Sample records for st lawrence estuary

  1. Acidification of Lower St. Lawrence Estuary Bottom Waters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alfonso Mucci; Michel Starr; Denis Gilbert; Bjorn Sundby

    2011-01-01

    Accumulation of metabolic CO2 can acidify marine waters above and beyond the ongoing acidification of the ocean by anthropogenic CO2. The impact of respiration on carbonate chemistry and pH is most acute in hypoxic and anoxic basins, where metabolic CO2 accumulates to high concentrations. The bottom waters of the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE), where persistently severe hypoxia has developed

  2. Turbulent nitrate fluxes in the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr, Frédéric; Bourgault, Daniel; Galbraith, Peter S.; Gosselin, Michel

    2015-03-01

    Turbulent vertical nitrate fluxes were calculated using new turbulent microstructure observations in the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE), Canada. Two stations were compared: the head of the Laurentian Channel (HLC), where intense mixing occurs on the shallow sill that marks the upstream limit of the LSLE, and another station located about 100 km downstream (St. 23), more representative of the LSLE mean mixing conditions. Mean turbulent diffusivities and nitrate fluxes at the base of the surface layer for both stations were, respectively (with 95% confidence intervals): K¯HLC = 8.6>(3.2,19>) × 10-3 m2 s-1,K¯23 = 4.4>(2.3,7.6>) × 10-5 m2 s-1,F¯HLC = 95>(18,300>) mmol m-2 d-1, and F¯23 = 0.21>(0.12,0.33>) mmol m-2 d-1. Observations suggest that the interplay between large isopleth heaving near the sill and strong turbulence is the key mechanism to sustain such high turbulent nitrate fluxes at the HLC (two to three orders of magnitude higher than those at Station 23). Calculations also suggest that nitrate fluxes at the HLC alone can sustain primary production rates of 3.4>(0.6,11>) g C m-2 mo-1 over the whole LSLE, approximately enough to account for a large part of the phytoplankton bloom and for most of the postbloom production. Surfacing nitrates are also believed to be consumed within the LSLE, not leaving much to be exported to the rest of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. This article was corrected on 13 APR 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  3. Cancer in Wildlife, a Case Study: Beluga from the St. Lawrence Estuary, Québec, Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Martineau; Karin Lemberger; André Dallaire; Philippe Labelle; Thomas P. Lipscomb; Pascal Michel; Igor Mikaelian

    2002-01-01

    A population of approximately 650 beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) inhabits a short segment of the St. Lawrence estuary (SLE). Over 17 years (1983-1999), we have examined 129 (or 49%) of 263 SLE beluga carcasses reported stranded. The major primary causes of death were respiratory and gastrointestinal infections with metazoan parasites (22%), cancer (18%), and bacterial, viral, and protozoan infections (17%). We

  4. Ploughing boulders along shorelines, with particular reference to the St. Lawrence estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionne, Jean-Claude

    1988-12-01

    Ploughing boulders are defined as large stones moved by drift ice with a ploughing action into the substrate, leaving a linear depression on the back and building a frontal push ridge. They are commonly found on unconsolidated tidal flats and on rock shore platforms along cold-region shorelines in the marine, lacustrine and fluvial environments. It is an erosional process of great significance, particularly for consolidated substrates. A total of 176 ploughing boulders were measured in eighteen localities along the St. Lawrence estuary. The largest boulder weighed 176 tons and was moved 3 m, while a 50 t boulder was moved 40 m. On shore platforms cut in shales, one boulder 49 t, has scoured a depression 19 m long and up to 40 cm deep, and built a frontal ridge 40 cm high. Along the St. Lawrence estuary about 95 of ploughing boulders were moved seaward by ice floes entrained by ebb currents.

  5. Trophic interactions in the St. Lawrence Estuary (Canada): Must the blue whale compete for krill?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenkoff, C.; Comtois, S.; Chabot, D.

    2013-09-01

    Inverse methodology was used to construct a mass-balance model of the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE) for the 2008-2010 time period. Our first objective was to make an overall description of community structure, trophic interactions, and the effects of fishing and predation on the vertebrate and invertebrate communities of the ecosystem. A second objective was to identify other important predators of krill, and to assess if these compete with blue whales, listed as endangered under the Canadian Species at Risk Act in 2005 (northwest Atlantic population). The Estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence are summer feeding grounds for blue whales and other marine mammals. Blue whales eat only euphausiids (krill) and require dense concentrations of prey to meet their energy requirements, which makes them particularly vulnerable to changes in prey availability. In the LSLE, many species from secondary producers (hyperiid amphipods, other macrozooplankton) to top predators (fish, birds, and marine mammals) consumed euphausiids. Consequently, krill predators were found at all consumer trophic levels. However, our results showed that only about 35% of the estimated euphausiid production was consumed by all predator species combined. Euphausiid did not seem to be a restricted resource in the LSLE ecosystem, at least during the study period. The blue whale did not appear to have to compete for krill in the LSLE.

  6. Molecular and spectroscopic analysis of non-hydrolyzable sedimentary organic matter from the St. Lawrence Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, M.; Simpson, A. J.; Gelinas, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Sediments are the ultimate long-term sink for organic carbon (OC) on Earth, thus playing an important role in the global cycles of O2 and CO2. Estuaries and river deltas are major conduits for terrestrial organic matter (OM) into marine systems, where it is mixed with locally produced OM and is eventually deposited and buried in the sediment bed. About 45% of global OC burial occurs along these river deltas and estuaries (Hedges and Keil, 1995), therefore it is of interest to follow OM deposition and preservation in these terrestrial to marine transition zones. We chemically fractionated bulk OM from a series of sediments from the St. Lawrence Estuary and Gulf into distinct reactivity classes. We define three such OM fractions based on pioneering work by Hedges and Keil (1995) who classified OM based on chemical reactivities: labile (degradable at similar rate under oxic and anoxic conditions), non-hydrolyzable (degraded primarily under oxic conditions), and refractory (preserved on long time scales independently of redox conditions). Here we present data on the elemental (C and N), isotopic (?13C and ?15N) and spectroscopic (FTIR, HR-MAS 1H/13C NMR) characterization of the different fractions, focusing primarily on the non-hydrolyzable fraction because of its importance in the long-term burial of OC below the seafloor. We used mild oxidation methods (cupric oxide and ruthenium tetroxide oxidation) followed by chromatographic analysis of the oxidation products. Combining results from the bulk and molecular analytical techniques provides insights into the composition and cycling of non-hydrolyzable OM in transitional system, from which OM preservation can be better understood. Hedges, J. I., Keil, Richard G. (1995). "Sedimentary organic matter preservation: an assessment and speculative synthesis." Marine Chemistry 49(2-3): 81-115.

