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Sample records for spontaneous r-parity violation

  1. Minimal gauged U(1) B-L model with spontaneous R parity violation.

    PubMed

    Barger, Vernon; Pérez, Pavel Fileviez; Spinner, Sogee

    2009-05-01

    We study the minimal gauged U(1) B-L supersymmetric model and show that it provides an attractive theory for spontaneous R-parity violation. Both U(1) B-L and R parity are broken by the vacuum expectation value of the right-handed sneutrino (proportional to the soft supersymmetry masses), thereby linking the B-L and soft SUSY scales. In this context we find a consistent mechanism for generating neutrino masses and a realistic mass spectrum, all without extending the Higgs sector of the minimal supersymmetry standard model. We discuss the most relevant collider signals and the connection between the Z' gauge boson and R-parity violation. PMID:19518859

  2. Models of dynamical R-parity violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csáki, Csaba; Kuflik, Eric; Slone, Oren; Volansky, Tomer

    2015-06-01

    The presence of R-parity violating interactions may relieve the tension between existing LHC constraints and natural supersymmetry. In this paper we lay down the theoretical framework and explore models of dynamical R-parity violation in which the breaking of R-parity is communicated to the visible sector by heavy messenger fields. We find that R-parity violation is often dominated by non-holomorphic operators that have so far been largely ignored, and might require a modification of the existing searches at the LHC. The dynamical origin implies that the effects of such operators are suppressed by the ratio of either the light fermion masses or the supersymmetry breaking scale to the mediation scale, thereby providing a natural explanation for the smallness of R-parity violation. We consider various scenarios, classified by whether R-parity violation, flavor breaking and/or supersymmetry breaking are mediated by the same messenger fields. The most compact case, corresponding to a deformation of the so called flavor mediation scenario, allows for the mediation of supersymmetry breaking, R-parity breaking, and flavor symmetry breaking in a unified manner.

  3. R-parity violation and sneutrino resonances at muon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    In supersymmetric models with R-parity violation, sneutrinos may be produced as channel resonances at {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders. The authors demonstrate that, for R-parity violating couplings as low as 10{sup {minus}4}, sneutrino resonances may be observed and may be exploited to yield high precision SUSY parameter measurements. The excellent beam energy resolution of muon colliders may also be used to resolve MeV level splitting between CP-even and CP-odd sneutrino mass eigenstates.

  4. Bilinear R-parity violation with flavor symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazzocchi, F.; Morisi, S.; Peinado, E.; Valle, J. W. F.; Vicente, A.

    2013-01-01

    Bilinear R-parity violation (BRPV) provides the simplest intrinsically super-symmetric neutrino mass generation scheme. While neutrino mixing parameters can be probed in high energy accelerators, they are unfortunately not predicted by the theory. Here we propose a model based on the discrete flavor symmetry A 4 with a single R-parity violating parameter, leading to (i) correct Cabbibo mixing given by the Gatto-Sartori-Tonin formula, and a successful unification-like b-tau mass relation, and (ii) a correlation between the lepton mixing angles θ 13 and θ 23 in agreement with recent neutrino oscillation data, as well as a (nearly) massless neutrino, leading to absence of neutrinoless double beta decay.

  5. U(1) prime dark matter and R-parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Brahm, D.E.

    1990-04-01

    Attempts to understand physics beyond the Standard Model must face many phenomenological constraint, from recent Z{sup {degree}} data, neutral current measurements, cosmology and astrophysics, neutrino experiments, tests of lepton-and baryon-number conservation and CP violation, and many other ongoing experiments. The most interesting models are those which are allowed by current data, but offer predictions which can soon be experimentally confirmed or refuted. Two classes of such models are explored in this dissertation. The first, containing an extra U(1){prime} gauge group, has a dark matter candidate which could soon be detected. The second, incorporating supersymmetry with R-parity violation, predicts rare Z{sup {degree}} decays at LEP; some of these models can already be ruled out by LEP data and gluino searches at the Tevatron. 54 refs., 31 figs.

  6. Invisible Higgs boson decays in spontaneously broken R parity

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, M.; Valle, J.W.F.; Villanova del Moral, A.

    2004-10-01

    The Higgs boson may decay mainly to an invisible mode characterized by missing energy, instead of the standard model channels. This is a generic feature of many models where neutrino masses arise from the spontaneous breaking of ungauged lepton number at relatively low scales, such as spontaneously broken R-parity models. Taking these models as framework, we reanalyze this striking suggestion in view of the recent data on neutrino oscillations that indicate nonzero neutrino masses. We show that, despite the smallness of neutrino masses, the Higgs boson can decay mainly to the invisible Goldstone boson associated to the spontaneous breaking of lepton number. This requires a gauge singlet superfield coupling to the electroweak doublet Higgses, as in the next to minimal supersymmetric standard model scenario for solving the {mu} problem. The search for invisibly decaying Higgs bosons should be taken into account in the planning of future accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider and the Next Linear Collider.

  7. Hadronic electric dipole moments in R-parity violating supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Kovalenko, Sergey

    2006-06-01

    We calculate the electric dipole moments (EDM) of the neutral {sup 199}Hg atom, neutron and deuteron within a generic R-parity violating SUSY model (Re{sub p} SUSY) on the basis of a one-pion-exchange model with CP-odd pion-nucleon interactions. We consider two types of the Re{sub p} SUSY contributions to the above hadronic EDMs: via the quark chromoelectric dipole moments (CEDM) and CP-violating 4-quark interactions. We demonstrate that the former contributes to all the three studied EDMs while the latter appears only in the nuclear EDMs via the CP-odd nuclear forces. We find that the Re{sub p} SUSY induced 4-quark interactions arise at tree level through the sneutrino exchange and involve only s and b quarks. Therefore, their effect in hadronic EDMs is determined by the strange and bottom-quark sea of the nucleon. From the null experimental results on the hadronic EDMs we derive the limits on the imaginary parts of certain products Im({lambda}{sup '}{lambda}{sup '}*) of the trilinear Re{sub p}-couplings and show that the currently best limits come from the {sup 199}Hg EDM experiments. We demonstrate that some of these limits are better than those existing in the literature. We argue that future storage ring experiments on the deuteron EDM are able to improve these limits by several orders of magnitude.

  8. Spontaneous R-parity breaking, stop LSP decays and the neutrino mass hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Zachary; Ovrut, Burt A.; Purves, Austin; Spinner, Sogee

    2014-05-01

    The MSSM with right-handed neutrino supermultiplets, gauged B-L symmetry and a non-vanishing sneutrino expectation value is the minimal theory that spontaneously breaks R-parity and is consistent with the bounds on proton stability and lepton number violation. This minimal B-L MSSM can have a colored/charged LSP, of which a stop LSP is the most amenable to observation at the LHC. We study the R-parity violating decays of a stop LSP into a bottom quark and charged leptons - the dominant modes for a generic "admixture" stop. A numerical analysis of the relative branching ratios of these decay channels is given using a wide scan over the parameter space. The fact that R-parity is violated in this theory by a vacuum expectation value of a sneutrino links these branching ratios directly to the neutrino mass hierarchy. It is shown how a discovery of bottom-charged lepton events at the LHC can potentially determine whether the neutrino masses are in a normal or inverted hierarchy, as well as determining the θ23 neutrino mixing angle. Finally, present LHC bounds on these leptoquark signatures are used to put lower bounds on the stop mass.

  9. Fate of R parity

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Pavel Fileviez; Spinner, Sogee

    2011-02-01

    The possible origin of the R-parity-violating interactions in the minimal supersymmetric standard model and its connection to the radiative symmetry-breaking mechanism is investigated in the context of the simplest model where the radiative symmetry-breaking mechanism can be implemented. We find that, in the majority of the parameter space, R parity is spontaneously broken at the low scale. These results hint that R-parity-violating processes could be observed at the Large Hadron Collider, if supersymmetry is realized in nature.

  10. Can R-parity violation hide vanilla supersymmetry at the LHC?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Masaki; Rolbiecki, Krzysztof; Sakurai, Kazuki

    2013-01-01

    Current experimental constraints on a large parameter space in supersymmetric models rely on the large missing energy signature. This is usually provided by the lightest neutralino which stability is ensured by R-parity. However, if R-parity is violated, the lightest neutralino decays into the standard model particles and the missing energy cut is not efficient anymore. In particular, the U DD type R-parity violation induces the neutralino decay to three quarks which potentially leads to the most difficult signal to be searched at hadron colliders. In this paper, we study the constraints on R-parity violating supersymmetric models using a same-sign dilepton and a multijet signatures. We show that the gluino and squarks lighter than TeV are already excluded in the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model with the R-parity violation if their masses are approximately equal. We also analyze constraints in a simplified model with the R-parity violation. We compare how the R-parity violation changes some of the observables typically used to distinguish a supersymmetric signal from standard model backgrounds.

  11. Lepton flavor violation and cosmological constraints on R-parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, Motoi; Hamaguchi, Koichi; Iwamoto, Sho E-mail: hama@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2010-02-01

    In supersymmetric standard models R-parity violating couplings are severely constrained, since otherwise they would erase the existing baryon asymmetry before the electroweak transition. It is often claimed that this cosmological constraint can be circumvented if the baryon number and one of the lepton flavor numbers are sufficiently conserved in these R-parity violating couplings, because B/3−L{sub i} for each lepton flavor is separately conserved by the sphaleron process. We discuss the effect of lepton flavor violation on the B−L conservation, and show that even tiny slepton mixing angles θ{sub 12}∼>O(10{sup −4}) and θ{sub 23},θ{sub 13}∼>O(10{sup −5}) will spoil the separate B/3−L{sub i} conservation. In particular, if lepton flavor violations are observed in experiments such as MEG and B-factories, it will imply that all the R-parity violating couplings must be suppressed to avoid the B−L erasure. We also discuss the implication for the decay of the lightest MSSM particle at the LHC.

  12. Z{yields}jets+{gamma} as a signal for R-parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, J.L.

    1992-02-01

    Supersymmetric models with explicit R-parity violation can induce new rare decay modes of the Z boson into single supersymmetric particles. Here, the rate and signature for one such decay, Z {yields} {tilde {upsilon}} {gamma}, is examined, where it is found that the rate is at least an order of magnitude smaller than that for the process Z{yields} H{gamma}, even with larger values of the R-parity violating couplings.

  13. Z yields jets+. gamma. as a signal for R-parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, J.L.

    1992-02-01

    Supersymmetric models with explicit R-parity violation can induce new rare decay modes of the Z boson into single supersymmetric particles. Here, the rate and signature for one such decay, Z {yields} {tilde {upsilon}} {gamma}, is examined, where it is found that the rate is at least an order of magnitude smaller than that for the process Z{yields} H{gamma}, even with larger values of the R-parity violating couplings.

  14. Search for supersymmetric particles with R-parity violation in Z decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Casper, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Palla, F.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bonvicini, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Engelhardt, A.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Girone, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Maggi, M.; Markou, C.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Oest, T.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Perrodo, P.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Passalacqua, L.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Ten Have, I.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; Morton, W. T.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Konstantinidis, N.; Moneta, L.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Colrain, P.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Wanke, R.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Thulasidas, M.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Denis, R. St.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Courault, F.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Musolino, G.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; Medcalf, T.; Mir, Ll. M.; Strong, J. A.; Bertin, V.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Beddall, A.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Rankin, C.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Feigl, E.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Ganis, G.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Pitis, L.; Ragusa, F.; Kim, H. Y.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    Searches for supersymmetric particles produced in e +e - interactions at the Z peak have been performed under the assumptions that R-parity is not conserved, that the dominant R-parity violating coupling involves only leptonic fields, and that the lifetime of the lightest supersymmetric particle can be neglected. In a data sample collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP up to 1993, and corresponding to almost two million hadronic Z decays, no signal was observed. As a result, supersymmetric particle masses and couplings are at least as well constrained as under the usual assumption of R-parity conservation.

  15. Neutrinos in anomaly mediated supersymmetry breaking with R-parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, F. de; Diaz, M.A.; Lineros, R.A.; Eboli, O.J.P.; Mercadante, P.G.; Magro, M.B.

    2005-03-01

    We show that a supersymmetric standard model exhibiting anomaly mediated supersymmetry breaking can generate naturally the observed neutrino mass spectrum as well mixings when we include bilinear R-parity violation interactions. In this model, one of the neutrinos gets its mass due to the tree-level mixing with the neutralinos induced by the R-parity violating interactions while the other two neutrinos acquire their masses due to radiative corrections. One interesting feature of this scenario is that the lightest supersymmetric particle is unstable and its decay can be observed at high energy colliders, providing a falsifiable test of the model.

  16. Reappraisal of two-loop contributions to the fermion electric dipole moments in R-parity violating supersymmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Nodoka; Sato, Toru; Kubota, Takahiro

    2012-06-01

    We reexamine the R-parity violating contribution to the fermion electric and chromo-electric dipole moments in the two-loop diagrams. It is found that the leading Barr-Zee-type two-loop contribution is smaller than the result found in previous works, and that electric dipole moment experimental data provide looser limits on R-parity violating couplings.

  17. CP violation in bilinear R-parity violation and its consequences for the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chériguène, Asma; Porod, Werner; Liebler, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    Supersymmetric models with bilinear R-parity violation (BRpV) provide a framework for neutrino masses and mixing angles to explain neutrino oscillation data. We consider CP violation within the new physical phases in BRpV and discuss their effect on the generation of neutrino masses and the decays of the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP), being a light neutralino with mass ˜100 GeV, at next-to-leading order. The decays affect the lepton and via sphaleron transitions the baryon asymmetry in the early universe. For a rather light LSP, asymmetries generated before the electroweak phase transition via e.g. the Affleck-Dine mechanism are reduced up to 2 orders of magnitude, but are still present. On the other hand, the decays of a light LSP themselves can account for the generation of a lepton and baryon asymmetry, the latter in accordance with the observation in our universe, since the smallness of the BRpV parameters allows for an out-of-equilibrium decay and sufficiently large CP violation is possible consistent with experimental bounds from the nonobservation of electric dipole moments.

  18. Search for R-parity violating supersymmetry in two-muon and four-jet topologies.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abdesselam, A; Abolins, M; Abramov, V; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Adams, M; Ahmed, S N; Alexeev, G D; Alton, A; Alves, G A; Amos, N; Anderson, E W; Arnoud, Y; Avila, C; Baarmand, M M; Babintsev, V V; Babukhadia, L; Bacon, T C; Baden, A; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beaudette, F; Begel, M; Belyaev, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bertram, I; Besson, A; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Bhattacharjee, M; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Boehnlein, A; Bojko, N I; Borcherding, F; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Breedon, R; Briskin, G; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burtovoi, V S; Butler, J M; Canelli, F; Carvalho, W; Casey, D; Casilum, Z; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chekulaev, S V; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Chopra, S; Christenson, J H; Chung, M; Claes, D; Clark, A R; Coney, L; Connolly, B; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; Davis, G A; Davis, K; De, K; de Jong, S J; Del Signore, K; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doulas, S; Ducros, Y; Dudko, L V; Duensing, S; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyshkant, A; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Eltzroth, J T; Elvira, V D; Engelmann, R; Eno, S; Eppley, G; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Fahland, T; Feher, S; Fein, D; Ferbel, T; Filthaut, F; Fisk, H E; Fisyak, Y; Flattum, E; Fleuret, F; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Frame, K C; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gallas, E; Galyaev, A N; Gao, M; Gavrilov, V; Genik, R J; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gilmartin, R; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Gómez, G; Goncharov, P I; González Solís, J L; Gordon, H; Goss, L T; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Graf, N; Graham, G; Grannis, P D; Green, J A; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Grinstein, S; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Gupta, A; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Hadley, N J; Haggerty, H; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Hall, R E; Hanlet, P; Hansen, S; Hauptman, J M; Hays, C; Hebert, C; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Huang, Y; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Karmanov, D; Karmgard, D; Kehoe, R; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kim, S K; Klima, B; Knuteson, B; Ko, W; Kohli, J M; Kostritskiy, A V; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Kotwal, A V; Kozelov, A V; Kozlovsky, E A; Krane, J; Krishnaswamy, M R; Krivkova, P; Krzywdzinski, S; Kubantsev, M; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kuznetsov, V E; Landsberg, G; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Leggett, C; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, X; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipton, R; Lucotte, A; Lueking, L; Lundstedt, C; Luo, C; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Malyshev, V L; Manankov, V; Mao, H S; Marshall, T; Martin, M I; Mauritz, K M; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McMahon, T; Melanson, H L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Miao, C; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mishra, C S; Mokhov, N; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Mostafa, M; Da Motta, H; Nagy, E; Nang, F; Narain, M; Narasimham, V S; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Negroni, S; Nunnemann, T; O'Neil, D; Oguri, V; Olivier, B; Oshima, N; Padley, P; Pan, L J; Papageorgiou, K; Para, A; Parashar, N; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Paterno, M; Patwa, A; Pawlik, B; Perkins, J; Peters, O; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Pope, B G; Popkov, E; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Przybycien, M B; Qian, J; Raja, R; Rajagopalan, S; Ramberg, E; Rapidis, P A; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Ridel, M; Rijssenbeek, M; Rizatdinova, F; Rockwell, T; Roco, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rutherfoord, J; Sabirov, B M; Sajot, G; Santoro, A; Sawyer, L; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schwartzman, A; Sen, N; Shabalina, E; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Shupe, M; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Singh, H; Singh, J B; Sirotenko, V; Slattery, P; Smith, E; Smith, R P; Snihur, R; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Solomon, J; Song, Y; Sorín, V; Sosebee, M; Sotnikova, N; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Stanton, N R; Steinbrück, G; Stephens, R W; Stichelbaut, F; Stoker, D; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Taylor, W; Tentindo-Repond, S; Tripathi, S M; Trippe, T G; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Vaniev, V; Van Kooten, R; Varelas, N; Vertogradov, L S; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Volkov, A A; Vorobiev, A P; Wahl, H D; Wang, H; Wang, Z-M; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weerts, H; White, A; White, J T; Whiteson, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Willis, S; Wimpenny, S J; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Xu, Q; Yamada, R; Yamin, P; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Youssef, S; Yu, J; Yu, Z; Zanabria, M; Zhang, X; Zheng, H; Zhou, B; Zhou, Z; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2002-10-21

    We present results of a search for R-parity-violating decay of the neutralino chi;01, taken as the lightest supersymmetric particle, to a muon and two jets. The decay proceeds through a lepton-number violating coupling lambda(')(2jk) (j=1,2; k=1,2,3), with R-parity conservation in all other production and decay processes. In the absence of candidate events from 77.5+/-3.9 pb(-1) of data collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.8 TeV, and with an expected background of 0.18+/-0.03+/-0.02 events, we set limits on squark and gluino masses within the framework of the minimal low-energy supergravity-supersymmetry model. PMID:12398658

  19. Probing (g -2 )μ at the LHC in the paradigm of R -parity violating MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Amit; Chakraborty, Sabyasachi

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon exhibits a long-standing discrepancy compared to the standard model prediction. In this paper, we concentrate on this issue in the framework of the R -parity violating minimal supersymmetric standard model. Such a scenario provides a substantial contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon while satisfying constraints from low energy experimental observables as well as the neutrino mass. In addition, we point out that the implication of such operators satisfying muon g -2 are immense from the perspective of the LHC experiment, leading to a spectacular four muon final state. We propose an analysis in this particular channel which might help to settle the debate of R -parity violation as a probable explanation for (g -2 )μ.

  20. Puzzles in B{yields}{pi}{pi},{pi}K decays: Possible implications for R-parity violating supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yadong; Wang, Rumin; Lu, G.R.

    2006-01-01

    Recent experiments suggest that certain data of B{yields}{pi}{pi},{pi}K decays are inconsistent with the standard model expectations. We try to explain the discrepancies with R-parity violating supersymmetry. By employing the QCD factorization approach, we study these decays in the minimal supersymmetric standard model with R-parity violation. We show that R-parity violation can resolve the discrepancies in both B{yields}{pi}{pi} and B{yields}{pi}K decays, and find that in some regions of parameter space all these requirements, including the CP averaged branching ratios and the direct CP asymmetries, can be satisfied. Furthermore, we have derived stringent bounds on relevant R-parity violating couplings from the latest experimental data, and some of these constraints are stronger than the existing bounds.

  1. New signatures and limits on R-parity violation from resonant squark production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteux, Angelo

    2016-03-01

    We discuss resonant squark production at the LHC via baryonic R-parity violating interactions. The cross section easily exceeds pair-production and a new set of signatures can be used to probe squarks, particularly stops. These include dijet resonances, same-sign top quarks and four-jet resonances with large b-jet multiplicities, as well as the possibility of displaced neutralino decays. We use publicly available searches at √{s}=8 TeV and first results from collisions at √{s}=13 TeV to set upper limits on R-parity violating couplings, with particular focus on simplified models with light stops and neutralinos. The exclusion reach of these signatures is comparable to R-parity-conserving searches, {m}_{tilde{t}} ≃ 500-700 GeV. In addition, we find that O(1) couplings involving the stop can be excluded well into the multi-TeV range, and stress that searches for single- and pair-produced four-jet resonances will be necessary to exclude sub-TeV stops for a natural SUSY spectrum with light higgsinos.

  2. Exploring neutrino physics at LHC via R-parity violating SUSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsou, Vasiliki A.

    2015-07-01

    R-parity violating supersymmetric models (RPV SUSY) are becoming increasingly more appealing than its R-parity conserving counterpart in view of the hitherto non-observation of SUSY signals at the LHC. In this paper, RPV scenarios where neutrino masses are naturally generated are discussed, namely RPV through bilinear terms (bRPV) and the "μ from ν" supersymmetric standard model (μνSSM). The latter is characterised by a rich Higgs sector that easily accommodates a 125-GeV Higgs boson. The phenomenology of such models at the LHC is reviewed, giving emphasis on final states with displaced objects, and relevant results obtained by LHC experiments are presented. The implications for dark matter for these theoretical proposals is also addressed.

  3. Search for r-parity violating supersymmetry in the multilepton final state

    SciTech Connect

    Attal, Alon J.; /UCLA

    2006-11-01

    This thesis presents a search for physics beyond the standard model of elementary particles in events containing three or more charged leptons in the final state. The search is based on an R-parity violating supersymmetric model that assumes supersymmetric particles are pair produced at hadron colliders and the R-parity violating coupling is small enough so that these particles ''cascade'' decay into the lightest supersymmetric particle. The lightest supersymmetric particle may only decay into two charged leptons (electrons or muons) plus a neutrino through a lepton number violating interaction. Proton-antiproton collision events produced with {radical} s= 1.96 TeV are collected between March 2002 and August 2004 with an integrated luminosity of 346 pb{sup -1}. R-parity violating supersymmetry is sought for in two data samples, one with exactly three leptons and one with four or more leptons. The trilepton sample has a modest background primarily from Drell-Yan events where an additional lepton is a result of photon conversions or jet misidentification while the four or more lepton sample has an extremely low background. In the three lepton samples 6 events are observed while in the four or more lepton sample zero events are observed. These results are consistent with the standard model expectation and are interpreted as mass limits on the lightest neutralino and lightest chargino particles. The neutralino mass is constrained to be heavier than 97.7 to 110.4 GeV/c{sup 2}, while the chargino mass is constrained to be heavier than 185.3 to 202.7 GeV/c{sup 2}, depending on the supersymmetry scenario.

  4. R -parity violation and light neutralinos at SHiP and the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Jordy; Dreiner, Herbi K.; Schmeier, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    We study the sensitivity of the proposed SHiP experiment to the L Q D operator in R -parity violating supersymmetric theories. We focus on single neutralino production via rare meson decays and the observation of downstream neutralino decays into charged mesons inside the SHiP decay chamber. We provide a generic list of effective operators and decay width formulas for any λ' coupling and show the resulting expected SHiP sensitivity for a widespread list of benchmark scenarios via numerical simulations. We compare this sensitivity to expected limits from testing the same decay topology at the LHC with ATLAS.

  5. Supersymmetry with spontaneous R-parity breaking in Z 0 decays: The case of an additional Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Valle, J. W. F.

    1991-05-01

    Single production of SUSY particles in the decays of the Z 0 may proceed with large rates in models with spontaneously broken R-parity. We focus on the case where there is a lepton number symmetry as part of the gauge group. In the simplest of such models there is a single additional neutral gauge boson and the strength of Rp-violating interactions is related with that of the new gauge force. We study the phenomenological implications of the model for Z 0 decays, including the study of the rates for single chargino production in Z 0 decays, i.e. Z 0→ ξ±τ±, as well as for the so-called Zen events, and find that they may be measurable at LEP. The first process, characteristics of spontaneously broken R-parity models, may proceed with a branching ratio as large as few × 10 -5 and should lead to a very clear signature. Zen events have a different origin than in the minimal SUSY standard model (MSSM). Their rates may also be enhanced with respect to MSSM. Our estimates of these rates take into account all of the relevant observational constraints, such as those that follow from neutrinophyics, from precise Z 0 property measurements, as well as SUSY particle searches at LEP.

  6. Polarizations in decays B{sub u,d}{yields}VV and possible implications for R-parity violating supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yadong; Wang, Rumin; Lu, G.R.

    2005-07-01

    Recently BABAR and Belle have measured anomalous large transverse polarizations in some pure penguin B{yields}VV decays, which might be inconsistent with the standard model expectations. We try to explore its implications for R-parity violating (RPV) supersymmetry. The QCD factorization approach is employed for the hadronic dynamics of B decays. We find that it is possible to have parameter spaces solving the anomaly. Furthermore, we have derived stringent bounds on relevant R-parity violating couplings from the experimental data, which is useful for further studies of RPV phenomena.

  7. 750 GeV diphoton excess explained by a resonant sneutrino in R -parity violating supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanach, B. C.; Dev, P. S. Bhupal; Renner, S. A.; Sakurai, Kazuki

    2016-06-01

    We explain the recent excess seen by ATLAS and CMS experiments at around 750 GeV in the diphoton invariant mass as a narrow-width sneutrino decaying to diphotons via a stau loop in R -parity violating supersymmetry. The stau mass is predicted to be somewhere between half the resonant sneutrino mass and half the sneutrino mass plus 14 GeV. The scenario also predicts further signal channels at an invariant mass of 750 GeV, the most promising being into dijets and W W . We also predict a left-handed charged slepton decaying into W Z and W γ at a mass 750-754 GeV.

  8. R-parity violation in flavor-changing neutral current processes and top quark decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, K.; Graesser, M.

    1996-10-01

    We show that supersymmetric R-parity-breaking (R/p) interactions always result in flavor changing neutral current processes. Within a single coupling scheme, these processes can be avoided in either the charge +2/3 or the charge -1/3 quark sector, but not both. These processes are used to place constraints on R/p couplings. The constraints on the first and the second generations are better than those existing in the literature. The R/p interactions may result in new top quark decays. Some of these violate electron-muon universality or produce a surplus of b quark events in tt¯ decays. Results from the CDF experiment are used to bound these R/p couplings.

  9. Computation of neutrino masses in R-parity violating supersymmetry: SOFTSUSY3.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanach, B. C.; Kom, C. H.; Hanussek, M.

    2012-03-01

    The program SOFTSUSY can calculate tree-level neutrino masses in the R-parity violating minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with real couplings. At tree-level, only one neutrino acquires a mass, in contradiction with neutrino oscillation data. Here, we describe an extension to the SOFTSUSY program which includes one-loop R-parity violating effects' contributions to neutrino masses and mixing. Including the one-loop effects refines the radiative electroweak symmetry breaking calculation, and may result in up to three massive, mixed neutrinos. This paper serves as a manual to the neutrino mass prediction mode of the program, detailing the approximations and conventions used. Program summaryProgram title: SOFTSUSY Catalogue identifier: ADPM_v3_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADPM_v3_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 93 291 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 288 618 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++, Fortran Computer: Personal computer Operating system: Tested on Linux 4.x Word size: 32 bits Classification: 11.1, 11.6 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADPM_v2_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 181 (2010) 232 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Calculation of neutrino masses and the neutrino mixing matrix at one-loop level in the R-parity violating minimal supersymmetric standard model. The solution to the renormalisation group equations must be consistent with a high or weak-scale boundary condition on supersymmetry breaking parameters and R-parity violating parameters, as well as a weak-scale boundary condition on gauge couplings, Yukawa couplings and the Higgs potential parameters. Solution method: Nested iterative algorithm

  10. Pion dominance in R-parity violating supersymmetry induced neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Simkovic, Fedor; Kovalenko, Sergey

    2008-06-01

    At the quark level there are basically two types of contributions of R-parity violating supersymmetry (Re{sub p} SUSY) to neutrinoless double beta decay: the short-range contribution involving only heavy virtual superpartners and the long-range one with the virtual squark and neutrino. Hadronization of the effective operators, corresponding to these two types of contributions, may in general involve virtual pions in addition to close on-mass-shell nucleons. From the previous studies it is known that the short-range contribution is dominated by the pion exchange. In the present paper we show that this is also true for the long-range Re{sub p} SUSY contribution. Therefore, we conclude that the Re{sub p} SUSY contributes to the neutrinoless double beta decay dominantly via charged pion exchange between the decaying nucleons.

  11. Flavor anomalies at the LHC and the R -parity violating supersymmetric model extended with vectorlike particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Weicong; Tang, Yi-Lei

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we consider a solution to explain the three discrepancies with the standard model (SM) predictions in flavor observables, i.e., anomalies in B →K*μ+μ- and RK=B (B →K μ+μ-)/B (B →K e+e-) at the LHCb and an excess in h →μ τ at the CMS in the context of R-parity violating (RPV) supersymmetry. We demonstrate that these anomalies can be explained within a unified framework: the minimal supersymmetry model (MSSM) extended with 5 +5 ¯ vectorlike (VL) particles. The new trilinear RPV couplings involving VL particles in our model can solve the b →s anomalies, and the mixing between the SM-like Higgs boson and the VL sneutrino can yield the extra h →μ τ decay mode.

  12. Realizing the supersymmetric inverse seesaw model in the framework of R-parity violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de S. Pires, C. A.; Rodrigues, J. G.; Rodrigues da Silva, P. S.

    2016-08-01

    If, on one hand, the inverse seesaw is the paradigm of TeV scale seesaw mechanism, on the other it is a challenge to find scenarios capable of realizing it. In this work we propose a scenario, based on the framework of R-parity violation, that realizes minimally the supersymmetric inverse seesaw mechanism. In it the energy scale parameters involved in the mechanism are recognized as the vacuum expectation values of the scalars that compose the singlet superfields NˆC and S ˆ . We develop also the scalar sector of the model and show that the Higgs mass receives a new tree-level contribution that, when combined with the standard contribution plus loop correction, is capable of attaining 125 GeV without resort to heavy stops.

  13. R -parity violation in a warped GUT scale Randall-Sundrum framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanach, B. C.; Iyer, A. M.; Sridhar, K.

    2016-03-01

    We consider a modified Randall-Sundrum (RS) framework between the Planck scale and the grand unified theory (GUT) scale. In this scenario, RS works as a theory of flavor and not as a solution to the hierarchy problem. The latter is resolved by supersymmetrizing the bulk, so that the minimal supersymmetric standard model is the effective four-dimensional theory. Matter fields are localized in the bulk in order to fit fermion-mass and mixing data. If R -parity violating (Rp) terms are allowed in the superpotential, their orders of magnitude throughout flavor space are then predicted, resulting in rich flavor textures. If the Rp contributions to neutrino masses are somewhat suppressed, then lepton-number violating models exist which explain the neutrino oscillation data while not being in contradiction with current experimental bounds. Another promising model is one where baryon number is violated and Dirac neutrino masses result solely from fermion localization. We sketch the likely discovery signatures of the baryon-number and the lepton-number violating cases.

  14. R-parity violating effects in top quark flavor-changing neutral-current production at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Junjie; Heng Zhaoxia; Yang Jinmin; Wu Lei

    2009-03-01

    In the minimal supersymmetric model the R-parity violating top quark interactions, which are so far weakly constrained, can induce various flavor-changing neutral-current (FCNC) productions for the top quark at the large hadron collider (LHC). In this work we assume the presence of the B-violating couplings and examine their contributions to the FCNC productions proceeding through the parton processes cg{yields}t, gg{yields}tc, cg{yields}t{gamma}, cg{yields}tZ and cg{yields}th. We find that all these processes can be greatly enhanced relative to the R-parity preserving predictions. In the parameter space allowed by current experiments, all the production channels except cg{yields}th can reach the 3{sigma} sensitivity, in contrast to the R-parity preserving case in which only cg{yields}t can reach the 3{sigma} sensitivity.

  15. Probing the R-parity violating supersymmetric effects in the exclusive c → d/sℓ+νℓ decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ru-Min; Zhu, Jie; Sheng, Jin-Huan; Liu, Mo-Lin; Xu, Yuan-Guo

    2015-12-01

    A lot of branching ratios of the exclusive c → d / sℓ+νℓ (ℓ = e , μ) decays have been quite accurately measured by CLEO-c, BELLE, BABAR, BES(I, II, III), ALEPH and MARKIII Collaborations. We probe the R-parity violating supersymmetric effects in the exclusive c → d / sℓ+νℓ decays. From the latest experimental measurements, we obtain new upper limits on the relevant R-parity violating coupling parameters within the decays, and many upper limits are obtained for the first time. Using the constrained new parameter spaces, we predict the R-parity violating effects on the observables, which have not been measured yet. We find that the R-parity violating effects due to slepton exchange could be large on the branching ratios of Dd/s →e+νe decays and the normalized forward-backward asymmetries of Du/d → π / Kℓ+νℓ as well as Ds → Kℓ+νℓ decays, and the constrained squark exchange couplings have negligible effects in the exclusive c → d / sℓ+νℓ decays. Our results in this work could be used to probe new physics effects in the leptonic decays as well as the semileptonic decays, and will correlate with searches for direct supersymmetric signals at LHC and BESIII.

  16. Search for bosonic stop decays in R-parity violating supersymmetry in e+ p collisions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Asmone, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bähr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J. C.; Böhme, J.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brisson, V.; Bröker, H.-B.; Brown, D. P.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J. G.; Coppens, Y. R.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cox, B. E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y. H.; Flucke, G.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formánek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garutti, E.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, S.; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grindhammer, G.; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Heuer, R.-D.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Höting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Koblitz, B.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Krüger, K.; Kückens, J.; Kuhr, T.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leißner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lueders, H.; Lüke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morozov, I.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Ossoskov, G.; Ozerov, D.; Paramonov, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Pöschl, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauvan, E.; Schätzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlák, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, M.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Winter, G.-G.; Wissing, Ch.; Woehrling, E.-E.; Wolf, R.; Wünsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; H1 Collaboration

    2004-10-01

    A search for scalar top quarks in R-parity violating supersymmetry is performed in e+ p collisions at HERA using the H1 detector. The data, taken at √{ s} = 319GeV and 301 GeV, correspond to an integrated luminosity of 106pb-1. The resonant production of scalar top quarks t˜ in positron quark fusion via an R-parity violating Yukawa coupling λ‧ is considered with the subsequent bosonic stop decay t˜ →b˜ W. The R-parity violating decay of the sbottom quark b˜ → dνbare and leptonic and hadronic W decays are considered. No evidence for stop production is found in the search for bosonic stop decays nor in a search for the direct R-parity violating decay t˜ → eq. Mass dependent limits on λ‧ are obtained in the framework of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. Stop quarks with masses up to 275GeV can be excluded at the 95% confidence level for a Yukawa coupling of electromagnetic strength.

  17. Production and decays of supersymmetric Higgs bosons in spontaneously broken R parity

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, M.; Valle, J.W.F.; Villanova del Moral, A.

    2006-03-01

    We study the mass spectra, production, and decay properties of the lightest supersymmetric CP-even and CP-odd Higgs bosons in models with spontaneously broken R parity. We compare the resulting mass spectra with expectations of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM), stressing that the model obeys the upper bound on the lightest CP-even Higgs boson mass. We discuss how the presence of the additional scalar singlet states affects the Higgs production cross sections, both for the Bjorken process and the ''associated production.'' The main phenomenological novelty with respect to the MSSM comes from the fact that the spontaneous breaking of lepton number leads to the existence of the majoron, denoted J, which opens new decay channels for supersymmetric Higgs bosons. We find that the invisible decays of CP-even Higgses can be dominant, while those of the CP-odd bosons may also be sizable.

  18. Search for charginos and neutralinos with R-parity violation at √s = 130 and 136 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Palla, F.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lunch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Büscher, V.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    Searches for charginos and neutralinos produced in e +e - collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV have been performed under the assumptions that R-parity is not conserved, that the dominant R-parity violating coupling involves only leptonic fields, and that the lifetime of the lightest supersymmetric particle can be neglected. In the 5.7 pb -1 data sample collected by ALEPH, no candidate events were found. As a result, chargino and neutralino masses and couplings are constrained and the domains previously excluded at LEP1 are extended.

