articular cartilage, weakening of the tendons, and subsequent rupture. In this case report, we present a rare case of a patient presented with unilateral spontaneous rupture of Achilles tendon due to AKU. The patient developed most of the orthopedic manifestations of the disease earlier than typical presentations. Alkaptonuria patients should avoid strenuous exercises and foot straining especially in patients developing early orthopedic manifestations. PMID:26620992

  16. Thin Film Catalyst Layers for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witham, C. K.; Chun, W.; Ruiz, R.; Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary obstacles to the widespread use of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is the high cost of the catalyst. Therefore, reducing the catalyst loading well below the current level of 8-12 mg/cm 2 would be important to commercialization. The current methods for preparation of catalyst layers consisting of catalyst, ionomer and sometimes a hydrophobic additive are applied by either painting, spraying, decal transfer or screen printing processes. Sputter deposition is a coating technique widely used in manufacturing and therefore particularly attractive. In this study we have begun to explore sputtering as a method for catalyst deposition. Present experiments focus on Pt-Ru catalyst layers for the anode.

  17. Ion-Ice Astrochemistry: Barrierless Low-Energy Deposition Pathways to HCOOH, CH3OH, and CO2 on Icy Grain Mantles from Precursor Cations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woon, David E.

    2011-01-01

    A new family of very favorable reaction pathways is explored involving the deposition of ions on icy grain mantles with very low energies. Quantum chemical cluster calculations at the MP2/6-31+G** level in 4H2O clusters and at the B3LYP/6-31+G** level in 17H2O clusters indicate that HCO+ and CH3 + are able to react spontaneously with one of the water molecules in the cluster to form protonated formic acid (HCOOH2 +) and protonated methanol (CH3OH2 +), respectively. It is furthermore found that these initial adducts spontaneously transfer their excess protons to the cluster to form neutral formic acid and methanol, plus solvated hydronium, H3O+. In the final case, if a CO molecule is bound to the surface of the cluster, OH+ may react with it to form protonated carbon dioxide (HCO2 +), which then loses its proton to yield CO2 and H3O+. In the present model, all of these processes were found to occur with no barriers. Discussion includes the analogous gas phase processes, which have been considered in previous studies, as well as the competitive abstraction pathway for HCO(+) + H2O.

  18. Enantioselective autocatalysis. Spontaneous resolution and the prebiotic generation of chirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonner, William A.

    1994-02-01

    Theoretical and experimental models for autocatalytic systems leading to the prebiotic origin of chiralityvia the spontaneous symmetry breaking (resolution) of racemic substrates are reviewed. Of the experimental models so far studied, only 2nd order assymetric transformations during crystallization of optically labile enantiometers, leading to their spontaneous resolution under racemizing conditions (SRURC) have been successful. Our objective was to investigate in further detail the most promising of these systems from the point of view of its overall efficiency and its potential viability as a mechanism for the spontaneous generation of molecular chirality on the prebiotic Earth. To this end the 1,4-benzo-diazepinooxazole derivative XI, having a single asymmetric carbon atom, has been synthesized. We here confirm a report in the literature that (±)-XI undergoes SRURC in methanol, both on crystallization and as a slurry. The ‘total spontaneous resolution’ of (±)-XI has been achieved in a yield of 99%, of which 80% had an optical purity ofca. 93%. Arguments are presented that SRURC of racemic substrates, while thus demonstrably effective in laboratory experiments, was probably not of major importance for the origin or amplification of molecular chirality on the primitive earth.

  19. The electrochemical oxidation of methanol on a Pt/TNTs/Ti electrode enhanced by illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Q.; Wei, Z. D.; Gao, B.; Qi, X. Q.; Li, L.; Zhang, Q.; Xia, M. R.

    A Pt/TNTs/Ti electrode is prepared by electrochemically depositing Pt using the modulated pulse current method onto high density, well ordered and uniformly distributed TiO 2 nanotubes (TNTs) on a Ti substrate. The results show that the performance and anti-poison ability of the Pt/TNTs/Ti electrode for methanol electro-oxidation under illumination is remarkably enhanced and is even better than the best bi-metallic Pt-Ru catalysts. CO poisoning is no longer a problem during methanol electro-oxidation with the Pt/TNTs/Ti electrode under illumination.

  20. Thin-Film Deposition of Metal Oxides by Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition: Evaluation of Film Crystallinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Masahiro; Maki, Kunisuke

    2007-12-01

    Sn-doped In2O3 (ITO) thin films are deposited on glass substrates using 0.2 M aqueous and methanol solutions of InCl3(4H2O) with 5 mol % SnCl2(2H2O) by aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition under positive and negative temperature gradient conditions. The film crystallinity is evaluated by determining the film thickness dependence of X-ray diffraction peak height. When using aqueous solution, the ITO films grow with the same crystallinity during the deposition, but when using methanol solution, the preferred orientation of ITO changes during the deposition.

  1. Quantum Spontaneous Stochasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drivas, Theodore; Eyink, Gregory

    Classical Newtonian dynamics is expected to be deterministic, but recent fluid turbulence theory predicts that a particle advected at high Reynolds-numbers by ''nearly rough'' flows moves nondeterministically. Small stochastic perturbations to the flow velocity or to the initial data lead to persistent randomness, even in the limit where the perturbations vanish! Such ``spontaneous stochasticity'' has profound consequences for astrophysics, geophysics, and our daily lives. We show that a similar effect occurs with a quantum particle in a ''nearly rough'' force, for the semi-classical (large-mass) limit, where spreading of the wave-packet is usually expected to be negligible and dynamics to be deterministic Newtonian. Instead, there are non-zero probabilities to observe multiple, non-unique solutions of the classical equations. Although the quantum wave-function remains split, rapid phase oscillations prevent any coherent superposition of the branches. Classical spontaneous stochasticity has not yet been seen in controlled laboratory experiments of fluid turbulence, but the corresponding quantum effects may be observable by current techniques. We suggest possible experiments with neutral atomic-molecular systems in repulsive electric dipole potentials.

  2. Simultaneous bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Graf-Deuel, E; Knoblauch, A

    1994-04-01

    We describe 12 patients with simultaneous bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax (SBSP). They represent 4 percent of patients with spontaneous pneumothorax seen at our hospital from 1971 to 1990. Five of the 12 had no underlying lung disease. In the seven remaining patients, SBSP was secondary to histiocytosis X, lymphangioleiomyomatosis, osteogenic sarcoma with pleural and pulmonary metastases, Hodgkin's disease, mesothelioma, cystic fibrosis, or miliary tuberculosis. Nineteen of the 56 patients with SBSP (34 percent) described in the literature (this series included) had pulmonary disease related to disorders of cells of mesenchymal origin. Emphysema and bullous lung disease were not associated with SBSP. Long-term prognosis was a function of pulmonary status. Four of the patients described herein died during the period reviewed. All suffered from severe underlying disease. In no case was SBSP the main cause of death. With timely treatment, the short-term prognosis is benign even for patients with underlying lung disease. Surgical pleurectomy should be attempted early, especially in SBSP secondary to underlying lung disease. PMID:8162740

  3. Spontaneous Tumor Lysis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kimple, Michelle E.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) is a known complication of malignancy and its treatment. The incidence varies on malignancy type, but is most common with hematologic neoplasms during cytotoxic treatment. Spontaneous TLS is thought to be rare. This case study is of a 62-year-old female admitted with multisystem organ failure, with subsequent diagnosis of aggressive B cell lymphoma. On admission, laboratory abnormalities included renal failure, elevated uric acid (20.7 mg/dL), and 3+ amorphous urates on urinalysis. Oliguric renal failure persisted despite aggressive hydration and diuretic use, requiring initiation of hemodialysis prior to chemotherapy. Antihyperuricemic therapy and hemodialysis were used to resolve hyperuricemia. However, due to multisystem organ dysfunction syndrome with extremely poor prognosis, the patient ultimately expired in the setting of a terminal ventilator wean. Although our patient did not meet current TLS criteria, she required hemodialysis due to uric acid nephropathy, a complication of TLS. This poses the clinical question of whether adequate diagnostic criteria exist for spontaneous TLS and if the lack of currently accepted guidelines has resulted in the underestimation of its incidence. Allopurinol and rasburicase are commonly used for prevention and treatment of TLS. Although both drugs decrease uric acid levels, allopurinol mechanistically prevents formation of the substrate rasburicase acts to solubilize. These drugs were administered together in our patient, although no established guidelines recommend combined use. This raises the clinical question of whether combined therapy is truly beneficial or, conversely, detrimental to patient outcomes. PMID:26904699

  4. Methanol: A Versatile Fuel for Immediate Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, T. B.; Lerner, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    Advocates the large-scale production and use of methanol as a substitute for the diminishing reserves of low-cost petroleum resources. Describes the manufacturing process and advantages of the versatile fuel. (JR)

  5. BHP may scale up methanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Alperowicz, N.

    1993-06-23

    Broken Hill Pty. (BHP: Melbourne) says otherwise uneconomic gas reserves in the Timor Sea off northwest Australia could be developed if the company`s plans to commercialize a novel gas-to-methanol technology prove to be viable. BHP is building an A$70-million ($50 million) research unit in Victoria using ICI`s Leading Concept Methanol gas-to-methanol process. If this unit proves viable, it could be put on a vessel and taken to Timor Sea where BHP has oil exploration and production interests. Timor gas is not economically viable because of lack of nearby markets. The 54,000-m.t./year research plant, located at Werrbee near Melbourne, is scheduled to start production in the second half of 1994, according to BHP manager Joe Evon. The plant is being built by Davy/John Brown. Provided the economic climate is right, BHP is expected to build a world-scale methanol plant offshore.

  6. Methanol production from fermentor off-gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, B. E.; Moreira, A. R.

    The off gases from an acetone butanol fermentation facility are composed mainly of CO2 and H2. Such a gas stream is an ideal candidate as a feed to a methanol synthesis plant utilizing modern technology recently developed and known as the CDH-methanol process. A detailed economic analysis for the incremental cost of a methanol synthesis plant utilizing the off gases from an acetone butanol fermentation indicates a profitable rate of return of 25 to 30% under the most likely production conditions. Bench scale studies at different fermentor mixing rates indicate that the volume of gases released during the fermentation is a strong function of the agitation rate and point to a potential interaction between the volume of H2 evolved and the levels of butanol present in the final fermented broth. Such interaction may require establishing optimum operating conditions for an integrated butanol fermentation methanol synthesis plant.

  7. Advances in direct oxidation methanol fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, S.; Narayanan, S. R.; Vamos, E.; Frank, H.; Halpert, G.; Laconti, Anthony B.; Kosek, J.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Olah, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    Fuel cells that can operate directly on fuels such as methanol are attractive for low to medium power applications in view of their low weight and volume relative to other power sources. A liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell has been developed based on a proton exchange membrane electrolyte and Pt/Ru and Pt catalyzed fuel and air/O2 electrodes, respectively. The cell has been shown to deliver significant power outputs at temperatures of 60 to 90 C. The cell voltage is near 0.5 V at 300 mA/cm(exp 2) current density and an operating temperature of 90 C. A deterrent to performance appears to be methanol crossover through the membrane to the oxygen electrode. Further improvements in performance appear possible by minimizing the methanol crossover rate.

  8. Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1991-02-12

    There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.-), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

  9. Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.13 ), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

  10. Spontaneous Atherosclerosis in Pigeons

    PubMed Central

    Santerre, Robert F.; Wight, Thomas N.; Smith, Samuel C.; Brannigan, David

    1972-01-01

    The interpretation of metabolic studies related to early changes in spontaneous atherosclerosis has been hampered by the focal nature of the disease and by the lack of a well-defined model system of the disease process. Gross, histologic and ultrastructural observations of lesion development at the celiac bifurcation of the aorta in atherosclerosis-susceptible White Carneau and atherosclerosis-resistant Show Racer pigeons are compared and discussed in terms of hemodynamics, muscular aggregation and altered metabolism of smooth muscle cells. Detailed knowledge of the morphologic sequence of events in lesion localization makes the celiac bifurcation in White Carneau and Show Racer pigeons a useful model for genetic comparisons of arterial wall metabolism and for investigating metabolic alterations occurring with atherogenesis. ImagesFig 9Fig 10Fig 1Fig 2Fig 10Fig 11Fig 3Fig 4Fig 12Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 8 PMID:4261591

  11. Spontaneously broken complete relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A. F.

    1982-08-01

    It is suggested that the equations of the theory of relativity should have a spontaneously broken invariance with respect to the complex Poincare group, in order that relative velocities stay below that of light. Lorentz transformation matrices corresponding to velocities higher than that of light, which contain imaginary elements, are combined with real transformations in a single group, requiring the introduction of a complex Lorentz group as a symmetry group. For this complex group to be realized in real, physical space-time, the complex character of the coordinates must be eliminated by introducing appropriate Goldstone fields. The properties of these Goldstone fiels are discussed. A massless Goldstone field is deduced which, in the linear approximation, has no manifestations of any sort in classical mechanics and whose sole macroscopic manifestation is the presence of a nonelectromagnetic long-range interaction of bodies having a nonvanishing average spin density. An experiment to detect such a field is suggested.

  12. Spontaneous aortocaval fistula.

    PubMed

    Rajmohan, B

    2002-01-01

    Spontaneous aortocaval fistula is rare, occurring only in 4% of all ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms. The physical signs can be missed but the presence of low back pain, palpable abdominal aortic aneurysm, machinery abdominal murmur and high-output cardiac failure unresponsive to medical treatment should raise the suspicion. Pre-operative diagnosis is crucial, as adequate preparation has to be made for the massive bleeding expected at operation. Successful treatment depends on management of perioperative haemodynamics, control of bleeding from the fistula and prevention of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Surgical repair of an aortocaval fistula is now standardised--repair of the fistula from within the aneurysm (endoaneurysmorraphy) followed by prosthetic graft replacement of the aneurysm. A case report of a 77-year-old woman, initially suspected to have unstable angina but subsequently diagnosed to have an aortocaval fistula and surgically treated successfully, is presented along with a review of literature. PMID:12432197

  13. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection.