  7. Anammox, denitrification and fixed-nitrogen removal in sediments from the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, S. A.; Canfield, D. E.; Mucci, A.; Sundby, B.; Maranger, R.

    2012-11-01

    Incubations of intact sediment cores and sediment slurries reveal that anammox is an important sink for fixed nitrogen in sediments from the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE), where it occurs at a rate of 5.5 ± 1.7 µmol N m-2 h-1. Canonical denitrification occurs at a rate of 11.3 ± 1.1 µmol N m-2 h-1, and anammox is thus responsible for up to 33% of the total N2 production. Both anammox and denitrification are mostly (> 95%) fueled by nitrate and nitrite produced in situ through benthic nitrification. Nitrification accounts for > 15% of the benthic oxygen demand and may, therefore, contribute significantly to the development and maintenance of hypoxic conditions in the LSLE. The rate of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium is three orders of magnitude lower than denitrification and anammox, and it is insignificant to N-cycling. NH4+ oxidation by sedimentary Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV) in slurry incubations with N isotope labels did not occur at measurable rates; moreover, we found no evidence for NH4+ oxidation by added Mn(III)-pyrophosphate.

  8. Effects of hypoxia on benthic macrofauna and bioturbation in the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belley, Rénald; Archambault, Philippe; Sundby, Bjorn; Gilbert, Franck; Gagnon, Jean-Marc

    2010-07-01

    The bottom water in the >300 m deep Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE) is persistently hypoxic in contrast to the normoxic bottom waters in the Gulf of St. Lawrence (GSL). We photographed the seabed at 11 stations in the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence (EGSL) during the summers 2006 and 2007 and analysed the images to identify bioturbation traces (lebensspuren) and benthic macrofauna. The objective was to identify the environmental variables that influence the density and diversity of benthic macrofauna and bioturbation traces, and the differences that exist among regions with high, medium and low oxygen levels in the bottom water. The bottom water oxygen concentration is the variable that best explains the densities of total-traces as well as surface-traces. However, the density of these traces was higher in hypoxic regions than in well-oxygenated regions. The higher density of traces in the hypoxic region of the LSLE is mainly due to the activities of the surface deposit feeder Ophiura sp., which occurs in large numbers in this region. Possible explanations explored are stress behaviour of the organisms in response to hypoxia and different benthic macrofauna community structures between the hypoxic regions of the LSLE and the normoxic regions of the GSL. In the former, surface deposit feeders and low-oxygen tolerant species dominate over suspension feeders and low-oxygen intolerant species.

  9. Cancer in wildlife, a case study: beluga from the St. Lawrence estuary, Québec, Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Martineau, Daniel; Lemberger, Karin; Dallaire, André; Labelle, Philippe; Lipscomb, Thomas P; Michel, Pascal; Mikaelian, Igor

    2002-01-01

    A population of approximately 650 beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) inhabits a short segment of the St. Lawrence estuary (SLE). Over 17 years (1983-1999), we have examined 129 (or 49%) of 263 SLE beluga carcasses reported stranded. The major primary causes of death were respiratory and gastrointestinal infections with metazoan parasites (22%), cancer (18%), and bacterial, viral, and protozoan infections (17%). We observed cancer in 27% of examined adult animals found dead, a percentage similar to that found in humans. The estimated annual rate (AR) of all cancer types (163/100,000 animals) is much higher than that reported for any other population of cetacean and is similar to that of humans and to that of hospitalized cats and cattle. The AR of cancer of the proximal intestine, a minimum figure of 63 per 100,000 animals, is much higher than that observed in domestic animals and humans, except in sheep in certain parts of the world, where environmental contaminants are believed to be involved in the etiology of this condition. SLE beluga and their environment are contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) produced by the local aluminum smelters. The human population living in proximity of the SLE beluga habitat is affected by rates of cancer higher than those found in people in the rest of Québec and Canada, and some of these cancers have been epidemiologically related to PAHs. Considered with the above observations, the exposure of SLE beluga to PAHs and their contamination by these compounds are consistent with the hypothesis that PAHs are involved in the etiology of cancer in these animals. PMID:11882480

  10. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in sediments and biota of the Saguenay Fjord and the St. Lawrence Estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Brochu, C.; Moore, S. [Environment et Faune, Laval, Quebec (Canada); Pelletier, E. [INRS-Oceanologie, Rimouski, Quebec (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    Sediment samples and marine organisms were collected in the Saguenay Fjord and at two selected sites of the St. Lawrence Estuary in 1991. Total PCDDs and total PCDFs ranged from 22 to 352 ng kg{sup {minus}1} and 29 to 188 ng kg{sup {minus}1}, respectively in Saguenay sediments, while total PCDFs reached, 287 ng kg{sup {minus}1} in Baie des Anglais, a small and deep bay of the St. Lawrence Estuary impacted by PCBs during the 1970s. All biological samples contained detectable amounts of chlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans, apart from the North Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). The highest concentrations (up to 59.7 ng kg{sup {minus}1} total PCDFs and 2.54 ng kg{sup {minus}1} 2,3,7,8T4CDD Equivalent (TCDD TEQ)) were observed in crab (Chionoecetes opilio) caught in Saguenay Fjord and in crab and whelk (Buccinwn undatwn) collected in Baie des Anglais. Nordic shrimp (Pandalus borealis) is less contaminated with a maximum total PCDDs and PCDFs concentration of 14.0 ng kg{sup {minus}1} and TCDD TEQ never exceeding 0.7 ng kg{sup {minus}1}. Greenland halibut (Reinhardtius hippoglossoides) caught in the Saguenay Fjord contained only 2,3,7,8 substituted congeners in their tissues leading to a low average TCDD TEQ of 1.66 ng kg{sup {minus}1}. Based upon this first series of results, benthic organisms and fish from the Saguenay Fjord and the north shore of the St. Lawrence Estuary are exposed to low levels of PCDDs and PCDFs, and carry tissue concentrations well below international guidelines for fisheries products.