  19. Search for r-parity violating supersymmetry in multilepton final states with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kaefer, Daniela; /Aachen, Tech. Hochsch.

    2006-11-01

    Results obtained from a search for the trilepton signature {mu}{mu}{ell} (with {ell} = e, or {mu}) are combined with two complementary searches for the trilepton signatures ee{ell} and eer and interpreted in the framework of R-parity violating Supersymmetry. Pairwise, R-parity conserving production of the supersymmetric particles is assumed, followed by R-parity violating decays via an LL{bar E}-operator with one dominant coupling {lambda}{sub 122}. An LL{bar E}-operator couples two weak isospin doublet and one singlet (s)lepton fields and thus violates lepton number conservation. The data, collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab proton-antiproton collider Tevatron, corresponds to an integrated luminosity of {integral} L dt = 360 {+-} 23 pb{sup -1}. No evident is observed, while 0.41 {+-} 0.11(stat) {+-} 0.07(sys) events are expected from Standard Model processes. The resulting 95% confidence level cross section limits on new physics producing a {mu}{mu}{ell} signature in the detector are of the order of 0.020 to 0.136 pb. They are interpreted in two different supersymmetry scenarios: the mSUGRA and the MSSM model. The corresponding lower limits on the masses of the lightest neutralino ({tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}) and the lightest chargino ({tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}) in case of the mSUGRA model are found to be in the range of: mSUGRA, {mu} > 0: M({tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}) {approx}> 115-128 GeV and M({tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}) {approx}> 215-241 GeV; mSUGRA, {mu} < 0: ({tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}) {approx}> 101-114 GeV and M({tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}) {approx}> 194-230 GeV, depending on the actual values of the model parameters: m{sub 0}, m{sub 1/2}, A{sub 0}, tan{beta}, and {mu}. The first and second parameters provide the boundary conditions for the masses of the supersymmetric spin-0 and spin-1/2 particles, respectively, while A{sub 0} gives the universal value for the trilinear couplings at the GUT scale. The parameter tan {beta} denotes

  20. Studying double charm decays of B{sub u,d} and B{sub s} mesons in the MSSM with R-parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C. S.; Wang Rumin; Yang Yadong

    2009-03-01

    Motivated by the possible large direct CP asymmetry of B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}D{sup +}D{sup -} decays measured by the Belle Collaboration, we investigate double charm B{sub u,d} and B{sub s} decays in the minimal supersymmetric standard model with R-parity violation. We derive the bounds on relevant R-parity violating couplings from the current experimental data, which show quite consistent measurements among relative collaborations. Using the constrained parameter spaces, we explore R-parity violating effects on other observables in these decays, which have not been measured or have not been well measured yet. We find that the R-parity violating effects on the mixing-induced CP asymmetries of B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}D{sup (}*{sup )+}D{sup (}*{sup )-} and B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}D{sub s}{sup (}*{sup )+}D{sub s}{sup (}*{sup )-} decays could be very large; nevertheless, the R-parity violating effects on the direct CP asymmetries could not be large enough to explain the large direct CP violation of B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}D{sup +}D{sup -} from Belle. Our results could be used to probe R-parity violating effects and will correlate with searches for direct R-parity violating signals in future experiments.

  1. New physics contribution to Bs→μ+μ- within R-parity violating supersymmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeghiyan, Gagik

    2013-08-01

    We revisit the problem of new physics (NP) contribution to the branching ratio of the Bs→μ+μ- decay in light of the recent observation of this decay by LHCb. We consider R-parity violating (RPV) supersymmetric models as a primary example—recently one has reported stringent constraints on the products of the RPV coupling constants that account for the Bs→μ+μ- transition at the tree level. We argue that despite the fact that the LHCb measurement of the B(Bs→μ+μ-) is in a remarkable agreement with the Standard Model (SM) prediction, there is still a room for a significant new physics contribution to the B(Bs→μ+μ-), as the sign of the Bs→μ+μ- transition amplitude may be opposite to that of the Standard Model; alternatively the amplitude may have a large phase. We conduct our analysis mainly for the case of real RPV couplings. We find that taking into account the scenario with the sign flip of the Bs→μ+μ- amplitude (as compared to that of the SM) makes the bounds on the RPV coupling products significantly weaker. Also, we discuss briefly how our results are modified if the RPV couplings have large phases. In particular, we examine the dependence of the derived bounds on the phase of the NP amplitude.

  2. Searching for R-parity violation at run-II of the tevatron.

    SciTech Connect

    Allanach, B.; Banerjee, S.; Berger, E. L.; Chertok, M.; Diaz, M. A.; Dreiner, H.; Eboli, O. J. P.; Harris, B. W.; Hewett, J.; Magro, M. B.; Mondal, N. K.; Narasimham, V. S.; Navarro, L.; Parua, N.; Porod, W.; Restrepo, D. A.; Richardson, P.; Rizzo, T.; Seymour, M. H.; Sullivan, Z.; Valle, J. W. F.; de Campos, F.

    1999-06-22

    The authors present an outlook for possible discovery of supersymmetry with broken R-parity at Run II of the Tevatron. They first present a review of the literature and an update of the experimental bounds. In turn they then discuss the following processes: (1) resonant slepton production followed by R{sub P} decay, (a) via LQD{sup c} and (b) via LLE{sup c}; (2) how to distinguish resonant slepton production from Z{prime} or W{prime} production; (3) resonant slepton production followed by the decay to neutralino LSP, which decays via LQD{sup c}; (4) resonant stop production followed by the decay to a chargino, which cascades to the neutralino LSP; (5) gluino pair production followed by the cascade decay to charm squarks which decay directly via L{sub 1}Q{sub 2}D{sub 1}{sup c}; (6) squark pair production followed by the cascade decay to the neutralino LSP which decays via L{sub 1}Q{sub 2}D{sub 1}{sup c}; (7) MSSM pair production followed by the cascade decay to the LSP which decays (a) via LLE{sup c}, (b) via LQD{sup c}, and (c) via U{sup c}D{sup c}D{sup c}, respectively; and (8) top quark and top squark decays in spontaneous R{sub P}.

  3. Explaining a CMS e e j j excess with R -parity violating supersymmetry and implications for neutrinoless double beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanach, Ben; Biswas, Sanjoy; Mondal, Subhadeep; Mitra, Manimala

    2015-01-01

    A recent CMS search for the right-handed gauge boson WR reports an interesting deviation from the Standard Model. The search has been conducted in the e e j j channel and has shown a 2.8 σ excess around me e j j˜2 TeV . In this work, we explain the reported CMS excess with R -parity violating supersymmetry. We consider resonant selectron and sneutrino production, followed by the three body decays of the neutralino and chargino via an R -parity violating coupling. We fit the excess for slepton masses around 2 TeV. The scenario can further be tested in neutrinoless double beta decay (0 ν β β ) experiments. GERDA Phase-II will probe a significant portion of the good-fit parameter space.

  4. R-parity violating supersymmetric Barr-Zee type contributions to the fermion electric dipole moment with weak gauge boson exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Nodoka; Sato, Toru; Kubota, Takahiro

    2013-06-01

    The contribution of the R-parity violating trilinear couplings in the supersymmetric model to the fermion electric dipole moment is analyzed at the two-loop level. We show that in general, the Barr-Zee type contribution to the fermion electric dipole moment with the exchange of W and Z bosons is not small compared to the currently known photon exchange one with R-parity violating interactions. We will then give new upper bounds on the imaginary parts of R-parity violating couplings from the experimental data of the electric dipole moments of the electron and of the neutron. The effect due to bilinear R-parity violating couplings, which needs to be investigated separately, is not included in our analyses.

  5. Galileogenesis: A new cosmophenomenological zip code for reheating through R-parity violating coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Sayantan; Dasgupta, Arnab

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we introduce an idea of leptogenesis scenario in higher derivative gravity induced DBI Galileon framework aka Galileogenesis in presence of one-loop R-parity violating couplings in the background of a low energy effective supergravity setup derived from higher dimensional string theory framework. We have studied extensively the detailed feature of reheating constraints and the cosmophenomenological consequences of thermal gravitino dark matter in light of PLANCK and PDG data. Finally, we have also established a direct cosmophenomenological connection among dark matter relic abundance, reheating temperature and tensor-to-scalar ratio in the context of DBI Galileon inflation. Higher order correction terms in the gravity sector are introduced in the effective action as a perturbative correction to the Einstein-Hilbert counterpart coming from the computation of Conformal Field Theory disk amplitude at the two loop level [34-36]. The matter sector encounters the effect of N=1, D=4 supergravity motivated DBI Galileon interaction which is embedded in the D3 brane. Additionally, we have considered the effect of R-parity violating interactions [37-40] in the matter sector which provide a convenient framework for quantifying quark and lepton-flavor violating effects. The low energy UV protective effective action for the proposed cosmophenomenological model is described by [31,32]: S=∫d4x √{-g}[K(Φ,X)-G(Φ,X)□Φ+B1R+(B2RRαβγδ-4B3RRαβ+B4R2)+B5] where the model dependent characteristic functions K(Φ,X) and G(Φ,X) are the implicit functions of Galileon and its kinetic counterpart is X=-1/2 >g∂μΦ∂νΦ. Additionally, Bi∀i are the self-coupling constants of graviton degrees of freedom appearing via dimensional reduction from higher dimensional string theory. Specifically B5 be the effective four dimensional cosmological constant. In general, B2≠B3≠B4 which implies that the quadratic curvature terms originated from two loop correction to the

  6. Sfermion loop contribution to the two-loop level fermion electric dipole moment in R-parity violating supersymmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Nodoka

    2012-10-01

    We evaluate the Barr-Zee-type two-loop level contribution to the fermion electric and chromo-electric dipole moments with sfermion loop in R-parity violating supersymmetric models. It is found that the Barr-Zee-type fermion dipole moment with sfermion loop acts destructively to the currently known fermion loop contribution, and that it has small effect when the mass of squarks or charged sleptons in the loop is larger than or comparable to that of the sneutrinos, but cannot be neglected if the sneutrinos are much heavier than loop sfermions.

  7. Implications of Higgs boson to diphoton decay rate in the bilinear R-parity violating supersymmetric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hundi, Raghavendra Srikanth

    2013-06-01

    The Large Hadron Collider has recently discovered a Higgs-like particle having a mass around 125 GeV and also indicated that there is an enhancement in the Higgs to diphoton decay rate as compared to that in the standard model. We have studied implications of these discoveries in the bilinear R-parity violating supersymmetric model, whose main motivation is to explain the nonzero masses for neutrinos. The R-parity violating parameters in this model are ɛ and bɛ, and these parameters determine the scale of neutrino masses. If the enhancement in the Higgs to diphoton decay rate is true, then we have found ɛ≳0.01GeV and bɛ˜1GeV2 in order to be compatible with the neutrino oscillation data. Also, in the above mentioned analysis, we can determine the soft masses of sleptons (mL) and CP-odd Higgs boson mass (mA). We have estimated that mL≳300GeV and mA≳700GeV. We have also commented on the allowed values of ɛ and bɛ, in case there is no enhancement in the Higgs to diphoton decay rate. Finally, we present a model to explain the smallness of ɛ and bɛ.

  8. Probing R -parity violating supersymmetric effects in the exclusive b →c ℓ-ν¯ℓ decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ru-Min; Zhu, Jie; Gan, Hua-Min; Fan, Ying-Ying; Chang, Qin; Xu, Yuan-Guo

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by recent results from the LHCb, BABAR, and Belle Collaborations on B →D(*)ℓ-ν¯ ℓ decays, which significantly deviate from the Standard Model and hint at the possible new physics beyond the Standard Model, we probe the R -parity violating supersymmetric effects in Bc-→ℓ-ν¯ ℓ and B →D(*)ℓ-ν¯ ℓ decays. We find the following: (i) B (Bc-→e-ν¯ e) and B (Bc-→μ-ν¯ μ) are sensitive to the constrained slepton exchange couplings. (ii) The normalized forward-backward asymmetries of B →D e-ν¯ e decays have been greatly affected by the constrained slepton exchange couplings, and their signs could be changed. (iii) All relevant observables in the exclusive b →c τ-ν¯ τ decays and ratios R (D(*)) are sensitive to the slepton exchange coupling, and R (D*) could be enhanced by the constrained slepton exchange coupling to reach each 95% confidence level experimental ranges from BABAR, Belle, and LHCb but not the lower limit of the 95% confidence level experimental average. Our results in this work could be used to probe R -parity violating effects and will correlate with searches for direct supersymmetric signals at the running LHCb and the forthcoming Belle-II.

  9. Constraint on R-parity violating MSSM at the one-loop level from CP-odd N-N interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanaka, Nodoka; Sato, Toru; Kubota, Takahiro

    2011-10-21

    Minimal supersymmetric standard model with R-parity violation (RPVMSSM) contributes to the P-, CP-odd four-quark interaction. The P-, CP-odd four-quark interaction is constrained by the new {sup 199}Hg EDM experimental data. It is then possible to constrain R-parity violating (RPV) couplings from the {sup 199}Hg EDM data. In this talk, we analyze the RPV contribution to the P-, CP-odd four-quark interaction at the one-loop level to give constraints on RPV parameters.

  10. CERN LHC signals for a neutrino mass model with bilinear R-parity violating minimal anomaly mediated supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, F. de; Diaz, M. A.; Eboli, O. J. P.; Magro, M. B.; Porod, W.; Skadhauge, S.

    2008-06-01

    We investigate a neutrino mass model in which the neutrino data is accounted for by bilinear R-parity violating supersymmetry with anomaly mediated supersymmetry breaking. We focus on the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) phenomenology, studying the reach of generic supersymmetry search channels with leptons, missing energy and jets. A special feature of this model is the existence of long-lived neutralinos and charginos which decay inside the detector leading to detached vertices. We demonstrate that the largest reach is obtained in the displaced vertices channel and that practically all of the reasonable parameter space will be covered with an integrated luminosity of 10 fb{sup -1}. We also compare the displaced vertex reaches of the LHC and Tevatron.

  11. Light Gluinos in Hiding: Reconstructing R-Parity Violating Decays at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Raklev, A.R.; Salam, G.P.; Wacker, J.G.; /SLAC

    2012-04-19

    If gluinos exist with masses less than 200 GeV, they are copiously produced at the Tevatron, but still may not have been discovered if they decay through baryon number violating operators. We show that using cuts on jet substructure can enable a discovery with existing data and even determine the gluino's mass. This contribution has demonstrated that the Tevatron can discover new light colored particles that decay into complicated hadronic final states, by using events where these particles are produced at high p{sub T} and their boosted decay products are collimated. The recently developed techniques using jet substructure can effectively separate signal from background, allowing the new particle to appear as a jet-mass resonance. This work is a proof-of-principle, but there is significantly more work to be done. Neither of the Tevatron's two detectors have calorimetry that is as finely segmented as the LHC detectors, where most studies have been done so far, and this may reduce the jet mass resolution and restrict the Tevatron reach. Some of this resolution loss may be recovered by using tracking information, particularly at CDF [99]. On the theoretical side, the optimal cuts and jet-size for a given mass have not been determined, nor have other jet algorithms such as Cambridge/Aachen been studied. Switching to a more inclusive analysis may also improve sensitivity. The primary challenge is to keep signal efficiency high due to the low number of gluinos in the high p{sub T} tail, e.g. with m{sub {tilde g}} = 150 GeV we see 18% of gluinos with p{sub T} > 350 GeV reconstructed using R = 1.0. Therefore it may be beneficial to search for one narrow gluino candidate jet with tight constraints recoiling against another wide jet-size gluino candidate jet. The application of loose substructure cuts to the jets of the ordinary di-jet search is also interesting. If the squarks become light enough that associated squark-gluino production or squark pair production becomes

  12. Including R-parity violation in the numerical computation of the spectrum of the minimal supersymmetric standard model: SOFTSUSY3.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanach, B. C.; Bernhard, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Current publicly available computer programs calculate the spectrum and couplings of the minimal supersymmetric standard model under the assumption of R-parity conservation. Here, we describe an extension to the SOFTSUSY program which includes R-parity violating effects. The user provides a theoretical boundary condition upon the high-scale supersymmetry breaking R-parity violating couplings. Successful radiative electroweak symmetry breaking, electroweak and CKM matrix data are used as weak-scale boundary conditions. The renormalisation group equations are solved numerically between the weak scale and a high energy scale using a nested iterative algorithm. This paper serves as a manual to the R-parity violating mode of the program, detailing the approximations and conventions used. Program summaryProgram title:SOFTSUSY v3.0 Catalogue identifier: ADPM_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADPM_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 75 927 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 570 916 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++, Fortran Computer: Personal computer Operating system: Tested on Linux 4.x Word size: 32 bits Classification: 11.6 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADPM_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 143 (2002) 305 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Calculating supersymmetric particle spectrum and mixing parameters in the R-parity violating minimal supersymmetric standard model. The solution to the renormalisation group equations must be consistent with a high-scale boundary condition on supersymmetry breaking parameters and R parameters, as well as a weak-scale boundary condition on gauge couplings, Yukawa

  13. Bs,d0→μμ¯ and B→Xsγ in the R-parity violating MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreiner, H. K.; Nickel, K.; Staub, F.

    2013-12-01

    The recent measurements of Bs0→μμ¯ decay candidates at the LHC consistent with the standard model rate and the improving upper limits for Bd0→μμ¯ can strongly constrain beyond the standard model physics. For example, in supersymmetric models with broken R-parity (RpV), they restrict the size of the new couplings. We use the combination of the public software packages SARAH and SPheno to derive new bounds on several combinations of RpV couplings. We improve existing limits for the couplings which open tree-level decay channels and state new limits for combinations which induce loop contributions. This is the first study which performs a full one-loop analysis of these observables in the context of R-parity violation. It turns out that at one loop despite the strong experimental limits only combinations of R-parity violating couplings are constrained which include third generation fermions. We compare our limits with those obtained via B→Xsγ and discuss the differences.

  14. Search for R -Parity Violating Supersymmetry Using Like-Sign Dielectrons in p[ovr p] Collisions at [radical] (s) =1. 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, R.E.; Byrum, K.L.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.E.; LeCompte, T.; Nodulman, L. ); Breccia, L.; Brunetti, R.; Deninno, M.; Fiori, I.; Mazzanti, P. ); Behrends, S.; Bensinger, J.; Blocker, C.; Kirsch, L.; Lamoureux, J.I. ); Bonushkin, Y.; Hauser, J.; Lindgren, M. ); Amadon, A.; Berryhill, J.; Contreras, M.; Culbertson, R.; Frisch, H.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Hohlmann, M.; Nakaya, T. ); Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dittmann, J.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Khazins, D.; Kowald, W.; Oh, S.H. ); Albrow, M.G.; Atac, M.; Beretvas, A.; Berge, J.P.; Biery, K.; Binkley, M.; Buckley-Geer,

    1999-09-01

    We present a search for like-sign dielectron plus multijet events using 107 pb[sup [minus]1] of data in p[ovr p] collisions at [radical] (s) =1.8 TeV collected in 1992[endash]1995 by the CDF experiment. Finding no events that pass our selection, we set [sigma][times]BR limits on two supersymmetric processes that can produce this experimental signature: gluino-gluino or squark-antisquark production with R -parity violating decays of the charm squark or lightest neutralino via a nonzero [lambda][sup [prime

  15. Search for R-parity violating decays of a top squark in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-01-01

    The results of a search for a supersymmetric partner of the top quark (top squark), pair-produced in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV, are presented. The search, which focuses on R-parity violating, chargino-mediated decays of the top squark, is performed in final states with low missing transverse momentum, two oppositely charged electrons or muons, and at least five jets. The analysis uses a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the CMS detector at the LHC in 2012. The data are found to be in agreement with the standard model expectation, and upper limits are placed on the top squark pair production cross section at 95% confidence level. Assuming a 100% branching fraction for the top squark decay chain, $ \\mathrm{ \\tilde{t} \\to t \\tilde{\\chi}^{\\pm}_1,\\, \\tilde{\\chi}^{\\pm}_1 \\to \\ell^\\pm+jj } $, top squark masses less than 890 (1000) GeV for the electron (muon) channel are excluded for the first time in models with a single nonzero R-parity violating coupling $\\lambda^{\\prime}_{ijk}$ $(i,j,k \\leq 2)$, where $i,j,k$ correspond to the three generations.

  16. Search for R-parity violating decays of a top squark in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.

    2016-09-01

    The results of a search for a supersymmetric partner of the top quark (top squark), pair-produced in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV, are presented. The search, which focuses on R-parity violating, chargino-mediated decays of the top squark, is performed in final states with low missing transverse momentum, two oppositely charged electrons or muons, and at least five jets. The analysis uses a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 collected with the CMS detector at the LHC in 2012. The data are found to be in agreement with the standard model expectation, and upper limits are placed on the top squark pair production cross section at 95% confidence level. Assuming a 100% branching fraction for the top squark decay chain, t ˜ → t χ˜1±, χ˜1± →ℓ± + jj, top squark masses less than 890 (1000) GeV for the electron (muon) channel are excluded for the first time in models with a single nonzero R-parity violating coupling λijk‧ (i, j, k ≤ 2), where i, j, k correspond to the three generations.

  17. Search for R-parity violating decays of a top squark in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Rurua, L.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. 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T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'Imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. 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V.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Myagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; de La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro de Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. 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V.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Piparo, D.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz Del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; de Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, R.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. 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M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-Storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; de Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Gastler, D.; Lawson, P.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon de La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; McLean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Paneva, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Derdzinski, M.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; MacNeill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; McColl, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes de Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sady, A.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; McGinn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira de Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Arora, S.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; de Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2016-09-01

    The results of a search for a supersymmetric partner of the top quark (top squark), pair-produced in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV, are presented. The search, which focuses on R-parity violating, chargino-mediated decays of the top squark, is performed in final states with low missing transverse momentum, two oppositely charged electrons or muons, and at least five jets. The analysis uses a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 collected with the CMS detector at the LHC in 2012. The data are found to be in agreement with the standard model expectation, and upper limits are placed on the top squark pair production cross section at 95% confidence level. Assuming a 100% branching fraction for the top squark decay chain, t ˜ → t χ˜1 ± , χ˜1 ± →ℓ± + jj , top squark masses less than 890 (1000) GeV for the electron (muon) channel are excluded for the first time in models with a single nonzero R-parity violating coupling λijk‧ (i , j , k ≤ 2), where i , j , k correspond to the three generations.

  18. Search for the production of single sleptons through R-parity violation in pp; collisions at square root (s) =1.8 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abdesselam, A; Abolins, M; Abramov, V; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Adams, M; Ahmed, S N; Alexeev, G D; Alton, A; Alves, G A; Anderson, E W; Arnoud, Y; Avila, C; Babintsev, V V; Babukhadia, L; Bacon, T C; Baden, A; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beaudette, F; Begel, M; Belyaev, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bertram, I; Besson, A; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Bhattacharjee, M; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Boehnlein, A; Bojko, N I; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Breedon, R; Briskin, G; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burtovoi, V S; Butler, J M; Canelli, F; Carvalho, W; Casey, D; Casilum, Z; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chekulaev, S V; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Chopra, S; Christenson, J H; Claes, D; Clark, A R; Coney, L; Connolly, B; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; Davis, G A; De, K; De Jong, S J; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doulas, S; Ducros, Y; Dudko, L V; Duensing, S; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyshkant, A; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Eltzroth, J T; Elvira, V D; Engelmann, R; Eno, S; Eppley, G; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Fein, D; Ferbel, T; Filthaut, F; Fisk, H E; Fisyak, Y; Flattum, E; Fleuret, F; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gallas, E; Galyaev, A N; Gao, M; Gavrilov, V; Genik, R J; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gilmartin, R; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goncharov, P I; Gordon, H; Goss, L T; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Graf, N; Grannis, P D; Green, J A; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Grinstein, S; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Gupta, A; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Hadley, N J; Haggerty, H; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Hall, R E; Hansen, S; Hauptman, J M; Hays, C; Hebert, C; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Huang, Y; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Karmanov, D; Karmgard, D; Kehoe, R; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kim, S K; Klima, B; Knuteson, B; Ko, W; Kohli, J M; Kostritskiy, A V; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Kozlovsky, E A; Krane, J; Krishnaswamy, M R; Krivkova, P; Krzywdzinski, S; Kubantsev, M; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kuznetsov, V E; Landsberg, G; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Leggett, C; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipton, R; Lucotte, A; Lueking, L; Lundstedt, C; Luo, C; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Malyshev, V L; Manankov, V; Mao, H S; Marshall, T; Martin, M I; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McMahon, T; Melanson, H L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Miao, C; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mishra, C S; Mokhov, N; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Mostafa, M; Da Motta, H; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Nang, F; Narain, M; Narasimham, V S; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nomerotski, A; Nunnemann, T; O'Neil, D; Oguri, V; Olivier, B; Oshima, N; Padley, P; Papageorgiou, K; Parashar, N; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Peters, O; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Pope, B G; Popkov, E; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Przybycien, M B; Qian, J; Raja, R; Rajagopalan, S; Rapidis, P A; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Ridel, M; Rijssenbeek, M; Rizatdinova, F; Rockwell, T; Roco, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rutherfoord, J; Sabirov, B M; Sajot, G; Santoro, A; Sawyer, L; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schwartzman, A; Shabalina, E; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Shupe, M; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Singh, H; Sirotenko, V; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Snihur, R; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Solomon, J; Song, Y; Sorín, V; Sosebee, M; Sotnikova, N; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Stanton, N R; Steinbrück, G; Stephens, R W; Stoker, D; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Taylor, W; Tentindo-Repond, S; Tripathi, S M; Trippe, T G; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Vaniev, V; Kooten, R Van; Varelas, N; Vertogradov, L S; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Volkov, A A; Vorobiev, A P; Wahl, H D; Wang, H; Wang, Z-M; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weerts, H; White, A; White, J T; Whiteson, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Willis, S; Wimpenny, S J; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Xu, Q; Yamada, R; Yamin, P; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Youssef, S; Yu, J; Zanabria, M; Zhang, X; Zheng, H; Zhou, B; Zhou, Z; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2002-12-23

    We report the first search for supersymmetric particles via s-channel production and decay of smuons or muon sneutrinos at hadronic colliders. The data for the two-muon and two-jets final states were collected by the D0 experiment and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 94+/-5 pb(-1). Assuming that R parity is violated via the single coupling lambda'211, the number of candidate events is in agreement with expectation from the standard model. Exclusion contours are given in the (m(0),m(1/2)) and (m(x),m(v)) planes for lambda(')(211)=0.09, 0.08, and 0.07. PMID:12484810

  19. Search for Scalar Top Quark Pair-Production in Scenario with Violated R-parity in ppbar Collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    A search for the pair production of supersymmetric partner of the top quark in scenario with R-parity violation is presented. The quantum number called R-parity distinguishes particles in standard model from supersymmetric particles. A scalar top quark (stop) is assumed to decay only via R{sub p}-violating supersymmetric coupling into tau lepton and b-quark. To collect events with multiple taus, a new special tau trigger (the lepton plus track trigger) is installed in Run II experiment of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The goal of the lepton plus track trigger is to collect generic dilepton ({ell}{ell}, {ell}{tau}, {tau}{tau}) events with lower p{sub T} threshold (8 GeV/c) and without prescale even at high luminosity. The Z {yields} {tau}{tau} event, where one {tau}-lepton decays leptonically and the other hadronically, is a good benchmark to calibrate the lepton plus track trigger and {tau} identification. The data sample of 72 pb{sup -1}, collected using the electron plus track trigger, contains clear a {tau} signal from Z {yields} {tau}{tau} events. The data used in stop search correspond to 200 pb{sup -1}. The lower stop mass bound of 134 GeV/c{sup 2} at a 95% confidence level is obtained. This limit is also directly applicable to the case of the third generation scalar leptoquark (LQ{sub 3}) assuming a 100% branching for the LQ{sub 3} {yields} {tau}b decay mode.

  20. B{sub s}{yields}K{sup (*)-}K{sup (*)+}, K{sup (*)-}{pi}{sup +}, K{sup (*)-}{rho}{sup +} decays in R-parity violating supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Yuanguo; Yang Yadong; Wang Rumin

    2009-05-01

    With the first measurements of the branching ratios and the direct CP asymmetries of B{sub s}{yields}K{sup -}K{sup +}, K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays by the CDF collaboration, we constrain the relevant parameter space of the minimal supersymmetric standard model with R-parity violation. Using the constrained R-parity violating couplings, we further examine their possible effects in B{sub s}{yields}K{sup -}*{pi}{sup +}, K{sup (*)-}{rho}{sup +} and K{sup (*){+-}}K{sup (*){+-}} decays. We find that some branching ratios and CP asymmetries are very sensitive to the R-parity violating couplings. The direct longitudinal CP asymmetries of tree-dominated process B{sub s}{yields}K*{sup -}{rho}{sup +} could be enlarged to {approx}70% and the longitudinal polarizations of B{sub s}{yields}K*{sup -}K*{sup +}, K*{sup -}{rho}{sup +} decays could be suppressed very much by the squark exchange couplings. Near future experiments at CERN LHC can test these predictions and shrink/reveal the parameter spaces of RPV SUSY.

  1. Gravity from spontaneous Lorentz violation

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelecky, V. Alan; Potting, Robertus

    2009-03-15

    We investigate a class of theories involving a symmetric two-tensor field in Minkowski spacetime with a potential triggering spontaneous violation of Lorentz symmetry. The resulting massless Nambu-Goldstone modes are shown to obey the linearized Einstein equations in a fixed gauge. Imposing self-consistent coupling to the energy-momentum tensor constrains the potential for the Lorentz violation. The nonlinear theory generated from the self-consistent bootstrap is an alternative theory of gravity, containing kinetic and potential terms along with a matter coupling. At energies small compared to the Planck scale, the theory contains general relativity, with the Riemann-spacetime metric constructed as a combination of the two-tensor field and the Minkowski metric. At high energies, the structure of the theory is qualitatively different from general relativity. Observable effects can arise in suitable gravitational experiments.

  2. Rare decays B{sub u}{sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}l{sup +}l{sup -}, {rho}{sup +}l{sup +}l{sup -} and B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}l{sup +}l{sup -} in the R-parity violating supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianjun; Wang Rumin; Xu Yuanguo; Yang Yadong

    2008-01-01

    We study the rare decays B{sub u}{sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}l{sup +}l{sup -}, {rho}{sup +}l{sup +}l{sup -} and B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}l{sup +}l{sup -} (l=e, {mu}) in the R-parity violating supersymmetric standard model. From the latest upper limits of B(B{sub u}{sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}l{sup +}l{sup -}) and B(B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}l{sup +}l{sup -}), we have derived new upper bounds on the relevant R-parity violating couplings products, which are stronger than the existing ones. Using the constrained parameter space, we present the R-parity violating effects on the branching ratios and the forward-backward asymmetries of these decays. We find that B(B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}l{sup +}l{sup -}) and B(B{sub u}{sup +}{yields}{rho}{sup +}l{sup +}l{sup -}) could be enhanced several orders by the R-parity violating sneutrino and squark exchanges, respectively. The R-parity violating effects on the dilepton invariant mass spectra of B{sub u}{sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}l{sup +}l{sup -}, {rho}{sup +}l{sup +}l{sup -} and the normalized forward-backward asymmetry A{sub FB}(B{sub u}{sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}l{sup +}l{sup -}) and A{sub FB}(B{sub u}{sup +}{yields}{rho}{sup +}l{sup +}l{sup -}) are studied in detail. Our results could be used to probe the R-parity violating effects and will correlate with searches for the direct R-parity violating signals at the future experiments.

  3. A simultaneous explanation of the large phase in B{sub s}-B{sub s}mixing and B{yields}{pi}{pi}/{pi}K puzzles in R-parity violating supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, Gautam; Chatterjee, Kalyan Brata

    2008-11-01

    Recent data on B meson mixings and decays are, in general, in accord with the standard model expectations, except showing a few hiccups: (i) a large phase in B{sub s} mixing, (ii) a significant difference (>3.5{sigma}) between CP-asymmetries in B{sup {+-}}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}} and B{sub d}{yields}{pi}{sup {+-}}K{sup {+-}} channels, and (iii) a larger than expected branching ratio in B{sub d}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} channel. We show that selective baryon-number violating Yukawa couplings in R-parity violating supersymmetry can reconcile all the measurements.

  4. A search for top squarks with R-parity-violating decays to all-hadronic final states with the ATLAS detector in √{s}=8 TeV proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

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T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Geng, C.; Gentile, S.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gignac, M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. 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D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Henkelmann, S.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Hong, T. M.; Hooberman, B. H.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. 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F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. 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M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-06-01

    A search for the pair production of top squarks, each with R-parity-violating decays into two Standard Model quarks, is performed using 17.4 fb-1 of √{s}=8 TeV proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Each top squark is assumed to decay to a b- and an s-quark, leading to four quarks in the final state. Background discrimination is achieved with the use of b-tagging and selections on the mass and substructure of large-radius jets, providing sensitivity to top squark masses as low as 100 GeV. No evidence of an excess beyond the Standard Model background prediction is observed and top squarks decaying to overline{b}overline{s} are excluded for top squark masses in the range 100 le {m}_{overline{t}}le 315 GeV at 95% confidence level. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Search for R-parity violating supersymmetry via the LL anti-E couplings lambda(121), lambda(122) or lambda(133) in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota

    2006-05-01

    A search for gaugino pair production with a trilepton signature in the framework of R-parity violating supersymmetry via the couplings {lambda}{sub 121}, {lambda}{sub 122}, or {lambda}{sub 133} is presented. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L {approx} 360 pb{sup -1}, were collected from April 2002 to August 2004 with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This analysis considers final states with three charged leptons with the flavor combinations ee{ell}, {mu}{mu}{ell}, and ee{tau} ({ell} = e or {mu}). No evidence for supersymmetry is found and limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the gaugino pair production cross section and lower bounds on the masses of the lightest neutralino and chargino are derived in two supersymmetric models.

  6. A search for top squarks with R-parity-violating decays to all-hadronic final states with the ATLAS detector in √{s}=8 TeV proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. 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R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. 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K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. 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H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-06-01

    A search for the pair production of top squarks, each with R-parity-violating decays into two Standard Model quarks, is performed using 17.4 fb-1 of √{s}=8 TeV proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Each top squark is assumed to decay to a b- and an s-quark, leading to four quarks in the final state. Background discrimination is achieved with the use of b-tagging and selections on the mass and substructure of large-radius jets, providing sensitivity to top squark masses as low as 100 GeV. No evidence of an excess beyond the Standard Model background prediction is observed and top squarks decaying to overline{b}overline{s} are excluded for top squark masses in the range 100 ≤ {m}_{overline{t}}≤ 315 GeV at 95% confidence level. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. A search for top squarks with R-parity-violating decays to all-hadronic final states with the ATLAS detector in $$$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$$ TeV proton-proton collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2016-06-10

    In this paper, a search for the pair production of top squarks, each with R -parity-violating decays into two Standard Model quarks, is performed using 17.4 fb -1 of √s=8 TeV proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Each top squark is assumed to decay to a b - and an s -quark, leading to four quarks in the final state. Background discrimination is achieved with the use of b -tagging and selections on the mass and substructure of large-radius jets, providing sensitivity to top squark masses as low as 100 GeV. Finally, no evidence ofmore » an excess beyond the Standard Model background prediction is observed and top squarks decaying to b ¯ s ¯ are excluded for top squark masses in the range 100 ≤ m t ¯ ≤ 315 GeV at 95% confidence level.« less

  8. Search for pair production of scalar top quarks in R-parity violating decay modes in pp collisions at square root of s=1.8 TeV.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bonushkin, Y; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Bruner, N; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M-T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Coca, M; Colijn, A P; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; De Cecco, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fan, Q; Farrington, S; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Gerstein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Goncharov, M; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Gresele, A; Grim, G; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Hou, S; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Issever, C; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karr, K; Kartal, S; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lannon, K; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Le, Y; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, T; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Manca, G; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Matthews, J A J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Napora, R; Niell, F; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C-Y P; Nigmanov, T; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Pratt, T; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Safonov, A; St Denis, R

    2004-02-01

    We present the results of a search for pair production of scalar top quarks (t(1)) in an R-parity violating supersymmetry scenario in 106 pb(-1) of pp collisions at square root of s=1.8 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. In this mode each t(1) decays into a tau lepton and a b quark. We search for events with two tau's, one decaying leptonically (e or mu) and one decaying hadronically, and two jets. No candidate events pass our final selection criteria. We set a 95% confidence level lower limit on the t(1) mass at 122 GeV/c(2) for Br(t(1)-->tau b)=1. PMID:14995297

  9. Neutrino constraints on spontaneous Lorentz violation

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Yuval; Kilic, Can; Thaler, Jesse; Walker, Devin G.E.