    PubMed

    Tweet, Marysia S; Gulati, Rajiv; Hayes, Sharonne N

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is an important etiology of nonatherosclerotic acute coronary syndrome, myocardial infarction, and sudden death. Innovations in the catheterization laboratory including optical coherence tomography and intravascular ultrasound have enhanced the ability to visualize intimal disruption and intramural hematoma associated with SCAD. Formerly considered "rare," these technological advances and heightened awareness suggest that SCAD is more prevalent than prior estimates. SCAD is associated with female sex, young age, extreme emotional stress, or extreme exertion, pregnancy, and fibromuscular dysplasia. The clinical characteristics and management strategies of SCAD patients are different than for atherosclerotic heart disease and deserve specific consideration. This review will highlight recent discoveries about SCAD as well as describe current efforts to elucidate remaining gaps in knowledge. PMID:27216840

  14. Spontaneous Iliac Vein Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Park, Hyung Sub; Lee, Taeseung

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous iliac vein rupture (SIVR) is a rare entity, which usually occurs without a precipitating factor, but can be a life-threatening emergency often requiring an emergency operation. This is a case report of SIVR in a 62-year-old female who presented to the emergency room with left leg swelling. Workup with contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a left leg deep vein thrombosis with May-Thurner syndrome and a hematoma in the pelvic cavity without definite evidence of arterial bleeding. She was managed conservatively without surgical intervention, and also underwent inferior vena cava filter insertion and subsequent anticoagulation therapy for pulmonary thromboembolism. This case shows that SIVR can be successfully managed with close monitoring and conservative management, and anticoagulation may be safely applied despite the patient presenting with venous bleeding. PMID:26217647

  15. Transesterification of waste vegetable oil under pulse sonication using ethanol, methanol and ethanol–methanol mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Guerra, Edith; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Pulse sonication effect on transesterification of waste vegetable oil was studied. • Effects of ethanol, methanol, and alcohol mixtures on FAMEs yield were evaluated. • Effect of ultrasonic intensity, power density, and its output rates were evaluated. • Alcohol mixtures resulted in higher biodiesel yields due to better solubility. - Abstract: This study reports on the effects of direct pulse sonication and the type of alcohol (methanol and ethanol) on the transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil without any external heating or mechanical mixing. Biodiesel yields and optimum process conditions for the transesterification reaction involving ethanol, methanol, and ethanol–methanol mixtures were evaluated. The effects of ultrasonic power densities (by varying sample volumes), power output rates (in W), and ultrasonic intensities (by varying the reactor size) were studied for transesterification reaction with ethanol, methanol and ethanol–methanol (50%-50%) mixtures. The optimum process conditions for ethanol or methanol based transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil were determined as: 9:1 alcohol to oil ratio, 1% wt. catalyst amount, 1–2 min reaction time at a power output rate between 75 and 150 W. It was shown that the transesterification reactions using ethanol–methanol mixtures resulted in biodiesel yields as high as >99% at lower power density and ultrasound intensity when compared to ethanol or methanol based transesterification reactions.

  16. Vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Musahid; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.; Belau, Leonid; Kostko, Oleg

    2008-05-12

    In this work we report on thevacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters. Clusters of methanol with water are generated via co-expansion of the gas phase constituents in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of methanol and water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuumultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Protonated methanol clusters of the form (CH3OH)nH + (n=1-12) dominate the mass spectrum below the ionization energy of the methanol monomer. With an increase in water concentration, small amounts of mixed clusters of the form (CH3OH)n(H2O)H + (n=2-11) are detected. The only unprotonated species observed in this work are the methanol monomer and dimer. Appearance energies are obtained from the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves for CH3OH +, (CH 3OH)2 +, (CH3OH)nH + (n=1-9), and (CH 3OH)n(H2O)H + (n=2-9 ) as a function of photon energy. With an increase in the water content in the molecular beam, there is an enhancement of photoionization intensity for methanol dimer and protonated methanol monomer at threshold. These results are compared and contrasted to previous experimental observations.

  17. Vacuum-Ultraviolet (VUV) Photoionization of Small Methanol and Methanol-Water Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kostko, Oleg; Belau, Leonid; Wilson, Kevin R.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2008-04-24

    In this work, we report on the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters. Clusters of methanol with water are generated via co-expansion of the gas phase constituents in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of methanol and water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Protonated methanol clusters of the form (CH3OH)nH+(n = 1-12) dominate the mass spectrum below the ionization energy of the methanol monomer. With an increase in water concentration, small amounts of mixed clusters of the form (CH3OH n(H2O)H+ (n = 2-11) are detected. The only unprotonated species observed in this work are the methanol monomer and dimer. Appearance energies are obtained from the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves for CH3OH+, (CH3OH)2+, (CH3OH)nH+ (n = 1-9), and (CH3OH)n(H2O)H+ (n = 2-9) as a function of photon energy. With an increasein the water content in the molecular beam, there is an enhancement of photoionization intensity for the methanol dimer and protonated methanol monomer at threshold. These results are compared and contrasted to previous experimental observations.

  18. Genetic and physical analyses of Methylobacterium organophilum XX genes encoding methanol oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Machlin, S.M.; Tam, P.E.; Bastien, C.A.; Hanson, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    When allyl alcohol was used as a suicide substrate, spontaneous mutants and UV light- and nitrous acid-generated mutants of Methylobacterium organophilum XX were selected which grew on methylamine but not on methanol. There was no detectable methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) activity in crude extracts of these mutants, yet Western blots revealed that some mutants still produced MDH protein. Complementation of 50 mutants by a cosmid gene bank of M. organophilum XX demonstrated that three major regions of the genome, each of which was separated by a minimum of 40 kilobases, were required for expression of active MDH. By subcloning and Tn5 insertion mutagenesis of subcloned fragments, at least 11 genes clustered within these three regions were subsequently identified. The identity of the MDH structural gene, which was initially determined by hybridization to the structural gene of Methylobacterium sp. strain AM1, was confirmed by Western blot analysis of an MDH-..beta..-galactosidase fusion protein.

  19. Microfluidic distillation chip for methanol concentration detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao-Nan; Liu, Chan-Chiung; Yang, Ruey-Jen; Ju, Wei-Jhong; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2016-03-17

    An integrated microfluidic distillation system is proposed for separating a mixed ethanol-methanol-water solution into its constituent components. The microfluidic chip is fabricated using a CO2 laser system and comprises a serpentine channel, a boiling zone, a heating zone, and a cooled collection chamber filled with de-ionized (DI) water. In the proposed device, the ethanol-methanol-water solution is injected into the microfluidic chip and driven through the serpentine channel and into the collection chamber by means of a nitrogen carrier gas. Following the distillation process, the ethanol-methanol vapor flows into the collection chamber and condenses into the DI water. The resulting solution is removed from the collection tank and reacted with a mixed indicator. Finally, the methanol concentration is inversely derived from the absorbance measurements obtained using a spectrophotometer. The experimental results show the proposed microfluidic system achieves an average methanol distillation efficiency of 97%. The practicality of the proposed device is demonstrated by detecting the methanol concentrations of two commercial fruit wines. It is shown that the measured concentration values deviate by no more than 3% from those obtained using a conventional bench top system. PMID:26920777

  20. Preferential oxidation of methanol and carbon monoxide for gas cleanup during methanol fuel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Birdsell, S.A.; Vanderborgh, N.E.; Inbody, M.A.

    1993-07-01

    Methanol fuel processing generates hydrogen for low-temperature, PEM fuel cell systems now being considered for transportation and other applications. Although liquid methanol fuel is convenient for this application, existing fuel processing techniques generate contaminants that degrade fuel cell performance. Through mathematical models and laboratory experiments chemical processing is described that removes CO and other contaminants from the anode feed stream.

  1. Spontaneous subgaleal aerocele.

    PubMed

    Ibe, M O N; Onu, D O; Igwe, N N

    2014-01-01

    Apart from reporting about a case of spontaneous subgaleal aerocele this paper looks at the possible causes and management also. A 35-year-old Igbo-Nigerian female, about 4 weeks post-natal, with a 10-month old steadily and gradually enlarging mass around the back of her head, including both temporal regions was referred to us. Plain skull radiographs showed air in this mass. Needle puncture produced air leading to immediate and complete flattening of the lesion. A few hours after this procedure while still in the hospital premises, she had generalized convulsions, for which she was hospitalized and treated. With no further attacks, her request for discharge the following day was granted. At the next visit, 7 days later, there was a re-accumulation, which was treated the same way as previously and with the same result. She has not reported back since then, though she was advised to visit us again in 7 day-time. This lesion should be considered when masses on the head are presented. Our health institutions should have adequate investigative facilities. PMID:24553041

  2. [Lazarus phenomenon: spontaneous resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Casielles García, J L; González Latorre, M V; Fernández Amigo, N; Guerra Vélz, A; Cotta Galán, M; Bravo Capaz, E; de las Mulas Béjar, M

    2004-01-01

    A 94-year-old woman undergoing surgery for simple repair of a duodenal perforation experienced a sudden massive hemorrhage (1500 mL) when the duodenum was separated from adjacent structures. Hemodynamic stability was re-established when fluids were replaced. After the abdominal wall was closed, increased amplitude of the QRS wave was observed and heart rate slowed until there was no pulse. Electromechanical dissociation (EMD) was diagnosed and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was started. When EMD persisted after 40 minutes, resuscitative measures were stopped and the ventilator was disconnected, though orotracheal intubation and arterial and electrocardiographic monitoring were maintained. After 2 or 3 minutes, heart rhythm restarted spontaneously and arterial pressure waves reappeared on the monitor. The patient progressed well for 72 hours, after which she developed septic shock and multiorgan failure, dying 18 days later. The Lazarus phenomenon may be more common than the medical literature would indicate, possibly because a large gap in our understanding of the pathophysiology of the phenomenon underlies anecdotes about "miracles". As we wait for adequate international consensus on a protocol for monitoring the withdrawal of resuscitative measures, we should act prudently before definitively certifying death. The case we report occurred during a surgical intervention in which the patient had received general anesthesia. We believe that the causes that might explain the Lazarus phenomenon are quite different in that context than they would be in a nonsurgical setting, such that it would be useful to create a national database to keep a record of such intraoperative events. PMID:15495638

  3. Spontaneous breaking of supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Zumino, B.

    1981-12-01

    There has been recently a revival of interest in supersymmetric gauge theories, stimulated by the hope that supersymmetry might help in clarifying some of the questions which remain unanswered in the so called Grand Unified Theories and in particular the gauge hierarchy problem. In a Grand Unified Theory one has two widely different mass scales: the unification mass M approx. = 10/sup 15/GeV at which the unification group (e.g. SU(5)) breaks down to SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) and the mass ..mu.. approx. = 100 GeV at which SU(2) x U(1) is broken down to the U(1) of electromagnetism. There is at present no theoretical understanding of the extreme smallness of the ratio ..mu../M of these two numbers. This is the gauge hierarchy problem. This lecture attempts to review the various mechanisms for spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in gauge theories. Most of the discussions are concerned with the tree approximation, but what is presently known about radiative correction is also reviewed.

  4. Neuropharmcological potential of methanolic extract and a triterpene isolated from Madhuca longifolia L leaves in mice.

    PubMed

    Inganakal, Triveni S; Ahmed, Md Liyakhat; Swamy, Paramjyothi

    2012-12-01

    The methanolic extract of M. longifolia (MLME) and a compound a triterpene, derivative of madhucic acid (dMA) isolated from the leaves of M. longifolia, were investigated for their possible neuropharmacological activities in mice using phenobarbitone induced sleeping time, spontaneous motor activity, marble burying test and Eddy's hot plate method. LD50 for MLME and dMA were 100 and 10 mg/kg of body weight, respectively. Both MLME and dMA (10 mg/kg and 2 mg/kg oral route respectively) exhibited significant increase in phenobarbitone induced sleeping time, greater reduction in spontaneous motor activity and marble burying activity, confirming their sedative nature. Both MLME and dMA also exhibited considerable antinociceptive activity in experimental animals. The results suggest that both MLME and dMA have CNS depressant activity in mice. PMID:23986969

  5. Methanol as a gasoline extender: a critique.

    PubMed

    Wigg, E E

    1974-11-29

    The tests conducted with the three vehicles at different emission control levels suggest that, in the area of fuel economy and emissions, potential benefits with methanol blends are related to carburetion and are only significant in the case of the rich-operating cars built before emission control standards were imposed. Theoretical considerations related to methanol's leaning effect on carburetion support this conclusion. Potential advantages for methanol in these areas are therefore continuously diminishing as the older cars leave the roads. At present, these older cars use only about one-fourth of the totalc motor gasoline consumed and, before methanol could be used on a large scale, this fraction would be much smaller. The use of methanol in gasoline would almost certainly create severe product quality problems. Water contamination could lead to phase separation in the distribution system and possibly in the car tank as well, and this would require additional investment in fuel handling and blending equipment. Excess fuel volatility in hot weather may also have adverse effects on car performance if the methanol blends include typical concentrations of butanes and pentanes. Removal of these light hydrocarbon components would detract from methanol's role as a gasoline extender and if current fuel volatility specifications were maintained, its use could lead to a net loss in the total available energy for use in motor fuels. Car performance problems associated with excessively lean operation would also be expected in the case of a significant proportion of late-model cars which are adjusted to operate on lean fuel-air mixtures. If methanol does become available in large quantities, these factors suggest that it would be more practical to use it for purposes other than those related to the extending of motor gasoline, such as for gas turbines used for electric power generation. In this case, the "pure" methanol would act as a cleanburning fuel, having none of the

  6. Study of core-shell platinum-based catalyst for methanol and ethylene glycol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, D.; Alon, M.; Burstein, L.; Rosenberg, Yu.; Peled, E.

    A Ru core-Pt shell, XC72-supported catalyst was synthesized in a two-step process: first, by deposition of Ru on XC72 by the polyol process and then by deposition of Pt on the XC72-supported Ru, with NaBH 4 as reducing agent. The structure and composition of this core-shell catalyst were determined by EDS, XPS, TEM and XRD. Electrochemical characterization was determined with the use of cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The methanol and ethylene glycol oxidation activities of the core-shell catalyst were studied at 80 °C and compared to those of a commercial catalyst. It was found to be significantly better (in terms of A g -1 of Pt) in the case of methanol oxidation and worse in the case of ethylene glycol oxidation. Possible reasons for the lower ethylene glycol oxidation activity of the core-shell catalyst are discussed.

  7. Opportunities for coal to methanol conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    The accumulations of mining residues in the anthracite coal regions of Pennsylvania offer a unique opportunity to convert the coal content into methanol that could be utilized in that area as an alternative to gasoline or to extend the supplies through blending. Additional demand may develop through the requirements of public utility gas turbines located in that region. The cost to run this refuse through coal preparation plants may result in a clean coal at about $17.00 per ton. After gasification and synthesis in a 5000 ton per day facility, a cost of methanol of approximately $3.84 per million Btu is obtained using utility financing. If the coal is to be brought in by truck or rail from a distance of approximately 60 miles, the cost of methanol would range between $4.64 and $5.50 per million Btu depending upon the mode of transportation. The distribution costs to move the methanol from the synthesis plant to the pump could add, at a minimum, $2.36 per million Btu to the cost. In total, the delivered cost at the pump for methanol produced from coal mining wastes could range between $6.20 and $7.86 per million Btu.

  8. Biotechnological production of methanol from waste biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, R.; Morris, D.