  11. Sources and early diagenesis of lignin and bulk organic matter in the sediments of the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary and the Saguenay Fjord

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick Louchouarn; Marc Lucotte; René Canuel; Jean-Pierre Gagné; Louis-Filip Richard

    1997-01-01

    Elemental and molecular organic matter concentrations were analyzed in sediments from the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary and the Saguenay Fjord in order to evaluate the historic evolution of pulp and paper mills solid-waste inputs in the system in the last decades and the relative reactivities of lignin and bulk organic materials in coastal sediments. A qualitative estimation of vascular plant

  12. Tris (4-chlorophenyl) methane and tris (4-chlorophenyl) methanol in marine mammals from the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence.

    PubMed

    Lebeuf, M; Bernt, K E; Trottier, S; Noël, M; Hammill, M O; Measures, L

    2001-01-01

    Levels of tris (4-chlorophenyl) methanol (TCPM) and its presumed precursor tris (4-chlorophenyl) methane (TCPMe) are reported in marine mammals from the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada. These compounds were measured in blubber samples of seals and whales using ion trap mass spectrometry (MS/MS) detection. Detectable concentrations of both TCPM and TCPMe were observed in all of the samples analysed. Concentrations of these compounds varied with species ranging from 1.7 to 153 and from 1.3 to 50.6 ng/g lipid wt. for TCPM and TCPMe, respectively. TCPM was from 1.3 to 10 times more concentrated than TCPMe. The highest levels of both TCPM and TCPMe were observed in adult male beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence Estuary, while adult female beluga whales from the same area showed levels similar to those in the seals examined. Among the four seal species investigated, TCPM and TCPMe levels were the highest in grey (Halichoerus grypus) and hooded (Cystophora cristata) seals, and lowest in harp seals (Phoca groenlandica). Intermediate levels were found in harbour seals (Phoca vitulina); however, their concentrations might be underestimated considering the younger mean age of these animals. Ratios of both 4,4'-DDE/sigma DDT and TCPM/sigma TCP were very similar between animals from the same species. Strong correlations between sigma TCP and sigma DDT were also observed for each species of mammals, most likely indicating that both sigma TCP and sigma DDT are bioaccumulated in marine mammals. The relationships between sigma DDT and sigma TCP also demonstrate that sigma TCP are less bioaccumulated than sigma DDT by the marine mammal species examined. PMID:11202713

  13. Habitat use and movements of postfledging American black ducks (Anas rubripes) in the St. Lawrence estuary, Quebec

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clugston, D.A.; Longcore, J.R.; McAuley, D.G.; Dupuis, P.

    1994-01-01

    We used radiotelemetry to determine habitat use and movements of 38 female juvenile American black ducks (Anas rubripes) on the north shore of the St. Lawrence estuary, Quebec, from 28 August to 15 November 1991. Ducks separated into three groups based on habitat use: inland, estuarine, and those using a mixture of habitats. Ducks using mixed habitats used the greatest variety of habitat types, flew the greatest distances and most often between night roosts and day foraging areas, and were unlikely to be shot. The mean distance flown between night-use and day-use areas for all ducks increased nearly 50% after the hunting season began (overall mean = 6104 m, range 1500 - 26384 m). Mean home range size was 27.6 t 6.5 (SE) km2. Ducks exhibited stronger fidelity to wetlands used at night than to those used during the day. Ducks that were shot spent a high percentage of their time on the estuary (90.1 t 7.4 %) and exhibited high fidelity to a day-use area before the hunting season (73 t 7.3 %).

  14. Late-Wisconsinan submarine moraines along the north shore of the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence (Eastern Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajeunesse, Patrick; St-Onge, Guillaume

    2013-04-01

    A series of ice-contact submarine fans and morainal banks along the Québec North-Shore of the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence (Eastern Canada), between the Manicouagan River delta and the Mingan Islands, have been revealed with great detail by recent multibeam echosounder and high-resolution subbottom profiler surveys. These grounding-line landforms are observed between 65 and 190 m water depths and were constructed as the marine-based margin of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) stabilized or readvanced. Radiocarbon ages obtained from shells sampled in sediment cores collected in glaciomarine deposits 6 km south of a grounding line in the Sept-Iles area indicate a stabilisation that took place around 11 000 14C yr BP (12.5 ka cal BP with a ?R=120 ± 40 yr). In the Mingan Islands area, organic matter collected in distal deposits of an ice-contact fan is dated at 10 800 14C yr BP (11.6 ka cal BP). The position of the Sept-Iles and Mingan deposits, 20 km south of the ~9.7-9.5 14C kyr BP North-Shore Moraine, suggests that these ice marginal landforms were constructed during the Younger Dryas (YD) cold episode and that they might be the eastward submarine extent of the early YD St. Narcisse morainic system. Superimposed till sheets and morainal banks observed within grounding line deposits indicate that this stability phase was interrupted by local readvances that were marked in some cases by ice streaming. Segments of this morainic system are also visible along the shoreline in some sectors, where they have been generally washed out of fine fragments by waves. Another series of ice-contact deposits and landforms of similar nature observed farther offshore and at greater depths (100-190 m) were formed during a previous phase of stabilisation of the LIS margin. This older morainic system was probably deposited immediately after the opening of the Estuary and Gulf of the St. Lawrence.

  15. Community development following removal of urchins, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, from the rocky subtidal zone of the St. Lawrence Estuary, Eastern Canada.

    PubMed

    Himmelman, J H; Cardinal, A; Bourget, E

    1983-08-01

    The role of sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, in structuring the rocky subtidal community was examined at Anse aux Basques on the north shore of the St. Lawrence Estuary, Québec. In an experimental area, measuring 20x20 m and extending from 0 to 10 m in depth, we greatly reduced the intensity of urchin grazing by eliminating all urchins larger than 10 mm in test diameter. This area was observed for two years and compared to an adjacent control area. In the upper portion of the experimental area during the first month after urchin removal, mid-July to mid-August 1978, a dense diatom cover developed, and during the second month the diatoms were overgrown by Ulvaria obscura. After four months (November) an Alaria esculenta overstory was present from near low water level to 3 m deep. Community development was much slower at greater depths and it took a year for the Alaria zone to extend to 4-5 m deep, and two years to extend to 6 m deep. The low light penetration at this estuarine location was probably the main factor for the slow algal development at 6-10 m deep. At the end of the experiment Agarum cribrosum was second in importance after Alaria and was most common at 3 to 6 m in depth. Laminaria spp. was found in low numbers in the first year and did not show an increase during the second year. There was a dramatic increase in the number of species and abundance of algae in the experimental area. Also, there was a marked increase in many animal species, particularly Acmaea testudinalis, Mytilus edulis and Margarites helicinus, and a decrease in Metridium senile. By contrast, in the control area, the number of algal and invertebrate species remained low. In the experimental area a sharp increase in the growth rate of a cohort of very small urchins, which was not eliminated by our removal effort, demonstrated that there is strong intraspecific competition amongst urchins when the food supply is limited. In the St. Lawrence Estuary, there are few predators of urchins and the urchin dominated community appears to be a stable situation. PMID:25024143

  16. Levels and temporal trends of toxaphene congeners in beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence Estuary, Canada.