    2005-12-15

    We study the effect of spontaneous Lorentz violation on neutrinos. We consider two kinds of effects: static effects, where the neutrino acquires a Lorentz-violating dispersion relation, and dynamic effects, which arise from the interactions of the neutrino with the Goldstone boson of spontaneous Lorentz violation. Static effects are well detailed in the literature. Here, special emphasis is given to the novel dynamic effect of Goldstone-Cerenkov radiation, where neutrinos moving with respect to a preferred rest frame can spontaneously emit Goldstone bosons. We calculate the observable consequences of this process and use them to derive experimental bounds from SN1987A and the CMBR. The bounds derived from dynamic effects are complementary to - and in many cases much stronger than - those obtained from static effects.

  10. Long-lived stop at the LHC with or without R-parity

    SciTech Connect

    Covi, L.; Dradi, F. E-mail: federico.dradi@theorie.physik.uni-goettingen.de

    2014-10-01

    We consider scenarios of gravitino LSP and DM with stop NLSP both within R-parity conserving and R-parity violating supersymmetry (RPC and RPV SUSY, respectively). We discuss cosmological bounds from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the gravitino abundance and then concentrate on the signals of long-lived stops at the LHC as displaced vertices or metastable particles. Finally we discuss how to distinguish R-parity conserving and R-parity breaking stop decays if they happen within the detector and how to suppress SM backgrounds.

  11. Probe R-parity violating supersymmetry effects in B{yields}K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -} and B{sub s}{yields}l{sup +}l{sup -} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Yuanguo; Yang Yadong; Wang Rumin

    2006-12-01

    We study the decays B{yields}K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -} and B{sub s}{yields}l{sup +}l{sup -}(l=e,{mu}) in the minimal supersymmetric standard model with R-parity violation (RPV). From the recent measurements of B(B{yields}K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -}) and the upper limits of B(B{sub s}{yields}l{sup +}l{sup -}), we have derived new upper bounds on the relevant RPV coupling products, which are stronger than the existing ones. Using the constrained parameter space, we predict the RPV effects on the forward-backward asymmetries A{sub FB}(B{yields}K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -}) and the branching ratios B(B{sub s}{yields}l{sup +}l{sup -}). Our results of the forward-backward asymmetries agree with the recent experiment data. It is also found that B(B{sub s}{yields}l{sup +}l{sup -}) could be enhanced several orders by the RPV sneutrino exchange. The RPV effects on the dilepton invariant mass spectra of B{yields}K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -} and the normalized A{sub FB}(B{yields}K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -}) are studied in detail. Our results could be used to probe RPV effects and will correlate with searches for direct RPV signals at LHC.

  12. The theory of R-parity, unification and SUSY at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Pavel Fileviez

    2012-07-27

    The simplest gauge theories for the conservation of R-parity in supersymmetry are discussed. We show how the minimal theory based on the B-L gauge symmetry predicts that R-parity must be spontaneously broken at the TeV scale. The most striking signals of these theories at the Large Hadron Collider are discussed. We present a realistic theory where the local baryon and lepton numbers are spontaneously broken at the supersymmetry breaking scale. The possibility to understand the conservation of R-parity in grand unified theories defined in four dimensions is mentioned.

  13. R parity from the heterotic string.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Mary K

    2005-04-15

    In T-duality invariant effective supergravity with gaugino condensation as the mechanism for supersymmetry breaking, there is a residual discrete symmetry that could play the role of R parity in supersymmetric extensions of the standard model. PMID:15904056

  14. Spontaneous CP-violation in extended technicolor models

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, W.H.

    1983-01-01

    The spontaneous CP-violation in models with dynamically broken weak interaction symmetries, i.e., extended technicolor models is examined. Attention is focussed on situations in which the global, flavor symmetry of the strong, color-technicolor, interactions is a product of chiral, horizontal U(2), or, when weak degrees of freedom are included, U(4) factors. In this context, we demonstrate the Eichten, Lane, Preskill CP-violation mechanism and show that the nemesis of this mechanism, strong CP-violation, can be easily avoided by imposing a discrete symmetry on the chiral perturbation. When strong CP-invariance is preserved by this means, we find that spontaneously generated CP-violating phases are suppressed by a ratio of extended technicolor mass scales. In addition, we consider, and attempt to analyze the direct contribution to strong CP-violation from colored technifermions.

  15. Testing R-parity with geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang-Hui; Jejjala, Vishnu; Matti, Cyril; Nelson, Brent D.

    2016-03-01

    We present a complete classification of the vacuum geometries of all renormalizable superpotentials built from the fields of the electroweak sector of the MSSM. In addition to the Severi and affine Calabi-Yau varieties previously found, new vacuum manifolds are identified; we thereby investigate the geometrical implication of theories which display a manifest matter parity (or R-parity) via the distinction between leptonic and Higgs doublets, and of the lepton number assignment of the right-handed neutrino fields.

  16. Leptonic radiative decay in supersymmetry without R parity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.-Y.; Kong, Otto C. W.

    2009-06-01

    We present a detailed analysis together with exact numerical calculations on one-loop contributions to the branching ratio of the radiative decay of {mu} and {tau}, namely {mu}{yields}e{gamma}, {tau}{yields}e{gamma}, and {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma} from supersymmetry without R parity, focusing on contributions involving bilinear couplings. A numerical study is performed to obtain explicit bounds on the parameters under the present experimental limit. We present, and use in the calculation, formulas for exact mass eigenstate effective couplings. In this sense, we present an exact analysis free from approximation for the first time. After comparing our results against the closest early analysis, we discovered a major difference in resulted constraints on some {mu}{sub i}*B{sub j} combinations. Constraints from neutrino masses on the parameters were considered. Our result indicates that the branching ratio measurement on {mu}{yields}e{gamma} down to 10{sup -13}-10{sup -14} and beyond, as targeted by the MEG experiment, has a chance of observing decay from the R-parity violating scenario.

  17. Vacuum stability with spontaneous violation of lepton number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, Cesar; Fonseca, Renato M.; Valle, José W. F.

    2016-05-01

    The vacuum of the Standard Model is known to be unstable for the measured values of the top and Higgs masses. Here we show how vacuum stability can be achieved naturally if lepton number is violated spontaneously at the TeV scale. More precise Higgs measurements in the next LHC run should provide a crucial test of our symmetry breaking scenario. In addition, these schemes typically lead to enhanced rates for processes involving lepton flavor violation.

  18. Spontaneous parity violation and SUSY strong gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Haba, Naoyuki; Ohki, Hiroshi

    2012-07-27

    We suggest simple models of spontaneous parity violation in supersymmetric strong gauge theory. We focus on left-right symmetric model and investigate vacuum with spontaneous parity violation. Non-perturbative effects are calculable in supersymmetric gauge theory, and we suggest new models. Our models show confinement, so that we try to understand them by using a dual description of the theory. The left-right symmetry breaking and electroweak symmetry breaking are simultaneously occurred with the suitable energy scale hierarchy. This structure has several advantages compared to the MSSM. The scale of the Higgs mass (left-right breaking scale) and that of VEVs are different, so the SUSY little hierarchy problems are absent. The second model also induces spontaneous supersymmetry breaking.

  19. Spontaneous CP violation in A4 flavor symmetry and leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Y. H.; Kang, Sin Kyu; Kim, C. S.

    2013-06-01

    We propose a simple renormalizable model for the spontaneous CP violation based on SU(2)L×U(1)Y×A4 symmetry in a radiative seesaw mechanism, which can be guaranteed by an extra Z2 symmetry. In our model CP is spontaneously broken at high energies, after the breaking of flavor symmetry, by a complex vacuum expectation value of the A4 triplet and gauge-singlet scalar field. We show that the spontaneously generated CP phase could become a natural source of leptogenesis, and also investigate CP violation at low energies in the lepton sector and show how the CP phases in the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata formalism could arise through a spontaneous symmetry-breaking mechanism. As a numerical study, interestingly, we show that the normal mass hierarchy favors relatively large values of θ13, large deviations from maximality of θ23<π/4, and the Dirac-CP phase 0°≤δCP≤50° and 300°≤δCP≤360°. For the inverted hierarchy case, the experimentally measured values of θ13 favors θ23>π/4 and discrete values of δCP around 100°, 135°, 255°, and 300°. Finally, with a successful leptogenesis our numerical results give more predictive values on the Dirac CP phase: for the normal mass hierarchy 1°≲δCP≲10° and for inverted one δCP˜100°, 135°, 300°.

  20. SUSY CP problem and spontaneous CP violation in SUSY GUT

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiduki, M.; Kim, S.-G.; Maekawa, N.; Sakurai, K.

    2008-11-23

    We study spontaneous CP violation in association with so-called SUSY flavor problem, SUSY CP problem, and stability of electroweak (EW) scale on the context of supersymmetric grand unified theory (SUSY GUT). In view of naturalness we retain stop masses on EW scale. Then in order to suppress non-decoupling SUSY contribution to up quark EDM we examine a certain type of flavor structure where up-type quark sector is real whereas down-type quark and charged lepton sectors are complex. We exhibit, as an example, an explicit model based on E{sub 6} SUSY GUT with SU(2) flavor symmetry that realizes these situations.

  1. R -parity conserving supersymmetric extension of the Zee model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanemura, Shinya; Shindou, Tetsuo; Sugiyama, Hiroaki

    2015-12-01

    We extend the Zee model, where tiny neutrino masses are generated at the one-loop level, to a supersymmetric model with R -parity conservation. It is found that the neutrino mass matrix can be consistent with the neutrino oscillation data thanks to the nonholomorphic Yukawa interaction generated via one-loop diagrams of sleptons. We find a parameter set of the model, where in addition to the neutrino oscillation data, experimental constraints from the lepton flavor violating decays of charged leptons and current LHC data are also satisfied. In the parameter set, an additional C P -even neutral Higgs boson other than the standard-model-like one, a C P -odd neutral Higgs boson, and two charged scalar bosons are light enough to be produced at the LHC and future lepton colliders. If the lightest charged scalar bosons are mainly composed of the SU (2 )L-singlet scalar boson in the model, they would decay into e ν and μ ν with 50% of a branching ratio for each. In such a case, the relation among the masses of the charged scalar bosons and the C P -odd Higgs in the minimal supersymmetric standard model approximately holds with a radiative correction. Our model can be tested by measuring the specific decay patterns of charged scalar bosons and the discriminative mass spectrum of additional scalar bosons.

  2. Constraints and stability in vector theories with spontaneous Lorentz violation

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, Robert; Gagne, Nolan L.; Potting, Robertus; Vrublevskis, Arturs

    2008-06-15

    Vector theories with spontaneous Lorentz violation, known as bumblebee models, are examined in flat spacetime using a Hamiltonian constraint analysis. In some of these models, Nambu-Goldstone modes appear with properties similar to photons in electromagnetism. However, depending on the form of the theory, additional modes and constraints can appear that have no counterparts in electromagnetism. An examination of these constraints and additional degrees of freedom, including their nonlinear effects, is made for a variety of models with different kinetic and potential terms, and the results are compared with electromagnetism. The Hamiltonian constraint analysis also permits an investigation of the stability of these models. For certain bumblebee theories with a timelike vector, suitable restrictions of the initial-value solutions are identified that yield ghost-free models with a positive Hamiltonian. In each case, the restricted phase space is found to match that of electromagnetism in a nonlinear gauge.

  3. Is electromagnetic gauge invariance spontaneously violated in superconductors?

    SciTech Connect

    Greiter, Martin . E-mail: greiter@tkm.uni-karlsruhe.de

    2005-09-01

    We aim to give a pedagogical introduction to those elementary aspects of superconductivity which are not treated in the classic textbooks. In particular, we emphasize that global U (1) phase rotation symmetry, and not gauge symmetry, is spontaneously violated, and show that the BCS wave function is, contrary to claims in the literature, fully gauge invariant. We discuss the nature of the order parameter, the physical origin of the many degenerate states, and the relation between formulations of superconductivity with fixed particle numbers vs. well-defined phases. We motivate and to some extend derive the effective field theory at low temperatures, explore symmetries and conservation laws, and justify the classical nature of the theory. Most importantly, we show that the entire phenomenology of superconductivity essentially follows from the single assumption of a charged order parameter field. This phenomenology includes Anderson's characteristic equations of superfluidity, electric and magnetic screening, the Bernoulli Hall effect, the balance of the Lorentz force, as well as the quantum effects, in which Planck's constant manifests itself through the compactness of the U (1) phase field. The latter effects include flux quantization, phase slippage, and the Josephson effect.

  4. Low scale seesaw, electron EDM and leptogenesis in a model with spontaneous CP violation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Mahanthappa, K.T.; /Colorado U.

    2006-09-01

    Strong correlations between leptogenesis and low energy CP violating leptonic processes have been shown by us to exist fin the minimal left-right symmetric model with spontaneous CP violation. In this note, they investigate the implications of this model for the electric dipole moment of the electron. With an additional broken U(1){sub H} symmetry, the seesaw scale can be lowered to close to the electroweak scale. This additional symmetry also makes the connection between CP violation in quark sector to that in the lepton sector possible.

  5. Spontaneous Lorentz violation, negative energy, and the second law of thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Feldstein, Brian

    2009-08-15

    We reconsider the possibility of violating the generalized second law of thermodynamics in theories with spontaneous Lorentz violation. It has been proposed that this may be accomplished in particular with a black hole immersed in a ghost condensate background, which may be taken to break Lorentz invariance without appreciably distorting the space-time geometry. In this paper we show that there in fact exist solutions explicitly describing the flow of negative energy into these black holes, allowing for violation of the second law in a very simple way. This second law violation is independent of any additional assumptions such as couplings of the ghost condensate to secondary fields, and suggests that violation of the null energy condition may be the true source of pathology in these theories.

  6. Experimental tests of Quantum Mechanics: from Pauli Exclusion Principle Violation to spontaneous collapse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curceanu (Petrascu, C.; Bartalucci, S.; Bassi, A.; Bertolucci, S.; Bragadireanu, M.; Cargnelli, M.; Clozza, A.; Di Matteo, S.; Donadi, S.; Egger, J.-P.; Guaraldo, C.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Marton, J.; Milotti, E.; Pietreanu, D.; Poli Lener, M.; Ponta, T.; Rizzo, A.; Romero Vidal, A.; Scordo, A.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Sperandio, L.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.

    2012-05-01

    The Pauli exclusion principle (PEP) and, more generally, the spin-statistics connection, is at the very basis of our understanding of matter. The PEP spurs, presently, a lively debate on its possible limits, deeply rooted in the very foundations of Quantum Field Theory. Therefore, it is extremely important to test the limits of its validity. Quon theory provides a suitable mathematical framework of possible violation of PEP, where the q violation parameter translates into a probability of violating PEP. Experimentally, setting a bound on PEP violation means confining the q-parameter to a value very close to either 1 (for bosons) or -1 (for fermions). The VIP (Violation of the Pauli exclusion principle) experiment established a limit on the probability that PEP is violated by electrons, using the method of searching for PEP forbidden atomic transitions in copper. We describe the experimental method, the obtained results, both in terms of the q-parameter and as probability of PEP violation, we briefly discuss the results and present future plans to go beyond the actual limit by upgrading the experimental technique using vetoed new spectroscopic fast Silicon Drift Detectors. We mention as well the possibility of using a similar experimental technique to search for eventual X-rays generated as a signature of the spontaneous collapse of the wave function, predicted by continuous spontaneous localization type theories.

  7. Neutron-antineutron transition as a test-bed for dynamical CPT violations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addazi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    We show a simple mechanism for a dynamical CPT violation in the neutron sector. In particular, we show a CPT-violating see-saw mechanism, generating a Majorana mass and a CPT-violating mass for the neutron. CPT-violating see-saw involves a sterile partner of the neutron, living in a hidden sector, in which CPT is spontaneously broken. In particular, neutrons (antineutrons) can communicate with the hidden sector through nonperturbative quantum gravity effects called exotic instantons. Exotic instantons dynamically break R-parity, generating one effective vertex between the neutron and its sterile partner. In this way, we show how a small CPT-violating mass term for the neutron is naturally generated. This model can be tested in the next generation of experiments in neutron-antineutron physics. This strongly motivates researches of CPT-violating effects in neutron-antineutron physics as a test-bed for dynamical CPT-violations in SM.

  8. Experimental tests of quantum mechanics: Pauli exclusion principle violation and spontaneous collapse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curceanu, Catalina; Bartalucci, S.; Bassi, A.; Bertolucci, S.; Bragadireanu, M.; Cargnelli, M.; Clozza, A.; Di Matteo, S.; Donadi, S.; Egger, J.-P.; Guaraldo, C.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Marton, J.; Milotti, E.; Pietreanu, D.; Ponta, T.; Rizzo, A.; Vidal, A. Romero; Scordo, A.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Sperandio, L.; Doce, O. Vazquez; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.

    2012-03-01

    The Pauli exclusion principle (PEP) is one of the basic principles of the modern physics. Being at the very basis of our understanding of matter, it spurs, presently, a lively debate on its possible limits, deeply rooted in the very foundations of Quantum Field Theory. Therefore, it is extremely important to test the limits of its validity. Quon theory provides a suitable mathematical framework of possible violation of PEP, where the violation parameter q translates into a probability of violating PEP. Experimentally, setting a bound on PEP violation means confining the violation parameter to a value very close to either 1 (for bosons) or -1 (for fermions). The VIP (VIolation of the Pauli exclusion principle) experiment established a limit on the probability that PEP is violated by electrons, using the method of searching for PEP forbidden atomic transitions in copper. We describe the experimental method, the obtained results, both in terms of the q-parameter from quon theory and as probability of PEP violation, we briefly discuss them and present future plans to go beyond the actual limit by upgrading the experimental technique using vetoed new spectroscopical fast Silicon Drift Detectors. We also mention the possibility of using a similar experimental technique to search for eventual X-rays, generated in the spontaneous collapse models.

  9. Spontaneous parity and charge-conjugation violations at real isospin and imaginary baryon chemical potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouno, Hiroaki; Kishikawa, Mizuho; Sasaki, Takahiro; Sakai, Yuji; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2012-01-01

    The phase structure of two-flavor QCD is investigated at real isospin and imaginary quark chemical potentials by using the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. In the region, parity symmetry is spontaneously broken by the pion-superfluidity phase transition, whereas charge-conjugation symmetry is spontaneously violated by the Roberge-Weiss transition. The chiral (deconfinement) crossover at zero isospin and quark chemical potentials is a remnant of the parity (charge-conjugation) violation. The interplay between the parity and charge-conjugation violations are analyzed, and it is investigated how the interplay is related to the correlation between the chiral and deconfinement crossovers at zero isospin and quark chemical potentials.

  10. Higgs bosons in a minimal R-parity conserving left-right supersymmetric model

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Mariana; Korutlu, Beste

    2011-04-01

    We revisit the Higgs sector of the left-right supersymmetric model. We study the scalar potential in a version of the model in which the minimum is the charge-conserving vacuum state, without R-parity violation or additional nonrenormalizable terms in the Lagrangian. We analyze the dependence of the potential and of the Higgs mass spectrum on the various parameters of the model, pinpointing the most sensitive ones. We also show that the model can predict light neutral flavor-conserving Higgs bosons, while the flavor-violating ones are heavy and within the limits from K{sup 0}-K{sup 0}, D{sup 0}-D{sup 0}, and B{sub d,s}{sup 0}-B{sub d,s}{sup 0} mixings. We study variants of the model in which at least one doubly charged Higgs boson is light and show that the parameter space for such Higgs masses and mixings is very restrictive, thus making the model more predictive.

  11. Decays $D^+_{(s)}\\to \\pi(K)^{+}\\ell^+\\ell^-$ and D0→ℓ+ℓ- in the MSSM with and without R-parity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ru-Min; Sheng, Jin-Huan; Zhu, Jie; Fan, Ying-Ying; Xu, Yuan-Guo

    2015-04-01

    We study the rare decays D+→π+ℓ+ℓ-, D+s-> K+l+l^- and D0→ℓ+ℓ-(ℓ = e, μ) in the minimal supersymmetic standard model with and without R-parity. Using the strong constraints on relevant supersymmetric parameters from D0-\\bar {D}^0 mixing and K+-> π +ν \\bar {ν } decay, we examine constrained supersymmetry contributions to relevant branching ratios, direct CP violations and ratios of D+(s)-> π (K)+μ +μ ^- and D+(s)-> π (K)+e+e^- decay rates. We find that both R-parity conserving LR as well as RL mass insertions and R-parity violating squark exchange couplings have huge effects on the direct CP violations of D+(s)-> π (K)+l+l^-, moreover, the constrained LR and RL mass insertions still have obvious effects on the ratios of D+(s)-> π (K)+μ +μ ^- and D+(s)-> π (K)+e+e^- decay rates. The direct CP asymmetries and the ratios of D+(s)-> π (K)+μ +μ ^- and D+(s)-> π (K)+e+e^- decay rates are very sensitive to both moduli and phases of relevant supersymmetric parameters. In addition, the differential direct CP asymmetries of D+(s)->π (K)+l^+l^- are studied in detail.

  12. Matter-gravity scattering in the presence of spontaneous Lorentz violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maluf, R. V.; Santos, Victor; Cruz, W. T.; Almeida, C. A. S.

    2013-07-01

    Considering quantum gravity within the framework of effective field theory, we investigated the consequences of spontaneous Lorentz violation for the gravitational potential. In particular, we focus our attention on the bumblebee models, in which the graviton couples to a vector Bμ that assumes a nonzero vacuum expectation value. The leading order corrections for the nonrelativistic potential are obtained from calculation of the scattering matrix of two scalar particles interacting gravitationally. These corrections imply anisotropic properties associated with the bumblebee background and also add a Darwin-like term for Newton’s potential.

  13. Violation of the weak energy condition: Is it generic of spontaneous scalarization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Marcelo; Sudarsky, Daniel; Nucamendi, Ulises

    2004-10-01

    It was recently shown by Whinnett and Torres [A. W. WhinnettD. F. Torres, Astrophys. J.6032004L133] that the phenomenon of spontaneous scalarization in compact objects (polytropes) was accompanied also by a spontaneous violation of the weak energy condition (WEC). Notably, by the encounter of negative-energy densities as measured by a static observer at several points of the star. Here we argue that such a situation is not generic of scalar-tensor theories of gravity (STT). We support this conclusion by numerical results within a class of STT and by using three realistic models of dense matter. However, we show that the “angular parts” of the additional conditions needed for the WEC to hold ρeff+Ti(eff)i≥0 tend to be “slightly violated” at the outskirts of the star.

  14. The Search for Anyon Superconductivity: do High - Superconductors Exhibit a Spontaneous T-Violating Circular Dichroism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Taylor Walton

    The subject of this thesis is an investigation of whether a class of cuprate compounds having superconducting transition temperatures as high as 100 K change the optical properties of reflected light in such a way that would indicate the violation of time-reversal symmetry (T-violation), analogous to that observed in ferromagnets. Such an effect could be interpreted as evidence that anyons are the fundamental microscopic charge carriers responsible for the superconductivity. An "anyon" is a new, fundamental, excitation of a strongly -correlated two-dimensional electron gas which can obey particle-exchange statistics anywhere between the Fermi -Dirac or Bose-Einstein limits. In this thesis, I report on an experiment in which I attempted to reproduce the data originally reported by K. B. Lyons, et al., of AT&T Bell Laboratories. Their data purportedly showed that certain high temperature superconducting compounds exhibit a spontaneous circular dichroism in reflection, below about 200 K. I show a simple extension to their original experiment, which I discovered, that discriminates against an important spurious term, and makes my apparatus exclusively sensitive to T-violating circular dichroism. I found no evidence for a temperature dependent signal in both thin films and an untwinned single crystal of YBa _2Cu_3O _{7-delta} (T_ {rm c} ~ 90 K), to an accuracy approaching 10^{ -6}. However, my data does show a temperature independent "background" signal which is correlated with the optical quality of the sample's surface. I offer a detailed explanation of the origins of this background signal, and show how it can become a temperature dependent signal when there are changes to the surface properties of the sample due to condensation of residual gases in a poor vacuum. Although this experiment shows no evidence for the macroscopic breakdown of time-reversal symmetry, anyons could still be at the heart of high temperature superconductivity, since there are numerous

  15. Broken R parity contributions to flavor changing rates and CP asymmetries in fermion pair production at leptonic colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemtob, M.; Moreau, G.

    1999-06-01

    We examine the effects of the R parity odd renormalizable interactions on flavor changing rates and CP asymmetries in the production of fermion-antifermion pairs at leptonic (electron and muon) colliders. In the reactions l-+l+-->fJ+f¯J' (l=e, μ J≠J') the produced fermions may be leptons, down quarks, or up quarks, and the center of mass energies may range from the Z-boson pole up to 1000 GeV. Off the Z-boson pole, the flavor changing rates are controlled by tree level amplitudes and the CP asymmetries by interference terms between tree and loop level amplitudes. At the Z-boson pole, both observables involve loop amplitudes. The lepton number violating interactions, associated with the coupling constants λijk, λ'ijk, are only taken into account. The consideration of loop amplitudes is restricted to the photon and Z-boson vertex corrections. We briefly review flavor violation physics at colliders. We present numerical results using a single, species and family independent, mass parameter m~ for all the scalar superpartners and considering simple assumptions for the family dependence of the R parity odd coupling constants. Finite nondiagonal rates (CP asymmetries) entail nonvanishing products of two (four) different coupling constants in different family configurations. For lepton pair production, the Z-boson decays branching ratios BJJ'=B(Z-->l-J+l+J') scale in order of magnitude as BJJ'~(λ/0.1)4(100 GeV/m~)2.510-9, with coupling constants λ=λijk or λ'ijk in appropriate family configurations. The corresponding results for d- and u quarks are larger, due to an extra color factor Nc=3. The flavor nondiagonal rates, at energies well above the Z-boson pole, slowly decrease with the center of mass energy and scale with the mass parameter approximately as σJJ'~(λ/0.1)4(100 GeV/m~)2-3(1-10) fbarn. Including the contributions from an sneutrino s-channel exchange could raise the rates for leptons or d quarks by one order of magnitude. The CP-odd asymmetries at

  16. Spontaneous CP Violation in E{sub 6} GUT with horizontal symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Maekawa, Nobuhiro

    2010-02-10

    We consider spontaneous CP violation in E{sub 6} grand unified theory (GUT) with horizontal symmetry and anomalous U(1){sub A} gauge symmetry in order to solve the SUSY CP problem. To realize the sufficiently small phases of SUSY Higgs mass mu and mixing parameter B, an additional discrete symmetry is introduced. The discrete symmetry plays multiple roles in explaining various things. By the symmetry, the up-type Yukawa couplings become real, which is important in satisfying the Chromo-EDM constraints to the imaginary part of the off-diagonal elements of squark mass matrices, and the down-type Yukawa couplings become complex, which is important in obtaining the Kobayashi-Maskawa phase. Moreover, this symmetry improves the smallness of up quark mass, and reduces the number of O(1) coefficients. One of the interesting predictions is V{sub ub}approxgamma{sup 4}, which is quite good agreement with the measured value. This talk is based on the works in Ref. [1].

  17. Hunting the "impossible atoms" Pauli exclusion principle violation and spontaneous collapse of the wave function at test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curceanu, Catalina; Bartalucci, Sergio; Bassi, Angelo; Bertolucci, Sergio; Berucci, Carolina; Bragadireanu, Alexandru Mario; Cargnelli, Michael; Clozza, Alberto; Di Matteo, Sergio; Donadi, S.; D'Uffizi, Alessandro; Egger, J.-P.; Guaraldo, Carlo; Iliescu, Mihail; Ishiwatari, Tomoichi; Laubenstein, Matthias; Marton, Johann; Milotti, Edoardo; Pietreanu, Dorel; Piscicchia, Kristian; Ponta, Titus; Sbardella, Emanuele; Scordo, Alessandro; Shi, Hexi; Sirghi, Diana; Sirghi, Florin; Sperandio, Laura; Doce, Oton Vazquez; Zmeskal, Johann

    2014-12-01

    The Pauli exclusion principle (PEP) and, more generally, the spin-statistics connection, are at the very basis of our understanding of matter, life and Universe. The PEP spurs, presently, a lively debate on its possible limits, deeply rooted in the very foundations of Quantum Mechanics. It is, therefore, extremely important to test the limits of its validity. The Violation of the PEP (VIP) experiment established the best limit on the probability that PEP is violated by electrons, using the method of searching for PEP forbidden atomic transitions in copper. We describe the experimental method, the obtained results, and plans to go beyond the actual limit by upgrading the experimental apparatus. We discuss the possibility of using a similar experimental technique to search for X-rays as a signature of the spontaneous collapse of the wave function predicted by continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) theories.

  18. Gauged B-xiL origin of R parity and its implications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, Hye-Sung; Ma, Ernest

    2010-05-01

    Gauged B-L is a popular candidate for the origin of the conservation of R parity, i.e.R=(-)3B+L+2j, in supersymmetry, but it fails to forbid the effective dimension-five terms arising from the superfield combinations QQQL, ucucdcec, and ucdcdcNc, which allow the proton to decay. Changing it to B-xiL, where xe+xμ+xτ=3 (with xi≠1) for the three families, would forbid these terms while still serving as a gauge origin of Rparity. We show how this is achieved in two minimal models with realistic neutrino mass matrices, and discuss their phenomenological implications.

  19. A glimpse into the Pandora box of the quantum mechanics: The Pauli exclusion principle violation and spontaneous collapse models put at test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curceanu Petrascu, C.; Bartalucci, S.; Bassi, A.; Bertolucci, S.; Bragadireanu, M.; Cargnelli, M.; Clozza, A.; Matteo, S. Di; Donadi, S.; Egger, J.-P.; Guaraldo, C.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Marton, J.; Milotti, E.; Pietreanu, D.; Piscicchia, K.; Poli Lener, M.; Ponta, T.; Rizzo, A.; Romero Vidal, A.; Scordo, A.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Sperandio, L.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Pauli exclusion principle (PEP) and, more generally, the spin-statistics connection, is at the very basis of our understanding of matter and Nature. The PEP spurs, presently, a lively debate on its possible limits, deeply rooted in the very foundations of Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Field Theory. Therefore, it is extremely important to test the limits of its validity. Quon theory provides a suitable mathematical framework of possible small violation of PEP, where the q violation parameter translates into a probability of violating PEP. Experimentally, setting a bound on PEP violation means confining the q-parameter to a value very close to either 1 (for bosons) or -1 (for fermions). The VIP (VIolation of the Pauli exclusion principle) experiment established a limit on the probability that PEP is violated by electrons, using the very clean method of searching for PEP forbidden atomic transitions in copper. We describe the experimental method, the obtained results, both in terms of the q-parameter and as probability of PEP violation, we briefly discuss the results and present plans to go beyond the actual limit by upgrading the experimental technique using vetoed new spectroscopical fast Silicon Drift Detectors. We discuss as well the possibility of using a similar experimental technique to search for X-rays generated as a signature of the spontaneous collapse of the wave function, predicted by continous spontaneous localization type theories.

  20. Trimaximal TM1 neutrino mixing in S4 with spontaneous CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhn, Christoph

    2013-10-01

    The measurement of the reactor angle by the Daya Bay and RENO experiments in 2012 has ruled out the tri-bimaximal paradigm. Adopting an S4 family symmetry, we propose direct models of the trimaximal type TM1 in which the tri-bimaximal Klein symmetry of the neutrino sector is broken to a residual Z2 symmetry. In such a scenario, the solar mixing angle is decreased compared to its tri-bimaximal value by about 1°, thus bringing it in excellent agreement with experimental observation. The atmospheric mixing angle, on the other hand, depends on the CP violating Dirac phase δ. Imposing CP conservation in the family symmetry limit, we show how to break the CP symmetry via flavon VEVs with well-defined complex phases, so that sizable deviations of the atmospheric angle from maximal mixing, consistent with the latest global fits, are produced. A related approach adopts non-Abelian groups which contain only half the Klein symmetry of the neutrino sector [44-47].

  1. Experimental search for the “impossible atoms” Pauli Exclusion Principle violation and spontaneous collapse of the wave function at test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curceanu, C.; Bartalucci, S.; Bassi, A.; Bertolucci, S.; Berucci, C.; Bragadireanu, A. M.; Cargnelli, M.; Clozza, A.; De Paolis, L.; Di Matteo, S.; Donadi, S.; d'Uffizi, A.; Egger, J.-P.; Guaraldo, C.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Marton, J.; Milotti, E.; Pietreanu, D.; Piscicchia, K.; Ponta, T.; Sbardella, E.; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Sperandio, L.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Zmeskal, J.

    2015-07-01

    Many experiments investigated the possible violation of the Pauli Exclusion Principle (PEP) since its discovery in 1925. The VIP(Violation of the Pauli Principle) experiment tested the PEP by measuring the probability for an external electron to be captured and undergo a 2p to 1s transition during its cascading process, with the 1s state already occupied by two electrons. This transition is forbidden by the PEP. The VIP experiment resulted in an upper limit for the probability of PEP violation of 4.7 × 10-29. Currently a setup for the follow up experiment VIP2 is under preparation. The goal of this experiment is to improve the upper limit for the violation of the PEP by two orders of magnitude, by using new X-ray detectors and by implementing an active shielding. We then present the idea of using an analogous experimental technique to search for X rays as a signature of the spontaneous collapse of the wave function, predicted by the continuous spontaneous localization theories, and discuss some very encouraging preliminary results.

  2. Polarization measurements and T violation in exclusive semileptonic B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guo-Hong; Kiers, Ken; Ng, John N.

    1997-11-01

    We provide a general analysis of time reversal invariance violation in the exclusive semileptonic B decays B-->Dlν¯ and B-->D*lν¯. Measurements of the lepton and D* polarizations can be used to search for and identify nonstandard model sources of T violation. Upper limits are placed on the T-odd polarization observables in both the supersymmetric R-parity-conserving and R-parity-breaking theories, as well as in some nonsupersymmetric extensions of the standard model, including multi-Higgs-doublet models, leptoquark models, and left-right symmetric models. It is noted that many of these models allow for large T-violating polarization effects which could be within the reach of the planned B factories.

  3. Spontaneous C P violation in lepton-sector: A common origin for θ13, the Dirac C P phase, and leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Biswajit; Sil, Arunansu

    2016-01-01

    A possible interplay between the two terms of the general type-II seesaw formula is exercised which leads to the generation of nonzero θ13. The specific flavor structure of the model, guided by the A4×Z4×Z3 symmetry and accompanied with the Standard Model singlet flavons, yields the conventional seesaw contribution to produce the tribimaximal lepton mixing which is further corrected by the presence of the S U (2 )L triplet contribution to accommodate θ13. We consider the C P symmetry to be spontaneously broken by the complex vacuum expectation value (vev) of a singlet field S . While the magnitude of its complex vev is responsible for generating θ13, its phase part induces the low energy C P violating phase (δ ) and the C P violation required for leptogenesis. Hence the triplet contribution, although subdominant, plays a crucial role in providing a common source for nonzero θ13, δ and C P -violation required for leptogenesis. We find that the recent hint for δ close to 3 π /2 is somewhat favored in this setup though it excludes the exact equality with 3 π /2 . We also discuss the generation of lepton asymmetry in this scenario.

  4. Beyond Quantum Mechanics? Hunting the `Impossible' Atoms --- Pauli Exclusion Principle Violation and Spontaneous Collapse of the Wave Function at Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piscicchia, K.; Curceanu, C.; Bartalucci, S.; Bassi, A.; Bertolucci, S.; Berucci, C.; Bragadireanu, A. M.; Cargnelli, M.; Clozza, A.; De Paolis, L.; Di Matteo, S.; Donadi, S.; D'Uffizi, A.; Egger, J.-P.; Guaraldo, C.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Marton, J.; Milotti, E.; Pietreanu, D.; Ponta, T.; Sbardella, E.; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Sperandio, L.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Zmeskal, J.

    The development of mathematically complete and consistent models solving the so-called "measurement problem", strongly renewed the interest of the scientific community for the foundations of quantum mechanics, among these the Dynamical Reduction Models posses the unique characteristic to be experimentally testable. In the first part of the paper an upper limit on the reduction rate parameter of such models will be obtained, based on the analysis of the X-ray spectrum emitted by an isolated slab of germanium and measured by the IGEX experiment. The second part of the paper is devoted to present the results of the VIP (Violation of the Pauli exclusion principle) experiment and to describe its recent upgrade. The VIP experiment established a limit on the probability that the Pauli Exclusion Principle (PEP) is violated by electrons, using the very clean method of searching for PEP forbidden atomic transitions in copper.