    1995-12-01

    The production of methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) from waste biomass is possible through the use of genetically modified bacteria. The biomass to methanol conversion process makes use of a naturally occurring, direct aerobic enzymatic system referred to as oxidative demethylation. Methoxy groups are stripped off of lignin and lignin like plant substances (approximately fifty percent of all plant biomass) and hydrolyzed to form methanol. Since the biotech process is stoichiometric, potentially every methoxy group in the lignin feedstock can be converted to methanol fuel. Approximately 30-35% of lignin is a methoxy compound that can be converted. Biotechnological conversion could produce up to 100 gallons/ton or 20 billion gallons a year of methanol from waste biomass. Current work has focused on the genetic modification of the enzymatic conversion process to reach commercial production. The goals of this research are; increase product yields, implement an operon {open_quotes}switch{close_quotes} mechanism to exploit multiple feedstocks, and produce environmentally safe by-products. Progress on these topics will be reported.

  9. Improved Anode for a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas; Narayanan, Sekharipuram

    2005-01-01

    A modified chemical composition has been devised to improve the performance of the anode of a direct methanol fuel cell. The main feature of the modified composition is the incorporation of hydrous ruthenium oxide into the anode structure. This modification can reduce the internal electrical resistance of the cell and increase the degree of utilization of the anode catalyst. As a result, a higher anode current density can be sustained with a smaller amount of anode catalyst. These improvements can translate into a smaller fuel-cell system and higher efficiency of conversion. Some background information is helpful for understanding the benefit afforded by the addition of hydrous ruthenium oxide. The anode of a direct methanol fuel cell sustains the electro-oxidation of methanol to carbon dioxide in the reaction CH3OH + H2O--->CO2 + 6H(+) + 6e(-). An electrocatalyst is needed to enable this reaction to occur. The catalyst that offers the highest activity is an alloy of approximately equal numbers of atoms of the noble metals platinum and ruthenium. The anode is made of a composite material that includes high-surface-area Pt/Ru alloy particles and a proton-conducting ionomeric material. This composite is usually deposited onto a polymer-electrolyte (proton-conducting) membrane and onto an anode gas-diffusion/current-collector sheet that is subsequently bonded to the proton-conducting membrane by hot pressing. Heretofore, the areal density of noble-metal catalyst typically needed for high performance has been about 8 mg/cm2. However, not all of the catalyst has been utilized in the catalyzed electro-oxidation reaction. Increasing the degree of utilization of the catalyst would make it possible to improve the performance of the cell for a given catalyst loading and/or reduce the catalyst loading (thereby reducing the cost of the cell). The use of carbon and possibly other electronic conductors in the catalyst layer has been proposed for increasing the utilization of the

  10. Methanol Emission from Leaves (Enzymatic Detection of Gas-Phase Methanol and Relation of Methanol Fluxes to Stomatal Conductance and Leaf Development).

    PubMed Central

    Nemecek-Marshall, M.; MacDonald, R. C.; Franzen, J. J.; Wojciechowski, C. L.; Fall, R.

    1995-01-01

    We recently reported the detection of methanol emissions from leaves (R. MacDonald, R. Fall [1993] Atmos Environ 27A: 1709-1713). This could represent a substantial flux of methanol to the atmosphere. Leaf methanol production and emission have not been investigated in detail, in part because of difficulties in sampling and analyzing methanol. In this study we used an enzymatic method to convert methanol to a fluorescent product and verified that leaves from several species emit methanol. Methanol was emitted almost exclusively from the abaxial surfaces of hypostomatous leaves but from both surfaces of amphistomatous leaves, suggesting that methanol exits leaves via stomates. The role of stomatal conductance was verified in experiments in which stomates were induced to close, resulting in reduced methanol. Free methanol was detected in bean leaf extracts, ranging from 26.8 [mu]g g-1 fresh weight in young leaves to 10.0 [mu]g g-1 fresh weight in older leaves. Methanol emission was related to leaf development, generally declining with increasing leaf age after leaf expansion; this is consistent with volatilization from a cellular pool that declines in older leaves. It is possible that leaf emission could be a major source of methanol found in the atmosphere of forests. PMID:12228547

  11. Methanol as an alternative automotive fuel: CMC's approach and experience

    SciTech Connect

    Ashton, P.M.; McCurdy, G.; Osler, C.F.

    1983-08-01

    This paper highlights experiences of Canadian Methanol Canadien (CMC) in demonstration of both methanol fuel and methanol-gasoline blends in Winnipeg since 1980 and describes CMC's commercial and technical approach to development of methanol as an alternative automotive fuel. CMC's marketing approach is to equip existing retail service station outlets with the capability to dispense a full slate of fuels (methanol, methanol containing gasolines, as well as conventional fuels) with fuel blending occurring at the service station location. In this way, the fuel distribution infrastructure can be put in place to service simultaneously both existing vehicles (with a range of methyl gasoline blends) and new methanol fuelled vehicles while assuming a high degree of blended fuel quality in a cost-effective manner. It is concluded that methanol and methanol containing gasolines are excellent transportation fuels for Canada and elsewhere, and can be readily integrated into existing transport fuel retail infrastructure.

  12. Methanol-use options study: Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    This volume contains data on the transportation and distribution of methanol fuels and end uses of methanol. Appendix D describes the transportation and distribution of pure methanol and methanol-gasoline blend fuels from production facilities to bulk terminals. It includes both the technical and commercial aspects of the distribution system. It indicates that the particular properties of methanol require slightly different technology than petroleum products for bulk distribution. Likewise, the adaptation of pure methanol and blends into the present petroleum products distribution system will require slight changes, both technical and commercial. Appendix E examines the use of methanol fuels in the transportation sector in terms of: (1) impacts on engine performance and engine design as well as passenger safety and health; (2) the implications for methanol fuels of government regulations and policies in the area of transportation; and finally, (3) the costs of methanol utilization in transportation for both the consumer and the manufacturer.

  13. Interstellar A-type methanol masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Q.; Lou, G. F.

    1990-02-01

    The formation conditions for A-type methanol masers are discussed. The correlation between A-type masers and external radiation fields is determined, with emphasis on the energy levels of A-type methanol and brightness temperature. Radiative transfer equations and statistical equilibrium are solved using a large velocity gradient model and the escape probability model. It is demonstrated that the 9(2)-10(1)A+ emission in W3(OH) and 7(0)-6(1)A in SgrB2 are masers, as discovered previously. The formation of the first type of masers requires pumping from an external radiation field, while the second type might be excited in the absence of an external radiation field. It is also pointed out that according to calculations there are A-type maser series similar to E-type methanol maser series of J2-J1E.

  14. Dynamic signature of molecular association in methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, C. E.; Self, J. L.; Copley, J. R. D.; Faraone, A.

    2016-07-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements and molecular dynamics simulations were combined to investigate the collective dynamics of deuterated methanol, CD3OD. In the experimentally determined dynamic structure factor, a slow, non-Fickian mode was observed in addition to the standard density-fluctuation heat mode. The simulation results indicate that the slow dynamical process originates from the hydrogen bonding of methanol molecules. The qualitative behavior of this mode is similar to the previously observed α-relaxation in supercooled water [M. C. Bellissent-Funel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3644 (2000)] which also originates from the formation and dissolution of hydrogen-bonded associates (supramolecular clusters). In methanol, however, this mode is distinguishable well above the freezing transition. This finding indicates that an emergent slow mode is not unique to supercooled water, but may instead be a general feature of hydrogen-bonding liquids and associating molecular liquids.

  15. Methanol and the productivity of tropical crops

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, T.U.

    1995-12-31

    Studies are being conducted in Trinidad and Tobago, St. Lucia and St. Kitts/Nevis to determine the effect of aqueous solutions of methanol on the growth and yield of a wide range of vegetable, field and perennial crops. The paper presents a summary of results to data for ten of the crops studied. Six of these crops, lettuce, sweet pepper, tomato, mango and breadfruit, have shown significant increases in growth or yield with methanol application, while others such as pigeon pea, rice, banana and cocoa have shown more limited responses. There appears to be some potential for the use of methanol in tropical crop production but further studies are required before this apparent potential can be harnessed.

  16. Efficient green methanol synthesis from glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Muhammad H.; Dummer, Nicholas F.; Knight, David W.; Jenkins, Robert L.; Howard, Mark; Moulijn, Jacob; Taylor, Stuart H.; Hutchings, Graham J.

    2015-12-01

    The production of biodiesel from the transesterification of plant-derived triglycerides with methanol has been commercialized extensively. Impure glycerol is obtained as a by-product at roughly one-tenth the mass of the biodiesel. Utilization of this crude glycerol is important in improving the viability of the overall process. Here we show that crude glycerol can be reacted with water over very simple basic or redox oxide catalysts to produce methanol in high yields, together with other useful chemicals, in a one-step low-pressure process. Our discovery opens up the possibility of recycling the crude glycerol produced during biodiesel manufacture. Furthermore, we show that molecules containing at least two hydroxyl groups can be converted into methanol, which demonstrates some aspects of the generality of this new chemistry.

  17. Methanol sensor operated in a passive mode

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2002-01-01

    A sensor outputs a signal related to a concentration of methanol in an aqueous solution adjacent the sensor. A membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is included with an anode side and a cathode side. An anode current collector supports the anode side of the MEA and has a flow channel therethrough for flowing a stream of the aqueous solution and forms a physical barrier to control access of the methanol to the anode side of the MEA. A cathode current collector supports the cathode side of the MEA and is configured for air access to the cathode side of the MEA. A current sensor is connected to measure the current in a short circuit across the sensor electrodes to provide an output signal functionally related to the concentration of methanol in the aqueous solution.

  18. Acute toxicity of methanol to mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Helmstetter, A.; Gamerdinger, A.P.; Pruell, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    Methanol is being promoted as an alternative fuel because of the clean air benefits of reduced carbon monoxide and other by-product emissions. In the event of an accidental spill or leakage from a storage tank, there is limited data available on the impact of alternative fuels on marine ecosystems. Before considering the impact of methanol on ecosystem processes, it is necessary to establish the acute toxicity. The blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) was selected for study because of its use as an indicator species of marine ecosystem health (Widdows and Donkin 1992). Our primary objective was to determine the LC-50 value of methanol to adult Mytilus edulis. We also not sublethal effects that were observed during the course of the 96-hr exposure. 16 refs., 1 fig. 3 tabs.

  19. Dynamic signature of molecular association in methanol.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, C E; Self, J L; Copley, J R D; Faraone, A

    2016-07-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements and molecular dynamics simulations were combined to investigate the collective dynamics of deuterated methanol, CD3OD. In the experimentally determined dynamic structure factor, a slow, non-Fickian mode was observed in addition to the standard density-fluctuation heat mode. The simulation results indicate that the slow dynamical process originates from the hydrogen bonding of methanol molecules. The qualitative behavior of this mode is similar to the previously observed α-relaxation in supercooled water [M. C. Bellissent-Funel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3644 (2000)] which also originates from the formation and dissolution of hydrogen-bonded associates (supramolecular clusters). In methanol, however, this mode is distinguishable well above the freezing transition. This finding indicates that an emergent slow mode is not unique to supercooled water, but may instead be a general feature of hydrogen-bonding liquids and associating molecular liquids. PMID:27394112

  20. Olefins from methanol by modified zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, T.; Takegami, Y.

    1982-11-01

    Compares the effects of modified catalysts (ZSM-34 and ZSM-5 class zeolites) on methanol conversion to olefins (MTO) with regard to olefin selectivity and cost. Presents tables with prices of olefins in the US and Japan; comparison of methanol-cracking with naphtha cracking; methanol conversion data for Type-1, Type-II and reference catalysts; hydrocarbon distribution from MTO processes; and speculative economics for MTO processes of Concept-1 and 2. Diagrams the proposed MTO process scheme. Scanning electron micrographs of the zeolite catalysts are shown. Graphs indicate the change of ethylene prices in the US since 1978 and forecast ethylene prices in several countries. Concludes that the prices of ethylene for both MTO processes examined compare favorably with products of conventional processes.

  1. On coherence in spontaneous emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, F. W.; Dorri, Ali

    1983-05-01

    The case of a single excited two-level atom emitting spontaneously in the presence of N unexcited atoms is solved exactly for emission into a single electromagnetic mode. The two-level atoms are in inequivalent mode positions.

  2. Quantifying global terrestrial methanol emissions using observations from the TES satellite sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, K. C.; Millet, D. B.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Shephard, M. W.; Henze, D. K.; Bousserez, N.; Apel, E. C.; de Gouw, J.; Warneke, C.; Singh, H. B.

    2014-03-01

    We employ new global space-based measurements of atmospheric methanol from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) with the adjoint of the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to quantify terrestrial emissions of methanol to the atmosphere. Biogenic methanol emissions in the model are based on version 2.1 of the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGANv2.1), using leaf area data from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and GEOS-5 assimilated meteorological fields. We first carry out a pseudo observation test to validate the overall approach, and find that the TES sampling density is sufficient to accurately quantify regional- to continental-scale methanol emissions using this method. A global inversion of two years of TES data yields an optimized annual global surface flux of 122 Tg yr-1 (including biogenic, pyrogenic, and anthropogenic sources), an increase of 60% from the a priori global flux of 76 Tg yr-1. Global terrestrial methanol emissions are thus nearly 25% those of isoprene (~540 Tg yr-1), and are comparable to the combined emissions of all anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (~100-200 Tg yr-1). Our a posteriori terrestrial methanol source leads to a strong improvement of the simulation relative to an ensemble of airborne observations, and corroborates two other recent top-down estimates (114-120 Tg yr-1) derived using in situ and space-based measurements. Inversions testing the sensitivity of optimized fluxes to model errors in OH, dry deposition, and oceanic uptake of methanol, as well as to the assumed a priori constraint, lead to global fluxes ranging from 118 to 126 Tg yr-1. The TES data imply a relatively modest revision of model emissions over most of the tropics, but a significant upward revision in midlatitudes, particularly over Europe and North America. We interpret the inversion results in terms of specific source types using the methanol : CO correlations measured by TES, and find that

  3. Photocatalytic conversion of methane to methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.E.; Noceti, R.P.; D`Este, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    A long-term goal of our research group is the exploration of novel pathways for the direct oxidation of methane to liquid fuels, chemicals, and intermediates. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol is attractive. The products of reaction, methanol and hydrogen, are both commercially desirable, methanol being used as is or converted to a variety of other chemicals, and the hydrogen could be utilized in petroleum and/or chemical manufacturing. Methane is produced as a by-product of coal gasification. Depending upon reactor design and operating conditions, up to 18% of total gasifier product may be methane. In addition, there are vast proven reserves of geologic methane in the world. Unfortunately, a large fraction of these reserves are in regions where there is little local demand for methane and it is not economically feasible to transport it to a market. There is a global research effort under way in academia, industry, and government to find methods to convert methane to useful, more readily transportable and storable materials. Methanol, the initial product of methane oxidation, is a desirable product of conversion because it retains much of the original energy of the methane while satisfying transportation and storage requirements. Investigation of direct conversion of methane to transportation fuels has been an ongoing effort at PETC for over 10 years. One of the current areas of research is the conversion of methane to methanol, under mild conditions, using light, water, and a semiconductor photocatalyst. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol, is attractive. Research in the laboratory is directed toward applying the techniques developed for the photocatalytic splitting of the water and the photochemical conversion of methane.