    PubMed

    Gouteux, Bruno; Lebeuf, Michel; Muir, Derek C G; Gagné, Jean-Pierre

    2003-10-15

    Environmentally relevant toxaphene congeners were determined in blubber samples of stranded beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence Estuary (SLE), Canada. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the levels and the temporal trends (1988-1999) of a suite of six chlorobornanes (P26, P40/41, P44, P50, and P62) in the SLE belugas. P26 and P50 mean concentrations were in the same range as those reported for animals living in the Arctic environment suggesting that the atmospheric transport represents the main input of toxaphene to the SLE. A general exponential decline of chlorobornane concentrations in belugas was observed, except for P26 and P50 in males. On average, concentrations decreased by a factor of two in 8.5 years during the 1988-1999 time period. This rate of decline is similar to the reduction of toxaphene emission from agricultural soils in the southern United States reported over the same time period. Some differences in decline rates were observed among the studied CHB congeners. For instance, P62 decreased more rapidly than P26 and P50 in both male and female belugas. Several hypotheses were advanced to explain these differences such as selective metabolism of specific chlorobornanes by SLE belugas or their prey. However, a most likely explanation is the selective degradation of the technical product in soils and atmosphere in the source region. PMID:14594368

  17. The Effects of Recent Floods and Geomorphic Processes on Red Ash Populations, Upper St Lawrence Estuary, Québec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlais, Dominique; Bégin, Yves

    1993-11-01

    Effects of recent floods on red ash ( Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) forest margins were studied along the upper St Lawrence Estuary in eastern Canada. Major floods amplified by tides left many injuries on riparian red ash trees, which allows dating of past disturbances based on stand structure and dendrochronological analysis. The formation of ice scars on stems, the development of basal sprouts, and the inhibition of population regeneration on shore, provide evidence of a recent increase in shore disturbance. Since the 1950s and especially the 1970s, a landward displacement of the tree line occurred as a result of increasing shore erosion. Usually the ice foot on the shore disintegrates in situ in April, but since the 1950s, early snow-melts in mid-winter have been causing sudden floods that raise the ice foot to the edge of the backshore forest, leaving many signs of damage. Increasing winter climatic variability since the 1950s seems responsible for such variations in flood regime.

  18. Chemical risks associated with consumption of shellfish harvested on the north shore of the St. Lawrence River's lower estuary.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Fabien; Tremblay, Thierry; Rouette, Justine; Cartier, Jacques-François

    2004-06-01

    Shellfish have the capacity to accumulate chemical contaminants found in their biotope and therefore present a potential risk for consumers. This study was conducted to assess the chemical risks associated with consumption of shellfish harvested on the north shore of the St. Lawrence River's lower estuary. A survey was carried out on 162 recreational harvesters, and shellfish were sampled for chemical contaminant analysis. We quantified 10 metals, 22 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 14 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and 10 chlorinated pesticides. We subsequently evaluated cancer and noncancer risks for four consumption scenarios based on our survey results and published results. Soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria) were by far the most consumed shellfish species. Of the 56 selected contaminants, 36 were detected in the 23 homogenates of soft-shell clam meat. None of the contaminants found in the soft-shell clams were associated with intakes that exceed the main exposure limit recommendations proposed to prevent noncancer effects. However, several limits must be considered before drawing conclusions about the relative safety of shellfish consumption regarding this end point. Furthermore, inorganic arsenic and PCBs were present in sufficient concentrations to lead to cancer risks exceeding the level often considered acceptable for environmental exposure (1 x 10 (-4) to 1 x 10(-6)) in each of the four scenarios, even for the lowest observed scenario of 15 meals of soft-shell clams per year. PMID:15175177

  19. Spatial distribution and viability of Alexandrium tamarense resting cysts in surface sediments from the St. Lawrence Estuary, Eastern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracia, Stéphanie; Roy, Suzanne; Starr, Michel

    2013-04-01

    The dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense Group 1 (as defined by Lilly et al., 2007) is responsible for recurrent outbreaks of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) in the St. Lawrence Estuary (SLE), Eastern Canada. In August 2008, a major bloom of A. tamarense developed in the SLE and caused major mortality of fish, seabirds and marine mammals notably in the vicinity of a marine park. Eleven months later, surface (0-5 cm) and deeper (5-10 cm) sediments were sampled to determine resting cysts concentrations, locate prospective cyst seedbeds and examine if these had changed following this major bloom. This information is thought to be important to understand inter-annual patterns in algal toxicity, cyst abundance being a good predictor of subsequent bloom magnitude in some regions. Surface cyst distribution was heterogeneous and it confirmed the location of the cyst seedbed previously reported on the north shore near the Manicouagan/aux-Outardes Rivers (>500 cysts cm-3). A zone of cyst accumulation was also observed on the south shore of the SLE (maximum of 1200 cysts cm-3), with higher concentrations relative to previous cyst mapping in the 1980s. A mismatch was observed between the zones with high surface cyst concentrations and those where the highest PSP toxins were detected (used as a proxy for vegetative cells in the water column). Cyst concentrations were negatively correlated with PSP levels from the same sites, suggesting that cysts were formed and deposited away from the major sites of toxicity. Deposition likely took place near the end of the bloom, once it had reached the eastern boundary of the SLE. PSP toxicity was worse near the peak of the bloom, which occurred westward of this region. This highlights the dynamic behaviour of local blooms, influenced by the estuarine and mesoscale circulation. Interestingly, the major bloom of August 2008 was not followed by particularly large cyst deposition or by any major bloom in 2009 in this region. Cyst viability was also examined, using Sytox Green, and found to be highest (nearly 100%) in the sites where cyst concentrations were maximum. Our results call for further investigation of the cyst mapping hypothesis in the St. Lawrence, where the local circulation seems to have an overriding influence on cyst deposition patterns.