  5. Spontaneous CP violation in E{sub 6} supersymmetric grand unified theory with SU(2) flavor and anomalous U(1) symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiduki, M.; Maekawa, N.; Kim, S.-G.; Sakurai, K.

    2009-12-01

    We construct a model of spontaneous CP violation in E{sub 6} supersymmetric grand unified theory. In the model, we employ an SU(2){sub F} flavor symmetry and an anomalous U(1){sub A} symmetry. The SU(2){sub F} flavor symmetry is introduced to provide the origin of hierarchical structures of Yukawa coupling and to ensure the universality of sfermion soft masses. The anomalous U(1){sub A} symmetry is introduced to realize the doublet-triplet mass splitting, to provide the origin of hierarchical structures of Yukawa couplings, and to solve the {mu} problem. In the model, CP is spontaneously broken by the SU(2){sub F} breaking in order to provide a Kobayashi-Maskawa phase and to evade the supersymmetric CP problem. However, a naive construction of the model generally leads to an unwanted outcome, arg[{mu}b*]=O(1), when CP violating effects in the flavor sector are taken into account. We cure this difficulty by imposing a discrete symmetry and find that this prescription can play additional roles. It ensures that the realistic up-quark mass and Cabibbo angle are simultaneously realized without cancellation between O(1) coefficients. Also, severe constraints from the chromo-electric dipole moment of the quark can be satisfied without destabilizing the weak scale. The discrete symmetry reduces the number of free parameters, but the model is capable of reproducing quark and lepton mass spectra, mixing angles, and a Jarlskog invariant. We obtain characteristic predictions V{sub ub}{approx}O({lambda}{sup 4}) ({lambda}=0.22) and |V{sub cb}Y{sub b}|=|Y{sub c}| at the grand unified theory scale.

  6. Model for particle masses, flavor mixing, and {ital CP} violation, based on spontaneously broken discrete chiral symmetry as the origin of families

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, S.L.

    1999-01-01

    We construct extensions of the standard model based on the hypothesis that Higgs bosons also exhibit a family structure and that the flavor weak eigenstates in the three families are distinguished by a discrete Z{sub 6} chiral symmetry that is spontaneously broken by the Higgs sector. We study in detail at the tree level models with three Higgs doublets and with six Higgs doublets comprising two weakly coupled sets of three. In a leading approximation of S{sub 3} cyclic permutation symmetry the three-Higgs-doublet model gives a {open_quotes}democratic{close_quotes} mass matrix of rank 1, while the six-Higgs-doublet model gives either a rank-1 mass matrix or, in the case when it spontaneously violates {ital CP}, a rank-2 mass matrix corresponding to nonzero second family masses. In both models, the CKM matrix is exactly unity in the leading approximation. Allowing small explicit violations of cyclic permutation symmetry generates small first family masses in the six-Higgs-doublet model, and first and second family masses in the three-Higgs-doublet model, and gives a nontrivial CKM matrix in which the mixings of the first and second family quarks are naturally larger than mixings involving the third family. Complete numerical fits are given for both models, flavor-changing neutral current constraints are discussed in detail, and the issues of unification of couplings and neutrino masses are addressed. On a technical level, our analysis uses the theory of circulant and retrocirculant matrices, the relevant parts of which are reviewed. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Neutrino masses in lepton number violating mSUGRA

    SciTech Connect

    Kom, Steve C. H.

    2008-11-23

    In SUSY models which violate R-parity, there exist trilinear lepton number violating (LNV) operators which can lead to neutrino masses. If these operators are defined at the unification scale, the renormalization group flow becomes important and generally leads to one neutrino mass much heavier than the others. We study, in a minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) set-up with two trilinear LNV operators and three charged lepton mixing angles, numerically how these parameters may be arranged to be compatible with neutrino oscillation data, and discuss some phenomenological observations.

  8. Nuclear beta-decay, Atomic Parity Violation, and New Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Ramsey-Musolf

    2000-08-01

    Determinations of vuds with super-allowed Fermi beta-decay in nuclei and of the weak charge of the cesium in atomic parity-violation deviate from the Standard Model predictions by 2 sigma or more. In both cases, the Standard Model over-predicts the magnitudes of the relevant observables. I discuss the implications of these results for R-parity violating (RPV) extensions of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. I also explore the possible consequences for RPV supersymmetry of prospective future low-energy electroweak measurements.

  9. Search for lepton flavor violating decays of a heavy neutral particle in p(-)p collisions at sqrt[s]=1.8 TeV.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bonushkin, Y; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Bruner, N; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M-T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; De Cecco, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fan, Q; Farrington, S; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Gerstein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Goncharov, M; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Gresele, A; Grim, G; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Hou, S; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Issever, C; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karr, K; Kartal, S; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Le, Y; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, T; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Manca, G; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Matthews, J A J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Napora, R; Niell, F; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C-Y P; Nigmanov, T; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Pratt, T; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Safonov, A; St Denis, R

    2003-10-24

    We report on a search for a high mass, narrow width particle that decays directly to emu, etau, or microtau. We use approximately 110 pb(-1) of data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab from 1992 to 1995. No evidence of lepton flavor violating decays is found. Limits are set on the production and decay of sneutrinos with R-parity violating interactions. PMID:14611332

  10. Numerical analysis of three-band models for CuO planes as candidates for a spontaneous T-violating orbital current phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomale, Ronny; Greiter, Martin

    2008-03-01

    Recently, we have numerically evaluated the current-current correlation function for the ground states of three-band models for the CuO planes of high- Tc superconductors at hole doping x=1/8 using systems with 24 sites and periodic boundary conditions. In this paper, the numerical analysis is extended to a wider range of parameters. Our results show no evidence for the time-reversal symmetry violating current patterns recently proposed by Varma [C. M. Varma, Phys. Rev. B 73, 155113 (2006)]. If such current patterns exist, our results indicate that the energy associated with the loop currents must be smaller than 5meV per link even if the on-site chemical potential on the oxygen sites, which is generally assumed to be of the order of γp-γd=3.6eV , is taken to 1.8, 0.9, 0.4, and finally 0eV . The current-current correlations remain virtually unaffected as we increase the interatomic Coulomb repulsion Vpd , the term driving the system into the current carrying phase in Varma’s analysis, from 1.2to2.4eV . Assuming that the three-band models are adequate, quantum critical fluctuations of such patterns hence cannot be responsible for phenomena occurring at significantly higher energies, such as superconductivity or the anomalous properties of the pseudogap phase. We further derive an upper bound for the magnetic moment per unit cell from the upper bound we obtain for spontaneous currents, and find it smaller than the magnetic moment measured in a recent neutron scattering experiment. In this context, we observe that if the observed magnetic moments were due to a current pattern, the magnitude of these currents would be insufficient to determine the phase diagram. Finally, we discuss the role of finite size effects in our numerical experiments. In particular, we show that the net spin 1/2 of our finite size ground states does not infringe on the validity of our conclusions.

  11. Gravity from Lorentz Symmetry Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Potting, Robertus

    2006-06-19

    In general relativity, the masslessness of gravitons can be traced to symmetry under diffeomorphisms. In this talk, we consider another possibility, whereby the masslessness arises from spontaneous violation of Lorentz symmetry.

  12. Lorentz violation and Faddeev-Popov ghosts

    SciTech Connect

    Altschul, B.

    2006-02-15

    We consider how Lorentz-violating interactions in the Faddeev-Popov ghost sector will affect scalar QED. The behavior depends sensitively on whether the gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken. If the symmetry is not broken, Lorentz violations in the ghost sector are unphysical, but if there is spontaneous breaking, radiative corrections will induce Lorentz-violating and gauge-dependent terms in other sectors of the theory.

  13. Probing the standard model and beyond with CP violation and particle cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savastio, Michael Paul

    We discuss topics related to CP violation and particle cosmology. First, we present some developments in improving the extraction of the CP violating parameter gamma from the decay B+/- → DK+/- followed by the subsequent decay D → KS pi +pi--. The mixing of the final state kaon is an additional CP violating effect which should be taken into account in the extraction of gamma, and we discuss how this should be done. We also discuss the optimization of phase space binning needed to extract gamma from these decays in a model independent way. Next, we discuss some cosmological constraints on R-parity violating, Minimally Flavor Violating (MFV) Supersymmetry (SUSY). Finally, we show that oribtally excited dark matter cannot persist over cosmic timescales for various model independent reasons.

  14. Search for lepton flavour violation in the eμ continuum with the ATLAS detector in √{s} = 7 TeV pp collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Aleppo, M.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, D.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G. A.; Beck, H. P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, G.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B. H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernardet, K.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Böser, S.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bona, M.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Booth, C. N.; Booth, P.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Brambilla, E.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Brett, N. D.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brubaker, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Buira-Clark, D.; Buis, E. J.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Byatt, T.; Caballero, J.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caccia, M.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camard, A.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Cammin, J.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carpentieri, C.; Carrillo Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda Hernandez, A. M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Cataneo, F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavallari, A.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Cazzato, A.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciba, K.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Clifft, R. W.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coe, P.; Coelli, S.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocaru, C. D.; Colas, J.; Colijn, A. P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Coluccia, R.; Comune, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Côté, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cuneo, S.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czirr, H.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Rocha Gesualdi Mello, A.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dahlhoff, A.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Daly, C. H.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dankers, R.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Daum, C.; Dauvergne, J. P.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, M.; Davison, A. R.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Castro Faria Salgado, P. E.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; de Mora, L.; De Nooij, L.; De Oliveira Branco, M.; De Pedis, D.; de Saintignon, P.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dean, S.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Deile, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delpierre, P.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Deng, W.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Devetak, E.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M. A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietl, H.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djilkibaev, R.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobbs, M.; Dobinson, R.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Dodd, J.; Dogan, O. B.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dohmae, T.; Donadelli, M.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Dowell, J. D.; Doxiadis, A. D.; Doyle, A. T.; Drasal, Z.; Drees, J.; Drevermann, H.; Dris, M.; Drohan, J. G.; Dubbert, J.; Dubbs, T.; Dube, S.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Dührssen, M.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Dydak, F.; Dzahini, D.; Düren, M.; Ebke, J.; Eckert, S.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C. A.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Egorov, K.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Ely, R.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Facius, K.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falou, A. C.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fasching, D.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fazio, S.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, I.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Fellmann, D.; Felzmann, C. U.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. 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P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giusti, P.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glazov, A.; Glitza, K. W.; Glonti, G. L.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goebel, M.; Göpfert, T.; Goeringer, C.; Gössling, C.; Göttfert, T.; Goldfarb, S.; Goldin, D.; Golling, T.; Golovnia, S. N.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L. S.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; Gonzalez, S.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Silva, M. L.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J. J.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Gorokhov, S. A.; Gosdzik, B.; Gosselink, M.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gouanère, M.; Gough Eschrich, I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grabski, V.; Grafström, P.; Grah, C.; Grahn, K.-J.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Grau, N.; Gray, H. M.; Gray, J. 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M.; Harrison, K.; Hartert, J.; Hartjes, F.; Haruyama, T.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawes, B. M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, D.; Hayakawa, T.; Hayden, D.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; He, M.; Head, S. J.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heinemann, B.; Heisterkamp, S.; Helary, L.; Heldmann, M.; Heller, M.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Hemperek, T.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henke, M.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Henry-Couannier, F.; Hensel, C.; Henß, T.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg, R.; Hershenhorn, A. D.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hessey, N. P.; Hidvegi, A.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillert, S.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hirose, M.; Hirsch, F.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. 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W.; Mudrinic, M.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Müller, T. A.; Muenstermann, D.; Muijs, A.; Muir, A.; Munwes, Y.; Murakami, K.; Murray, W. J.; Mussche, I.; Musto, E.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagano, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Nanava, G.; Napier, A.; Nash, M.; Nation, N. R.; Nattermann, T.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nderitu, S. K.; Neal, H. A.; Nebot, E.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Negri, A.; Negri, G.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nelson, A.; Nelson, S.; Nelson, T. K.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Nesterov, S. Y.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neusiedl, A.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newman, P. R.; Nickerson, R. 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M.; Sellden, B.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, C.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siebel, A.; Siegert, F.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloan, T. J.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Sondericker, J.; Soni, N.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sorbi, M.; Sosebee, M.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiriti, E.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockmanns, T.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, HS.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suita, K.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Swedish, S.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Tevlin, C. M.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonazzo, A.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Traynor, D.; Trefzger, T.; Treis, J.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. 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A.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; Van Eijk, B.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villani, E. G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vovenko, A. S.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walbersloh, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B. M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Yabsley, B.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zalite, Yo. K.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zema, P. F.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, A. V.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zinonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zilka, B.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a search for the t-channel exchange of an R-parity violating scalar top quark (tilde{t}) in the e ± μ ∓ continuum using 2.1 fb-1 of data collected by the ATLAS detector in √{s}=7 TeV pp collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. Data are found to be consistent with the expectation from the Standard Model backgrounds. Limits on R-parity-violating couplings at 95 % C.L. are calculated as a function of the scalar top mass (m_{tilde{t}}). The upper limits on the production cross section for pp→ eμX, through the t-channel exchange of a scalar top quark, ranges from 170 fb for m_{tilde{t}}=95 GeV to 30 fb for m_{tilde{t}}=1000 GeV.

  15. Supersymmetric Froggatt-Nielsen Models with Baryon- and Lepton-Number Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Dreiner, Herbi K.; Thormeier, Marc

    2004-04-16

    We systematically investigate the embedding of U(1)_X Froggatt-Nielsen models in (four-dimensional) local supersymmetry. We restrict ourselves to models with a single flavon field. We do not impose a discrete symmetry by hand, e.g., R-parity, baryon-parity or lepton-parity. Thus we determine the order of magnitude of the baryon- and/or lepton violating coupling constants through the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism. We then scrutinize whether the predicted coupling constants are in accord with weak or GUT scale constraints. Many models turn out to be incompatible.

  16. Same-sign trileptons at the LHC: A window to lepton-number violating supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Satyanarayan; Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup

    2011-11-01

    We present a detailed investigation to establish that lepton-number (L) violating supersymmetry (SUSY) can be effectively probed at the LHC in the practically background-free same-sign trilepton (SS3l) and same-sign four-lepton (SS4l) channels. With this in view, we extend our earlier analysis of SS3l and SS4l signals by considering situations based on minimal supergravity as well as a phenomenological SUSY model. We find that the R-parity violating scenario predicts large event rates, for both the 7 and 14 TeV runs. Furthermore, we show that it is extremely unlikely to ever achieve similar rates in R-parity conserving SUSY. In addition, we show how SS3l and SS4l, in conjunction with the mixed-sign trilepton and four-lepton channels, can be used to extract dynamical information about the underlying SUSY theory, namely, the Majorana character of the decaying lightest neutralino and the nature of L-violating couplings. We define suitable variables and relationships between them which can be verified experimentally and which are largely independent of the SUSY production cross sections and the cascade decay branching fractions. These theoretical predictions are validated by Monte Carlo simulations including detector and background effects.

  17. CP Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigi, I. I.; Sanda, A. I.

    2009-04-01

    Foreword; Part I. Basics of CP Violation: 1. Prologue; 2. Prelude: C, P and T in classical dynamics; 3. C, P and T in non-relativistic quantum mechanics; 4. C, P and T in relativistic quantum theories; 5. The arrival of strange particles; 6. Quantum mechanics of neutral particles; Part II. Theory and Experiments: 7. The quest for CP violation in K decays - a marathon; 8. The KM implementation of CP violation; 9. The theory of KL → ππ decays; 10. Paradigmatic discoveries in B physics; 11. Let the drama unfold - B CP phenomenology; 12. Rare K and B decays - almost perfect laboratories; 13. CPT violation - could it be in K and B decays?; 14. CP violation in charm decays - the dark horse; 15. The strong CP problem; Part III. Looking Beyond the Standard Model: 16. Quest for CP violation in the neutrino sector; 17. Possible corrections to the KM ansatz: right-handed currents and non-minimal Higgs dynamics; 18. CP violation without nonperturbative dynamics - top quarks and charged leptons; 19. SUSY - providing shelter for Higgs dynamics; 20. Minimal flavour violation and extra dimensions; 21. Baryogenesis in the universe; Part IV. Summary: 11. Summary and Perspectives; References; Index.

  18. CP violation

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, F.J.

    1989-12-01

    Predictions for CP violation in the three generation Standard Model are reviewed based on what is known about the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. Application to the K and B meson systems are emphasized. 43 refs., 13 figs.

  19. Outlook of an Improved Measurement of Parity Violation in Moeller Scattering at JLab (e2ePV)

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, David

    2008-06-01

    Jefferson Laboratory has the potential to make a dramatically improved measurement of parity violation in Moeller scattering (e + e â e + e). In the context of the Standard Model, the measurement would yield the best determination of sin2  W at low energy ( sin2  W = ±0.00025), and one of the best at any energy scale. As a new physics search via the running of the weak mixing angle, the experiment would have unparalleled sensitivity to new parity-violating e ? e interactions, probing electron substructure to 29 TeV (95% CL). In terms of specific models, pulls of 6A are allowed in R-parity violating SUSY, about 5A in E6 Z2, and almost 3A in R-parity conserving SUSY. The latter makes an improved Moeller measurement complementary to searches for SUSY loop-induced Electric Dipole Moments. Interpretability limits are well below the projected experimental error. A conceptual design for a 12 GeV JLab experiment is presented.

  20. CP-Violating Phases From D Branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Lisa L.

    2001-04-01

    Theories with softly broken supersymmetry (SUSY) are the best motivated candidates for physics beyond the Standard Model (SM), as they can provide a resolution to the hierarchy problem and explain the origin of the electroweak scale. In these theories, a central issue to be addressed is the origin and dynamical mechanism of spontaneous supersymmetry breaking. In supersymmetric extensions of the SM such as the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), the effects of the unknown dynamics of supersymmetry breaking are encoded by adding terms to the Lagrangian which break supersymmetry explicitly, at the expense of introducing a considerable number of parameters into the theory. For example, the most general set of soft supersymmetry breaking parameters in the MSSM (defined to be the minimal supersymmetric extension of the SM with the standard Higgs sector and conserved R-parity) includes 105 masses, mixing angles, and phases. From the phenomenological viewpoint this large number of parameters can be cumbersome but not otherwise problematic, as it is for experiments to measure and for the underlying theory (for example, superstring theory) to predict the values of these parameters. Phenomenological analyses aid in this process both for experimentalists and theorists by serving as a helpful guide to the allowed regions of parameter space, and are crucial from the experimental side since almost none of the Lagrangian parameters are directly measured...

  1. CPT violation implies violation of Lorentz invariance.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, O W

    2002-12-01

    A interacting theory that violates CPT invariance necessarily violates Lorentz invariance. On the other hand, CPT invariance is not sufficient for out-of-cone Lorentz invariance. Theories that violate CPT by having different particle and antiparticle masses must be nonlocal. PMID:12484997

  2. Baryon number violation in supersymmetry: n - overline{n} oscillations as a probe beyond the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calibbi, Lorenzo; Ferretti, Gabriele; Milstead, David; Petersson, Christoffer; Pöttgen, Ruth

    2016-05-01

    We study baryon number violation in R-parity violating supersymmetry with focus on Δ B = 2 processes which allow neutron-anti-neutron ( n - overline{n} ) oscillations. We provide prospects for going beyond the present limits by means of a new search for n - overline{n} oscillations. The motivation is the recently proposed n - overline{n} oscillation experiment at the European Spallation Source in Lund, which is projected to be able to improve the current bound on the transition probability in the quasi-free regime by three orders of magnitude. We consider various processes giving rise to baryon number violation and extract the corresponding simplified models, including only the relevant superpartners and couplings. In terms of these models we determine the exclusion limits from LHC searches as well as from searches for flavor transitions, CP violation and di-nucleon decays. We find that, for certain regions of parameter space, the proposed n - overline{n} experiment has a reach that goes beyond all other experiments, as it can probe gluino and squark masses in the multi-TeV range.

  3. Search for lepton-flavor violation in e+p collisions at DESY HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Pellegrino, A.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; de Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Aghuzumtsyan, G.; Bartsch, D.; Brock, I.; Crittenden, J.; Goers, S.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Irrgang, P.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U. F.; Kerger, R.; Kind, O.; Paul, E.; Rautenberg, J.; Renner, R.; Schnurbusch, H.; Stifutkin, A.; Tandler, J.; Voss, K. C.; Weber, A.; Wessoleck, H.; Bailey, D. S.; Brook, N. H.; Cole, J. E.; Foster, B.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Robins, S.; Rodrigues, E.; Scott, J.; Tapper, R. J.; Wing, M.; Capua, M.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Jeoung, H. Y.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Ma, K. J.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Helbich, M.; Liu, X.; Mellado, B.; Paganis, S.; Schmidke, W. B.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Przybycień, M. B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Bednarek, B.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowal, A. M.; Kowal, M.; Kowalski, T.; Mindur, B.; Przybycień, M.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Kotański, A.; Słomiński, W.; Bauerdick, L. A.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Chiochia, V.; Dannheim, D.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Fourletova, J.; Fox-Murphy, A.; Fricke, U.; Geiser, A.; Goebel, F.; Göttlicher, P.; Graciani, R.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G. F.; Hillert, S.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labes, H.; Lelas, D.; Löhr, B.; Mankel, R.; Martens, J.; Martínez, M.; Moritz, M.; Notz, D.; Petrucci, M. C.; Polini, A.; Schneekloth, U.; Selonke, F.; Stonjek, S.; Surrow, B.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, R.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Coldewey, C.; Lopez-Duran Viani, A.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Genta, C.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Benen, A.; Coppola, N.; Markun, P.; Raach, H.; Wölfle, S.; Bell, M.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Glasman, C.; Hanlon, S.; Lee, S. W.; Lupi, A.; McCance, G. J.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Bodmann, B.; Holm, U.; Salehi, H.; Wick, K.; Ziegler, A.; Ziegler, Ar.; Carli, T.; Gialas, I.; Klimek, K.; Lohrmann, E.; Milite, M.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Foudas, C.; Gonçalo, R.; Long, K. R.; Metlica, F.; Miller, D. B.; Tapper, A. D.; Walker, R.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Kuze, M.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Ahn, S. H.; Lee, S. B.; Park, S. K.; Lim, H.; Son, D.; Barreiro, F.; García, G.; González, O.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Redondo, I.; Terrón, J.; Vázquez, M.; Barbi, M.; Bertolin, A.; Corriveau, F.; Ochs, A.; Padhi, S.; Stairs, D. G.; St-Laurent, M.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Bashkirov, V.; Danilov, P.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Katkov, I. I.; Khein, L. A.; Korotkova, N. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Vlasov, N. N.; Zotkin, S. A.; Bokel, C.; Engelen, J.; Grijpink, S.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Maddox, E.; Schagen, S.; Tassi, E.; Tiecke, H.; Tuning, N.; Velthuis, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Brümmer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; Boogert, S.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C.; Ferrando, J.; Matsushita, T.; Rigby, M.; Ruske, O.; Sutton, M. R.; Walczak, R.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S.; Longhin, A.; Parenti, A.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Turcato, M.; Adamczyk, L.; Oh, B. Y.; Saull, P. R.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cormack, C.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Heusch, C.; Park, I. H.; Pavel, N.; Abramowicz, H.; Dagan, S.; Gabareen, A.; Kananov, S.; Kreisel, A.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Kohno, T.; Umemori, K.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Kitamura, S.; Matsuzawa, K.; Nishimura, T.; Arneodo, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Galea, R.; Koop, T.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Mirea, A.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Butterworth, J. M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Hayes, M. E.; Heaphy, E. A.; Jones, T. W.; Lane, J. B.; Lightwood, M. S.; West, B. J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Grzelak, G.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Smalska, B.; Sztuk, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Ukleja, A.; Ukleja, J.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Eisenberg, Y.; Gladilin, L. K.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Breitweg, J.; Chapin, D.; Cross, R.; Kçira, D.; Lammers, S.; Reeder, D. D.; Savin, A. A.; Smith, W. H.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Hughes, V. W.; Straub, P. B.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Fourletov, S.; Menary, S.; Soares, M.; Standage, J.

    2002-05-01

    A search has been made for lepton-flavor-violating interactions of the type e+p-->lX, where l denotes a μ or τ with high transverse momentum, at a center-of-mass energy (s) of 300 GeV with an integrated luminosity of 47.7 pb-1 using the ZEUS detector at HERA. No evidence was found for lepton-flavor violation and constraints were derived on leptoquarks (LQs) that could mediate such interactions. For LQ masses below (s), limits are set on λeq1 (βlq), where λeq1 is the coupling of the LQ to an electron and a first-generation quark q1 and βlq is the branching ratio of the LQ to l and a quark. For LQ masses exceeding (s), limits are set on the four-fermion contact-interaction term λeqα λlqβ/M2LQ for leptoquarks that couple to an electron and a quark qα and also to l and a quark qβ. Some of the limits are also applicable to lepton-flavor-violating processes mediated by squarks in R-parity-violating supersymmetric models. In some cases involving heavy quarks and especially for l=τ, the ZEUS limits are the most stringent published to date.

  4. Spontaneous Fission

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Segre, Emilio

    1950-11-22

    The first attempt to discover spontaneous fission in uranium was made by [Willard] Libby, who, however, failed to detect it on account of the smallness of effect. In 1940, [K. A.] Petrzhak and [G. N.] Flerov, using more sensitive methods, discovered spontaneous fission in uranium and gave some rough estimates of the spontaneous fission decay constant of this substance. Subsequently, extensive experimental work on the subject has been performed by several investigators and will be quoted in the various sections. [N.] Bohr and [A.] Wheeler have given a theory of the effect based on the usual ideas of penetration of potential barriers. On this project spontaneous fission has been studied for the past several years in an effort to obtain a complete picture of the phenomenon. For this purpose the spontaneous fission decay constants {lambda} have been measured for separated isotopes of the heavy elements wherever possible. Moreover, the number {nu} of neutrons emitted per fission has been measured wherever feasible, and other characteristics of the spontaneous fission process have been studied. This report summarizes the spontaneous fission work done at Los Alamos up to January 1, 1945. A chronological record of the work is contained in the Los Alamos monthly reports.

  5. Peritonitis - spontaneous

    MedlinePlus

    ... a catheter used in peritoneal dialysis. Antibiotics may control infection in cases of spontaneous peritonitis with liver or kidney disease. Intravenous therapy can treat dehydration . You may need to stay in the hospital so health care providers can rule out conditions ...

  6. Time Reversal Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, H; /SLAC

    2009-01-27

    This talk briefly reviews three types of time-asymmetry in physics, which I classify as universal, macroscopic and microscopic. Most of the talk is focused on the latter, namely the violation of T-reversal invariance in particle physics theories. In sum tests of microscopic T-invariance, or observations of its violation, are limited by the fact that, while we can measure many processes, only in very few cases can we construct a matched pair of process and inverse process and observe it with sufficient sensitivity to make a test. In both the cases discussed here we can achieve an observable T violation making use of flavor tagging, and in the second case also using the quantum properties of an antisymmetric coherent state of two B mesons to construct a CP-tag. Both these tagging properties depend only on very general properties of the flavor and/or CP quantum numbers and so provide model independent tests for T-invariance violations. The microscopic laws of physics are very close to T-symmetric. There are small effects that give CP- and T-violating processes in three-generation-probing weak decays. Where a T-violating observable can be constructed we see the relationships between T-violation and CP-violation expected in a CPT conserving theory. These microscopic effects are unrelated to the 'arrow of time' that is defined by increasing entropy, or in the time direction defined by the expansion of our Universe.

  7. Search for the lepton-flavour violating decay D0 → e±μ∓

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-03-01

    A search for the lepton-flavour violating decay D0 →e±μ∓ is made with a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0fb-1 of proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7TeV and 8TeV, collected by the LHCb experiment. Candidate D0 mesons are selected using the decay D*+ →D0π+ and the D0 →e±μ∓ branching fraction is measured using the decay mode D0 →K-π+ as a normalization channel. No significant excess of D0 →e±μ∓ candidates over the expected background is seen, and a limit is set on the branching fraction, B (D0 →e±μ∓) < 1.3 ×10-8, at 90% confidence level. This is an order of magnitude lower than the previous limit and it further constrains the parameter space in some leptoquark models and in supersymmetric models with R-parity violation.

  8. Soft CP violation and the global matter-antimatter symmetry of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senjanovic, G.; Stecker, F. W.

    1980-01-01

    Scenarios for baryon production are considered within the context of SU(5) and SO(10) grand unified theories where CP violation arises spontaneously. The spontaneous CP symmetry breaking then results in a matter-antimatter domain structure in the universe. Two possible, distinct types of theories of soft CP violation are defined. In the first type the CP nonconservation originates only from the breaking of SU(2) sub L X U(1) symmetry, and in the second type, even at the unification temperature scale, CP violation can emerge as a result of symmetry breaking by the vacuum expectation values of the superheavy Higgs sector scalars.

  9. Lorentz-violating gravitoelectromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Quentin G.

    2010-09-15

    The well-known analogy between a special limit of general relativity and electromagnetism is explored in the context of the Lorentz-violating standard-model extension. An analogy is developed for the minimal standard-model extension that connects a limit of the CPT-even component of the electromagnetic sector to the gravitational sector. We show that components of the post-Newtonian metric can be directly obtained from solutions to the electromagnetic sector. The method is illustrated with specific examples including static and rotating sources. Some unconventional effects that arise for Lorentz-violating electrostatics and magnetostatics have an analog in Lorentz-violating post-Newtonian gravity. In particular, we show that even for static sources, gravitomagnetic fields arise in the presence of Lorentz violation.

  10. Decoupling and nondecoupling of heavy fermions in theories with spontaneous symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ling-Fong . Dept. of Physics); Cheng, T.P. . Dept. of Physics Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong, Shatin . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    The validity of the decoupling theorem is discussed in the context of gauge theories with spontaneous symmetry breaking. The presence of large Yukawa couplings which grow with heavy masses is responsible for the violation of decoupling theorem. 7 refs.

  11. On spontaneous CP violation in the lepton sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimus, W.; Neufeld, H.

    1990-03-01

    After a general discussion of CP transformations in the lepton sector we apply a class of non-standard CP sysmmetries to the Zee model. We show that the resulting cases are all equivalent and give rise to a Zeldovich-Konopinski-Mahmoud lepton number and to neutral flavour conservation. The mass, the magnetic moment and the electric dipole moment of the corresponding Dirac neutrino are calculated.

  12. CP violation in K decays

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, F.J.

    1989-05-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental progress on the manifestation of CP violation in K decays, and toward understanding whether CP violation originates in a phase, or phases, in the weak mixing matrix of quarks is reviewed. 23 refs., 10 figs.

  13. Moral Violations Reduce Oral Consumption.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cindy; Van Boven, Leaf; Andrade, Eduardo B; Ariely, Dan

    2014-07-01

    Consumers frequently encounter moral violations in everyday life. They watch movies and television shows about crime and deception, hear news reports of corporate fraud and tax evasion, and hear gossip about cheaters and thieves. How does exposure to moral violations influence consumption? Because moral violations arouse disgust and because disgust is an evolutionarily important signal of contamination that should provoke a multi-modal response, we hypothesize that moral violations affect a key behavioral response to disgust: reduced oral consumption. In three experiments, compared with those in control conditions, people drank less water and chocolate milk while (a) watching a film portraying the moral violations of incest, (b) writing about moral violations of cheating or theft, and (c) listening to a report about fraud and manipulation. These findings imply that "moral disgust" influences consumption in ways similar to core disgust, and thus provide evidence for the associations between moral violations, emotions, and consumer behavior. PMID:25125931

  14. Moral Violations Reduce Oral Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Cindy; Van Boven, Leaf; Andrade, Eduardo B.; Ariely, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Consumers frequently encounter moral violations in everyday life. They watch movies and television shows about crime and deception, hear news reports of corporate fraud and tax evasion, and hear gossip about cheaters and thieves. How does exposure to moral violations influence consumption? Because moral violations arouse disgust and because disgust is an evolutionarily important signal of contamination that should provoke a multi-modal response, we hypothesize that moral violations affect a key behavioral response to disgust: reduced oral consumption. In three experiments, compared with those in control conditions, people drank less water and chocolate milk while (a) watching a film portraying the moral violations of incest, (b) writing about moral violations of cheating or theft, and (c) listening to a report about fraud and manipulation. These findings imply that “moral disgust” influences consumption in ways similar to core disgust, and thus provide evidence for the associations between moral violations, emotions, and consumer behavior. PMID:25125931

  15. Lorentz violation naturalness revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belenchia, Alessio; Gambassi, Andrea; Liberati, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    We revisit here the naturalness problem of Lorentz invariance violations on a simple toy model of a scalar field coupled to a fermion field via a Yukawa interaction. We first review some well-known results concerning the low-energy percolation of Lorentz violation from high energies, presenting some details of the analysis not explicitly discussed in the literature and discussing some previously unnoticed subtleties. We then show how a separation between the scale of validity of the effective field theory and that one of Lorentz invariance violations can hinder this low-energy percolation. While such protection mechanism was previously considered in the literature, we provide here a simple illustration of how it works and of its general features. Finally, we consider a case in which dissipation is present, showing that the dissipative behaviour does not percolate generically to lower mass dimension operators albeit dispersion does. Moreover, we show that a scale separation can protect from unsuppressed low-energy percolation also in this case.

  16. SO(10) SUSY GUT for fermion masses: Lepton flavor and CP violation

    SciTech Connect

    Dermisek, R.; Harada, M.; Raby, S.

    2006-08-01

    We discuss the results of a global {chi}{sup 2} analysis of a simple SO(10) supersymmetric grand unified theory (SUSY GUT) with D{sub 3} family symmetry and low energy R parity. The model describes fermion mass matrices with 14 parameters and gives excellent fits to 20 observable masses and mixing angles in both quark and lepton sectors, giving six predictions. Bi-large neutrino mixing is obtained with hierarchical quark and lepton Yukawa matrices, thus avoiding the possibility of large lepton flavor violation. The model naturally predicts small 1-3 neutrino mixing, with sin{theta}{sub 13}{approx_equal}0.05-0.06. In this paper we evaluate the predictions for the lepton flavor violating processes, {mu}{yields}e{gamma}, {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma} and {tau}{yields}e{gamma} and also the electric dipole moment of the electron (d{sub e}), the muon, and the tau, assuming universal squark and slepton masses (m{sub 16}) and a universal soft SUSY breaking A parameter (A{sub 0}) at the GUT scale. We find Br({mu}{yields}e{gamma}) is naturally below present bounds, but may be observable by MEG. Similarly, d{sub e} is below present bounds, but it is within the range of future experiments. We also give predictions for the light Higgs mass (using FeynHiggs). We find an upper bound given by m{sub h}{<=}127 GeV, with an estimated {+-}3 GeV theoretical uncertainty. Finally we present predictions for SUSY particle masses in the favored region of parameter space.

  17. Lepton flavor-violating decays of the Higgs boson from sgoldstino mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, S. V.; Sobolev, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    We study lepton flavor violation in a class of supersymmetric models with light sgoldstino — scalar superpartner of Goldstone fermions responsible for spontaneous supersymmetry breaking. Sgoldstino couplings to the Standard Model (SM) fermions are determined by the MSSM soft terms and, in general, provide with flavor violation in this sector. Sgoldstino admixture to the lightest Higgs boson results in changes of its coupling constants and, in particular, leads to lepton flavor-violating decay h → τ μ of the Higgs resonance. We discuss viability and phenomenological consequences of this scenario.

  18. CP violation at ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Adam; Atlas Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    A measurement of several properties of the Bs meson, including the CP-violating weak phase phis and the mixing-induced width difference ΔΓs, is performed using the decay Bs → J/ψ(μ+μ-)phi(K+K-), from a dataset of 4.9 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected in 2011 by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The measured parameters are consistent with the world average values and theoretical expectations; in particular phis is within 1 σ of the expected value in the Standard Model.

  19. CP Violation in B Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzaro, Alfio; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2007-05-11

    Symmetries and their conservation laws play a fundamental role in Physics. Among them, the discrete symmetries corresponding to charge (C), parity (P), and time (T) transformations are extensively used in the theory of the elementary particles and their interactions (so called Standard Model (SM)) to give the basis of the fundamental physical description of nature. Eventual discoveries of violations of these symmetries become a crucial test for our understanding of the nature. It was assumed that the three discrete symmetries were not violated until 1956 when it was found that P is violated in the weak interaction. Soon it was understood that also the C is violated in the weak interaction. At that time these two violated symmetries were replaced by their combination, CP, which was considered a new fundamental symmetry. In 1964 also the CP was found violated in the case of the neutral K meson system. Since that year there were many achievements in theories and experiments in order to explain this symmetry violation. In the last five years the main contribution comes from the discovery of the CP violation in B meson system. In this note we will describe briefly how the CP violation is described in the SM and the main experimental results obtained in the B mesons system.