  4. Neuromuscular Functions on Experimental Acute Methanol Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Moral, Ali Reşat; Çankayalı, İlkin; Sergin, Demet; Boyacılar, Özden

    2015-01-01

    Objective The incidence of accidental or suicidal ingestion of methyl alcohol is high and methyl alcohol intoxication has high mortality. Methyl alcohol intoxication causes severe neurological sequelae and appears to be a significant problem. Methyl alcohol causes acute metabolic acidosis, optic neuropathy leading to permanent blindness, respiratory failure, circulatory failure and death. It is metabolised in the liver, and its metabolite formic acid has direct toxic effects, causing oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and increased lipid peroxidation associated with the mechanism of neurotoxicity. Methanol is known to cause acute toxicity of the central nervous system; however, the effects on peripheral neuromuscular transmission are unknown. In our study, we aimed to investigate the electrophysiological effects of experimentally induced acute methanol intoxication on neuromuscular transmission in the early period (first 24 h). Methods After approval by the Animal Experiment Ethics Committee of Ege University, the study was carried out on 10 Wistar rats, each weighing about 200 g. During electrophysiological recordings and orogastric tube insertion, the rats were anaesthetised using intra-peritoneal (IP) injection of ketamine 100 mg kg−1 and IP injection of xylazine 10 mg kg−1. The rats were given 3 g kg−1 methyl alcohol by the orogastric tube. Electrophysiological measurements from the gastrocnemius muscle were compared with baseline. Results Latency measurements before and 24 h after methanol injection were 0.81±0.11 ms and 0.76±0.12 ms, respectively. CMAP amplitude measurements before and 24 h after methanol injection were 9.85±0.98 mV and 9.99±0.40 mV, respectively. CMAP duration measurements before and 24 h after methanol injection were 9.86±0.03 ms and 9.86±0.045 ms, respectively. Conclusion It was concluded that experimental methanol intoxication in the acute phase (first 24 h) did not affect neuromuscular function. PMID:27366524

  5. Platinum-coated porous gold nanorods in methanol electrooxidation: dependence of catalytic activity on ligament size.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sang-Hoon; Liu, Lichun; Cho, Sang Hyun; Park, Sungho

    2012-12-01

    Here we demonstrate that, in the dealloying process of Au-Ag nanorods, temperature is the key parameter for producing porous Au nanorods with tunable ligament sizes. The vertically aligned Au-Ag alloy nanorods were first synthesized by the electrochemical co-deposition of Au and Ag onto anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane templates. Porous Au nanorods were then obtained by selectively etching Ag away from the precursor Au-Ag alloy nanorods. Control of the ligament size was achieved by controlling the dealloying temperature. Pt deposited on the porous Au nanorods with smaller ligaments exhibited a higher catalytic activity during methanol electrooxidation than those deposited on nanorods with larger ligaments produced by dealloying at higher temperatures. The strong dependence of the catalytic activity on the ligament size of porous Au is principally due to different amounts of carbon monoxide (CO) generated during methanol electrooxidation. Less CO was generated as the ligament size decreased. This finding is of importance for developing highly efficient cathode materials for carrying out methanol electrooxidation in practical applications in which porous Au with a large surface area is used as a supporting substrate. PMID:23023934

  6. Spin trapping of radicals in tritiated methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, A.

    1984-01-01

    The radicals in [methyl- 3H]-methanol have been detected by spin trapping with PBN. Two radicals observed in deaerated samples at 273 K are methoxy and hydroxymethyl radicals. The relative contribution of these two radicals changes with the storage time, finally only the PBNCH 2OH adduct being observed. This behaviour is hypothetically explained as resulting from the secondary reactions with a product formed in methanol by internal β-radiolysis or otherwise, whose steadily increasing concentration accelerates the decay of the PBNCH 3O adduct.

  7. Neat methanol fuel cell power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abens, S.; Farooque, M.

    1985-12-01

    Attention is given to a fuel cell development effort which has been directed, by ease-of-supply, low weight, and low volume criteria toward the use of undiluted methanol. Partial oxidation and internal water recovery concepts are incorporated, allowing the onboard dilution of methanol fuel through mixing with exhaust-recovered water. This scheme is successfully demonstrated for the case of a 3 kW unit employing commercial cross flow heat exchangers, as well as for a 5 kW reformer flue exhaust water recovery design with U.S. Air force baseload stationary applications. The USAF powerplant has an overall thermal efficiency of 32 percent at rated load.

  8. Acid Deposition

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator presents acid deposition trends in the contiguous U.S. from 1989 to 2007. Data are broken down by wet and dry deposition and deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds. Acid deposition is particularly damaging to lakes, streams, and forests and the plants and a...

  9. Water and methanol uptakes in Nafion membranes and membrane effects on direct methanol cell performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, X.; Springer, T.E.; Gottesfeld, S.

    2000-01-01

    This paper compares direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) employing two types of Nafion{reg{underscore}sign} (E.I.DuPont de Nemours and Company) membranes of different equivalent weight (EW). Methanol and water uptakes in 1,100 and 1,200 EW Nafion membranes were determined by weighing P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-dried and methanol solution-equilibrated membranes. Both methanol and water uptakes in the 1,200 EW membrane were about 70--74% of those in the 1,100 EW membrane. The methanol crossover rate corresponding to that in a DMFC at open circuit was measured using a voltammetric method in the DMFC configuration and under the same cell operating conditions. After accounting for the thickness difference between the membrane samples, the methanol crossover rate through a 1,200 EW membrane was 52% of that through an 1,100 EW membrane. To resolve the cathode and anode performances in an operating DMFC, a dynamic hydrogen electrode was used as a reference electrode. Results show that in an operating DMFC the cathode can be easily flooded, as shown in a DMFC using 1,100 EW membrane. An increase in methanol crossover rate decreases the DMFC cathode potential at open circuit. At a high cell current density, the DMFC cathode potential can approach that of a H{sub 2}/air cell.

  10. 37 GHz Methanol Masers : Horsemen of the Apocalypse for the Class II Methanol Maser Phase?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L.; Sobolev, A. M.; Voronkov, M. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Lo, N.

    2011-12-01

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3, and 38.5 GHz toward a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched toward regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesized to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  11. The Acid Catalyzed Nitration of Methanol: Formation of Methyl Nitrate via Aerosol Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riffel, Brent G.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Iraci, Laura T.

    2004-01-01

    The liquid phase acid catalyzed reaction of methanol with nitric acid to yield methyl nitrate under atmospheric conditions has been investigated using gas phase infrared spectroscopy. This nitration reaction is expected to occur in acidic aerosol particles found in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere as highly soluble methanol and nitric acid diffuse into these aerosols. Gaseous methyl nitrate is released upon formation, suggesting that some fraction of NO(x) may he liberated from nitric acid (methyl nitrate is later photolyzed to NO(x)) before it is removed from the atmosphere by wet deposition. Thus, this reaction may have important implications for the NO(x) budget. Reactions have been initiated in 45-62 wt% H2SO4 solutions at 10.0 C. Methyl nitrate production rates increased exponentially with acidity within the acidity regime studied. Preliminary calculations suggest that the nitronium ion (NO2(+) is the active nitrating agent under these conditions. The reaction order in methanol appears to depend on the water/methanol ratio and varies from first to zeroth order under conditions investigated. The nitration is first order in nitronium at all acidities investigated. A second order rate constant, kappa(sub 2), has been calculated to be 1 x 10(exp 8)/ M s when the reaction is first order in methanol. Calculations suggest the nitration is first order in methanol under tropospheric conditions. The infinitesimal percentage of nitric acid in the nitronium ion form in this acidity regime probably makes this reaction insignificant for the upper troposphere; however, this nitration may become significant in the mid stratosphere where colder temperatures increase nitric acid solubility and higher sulfuric acid content shifts nitric acid speciation toward the nitronium ion.

  12. Liquid phase methanol reactor staging process for the production of methanol

    DOEpatents

    Bonnell, Leo W.; Perka, Alan T.; Roberts, George W.

    1988-01-01

    The present invention is a process for the production of methanol from a syngas feed containing carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Basically, the process is the combination of two liquid phase methanol reactors into a staging process, such that each reactor is operated to favor a particular reaction mechanism. In the first reactor, the operation is controlled to favor the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide, and in the second reactor, the operation is controlled so as to favor the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide. This staging process results in substantial increases in methanol yield.

  13. Role of retinal metabolism in methanol-induced retinal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, C.D. |; Lee, E.W.; Terzo, T.S.; Louis-Ferdinand, R.T.

    1995-08-01

    Methanol is a toxicant that causes systemic and ocular toxicity after acute exposure. The folate-reduced (FR) rat is an excellent animal model that mimics characteristic human methanol toxic responses. The present study examines the role of the methanol metabolites formaldehyde and formate in the initiation of methanol-induced retinal toxicity. After a single oral dose of 3.0 g/kg methanol, blood methanol concentrations were not significantly different in FR rats compared with folate-sufficient (FS) (control) rats. However, FR rats treated with 3.0 g/kg methanol displayed elevated blood (14.6 mM) and vitreous humor (19.5 mM) formate levels and abnormal electroretinograms (loss of b-wave) 48 h postdose. FR rats pretreated with disulfiram (DSF) prior to 3.0 g/kg methanol treatment failed to display these symptoms. Formaldehyde was not detected in blood or vitreous humor with or without DSF treatment, suggesting that formate is the toxic metabolite in methanol-induced retinal toxicity. Additionally, creating a blood formate profile (14.2 mM at 48 h) similar to that observed in methanol-treated rats by iv infusion of pH-buffered formate does not alter the electroretinogram as is observed with methanol treatment. These data suggest that intraretinal metabolism of methanol is necessary for the formate-mediated initiation of methanol-induced retinal toxicity. 31 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. The Relationship among Spontaneity, Impulsivity, and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kipper, David A.; Green, Doreen J.; Prorak, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate two characteristics of spontaneity, its relationship to creativity and to impulsivity. We hypothesized a positive relationship between spontaneity and creativity, consistent with Moreno, 1953 "canon of spontaneity-creativity." We also predicted a negative relationship between spontaneity and…

  15. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  16. [Optic neuropathy in acute poisoning with methanol].

    PubMed

    Sekkat, A; Maillard, P; Dupeyron, G; Bensouda, J; Arne, J L; Bec, P

    1982-01-01

    The authors report four cases of methanol poisoning, two of which suffering acute bilateral optic neuropathy which secondarily leads to optic atrophy. The report the main clinical features of such a poisoning and the actual basis of its physiopathology and treatment. According to the four cases reported, they underline the importance of early diagnosis and specific treatment. PMID:7169508

  17. Methanex, Hoechst Celanese dissolve methanol partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, G.D.L.

    1993-03-31

    One of the many joint venture alliances recently announced in the petrochemical sector is ending in divorce. Hoechst Celanese Chemical (Dallas) and Methanex Corp. (Vancouver) are in the process of dissolving the partnership they had formed to restart Hoechst Celanese's methanol plant at Clear Lake, TX. Hoechst Celanese says it is actively seeking replacement partners and has several likely prospects, while Methanex is concentrating on its other ventures. Those include its just-completed acquisition of Fletcher Challenge's (Auckland, NZ) methanol business and a joint venture with American Cyanamid to convert an ammonia plant at Fortier, LA to methanol. Methanex will still be the world's largest producer of methanol. Officially, the negotiations between Methanex and Hoechst Celanese just broke down over the last month or so,' says Steve Yurich, operations manager for the Clear Lake plant. Market sources, however, say that Methanex found itself with too many irons in the fire' and pulled out before it ran into financial or perhaps even antitrust difficulties.

  18. A novel process for methanol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1991-01-01

    A bench-scale reactor is being used to conduct studies of the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol by a novel process. In previous reports, we provided evidence for a two step reaction in series, the carbonylation reaction mainly taking place in a non-equilibrium region in the vicinity of the Cu-chromite surface, and the hydrogenolysis reaction taking place on the surface of the Cu-chromite. The synergism between the two catalysts enhances the rate of methanol formation. In this quarter, we studied the effect of pressure and temperature on the rate of MeOH synthesis. We also compared the reaction rate of a syngas feed simulated for an H{sub 2}/CO ratio from a Texaco gasifier with a methanol balanced syngas feed (H{sub 2}/CO=2). Atomic absorption analysis of solid and liquid samples for the KOMe/Cu-chromite runs was undertaken to identify the distribution of potassium at the end of the methanol synthesis runs. Modelling studies were initiated with emphasis on both kinetic and process behavior. 12 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY OF INHALED METHANOL IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dr. Weiss and his colleagues conducted a controlled series of experiments in which they exposed pregnant rats and their newborn offspring to 4,500 parts per million (ppm) methanol by inhalation, and then submitted them to tests of behavioral function.

    Exposure to 4,500...

  20. Gasoline-methanol blends boost mileage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-17

    A 16-month study commissioned by the Bank of America reports that by blending gasoline with methanol, substantial increases in fuel economy can be obtained in late-model cars. Fuel economy was found to increase by 3% in 1975-79 models and by 13% in 1980 models. Operating costs were found to be lower, and there was an improvement in engine performance.

  1. THE SOLUBILITY OF ACID GASES IN METHANOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a thermodynamic model developed to predict phase-equilibrium behavior in a methanol/carbon-dioxide/nitrogen/hydrogen-sulfide system based on parameters determined from binary vapor/liquid equilibrium data available in the literature. Model predictions are com...

  2. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  3. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  4. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Improvements to non-acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  5. Metacridamide B methanol-d4 monosolvate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The title compound was extracted from conidia of the fungus Metarhizium acridum. Crystals were obtained as a methanol-d4 solvate. The tail part of the 4-methylhexan-2-yl group exhibits disorder over two positions, with an occupancy ratio of 0.682 (9):0.318 (9). The crystal structure confirms the abs...