  20. Submarine canyons and channels in the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (Eastern Canada): Morphology, classification and recent sediment dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normandeau, Alexandre; Lajeunesse, Patrick; St-Onge, Guillaume

    2015-07-01

    Series of submarine canyons and channels observed in the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE) provide an opportunity to analyze in great detail the morphology, spatial distribution and modern activity of such systems in a relatively shallow (? 300 m) semi-enclosed basin. Based on their geomorphology and physical settings, the canyons and channels were classified into four categories according to their feeding sources (ancient or recent): glacially-fed, river-fed, longshore drift-fed and sediment-starved systems. Their activity was interpreted based on geomorphological characteristics such as the presence of bedforms related to gravity flows, backscatter intensity, axial incision and the presence of rapidly deposited layers in surficial sediments. River-fed deltas were interpreted as inactive, mainly because suspended sediment concentrations at river mouths are low, preventing the generation of hyperpycnal currents or delta-lip failures related to high sediment supply. Longshore drift-fed canyons, present where the coastal shelf narrows, were found to be episodically active probably due to earthquakes or extreme storm events. Unlike other longshore drift-fed canyons observed elsewhere in the world, they are active infrequently because of the modern low rates of sediment supply to their heads. The most active canyons are the sediment-starved type and were observed near Pointe-des-Monts. Their activity is probably due to slope failures and to the presence of strong hydrodynamic processes. Therefore, sediment supply is not the main mechanism responsible for modern canyon and channel activity in the LSLE. However, sediment supply has been an important factor during the formation of the submarine channels and canyons. Their quasi-exclusive occurrence on the Québec North Shore is attributed to its larger watershed and important sedimentary delivery during deglaciation. The Québec North Shore watershed is 20 times greater than the Québec South Shore watershed, which favored the transport of greater volumes of sediment during the early-Holocene. Moreover, the slope proximity to the shore led to the formation of longshore-drift fed systems on the North Shore when sediment supplied to rivers were transferred on a narrow shelf.

  1. Levels of C{sub 10}-C{sub 13} polychloro-n-alkanes in marine mammals from the Arctic and the St. Lawrence River estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Tomy, G.T.; Muir, D.C.G.; Stern, G.A.; Westmore, J.B.

    2000-05-01

    Marine mammals from various regions of the Arctic and the St. Lawrence River estuary were examined for the first time for levels of C{sub 10}--C{sub 13} polychloro-n-alkanes (sPCAs). Respective mean total sPCA concentrations in the blubber of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from Saqqaq and Nuussuaq, western Greenland, were 0.23 {+-} 0.02 (n = 2) and 0.164 {+-} 0.06 {micro}g/g (n = 2), similar to that in beluga from the Mackenzie Delta in the western Canadian Arctic 0.21 {+-} 0.08 {micro}g/g (m = 3). sPCAs levels were higher in beluga blubber from the St. Lawrence River (0.37 to 1.4 {micro}g/g). Mean sPCA concentrations in the blubber samples from walruses (Odobenus rosmarus) (Thule, northwest Greenland) and ringed seal (Phoca hispida) (Eureka, southwest Ellesmere Island) were 0.43 {+-} 0.06 (n = 2) and 0.53 {+-} 0.2 {micro}g/g (n = 6), respectively. Relative to commercial sPCA formulations, samples from the Arctic marine mammals showed a predominance of the shorter chain length lower percent chlorinated PCA congeners, the more volatile components of industrial formulations. This observation is consistent with long-range atmospheric transport of sPCAs to this region. The profiles of the belugas from the St. Lawrence River estuary, however, had higher proportions of the less volatile sPCA congeners, implying that contamination to this region is probably from local sources.

  2. Cyclic steps in proglacial delta fronts: New insights from Upper Pleistocene-Holocene successions, St. Lawrence Estuary and Gulf, Québec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Pierre; Ghienne, Jean-François; Normandeau, Alexandre; Lajeunesse, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Proglacial delta fronts in both present-day systems and in the sedimentary record frequently include sand-sized, upstream-migrating bedforms. Although several studies have recently monitored their sediment dynamics, their formative processes are still matter to debate. Here we report on two Pleistocene-Holocene proglacial deltaic successions located on the North Shore of the St. Lawrence Estuary and Gulf, Québec, Canada. Owing to a well-constrained pattern of glacio-isostatic rebound, these now-emerged successions are characterized by accurate palaeo-bathymetric reconstructions. In our case study, we describe backstepping (upstream-migrating) cross strata lying on delta foresets at shallow bathymetries ranging from 10 m to deeper part, reaching in places 50 m. Cross strata, interpreted as being deposited by Froude-supercritical cyclic steps, are characterized by steep mean dips (up to 13°) and short-wavelength (10-20 m) undulations. They form backstepping assemblages of massive to faintly laminated sand bounded on either side by downslope-dipping erosive surfaces on which strata onlap and are truncated upslope and downslope respectively. Graded sand beds, sheared flamed mud layers, matrix- to clasts-supported pebbles or sand intraclasts occasionally occur. In a first case study located in the St. Lawrence Estuary (Portneuf), cyclic steps are borne by gently-sloped (2-3°) foresets deposits at depositional depth less than 50 m. Related sand includes graded beds, thin (5-10 mm) muddy interbeds and terrestrial organic debris. In a second delta located in the Gulf of St. Lawrence (Moisie River), backstepping, faintly laminated gravelly sand beds are directly overlain by pebbly topsets constituted by the subaqueous termination of a sandur. They are in addition either sharply truncated or are passing gradually downslope to regular, steep-sloped gilbert-like delta foresets. Scour infills with backsets are commonly associated with these strata that were deposited at very shallow bathymetries (10 m) as inferred from the stratigraphic architecture. These features suggest that river outflow directly derived from proglacial distributary channel(s) on the delta plain is responsible for the genesis of cyclic steps on delta foresets. The outflow maintained its inherited supercritical state without experiencing a hydraulic jump while entering the sea. This scenario is an alternative to depositional models linking cyclic steps generation and mass-wasting processes related to mouth bars oversteepening. We argue that either meltwater outburst flows issuing from a nearby ice-margin or spring low tide condition, or a combination of both, can produce adequate flow conditions, in terms of water and sediment discharge, for creating supercritical flow and related depositional structures in delta front settings.

  3. Relationships between intertidal clam population and health status of the soft-shell clam Mya arenaria in the St. Lawrence Estuary and Saguenay Fjord (Québec, Canada).