  20. Second law violations, continuum mechanics, and permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The violations of the second law are relevant as the length and/or time scales become very small. The second law then needs to be replaced by the fluctuation theorem and mathematically, the irreversible entropy is a submartingale. First, we discuss the consequences of these results for the axioms of continuum mechanics, arguing in favor of a framework relying on stochastic functionals of energy and entropy. We next determine a Lyapunov function for diffusion-type problems governed by stochastic rather than deterministic functionals of internal energy and entropy, where the random field coefficients of diffusion are not required to satisfy the positive definiteness everywhere. Next, a formulation of micropolar fluid mechanics is developed, accounting for the lack of symmetry of stress tensor on molecular scales. This framework is then applied to employed to show that spontaneous random fluctuations of the microrotation field will arise in Couette—and Poiseuille-type flows in the absence of random (turbulence-like) fluctuations of the classical velocity field. Finally, while the permeability is classically modeled by the Darcy law or its modifications, besides considering the violations of the second law, one also needs to account for the spatial randomness of the channel network, implying a modification of the hierarchy of scale-dependent bounds on the macroscopic property of the network.

  1. Beyond Spontaneously Broken Symmetry in Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, W. J.; Laloee, F.

    2010-04-16

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB) for Bose-Einstein condensates cannot treat phase off-diagonal effects, and thus cannot explain Bell inequality violations. We describe another situation that is beyond a SSB treatment: an experiment where particles from two (possibly macroscopic) condensate sources are used for conjugate measurements of the relative phase and populations. Off-diagonal phase effects are characterized by a 'quantum angle' and observed via 'population oscillations', signaling quantum interference of macroscopically distinct states.

  2. Impact of Lorentz violation on the dynamics of inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Avelino, P. P.; Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Rodrigues, J. J.; Menezes, R.

    2009-06-15

    This work deals with the dynamics of inflation in the context of a scalar-vector-tensor theory of gravity exhibiting spontaneous Lorentz violation at early times. We describe a first-order formalism which we use to obtain new exact Lorentz violating inflationary solutions for a broad family of models, some in the absence of a potential for the inflaton field. Our results show that different conditions are required to solve the horizon and flatness problems. In particular, we find a necessary condition for inflation to provide a solution to both problems and we show that in inflationary models with no inflaton potential a period of superinflation might be necessary to solve the flatness problem.

  3. Cosmological aspects of spontaneous baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Simone, Andrea; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    We investigate cosmological aspects of spontaneous baryogenesis driven by a scalar field, and present general constraints that are independent of the particle physics model. The relevant constraints are obtained by studying the backreaction of the produced baryons on the scalar field, the cosmological expansion history after baryogenesis, and the baryon isocurvature perturbations. We show that cosmological considerations alone provide powerful constraints, especially for the minimal scenario with a quadratic scalar potential. Intriguingly, we find that for a given inflation scale, the other parameters including the reheat temperature, decoupling temperature of the baryon violating interactions, and the mass and decay constant of the scalar are restricted to lie within ranges of at most a few orders of magnitude. We also discuss possible extensions to the minimal setup, and propose two ideas for evading constraints on isocurvature perturbations: one is to suppress the baryon isocurvature with nonquadratic scalar potentials, another is to compensate the baryon isocurvature with cold dark matter isocurvature by making the scalar survive until the present.

  4. Quark model and CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    After a short review of the activities of Shoichi Sakata and his group, how the six-quark model explains CP violation is described. Experimental verification of the model at the B-factories is also briefly discussed.

  5. Violation of classical inequalities by resonant Hawking radiation in a sonic black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Nova, J. R. M.; Zapata, I.; Sols, F.

    2015-10-01

    We argue that, in a sonic black hole, the two-mode classical Cauchy-Schwarz inequality can be violated at nonzero frequencies, which can be viewed as a smoking gun of spontaneous analog Hawking radiation. A double-barrier structure generates resonant peaks in the spectrum where the inequality can be largely violated. For a given frequency, we compute the maximum temperature at which this violation can be observed. We also study the scenario where a space-dependent constant coupling produces a resonant spectrum. We prove that the zero-frequency peak always shows classical behavior. When we compare our results with those obtained for non-resonant structures such as the single barrier or the waterfall configuration, we find that the absolute amount of violation is extremely weak compared to that of resonant setups.

  6. CP Violation in B Mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, Natalie A.

    2001-04-01

    Our world manifestly violates CP, the symmetry between matter and antimatter; there is no observational evidence for any significant amount of antimatter in the Universe. Andrei Sakharov was the first to point out that, in the context of Big Bang theory, a matter-dominated universe requires CP violation at the quantum level. Indeed, CP violation was subsequently observed as a tiny effect in K-meson decays, and it can be naturally accommodated in the Standard Model of fundamental particles with 3 generations of quarks. However, to produce the observed baryon asymmetry, baryogenesis calculations require more CP violation than the Standard Model affords. This is an intriguing puzzle whose solution will require input from both particle physics and cosmology, and it has inspired particle physicists to study CP violation with greater precision in a new generation of experiments. We are now entering this exciting new era in CP violation studies. Several new or upgraded experiments plan a program of detailed measurements of CP violating effects in B mesons. The predicted asymmetries are large, observable in a variety of decay channels, and the theoretical uncertainties are small for the best modes. Some interesting experimental results have recently been announced, and more precise measurements will soon follow. Future experiments are already planned to make even more definitive measurements. In this talk I will review the theoretical predictions and the connection to cosmology, survey the experimental scene, and describe how the study of CP violation in B mesons will allow us to make stringent tests of the Standard Model.

  7. 7 CFR 632.42 - Violation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... conservationist, that a violation did not occur or that the violation was of such a nature that no penalty of... refused. (2) The notice setting forth the nature of the alleged violation is to give the land user an... decision is to state whether the violation is of such a nature as to warrant termination of the...

  8. CPT violation and B-meson oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelecky, V. Alan; Van Kooten, Richard J.

    2010-11-15

    Recent evidence for anomalous CP violation in B-meson oscillations can be interpreted as resulting from CPT violation. This yields the first sensitivity to CPT violation in the B{sub s}{sup 0} system, with the relevant coefficient for CPT violation constrained at the level of parts in 10{sup 12}.

  9. Speeded Recognition of Ungrammaticality: Double Violations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Timothy E.; Biederman, Irving

    1979-01-01

    The speed at which sentences with various kinds of violations could be rejected was studied. Compatible with the sequential model was the finding that noun-verb and adjective-noun double violations did not result in shorter reaction times than noun-verb single violations, although double violations were judged less acceptable. (Author/RD)

  10. Time-reversal violation in beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Herczeg, P.

    2003-01-01

    At present there is no unambigous direct evidence for time-reversal (T) violation in the fundamental interactions. But T-violation is intimately connected with CP-violation by the CPT theorem. A stringent bound on possible violation of CPT invariance comes from the properties of K{sup 0} - {bar K}{sup 0} mixing [I]. In the following we shall assume that CPT violating interactions, if present, can be neglected, and use the terms 'T-violation' and 'CP-violation' interchangably.

  11. CP violation at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreau, J.

    2001-04-16

    A major goal of experimental particle physics over the next decade is to measure the sides and angles of the Unitarity triangle redundantly, and as precisely as possible. Overconstraining the triangle will test the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa model of quark mixing. The CDF collaboration, due to begin a second run in March 2001 with major upgrades to both the accelerator and the detector, will study the angle {beta} using B{sup 0} decays, the angle {gamma} using B{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0} decays, and a side of the triangle through the observation of B{sub s}{sup 0}--{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} mixing. Projected sensitivities are driven mostly by previous measurements using data from the first run. One highlight of the Run I B physics program is a measurement of the CP violating parameter sin 2{beta} = 0.79{sub {minus}0.44}{sup +0.41}, based on a tagged sample of 400 B{sup 0} decays in the mode B{sub 0}/{bar B}{sup 0} {r_arrow} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0}. The technology of flavor tagging, used here as well as in numerous B{sup 0}-{bar B}{sup 0} mixing analyses in run I, is crucial and will be augmented in Run II with better particle identification capabilities. Exclusive all-hadronic final states will enter the data sample in Run II through a new displaced track trigger.

  12. Why men violate.

    PubMed

    Mcfadden, P

    1993-10-01

    Soldiers in Bosnia-Herzegovina freely rape and kill women. In Botswana, a policeman laughed when a mother reported the rape of her daughter; he commented that some men are fortunate and do not have to pay for sex. His behavior condoned rape as men's right to any female they want. Girls are the most vulnerable of all females. In South Africa, white adults claim that black men and women spread HIV, yet white policemen and white soldiers have raped many black women. White bosses often rape their black housekeepers. A rapist is defined an any man who believes he has the right to rape a woman or child to express his patriarchal sexual power. Most rapists in Africa are black men. Yet many adults continue to deny that male Africans rape and molest children, explaining in part why rape of children and married women is still a silent problem. A study in Zimbabwe shows that the numbers of children less than 11 years old who are raped is increasing quickly (in 1993, 56 of 57 children were girls). Men tend to rape women whom they know, who are often female family members. Men in all classes violate women with whom they work. Rarely do women place themselves in danger. Marital rape is no uncommon, but is often ignored. Society tends to blame the victim, even when she is a child. Same-sex rape does occur, but is rare, and often occurs in prisons. Soldiers, especially during war, believe that women have no value. Men from both sides always consider women to be the enemy. Instead of being captured and shot, women are raped and desecrated as human beings. Often soldiers have no identity outside of their military uniform, and that identity is limited to taking orders, so they assume power over unarmed, defenseless women. PMID:12287226

  13. Spontaneous droplet trampolining on rigid superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schutzius, Thomas M; Jung, Stefan; Maitra, Tanmoy; Graeber, Gustav; Köhme, Moritz; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous removal of condensed matter from surfaces is exploited in nature and in a broad range of technologies to achieve self-cleaning, anti-icing and condensation control. But despite much progress, our understanding of the phenomena leading to such behaviour remains incomplete, which makes it challenging to rationally design surfaces that benefit from its manifestation. Here we show that water droplets resting on superhydrophobic textured surfaces in a low-pressure environment can self-remove through sudden spontaneous levitation and subsequent trampoline-like bouncing behaviour, in which sequential collisions with the surface accelerate the droplets. These collisions have restitution coefficients (ratios of relative speeds after and before collision) greater than unity despite complete rigidity of the surface, and thus seemingly violate the second law of thermodynamics. However, these restitution coefficients result from an overpressure beneath the droplet produced by fast droplet vaporization while substrate adhesion and surface texture restrict vapour flow. We also show that the high vaporization rates experienced by the droplets and the associated cooling can result in freezing from a supercooled state that triggers a sudden increase in vaporization, which in turn boosts the levitation process. This effect can spontaneously remove surface icing by lifting away icy drops the moment they freeze. Although these observations are relevant only to systems in a low-pressure environment, they show how surface texturing can produce droplet-surface interactions that prohibit liquid and freezing water-droplet retention on surfaces. PMID:26536959

  14. Spontaneous droplet trampolining on rigid superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutzius, Thomas M.; Jung, Stefan; Maitra, Tanmoy; Graeber, Gustav; Köhme, Moritz; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous removal of condensed matter from surfaces is exploited in nature and in a broad range of technologies to achieve self-cleaning, anti-icing and condensation control. But despite much progress, our understanding of the phenomena leading to such behaviour remains incomplete, which makes it challenging to rationally design surfaces that benefit from its manifestation. Here we show that water droplets resting on superhydrophobic textured surfaces in a low-pressure environment can self-remove through sudden spontaneous levitation and subsequent trampoline-like bouncing behaviour, in which sequential collisions with the surface accelerate the droplets. These collisions have restitution coefficients (ratios of relative speeds after and before collision) greater than unity despite complete rigidity of the surface, and thus seemingly violate the second law of thermodynamics. However, these restitution coefficients result from an overpressure beneath the droplet produced by fast droplet vaporization while substrate adhesion and surface texture restrict vapour flow. We also show that the high vaporization rates experienced by the droplets and the associated cooling can result in freezing from a supercooled state that triggers a sudden increase in vaporization, which in turn boosts the levitation process. This effect can spontaneously remove surface icing by lifting away icy drops the moment they freeze. Although these observations are relevant only to systems in a low-pressure environment, they show how surface texturing can produce droplet-surface interactions that prohibit liquid and freezing water-droplet retention on surfaces.

  15. Spontaneous combustion of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nusselt, Wilhelm; Pothmann, PH

    1923-01-01

    It is shown by the author's experiments that hydrogen which escapes to the atmosphere through openings in the system may burn spontaneously if it contains dust. Purely thermal reasoning can not account for the combustion. It seems to be rather an electrical ignition. In order to determine whether the cause of the spontaneous ignition was thermo-chemical, thermo-mechanical, or thermo-electrical, the experiments in this paper were performed.

  16. CP VIOLATION HIGHLIGHTS: CIRCA 2005

    SciTech Connect

    SONI A.

    2005-02-27

    Recent highlights in CP violation phenomena, are reviewed. B-factory results imply that, CP-violation phase in the CKM matrix is the dominant contributor to the observed CP violation in K and B-physics. Deviations from the predictions of the CKM-paradigm due to beyond the Standard Model CP-odd phase are likely to be a small perturbation. Therefore, large data sample of clean B's will be needed. Precise determination of the unitarity triangle, along with time dependent CP in penguin dominated hadronic and radiative modes are discussed. Null tests in B, K and top-physics and separate determination of the K-unitarity triangle are also emphasized.

  17. Chirality and gravitational parity violation.

    PubMed

    Bargueño, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    In this review, parity-violating gravitational potentials are presented as possible sources of both true and false chirality. In particular, whereas phenomenological long-range spin-dependent gravitational potentials contain both truly and falsely chiral terms, it is shown that there are models that extend general relativity including also coupling of fermionic degrees of freedom to gravity in the presence of torsion, which give place to short-range truly chiral interactions similar to that usually considered in molecular physics. Physical mechanisms which give place to gravitational parity violation together with the expected size of the effects and their experimental constraints are discussed. Finally, the possible role of parity-violating gravity in the origin of homochirality and a road map for future research works in quantum chemistry is presented. PMID:25919812

  18. CP violation results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Austin; /Tufts U.

    2012-01-01

    We present world-leading results on CP-violating asymmetries and branching fractions of several decay modes of B{sup 0}, B{sub s}{sup 0}, and {Lambda}{sub b} hadrons into charmless two-body, and of B{sup {+-}} into charm, final states collected by the CDF detector. We also report a new measurement of CP-violating asymmetries in D*{sup {+-}}-tagged D{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h{sup -} (h = K or {pi}) decays, where any enhancement from the Standard Model prediction would be unambiguous evidence for New Physics.

  19. Spontaneous Representations of Small Numbers of Objects by Rhesus Macaques: Examinations of Content and Format

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauser, Marc D.; Carey, Susan

    2003-01-01

    The project of comparative cognition benefits from common measures across species. We report here on five experiments using the violation of expectancy looking time measure with free-ranging rhesus macaques ("Macaca mulatta"), each designed to build on current knowledge concerning spontaneous representations of number. Each subject, tested in only…

  20. Models of neutrino mass, mixing and CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephen F.

    2015-12-01

    In this topical review we argue that neutrino mass and mixing data motivates extending the Standard Model (SM) to include a non-Abelian discrete flavour symmetry in order to accurately predict the large leptonic mixing angles and {C}{P} violation. We begin with an overview of the SM puzzles, followed by a description of some classic lepton mixing patterns. Lepton mixing may be regarded as a deviation from tri-bimaximal mixing, with charged lepton corrections leading to solar mixing sum rules, or tri-maximal lepton mixing leading to atmospheric mixing rules. We survey neutrino mass models, using a roadmap based on the open questions in neutrino physics. We then focus on the seesaw mechanism with right-handed neutrinos, where sequential dominance (SD) can account for large lepton mixing angles and {C}{P} violation, with precise predictions emerging from constrained SD (CSD). We define the flavour problem and discuss progress towards a theory of favour using GUTs and discrete family symmetry. We classify models as direct, semidirect or indirect, according to the relation between the Klein symmetry of the mass matrices and the discrete family symmetry, in all cases focussing on spontaneous {C}{P} violation. Finally we give two examples of realistic and highly predictive indirect models with CSD, namely an A to Z of flavour with Pati-Salam and a fairly complete A 4 × SU(5) SUSY GUT of flavour, where both models have interesting implications for leptogenesis.

  1. Bonobos (Pan paniscus) vocally protest against violations of social expectations.

    PubMed

    Clay, Zanna; Ravaux, Lucie; de Waal, Frans B M; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    Research has shown that great apes possess certain expectations about social regularities and both perceive and act according to social rules within their group. During natural and experimentally induced contexts, such as the inequitable distribution of resources, individuals also show protesting behaviors when their expectations about a social situation are violated. Despite broad interest in this topic, systematic research examining the nature of these expectations and the communicative signals individuals use to express them remains scant. Here, we addressed this by exploring whether bonobos (Pan paniscus) respond to violations of social expectations in naturally occurring social interactions, focusing on the vocal behavior of victims following socially expected and unexpected aggression. Expected aggression included conflicts over a contested resource and conflicts that were provoked by the victim. Unexpected aggression was any spontaneous, unprovoked hostility toward the victim. For each conflict, we also determined its severity and the composition of the nearby audience. We found that the acoustic and temporal structure of victim screams was individually distinct and varied significantly depending on whether or not aggression could be socially predicted. Certain acoustic parameters also varied as a function of conflict severity, but unlike social expectation, conflict severity did not discriminate scream acoustic structure overall. We found no effect of audience composition. We concluded that, beyond the physical nature of a conflict, bonobos possess certain social expectations about how they should be treated and will publicly protest with acoustically distinctive vocal signals if these expectations are violated. PMID:26881943

  2. Parity violation in atomic ytterbium: Experimental sensitivity and systematics

    SciTech Connect

    Tsigutkin, K.; Dounas-Frazer, D.; Family, A.; Stalnaker, J. E.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Budker, D.

    2010-03-15

    We present a detailed description of the observation of parity violation in the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}D{sub 1} 408-nm forbidden transition of ytterbium, a brief report of which appeared earlier. Linearly polarized 408-nm light interacts with Yb atoms in crossed E and B fields. The probability of the 408-nm transition contains a parity-violating term, proportional to ({center_dot}B)[(Ex){center_dot}B], arising from interference between the parity-violating amplitude and the Stark amplitude due to the E field ( is the electric field of the light). The transition probability is detected by measuring the population of the {sup 3}P{sub 0} state, to which 65% of the atoms excited to the {sup 3}D{sub 1} state spontaneously decay. The population of the {sup 3}P{sub 0} state is determined by resonantly exciting the atoms with 649-nm light to the 6s7s {sup 3}S{sub 1} state and collecting the fluorescence resulting from its decay. Systematic corrections due to E-field and B-field imperfections are determined in auxiliary experiments. The statistical uncertainty is dominated by parasitic frequency excursions of the 408-nm excitation light due to the imperfect stabilization of the optical reference with respect to the atomic resonance. The present uncertainties are 9% statistical and 8% systematic. Methods of improving the accuracy for future experiments are discussed.

  3. Biomodal spontaneous fission

    SciTech Connect

    Hulet, E.K. )

    1989-09-26

    Investigations of mass and kinetic-energy distributions from spontaneous fission have been extended in recent years to an isotope of element 104 and, for half-lives, to an isotope of element 108. The results have been surprising in that spontaneous fission half-lives have turned out to be much longer than expected and mass and kinetic- energy distributions were found to abruptly shift away from those of the lighter actinides, showing two modes of fission. These new developments have caused a re-evaluation of our understanding of the fission process, bringing an even deeper appreciation of the role played by nuclear shell effects upon spontaneous fission properties. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  4. [Spontaneous mediastinal emphysema].

    PubMed

    Svedbrand, Charlotte; Lange, Peter; Nielsen, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous mediastinal emphysema, also known as spontaneous pneumomediastinum, is defined as radiologically detected free air in the mediastinum, without preceding trauma. It is a rare condition, mainly affecting young adults. It can be caused by coughing, strenuous sports or cocaine inhalation, however, 40% are idiopatic. Common symptoms are chest pain and dyspnoea. 75-90% can be diagnosed with a chest X-ray, and 100% with a computed tomography. Treatment is symptomatic and complications are rare, however, pneumothorax and pneumorrachis have been reported. PMID:26750190

  5. Spontaneous sarcomere dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Stefan; Kruse, Karsten

    2010-12-01

    Sarcomeres are the basic force generating units of striated muscles and consist of an interdigitating arrangement of actin and myosin filaments. While muscle contraction is usually triggered by neural signals, which eventually set myosin motors into motion, isolated sarcomeres can oscillate spontaneously between a contracted and a relaxed state. We analyze a model for sarcomere dynamics, which is based on a force-dependent detachment rate of myosin from actin. Our numerical bifurcation analysis of the spontaneous sarcomere dynamics reveals notably Hopf bifurcations, canard explosions, and gluing bifurcations. We discuss possible implications for experiments.

  6. 7 CFR 632.41 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... control of the land, and (B) The violation was of a nature as to warrant termination of the contract. (ii... nature of the violation does not warrant termination of the contract. (ii) Payment adjustments...

  7. 7 CFR 632.41 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... control of the land, and (B) The violation was of a nature as to warrant termination of the contract. (ii... nature of the violation does not warrant termination of the contract. (ii) Payment adjustments...

  8. 25 CFR 11.445 - Driving violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.445 Driving violations. (a) A person who shall operate any vehicle in....450 depending on the nature of the traffic code violation, and may be deprived of the right to...

  9. Atomic CP-violating polarizability

    SciTech Connect

    Ravaine, Boris; Derevianko, Andrei; Kozlov, M.G.

    2005-07-15

    Searches for CP-violating effects in atoms and molecules provide important constrains on competing extensions to the standard model of elementary particles. In particular, CP violation in an atom leads to the CP-odd (T,P-odd) polarizability {beta}{sup CP}: a magnetic moment {mu}{sup CP} is induced by an electric field E{sub 0} applied to an atom, {mu}{sup CP}={beta}{sup CP}E{sub 0}. We estimate the CP-violating polarizability for rare-gas (diamagnetic) atoms He through Rn. We relate {beta}{sup CP} to the permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron and to the scalar constant of the CP-odd electron-nucleus interaction. The analysis is carried out using the third-order perturbation theory and the Dirac-Hartree-Fock formalism. We find that, as a function of nuclear charge Z, {beta}{sup CP} scales steeply as Z{sup 5}R(Z), where slowly varying R(Z) is a relativistic enhancement factor. Finally, we evaluate the feasibility of setting a limit on electron EDM by measuring CP-violating magnetization of liquid Xe. We find that such an experiment could provide competitive bounds on electron EDM only if the present level of experimental sensitivity to ultraweak magnetic fields [Kominis et al., Nature 422, 596 (2003)] is improved by several orders of magnitude.

  10. 48 CFR 303.104-7 - Violations or possible violations of the Procurement Integrity Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations or possible violations of the Procurement Integrity Act. 303.104-7 Section 303.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations... Safeguards 303.104-7 Violations or possible violations of the Procurement Integrity Act. (a)(1)...

  11. 7 CFR 1412.61 - Contract violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Contract violations. 1412.61 Section 1412.61... CROP REVENUE ELECTION PROGRAM FOR THE 2008 AND SUBSEQUENT CROP YEARS Contract Violations and Reduction in Payments § 1412.61 Contract violations. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of...

  12. 10 CFR 218.41 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 218.41 Section 218.41 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL STANDBY MANDATORY INTERNATIONAL OIL ALLOCATION Investigations, Violations, Sanctions and Judicial Actions § 218.41 Violations. Any practice that circumvents, contravenes or results in...

  13. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or...

  14. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or...

  15. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or...

  16. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or...

  17. 10 CFR 490.708 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 490.708 Section 490.708 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Biodiesel Fuel Use Credit § 490.708 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart G of...

  18. 10 CFR 1016.44 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 1016.44 Section 1016.44 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) SAFEGUARDING OF RESTRICTED DATA Control of Information § 1016.44 Violations. An injunction or other court order may be obtained prohibiting any violation of any provision of...

  19. 40 CFR 141.810 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Violations. 141.810 Section 141.810 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Aircraft Drinking Water Rule § 141.810 Violations. An air carrier is in violation of this subpart when, for...

  20. 18 CFR 415.52 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Violations. 415.52 Section 415.52 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Enforcement § 415.52 Violations. Any violation of...

  1. 10 CFR 39.101 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 39.101 Section 39.101 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Enforcement § 39.101 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of...

  2. 10 CFR 39.101 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 39.101 Section 39.101 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Enforcement § 39.101 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of...

  3. 10 CFR 39.101 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 39.101 Section 39.101 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Enforcement § 39.101 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of...

  4. 10 CFR 39.101 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 39.101 Section 39.101 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Enforcement § 39.101 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of...

  5. 10 CFR 39.101 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 39.101 Section 39.101 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Enforcement § 39.101 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of...

  6. 10 CFR 63.171 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 63.171 Section 63.171 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Violations § 63.171 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other...

  7. 10 CFR 63.171 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 63.171 Section 63.171 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Violations § 63.171 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other...

  8. 10 CFR 63.171 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 63.171 Section 63.171 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Violations § 63.171 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other...

  9. 10 CFR 63.171 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 63.171 Section 63.171 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Violations § 63.171 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other...

  10. 10 CFR 63.171 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 63.171 Section 63.171 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Violations § 63.171 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other...

  11. 10 CFR 490.310 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 490.310 Section 490.310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.310 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation...

  12. 10 CFR 490.708 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 490.708 Section 490.708 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Biodiesel Fuel Use Credit § 490.708 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart G of...

  13. 10 CFR 490.206 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 490.206 Section 490.206 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Mandatory State Fleet Program § 490.206 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under...

  14. 10 CFR 490.206 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 490.206 Section 490.206 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Mandatory State Fleet Program § 490.206 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under...

  15. 10 CFR 490.708 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 490.708 Section 490.708 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Biodiesel Fuel Use Credit § 490.708 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart G of...

  16. 10 CFR 490.310 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 490.310 Section 490.310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.310 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation...

  17. 10 CFR 490.708 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 490.708 Section 490.708 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Biodiesel Fuel Use Credit § 490.708 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart G of...

  18. 10 CFR 490.206 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 490.206 Section 490.206 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Mandatory State Fleet Program § 490.206 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under...

  19. 10 CFR 490.310 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 490.310 Section 490.310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.310 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation...

  20. 10 CFR 490.310 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 490.310 Section 490.310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.310 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation...

  1. 10 CFR 490.206 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 490.206 Section 490.206 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Mandatory State Fleet Program § 490.206 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under...

  2. 10 CFR 490.310 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 490.310 Section 490.310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.310 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation...

  3. 10 CFR 490.708 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 490.708 Section 490.708 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Biodiesel Fuel Use Credit § 490.708 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart G of...

  4. 10 CFR 490.206 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 490.206 Section 490.206 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Mandatory State Fleet Program § 490.206 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under...

  5. 32 CFR 763.6 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Violations. 763.6 Section 763.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY ISLANDS UNDER NAVY JURISDICTION RULES GOVERNING PUBLIC ACCESS Entry Regulations for Kaho'olawe Island, Hawaii § 763.6 Violations. (a) Any person who violates this subpart is subject...

  6. 32 CFR 763.6 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Violations. 763.6 Section 763.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY ISLANDS UNDER NAVY JURISDICTION RULES GOVERNING PUBLIC ACCESS Entry Regulations for Kaho'olawe Island, Hawaii § 763.6 Violations. (a) Any person who violates this subpart is subject...

  7. 32 CFR 763.6 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Violations. 763.6 Section 763.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY ISLANDS UNDER NAVY JURISDICTION RULES GOVERNING PUBLIC ACCESS Entry Regulations for Kaho'olawe Island, Hawaii § 763.6 Violations. (a) Any person who violates this subpart is subject...

  8. 5 CFR 1312.31 - Security violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Security violations. 1312.31 Section 1312..., DOWNGRADING, DECLASSIFICATION AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Control and Accountability of Classified Information § 1312.31 Security violations. (a) A security violation notice is issued by the...

  9. 18 CFR 415.52 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Violations. 415.52 Section 415.52 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Enforcement § 415.52 Violations. Any violation of...

  10. CP violation without elementary scalar fields

    SciTech Connect

    Eichten, E.; Lane, K.; Preskill, J.

    1980-04-01

    Dynamically broken gauge theories of electroweak interactions provide a natural mechanism for generating CP violation. Even if all vacuum angles are unobservable, strong CP violation is not automatically avoided. In the absence of strong CP violation, the neutron electric dipole moment is expected to be of order 10/sup -24/e cm.

  11. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or...

  12. 10 CFR 810.15 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 810.15 Section 810.15 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.15 Violations. (a) The Atomic Energy Act... person from violating any provision of the Atomic Energy Act or its implementing regulations. (2)...

  13. 10 CFR 810.15 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 810.15 Section 810.15 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.15 Violations. (a) The Atomic Energy Act... person from violating any provision of the Atomic Energy Act or its implementing regulations. (2)...

  14. 10 CFR 810.15 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 810.15 Section 810.15 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.15 Violations. (a) The Atomic Energy Act... person from violating any provision of the Atomic Energy Act or its implementing regulations. (2)...

  15. 10 CFR 60.181 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 60.181 Section 60.181 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Violations § 60.181 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  16. 10 CFR 60.181 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 60.181 Section 60.181 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Violations § 60.181 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  17. 10 CFR 60.181 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 60.181 Section 60.181 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Violations § 60.181 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  18. 10 CFR 60.181 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 60.181 Section 60.181 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Violations § 60.181 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  19. 10 CFR 60.181 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 60.181 Section 60.181 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Violations § 60.181 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  20. 40 CFR 141.860 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Revised Total Coliform Rule § 141.860 Violations. (a) E. coli MCL Violation. A system is in violation of the MCL for E. coli when any of the conditions identified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(4) of this section occur. (1) The system has an E. coli-positive repeat...

  1. 40 CFR 141.860 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Revised Total Coliform Rule § 141.860 Violations. (a) E. coli MCL Violation. A system is in violation of the MCL for E. coli when any of the conditions identified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(4) of this section occur. (1) The system has an E. coli-positive repeat...

  2. 10 CFR 95.61 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 95.61 Section 95.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND RESTRICTED DATA Violations § 95.61 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other...

  3. 10 CFR 76.131 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 76.131 Section 76.131 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Enforcement § 76.131 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of...

  4. 10 CFR 76.131 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 76.131 Section 76.131 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Enforcement § 76.131 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of...

  5. 10 CFR 76.131 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 76.131 Section 76.131 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Enforcement § 76.131 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of...

  6. 10 CFR 76.131 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 76.131 Section 76.131 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Enforcement § 76.131 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of...

  7. 10 CFR 76.131 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 76.131 Section 76.131 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Enforcement § 76.131 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of...

  8. Spontaneous otogenic pneumocephalus.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, El Romyssa; Profant, Milan

    2011-06-01

    The diagnosis and management of spontaneous otogenic pneumocephalus with literature review is described. A young sportsman experienced headache and fluctuating mass in his occiput during increased physical activity. A large extradural intracranial pneumocephalus with corresponding emphysema was imaged on a CT scan. Transmastoid identification and plugging of temporal bone defect solved the problem with complete pneumocephalus and emphysema resorption. PMID:21254960

  9. CP violation experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, Yee B.

    1990-07-01

    The E731 experiment at Fermilab has searched for direct'' CP violation in K{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{pi}, which is parametrized by {var epsilon}{prime}/{var epsilon}. For the first time, in 20% of the data set, all four modes of the K{sub L,S} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} ({pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) were collected simultaneously, providing a great check on the systematic uncertainty. The result is Re({var epsilon}{prime}/{var epsilon}) = {minus}0.0004 {plus minus} 0.0014 (stat) {plus minus} 0.0006(syst), which provides no evidence for direct'' CP violation. The CPT symmetry has also been tested by measuring the phase difference {Delta}{phi} = {phi}{sub 00} {minus} {phi}{sub {plus minus}} between the two CP violating parameters {eta}{sub 00} and {eta}{sub {plus minus}}. We fine {Delta}{phi} = {minus}0.3{degrees} {plus minus} 2.4{degree}(stat) {plus minus} 1.2{degree}(syst). Using this together with the world average {phi}{sub {plus minus}}, we fine that the phase of the K{sup 0}-{bar K}{sup 0} mixing parameter {var epsilon} is 44.5{degree} {plus minus} 1.5{degree}. Both of these results agree well with the predictions of CPT symmetry. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  10. Arachnoid cyst spontaneous rupture.

    PubMed

    Marques, Inês Brás; Vieira Barbosa, José

    2014-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are benign congenital cerebrospinal fluid collections, usually asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally in children or adolescents. They may become symptomatic after enlargement or complications, frequently presenting with symptoms of intracranial hypertension. We report an unusual case of progressive refractory headache in an adult patient due to an arachnoid cyst spontaneous rupture. Although clinical improvement occurred with conservative treatment, the subdural hygroma progressively enlarged and surgical treatment was ultimately needed. Spontaneous rupture is a very rare complication of arachnoid cysts. Accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid accumulation in the subdural space causes sustained intracranial hypertension that may be life-threatening and frequently requires surgical treatment. Patients with arachnoid cysts must be informed on their small vulnerability to cyst rupture and be aware that a sudden and severe headache, especially if starting after minor trauma or a Valsalva manoeuvre, always requires medical evaluation. PMID:24581205

  11. Spontaneous Quantum Hall Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan

    2012-02-01

    Driven by electron-electron interactions, bilayer graphene and its thicker cousins, chirally (ABC) stacked multilayers, exhibit a variety of distinct broken symmetry states in which each spin-valley flavor spontaneously transfers charge between layers, because of their flat touching bands and large pseudospin chiralities. These gapped states are accompanied by large momentum space Berry curvatures and different types of topological orders. These competing ground states are distinguished by their flavor Hall conductivities, orbital magnetizations, edge state properties, and response to external fields. These spontaneous quantum Hall (SQH) states at zero field smoothly evolve into quantum Hall ferromagnet states at finite field. Various phase transitions occur by tuning carrier densities, temperature, and external fields. Recently, SQH states have started to be observed and explored in transport and Hall experiments on suspended devices with dual gates.

  12. Spontaneous Perforation of Pyometra.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nalini; Singh, Ahanthem Santa; Bhaphiralyne, Wankhar

    2016-04-01

    Pyometra is collection of purulent material which occurs when there is interference with its normal drainage. It is an uncommon condition with incidence of 0.1 to 0.5% of all gynecological patients. Spontaneous rupture of uterus is an extremely rare complication of pyometra. A 65-year-old lady presented with pain abdomen and purulent vaginal discharge. Preoperative diagnosis of pyometra was made by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Laparotomy followed by peritoneal lavage and repair of perforation was performed. Although spontaneously perforated pyometra is rare, the condition must be borne in mind with regard to elderly women with acute abdominal pain. Preoperative diagnosis of perforated pyometra is absolutely essential. Computed tomography (CT) and MRI are diagnostic tools. In selected cases conservative approach at surgery can be opted. PMID:27152313

  13. Spontaneous Perforation of Pyometra

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ahanthem Santa; Bhaphiralyne, Wankhar

    2016-01-01

    Pyometra is collection of purulent material which occurs when there is interference with its normal drainage. It is an uncommon condition with incidence of 0.1 to 0.5% of all gynecological patients. Spontaneous rupture of uterus is an extremely rare complication of pyometra. A 65-year-old lady presented with pain abdomen and purulent vaginal discharge. Preoperative diagnosis of pyometra was made by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Laparotomy followed by peritoneal lavage and repair of perforation was performed. Although spontaneously perforated pyometra is rare, the condition must be borne in mind with regard to elderly women with acute abdominal pain. Preoperative diagnosis of perforated pyometra is absolutely essential. Computed tomography (CT) and MRI are diagnostic tools. In selected cases conservative approach at surgery can be opted. PMID:27152313

  14. Spontaneous ileostomy closure

    PubMed Central

    Alyami, Mohammad S.; Lundberg, Peter W.; Cotte, Eddy G.; Glehen, Olivier J.

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic ileostomies are routinely placed during colorectal surgery for the diversion of intestinal contents to permit healing of the distal anastomosis prior to elective reversal. We present an interesting case of spontaneous closure of a diverting ileostomy without any adverse effects to the patient. A 65-year-old woman, positive for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer type-I, with locally invasive cancer of the distal colon underwent en-bloc total colectomy, hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingoophorectomy with creation of a proximal loop ileostomy. The ostomy temporarily closed without reoperation at 10 weeks, after spontaneously reopening, it definitively closed, again without surgical intervention at 18 weeks following the original surgery. This rare phenomenon has occurred following variable colorectal pathology and is poorly understood, particularly in patients with aggressive disease and adjunct perioperative interventions. PMID:27279518

  15. [Spontaneous intraperitoneal hemorrhage: etiology].