  6. Approach to the Treatment of Methanol Intoxication.

    PubMed

    Kraut, Jeffrey A

    2016-07-01

    Methanol intoxication is an uncommon but serious poisoning. Its adverse effects are due primarily to the impact of its major metabolite formic acid and lactic acid resulting from cellular hypoxia. Symptoms including abdominal pain and loss of vision can appear a few hours to a few days after exposure, reflecting the time necessary for accumulation of the toxic byproducts. In addition to a history of exposure, increases in serum osmolal and anion gaps can be clues to its presence. However, increments in both parameters can be absent depending on the nature of the toxic alcohol, time of exposure, and coingestion of ethanol. Definitive diagnosis requires measurement with gas or liquid chromatography, which are laborious and expensive procedures. Tests under study to detect methanol or its metabolite formate might facilitate the diagnosis of this poisoning. Treatment can include administration of ethanol or fomepizole, both inhibitors of the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase to prevent formation of its metabolites, and hemodialysis to remove methanol and formate. In this Acid-Base and Electrolyte Teaching Case, a patient with methanol intoxication due to ingestion of model airplane fuel is described, and the value and limitations of current and new diagnostic and treatment measures are discussed. PMID:27180631

  7. HYDROGEN BONDING IN THE METHANOL DIMER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this work, two methanol molecules are placed in different arrangements to study hydrogen bonding in carbohydrate materials such as cellulose. Energy was calculated as a function of both hydrogen bond length and angle over wide ranges, using quantum mechanics (QM). The QM wavefunctions are analyze...

  8. Methanol Steam Reformer on a Silicon Wafer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Malen, J; Piggott, T; Morse, J; Sopchak, D; Greif, R; Grigoropoulos, C; Havstad, M; Upadhye, R

    2004-04-15

    A study of the reforming rates, heat transfer and flow through a methanol reforming catalytic microreactor fabricated on a silicon wafer are presented. Comparison of computed and measured conversion efficiencies are shown to be favorable. Concepts for insulating the reactor while maintaining small overall size and starting operation from ambient temperature are analyzed.

  9. Methanol decomposition bottoming cycle for IC engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purohit, G.; Houseman, J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of methanol decomposition using engine exhaust heat, and examines its potential for use in the operation of passenger cars, diesel trucks, and diesel-electric locomotives. Energy economy improvements of 10-20% are calculated over the representative driving cycles without a net loss in power. Some reductions in exhaust emissions are also projected.

  10. Optimized fuel cell grade hydrogen from methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongtaek

    2003-10-01

    To evaluate reaction rates liar making hydrogen from methanol, kinetic studies of methanol decomposition, methanol steam reforming, water gas shift reaction, and CO selective oxidation have been performed. These reactions were studied in a micro reactor testing unit using a commercial Cu-ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst for the first three reactions and Pt-Fe/gamma-alumina catalyst for the last reaction. The activity tests were performed between 120˜325°C and atmospheric pressure with a range of feed rates and compositions. For methanol decomposition, water addition to the feed increased the yield of hydrogen and reduced the formation of by-products. XPS analysis of used catalyst samples and time on-stream data showed that the Cu2+ oxidation state of copper favors methanol decomposition. A simplified reaction network of 5 elementary reactions was proposed and all five rate expressions were obtained using non-linear least squares optimization, numerical integration of a one-dimensional PFR model, and extensive experimental data. Similar numerical analysis was carried out to obtain the rate expressions for methanol steam reaction, the water gas shift reaction, and CO selective oxidation. For the kinetics of the water gas shift reaction, an empirical rate expression was obtained from the experimental data. Based on a review of published work on the WGS reaction mechanism, our study found that a rate expression derived from a regenerative mechanism and another rate expression derived from adsorptive mechanism fit the experimental data equally well. For the kinetics of CO preferential oxidation, a reaction model in which three reactions (CO oxidation, H2 oxidation and the WGS reaction) occur simultaneously was chosen to predict the reactor performance. In particular the reverse water gas shift reaction had an important role when fitting the experimental data precisely and explained the selectivity decrease at higher reaction temperatures. Combining the three reactors and several

  11. Novel Formaldehyde-Activating Enzyme in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 Required for Growth on Methanol

    PubMed Central

    Vorholt, Julia A.; Marx, Christopher J.; Lidstrom, Mary E.; Thauer, Rudolf K.

    2000-01-01

    Formaldehyde is toxic for all organisms from bacteria to humans due to its reactivity with biological macromolecules. Organisms that grow aerobically on single-carbon compounds such as methanol and methane face a special challenge in this regard because formaldehyde is a central metabolic intermediate during methylotrophic growth. In the α-proteobacterium Methylobacterium extorquens AM1, we found a previously unknown enzyme that efficiently catalyzes the removal of formaldehyde: it catalyzes the condensation of formaldehyde and tetrahydromethanopterin to methylene tetrahydromethanopterin, a reaction which also proceeds spontaneously, but at a lower rate than that of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. Formaldehyde-activating enzyme (Fae) was purified from M. extorquens AM1 and found to be one of the major proteins in the cytoplasm. The encoding gene is located within a cluster of genes for enzymes involved in the further oxidation of methylene tetrahydromethanopterin to CO2. Mutants of M. extorquens AM1 defective in Fae were able to grow on succinate but not on methanol and were much more sensitive toward methanol and formaldehyde. Uncharacterized orthologs to this enzyme are predicted to be encoded by uncharacterized genes from archaea, indicating that this type of enzyme occurs outside the methylotrophic bacteria. PMID:11073907

  12. On the classification and list of transitions of methanol masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, A. M.

    A classification of methanol masers according to the type of maser sources is suggested. The list of candidates to be methanol masering transitions is compiled on the basis of general regularities analysis combined with results of statistical equilibrium calculations.

  13. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Aricò, Antonino S.; Sebastian, David; Schuster, Michael; Bauer, Bernd; D’Urso, Claudia; Lufrano, Francesco; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion® were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK), new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) systems, and composite zirconium phosphate–PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was higher than the benchmark Nafion® 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm−2 vs. 64 mW·cm−2). This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm−2 equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm−2 for Nafion® 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol) and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm2 for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm2 for Nafion® 115). PMID:26610582

  14. Optical antenna enhanced spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Eggleston, Michael S; Messer, Kevin; Zhang, Liming; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C

    2015-02-10

    Atoms and molecules are too small to act as efficient antennas for their own emission wavelengths. By providing an external optical antenna, the balance can be shifted; spontaneous emission could become faster than stimulated emission, which is handicapped by practically achievable pump intensities. In our experiments, InGaAsP nanorods emitting at ∼ 200 THz optical frequency show a spontaneous emission intensity enhancement of 35 × corresponding to a spontaneous emission rate speedup ∼ 115 ×, for antenna gap spacing, d = 40 nm. Classical antenna theory predicts ∼ 2,500 × spontaneous emission speedup at d ∼ 10 nm, proportional to 1/d(2). Unfortunately, at d < 10 nm, antenna efficiency drops below 50%, owing to optical spreading resistance, exacerbated by the anomalous skin effect (electron surface collisions). Quantum dipole oscillations in the emitter excited state produce an optical ac equivalent circuit current, I(o) = qω|x(o)|/d, feeding the antenna-enhanced spontaneous emission, where q|x(o)| is the dipole matrix element. Despite the quantum-mechanical origin of the drive current, antenna theory makes no reference to the Purcell effect nor to local density of states models. Moreover, plasmonic effects are minor at 200 THz, producing only a small shift of antenna resonance frequency. PMID:25624503

  15. Optical antenna enhanced spontaneous emission

    PubMed Central

    Eggleston, Michael S.; Messer, Kevin; Zhang, Liming; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C.

    2015-01-01

    Atoms and molecules are too small to act as efficient antennas for their own emission wavelengths. By providing an external optical antenna, the balance can be shifted; spontaneous emission could become faster than stimulated emission, which is handicapped by practically achievable pump intensities. In our experiments, InGaAsP nanorods emitting at ∼200 THz optical frequency show a spontaneous emission intensity enhancement of 35× corresponding to a spontaneous emission rate speedup ∼115×, for antenna gap spacing, d = 40 nm. Classical antenna theory predicts ∼2,500× spontaneous emission speedup at d ∼ 10 nm, proportional to 1/d2. Unfortunately, at d < 10 nm, antenna efficiency drops below 50%, owing to optical spreading resistance, exacerbated by the anomalous skin effect (electron surface collisions). Quantum dipole oscillations in the emitter excited state produce an optical ac equivalent circuit current, Io = qω|xo|/d, feeding the antenna-enhanced spontaneous emission, where q|xo| is the dipole matrix element. Despite the quantum-mechanical origin of the drive current, antenna theory makes no reference to the Purcell effect nor to local density of states models. Moreover, plasmonic effects are minor at 200 THz, producing only a small shift of antenna resonance frequency. PMID:25624503

  16. Methane and methanol oxidation in supercritical water: Chemical kinetics and hydrothermal flame studies

    SciTech Connect

    Steeper, R.R.

    1996-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is an emerging technology for the treatment of wastes in the presence of a large concentration of water at conditions above water`s thermodynamic critical point. A high-pressure, optically accessible reaction cell was constructed to investigate the oxidation of methane and methanol in this environment. Experiments were conducted to examine both flame and non-flame oxidation regimes. Optical access enabled the use of normal and shadowgraphy video systems for visualization, and Raman spectroscopy for in situ measurement of species concentrations. Flame experiments were performed by steadily injecting pure oxygen into supercritical mixtures of water and methane or methanol at 270 bar and at temperatures from 390 to 510{degrees}C. The experiments mapped conditions leading to the spontaneous ignition of diffusion flames in supercritical water. Above 470{degrees}C, flames spontaneously ignite in mixtures containing only 6 mole% methane or methanol. This data is relevant to the design and operation of commercial SCWO processes that may be susceptible to inadvertent flame formation. Non-flame oxidation kinetics experiments measured rates of methane oxidation in supercritical water at 270 bar and at temperatures from 390 to 442{degrees}C. The initial methane concentration was nominally 0.15 gmol/L, a level representative of commercial SCWO processes. The observed methane concentration histories were fit to a one-step reaction rate expression indicating a reaction order close to two for methane and zero for oxygen. Experiments were also conducted with varying water concentrations (0 to 8 gmol/L) while temperature and initial reactant concentrations were held constant. The rate of methane oxidation rises steadily with water concentration up to about 5 gmol/L and then abruptly falls off at higher concentrations.

  17. Methanol production from Eucalyptus wood chips. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-06-01

    This feasibility study includes all phases of methanol production from seedling to delivery of finished methanol. The study examines: production of 55 million, high quality, Eucalyptus seedlings through tissue culture; establishment of a Eucalyptus energy plantation on approximately 70,000 acres; engineering for a 100 million gallon-per-day methanol production facility; potential environmental impacts of the whole project; safety and health aspects of producing and using methanol; and development of site specific cost estimates.

  18. Spontaneous resorption of calcification at the long head of the biceps tendon

    PubMed Central

    Amri, Adriansyah; Nakai, Sho; Hara, Michiharu; Yamanaka, Issei; Hamawaki, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Calcific tendinitis of the long head of the biceps tendon is a rare cause of shoulder pain. Calcium deposits are often spontaneously resorbed or reduced in size in the rotator cuff tendons, which represent the most common sites of calcific tendinitis around the shoulder. To our knowledge, no case of spontaneous resorption of calcification in the long head of the biceps tendon has been reported in the literature. Here, we report one such case and describe its successful treatment using a conservative approach.

  19. Acidities of Water and Methanol in Aqueous Solution and DMSO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Daqing

    2009-01-01

    The relative acidities of water and methanol have been a nagging issue. In gas phase, methanol is more acidic than water by 36.0 kJ/mol; however, in aqueous solution, the acidities of methanol and water are almost identical. The acidity of an acid in solution is determined by both the intrinsic gas-phase ionization Gibbs energy and the solvent…

  20. THERMOREGULATORY EFFECTS OF METHANOL IN FISCHER AND LONG EVANS RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    While methanol neurotoxicity has been studied for decades, there are very few data available on the thermoregulatory effects of methanol exposure. his paper will present the results of three studies designed to assess the effects of methanol on body temperature and behavioral the...

  1. Tungsten carbides as potential alternative direct methanol fuel cell anode electrocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellner, Michael

    The reduction of precious metal loading and the improvement of sluggish kinetics at the anode electrocatalyst are two primary concerns for economical development of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC). The purpose of this research is to examine the feasibility of using tungsten carbides as alternative fuel cell anode electrocatalysts. The anodic chemistry of the direct methanol fuel cell requires the oxidation of methanol and the decomposition of water to produce protons, electrons, and gas-phase CO2. Currently, the most effective anode electrocatalyst for DMFC is the Pt/Ru bimetallic catalyst, which efficiently oxidizes methanol, as well as decomposes water for the oxidation and removal of adsorbed CO species. Although the Pt/Ru bimetallic system exhibits desirable electrochemical activities, both Pt and Ru are expensive due to limited supplies. In addition, strong chemisorption of CO on Pt and Ru makes the electrocatalyst susceptible to CO poisoning, blocking the active sites for methanol oxidation. This work began by examining the reactions of methanol, water, and CO on carbide-modified tungsten (C/W) single crystal surfaces, with and without submonolayer coverages of Pt. These fundamental surface science results demonstrated the potential for tungsten carbides to be used as anode catalysts in DMFC, exhibiting decomposition of both methanol and water along with significantly lowered CO desorption temperatures. Additionally, submonolayer Pt-modification of the C/W surfaces resulted in a synergistic effect, eliminating the undesired reaction pathway on the C/W surface that produced gas-phase CH4. To bridge the materials gap between model single crystal surfaces and the more realistic thin film electrocatalysts, polycrystalline tungsten carbide thin films were created via physical vapor deposition (PVD) and carburization of polycrystalline tungsten foil. Fundamental surface science techniques were applied to the PVD films to examine the reaction pathways of DMFC

  2. Children spontaneously police adults' transgressions.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Gail D; Chiu Loke, Ivy; Lee, Kang

    2016-10-01

    Maintaining social order requires the policing of transgressions. Prior research suggests that policing emerges early in life, but little is known about children's engagement in such behavior in live interactions where there is uncertainty about the consequences. In this study, 4- to 11-year-old children (N=158) witnessed an unfamiliar adult confederate intentionally destroy another adult's property. Of interest was whether children would engage in policing behavior by protesting to the transgressor or by spontaneously reporting the transgression to a third party. Some children engaged in these behaviors spontaneously; nearly half (42%) protested the transgression, and 27% reported it without being prompted. Even when children did not spontaneously report the transgression, they almost always reported it when asked directly. The findings show that children commonly engage in policing even in the face of potentially negative consequences. PMID:27295206

  3. [Three cases of spontaneous pneumomediastinum].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kashin; Tachikawa, Soichi; Horiguchi, Takahiko; Kondo, Rieko; Shiga, Mamoru; Hirose, Masahiro; Sasaki, Yasushi; Torigoe, Hiroshi

    2006-04-01

    We encountered 3 male patients with spontaneous pneumomediastinum. The patients were a 16-year old and a 17-year old and a 24-year old. Predisposing episodes for the development of spontaneous pneumomediastinum could be identified in all 3 patients: throwing a ball during a baseball game in 1, lifting a heavy load during work in 2. However, they were healthy and suddenly developed symptoms in the absence of any underlying disease. The presenting complaint was chest pain in all 3 patients. Chest X-ray films and chest CT images revealed pneumomediastinum. A diagnosis of spontaneous pneumomediastinum was made based on chest X-ray films and chest CT images. After conservative treatment, all 3 patients recovered. PMID:16681254

  4. Spontaneous baryogenesis from asymmetric inflaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Fuminobu; Yamada, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    We propose a variant scenario of spontaneous baryogenesis from asymmetric inflaton based on current-current interactions between the inflaton and matter fields with a non-zero B - L charge. When the inflaton starts to oscillate around the minimum after inflation, it may lead to excitation of a CP-odd component, which induces an effective chemical potential for the B - L number through the current-current interactions. We study concrete inflation models and show that the spontaneous baryogenesis scenario can be naturally implemented in the chaotic inflation in supergravity.