    PubMed

    Gagné, F; Blaise, C; Pellerin, J; Fournier, M; Durand, M J; Talbot, A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impacts of anthropogenic activity on the health status of intertidal clam populations of the Saguenay Fjord and the St. Lawrence Estuary (Québec, Canada). Clams were collected during low tide at sites subject to direct contamination and at sites far from human activity. Clams were analyzed for tributyltin and dibutyltin total levels and toxic stress (glutathione S-transferase, gonadal lipid peroxidation and DNA strand breaks), immunocompetence (phagocytic activity, hemocyte count and viability), reproduction (gonado-somatic index, gamete maturation, and vitellogenin-like proteins), energy status (temperature-dependent mitochondrial electron transport, and gonad lipids), and individual status (age, condition factor, and growth index). These responses were compared against population characteristics such as live clam density, number of empty shells, and sex ratio. The results show that clam density decreased with distance from the estuary (high salinity level) to upstream of the fjord (low salinity). There was no clear relationship between the number of empty shells and distance or site quality. Clam density values corrected against distance were significantly correlated with hemocyte viability, phagocytic activity, mitochondrial electron transport (MET), DNA damage in gonad, and temperature-dependent mitochondrial electron transport activity. A canonical analysis of the various groups of biomarkers revealed that population metrics were more strongly related with immunocompetence, followed by energy status and temperature-dependent mitochondrial electron transport activity. However, toxic stress biomarkers were strongly associated with energy status and reproduction. This was further confirmed by non-linear modeling using adaptive artificial neural networks (genetic selection and back propagation learning paradigms), where the following parameters were able to predict population parameters with <20% error: gonad maturation and somatic index, MET (at 4 degrees C), gonad LPO, DNA damage, and phagocytic capacity. Intertidal clam populations were influenced by a distance gradient effect (salinity), where immunocompetence, in addition to energy status, was the strongest physiological parameter related to clam population metrics. PMID:17825412

  4. Levels and temporal trends (1988-1999) of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence Estuary, Canada.

    PubMed

    Lebeuf, Michel; Gouteux, Bruno; Measures, Lena; Trottier, Steve

    2004-06-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were determined in blubber samples of 54 stranded adult beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) collected between 1988 and 1999 in the St. Lawrence Estuary (SLE), Quebec, Canada. Summed concentrations of 10 PBDE congeners (sigmaPBDEs) measured in beluga samples varied between 20 and almost 1000 ng/g wet weight. According to the PBDE concentrations in marine mammals reported in the scientific literature, SLE belugas appear to be relatively lightly contaminated. Only a few predominant congeners (namely, PBDE-47, -99, and -100) represent on average more than 75% of sigmaPBDEs in SLE belugas. The accumulation of sigmaPBDEs in both male and female belugas showed significant exponential increase throughout the 1988-1999 time period. The time necessary for beluga to double their blubber concentration of the most prevalent PBDE congeners was no longer than 3 years. The PBDE temporal changes reported in this study are generally faster but in agreement with the trend observed in other organisms collected in Canada, such as lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from the Great Lakes, ringed seal (Phoca hispida), and beluga whale from the Canadian Arctic. Some changes in the pattern of PBDEs in belugas were also observed during the time period investigated. The recent and important increase of PBDE levels in SLE belugas could explain the unexpected lack of statistical difference in PBDE contamination between males and females. This suggests that to date PBDEs tend to be accumulated by both male and female belugas, masking the elimination of PBDEs by females through post-natal transfer to their offspring. This study confirms that the growing use of PBDEs as flame retardants has resulted in rising contamination of Canadian aquatic environments. Additional studies are needed to assess the toxicological implications of the PBDE tissue levels found in SLE belugas. PMID:15224724

  5. Late-Quaternary morpho-sedimentology and submarine mass movements of the Betsiamites area, Lower St. Lawrence Estuary, Quebec, Canada

    E-print Network

    Long, Bernard

    Late-Quaternary morpho-sedimentology and submarine mass movements of the Betsiamites area, Lower St 2008 Accepted 4 March 2008 Available online xxxx Keywords: submarine mass movements morpho submarine geomorphology was revealed from multibeam bathymetry and seismic reflection surveys conducted

  6. Late-Quaternary morpho-sedimentology and submarine mass movements of the Betsiamites area, Lower St. Lawrence Estuary, Quebec, Canada

    E-print Network

    St-Ong, Guillaume

    Late-Quaternary morpho-sedimentology and submarine mass movements of the Betsiamites area, Lower St 2008 Accepted 4 March 2008 Keywords: submarine mass movements morpho-sedimentology multibeam bathymetry the submarine morpho-sedimentology of an area of 500 km2 with focus on the consequences of four mass movement

  7. Invasion of the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence by the clubbed tunicate ( Styela clava Herdman): Potential mechanisms for invasions of Prince Edward Island estuaries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrea Locke; J. Mark Hanson; Karla M. Ellis; Jason Thompson; Rémy Rochette

    2007-01-01

    All but one of the nine non-native marine species that established populations in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence (sGSL) in the past decade initially invaded the sGSL via coastal and estuarine waters of Prince Edward Island (PEI). Almost half of these species are tunicates, and all but one still occur only in PEI. Recent introductions include Styela clava Herdman

  8. Toxic compounds and health and reproductive effects in St. Lawrence Beluga Whales

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Beland; R. Michaud; S. DeGuise; C. Girard; A. Lagace; D. Martineau; Derek C. G. Muir; R. J. Norstorm; E. Pelletier; Sankar Ray

    1993-01-01

    An epidemiologic study was carried out over a period of 9 years on an isolated population of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) residing in the St. Lawrence estuary (Quebec, Canada). More than 100 individual deaths were aged, and\\/or autopsied and analyzed for toxic compounds, and the population was surveyed for size and structure. Arctic belugas and other species of whales and

  9. Sivuqam Ungipaghaatangi (St. Lawrence Island Legends).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slwooko, Grace

    Transmitted orally for generations until the Eskimo language became a written one, the eleven St. Lawrence Island legends compiled in this volume for high school students tell of feats that were accomplished through supernatural power. Meant for both entertainment and instruction, the tales convey wise council indirectly through the conversations…