    PubMed

    Ksontini, R; Roulet, D; Cosendey, B A; Cavin, R

    2001-10-01

    Spontaneous intraperitoneal hemorrhage is a rare and sometime fatal condition. The clinical presentation may range from a non-specific abdominal pain to an acute abdomen with hemodynamic instability. Often, a preoperative diagnosis cannot be obtained. Immediate surgical exploration remains the treatment of choice. However, pre or postoperative diagnosis can sometime be confirmed and treated with interventional radiology. In rare cases, the site of bleeding remains unknown despite intraoperative exploration and radiographic studies. PMID:11715286

  16. Lorentz Violation in Warped Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-11

    Higher dimensional theories which address some of the problematic issues of the Standard Model(SM) naturally involve some form of D = 4 + n-dimensional Lorentz invariance violation (LIV). In such models the fundamental physics which leads to, e.g., field localization, orbifolding, the existence of brane terms and the compactification process all can introduce LIV in the higher dimensional theory while still preserving 4-d Lorentz invariance. In this paper, attempting to capture some of this physics, we extend our previous analysis of LIV in 5-d UED-type models to those with 5- d warped extra dimensions. To be specific, we employ the 5-d analog of the SM Extension of Kostelecky et al. which incorporates a complete set of operators arising from spontaneous LIV. We show that while the response of the bulk scalar, fermion and gauge fields to the addition of LIV operators in warped models is qualitatively similar to what happens in the flat 5-d UED case, the gravity sector of these models reacts very differently than in flat space. Specifically, we show that LIV in this warped case leads to a non-zero bulk mass for the 5-d graviton and so the would-be zero mode, which we identify as the usual 4-d graviton, must necessarily become massive. The origin of this mass term is the simultaneous existence of the constant non-zero AdS{sub 5} curvature and the loss of general co-ordinate invariance via LIV in the 5-d theory. Thus warped 5-d models with LIV in the gravity sector are not phenomenologically viable.

  17. Spontaneous CP symmetry breaking at the electroweak scale

    SciTech Connect

    Valenzuela, Cristian

    2005-05-01

    We present a top-condensation model in which the CP symmetry is spontaneously broken at the electroweak scale due to the condensation of two composite Higgs doublets. In particular the CP-violating phase of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark-mixing matrix is generated. A simpler model where only one quark family is included is also discussed. In this case, for a general four-fermion interaction (G{sub tb}{ne}0), the particle spectrum is the one of the one Higgs doublet model.

  18. [Spontaneous abortion. Etiologic survey. Results].

    PubMed

    Baaklini, N; Anguenot, J L; Boulanger, J C; Vitse, M

    1990-12-01

    The definition of repeated spontaneous abortions is subject to caution. For some, it corresponds to at least three repeated spontaneous abortions with no normal previous pregnancy; for others, it comprises the repeated spontaneous abortions occurring after a normal pregnancy. It is a frequent problem, especially if one tries to give a wider definition. The authors studied the frequency of repeated spontaneous abortions in a continuous series of 14,857 pregnancies which took place between January 1982 and December 1988. In the study of the aetiology of the repeated spontaneous abortions in the various groups of women defined according to the number of previous pregnancies and abortions, they find the classical causes of repeated spontaneous abortions in all the categories: therefore, it seems legitimate to them that a wider definition be given for repeated spontaneous abortions. PMID:2291048

  19. Flavor Physics & CP Violation 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    "Flavor Physics & CP violation 2015" (FPCP 2015) was held in Nagoya, Japan, at Nagoya University, from May 25 to May 29 2015. This is the 13th meeting of the series of annual conferences started in Philadelphia, PA, USA in 2002. The aim of the conference is to review developments in flavor physics and CP violation, in both theory and experiment, exploiting the potential to study new physics at the LHC and future facilities. The topics include CP violation, rare decays, CKM elements with heavy quark decays, flavor phenomena in charged leptons and neutrinos, and also interplay between flavor and LHC high Pt physics. The FPCP2015 conference had more than 140 participants, including researchers from abroad and many young researchers (postdocs and students). The conference consisted of plenary talks and poster presentations. The plenary talks include 2 overview talks, 48 review talks, and 2 talks for outlook in theories and experiments, given by world leading researchers. There was also a special lecture by Prof. Makoto Kobayashi, one of the Nobel laureates in 2008. The poster session had 41 contributions. Many young researchers presented their works. These proceedings contain written documents for these plenary and poster presentations. The full scientific program and presentation materials can be found at http://fpcp2015.hepl.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp/. We would like to thank the International Advisory Committee for their invaluable assistance in coordinating the scientific program and in helping to identifying many speakers. Thanks are also due to the Local Organizing Committee for tireless efforts for smooth running of the conference and very enjoyable social activities. We also thank the financial supports provided by Japanese Scociety for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) unfer the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (S) "Probing New Physics with Tau-Lepton" (No. 26220706), by Nagoya University under the Program for Promoting the Enhancement of Research Universities, and

  20. Parity violation in electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souder, P.; Paschke, K. D.

    2016-02-01

    By comparing the cross sections for left- and right-handed electrons scattered from various unpolarized nuclear targets, the small parity-violating asymmetry can be measured. These asymmetry data probe a wide variety of important topics, including searches for new fundamental interactions and important features of nuclear structure that cannot be studied with other probes. A special feature of these experiments is that the results are interpreted with remarkably few theoretical uncertainties, which justifies pushing the experiments to the highest possible precision. To measure the small asymmetries accurately, a number of novel experimental techniques have been developed.

  1. Spontaneous Tumor Lysis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kimple, Michelle E.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) is a known complication of malignancy and its treatment. The incidence varies on malignancy type, but is most common with hematologic neoplasms during cytotoxic treatment. Spontaneous TLS is thought to be rare. This case study is of a 62-year-old female admitted with multisystem organ failure, with subsequent diagnosis of aggressive B cell lymphoma. On admission, laboratory abnormalities included renal failure, elevated uric acid (20.7 mg/dL), and 3+ amorphous urates on urinalysis. Oliguric renal failure persisted despite aggressive hydration and diuretic use, requiring initiation of hemodialysis prior to chemotherapy. Antihyperuricemic therapy and hemodialysis were used to resolve hyperuricemia. However, due to multisystem organ dysfunction syndrome with extremely poor prognosis, the patient ultimately expired in the setting of a terminal ventilator wean. Although our patient did not meet current TLS criteria, she required hemodialysis due to uric acid nephropathy, a complication of TLS. This poses the clinical question of whether adequate diagnostic criteria exist for spontaneous TLS and if the lack of currently accepted guidelines has resulted in the underestimation of its incidence. Allopurinol and rasburicase are commonly used for prevention and treatment of TLS. Although both drugs decrease uric acid levels, allopurinol mechanistically prevents formation of the substrate rasburicase acts to solubilize. These drugs were administered together in our patient, although no established guidelines recommend combined use. This raises the clinical question of whether combined therapy is truly beneficial or, conversely, detrimental to patient outcomes. PMID:26904699

  2. Quantum Spontaneous Stochasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drivas, Theodore; Eyink, Gregory

    Classical Newtonian dynamics is expected to be deterministic, but recent fluid turbulence theory predicts that a particle advected at high Reynolds-numbers by ''nearly rough'' flows moves nondeterministically. Small stochastic perturbations to the flow velocity or to the initial data lead to persistent randomness, even in the limit where the perturbations vanish! Such ``spontaneous stochasticity'' has profound consequences for astrophysics, geophysics, and our daily lives. We show that a similar effect occurs with a quantum particle in a ''nearly rough'' force, for the semi-classical (large-mass) limit, where spreading of the wave-packet is usually expected to be negligible and dynamics to be deterministic Newtonian. Instead, there are non-zero probabilities to observe multiple, non-unique solutions of the classical equations. Although the quantum wave-function remains split, rapid phase oscillations prevent any coherent superposition of the branches. Classical spontaneous stochasticity has not yet been seen in controlled laboratory experiments of fluid turbulence, but the corresponding quantum effects may be observable by current techniques. We suggest possible experiments with neutral atomic-molecular systems in repulsive electric dipole potentials.

  3. Simultaneous bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Graf-Deuel, E; Knoblauch, A

    1994-04-01

    We describe 12 patients with simultaneous bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax (SBSP). They represent 4 percent of patients with spontaneous pneumothorax seen at our hospital from 1971 to 1990. Five of the 12 had no underlying lung disease. In the seven remaining patients, SBSP was secondary to histiocytosis X, lymphangioleiomyomatosis, osteogenic sarcoma with pleural and pulmonary metastases, Hodgkin's disease, mesothelioma, cystic fibrosis, or miliary tuberculosis. Nineteen of the 56 patients with SBSP (34 percent) described in the literature (this series included) had pulmonary disease related to disorders of cells of mesenchymal origin. Emphysema and bullous lung disease were not associated with SBSP. Long-term prognosis was a function of pulmonary status. Four of the patients described herein died during the period reviewed. All suffered from severe underlying disease. In no case was SBSP the main cause of death. With timely treatment, the short-term prognosis is benign even for patients with underlying lung disease. Surgical pleurectomy should be attempted early, especially in SBSP secondary to underlying lung disease. PMID:8162740

  4. Aspects of current correlators in holographic theories with hyperscaling violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edalati, Mohammad; Pedraza, Juan F.

    2013-10-01

    We study the low-energy and low-momentum behavior of current correlators in a class of holographic zero-temperature, finite-density critical theories which do not respect the hyperscaling relation. The dual holographic description is assumed to be given by probe D-branes embedded in background geometries characterized by a dynamical critical exponent z and a hyperscaling violation exponent θ. We show that a subset of these theories with 1≤z<2(1-θ/d) exhibit a stable, linearly dispersing mode in their low-energy spectrum of excitations. This mode, which appears as a pole in the retarded correlators of charge density and longitudinal currents, has some characteristics similar to that of the zero sound in Fermi liquids. Given some reasonable assumptions, we argue that the class of theories with θ=d-1 that logarithmically violate the area law in the entanglement entropy in a manner reminiscent of theories with Fermi surfaces does not exhibit a zero-sound-like mode in the low-energy spectrum of the probe sector. Furthermore, utilizing the holographic Wilsonian approach, we explicitly show that such a mode has a natural interpretation as a Goldstone boson arising from the spontaneous breaking of a specific symmetry.

  5. Generalised geometrical CP violation in a T ' lepton flavour model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardi, Ivan; Meroni, Aurora; Petcov, S. T.; Spinrath, Martin

    2014-02-01

    We analyse the interplay of generalised CP transformations and the non-Abelian discrete group T ' and use the semi-direct product G f = T ' ⋊ H CP, as family symmetry acting in the lepton sector. The family symmetry is shown to be spontaneously broken in a geometrical manner. In the resulting flavour model, naturally small Majorana neutrino masses for the light active neutrinos are obtained through the type I see-saw mechanism. The known masses of the charged leptons, lepton mixing angles and the two neutrino mass squared differences are reproduced by the model with a good accuracy. The model allows for two neutrino mass spectra with normal ordering (NO) and one with inverted ordering (IO). For each of the three spectra the absolute scale of neutrino masses is predicted with relatively small uncertainty. The value of the Dirac CP violation (CPV) phase δ in the lepton mixing matrix is predicted to be δ = π/2 or 3 π/2. Thus, the CP violating effects in neutrino oscillations are predicted to be maximal (given the values of the neutrino mixing angles) and experimentally observable. We present also predictions for the sum of the neutrino masses, for the Majorana CPV phases and for the effective Majorana mass in neutrinoless double beta decay. The predictions of the model can be tested in a variety of ongoing and future planned neutrino experiments.

  6. Parity Violation in Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Beise, Elizabeth

    2007-10-26

    About thirty years ago, electron scattering from nucleons was used [1] to identify, and then measure, the properties of the weak interaction, the only force of nature known to violate the symmetry parity. The basic technique has not fundamentally changed, which is to look for a small asymmetry in count rate from scattering a polarized electron beam from an unpolarized target. Since then, parity-violating (PV) electron scattering has developed substantially, a result of significant improvements in polarized electron beams, accelerator advancements, and developments in cryogenic targets that make it possible to carry out experiments with much higher statistical precision. In the last decade PV experiments have focused on using the complementary electron-quark flavor coupling of the weak interaction to identify and place limits on contributions of strange quark-antiquark pairs to the charge and magnetism of the proton. This observable provides a unique window into the structure of the proton since strange quark contributions can arise only from the sea of quarks and gluons that are responsible for the vast majority of the nucleon's mass. This paper will report on recent results aimed at this goal, along with a brief overview of future directions.

  7. Lepton flavor violation without supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Cirigliano, V.; Kurylov, A.; Ramsey-Musolf, M.J.; Vogel, P.

    2004-10-01

    We study the lepton flavor-violating (LFV) processes {mu}{yields}e{gamma}, {mu}{yields}3e, and {mu}{yields}e conversion in nuclei in the left-right symmetric model without supersymmetry and perform the first complete computation of the LFV branching ratios B({mu}{yields}f) to leading nontrivial order in the ratio of left- and right-handed symmetry-breaking scales. To this order, B({mu}{yields}e{gamma}) and B({mu}{yields}e) are governed by the same combination of LFV violating couplings, and their ratio is naturally of order unity. We also find B({mu}{yields}3e)/B({mu}{yields}e){approx}100 under slightly stronger assumptions. Existing limits on the branching ratios already substantially constrain mass splittings and/or mixings in the heavy neutrino sector. When combined with future collider studies and precision electroweak measurements, improved limits on LFV processes will test the viability of low-scale, nonsupersymmetric LFV scenarios.

  8. C P -violating phenomenological MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Joshua; Cahill-Rowley, Matthew W.; Ghosh, Diptimoy; Hewett, JoAnne L.; Ismail, Ahmed; Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of the next generation of flavor-based low-energy experiments to probe the supersymmetric parameter space in the context of the phenomenological minimal supersymmetric Standard Model and examine the complementarity with direct searches for supersymmetry at the 13 TeV LHC in a quantitative manner. To this end, we enlarge the previously studied phenomenological minimal supersymmetric Standard Model parameter space to include all physical nonzero C P -violating phases, namely those associated with the gaugino mass parameters; Higgsino mass parameter and the trilinear couplings of the top quark, bottom quark, and tau lepton. We find that future electric dipole moment and flavor measurements can have a strong impact on the viability of these models even if the sparticle spectrum is out of reach of the 13 TeV LHC. In particular, the lack of positive signals in future low-energy probes would exclude values of the phases between O (1 0-2) and O (1 0-1). We also find regions of parameter space where large phases remain allowed due to cancellations. Most interestingly, in some rare processes, such as BR (Bs→μ+μ-) , we find that contributions arising from C P -violating phases can bring the potentially large supersymmetry contributions into better agreement with experiment and Standard Model predictions.

  9. Quantum explorations: from the waltz of the Pauli exclusion principle to the rock of the spontaneous collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curceanu, C.; Bartalucci, S.; Bassi, A.; Bertolucci, S.; Berucci, C.; Bragadireanu, A. M.; Cargnelli, M.; Clozza, A.; De Paolis, L.; Di Matteo, S.; Donadi, S.; d'Uffizi, A.; Egger, J.-P.; Guaraldo, C.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Marton, J.; Milotti, E.; Pietreanu, D.; Piscicchia, K.; Ponta, T.; Sbardella, E.; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Sperandio, L.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Zmeskal, J.

    2015-02-01

    The spin-statistics connection, in particular the Pauli exclusion principle (PEP), plays a very important role in our comprehension of matter and nature. Presently, the PEP violation, possible within some theories, generates a lively debate; it has given birth to a few experiments looking for tiny effects. The violation of the Pauli exclusion principle experiment put a very strong limit on the PEP violation probability by electrons, using the method of searching for PEP forbidden atomic transitions in a copper target. In this paper we present this experiment, the obtained results and future plans to upgrade the experimental setup with fast silicon drift detectors. We then present the idea of using an analogous experimental technique to search for x-rays as a signature of the spontaneous collapse of the wave function, predicted by the continuous spontaneous localization theories, and some very encouraging preliminary results. This paper was originally submitted as part of Topical Issue T163.

  10. Spontaneous pneumomediastinum: a rare presentation of diabetic ketoacidosis in a pregnant woman

    PubMed Central

    Speksnijder, Leonie; Duvekot, Johannes J; Duschek, Erik J J; Jebbink, Max C W; Bremer, Henk A

    2010-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum (PM) or mediastinal emphysema is defined as the presence of free air around mediastinal structures. Spontaneous (or atraumatic) pneumomediastinum (SPM) is a rare complication during pregnancy. Primary or spontaneous PM can arise due to increased intra-alveolar pressure. Secondary PM is due to direct trauma, intrathoracic infections or violation of the aerodigestive track. This case report describes a pregnant woman newly diagnosed with diabetes presenting with an SPM due to vigorously vomiting and Kussmaul's breathing caused by diabetic ketoacidosis. Appropriate management of SPM and its underlying cause is required to reduce the risks for both mother and child.

  11. 20 CFR 655.60 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Nonimmigrant Worker for an H-2B worker in 8 CFR 214.2(h). (c) Misrepresented a material fact to the State... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Violations. 655.60 Section 655.60 Employees...) Post Certification Activities § 655.60 Violations. The WHD Administrator, through investigation,...

  12. 7 CFR 1430.214 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... benefits; (3) Failure to comply with highly erodible land conservation and wetland provisions of this 7 CFR... AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS DAIRY PRODUCTS Milk Income Loss Contract Program § 1430.214 Violations. (a) If producers in a dairy operation violates the MILC or the requirements of this subpart,...

  13. 10 CFR 37.107 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 37.107 Section 37.107 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF CATEGORY 1 AND CATEGORY 2 QUANTITIES OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL Enforcement § 37.107 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  14. 10 CFR 72.220 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 72.220 Section 72.220 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL... Storage of Spent Fuel at Power Reactor Sites § 72.220 Violations. This general license is subject to...

  15. 10 CFR 216.9 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 216.9 Section 216.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL MATERIALS ALLOCATION AND PRIORITY PERFORMANCE UNDER CONTRACTS OR ORDERS TO MAXIMIZE DOMESTIC ENERGY SUPPLIES § 216.9 Violations. Any person who willfully furnishes false information or conceals...

  16. 10 CFR 207.5 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 207.5 Section 207.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL COLLECTION OF INFORMATION Collection of Information Under the Energy Supply and Environmental Coordination Act of 1974 § 207.5 Violations. Any practice that circumvents or contravenes or results in...

  17. CPand t violation in neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Hisakazu Minakata; Hiroshi Nunokawa; Stephen Parke

    2003-09-18

    In this short lecture, we discuss some basic phenomenological aspects of CP and T violation in neutrino oscillation. Using CP/T trajectory diagrams in the bi-probability space, we try to sketch out some essential features of the interplay between the effect of CP/T violating phase and that of the matter in neutrino oscillation.

  18. 32 CFR 552.96 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Violations. 552.96 Section 552.96 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Fort Lewis Land Use Policy § 552.96 Violations....

  19. 32 CFR 552.96 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Violations. 552.96 Section 552.96 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Fort Lewis Land Use Policy § 552.96 Violations....

  20. 32 CFR 552.96 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Violations. 552.96 Section 552.96 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Fort Lewis Land Use Policy § 552.96 Violations....

  1. 32 CFR 552.96 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Violations. 552.96 Section 552.96 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Fort Lewis Land Use Policy § 552.96 Violations....

  2. 32 CFR 552.96 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Violations. 552.96 Section 552.96 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Fort Lewis Land Use Policy § 552.96 Violations....

  3. 40 CFR 141.810 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Aircraft Drinking Water Rule § 141.810 Violations. An air carrier is in violation of this subpart when, for any aircraft water system it owns or operates, any of the...

  4. 40 CFR 141.810 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Aircraft Drinking Water Rule § 141.810 Violations. An air carrier is in violation of this subpart when, for any aircraft water system it owns or operates, any of the...

  5. 40 CFR 141.810 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Aircraft Drinking Water Rule § 141.810 Violations. An air carrier is in violation of this subpart when, for any aircraft water system it owns or operates, any of the...

  6. 49 CFR 661.18 - Intentional violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Intentional violations. 661.18 Section 661.18 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BUY AMERICA REQUIREMENTS § 661.18 Intentional violations. A person shall be ineligible to receive any contract...

  7. 49 CFR 661.18 - Intentional violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Intentional violations. 661.18 Section 661.18 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BUY AMERICA REQUIREMENTS § 661.18 Intentional violations. A person shall...

  8. 49 CFR 661.18 - Intentional violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Intentional violations. 661.18 Section 661.18 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BUY AMERICA REQUIREMENTS § 661.18 Intentional violations. A person shall...

  9. 49 CFR 661.18 - Intentional violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Intentional violations. 661.18 Section 661.18 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BUY AMERICA REQUIREMENTS § 661.18 Intentional violations. A person shall...

  10. 49 CFR 661.18 - Intentional violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intentional violations. 661.18 Section 661.18 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BUY AMERICA REQUIREMENTS § 661.18 Intentional violations. A person shall...

  11. 33 CFR 6.18-1 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Violations. 6.18-1 Section 6.18-1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL PROTECTION AND SECURITY OF VESSELS, HARBORS, AND WATERFRONT FACILITIES Penalties § 6.18-1 Violations. Section 2, Title II of the act of June 15, 1917, as...

  12. 10 CFR 490.809 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 490.809 Section 490.809 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Compliance § 490.809 Violations. If a State or covered person that receives a waiver under this subpart fails to comply with...

  13. 10 CFR 1048.5 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 1048.5 Section 1048.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) TRESPASSING ON STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE FACILITIES AND OTHER PROPERTY § 1048.5 Violations. Willful unauthorized entry, or willful unauthorized introduction of weapons...

  14. 10 CFR 1048.5 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 1048.5 Section 1048.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) TRESPASSING ON STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE FACILITIES AND OTHER PROPERTY § 1048.5 Violations. Willful unauthorized entry, or willful unauthorized introduction of weapons...

  15. 43 CFR 12.820 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... PRINCIPLES FOR ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Buy American Requirements for Assistance Programs Buy American Act-Construction Materials § 12.820 Violations. Violation of the Buy American Act in the performance of a... concerning a failure to comply with the clause at § 12.830, Buy American Act—Construction Materials, shall...

  16. 43 CFR 12.820 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... PRINCIPLES FOR ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Buy American Requirements for Assistance Programs Buy American Act-Construction Materials § 12.820 Violations. Violation of the Buy American Act in the performance of a... concerning a failure to comply with the clause at § 12.830, Buy American Act—Construction Materials, shall...

  17. 5 CFR 1312.31 - Security violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... will remove one file bearing the highest classification level, annotate it with his or her name, badge... rise to the violation. (e) Staff penalties for OMB security violations. When assessing penalties in... designee, greater or lesser penalties may be imposed based upon the circumstances giving rise to...

  18. Parity violation in low-energy

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Savage

    2001-12-01

    Parity violation in low-energy nuclear observables is included in the pionless effective field theory. The model-independent relation between the parity-violating asymmetry in polarized np -> d gamma and the non-nucleon part of the deuteron anapole moment is discussed. The asymmetry in np -> d gamma computed with KSW power-counting, and recently criticized by Desplanques, is discussed.

  19. 7 CFR 634.29 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 634.29 Section 634.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM Participant RCWP Contracts § 634.29 Violations....

  20. 7 CFR 634.29 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 634.29 Section 634.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM Participant RCWP Contracts § 634.29 Violations....

  1. 7 CFR 634.29 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 634.29 Section 634.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM Participant RCWP Contracts § 634.29 Violations....

  2. 7 CFR 634.29 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 634.29 Section 634.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM Participant RCWP Contracts § 634.29 Violations....

  3. 7 CFR 634.29 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 634.29 Section 634.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM Participant RCWP Contracts § 634.29 Violations....

  4. 14 CFR 1214.704 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 1214.704 Section 1214.704 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT The Authority of the Space Shuttle Commander § 1214.704 Violations. (a) All personnel on board a Space Shuttle flight are subject...

  5. 14 CFR 1214.704 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 1214.704 Section 1214.704 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT The Authority of the Space Shuttle Commander § 1214.704 Violations. (a) All personnel on board a Space Shuttle flight are subject...

  6. 14 CFR 1214.704 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 1214.704 Section 1214.704 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT The Authority of the Space Shuttle Commander § 1214.704 Violations. (a) All personnel on board a Space Shuttle flight are subject...

  7. 14 CFR § 1214.704 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. § 1214.704 Section § 1214.704 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT The Authority of the Space Shuttle Commander § 1214.704 Violations. (a) All personnel on board a Space Shuttle flight are subject...

  8. 14 CFR 1214.704 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Violations. 1214.704 Section 1214.704 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT The Authority of the Space Shuttle Commander § 1214.704 Violations. (a) All personnel on board a Space Shuttle flight are subject...

  9. 10 CFR 73.80 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 73.80 Section 73.80 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Enforcement § 73.80 Violations. (a) The... Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as...

  10. 10 CFR 73.80 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 73.80 Section 73.80 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Enforcement § 73.80 Violations. (a) The... Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as...

  11. 10 CFR 54.41 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 54.41 Section 54.41 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) REQUIREMENTS FOR RENEWAL OF OPERATING LICENSES FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General... violation of the provisions of the following acts— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended. (2)...

  12. 10 CFR 810.15 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.15 Violations. (a) The Atomic Energy Act... person from violating any provision of the Atomic Energy Act or its implementing regulations. (2) Any... Atomic Energy Act may be fined up to $10,000 or imprisoned up to 10 years, or both. If the offense...

  13. 10 CFR 810.15 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.15 Violations. (a) The Atomic Energy Act... person from violating any provision of the Atomic Energy Act or its implementing regulations. (2) Any... Atomic Energy Act may be fined up to $10,000 or imprisoned up to 10 years, or both. If the offense...

  14. 10 CFR 52.301 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 52.301 Section 52.301 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Enforcement § 52.301 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  15. 32 CFR 763.6 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Violations. 763.6 Section 763.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY ISLANDS UNDER NAVY JURISDICTION RULES GOVERNING PUBLIC ACCESS Entry Regulations for Kaho'olawe Island, Hawaii § 763.6 Violations. (a) Any person...

  16. 14 CFR 1214.404 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Violations. 1214.404 Section 1214.404 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT International Space Station Crew § 1214.404 Violations. This subpart is a regulation within the meaning of 18 U.S.C. 799,...

  17. 14 CFR 1214.404 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 1214.404 Section 1214.404 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT International Space Station Crew § 1214.404 Violations. This subpart is a regulation within the meaning of 18 U.S.C. 799,...

  18. 14 CFR 1214.404 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 1214.404 Section 1214.404 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT International Space Station Crew § 1214.404 Violations. This subpart is a regulation within the meaning of 18 U.S.C. 799,...

  19. 14 CFR § 1214.404 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. § 1214.404 Section § 1214.404 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT International Space Station Crew § 1214.404 Violations. This subpart is a regulation within the meaning of 18 U.S.C. 799,...

  20. 14 CFR 1214.404 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 1214.404 Section 1214.404 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT International Space Station Crew § 1214.404 Violations. This subpart is a regulation within the meaning of 18 U.S.C. 799,...

  1. 5 CFR 1312.31 - Security violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... will remove one file bearing the highest classification level, annotate it with his or her name, badge... rise to the violation. (e) Staff penalties for OMB security violations. When assessing penalties in... designee, greater or lesser penalties may be imposed based upon the circumstances giving rise to...

  2. 10 CFR 52.301 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 52.301 Section 52.301 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Enforcement § 52.301 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  3. 10 CFR 52.301 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 52.301 Section 52.301 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Enforcement § 52.301 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  4. 10 CFR 52.301 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 52.301 Section 52.301 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Enforcement § 52.301 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  5. 10 CFR 52.301 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 52.301 Section 52.301 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Enforcement § 52.301 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  6. Spontaneously broken complete relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A. F.

    1982-08-01

    It is suggested that the equations of the theory of relativity should have a spontaneously broken invariance with respect to the complex Poincare group, in order that relative velocities stay below that of light. Lorentz transformation matrices corresponding to velocities higher than that of light, which contain imaginary elements, are combined with real transformations in a single group, requiring the introduction of a complex Lorentz group as a symmetry group. For this complex group to be realized in real, physical space-time, the complex character of the coordinates must be eliminated by introducing appropriate Goldstone fields. The properties of these Goldstone fiels are discussed. A massless Goldstone field is deduced which, in the linear approximation, has no manifestations of any sort in classical mechanics and whose sole macroscopic manifestation is the presence of a nonelectromagnetic long-range interaction of bodies having a nonvanishing average spin density. An experiment to detect such a field is suggested.

  7. Spontaneous Atherosclerosis in Pigeons

    PubMed Central

    Santerre, Robert F.; Wight, Thomas N.; Smith, Samuel C.; Brannigan, David

    1972-01-01

    The interpretation of metabolic studies related to early changes in spontaneous atherosclerosis has been hampered by the focal nature of the disease and by the lack of a well-defined model system of the disease process. Gross, histologic and ultrastructural observations of lesion development at the celiac bifurcation of the aorta in atherosclerosis-susceptible White Carneau and atherosclerosis-resistant Show Racer pigeons are compared and discussed in terms of hemodynamics, muscular aggregation and altered metabolism of smooth muscle cells. Detailed knowledge of the morphologic sequence of events in lesion localization makes the celiac bifurcation in White Carneau and Show Racer pigeons a useful model for genetic comparisons of arterial wall metabolism and for investigating metabolic alterations occurring with atherogenesis. ImagesFig 9Fig 10Fig 1Fig 2Fig 10Fig 11Fig 3Fig 4Fig 12Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 8 PMID:4261591

  8. Spontaneous Iliac Vein Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Park, Hyung Sub; Lee, Taeseung

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous iliac vein rupture (SIVR) is a rare entity, which usually occurs without a precipitating factor, but can be a life-threatening emergency often requiring an emergency operation. This is a case report of SIVR in a 62-year-old female who presented to the emergency room with left leg swelling. Workup with contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a left leg deep vein thrombosis with May-Thurner syndrome and a hematoma in the pelvic cavity without definite evidence of arterial bleeding. She was managed conservatively without surgical intervention, and also underwent inferior vena cava filter insertion and subsequent anticoagulation therapy for pulmonary thromboembolism. This case shows that SIVR can be successfully managed with close monitoring and conservative management, and anticoagulation may be safely applied despite the patient presenting with venous bleeding. PMID:26217647

  9. Spontaneous aortocaval fistula.

    PubMed

    Rajmohan, B

    2002-01-01

    Spontaneous aortocaval fistula is rare, occurring only in 4% of all ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms. The physical signs can be missed but the presence of low back pain, palpable abdominal aortic aneurysm, machinery abdominal murmur and high-output cardiac failure unresponsive to medical treatment should raise the suspicion. Pre-operative diagnosis is crucial, as adequate preparation has to be made for the massive bleeding expected at operation. Successful treatment depends on management of perioperative haemodynamics, control of bleeding from the fistula and prevention of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Surgical repair of an aortocaval fistula is now standardised--repair of the fistula from within the aneurysm (endoaneurysmorraphy) followed by prosthetic graft replacement of the aneurysm. A case report of a 77-year-old woman, initially suspected to have unstable angina but subsequently diagnosed to have an aortocaval fistula and surgically treated successfully, is presented along with a review of literature. PMID:12432197

  10. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection.

    PubMed

    Tweet, Marysia S; Gulati, Rajiv; Hayes, Sharonne N

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is an important etiology of nonatherosclerotic acute coronary syndrome, myocardial infarction, and sudden death. Innovations in the catheterization laboratory including optical coherence tomography and intravascular ultrasound have enhanced the ability to visualize intimal disruption and intramural hematoma associated with SCAD. Formerly considered "rare," these technological advances and heightened awareness suggest that SCAD is more prevalent than prior estimates. SCAD is associated with female sex, young age, extreme emotional stress, or extreme exertion, pregnancy, and fibromuscular dysplasia. The clinical characteristics and management strategies of SCAD patients are different than for atherosclerotic heart disease and deserve specific consideration. This review will highlight recent discoveries about SCAD as well as describe current efforts to elucidate remaining gaps in knowledge. PMID:27216840

  11. Unbounded Violation of Quantum Steering Inequalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciniak, M.; Rutkowski, A.; Yin, Z.; Horodecki, M.; Horodecki, R.

    2015-10-01

    We construct steering inequalities that exhibit unbounded violation. The concept was to exploit the relationship between steering violation and the uncertainty relation. To this end, we apply mutually unbiased bases and anticommuting observables, known to exhibit the strongest uncertainty. In both cases, we are able to procure unbounded violations. Our approach is much more constructive and transparent than the operator space theory approach employed to obtain large violation of Bell inequalities. Importantly, using anticommuting observables we are able to obtain a dichotomic steering inequality with unbounded violation. Thus far, there is no analogous result for Bell inequalities. Interestingly, both the dichotomic inequality and one of our inequalities cannot be directly obtained from existing uncertainty relations, which strongly suggest the existence of an unknown kind of uncertainty relation.

  12. The neural correlates of implicit theory violation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaowen; Plaks, Jason E

    2015-08-01

    The present study examined whether perceivers' implicit theories about the fixedness of intelligence would modulate neurophysiological responses to stereotype-violating and stereotype-confirming information. Brain activity was recorded using EEG as participants read a series of stereotype-confirming or stereotype-violating behaviors performed by a target character. Compared to incremental theorists (who believe that intelligence is malleable), entity theorists (who believe that intelligence is fixed) displayed more pronounced N400 responses to stereotype-violating behaviors. In contrast, incremental theorists exhibited more pronounced N400 responses than entity theorists to stereotype-confirming behaviors. These results shed light on basic processes in Person Memory by suggesting that perceivers make a distinction at the neurocognitive level between stereotype violations versus implicit theory violations. PMID:25650726

  13. A System for Traffic Violation Detection

    PubMed Central

    Aliane, Nourdine; Fernandez, Javier; Mata, Mario; Bemposta, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the framework and components of an experimental platform for an advanced driver assistance system (ADAS) aimed at providing drivers with a feedback about traffic violations they have committed during their driving. The system is able to detect some specific traffic violations, record data associated to these faults in a local data-base, and also allow visualization of the spatial and temporal information of these traffic violations in a geographical map using the standard Google Earth tool. The test-bed is mainly composed of two parts: a computer vision subsystem for traffic sign detection and recognition which operates during both day and nighttime, and an event data recorder (EDR) for recording data related to some specific traffic violations. The paper covers firstly the description of the hardware architecture and then presents the policies used for handling traffic violations. PMID:25421737

  14. Theory prospective on leptonic CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petcov, S. T.

    2016-07-01

    The phenomenology of 3-neutrino mixing, the current status of our knowledge about the 3-neutrino mixing parameters, including the absolute neutrino mass scale, and of the Dirac and Majorana CP violation in the lepton sector are reviewed. The problems of CP violation in neutrino oscillations and of determining the nature - Dirac or Majorana - of massive neutrinos are discussed. The seesaw mechanism of neutrino mass generation and the related leptogenesis scenario of generation of the baryon asymmetry of the Universe are considered. The results showing that the CP violation necessary for the generation of the baryon asymmetry of the Universe in leptogenesis can be due exclusively to the Dirac and/or Majorana CP-violating phase(s) in the neutrino mixing matrix U are briefly reviewed. The discrete symmetry approach to understanding the observed pattern of neutrino mixing and the related predictions for the leptonic Dirac CP violation are also reviewed.

  15. Massive neutrinos and flavour violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiero, Antonio; Vempati, Sudhir K.; Vives, Oscar

    2004-12-01

    In spite of the large lepton flavour violation (LFV) observed in neutrino oscillations, within the Standard Model, we do not expect any visible LFV in the charged lepton sector (μ → e, γ, τ → μ, γ, etc). On the contrary, the presence of new physics close to the electroweak scale can enhance the amplitudes of these processes. We discuss this in general and focus on a particularly interesting case: the marriage of low-energy supersymmetry (SUSY) and seesaw mechanism for neutrino masses (SUSY seesaw). Several ideas presented in this context are reviewed both in the bottom-up and top-down approaches. We show that there exist attractive models where the rate for LFV processes can attain values to be probed in pre-LHC experiments.