  5. Spontaneous Scalarization of Massive Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramazanoglu, Fethi M.; Pretorius, Frans

    2014-03-01

    Spontaneous scalarization is a phenomenon in certain scalar-tensor theories where large deviations from general relativity can be observed inside compact stars, while the known observational bounds can also be satisfied far away. This scenario has been investigated for massless scalars and binary neutron stars using numerical relativity, but the parameter space for such theories have been severely restricted by recent observations. Here, we present our results on the spontaneous scalarization of massive scalars. We simulate cases with different equations of state and scalar field parameters, and comment on the detectability of the scalar field effects from the gravitational wave signal.

  6. Flow Friction or Spontaneous Ignition?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Gallus, Timothy D.; Sparks, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    "Flow friction," a proposed ignition mechanism in oxygen systems, has proved elusive in attempts at experimental verification. In this paper, the literature regarding flow friction is reviewed and the experimental verification attempts are briefly discussed. Another ignition mechanism, a form of spontaneous combustion, is proposed as an explanation for at least some of the fire events that have been attributed to flow friction in the literature. In addition, the results of a failure analysis performed at NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility are presented, and the observations indicate that spontaneous combustion was the most likely cause of the fire in this 2000 psig (14 MPa) oxygen-enriched system.

  7. Torsion-rotation intensities in methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, John

    Methanol exists in numerous kinds of astronomical objects featuring a wide range of local conditions. The light nature of the molecule coupled with the internal rotation of the methyl group with respect to the hydroxyl group results in a rich, strong spectrum that spans the entire far-infrared region. As a result, any modest size observational window will have a number of strong methanol transitions. This has made it the gas of choice for testing THz receivers and to extract the local physical conditions from observations covering small frequency windows. The latter has caused methanol to be dubbed the Swiss army knife of astrophysics. Methanol has been increasingly used in this capacity and will be used even more for subsequent investigations into the Herschel archive, and with SOFIA and ALMA. Interpreting physical conditions on the basis of a few methanol lines requires that the molecular data, line positions, intensities, and collision rates, be complete, consistent and accurate to a much higher level than previously required for astrophysics. The need for highly reliable data is even more critical for modeling the two classes of widespread maser action and many examples of optical pumping through the torsional bands. Observation of the torsional bands in the infrared will be a unique opportunity to directly connect JWST observations with those of Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA. The theory for the intensities of torsion-rotation transitions in a molecule featuring a single internally rotating methyl group is well developed after 70 years of research. However, other than a recent very preliminary and not completely satisfactory investigation of a few CH3OH torsional bands, this theory has never been experimentally tested for any C3V internal rotor. More alarming is a set of recent intensity calibrated microwave measurements that showed deviations relative to calculations of up to 50% in some ground state rotational transitions commonly used by astronomers to extract

  8. A pharmacokinetic model of inhaled methanol in humans and comparison to methanol disposition in mice and rats.

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, R A; Ward, K W; Pollack, G M

    1995-01-01

    We estimated kinetic parameters associated with methanol disposition in humans from data reported in the literature. Michaelis-Menten elimination parameters (Vmax = 115 mg/L/hr; Km = 460 mg/L) were selected for input into a semi-physiologic pharmacokinetic model. We used reported literature values for blood or urine methanol concentrations in humans and nonhuman primates after methanol inhalation as input to an inhalation disposition model that evaluated the absorption of methanol, expressed as the fraction of inhaled methanol concentration that was absorbed (phi). Values of phi for nonexercising subjects typically varied between 0.64 and 0.75; 0.80 was observed to be a reasonable upper boundary for fractional absorption. Absorption efficiency in exercising subjects was lower than that in resting individuals. Incorporation of the kinetic parameters and phi into a pharmacokinetic model of human exposure to methanol, compared to a similar analysis in rodents, indicated that following an 8-hr exposure to 5000 ppm of methanol vapor, blood methanol concentrations in the mouse would be 13- to 18-fold higher than in humans exposed to the same methanol vapor concentration; blood methanol concentrations in the rat under similar conditions would be 5-fold higher than in humans. These results demonstrate the importance in the risk assessment for methanol of basing extrapolations from rodents to humans on actual blood concentrations rather than on methanol vapor exposure concentrations. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 5. C PMID:7588485

  9. Rapid detection of methanol in artisanal alcoholic beverages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Goes, R. E.; Muller, M.; Fabris, J. L.

    2015-09-01

    In the industry of artisanal beverages, uncontrolled production processes may result in contaminated products with methanol, leading to risks for consumers. Owing to the similar odor of methanol and ethanol, as well as their common transparency, the distinction between them is a difficult task. Contamination may also occur deliberately due to the lower price of methanol when compared to ethanol. This paper describes a spectroscopic method for methanol detection in beverages based on Raman scattering and Principal Component Analysis. Associated with a refractometric assessment of the alcohol content, the method may be applied in field for a rapid detection of methanol presence.

  10. Compact Fuel-Cell System Would Consume Neat Methanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Kindler, Andrew; Valdez, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    In a proposed direct methanol fuel-cell electric-power-generating system, the fuel cells would consume neat methanol, in contradistinction to the dilute aqueous methanol solutions consumed in prior direct methanol fuel-cell systems. The design concept of the proposed fuel-cell system takes advantage of (1) electro-osmotic drag and diffusion processes to manage the flows of hydrogen and water between the anode and the cathode and (2) evaporative cooling for regulating temperature. The design concept provides for supplying enough water to the anodes to enable the use of neat methanol while ensuring conservation of water for the whole fuel-cell system.

  11. Platinum Nickel Nanowires as Methanol Oxidation Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Alia, Shaun M.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Neyerlin, Kenneth C.; Kocha, Shyam S.; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2015-08-27

    We investigated platinum(Pt) nickel (Ni) nanowires (PtNiNWs) as methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) catalysts in rotating disk electrode (RDE) half-cells under acidic conditions. Pt-ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles have long been the state of the art MOR catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) where Ru provides oxophilic sites, lowering the potential for carbon monoxide oxidation and the MOR onset. Ru, however, is a precious metal that has long term durability concerns. Ni/Ni oxide species offer a potential to replace Ru in MOR electrocatalysis. PtNiNWs were investigated for MOR and oxygen annealing was investigated as a route to improve catalyst performance (mass activity 65% greater) and stability to potential cycling. Our results presented show that PtNiNWs offer significant promise in the area, but also result in Ni ion leaching that is a concern requiring further evaluation in fuel cells.

  12. Depolymerization of polyethylene terephthalate in supercritical methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Motonobu; Koyamoto, Hiroshi; Kodama, Akio; Hirose, Tsutomu; Nagaoka, Shoji

    2002-11-01

    The degradation of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) in supercritical methanol was investigated with the aim of developing a process for chemical recycling of waste plastics. A batch reactor was used at temperatures of 573-623 K under an estimated pressure of 20 MPa for a reaction time of 2-120 min. PET was decomposed to its monomers, dimethyl terephthalate and ethylene glycol, by methanolysis in supercritical methanol. The reaction products were analysed using size-exclusion chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and reversed-phase liquid chromatography. The molecular weight distribution of the products was obtained as a function of reaction time. The yields of monomer components of the decomposition products including by-products were measured. Continuous kinetics analysis was performed on the experimental data.

  13. Platinum Nickel Nanowires as Methanol Oxidation Electrocatalysts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alia, Shaun M.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Neyerlin, Kenneth C.; Kocha, Shyam S.; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2015-08-27

    We investigated platinum(Pt) nickel (Ni) nanowires (PtNiNWs) as methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) catalysts in rotating disk electrode (RDE) half-cells under acidic conditions. Pt-ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles have long been the state of the art MOR catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) where Ru provides oxophilic sites, lowering the potential for carbon monoxide oxidation and the MOR onset. Ru, however, is a precious metal that has long term durability concerns. Ni/Ni oxide species offer a potential to replace Ru in MOR electrocatalysis. PtNiNWs were investigated for MOR and oxygen annealing was investigated as a route to improve catalyst performance (mass activitymore » 65% greater) and stability to potential cycling. Our results presented show that PtNiNWs offer significant promise in the area, but also result in Ni ion leaching that is a concern requiring further evaluation in fuel cells.« less

  14. Spontaneous Number Representation in Mosquitofish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadda, Marco; Piffer, Laura; Agrillo, Christian; Bisazza, Angelo

    2009-01-01

    While there is convincing evidence that preverbal human infants and non-human primates can spontaneously represent number, considerable debate surrounds the possibility that such capacity is also present in other animals. Fish show a remarkable ability to discriminate between different numbers of social companions. Previous work has demonstrated…

  15. Toddlers' Spontaneous Attention to Number

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baroody, Arthur J.; Li, Xia; Lai, Meng-lung

    2008-01-01

    Hannula and Lehtinen (2001, 2005) defined spontaneous focusing on numerosity (SFON) as the tendency to notice the relatively abstract attribute of number despite the presence of other attributes. According to nativists, an innate concept of one to three directs young children's attention to these "intuitive numbers" in everyday situations--even…

  16. Student Experiments in Spontaneous Fission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becchetti, F. D.; Ying, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    Advanced undergraduate experiments utilizing a commercially available, thin spontaneous fission source are described, including studies of the energy and mass distribution of the fission fragments and their energy and angular correlation. The experiments provide a useful introduction to fission, nuclear mass equations, heavy-ion physics, and…

  17. Supercritical methanol for polyethylene terephthalate depolymerization: observation using simulator.

    PubMed

    Genta, Minoru; Iwaya, Tomoko; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Goto, Motonobu

    2007-01-01

    To apply PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol to commercial recycling, the benefits of supercritical methanol usage in PET depolymerization was investigated from the viewpoint of the reaction rate and energy demands. PET was depolymerized in a batch reactor at 573 K in supercritical methanol under 14.7 MPa and in vapor methanol under 0.98 MPa in our previous work. The main products of both reactions were the PET monomers of dimethyl terephthalate (DMT) and ethylene glycol (EG). The rate of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol was faster than that of PET depolymerization in vapor methanol. This indicates supercritical fluid is beneficial in reducing reaction time without the use of a catalyst. We depicted the simple process flow of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol and in vapor methanol, and by simulation evaluated the total heat demand of each process. In this simulation, bis-hydroxyethyl terephthalate (BHET) was used as a model component of PET. The total heat demand of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol was 2.35 x 10(6)kJ/kmol Produced-DMT. That of PET depolymerization in vapor methanol was 2.84 x 10(6)kJ/kmol Produced-DMT. The smaller total heat demand of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol clearly reveals the advantage of using supercritical fluid in terms of energy savings. PMID:16914302

  18. Supercritical methanol for polyethylene terephthalate depolymerization: Observation using simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Genta, Minoru; Iwaya, Tomoko; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Goto, Motonobu

    2007-07-01

    To apply PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol to commercial recycling, the benefits of supercritical methanol usage in PET depolymerization was investigated from the viewpoint of the reaction rate and energy demands. PET was depolymerized in a batch reactor at 573 K in supercritical methanol under 14.7 MPa and in vapor methanol under 0.98 MPa in our previous work. The main products of both reactions were the PET monomers of dimethyl terephthalate (DMT) and ethylene glycol (EG). The rate of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol was faster than that of PET depolymerization in vapor methanol. This indicates supercritical fluid is beneficial in reducing reaction time without the use of a catalyst. We depicted the simple process flow of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol and in vapor methanol, and by simulation evaluated the total heat demand of each process. In this simulation, bis-hydroxyethyl terephthalate (BHET) was used as a model component of PET. The total heat demand of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol was 2.35 x 10{sup 6} kJ/kmol Produced-DMT. That of PET depolymerization in vapor methanol was 2.84 x 10{sup 6} kJ/kmol Produced-DMT. The smaller total heat demand of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol clearly reveals the advantage of using supercritical fluid in terms of energy savings.

  19. Towards oil independence through renewable methanol chemistry.

    PubMed

    Olah, George A

    2013-01-01

    Recycling of CO(2) into methanol, dimethyl ether (DME), and derived fuels and materials is a feasible approach to address our carbon conundrum. It would free humankind from its dependence on fossil fuel while at the same time help mitigate the problems associated with excessive CO(2) emission. The energy needed for this carbon cycle can come from renewable sources (hydro, solar, wind) as well as atomic energy. PMID:23208664

  20. Isotopic quantum effects in liquid methanol.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Ralf

    2005-07-11

    Density functional calculations (B3 LYP/6-31+G*) on molecular clusters and a quantum cluster equilibrium (QCE) model were used to calculate thermodynamic and structural properties of four isotopically labeled methanol species. The method allowed the reproduction of the characteristic differences in boiling points and heats of vaporization. Structural changes were also detected and related to recent experimental findings. It was shown that isotopic effects clearly have a quantum-mechanical origin. PMID:15991271

  1. Materials experience in methanol reforming units

    SciTech Connect

    Baumert, K.L.; Hoffman, J.J.

    1997-09-01

    Metallurgical evaluations were performed on samples of Type 310 and aluminized 304 SS after long-term, high temperature exposure in methanol reforming service. The secondary phases were identified and the effectiveness of aluminizing at inhibiting metal dusting was examined. Secondary phases adversely affect the materials service life and repairability. Aluminizing effectively inhibits metal dusting for at least 13--14 years. Metal dusting is most severe in crevices on bare metal.

  2. Vibrational analysis of phenol/(methanol)1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhards, M.; Beckmann, K.; Kleinermanns, K.

    1994-09-01

    Ab initio calculations at the Hartree-Fock 4-31G* level were performed in order to calculate binding energies and vibrational frequencies of the phenol/CH3OH-cluster and two deuterated isotopomers ( d-phenol/CH3OD, d-phenol-CD3OD). The minimum energy structure is trans-linear, as for the phenol/H2O-cluster. The calculated frequencies of phenol and methanol as well as the intramolecular frequencies of the phenol/CH3OH-cluster are assigned to experimental values. The calculated intermolecular frequencies of the phenol/CH3OH-cluster are compared with the available experimental frequencies of the S 0 (and S 1)-state of the phenol/methanol-cluster and the similar p-cresol/methanol-cluster. Assignments are suggested for the σ and p 1-mode. In order to clarify the assignment of the low frequency vibration at 22 cm-1 anharmonic corrections for the β2-mode of the phenol/CH3OH-cluster are calculated. These calculations show only slight anharmonicity compared with the β2-mode calculations carried out for the phenol/H2O-cluster.