  10. Stratigraphic architecture and morphostructures of a recent glacio-isostatically forced-regressive delta: implications in terms of proglacial fluvial dynamics, North Shore of the St-Lawrence Estuary, Québec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Pierre; Ghienne, Jean-François; Schuster, Mathieu; Lajeunesse, Patrick; Deschamps, Rémy; Nutz, Alexis; Roquin, Claude; Duringer, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Proglacial deltaic systems provide information about ice margins evolution, related glacio-isostatic rebound and proglacial fluvial dynamic during ice-sheet retreat. Here, we document a case study based on the North Shore of the St-Lawrence Estuary, Québec, Canada, recording the recession of the Laurentide Ice Sheet after the Last Glacial Maximum (Upper Wisconsinian-Holocene). The entire deltaic succession is exposed throughout coastal cliffs and river-cut terraces. Field investigations involve sedimentary logs, 14C dating and the characterization of morphosedimentary structures in the hinterlands. The delta initiates around 11 kyr Cal BP during an ice-front stabilization. Marine invasion on isostatically flexured lowlands led to the development of the Goldthwait Sea that reached a marine limit at the present-day 140 m elevation. At this time, ice contact and glaciomarine sediments were emplaced at the mouth of the major structural valleys. The subsequent glacial retreat farther inland turned the structural valleys into fjords into which deltas develop. The rapid fulfilling of these depocenters by glaciogenic sediments led to the emergence and coalescence of the deltas on the open sea. Lower delta front deposits are made up of mud while sand-sized, turbiditic deposits including facies related to supercritical flows (chutes, cyclic steps) prevail in the upper reaches. The delta plain is composed of gravelly facies deposited by braided streams. The progradation of the proglacial deltaic complex was about 10 km (thickness > 100 m) in only 1000 years in the open coast setting while the sea-level fall due to the glacio-isostatic rebound was up to 10 cm/yrs. This system remains active until the melting of the ice margins out of the catchment area at 10 kyr Cal BP. Sedimentary suites associated with the later paraglacial evolution comprise nearshore sand wedge (spit platform) and foreshore complexes. Throughout the entire proglacial deltaic development, no major fluvial incision occurred in spite of significant rates of sea-level fall (50m/1000 yrs). This owes to a fluvial equilibrium profile steeper than the descending regressive shoreline trajectory mainly due to an important glaciogenic sediment supply. Alternatively, fluvial entrenchment actively arose as soon as the ice margins retreated out of the catchment area in a context enduring lesser rates of sea-level fall. Fluvial entrenchment processes are explored, including buffer/buttress incision processes and the key role of bedrock thresholds, rate of sea level-fall and the drawdown of the glaciogenic/paraglacial sediment supply.

  11. New York Landscape Regions in Google Earth: St. Lawrence Lowlands

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The St. Lawrence Lowlands tour is part of the New York Landscape Regions Collection of Google Earth Tours. This tour allows students to explore the Thousand Islands, formed of granite which has withstood the erosive energy of the St. Lawrence River, creating thousands of islands ranging in size from single rocks to over 25 square miles. There is also an activity in which students map some of the many shipwrecks that have accumulated at the entrance to the St. Lawrence Seaway.

  12. Characterization and profiling of hepatic cytochromes P450 and phase II xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence River Estuary and the Canadian Arctic.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Melissa A; Arukwe, Augustine; De Guise, Sylvain; Martineau, Daniel; Béland, Pierre; Dallaire, André; Lair, Stéphane; Lebeuf, Michel; Letcher, Robert J

    2004-07-30

    Cytochromes P450 (CYP, phase I) and conjugating (phase II) enzymes can be induced by and influence the toxicokinetics (metabolism) and toxicity of xenobiotic contaminants in exposed organisms. Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) from the endangered St. Lawrence (SL) River Estuary population exhibit deleterious health effects and various severe pathologies that have been associated with contaminant exposure. In contrast, such effects (e.g. reproductive and immunological impairment) are generally less frequent in less exposed populations in the Canadian Arctic (CA). In the present study, opportunistic sampling resulted in the collection immediately after death of liver tissue from a single female neonate SL beluga (SL6) and male and female CA beluga (n=10) from the Arviat region of western Hudson Bay, in addition to sampling of stranded carcasses of male and female SL beluga (n=5) at least 12 h postmortem. We immunologically characterized cross-reactive proteins of hepatic microsomal CYP1A, CYP2B, CYP3A, CYP2E, epoxide hydrolase (EH) and uridine diphosphoglucuronosyl transferase (UDPGT) isozymes. Cross-reactive proteins were found in all SL and CA beluga using anti-rat CYP1A1, anti-rainbow trout CYP3A, anti-human CYP2E1, anti-rabbit EH and anti-human UDPGT1A1 polyclonal antibodies (Abs), whereas faintly cross-reactive CYP2B proteins were only found in SL6 and the CA samples using an anti-rabbit CYP2B1 Ab. In corresponding catalytic activity assessments, only SL6 and all CA beluga microsomal samples exhibited CYP1A-mediated 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity (51-260 pmol/mg/min), CYP3A-mediated activity (113-899 pmol/mg/min) based on the formation of 6beta-hydroxytestosterone using a testosterone hydroxylase assay, and UDPGT activity (830-4956 pmol/mg/min) based on 1-naphthylglucuronide formation. The marginal cross-reactivity with the anti-CYP2B1 Ab and lack of catalytically measurable hydroxytestosterone isomers associated with CYP2B-type activity in all the SL and CA animals is suggestive of low CYP2B-type enzyme expression in beluga. The absence of measurable total P450 enzyme levels and catalytic activities in samples from the stranded SL belugas suggested catalytically inactive enzymes as a consequence of tissue degradation related due to the time delay of sample collection after death. However, all SL and CA animals demonstrated similar, immunologically cross-reactive phase I and II hepatic enzyme profiles, which is suggestive of the importance of metabolism in the toxicokinetics and fate of xenobiotics in animals from both populations PMID:15210296

  13. Methylsulfone polychlorinated biphenyl and 2,2-bis(chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene metabolites in beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence River estuary and western Hudson Bay, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Letcher, R.J.; Norstrom, R.J.; Muir, D.C.G.; Sandau, C.D.; Koczanski, K.; Michaud, R.; De Guise, S.; Beland, P.