  16. Models of isospin violating ADM

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Nobuchika; Seto, Osamu

    2014-06-24

    The isospin violating dark matter (IVDM) scenario offers an interesting possibility to reconcile conflicting results among direct dark matter search experiments for a mass range around 10 GeV. We consider two simple renormalizable IVDM models with a complex scalar dark matter and a Dirac fermion dark matter, respectively, whose stability is ensured by the conservation of “dark matter number.” Although both models successfully work as the IVDM scenario with destructive interference between effective couplings to proton and neutron, the dark matter annihilation cross section is found to exceed the cosmological/astrophysical upper bounds. Then, we propose a simple scenario to reconcile the IVDM scenario with the cosmological/astrophysical bounds, namely, the IVDM being asymmetric. We also discuss collider experimental constraints on the models and an implication to Higgs boson physics.

  17. An Analysis of Shuttle Crew Scheduling Violations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristol, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    From the early years of the Space Shuttle program, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Shuttle crews have had a timeline of activities to guide them through their time on-orbit. Planners used scheduling constraints to build timelines that ensured the health and safety of the crews. If a constraint could not be met it resulted in a violation. Other agencies of the federal government also have scheduling constraints to ensure the safety of personnel and the public. This project examined the history of Space Shuttle scheduling constraints, constraints from Federal agencies and branches of the military and how these constraints may be used as a guide for future NASA and private spacecraft. This was conducted by reviewing rules and violations with regard to human aerospace scheduling constraints, environmental, political, social and technological factors, operating environment and relevant human factors. This study includes a statistical analysis of Shuttle Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) related violations to determine if these were a significant producer of constraint violations. It was hypothesized that the number of SCSC violations caused by EVA activities were a significant contributor to the total number of violations for Shuttle/ISS missions. Data was taken from NASA data archives at the Johnson Space Center from Space Shuttle/ISS missions prior to the STS-107 accident. The results of the analysis rejected the null hypothesis and found that EVA violations were a significant contributor to the total number of violations. This analysis could help NASA and commercial space companies understand the main source of constraint violations and allow them to create constraint rules that ensure the safe operation of future human private and exploration missions. Additional studies could be performed to evaluate other variables that could have influenced the scheduling violations that were analyzed.

  18. Two-Photon Entanglement and EPR Experiments Using Type-2 Spontaneous Parametric Down Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sergienko, A. V.; Shih, Y. H.; Pittman, T. B.; Rubin, M. H.

    1996-01-01

    Simultaneous entanglement in spin and space-time of a two-photon quantum state generated in type-2 spontaneous parametric down-conversion is demonstrated by the observation of quantum interference with 98% visibility in a simple beam-splitter (Hanburry Brown-Twiss) anticorrelation experiment. The nonlocal cancellation of two-photon probability amplitudes as a result of this double entanglement allows us to demonstrate two different types of Bell's inequality violations in one experimental setup.

  19. 7 CFR 1465.25 - Contract violations and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... participant continues in violation, the State Conservationist may terminate the AMA contract. (b... refund all or part of the payments received, plus interest. Participants violating AMA contracts may...

  20. Entanglement estimation from Bell inequality violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Horst, Bohdan; Lemr, Karel; Miranowicz, Adam

    2013-11-01

    It is well known that the violation of Bell's inequality in the form given by Clauser, Horne, Shimony, and Holt (CHSH) in two-qubit systems requires entanglement, but not vice versa, i.e., there are entangled states which do not violate the CHSH inequality. Here we compare some standard entanglement measures with violations of the CHSH inequality (as given by the Horodecki measure) for two-qubit states generated by Monte Carlo simulations. We describe states that have extremal entanglement according to the negativity, concurrence, and relative entropy of entanglement for a given value of the CHSH violation. We explicitly find these extremal states by applying the generalized method of Lagrange multipliers based on the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions. The found minimal and maximal states define the range of entanglement accessible for any two-qubit states that violate the CHSH inequality by the same amount. We also find extremal states for the concurrence versus negativity by considering only such states which do not violate the CHSH inequality. Furthermore, we describe an experimentally efficient linear-optical method to determine the highest Horodecki degree of the CHSH violation for arbitrary mixed states of two polarization qubits. By assuming to have access simultaneously to two copies of the states, our method requires only six discrete measurement settings instead of nine settings, which are usually considered.

  1. Particle physics: CP violation in hyperon decays

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, Michael J.

    2000-10-31

    The primary research activities under this grant were in E871 (HyperCP) at Fermilab, a search for CP violation in hyperon decays which completed data taking in January, 2000. HyperCP is an experiment designed to perform a sensitive search for direct CP violation in the decays of cascade ({Xi}) and {Lambda} hyperons by looking for an asymmetry between particle and antiparticle decay parameters. The experiment is expected to achieve a sensitivity {approx}10{sup -4} in the decay parameters. Standard model predictions for this CP-violating asymmetry range from 0.3 to 5 x 10{sup -4}. A difference between the decay parameters for particle and antiparticle is direct evidence that CP symmetry is violated. A non-zero asymmetry would be the first evidence for CP violation outside of the K{sup o} system. Recent results from KTeV indicate a direct CP violation in K{sup o} decays, which suggests that CP violation will appear in other decays. In addition, we will look at a number of rare hyperon decays involving muons. These probe important new physics topics such as Majorana neutrinos and lepton number violating processes. The latter are of great current interest because new evidence for neutrino oscillations indicate lepton flavor violation does occur. Our data will lead to an improvement in the limits on branching ratios for these processes typically by three to four orders-of-magnitude. The muon detector construction and data resulting from it have been the responsibility of the Michigan group. We are now leading the analysis of the rare muon-related decay modes, and were responsible for the muon system and beam monitor upgrades for the 1999 run.

  2. [Lazarus phenomenon: spontaneous resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Casielles García, J L; González Latorre, M V; Fernández Amigo, N; Guerra Vélz, A; Cotta Galán, M; Bravo Capaz, E; de las Mulas Béjar, M

    2004-01-01

    A 94-year-old woman undergoing surgery for simple repair of a duodenal perforation experienced a sudden massive hemorrhage (1500 mL) when the duodenum was separated from adjacent structures. Hemodynamic stability was re-established when fluids were replaced. After the abdominal wall was closed, increased amplitude of the QRS wave was observed and heart rate slowed until there was no pulse. Electromechanical dissociation (EMD) was diagnosed and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was started. When EMD persisted after 40 minutes, resuscitative measures were stopped and the ventilator was disconnected, though orotracheal intubation and arterial and electrocardiographic monitoring were maintained. After 2 or 3 minutes, heart rhythm restarted spontaneously and arterial pressure waves reappeared on the monitor. The patient progressed well for 72 hours, after which she developed septic shock and multiorgan failure, dying 18 days later. The Lazarus phenomenon may be more common than the medical literature would indicate, possibly because a large gap in our understanding of the pathophysiology of the phenomenon underlies anecdotes about "miracles". As we wait for adequate international consensus on a protocol for monitoring the withdrawal of resuscitative measures, we should act prudently before definitively certifying death. The case we report occurred during a surgical intervention in which the patient had received general anesthesia. We believe that the causes that might explain the Lazarus phenomenon are quite different in that context than they would be in a nonsurgical setting, such that it would be useful to create a national database to keep a record of such intraoperative events. PMID:15495638

  3. Spontaneous subgaleal aerocele.

    PubMed

    Ibe, M O N; Onu, D O; Igwe, N N

    2014-01-01

    Apart from reporting about a case of spontaneous subgaleal aerocele this paper looks at the possible causes and management also. A 35-year-old Igbo-Nigerian female, about 4 weeks post-natal, with a 10-month old steadily and gradually enlarging mass around the back of her head, including both temporal regions was referred to us. Plain skull radiographs showed air in this mass. Needle puncture produced air leading to immediate and complete flattening of the lesion. A few hours after this procedure while still in the hospital premises, she had generalized convulsions, for which she was hospitalized and treated. With no further attacks, her request for discharge the following day was granted. At the next visit, 7 days later, there was a re-accumulation, which was treated the same way as previously and with the same result. She has not reported back since then, though she was advised to visit us again in 7 day-time. This lesion should be considered when masses on the head are presented. Our health institutions should have adequate investigative facilities. PMID:24553041

  4. Spontaneous breaking of supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Zumino, B.

    1981-12-01

    There has been recently a revival of interest in supersymmetric gauge theories, stimulated by the hope that supersymmetry might help in clarifying some of the questions which remain unanswered in the so called Grand Unified Theories and in particular the gauge hierarchy problem. In a Grand Unified Theory one has two widely different mass scales: the unification mass M approx. = 10/sup 15/GeV at which the unification group (e.g. SU(5)) breaks down to SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) and the mass ..mu.. approx. = 100 GeV at which SU(2) x U(1) is broken down to the U(1) of electromagnetism. There is at present no theoretical understanding of the extreme smallness of the ratio ..mu../M of these two numbers. This is the gauge hierarchy problem. This lecture attempts to review the various mechanisms for spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in gauge theories. Most of the discussions are concerned with the tree approximation, but what is presently known about radiative correction is also reviewed.

  5. Phenomena related to CP violation at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Squillacioti, Paola

    2010-02-10

    We report recent CDF results on CP violation in B{sup -}->DK{sup -} modes, where D goes to Cabibbo suppressed (pipi, KK) or doubly cabibbo suppressed (K{sup +}pi{sup -}) modes, which are related to CKM angle gamma. We also describe direct CP violation measurements in charmless two-body decays of B{sub s}{sup 0}->Kpi and LAMBDA{sub b}{sup 0}->pK, ppi modes, which are unique to the CDF experiment. We also report on CP violation measurements in D{sup 0}->h{sup +}h{sup -} modes.

  6. Probing CPT violation in B systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, Anirban; Patra, Sunando Kumar; Nandi, Soumitra

    2010-04-01

    We discuss how a possible violation of the combined symmetry CPT in the B meson system can be investigated at the LHC. We show how a tagged and an untagged analysis of the decay modes of both B{sub d} and B{sub s} mesons can lead not only to a possible detection of a CPT-violating new physics but also to an understanding of its precise nature. The implication of CPT violation to a large mixing phase in the B{sub s} system is also discussed.

  7. Phenomena related to CP violation at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Squillacioti, Paola; /Siena U. /INFN, Pisa

    2009-10-01

    We report recent CDF results on CP violation in B{sup -} {yields} DK{sup -} modes, where D goes to Cabibbo suppressed ({pi}{pi}, KK) or doubly cabibbo suppressed (K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) modes, which are related to CKM angle gamma. We also describe direct CP violation measurements in charmless two-body decays of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{pi} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} pK, p{pi} modes, which are unique to the CDF experiment. We also report on CP violation measurements in D{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h{sup -} modes.

  8. Experimental tests of quantum mechanics: Pauli Exclusion Principle Violation (the VIP experiment) and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curceanu, C.; Bartalucci, S.; Bertolucci, S.; Bragadireanu, M.; Cargnelli, M.; di Matteo, S.; Egger, J.-P.; Guaraldo, C.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Marton, J.; Milotti, E.; Pietreanu, D.; Ponta, T.; Rizzo, A.; Vidal, A. Romero; Scordo, A.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Sperandio, L.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.

    The Pauli exclusion principle (PEP), as a consequence or the spin-statistics connection, is one of the basic principles of the modern physics. Being at the very basis of our understanding of matter, it spurs a lively debate on its possible limits, deeply rooted as it is in the very foundations of Quantum Field Theory. The VIP (VIolation of the Pauli exclusion principle) experiment established the world's best limit on the probability that PEP is violated by electrons, using the method of searching for PEP forbidden atomic transitions in copper. We describe the experimental method and the obtained results; we briefly present future plans to go beyond the actual limit by upgrading the experiment using vetoed new spectroscopic fast Silicon Drift Detectors. We also shortly mention the possibility of using a similar experimental technique to search for possible X-rays generated in the spontaneous collapse models of quantum mechanics.

  9. Lepton number violation in theories with a large number of standard model copies

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalenko, Sergey; Schmidt, Ivan; Paes, Heinrich

    2011-03-01

    We examine lepton number violation (LNV) in theories with a saturated black hole bound on a large number of species. Such theories have been advocated recently as a possible solution to the hierarchy problem and an explanation of the smallness of neutrino masses. On the other hand, the violation of the lepton number can be a potential phenomenological problem of this N-copy extension of the standard model as due to the low quantum gravity scale black holes may induce TeV scale LNV operators generating unacceptably large rates of LNV processes. We show, however, that this issue can be avoided by introducing a spontaneously broken U{sub 1(B-L)}. Then, due to the existence of a specific compensation mechanism between contributions of different Majorana neutrino states, LNV processes in the standard model copy become extremely suppressed with rates far beyond experimental reach.

  10. CP-Violating Sources for Electroweak Baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Christopher

    2008-11-23

    In this talk I derive the CP-violating sources for the squark number density in the MSSM generated by interactions with the spacetime-varying Higgs vev during a first-order electroweak phase transition.

  11. 14 CFR 1214.610 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 1214.610 Section 1214.610 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT Mementos Aboard Space Shuttle... Aeronautics and Space Administration....

  12. 14 CFR 1214.610 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 1214.610 Section 1214.610 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT Mementos Aboard Space Shuttle... Aeronautics and Space Administration....

  13. 14 CFR 1214.610 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Violations. 1214.610 Section 1214.610 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT Mementos Aboard Space Shuttle... Aeronautics and Space Administration....

  14. 14 CFR 1214.610 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 1214.610 Section 1214.610 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT Mementos Aboard Space Shuttle... Aeronautics and Space Administration....

  15. 10 CFR 72.220 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS C WASTE General License for Storage of Spent Fuel at Power Reactor Sites § 72.220 Violations. This general license is subject to...

  16. 10 CFR 72.220 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS C WASTE General License for Storage of Spent Fuel at Power Reactor Sites § 72.220 Violations. This general license is subject to...

  17. 10 CFR 72.220 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS C WASTE General License for Storage of Spent Fuel at Power Reactor Sites § 72.220 Violations. This general license is subject to...

  18. Violations of Management Principles within Academe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikula, Andrew F.; Sikula, John P.

    1980-01-01

    Principles of effective management commonly violated by educational institutions include: (1) unity of command; (2) division or specialization of labor; (3) delegation of authority; and (4) authority equal to responsibility. (JMF)

  19. New bounds on isotropic Lorentz violation

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Carone; Marc Sher; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2006-09-19

    Violations of Lorentz invariance that appear via operators of dimension four or less are completely parameterized in the Standard Model Extension (SME). In the pure photonic sector of the SME, there are nineteen dimensionless, Lorentz-violating parameters. Eighteen of these have experimental upper bounds ranging between 10{sup -11} and 10{sup -32}; the remaining parameter, ktr, is isotropic and has a much weaker bound of order 10{sup -4}. In this Brief Report, we point out that ktr gives a significant contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron and find a new upper bound of order 10{sup -8}. With reasonable assumptions, we further show that this bound may be improved to 10{sup -14} by considering the renormalization of other Lorentz-violating parameters that are more tightly constrained. Using similar renormalization arguments, we also estimate bounds on Lorentz violating parameters in the pure gluonic sector of QCD.

  20. On coherence in spontaneous emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, F. W.; Dorri, Ali

    1983-05-01

    The case of a single excited two-level atom emitting spontaneously in the presence of N unexcited atoms is solved exactly for emission into a single electromagnetic mode. The two-level atoms are in inequivalent mode positions.

  1. Mixing and CP Violation at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Brooijmans, G.; /Columbia U.

    2008-08-01

    Measurements of meson mixing and CP violation parameters obtained by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron are presented. These include results on B{sub s} and D meson mixing, and searches for CP violation in the decay B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup +}, in mixing through semileptonic B{sub s} meson decays, and in the interference between mixing and decay in the process B{sub s} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}.

  2. 20 CFR 655.65 - Remedies for violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... employer under the INA and this subpart, and 8 CFR 214.2; (2) The number of U.S. or H-2B workers employed by the employer and affected by the violation or violations; (3) The gravity of the violation or... of this subpart and at 8 CFR 214.2(h); (5) The employer's explanation of the violation or...

  3. 20 CFR 655.65 - Remedies for violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... employer under the INA and this subpart, and 8 CFR 214.2; (2) The number of U.S. or H-2B workers employed by the employer and affected by the violation or violations; (3) The gravity of the violation or... of this subpart and at 8 CFR 214.2(h); (5) The employer's explanation of the violation or...

  4. Search for lepton flavour violating decays of heavy resonances and quantum black holes to an mathrm {e}μ pair in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=8 {TeV}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fang, W.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.

    2016-06-01

    A search for narrow resonances decaying to an electron and a muon is presented. The mathrm {e} {μ } mass spectrum is also investigated for non-resonant contributions from the production of quantum black holes (QBHs). The analysis is performed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 {fb}^ {-1} collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 {TeV} with the CMS detector at the LHC. With no evidence for physics beyond the standard model in the invariant mass spectrum of selected mathrm {e}μ pairs, upper limits are set at 95 % confidence level on the product of cross section and branching fraction for signals arising in theories with charged lepton flavour violation. In the search for narrow resonances, the resonant production of a mathrm {τ } sneutrino in R-parity violating supersymmetry is considered. The mathrm {τ } sneutrino is excluded for masses below 1.28 {TeV} for couplings λ _{132}=λ _{231}=λ '_{311}=0.01, and below 2.30 {TeV} for λ _{132}=λ _{231}=0.07 and λ '_{311}=0.11. These are the most stringent limits to date from direct searches at high-energy colliders. In addition, the resonance searches are interpreted in terms of a model with heavy partners of the {Z} boson and the photon. In a framework of TeV-scale quantum gravity based on a renormalization of Newton's constant, the search for non-resonant contributions to the mathrm {e} {μ } mass spectrum excludes QBH production below a threshold mass M_{th} of 1.99 {TeV}. In models that invoke extra dimensions, the bounds range from 2.36 {TeV} for one extra dimension to 3.63 {TeV} for six extra dimensions. This is the first search for QBHs decaying into the mathrm {e} {μ } final state.

  5. Search for lepton flavour violating decays of heavy resonances and quantum black holes to an {e}μ pair in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=8 {TeV}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fang, W.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Rurua, L.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Mukherjee, S.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Campbell, A.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Stefaniuk, N.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schumann, S.; Schwandt, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Stober, F. M.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; de Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Schröder, M.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Choudhury, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Jain, Sa.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Kapoor, A.; Kothekar, K.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. 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W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bartek, R.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira de Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Kumar, A.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; de Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Woods, N.; CMS Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    A search for narrow resonances decaying to an electron and a muon is presented. The {e} {μ } mass spectrum is also investigated for non-resonant contributions from the production of quantum black holes (QBHs). The analysis is performed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 {fb}^ {-1} collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 {TeV} with the CMS detector at the LHC. With no evidence for physics beyond the standard model in the invariant mass spectrum of selected {e}μ pairs, upper limits are set at 95 % confidence level on the product of cross section and branching fraction for signals arising in theories with charged lepton flavour violation. In the search for narrow resonances, the resonant production of a {τ } sneutrino in R-parity violating supersymmetry is considered. The {τ } sneutrino is excluded for masses below 1.28 {TeV} for couplings λ _{132}=λ _{231}=λ '_{311}=0.01, and below 2.30 {TeV} for λ _{132}=λ _{231}=0.07 and λ '_{311}=0.11. These are the most stringent limits to date from direct searches at high-energy colliders. In addition, the resonance searches are interpreted in terms of a model with heavy partners of the {Z} boson and the photon. In a framework of TeV-scale quantum gravity based on a renormalization of Newton's constant, the search for non-resonant contributions to the {e} {μ } mass spectrum excludes QBH production below a threshold mass M_{th} of 1.99 {TeV}. In models that invoke extra dimensions, the bounds range from 2.36 {TeV} for one extra dimension to 3.63 {TeV} for six extra dimensions. This is the first search for QBHs decaying into the {e} {μ } final state.

  6. The Relationship among Spontaneity, Impulsivity, and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kipper, David A.; Green, Doreen J.; Prorak, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate two characteristics of spontaneity, its relationship to creativity and to impulsivity. We hypothesized a positive relationship between spontaneity and creativity, consistent with Moreno, 1953 "canon of spontaneity-creativity." We also predicted a negative relationship between spontaneity and…

  7. 48 CFR 703.104-10.1 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 703.104-10.1 Section 703.104-10.1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards...

  8. Atomic Parity Violation and Related Physics in Ytterbium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri Robert

    Atomic parity violation has been observed in the 408 nm 1 S0→3D1 forbidden transition of ytterbium. The parity violating amplitude is 8.7(1.4)e-10 ea0, two orders of magnitude larger than in cesium, where the most precise experiments to date have been performed. This is in accordance with theoretical predictions and constitutes the largest atomic parity violating amplitude yet observed. This also opens the way to future measurements of neutron skins and anapole moments by comparing parity-violating amplitudes for various isotopes and hyperfine components of the transition. We present a detailed description of the observation. Linearly polarized 408 nm light interacts with ytterbium atoms in crossed electric (E) and magnetic fields (B). The probability of the 1 S0→3D1 transition contains a parity-violating term, proportional to E'B[( E'xE B], arising from interference between the amplitudes of transitions induced by the electroweak interaction and the Stark effect ((E' is the optical electric field). The transition probability is detected by measuring the population of the metastable 3P0 state, to which 65% of the atoms excited to the 3D1 state spontaneously decay. The population of the 3P0 state is determined by resonantly exciting the atoms with 649 nm light to the 3S1 state and collecting the fluorescence resulting from its decay. Systematic corrections due to imperfections in the applied electric and magnetic fields are determined in auxiliary experiments. The statistical uncertainty is dominated by parasitic frequency excursions of the 408-nm excitation light due to imperfect stabilization of the optical reference with respect to the atomic resonance. The present uncertainties are 9% statistical and 8% systematic. Methods of improving the accuracy for the future experiments are discussed. We further present a measurement of the dynamic scalar and tensor polarizabilities of ytterbium's 3D1 state. The polarizabilities were measured by analyzing the spectral

  9. Optical antenna enhanced spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Eggleston, Michael S; Messer, Kevin; Zhang, Liming; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C

    2015-02-10

    Atoms and molecules are too small to act as efficient antennas for their own emission wavelengths. By providing an external optical antenna, the balance can be shifted; spontaneous emission could become faster than stimulated emission, which is handicapped by practically achievable pump intensities. In our experiments, InGaAsP nanorods emitting at ∼ 200 THz optical frequency show a spontaneous emission intensity enhancement of 35 × corresponding to a spontaneous emission rate speedup ∼ 115 ×, for antenna gap spacing, d = 40 nm. Classical antenna theory predicts ∼ 2,500 × spontaneous emission speedup at d ∼ 10 nm, proportional to 1/d(2). Unfortunately, at d < 10 nm, antenna efficiency drops below 50%, owing to optical spreading resistance, exacerbated by the anomalous skin effect (electron surface collisions). Quantum dipole oscillations in the emitter excited state produce an optical ac equivalent circuit current, I(o) = qω|x(o)|/d, feeding the antenna-enhanced spontaneous emission, where q|x(o)| is the dipole matrix element. Despite the quantum-mechanical origin of the drive current, antenna theory makes no reference to the Purcell effect nor to local density of states models. Moreover, plasmonic effects are minor at 200 THz, producing only a small shift of antenna resonance frequency. PMID:25624503

  10. Optical antenna enhanced spontaneous emission

    PubMed Central

    Eggleston, Michael S.; Messer, Kevin; Zhang, Liming; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C.

    2015-01-01

    Atoms and molecules are too small to act as efficient antennas for their own emission wavelengths. By providing an external optical antenna, the balance can be shifted; spontaneous emission could become faster than stimulated emission, which is handicapped by practically achievable pump intensities. In our experiments, InGaAsP nanorods emitting at ∼200 THz optical frequency show a spontaneous emission intensity enhancement of 35× corresponding to a spontaneous emission rate speedup ∼115×, for antenna gap spacing, d = 40 nm. Classical antenna theory predicts ∼2,500× spontaneous emission speedup at d ∼ 10 nm, proportional to 1/d2. Unfortunately, at d < 10 nm, antenna efficiency drops below 50%, owing to optical spreading resistance, exacerbated by the anomalous skin effect (electron surface collisions). Quantum dipole oscillations in the emitter excited state produce an optical ac equivalent circuit current, Io = qω|xo|/d, feeding the antenna-enhanced spontaneous emission, where q|xo| is the dipole matrix element. Despite the quantum-mechanical origin of the drive current, antenna theory makes no reference to the Purcell effect nor to local density of states models. Moreover, plasmonic effects are minor at 200 THz, producing only a small shift of antenna resonance frequency. PMID:25624503

  11. Higgs-like mechanism for spontaneous spacetime symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Kimihide

    2015-10-01

    The study of spontaneous breakdown of spacetime symmetries leads to the discovery of another type of Higgs mechanism operating in a chiral SU(2) model. Some of the Nambu-Goldstone vector mesons emergent from simultaneous violations of gauge and Lorentz symmetries are, in this case, absorbed by a left-handed doublet and endow one of the fermions with a right-handed state, while another part becomes emergent as photons. Accordingly, this mechanism allows a chiral fermion to acquire a mass, and it may enable the emergent theory to reproduce the electromagnetism equivalent to the QED sector in the standard theory. It is also mentioned that the "fermion-boson puzzle" known in the presence of a 't Hooft-Polyakov monopole does not exist in our theory.

  12. Antisymmetric tensor field and spontaneous magnetization in holographic duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Yang, Run-Qiu

    2015-08-01

    A real antisymmetric tensor field was introduced to realize a holographic magnetic ordered phase in our previous papers. However, a more careful analysis shows there is a vector ghost in the model. In this paper we present a modified Lagrangian density for the antisymmetric tensor, which is ghost free and causality is well defined, and keeps all the significant results in the original model qualitatively. We show this modified Lagrangian density could come from the dimensional compactification of p -form field in string/M theory. For static curved space-time, we also prove that this modified model is ghost free and does not violate causality. This new model offers a solid foundation for the application of antisymmetric tensor field in holographic duality, especially for the spontaneous magnetization.

  13. Unbounded Violation of Tripartite Bell Inequalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-García, D.; Wolf, M. M.; Palazuelos, C.; Villanueva, I.; Junge, M.

    2008-04-01

    We prove that there are tripartite quantum states (constructed from random unitaries) that can lead to arbitrarily large violations of Bell inequalities for dichotomic observables. As a consequence these states can withstand an arbitrary amount of white noise before they admit a description within a local hidden variable model. This is in sharp contrast with the bipartite case, where all violations are bounded by Grothendieck’s constant. We will discuss the possibility of determining the Hilbert space dimension from the obtained violation and comment on implications for communication complexity theory. Moreover, we show that the violation obtained from generalized Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states is always bounded so that, in contrast to many other contexts, GHZ states do not lead to extremal quantum correlations in this case. In order to derive all these physical consequences, we will have to obtain new mathematical results in the theories of operator spaces and tensor norms. In particular, we will prove the existence of bounded but not completely bounded trilinear forms from commutative C*-algebras. Finally, we will relate the existence of diagonal states leading to unbounded violations with a long-standing open problem in the context of Banach algebras.

  14. Children spontaneously police adults' transgressions.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Gail D; Chiu Loke, Ivy; Lee, Kang

    2016-10-01

    Maintaining social order requires the policing of transgressions. Prior research suggests that policing emerges early in life, but little is known about children's engagement in such behavior in live interactions where there is uncertainty about the consequences. In this study, 4- to 11-year-old children (N=158) witnessed an unfamiliar adult confederate intentionally destroy another adult's property. Of interest was whether children would engage in policing behavior by protesting to the transgressor or by spontaneously reporting the transgression to a third party. Some children engaged in these behaviors spontaneously; nearly half (42%) protested the transgression, and 27% reported it without being prompted. Even when children did not spontaneously report the transgression, they almost always reported it when asked directly. The findings show that children commonly engage in policing even in the face of potentially negative consequences. PMID:27295206

  15. [Three cases of spontaneous pneumomediastinum].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kashin; Tachikawa, Soichi; Horiguchi, Takahiko; Kondo, Rieko; Shiga, Mamoru; Hirose, Masahiro; Sasaki, Yasushi; Torigoe, Hiroshi

    2006-04-01

    We encountered 3 male patients with spontaneous pneumomediastinum. The patients were a 16-year old and a 17-year old and a 24-year old. Predisposing episodes for the development of spontaneous pneumomediastinum could be identified in all 3 patients: throwing a ball during a baseball game in 1, lifting a heavy load during work in 2. However, they were healthy and suddenly developed symptoms in the absence of any underlying disease. The presenting complaint was chest pain in all 3 patients. Chest X-ray films and chest CT images revealed pneumomediastinum. A diagnosis of spontaneous pneumomediastinum was made based on chest X-ray films and chest CT images. After conservative treatment, all 3 patients recovered. PMID:16681254

  16. Spontaneous Scalarization of Massive Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramazanoglu, Fethi M.; Pretorius, Frans

    2014-03-01

    Spontaneous scalarization is a phenomenon in certain scalar-tensor theories where large deviations from general relativity can be observed inside compact stars, while the known observational bounds can also be satisfied far away. This scenario has been investigated for massless scalars and binary neutron stars using numerical relativity, but the parameter space for such theories have been severely restricted by recent observations. Here, we present our results on the spontaneous scalarization of massive scalars. We simulate cases with different equations of state and scalar field parameters, and comment on the detectability of the scalar field effects from the gravitational wave signal.

  17. Spontaneous baryogenesis from asymmetric inflaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Fuminobu; Yamada, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    We propose a variant scenario of spontaneous baryogenesis from asymmetric inflaton based on current-current interactions between the inflaton and matter fields with a non-zero B - L charge. When the inflaton starts to oscillate around the minimum after inflation, it may lead to excitation of a CP-odd component, which induces an effective chemical potential for the B - L number through the current-current interactions. We study concrete inflation models and show that the spontaneous baryogenesis scenario can be naturally implemented in the chaotic inflation in supergravity.

  18. Flow Friction or Spontaneous Ignition?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Gallus, Timothy D.; Sparks, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    "Flow friction," a proposed ignition mechanism in oxygen systems, has proved elusive in attempts at experimental verification. In this paper, the literature regarding flow friction is reviewed and the experimental verification attempts are briefly discussed. Another ignition mechanism, a form of spontaneous combustion, is proposed as an explanation for at least some of the fire events that have been attributed to flow friction in the literature. In addition, the results of a failure analysis performed at NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility are presented, and the observations indicate that spontaneous combustion was the most likely cause of the fire in this 2000 psig (14 MPa) oxygen-enriched system.

  19. Chiral flavor violation from extended gauge mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Jared A.; Shih, David; Thalapillil, Arun

    2015-07-01

    Models of extended gauge mediation, in which large A-terms arise through direct messenger-MSSM superpotential couplings, are well-motivated by the discovery of the 125 GeV Higgs. However, since these models are not necessarily MFV, the flavor constraints could be stringent. In this paper, we perform the first detailed and quantitative study of the flavor violation in these models. To facilitate our study, we introduce a new tool called FormFlavor for computing precision flavor observables in the general MSSM. We validate FormFlavor and our qualitative understanding of the flavor violation in these models by comparing against analytical expressions. Despite being non-MFV, we show that these models are protected against the strongest constraints by a special flavor texture, which we dub chiral flavor violation (χFV). This results in only mild bounds from current experiments, and exciting prospects for experiments in the near future.

  20. CP violation versus flavour in supersymmetric theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, S.; Branco, G. C.; Khalil, S.

    2003-09-01

    We show that the quark flavour structure and CP violating phenomena are strongly correlated in supersymmetric theories. For a generic pattern of supersymmetry breaking the two broad categories of Yukawa couplings, democratic and hierarchical textures, have entirely different phenomenological implications. With hierarchical Yukawas, the rephasing invariant phase, arg(VusVcbVcb∗Vcs∗), in the CKM mixing matrix has to be of order unity, while the SUSY CP violating phases are severely constrained by electric dipole moments, giving rise to the so-called SUSY CP problem. With democratic Yukawas, all experimental CP results can be accommodated with small values for the CKM and SUSY CP violating phases (i.e., CP can be considered as an approximate symmetry at the high energy scale). We also show that within this scenario, an entirely real CKM matrix in supersymmetric models is still allowed by the present experimental results.

  1. Temperature dependence of standard model CP violation.

    PubMed

    Brauner, Tomáš; Taanila, Olli; Tranberg, Anders; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2012-01-27

    We analyze the temperature dependence of CP violation effects in the standard model by determining the effective action of its bosonic fields, obtained after integrating out the fermions from the theory and performing a covariant gradient expansion. We find nonvanishing CP violating terms starting at the sixth order of the expansion, albeit only in the C-odd-P-even sector, with coefficients that depend on quark masses, Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements, temperature and the magnitude of the Higgs field. The CP violating effects are observed to decrease rapidly with temperature, which has important implications for the generation of a matter-antimatter asymmetry in the early Universe. Our results suggest that the cold electroweak baryogenesis scenario may be viable within the standard model, provided the electroweak transition temperature is at most of order 1 GeV. PMID:22400822

  2. CP Violation Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Mark .R.J.; /Lancaster U.

    2010-07-09

    The two colliding beam experiments at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, CDF and D0, continue to publish world-leading measurements of CP Violation parameters in the B meson sector. I will present several recent results from both experiments, including measurements of direct CP violating parameters in decays of B{sup +}{sub u}, B{sup 0}{sub d} and B{sup 0}{sub s} mesons; a new D0 measurement of a{sup s}{sub sl} using time-dependent analysis of B{sub s} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}D{sup -}{sub s}X decays; and the latest Tevatron combination of the CP violating phase {beta}{sub s}, measured in the 'golden mode' B{sub s} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}.

  3. CP Violation in B Mixing and Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesterinen, Mika

    2013-05-01

    Recent LHCb results on CP violation in B mixing and decays are reported. The analyses are based on 1 fb-1 of pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV recorded in 2011. First evidence is presented for CP violation in B± decays to the K±K+K-, π±K+K-, and π±π+π- final states. The CP violating flavour specific asymmetry, asls, is measured to be (-0.24 ± 0.54stat ± 0.33syst) × 10-2, in good agreement with Standard Model expectations. A flavour tagged and time dependent analysis of the decays, Bs → J/ψϕ and Bs → J/ψπ+π-, measures ϕs = -0.002 ± 0.083stat ± 0.027syst rad, in good agreement with Standard Model predictions.

  4. Communication Strength of Correlations Violating Monogamy Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kłobus, Waldemar; Oszmaniec, Michał; Augusiak, Remigiusz; Grudka, Andrzej

    2016-05-01

    In any theory satisfying the no-signaling principle correlations generated among spatially separated parties in a Bell-type experiment are subject to certain constraints known as monogamy relations. Recently, in the context of the black hole information loss problem it was suggested that these monogamy relations might be violated. This in turn implies that correlations arising in such a scenario must violate the no-signaling principle and hence can be used to send classical information between parties. Here, we study the amount of information that can be sent using such correlations. To this aim, we first provide a framework associating them with classical channels whose capacities are then used to quantify the usefulness of these correlations in sending information. Finally, we determine the minimal amount of information that can be sent using signaling correlations violating the monogamy relation associated to the chained Bell inequalities.

  5. CP violation in hadronic τ decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Alakabha; Kiers, Ken; London, David; O'Donnell, Patrick J.; Szynkman, Alejandro

    2007-04-01

    We reexamine CP violation in the ΔS=0 decays τ→Nπντ (N=2,3,4). We assume that the new physics (NP) is a charged Higgs boson. We show that there is no NP contribution to τ→ππντ, which means that no CP violation is expected in this decay. On the other hand, NP can contribute to τ→Nπντ (N=3,4). These are dominated by the intermediate resonant decays τ→ωπντ, τ→ρπντ, and τ→a1πντ. We show that the only sizeable CP-violating effects which are possible are in τ→a1πντ→4πντ (polarization-dependent rate asymmetry) and τ→ωπντ (triple-product asymmetry).

  6. Completing Lorentz violating massive gravity at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Blas, D.; Sibiryakov, S.

    2015-03-15

    Theories with massive gravitons are interesting for a variety of physical applications, ranging from cosmological phenomena to holographic modeling of condensed matter systems. To date, they have been formulated as effective field theories with a cutoff proportional to a positive power of the graviton mass m{sub g} and much smaller than that of the massless theory (M{sub P} ≈ 10{sup 19} GeV in the case of general relativity). In this paper, we present an ultraviolet completion for massive gravity valid up to a high energy scale independent of the graviton mass. The construction is based on the existence of a preferred time foliation combined with spontaneous condensation of vector fields. The perturbations of these fields are massive and below their mass, the theory reduces to a model of Lorentz violating massive gravity. The latter theory possesses instantaneous modes whose consistent quantization we discuss in detail. We briefly study some modifications to gravitational phenomenology at low-energies. The homogeneous cosmological solutions are the same as in the standard cosmology. The gravitational potential of point sources agrees with the Newtonian one at distances small with respect to m{sub g}{sup −1}. Interestingly, it becomes repulsive at larger distances.