  3. Liquid methanol under a static electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassone, Giuseppe; Giaquinta, Paolo V.; Saija, Franz; Saitta, A. Marco

    2015-02-01

    We report on an ab initio molecular dynamics study of liquid methanol under the effect of a static electric field. We found that the hydrogen-bond structure of methanol is more robust and persistent for field intensities below the molecular dissociation threshold whose value (≈0.31 V/Å) turns out to be moderately larger than the corresponding estimate obtained for liquid water. A sustained ionic current, with ohmic current-voltage behavior, flows in this material for field intensities above 0.36 V/Å, as is also the case of water, but the resulting ionic conductivity (≈0.40 S cm-1) is at least one order of magnitude lower than that of water, a circumstance that evidences a lower efficiency of proton transfer processes. We surmise that this study may be relevant for the understanding of the properties and functioning of technological materials which exploit ionic conduction, such as direct-methanol fuel cells and Nafion membranes.

  4. Photolysis of oxyfluorfen in aqueous methanol.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Subhasish K; Chakraborty, Savitri; Bhattacharyya, Anjan; Chowdhury, Ashim

    2013-01-01

    Photolysis of oxyfluorfen, an herbicide of the nitrodiphenyl ether class, was studied in aqueous methanol under UV and sunlight. UV irradiation was carried out in a borosilicate glass photoreactor (containing 250 ppm oxyfluorfen in 50% aqueous methanol) equipped with a quartz filter and 125 watt mercury lamp (maximum output 254 nm) at 25 ± 1°C. Sunlight irradiation was conducted at 28 ± 1°C in borosilicate Erlenmeyer flasks containing 250 ppm oxyfluorfen in 50% aqueous methanol. The samples from both the irradiated conditions were withdrawn at a definite time interval and extracted to measure oxyfluorfen content by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector for rate study. The half-life values were 20 hours and 2.7 days under UV and sunlight exposure, respectively. Photolysis of oxyfluorfen yielded 13 photoproducts of which three were characterized by infrared spectrophotometer and (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The rest of the photoproducts were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and thin layer chromatography (TLC). An ionization potential 70 eV was used for electron impact-mass spectrometry (EI-MS) and methane was used as reagent gas for chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (CI-MS). Two of the photoproducts were also synthesized for comparison. The main phototransformation pathways of oxyfluorfen involved nitro reduction, dechlorination, and hydrolysis as well as nucleophiles displacement reaction. PMID:23998303

  5. Class i Methanol Maser Conditions Near SNRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Bridget C.; Pihlström, Ylva M.; Sjouwerman, Loránt O.

    2015-06-01

    We present results from calculations of the physical conditions necessary for the occurrence of 36.169 (4-1-30 E), 44.070 (70-61 A^+), 84.521 (5-1-40 E), and 95.169 (80-71 A^+) GHz methanol (CH_3OH) maser emission lines near supernova remnants (SNRs), using the MOLPOP-CEP program. The calculations show that given a sufficient methanol abundance, methanol maser emission arises over a wide range of densities and temperatures, with optimal conditions at n˜ 10^4-10^6 cm-3 and T>60 K. The 36~GHz and 44~GHz transitions display more significant maser optical depths compared to the 84~GHz and 95~GHz transitions over the majority of physical conditions. It is also shown that line ratios are an important and applicable probe of the gas conditions. The line ratio changes are largely a result of the E-type transitions becoming quenched faster at increasing densities. The modeling results will be discussed using recent observations of CH_3OH masers near the SNRs G1.4-0.1, W28, and Sgr A East and used as a diagnostic tool to estimate densities and temperatures of the regions in which the CH_3OH masers are observed.

  6. Liquid methanol under a static electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Cassone, Giuseppe; Giaquinta, Paolo V.; Saija, Franz; Saitta, A. Marco

    2015-02-07

    We report on an ab initio molecular dynamics study of liquid methanol under the effect of a static electric field. We found that the hydrogen-bond structure of methanol is more robust and persistent for field intensities below the molecular dissociation threshold whose value (≈0.31 V/Å) turns out to be moderately larger than the corresponding estimate obtained for liquid water. A sustained ionic current, with ohmic current-voltage behavior, flows in this material for field intensities above 0.36 V/Å, as is also the case of water, but the resulting ionic conductivity (≈0.40 S cm{sup −1}) is at least one order of magnitude lower than that of water, a circumstance that evidences a lower efficiency of proton transfer processes. We surmise that this study may be relevant for the understanding of the properties and functioning of technological materials which exploit ionic conduction, such as direct-methanol fuel cells and Nafion membranes.

  7. Lightweight Stacks of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Valdez, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    An improved design concept for direct methanol fuel cells makes it possible to construct fuel-cell stacks that can weigh as little as one-third as much as do conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks of equal power. The structural-support components of the improved cells and stacks can be made of relatively inexpensive plastics. Moreover, in comparison with conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks, the improved fuel-cell stacks can be assembled, disassembled, and diagnosed for malfunctions more easily. These improvements are expected to bring portable direct methanol fuel cells and stacks closer to commercialization. In a conventional bipolar fuel-cell stack, the cells are interspersed with bipolar plates (also called biplates), which are structural components that serve to interconnect the cells and distribute the reactants (methanol and air). The cells and biplates are sandwiched between metal end plates. Usually, the stack is held together under pressure by tie rods that clamp the end plates. The bipolar stack configuration offers the advantage of very low internal electrical resistance. However, when the power output of a stack is only a few watts, the very low internal resistance of a bipolar stack is not absolutely necessary for keeping the internal power loss acceptably low.

  8. Spontaneous remission of membranous glomerulonephritis with successful fetal outcome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan-Mei; Zhou, Hui-Rong; Zhang, Ling; Yang, Ke-Ke; Luo, Jiang-Xi; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) represents an immunologically mediated disease characterized by deposition of immune complexes in the glomerular subepithelial space. Persistent proteinuria at diagnosis predicts poor prognosis. Pregnancy with MGN is a risk of fetal loss and may worsen maternal renal function. Here, we report a lady with MGN and proteinuria achieved spontaneous remission and successful fetal outcome naive to any medications. The 26-year old woman had 1-year history of persistent proteinuria (5.5–12.56 g/24 hours) and biopsy-proven MGN. Histopathological characteristics included glomerular basement membrane spikes, subepithelial monoclonal IgG immunofluorescence, and diffuse electron dense deposits. She was sticking to a regular morning exercise routine without any medications. After successful delivery of a full-term baby girl, the mother had improved proteinuria (0.56 g/24 hours) and albuminuria (351.96 g/24 hours contrasting 2281.6 g/24 hours before pregnancy). The baby had normal height and body weight at 4 months old. We identified more pregnancies with MGN in 5 case reports and 5 clinical series review articles (7–33 cases included). Spontaneous remission of maternal MGN with good fetal outcome rarely occurred in mothers on immunosuppressive therapy. Mothers naive to immunosuppressive therapy may achieve spontaneous remission of maternal membranous glomerulonephritis and successful fetal outcome. Theoretically, fetus might donate stem cells to heal mother's kidney. PMID:27368022

  9. High performance methanol-oxygen fuel cell with hollow fiber electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Daniel D. (Inventor); Ingham, John D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A methanol/air-oxygen fuel cell including an electrode formed by open-ended ion-exchange hollow fibers having a layer of catalyst deposited on the inner surface thereof and a first current collector in contact with the catalyst layer. A second current collector external of said fibers is provided which is immersed along with the hollow fiber electrode in an aqueous electrolyte body. Upon passage of air or oxygen through the hollow fiber electrode and introduction of methanol into the aqueous electrolyte, a steady current output is obtained. Two embodiments of the fuel cell are disclosed. In the first embodiment the second metal electrode is displaced away from the hollow fiber in the electrolyte body while in the second embodiment a spiral-wrap electrode is provided about the outer surface of the hollow fiber electrode.

  10. Surface science studies of catalyzed methanol synthesis on model copper and Cu-Zn-O surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Sabrina Su-Bin . Dept. of Chemistry Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1991-06-01

    Cu-Zn-O surfaces that are catalysts for methanol synthesis from CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2} modeled using zinc oxide overlayers on copper single crystals. These studies were performed in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) utilizing Temperature Programmed Desorption, Auger Electron Spectroscopy, and Low Energy Electron Diffraction techniques. The chemisorption of O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and D{sub 2} were compared on a stepped on Cu(311), and a flat Cu(110). At low pressures ({approximately}10{sup {minus}6} Torr), Cu(311) was found to be much more reactive than Cu(110) for the dissociative adsorption of CO{sub 2} and D{sub 2}, and the formation of CO{sub 2} from surface oxygen and CO. Since these reactions are important in methanol synthesis, these results suggest that methanol synthesis over copper may be a structure sensitive reaction. The interaction of copper, zinc, and oxygen were examined by the deposition of submonolayers to multilayers of zinc and oxygen in UHV on Cu(110). The interaction of methanol with these model Cu-Zn-O surfaces was also studied. Oxygen was adsorbed onto these exposed copper part of the surface to form ZnO{sub x}/y ML O/Cu(110) surfaces. The roles of ZnO{sub x} islands and chemisorbed oxygen on copper were investigated by monitoring methanol decomposition, into surface formate and methoxy species, on these ZnO{sub x}/y ML O/Cu(11) surfaces.

  11. Efficient Ceria-Platinum Inverse Catalyst for Partial Oxidation of Methanol.

    PubMed

    Ostroverkh, Anna; Johánek, Viktor; Kúš, Peter; Šedivá, Romana; Matolín, Vladimír

    2016-06-28

    Ceria-platinum-based bilayered thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering were developed and tested in regard to their catalytic activity for methanol oxidation by employing a temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) technique. The composition and structure of the samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both conventional (oxide-supported metal nanoparticles [NPs]) and inverse configurations (metal with oxide overlayer) were analyzed to uncover the structural dependence of activity and selectivity of these catalysts with respect to different pathways of methanol oxidation. We clearly demonstrate that the amount of cerium oxide (ceria) loading has a profound influence on methanol oxidation reaction characteristics. Adding a noncontinuous adlayer of ceria greatly enhances the catalytic performance of platinum (Pt) in favor of partial oxidation of methanol (POM), gaining an order of magnitude in the absolute yield of hydrogen. Moreover, the undesired by-production of carbon monoxide (CO) is strongly suppressed, making the ceria-platinum inverse catalyst a great candidate for clean hydrogen production. It is suggested that the methanol oxidation process is facilitated by the synergistic effect between both components of the inverse catalyst (involving oxygen from ceria and providing a reaction site on the adjacent Pt surface) as well as by the fact that the ability of ceria to exchange oxygen (i.e., to alter the oxidation state of Ce between 3+ and 4+) during the reaction is inversely proportional to its thickness. The increased redox capability of the discontinuous ceria adlayer shifts the preferred reaction pathway from dehydrogenation of hydroxymethyl intermediate to CO in favor of its oxidation to formate. PMID:27254727

  12. Discovery of Methanol in a Planetary Birthplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    Data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has recently revealed the first detection of gas-phase methanol, a derivative of methane, in a protoplanetary disk. This milestone discovery is an important step in understanding the conditions for planet formation that can lead to life-supporting planets like Earth.Planetary ChemistryOne major goal in the study of exoplanets is to find planets that orbit in their host stars habitable zones, a measure that determines whether the planet receives the right amount of sunlight to support liquid water. But theres another crucial element in the formation of a life-supporting planet: chemistry.To understand the chemistry of newly born planets, we need to study protoplanetary disks because its from these that young planets form. The elements and molecules contained in these dusty disks are what initially make up the atmospheres of planets forming within the disks.The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array under the southern sky. [ESO/B. Tafreshi]The Hunt for ComplexityThe detection of complex molecules in protoplanetary disks is an important milestone, because complex molecules are necessary to build the correct chemistry to support life. Unfortunately, detecting these molecules is very difficult, requiring observations with both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity. Thus far, though weve observed elements and simple molecules in protoplanetary disks, detections of complex molecules have been elusive with only one success before now.Luckily, we now have an observatory up to the challenge! ALMAs unprecedented spatial resolution and sensitivity has recently allowed a team of scientists led by Catherine Walsh (Leiden University) to observe gas-phase methanol in a protoplanetary disk for the first time. This detection was made in the disk around the young star TW Hya, and it represents one of the largest molecules that has ever been observed in a disk to date.Locating IcesThe model (purple line

  13. Speeding up spontaneous disease extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasin, Michael

    2012-02-01

    The dynamics of epidemic in a susceptible population is affected both by the random character of interactions between the individuals and by environmental variations. As a consequence, the sizes of the population groups (infected, susceptible, etc.) fluctuate in the course of evolution of the epidemic. In a small community a rare large fluctuation in the number of infected can result in extinction of the disease. We suggest a novel paradigm of controlling the epidemic, where the control field, such as vaccination, is designed to maximize the rate of spontaneous disease extinction. We show that, for a limited-scope vaccination, the optimal vaccination protocol and its impact on the epidemics have universal features: (i) the vaccine must be applied in pulses, (ii) the spontaneous disease extinction is synchronized with the vaccination. We trace this universality to general properties of the response of large fluctuations to external perturbations.