  7. CP Violation in Single Top Quark Production

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Weigang

    2012-01-01

    We present a search for CP violation in single top quark production with the DØ experiment at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. CP violation in the top electroweak interaction results in different single top quark production cross sections for top and antitop quarks. We perform the search in the single top quark final state using 5.4 fb-1 of data, in the s-channel, t-channel, and for both combined. At this time, we do not see an observable CP asymmetry.

  8. CP violation in B meson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, S.; Belle Group

    2003-06-01

    CP violation in neutral B meson decays has been observed confirming the prediction of the Kobayashi-Maskawa model where introduction of six quaks naturally induces CP violation in the weak interaction. The measurements of CP asymmetryc in B meson decays were made at the newly constructed Asymmetric B factories, which consist of high luminosity, ebergy-asymmetric e+e- colliders (KEKB and PEP-II) and detectors (Belle and BaBar). The results are in good agreement and are consistent with other experimental results within the framework of the Standard Model.

  9. Violation of detailed balance accelerates relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiki, Akihisa; Ohzeki, Masayuki

    2013-08-01

    Recent studies have experienced the acceleration of convergence in Markov chain Monte Carlo methods implemented by the systems without detailed balance condition (DBC). However, such advantage of the violation of DBC has not been confirmed in general. We investigate the effect of the absence of DBC on the convergence toward equilibrium. Surprisingly, it is shown that the DBC violation always makes the relaxation faster. Our result implies the existence of a kind of thermodynamic inequality that connects the nonequilibrium process relaxing toward steady state with the relaxation process which has the same probability distribution as its equilibrium state.

  10. Question of Lorentz violation in muon decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noordmans, J. P.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Wilschut, H. W.; Timmermans, R. G. E.

    2016-06-01

    Possibilities to test the Lorentz invariance of the weak interaction in muon decay are considered. We derive the direction-dependent muon-decay rate with a general Lorentz-violating addition to the W -boson propagator. We discuss measurements of the directional and boost dependence of the Michel parameters and of the muon lifetime as a function of absolute velocity. The total muon-decay rate in the Lorentz-violating standard model extension is addressed. Suggestions are made for dedicated (re)analyses of the pertinent data and for future experiments.

  11. Tau Flavour Violation at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Carquin, E.

    2009-04-17

    We study the relevance of neutrino oscillation data for sparticle decays that violate the {tau} lepton number at the LHC, in the context of the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Extension of the Standard Model (CMSSM) and in SU(5) extensions of the theory. We study the conditions required for {chi}{sub 2}{yields}{chi}+{tau}{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {+-}} decays to yield observable tau flavour violation, for cosmologically interesting values of the neutralino relic density. We present detailed studies of the relevant supersymmetric parameter space and pay particular emphasis to signals from tau hadronisation, that are analysed using PYTHIA event simulation.

  12. Imperfect fluids, Lorentz violations, and Finsler cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Kouretsis, A. P.; Stathakopoulos, M.; Stavrinos, P. C.

    2010-09-15

    We construct a cosmological toy model based on a Finslerian structure of space-time. In particular, we are interested in a specific Finslerian Lorentz violating theory based on a curved version of Cohen and Glashow's very special relativity. The osculation of a Finslerian manifold to a Riemannian manifold leads to the limit of relativistic cosmology, for a specified observer. A modified flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology is produced. The analogue of a zero energy particle unfolds some special properties of the dynamics. The kinematical equations of motion are affected by local anisotropies. Seeds of Lorentz violations may trigger density inhomogeneities to the cosmological fluid.

  13. Probing lepton number violation on three frontiers

    SciTech Connect

    Deppisch, Frank F.

    2013-12-30

    Neutrinoless double beta decay constitutes the main probe for lepton number violation at low energies, motivated by the expected Majorana nature of the light but massive neutrinos. On the other hand, the theoretical interpretation of the (non-)observation of this process is not straightforward as the Majorana neutrinos can destructively interfere in their contribution and many other New Physics mechanisms can additionally mediate the process. We here highlight the potential of combining neutrinoless double beta decay with searches for Tritium decay, cosmological observations and LHC physics to improve the quantitative insight into the neutrino properties and to unravel potential sources of lepton number violation.

  14. Spontaneous Number Representation in Mosquitofish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadda, Marco; Piffer, Laura; Agrillo, Christian; Bisazza, Angelo

    2009-01-01

    While there is convincing evidence that preverbal human infants and non-human primates can spontaneously represent number, considerable debate surrounds the possibility that such capacity is also present in other animals. Fish show a remarkable ability to discriminate between different numbers of social companions. Previous work has demonstrated…

  15. Toddlers' Spontaneous Attention to Number

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baroody, Arthur J.; Li, Xia; Lai, Meng-lung

    2008-01-01

    Hannula and Lehtinen (2001, 2005) defined spontaneous focusing on numerosity (SFON) as the tendency to notice the relatively abstract attribute of number despite the presence of other attributes. According to nativists, an innate concept of one to three directs young children's attention to these "intuitive numbers" in everyday situations--even…

  16. Student Experiments in Spontaneous Fission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becchetti, F. D.; Ying, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    Advanced undergraduate experiments utilizing a commercially available, thin spontaneous fission source are described, including studies of the energy and mass distribution of the fission fragments and their energy and angular correlation. The experiments provide a useful introduction to fission, nuclear mass equations, heavy-ion physics, and…

  17. 50 CFR 20.72 - Violation of State law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... export any migratory bird, or any part, nest, or egg of any such bird, in violation of any applicable law... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Federal, State, and Foreign Law § 20.72 Violation...

  18. 50 CFR 20.72 - Violation of State law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... export any migratory bird, or any part, nest, or egg of any such bird, in violation of any applicable law... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Federal, State, and Foreign Law § 20.72 Violation...

  19. 50 CFR 20.71 - Violation of Federal law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... export any migratory bird, or any part, nest, or egg of any such bird, in violation of any act of... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Federal, State, and Foreign Law § 20.71 Violation...

  20. 50 CFR 20.72 - Violation of State law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... export any migratory bird, or any part, nest, or egg of any such bird, in violation of any applicable law... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Federal, State, and Foreign Law § 20.72 Violation...

  1. 50 CFR 20.71 - Violation of Federal law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... export any migratory bird, or any part, nest, or egg of any such bird, in violation of any act of... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Federal, State, and Foreign Law § 20.71 Violation...

  2. 50 CFR 20.71 - Violation of Federal law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... export any migratory bird, or any part, nest, or egg of any such bird, in violation of any act of... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Federal, State, and Foreign Law § 20.71 Violation...

  3. 50 CFR 20.72 - Violation of State law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... export any migratory bird, or any part, nest, or egg of any such bird, in violation of any applicable law... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Federal, State, and Foreign Law § 20.72 Violation...

  4. 50 CFR 20.71 - Violation of Federal law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... export any migratory bird, or any part, nest, or egg of any such bird, in violation of any act of... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Federal, State, and Foreign Law § 20.71 Violation...

  5. 50 CFR 20.71 - Violation of Federal law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... export any migratory bird, or any part, nest, or egg of any such bird, in violation of any act of... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Federal, State, and Foreign Law § 20.71 Violation...

  6. 50 CFR 20.72 - Violation of State law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... export any migratory bird, or any part, nest, or egg of any such bird, in violation of any applicable law... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Federal, State, and Foreign Law § 20.72 Violation...

  7. 36 CFR 331.25 - Violation of regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE PROTECTION, USE AND MANAGEMENT OF THE FALLS OF THE OHIO NATIONAL WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AREA, KENTUCKY AND INDIANA § 331.25 Violation of regulations. Anyone violating the provisions...

  8. 36 CFR 331.25 - Violation of regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE PROTECTION, USE AND MANAGEMENT OF THE FALLS OF THE OHIO NATIONAL WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AREA, KENTUCKY AND INDIANA § 331.25 Violation of regulations. Anyone violating the provisions...

  9. 36 CFR 331.25 - Violation of regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE PROTECTION, USE AND MANAGEMENT OF THE FALLS OF THE OHIO NATIONAL WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AREA, KENTUCKY AND INDIANA § 331.25 Violation of regulations. Anyone violating the provisions...

  10. 36 CFR 331.25 - Violation of regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE PROTECTION, USE AND MANAGEMENT OF THE FALLS OF THE OHIO NATIONAL WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AREA, KENTUCKY AND INDIANA § 331.25 Violation of regulations. Anyone violating the provisions...

  11. 36 CFR 331.25 - Violation of regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE PROTECTION, USE AND MANAGEMENT OF THE FALLS OF THE OHIO NATIONAL WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AREA, KENTUCKY AND INDIANA § 331.25 Violation of regulations. Anyone violating the provisions...

  12. 9 CFR 88.6 - Violations and penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION OF EQUINES FOR SLAUGHTER § 88.6 Violations and penalties. (a) The Secretary is authorized to... equine transported in violation of the regulations of this part will be considered a separate...

  13. 9 CFR 88.6 - Violations and penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION OF EQUINES FOR SLAUGHTER § 88.6 Violations and penalties. (a) The Secretary is authorized to... equine transported in violation of the regulations of this part will be considered a separate...

  14. 49 CFR 1503.201 - Reports of violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROCEDURAL RULES INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Investigative Procedures § 1503.201 Reports of violations. (a) Any person who knows of a violation of a TSA... legal enforcement action....

  15. 49 CFR 1503.201 - Reports of violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROCEDURAL RULES INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Investigative Procedures § 1503.201 Reports of violations. (a) Any person who knows of a violation of a TSA... legal enforcement action....

  16. 10 CFR 72.220 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 72.220 Section 72.220 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS C WASTE General License for Storage of Spent Fuel at Power Reactor Sites §...

  17. Weak matrix elements for CP violation.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.; Gupta, R.; Christ, N.; Fleming, G. T.; Kilcup, G.; Liu, G.; Mawhinney, R.; Sharpe, S.; Wu, L.; Bhattacharya, T.

    2001-01-01

    We present preliminary results of matrix elements of four fermion operators relevant to the determination of e and E ' / E using staggered fermions. To calculate the matrix elements relevant to CP violation in Kaon decays it is important to use a lattice formulation which preserves (some) chiral symmetry.

  18. 14 CFR § 1214.610 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. § 1214.610 Section § 1214.610 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT Mementos Aboard Space Shuttle... Aeronautics and Space Administration....

  19. Scaling violation in hadron-nucleus interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garsevanishvili, L. P.; Ladaria, N. K.; Tsomaya, P. V.; Sherer, N. I.; Shabelski, Y. M.; Verbetski, Y. G.; Kotlyarevski, D. M.; Tatalashvili, N. G.; Stemanetyan, G. Z.

    1985-01-01

    The scaling violation within the pionization region in the energy range of 0.2 to 2.0 TeV is shown on the basis of the analysis of angular characteristics in the interactions of the cosmic radiation hadrons with the nuclei of various substances (CH2, Al, Cu, Pb).

  20. 7 CFR 631.14 - Contract violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Contract violations. 631.14 Section 631.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING GREAT PLAINS CONSERVATION PROGRAM Contracts § 631.14 Contract...

  1. 7 CFR 631.14 - Contract violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contract violations. 631.14 Section 631.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING GREAT PLAINS CONSERVATION PROGRAM Contracts § 631.14 Contract...

  2. 7 CFR 631.14 - Contract violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Contract violations. 631.14 Section 631.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING GREAT PLAINS CONSERVATION PROGRAM Contracts § 631.14 Contract...

  3. 7 CFR 631.14 - Contract violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Contract violations. 631.14 Section 631.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING GREAT PLAINS CONSERVATION PROGRAM Contracts § 631.14 Contract...

  4. Isospin violation and tensor-glueball decay

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, A.; Bagchi, B.

    1983-02-01

    We consider the possibility of an isospin-violating decay theta(1640)..-->..E(1440)..pi../sup 0/. We estimate its branching ratio and find GAMMA(theta..-->..E..pi../sup 0/)roughly-equal0.1 keV corresponding to B(theta..-->..etaeta) = 0.5

  5. CP Violation, Neutral Currents, and Weak Equivalence

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fitch, V. L.

    1972-03-23

    Within the past few months two excellent summaries of the state of our knowledge of the weak interactions have been presented. Correspondingly, we will not attempt a comprehensive review but instead concentrate this discussion on the status of CP violation, the question of the neutral currents, and the weak equivalence principle.

  6. 32 CFR 552.172 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Violations. 552.172 Section 552.172 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training...

  7. 32 CFR 552.172 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Violations. 552.172 Section 552.172 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training...

  8. 32 CFR 552.172 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Violations. 552.172 Section 552.172 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training...

  9. 32 CFR 552.172 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Violations. 552.172 Section 552.172 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training...

  10. 32 CFR 552.172 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Violations. 552.172 Section 552.172 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training...

  11. Lepton Flavour Violation Beyond the Present Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calibbi, Lorenzo

    2014-12-01

    The status of the theoretical predictions for processes with flavor violation in the charged lepton sector is discussed in the light of the recent determination of the reactor angle θ13, as well as the improved limit set by MEG on BR(μ → eγ).

  12. 15 CFR 280.201 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 280.201 Section 280.201 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ACCREDITATION AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAMS FASTENER...

  13. 15 CFR 280.201 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 280.201 Section 280.201 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ACCREDITATION AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAMS FASTENER...

  14. 15 CFR 280.201 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 280.201 Section 280.201 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ACCREDITATION AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAMS FASTENER...

  15. 15 CFR 280.201 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 280.201 Section 280.201 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ACCREDITATION AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAMS FASTENER...

  16. 15 CFR 280.201 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 280.201 Section 280.201 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ACCREDITATION AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAMS FASTENER...

  17. Parity violation in deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Souder, P.

    1994-04-01

    AA beam of polarized electrons at CEBAF with an energy of 8 GeV or more will be useful for performing precision measurements of parity violation in deep inelastic scattering. Possible applications include precision tests of the Standard Model, model-independent measurements of parton distribution functions, and studies of quark correlations.

  18. 7 CFR 247.20 - Program violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.20 Program violations. (a) What are...) Selling commodities obtained in the program, or exchanging them for non-food items; (4) Physical abuse, or threat of physical abuse, of program staff; or (5) Committing dual participation. (b) What are...

  19. 7 CFR 247.20 - Program violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.20 Program violations. (a) What are...) Selling commodities obtained in the program, or exchanging them for non-food items; (4) Physical abuse, or threat of physical abuse, of program staff; or (5) Committing dual participation. (b) What are...

  20. 7 CFR 247.20 - Program violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.20 Program violations. (a) What are...) Selling commodities obtained in the program, or exchanging them for non-food items; (4) Physical abuse, or threat of physical abuse, of program staff; or (5) Committing dual participation. (b) What are...

  1. 7 CFR 247.20 - Program violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.20 Program violations. (a) What are...) Selling commodities obtained in the program, or exchanging them for non-food items; (4) Physical abuse, or threat of physical abuse, of program staff; or (5) Committing dual participation. (b) What are...

  2. 7 CFR 247.20 - Program violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.20 Program violations. (a) What are...) Selling commodities obtained in the program, or exchanging them for non-food items; (4) Physical abuse, or threat of physical abuse, of program staff; or (5) Committing dual participation. (b) What are...

  3. A Test of the Abstinence Violation Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruderman, Audrey J.

    According to the abstinence violation effect, highly controlled drinkers tend to overindulge following an initial slip. To investigate this relapse model, 47 male college students, ranging in age from 21 to 46, were assigned either to an unrestrained or a restrained drinker group according to their scores on the Restrained Drinking Scale. Subjects…

  4. West Virginia U. Violated Procedures, Panel Says

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fain, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Administrators at West Virginia University violated procedures and displayed poor judgment in their "seriously flawed" response to an inquiry about a high-profile academic transcript, according to a report issued last week by an independent panel. The harshly worded report found that when the "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette" raised questions last October…

  5. New signatures of flavor violating Higgs couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschmann, Malte; Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2016-06-01

    We explore several novel LHC signatures arising from quark or lepton flavor violating couplings in the Higgs sector, and we constrain such couplings using LHC data. Since the largest signals are possible in channels involving top quarks or tau leptons, we consider in particular the following flavor violating processes: (1) pp → thh (top plus di-Higgs final state) arising from a dimension six coupling of up-type quarks to three insertions of the Higgs field. We develop a search strategy for this final state and demonstrate that detection is possible at the high luminosity LHC if flavor violating top-up-Higgs couplings are not too far below the current limit. (2) pp → tH 0, where H 0 is the heavy neutral CP-even Higgs boson in a two Higgs doublet model (2HDM). We consider the decay channels H 0 → tu, WW, ZZ, hh and use existing LHC data to constrain the first three of them. For the fourth, we adapt our search for the thh final state, and we demonstrate that in large regions of the parameter space, it is superior to other searches, including searches for flavor violating top quark decays ( t → hq). (3) H 0 → τ μ, again in the context of a 2HDM. This channel is particularly well motivated by the recent CMS excess in h → τ μ, and we use the data from this search to constrain the properties of H 0.

  6. 10 CFR 490.809 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 490.809 Section 490.809 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Compliance § 490.809... petroleum motor fuel reduction or reporting requirements of this subpart, DOE will revoke the waiver....

  7. 10 CFR 490.809 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 490.809 Section 490.809 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Compliance § 490.809... petroleum motor fuel reduction or reporting requirements of this subpart, DOE will revoke the waiver....

  8. 10 CFR 490.809 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 490.809 Section 490.809 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Compliance § 490.809... petroleum motor fuel reduction or reporting requirements of this subpart, DOE will revoke the waiver....

  9. 10 CFR 490.809 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 490.809 Section 490.809 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Compliance § 490.809... petroleum motor fuel reduction or reporting requirements of this subpart, DOE will revoke the waiver....

  10. CP violation in heavy MSSM Higgs scenarios

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carena, M.; Ellis, J.; Lee, J. S.; Pilaftsis, A.; Wagner, C. E. M.

    2016-02-18

    We introduce and explore new heavy Higgs scenarios in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with explicit CP violation, which have important phenomenological implications that may be testable at the LHC. For soft supersymmetry-breaking scales MS above a few TeV and a charged Higgs boson mass MH+ above a few hundred GeV, new physics effects including those from explicit CP violation decouple from the light Higgs boson sector. However, such effects can significantly alter the phenomenology of the heavy Higgs bosons while still being consistent with constraints from low-energy observables, for instance electric dipole moments. To consider scenarios with amore » charged Higgs boson much heavier than the Standard Model (SM) particles but much lighter than the supersymmetric particles, we revisit previous calculations of the MSSM Higgs sector. We compute the Higgs boson masses in the presence of CP violating phases, implementing improved matching and renormalization-group (RG) effects, as well as two-loop RG effects from the effective two-Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM) scale MH± to the scale MS. Here, we illustrate the possibility of non-decoupling CP-violating effects in the heavy Higgs sector using new benchmark scenarios named.« less

  11. Violation of Bell's inequalities in quantum optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, M. D.; Walls, D. F.

    1984-01-01

    An optical field produced by intracavity four-wave mixing is shown to exhibit the following nonclassical features: photon antibunching, squeezing, and violation of Cauchy-Schwarz and Bell's inequalities. These intrinsic quantum mechanical effects are shown to be associated with the nonexistence of a positive normalizable Glauber-Sudarshan P function.

  12. 32 CFR 770.20 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Violations. 770.20 Section 770.20 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES RULES LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor,...

  13. 32 CFR 770.20 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Violations. 770.20 Section 770.20 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES RULES LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor,...

  14. 32 CFR 770.46 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.46 Violations. (a) Any person entering or remaining on Naval Submarine Base New London, without the consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London or his...

  15. 32 CFR 770.46 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.46 Violations. (a) Any person entering or remaining on Naval Submarine Base New London, without the consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London or his...

  16. 32 CFR 770.46 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.46 Violations. (a) Any person entering or remaining on Naval Submarine Base New London, without the consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London or his...

  17. 32 CFR 770.20 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Violations. 770.20 Section 770.20 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES RULES LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor,...

  18. 32 CFR 770.46 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.46 Violations. (a) Any person entering or remaining on Naval Submarine Base New London, without the consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London or his...

  19. 32 CFR 770.46 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.46 Violations. (a) Any person entering or remaining on Naval Submarine Base New London, without the consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London or his...

  20. 32 CFR 770.20 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Violations. 770.20 Section 770.20 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES RULES LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor,...

  1. 32 CFR 770.20 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Violations. 770.20 Section 770.20 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES RULES LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor,...

  2. Lorentz violating Julia-Toulouse mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaete, Patricio; Wotzasek, Clovis

    2007-03-01

    We study a Lorentz invariance violating extension for the pure photonic sector of the standard model. A phenomenological proposal is made for the condensation of topological defects in the presence of a constant rank-m tensor in the context of the Julia-Toulouse mechanism. Possible physical consequences leading to direct measurable effects over the confining properties of the elementary particles are explored.

  3. 7 CFR 1450.4 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 1450.4 Section 1450.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS BIOMASS CROP ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (BCAP) Common...

  4. 7 CFR 1450.4 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 1450.4 Section 1450.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS BIOMASS CROP ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (BCAP) Common...

  5. 7 CFR 1450.4 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 1450.4 Section 1450.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS BIOMASS CROP ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (BCAP) Common...

  6. 7 CFR 1450.4 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 1450.4 Section 1450.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS BIOMASS CROP ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (BCAP) Common...

  7. 48 CFR 2903.104-7 - Violations or possible violations of standards of conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... or designee must refer all information describing an actual or possible violation to the Associate Solicitor for Legislation and Legal Counsel, the Senior Procurement Executive, and Inspector General staff....

  8. D0 Evidence for CP Violation and Implication for CPT Violation in B-Meson Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Kooten, R.Van; /Indiana U.

    2010-08-01

    A D0 analysis measuring the charge asymmetry A{sub sl}{sup b} of like-sign dimuon events due to semileptonic b-hadron decays at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider is described. It differs by 3.2 standard deviations from the Standard Model prediction to provide first evidence of CPT-invariant anomalous CP violation in the mixing of neutral B mesons, and is compared to the CP-violating phase obtained from a D0 analysis of the time-dependent decay angles in B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}. If CPT violation is allowed, the dimuon asymmetry also yields the first sensitivity to CPT violation in the B{sub s}{sup 0} system.

  9. Entanglement Measure and Quantum Violation of Bell-Type Inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Dong; He, Ying-Qiu; Yan, Feng-Li; Gao, Ting

    2016-05-01

    By calculating entanglement measures and quantum violation of Bell-type inequality, we reveal the relationship between entanglement measure and the amount of quantum violation for a family of four-qubit entangled states. It has been demonstrated that the Bell-type inequality is completely violated by these four-qubit entangled states. The plot of entanglement measure as a function of the expectation value of Bell operator shows that entanglement measure first decreases and then increases smoothly with increasing quantum violation.

  10. Magnetotail dynamics: MHD simulations of driven and spontaneous dynamic changes

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J.; Schindler, K.; Hesse, M.

    1994-05-01

    The dynamic evolution of the magnetotail during growth phase and expansion phase of a substorm is studied through threedimensional time-dependent MHD simulations. To model growth phase effects, an external electric field with an equatorward inflow is applied at the boundaries over a finite time period. This leads to the formation of a thin current sheet with greatly enhanced current density in the near tail, embedded in the wider plasma/current sheet, which becomes diminished in strength. A faster, spontaneous current sheet formation occurs when entropy conservation is released in an isobaric model, while the ideal MHD constraint persists. This may be a suitable model for the late, explosive part of the growth phase. The transition to the substorm expansive phase is modeled by an increase in anomalous resistivity, using either uniform resistivity or a current density dependent resistivity which is turned on when the current density exceeds a certain threshold. In both cases the violation of ideal MHD leads to resistive instability and the formation of a near-Earth neutral line, fast flow, and plasmoid ejection, together with the dipolarization and current reduction in the region further earthward. The spontaneous increase in total region 1 type field-aligned currents associated with the disruptions of the thin current sheets is less significant than that found in earlier simulations of the disruption of a wider current sheet, whereas the driven increase in the region 1 type current is substantial. The results demonstrate that the same dynamic process which appears spontaneous in the behavior of some quantities might be interpreted as entirely driven from the observation of others.

  11. 40 CFR 80.23 - Liability for violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Liability for violations. 80.23 Section 80.23 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Controls and Prohibitions § 80.23 Liability for violations. Liability for violations of paragraphs (a) and...

  12. 40 CFR 80.23 - Liability for violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Liability for violations. 80.23 Section 80.23 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Controls and Prohibitions § 80.23 Liability for violations. Liability for violations of paragraphs (a) and...

  13. 6 CFR 7.12 - Violations of classified information requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations of classified information... CLASSIFIED NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Administration § 7.12 Violations of classified information... suspected loss or compromise of classified information, shall promptly report such violations or...

  14. Manifestations of CP Violation in the MSSM Higgs Sector

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae Sik

    2008-11-23

    We demonstrate how CP violation manifests itself in the Higgs sector of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM). Starting with a brief introduction to CP violation in the MSSM and its effects on the Higgs sector, we discuss some phenomenological aspects of the Higgs sector CP violation based on the two scenarios called CPX and Trimixing.

  15. 10 CFR 824.6 - Preliminary notice of violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preliminary notice of violation. 824.6 Section 824.6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES FOR CLASSIFIED INFORMATION SECURITY VIOLATIONS § 824.6 Preliminary notice of violation. (a) In order to begin a proceeding...

  16. 10 CFR 824.7 - Final notice of violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... whether the person violated or is continuing to violate a classified information security requirement. (b... classified information security requirement, the Director may issue to the person a final notice of violation... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES FOR CLASSIFIED...

  17. 28 CFR 523.2 - Good time credit for violators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Good time credit for violators. 523.2..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Good Time § 523.2 Good time credit for violators. (a) An... good time, upon being returned to custody for violation of supervised release, based on the number...

  18. 28 CFR 523.2 - Good time credit for violators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Good time credit for violators. 523.2..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Good Time § 523.2 Good time credit for violators. (a) An... good time, upon being returned to custody for violation of supervised release, based on the number...

  19. 28 CFR 523.2 - Good time credit for violators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Good time credit for violators. 523.2..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Good Time § 523.2 Good time credit for violators. (a) An... good time, upon being returned to custody for violation of supervised release, based on the number...

  20. 28 CFR 523.2 - Good time credit for violators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Good time credit for violators. 523.2..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Good Time § 523.2 Good time credit for violators. (a) An... good time, upon being returned to custody for violation of supervised release, based on the number...

  1. 28 CFR 523.2 - Good time credit for violators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Good time credit for violators. 523.2..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Good Time § 523.2 Good time credit for violators. (a) An... good time, upon being returned to custody for violation of supervised release, based on the number...

  2. 49 CFR 384.218 - Second serious traffic violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Second serious traffic violation. 384.218 Section... § 384.218 Second serious traffic violation. The State must disqualify from operating a CMV for a period... of this subchapter, in any State(s) or jurisdiction(s), of two serious traffic violations...

  3. 49 CFR 384.219 - Third serious traffic violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Third serious traffic violation. 384.219 Section... § 384.219 Third serious traffic violation. The State must disqualify from operating a CMV for a period....5 of this subchapter, in any State(s) or jurisdiction(s), of three serious traffic violations...

  4. 49 CFR 384.219 - Third serious traffic violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Third serious traffic violation. 384.219 Section... § 384.219 Third serious traffic violation. The State must disqualify from operating a CMV for a period....5 of this subchapter, in any State(s) or jurisdiction(s), of three serious traffic violations...

  5. 49 CFR 384.209 - Notification of traffic violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notification of traffic violations. 384.209... § 384.209 Notification of traffic violations. (a) Required notification with respect to CDL holders... relating to motor vehicle traffic control (other than a parking violation), in any type of vehicle,...

  6. 49 CFR 384.219 - Third serious traffic violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Third serious traffic violation. 384.219 Section... § 384.219 Third serious traffic violation. The State must disqualify from operating a CMV for a period....5 of this subchapter, in any State(s) or jurisdiction(s), of three serious traffic violations...

  7. 49 CFR 384.218 - Second serious traffic violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Second serious traffic violation. 384.218 Section... § 384.218 Second serious traffic violation. The State must disqualify from operating a CMV for a period... of this subchapter, in any State(s) or jurisdiction(s), of two serious traffic violations...

  8. 49 CFR 384.218 - Second serious traffic violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Second serious traffic violation. 384.218 Section... § 384.218 Second serious traffic violation. The State must disqualify from operating a CMV for a period... of this subchapter, in any State(s) or jurisdiction(s), of two serious traffic violations...

  9. 49 CFR 384.218 - Second serious traffic violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Second serious traffic violation. 384.218 Section... § 384.218 Second serious traffic violation. The State must disqualify from operating a CMV for a period... of this subchapter, in any State(s) or jurisdiction(s), of two serious traffic violations...

  10. 49 CFR 384.219 - Third serious traffic violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Third serious traffic violation. 384.219 Section... § 384.219 Third serious traffic violation. The State must disqualify from operating a CMV for a period....5 of this subchapter, in any State(s) or jurisdiction(s), of three serious traffic violations...

  11. 48 CFR 903.204 - Treatment of violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Treatment of violations. 903.204 Section 903.204 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL IMPROPER... Treatment of violations. Apparent violations will be processed in accordance with the debarment...

  12. 49 CFR 384.219 - Third serious traffic violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Third serious traffic violation. 384.219 Section... § 384.219 Third serious traffic violation. The State must disqualify from operating a CMV for a period....5 of this subchapter, in any State(s) or jurisdiction(s), of three serious traffic violations...

  13. 49 CFR 384.218 - Second serious traffic violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Second serious traffic violation. 384.218 Section... § 384.218 Second serious traffic violation. The State must disqualify from operating a CMV for a period... of this subchapter, in any State(s) or jurisdiction(s), of two serious traffic violations...

  14. 22 CFR 513.620 - Effect of violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Effect of violation. 513.620 Section 513.620 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS GOVERNMENT DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) AND... Effect of violation. (a) In the event of a violation of this subpart as provided in § 513.615, and...

  15. 46 CFR 42.07-50 - Penalties for violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Penalties for violations. 42.07-50 Section 42.07-50 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Control, Enforcement, and Rights of Appeal § 42.07-50 Penalties for violations. (a) The penalties for violation of various provisions of...

  16. 32 CFR 634.32 - Traffic violation reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Traffic violation reports. 634.32 Section 634.32... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Traffic Supervision § 634.32 Traffic violation reports. (a) Most traffic violations occurring on DOD installations (within the UNITED STATES or...

  17. 11 CFR 110.9 - Violation of limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... PROHIBITIONS § 110.9 Violation of limitations. No candidate or political committee shall knowingly accept any contribution or make any expenditure in violation of the provisions of 11 CFR part 110. No officer or employee... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violation of limitations. 110.9 Section...

  18. 11 CFR 110.9 - Violation of limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... PROHIBITIONS § 110.9 Violation of limitations. No candidate or political committee shall knowingly accept any contribution or make any expenditure in violation of the provisions of 11 CFR part 110. No officer or employee... 11 Federal Elections 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violation of limitations. 110.9 Section...

  19. 11 CFR 110.9 - Violation of limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... PROHIBITIONS § 110.9 Violation of limitations. No candidate or political committee shall knowingly accept any contribution or make any expenditure in violation of the provisions of 11 CFR part 110. No officer or employee... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violation of limitations. 110.9 Section...

  20. 11 CFR 110.9 - Violation of limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... PROHIBITIONS § 110.9 Violation of limitations. No candidate or political committee shall knowingly accept any contribution or make any expenditure in violation of the provisions of 11 CFR part 110. No officer or employee... 11 Federal Elections 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violation of limitations. 110.9 Section...

  1. 11 CFR 110.9 - Violation of limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... PROHIBITIONS § 110.9 Violation of limitations. No candidate or political committee shall knowingly accept any contribution or make any expenditure in violation of the provisions of 11 CFR part 110. No officer or employee... 11 Federal Elections 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Violation of limitations. 110.9 Section...

  2. 24 CFR 30.30 - Urban Homestead violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Urban Homestead violations. 30.30 Section 30.30 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development CIVIL MONEY PENALTIES: CERTAIN PROHIBITED CONDUCT Violations § 30.30 Urban Homestead violations. (a) General. The Assistant Secretary...

  3. 12 CFR 238.6 - Penalties for violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... in accordance with subpart C of the Board's Rules of Practice for Hearings (12 CFR part 263, subpart... violations. (a) Criminal and civil penalties. (1) Section 10 of the HOLA provides criminal penalties for willful violation, and civil penalties for violation, by any company or individual, of HOLA or...

  4. 12 CFR 238.6 - Penalties for violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... in accordance with subpart C of the Board's Rules of Practice for Hearings (12 CFR part 263, subpart... violations. (a) Criminal and civil penalties. (1) Section 10 of the HOLA provides criminal penalties for willful violation, and civil penalties for violation, by any company or individual, of HOLA or...

  5. 12 CFR 238.6 - Penalties for violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... in accordance with subpart C of the Board's Rules of Practice for Hearings (12 CFR part 263, subpart... violations. (a) Criminal and civil penalties. (1) Section 10 of the HOLA provides criminal penalties for willful violation, and civil penalties for violation, by any company or individual, of HOLA or...

  6. 19 CFR 162.79 - Determination as to violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Determination as to violation. 162.79 Section 162... § 162.79 Determination as to violation. (a) No violation. If, after considering any presentations made... apply for relief under section 618, Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1618), in accordance...

  7. 19 CFR 162.79 - Determination as to violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination as to violation. 162.79 Section 162... § 162.79 Determination as to violation. (a) No violation. If, after considering any presentations made... apply for relief under section 618, Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1618), in accordance...

  8. 19 CFR 162.79 - Determination as to violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Determination as to violation. 162.79 Section 162... § 162.79 Determination as to violation. (a) No violation. If, after considering any presentations made... apply for relief under section 618, Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1618), in accordance...

  9. 19 CFR 162.79 - Determination as to violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Determination as to violation. 162.79 Section 162... § 162.79 Determination as to violation. (a) No violation. If, after considering any presentations made... apply for relief under section 618, Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1618), in accordance...

  10. 19 CFR 162.79 - Determination as to violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Determination as to violation. 162.79 Section 162... § 162.79 Determination as to violation. (a) No violation. If, after considering any presentations made... apply for relief under section 618, Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1618), in accordance...

  11. 48 CFR 2903.204 - Treatment of violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Treatment of violations. 2903.204 Section 2903.204 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF LABOR GENERAL IMPROPER....204 Treatment of violations. Any suspected violations of FAR subpart 3.2 and the clause at FAR...

  12. 48 CFR 2903.204 - Treatment of violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Treatment of violations. 2903.204 Section 2903.204 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF LABOR GENERAL IMPROPER....204 Treatment of violations. Any suspected violations of FAR subpart 3.2 and the clause at FAR...

  13. 48 CFR 1303.204 - Treatment of violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Treatment of violations. 1303.204 Section 1303.204 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL... Personnel 1303.204 Treatment of violations. (a) The designee authorized to determine violations of...

  14. 48 CFR 2903.204 - Treatment of violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Treatment of violations. 2903.204 Section 2903.204 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF LABOR GENERAL IMPROPER....204 Treatment of violations. Any suspected violations of FAR subpart 3.2 and the clause at FAR...

  15. 48 CFR 903.204 - Treatment of violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Treatment of violations. 903.204 Section 903.204 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL IMPROPER... Treatment of violations. Apparent violations will be processed in accordance with the debarment...

  16. 48 CFR 2903.204 - Treatment of violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Treatment of violations. 2903.204 Section 2903.204 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF LABOR GENERAL IMPROPER....204 Treatment of violations. Any suspected violations of FAR subpart 3.2 and the clause at FAR...

  17. 48 CFR 903.204 - Treatment of violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Treatment of violations. 903.204 Section 903.204 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL IMPROPER... Treatment of violations. Apparent violations will be processed in accordance with the debarment...

  18. 48 CFR 1303.204 - Treatment of violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Treatment of violations. 1303.204 Section 1303.204 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL... Personnel 1303.204 Treatment of violations. (a) The designee authorized to determine violations of...

  19. 10 CFR 824.7 - Final notice of violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... whether the person violated or is continuing to violate a classified information security requirement. (b... classified information security requirement, the Director may issue to the person a final notice of violation... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES FOR CLASSIFIED...

  20. 10 CFR 824.6 - Preliminary notice of violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Preliminary notice of violation. 824.6 Section 824.6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES FOR CLASSIFIED INFORMATION SECURITY VIOLATIONS § 824.6 Preliminary notice of violation. (a) In order to begin a proceeding...