  14. Spontaneous mid-oesophageal rupture.

    PubMed

    Holt, S; Millar, J W; Heading, R C; Charles, R G

    1978-08-01

    The clinical presentation and management of spontaneous rupture of the middle third of the oesophagus is described in two patients. Early presentation and treatment in one case led to uncomplicated recovery. In the other patient late presentation and diagnosis resulted in delayed surgical intervention with an unsuccessful outcome. The nature of this rare lesion is discussed and nine previously described cases are reviewed. PMID:733690

  15. Spontaneous chirality in simple systems

    PubMed

    Pickett; Gross; Okuyama

    2000-10-23

    Two simple examples of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking are presented. The first is close-packed cylindrically confined spheres. As the cylinder diameter is varied, one obtains a variety of chiral phases. The second example involves unconfined dipolar particles with an isotropic attraction, which also exhibits chiral ground states. We speculate that a dilute magnetorheological fluid film, with the addition of smaller particles to provide an attractive entropic interaction, will exhibit a chiral columnar ground state. PMID:11030973

  16. Spontaneous shrinkage of vestibular schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Rossana; Pollock, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Background: “Watch, wait, and rescan” (WWR) has an established place as a successful management option for a significant proportion of vestibular schwannomas (VS) as an alternative to microsurgical removal or stereotactic radiotherapy. VS may grow slowly and continuously, followed by stagnation or even shrinkage. We present two case reports of spontaneous shrinkage of VS along with a review of the literature. Case Description: A 29-year-old female presented with a progressive history of visual blurring and intermittent diplopia over 2 months. A 29 mm of maximum intracranial diameter (ICD) VS with secondary obstructive hydrocephalus was diagnosed. The patient underwent a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt with resolution of her symptoms and opted for initial WWR management. Interval scanning between 2007 and 2014 showed progressive reduction in the maximum ICD together with reduction in the degree of central tumor enhancement. Maximum ICD at most recent follow up was 22 mm. A 28-year-old female was referred with right sensorineural deafness. A right VS of maximum ICD of 27 mm was diagnosed. Initial WWR management was planned after discussion. Serial imaging showed an initial increase in the size of the tumor followed by progressive reduction in size. The most recent follow up showed a maximum ICD of 20 mm. Conclusion: Early WWR management can be associated with spontaneous shrinkage of VS over time. Prospective clinical study of larger numbers of such cases using the UK VS database may help to identify predictive factors for the spontaneous regression of VS. PMID:27280055

  17. Spontaneous regression of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lewison, E F

    1976-11-01

    The dramatic but rare regression of a verified case of breast cancer in the absence of adequate, accepted, or conventional treatment has been observed and documented by clinicians over the course of many years. In my practice limited to diseases of the breast, over the past 25 years I have observed 12 patients with a unique and unusual clinical course valid enough to be regarded as spontaneous regression of breast cancer. These 12 patients, with clinically confirmed breast cancer, had temporary arrest or partial remission of their disease in the absence of complete or adequate treatment. In most of these cases, spontaneous regression could not be equated ultimately with permanent cure. Three of these case histories are summarized, and patient characteristics of pertinent clinical interest in the remaining case histories are presented and discussed. Despite widespread doubt and skepticism, there is ample clinical evidence to confirm the fact that spontaneous regression of breast cancer is a rare phenomenon but is real and does occur. PMID:799758

  18. Spontaneous Curvature of Polymer Brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheiko, Sergei; da Silva, Marcelo; Shirvaniants, David; Rodrigues, Carlos; Beers, Kathryn; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Potemkin, Igor; Moeller, Martin

    2003-03-01

    Experimental studies of cylindrical brushes on surfaces revealed peculiar shape of brush molecules with a curved backbone. According to scaling analysis, spontaneous bending of the backbone can be driven by entropic elasticity of the side chains: smaller extension of the chains is attained due to their asymmetric distribution with respect to the backbone. An equilibrium, i.e. spontaneous curvature results from the balance of the elasticity of the side chains and the elasticity of the interface. The curvature is predicted to increase with the side chain length. The system is of general interest because cylindrical brushes confined to a flat surface represent a two-dimensional cross-section of a planar brush grafted on both sides. Here we present systematic studies of cylindrical brushes with different length of the side chains. The curvature of cylindrical brushes confined to a flat substrate was investigated by atomic force microscopy. The method allowed visualization of individual molecules and quantitative analysis of their conformation. In agreement with theory, adsorbed brushes demonstrated spontaneous curvature, however the curvature was shown to decrease with the side chain length.

  19. Etiology of primary spontaneous pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Lyra, Roberto de Menezes

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of HRCT, primary spontaneous pneumothorax has come to be better understood and managed, because its etiology can now be identified in most cases. Primary spontaneous pneumothorax is mainly caused by the rupture of a small subpleural emphysematous vesicle (designated a bleb) or of a subpleural paraseptal emphysematous lesion (designated a bulla). The aim of this pictorial essay was to improve the understanding of primary spontaneous pneumothorax and to propose a description of the major anatomical lesions found during surgery. RESUMO Com o advento da TCAR, o pneumotórax espontâneo primário passou a ser mais bem entendido e conduzido, pois sua etiologia pode ser atualmente identificada na maioria dos casos. O pneumotórax espontâneo primário tem como principal causa a rotura de uma pequena vesícula enfisematosa subpleural, denominada bleb ou de uma lesão enfisematosa parasseptal subpleural, denominada bulla. O objetivo deste ensaio pictórico foi melhorar o entendimento do pneumotórax espontâneo primário e propor uma descrição das principais lesões anatômicas encontradas durante a cirurgia. PMID:27383937

  20. Spontaneous scalarization with massive fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramazanoǧlu, Fethi M.; Pretorius, Frans

    2016-03-01

    We study the effect of a mass term in the spontaneous scalarization of neutron stars, for a wide range of scalar field parameters and neutron star equations of state. Even though massless scalars have been the focus of interest in spontaneous scalarization so far, recent observations of binary systems rule out most of their interesting parameter space. We point out that adding a mass term to the scalar field potential is a natural extension to the model that avoids these observational bounds if the Compton wavelength of the scalar is small compared to the binary separation. Our model is formally similar to the asymmetron scenario recently introduced in application to cosmology, though here we are interested in consequences for neutron stars and thus consider a mass term that does not modify the geometry on cosmological scales. We review the allowed values for the mass and scalarization parameters in the theory given current binary system observations and black hole spin measurements. We show that within the allowed ranges, spontaneous scalarization can have nonperturbative, strong effects that may lead to observable signatures in binary neutron star or black hole-neutron star mergers, or even in isolated neutron stars.

  1. Methanol May Function as a Cross-Kingdom Signal

    PubMed Central

    Dorokhov, Yuri L.; Komarova, Tatiana V.; Petrunia, Igor V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Zinovkin, Roman A.; Shindyapina, Anastasia V.; Frolova, Olga Y.; Gleba, Yuri Y.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that leaf wounding results in the synthesis of pectin methylesterase (PME), which causes the plant to release methanol into the air. Methanol emitted by a wounded plant increases the accumulation of methanol-inducible gene mRNA and enhances antibacterial resistance as well as cell-to-cell communication, which facilitates virus spreading in neighboring plants. We concluded that methanol is a signaling molecule involved in within-plant and plant-to-plant communication. Methanol is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-mediated conversion of methanol into toxic formaldehyde. However, recent data showed that methanol is a natural compound in normal, healthy humans. These data call into question whether human methanol is a metabolic waste product or whether methanol has specific function in humans. Here, to reveal human methanol-responsive genes (MRGs), we used suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA libraries of HeLa cells lacking ADH and exposed to methanol. This design allowed us to exclude genes involved in formaldehyde and formic acid detoxification from our analysis. We identified MRGs and revealed a correlation between increases in methanol content in the plasma and changes in human leukocyte MRG mRNA levels after fresh salad consumption by volunteers. Subsequently, we showed that the methanol generated by the pectin/PME complex in the gastrointestinal tract of mice induces the up- and downregulation of brain MRG mRNA. We used an adapted Y-maze to measure the locomotor behavior of the mice while breathing wounded plant vapors in two-choice assays. We showed that mice prefer the odor of methanol to other plant volatiles and that methanol changed MRG mRNA accumulation in the mouse brain. We hypothesize that the methanol emitted by wounded plants may have a role in plant-animal signaling. The known positive effect of plant food intake on human health suggests a role for physiological methanol in

  2. Methanol may function as a cross-kingdom signal.

    PubMed

    Dorokhov, Yuri L; Komarova, Tatiana V; Petrunia, Igor V; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S; Zinovkin, Roman A; Shindyapina, Anastasia V; Frolova, Olga Y; Gleba, Yuri Y

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that leaf wounding results in the synthesis of pectin methylesterase (PME), which causes the plant to release methanol into the air. Methanol emitted by a wounded plant increases the accumulation of methanol-inducible gene mRNA and enhances antibacterial resistance as well as cell-to-cell communication, which facilitates virus spreading in neighboring plants. We concluded that methanol is a signaling molecule involved in within-plant and plant-to-plant communication. Methanol is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-mediated conversion of methanol into toxic formaldehyde. However, recent data showed that methanol is a natural compound in normal, healthy humans. These data call into question whether human methanol is a metabolic waste product or whether methanol has specific function in humans. Here, to reveal human methanol-responsive genes (MRGs), we used suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA libraries of HeLa cells lacking ADH and exposed to methanol. This design allowed us to exclude genes involved in formaldehyde and formic acid detoxification from our analysis. We identified MRGs and revealed a correlation between increases in methanol content in the plasma and changes in human leukocyte MRG mRNA levels after fresh salad consumption by volunteers. Subsequently, we showed that the methanol generated by the pectin/PME complex in the gastrointestinal tract of mice induces the up- and downregulation of brain MRG mRNA. We used an adapted Y-maze to measure the locomotor behavior of the mice while breathing wounded plant vapors in two-choice assays. We showed that mice prefer the odor of methanol to other plant volatiles and that methanol changed MRG mRNA accumulation in the mouse brain.We hypothesize that the methanol emitted by wounded plants may have a role in plant-animal signaling. The known positive effect of plant food intake on human health suggests a role for physiological methanol in

  3. A novel process for manufacture of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1990-01-01

    A bench-scale reactor is being used to conduct studies of the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol by a novel process. During the last quarter, the effect of potassium methoxide and Cu-chromite loading on the MeOH formation rate was investigated. The rate obtained with Cu-chromite was compared to that using Cu-ZnO as catalyst. Work also continued on the modification of the experimental equipment to permit on-line monitoring of liquid and gas compositions.

  4. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous. The fuel cell system also comprises a fuel supplying part including a meter which meters an amount of fuel which is used by the fuel cell, and controls the supply of fuel based on said metering.

  5. Improved Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Ramsey, John C.

    2005-03-08

    A stack of direct methanol fuel cells exhibiting a circular footprint. A cathode and anode manifold, tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are located within the circular footprint. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet cathode manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold, where the serpentine channels of the anode are orthogonal to the serpentine channels of the cathode. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  6. Methanol-use options study: Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Coal derived methanol is a potentially important alternative fuel for the US. If methanol fuels are to be considered with other federal options on synthetic fuels such as SRC-2, H-coal and ethanol (from biomass), the barriers to large scale methanol fuel use, including technical, economic, institutional, regulatory, and environmental issues, should be identified and sharply defined. The Office of Coal and Synthetic Fuels of the Assistant Secretary for Policy and Evaluation requested that a three-phase methanol use options study be undertaken. Phase I of this study was a preliminary scoping effort which (1) developed an overall system evaluation framework; (2) updated cost estimates for producing neat methanol and M-gasoline (via the Mobile-Zeolite Catalytic process); and (3) identified the technical, economic, institutional, regulatory and environmental issues of producing, distributing, and using neat methanol in transportation, utility peaking turbines and petrochemical markets.

  7. Hydrogenotitanates nanotubes supported platinum anode for direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abida, Bochra; Chirchi, Lotfi; Baranton, Stève; Napporn, Teko Wilhelmin; Morais, Cláudia; Léger, Jean-Michel; Ghorbel, Abdelhamid

    2013-11-01

    Hydrogenotitanates nanotubes (HTNs) are prepared from TiO2 powder via hydrothermal processing in 11.25 M NaOH aq. The reaction temperature is 130 °C for 20 h. Afterward a heat treatment is done during 2 h at 500 °C in air, to obtain calcined HTNs (HTNs-cal). The structural change on the molecular TiO2 during the hydrothermal treatment is investigated in detail by various analytic techniques such as XRD and TEM, which reveal that the crystal structure of the HTNs materials is similar to that of H2Ti2O5·H2O nanotubes with 160 nm in length and 10 nm in diameter. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms indicate that synthesized solids are mesoporous materials with a multiwalled nanotubular structure and high specific surface area. Platinum nanoparticles are deposited on the HTNs by the impregnation method for a total noble metal loading of 10 wt%. The electrocatalytic activity of these electrocatalysts is evaluated by cyclic voltammetry in acid medium. Typical CO stripping voltammetry in acidic solutions is investigated. The results demonstrate that the HTNs can greatly enhance the catalytic activity of Pt for methanol oxidation. The CO stripping test shows that the Pt/HTNs can shift the CO oxidation potential to lower direction than Pt/C (XC72) and Pt/HTNs-cal catalysts.

  8. Activation of catalysts for synthesizing methanol from synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David B.; Gelbein, Abraham P.

    1985-01-01

    A method for activating a methanol synthesis catalyst is disclosed. In this method, the catalyst is slurried in an inert liquid and is activated by a reducing gas stream. The activation step occurs in-situ. That is, it is conducted in the same reactor as is the subsequent step of synthesizing methanol from a methanol gas stream catalyzed by the activated catalyst still dispersed in a slurry.

  9. Pressure Effects on Combustion of Methanol and Methanol-Docecanol Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okai, K.; Ono, Y.; Muriue, O.; Tsue, M.; Kono, M.; Sato, J.; Dietrich, D. L.; Williams, F. A.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this research is to improve understanding of the combustion of binary fuel mixtures in the vicinity of the critical point. Fiber-supported single droplets and two-droplet arrays of methanol and of mixtures of methanol and 1-dodecanol, initially 0.9 mm in diameter, were burned in room-temperature air at pressures from 0.1 MPa to 9.0 MPa in the NASA Lewis 2.2-second drop tower. The work is a continuation of a collaborative Japan-US research effort designed to increase knowledge of high-pressure combustion of fuel sprays, relevant to application in propulsive and power-production devices such as Diesel engines. Some previous publications from this cooperative program may be cited. All of the previous experiments concerned alkanes and alkane mixtures. The new research reported here addresses alcohols and alcohol mixtures, to ascertain the degree to which previous results for alkanes extend to alcohols. There have been many previous experimental studies of methanol droplet combustion and a few of alcohol mixtures, but not at the high pressures of interest here. There is some experimental information on methanol droplet combustion at elevated pressure but none on the alcohol mixtures extending to critical pressures, as in the present study.

  10. Biological Methanol Production by a Type II Methanotroph Methylocystis bryophila.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sanjay K S; Mardina, Primata; Kim, Sang-Yong; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kim, In-Won

    2016-04-28

    Methane (CH₄) is the most abundant component in natural gas. To reduce its harmful environmental effect as a greenhouse gas, CH₄ can be utilized as a low-cost feed for the synthesis of methanol by methanotrophs. In this study, several methanotrophs were examined for their ability to produce methanol from CH₄; including Methylocella silvestris, Methylocystis bryophila, Methyloferula stellata, and Methylomonas methanica. Among these methanotrophs, M. bryophila exhibited the highest methanol production. The optimum process parameters aided in significant enhancement of methanol production up to 4.63 mM. Maximum methanol production was observed at pH 6.8, 30°C, 175 rpm, 100 mM phosphate buffer, 50 mM MgCl₂ as a methanol dehydrogenase inhibitor, 50% CH₄ concentration, 24 h of incubation, and 9 mg of dry cell mass ml(-1) inoculum load, respectively. Optimization of the process parameters, screening of methanol dehydrogenase inhibitors, and supplementation with formate resulted in significant improvements in methanol production using M. bryophila. This report suggests, for the first time, the potential of using M. bryophila for industrial methanol production from CH₄. PMID:26838340