    2000-05-01

    Knowledge is limited regarding methylsulfone (MeSO{sub 2})-polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), and especially MeSo{sub 2}-2,2-bis(chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene (DDE), metabolites in cetacean species. The authors hypothesized that the ability of beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) to biotransform PCB and DDE compounds, and to form and degrade their MeSO{sub 2}-PCB and -DDE metabolites, is related to the capacity for xenobiotic metabolism. Adipose biopsies were collected from male and female beluga whale from distinct populations in the St. Lawrence River estuary (STL) and western Hudson Bay (WHB), Canada, which are contrasted by the exposure to different levels of cytochrome P450 enzyme-inducing, chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants. The PCBs, DDTs, DDEs, 28 MeSO{sub 2} metabolites of 14 meta-para chlorine-unsubstituted PCBs, and four MeSO{sub 2} metabolites of 4,4{prime}- and 2,4{prime}-DDE were determined. The mean concentrations of total ({Sigma}-) MeSO{sub 2}-PCB in male STL beluga (230 ng/g), and ratios of {Sigma}-MeSO{sub 2}-PCB to {Sigma}-PCB (0.05) and {Sigma}-precursor-PCB (0.17) were approximately twofold higher, whereas the {Sigma}-precursor-PCB to {Sigma}-PCB ratio was approximately twofold lower, than in male WHB beluga. Both populations had a low formation capacity for MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs with {le} six chlorines (<4% of {Sigma}-MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs). The congener patterns were dominated by trichloro- and tetrachloro-MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs, and tetrachloro- and pentachloro-MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs in WHB and STL animals, respectively. In addition to 2- and 3-MeSO{sub 2}-4,4{prime}-DDE, two unknown MeSO{sub 2}-2,4{prime}-DDEs were detected. The mean 3-MeSO{sub 2}-4,4{prime}-DDE concentration in STL beluga (1.2 ng/g) was much greater than in WHB animals. The concentrations of 4,4{prime}-DDE, and not 3-MeSO{sub 2}-4,4{prime}-DDE, increased with age in male STL animals. The authors demonstrated that sulfone formation and clearance is related to metabolic capacity, and thus PCB, DDE, and MeSO{sub 2}-PCB and -DDE toxicokinetics differ for STL and WHB beluga. In the past, the capacity of odontocetes for PCB and DDE biotransformation leading to persistent sulfone formation and clearance is related to metabolic capacity, and thus PCB, DDE, and MeSO{sub 2}-PCB and -DDE toxicokinetics differ for STL and WHB beluga. In the past, the capacity of odontocetes for PCB and DDE biotransformation leading to persistent sulfone metabolites has been underestimated. More information is needed for other cetacean species and marine mammals. The results of this study indicate that MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs and -DDEs need to be included in the toxicologic risk assessment of PCB and DDT exposure in odontocetes, and perhaps for cetaceans in general.

  14. Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway connects the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes, and it was completed in 1959. This website details the activities of the Seaway System, and visitors with an interest in transportation and public policy will find the site both useful and interesting. At the top of the homepage, visitors will find the five primary sections of the site, which include "Management of the Seaway" and "Commercial Shipping". First-time visitors should start at "The Seaway" section. Here they will find the interactive "Gateway to North America" tour, along with information on the System's locks and channels and a nice "Facts and Figures" area. The site also contains thematic collections of information designed for business people, students and educators, and the media. Visitors who wish to stay abreast of System activities can sign up for email updates on the homepage. Francophone users will be glad to learn that the entire site is also available in French.

  15. St. Lawrence blue whale vocalizations revisited: characterization of calls detected from 1998 to 2001.

    PubMed

    Berchok, Catherine L; Bradley, David L; Gabrielson, Thomas B

    2006-10-01

    From 1998 to 2001, 115 h of acoustic recordings were made in the presence of the well-studied St. Lawrence population of blue whales, using a calibrated omnidirectional hydrophone [flat (+/- 3 dB) response from 5 to 800 Hz] suspended at 50 m depth from a surface isolation buoy. The primary field site for this study was the estuary region of the St. Lawrence River (Québec, Canada), with most recordings made between mid-August and late October. During the recordings, detailed field notes were taken on all cetaceans within sight. Characterization of the more than 1000 blue whale calls detected during this study revealed that the St. Lawrence repertoire is much more extensive than previously reported. Three infrasonic (<20 Hz) and three audible range (30-200 Hz) call types were detected, with much time/frequency variation seen within each type. Further variation is seen in the form of call segmentation, which appears (through examination of Lloyd's Mirror interference effects) to be controlled at least partially by the whales. Although St. Lawrence blue whale call characteristics are similar to those of the North Atlantic, comparisons of phrase composition and spacing among studies suggest the possibility of population dialects within the North Atlantic. PMID:17069329

  16. Stocking young Atlantic salmon in St. Lawrence River system

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Thousands of young Atlantic salmon are released into the St. Regis River system (a tributary of the St. Lawrence River) in an effort to restore this diminished Lake Ontario fish population. The salmon were reared at the USGS Tunison Laboratory in Cortland, N.Y., and are released by USGS scienti...

  17. 50 CFR Table 45 to Part 679 - St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area 45 Table 45 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude...

  18. 50 CFR Table 45 to Part 679 - St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area 45 Table 45 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude...

  19. Inter-Annual Variability of the St. Lawrence Productivity: a Modeling Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chifflet, M.; Le Fouest, V.; Starr, M.; Saucier, F.; Zakardjian, B.

    2004-05-01

    The productivity of the St. Lawrence is strongly dependent on circulation and fresh water input. How natural climate variability or climate changes may affect the dynamics of this ecosystem need to be evaluated in order to improve its predictability. Here, we present results of a coupled 3D physical-ecosystem model of the Estuary and Gulf of St Lawrence that was developed to study the complex interactions between climate forcing and the productivity of biological resources at the base of the food chain. The physical model is a high resolution 3D baroclinic circulation model (5 km in the horizontal and 5 m in the vertical) that is presently operational for the St. Lawrence basin (Saucier et al. 2003). It includes a level 2.5 turbulent kinetic energy scheme and an ice module. The ecosystem model includes eight compartments : nitrate and ammonium, two classes of phytoplankton (diatoms and flagellates), two classes of zooplankton (microzooplankton and mesozooplankton), and two sizes of detritus (Le Fouest et al. 2004). This ecosystem model is driven by the physical model using realistic tidal, atmospheric and hydrologic forcing for three years: 1997 as a typical year with high ice cover and high runoff, 1999 as a warm and productive year with low runoff and low ice cover and 1998, an intermediate year with low ice cover and high runoff. The simulated results of the seasonal and inter-annual variability in ocean climate and primary production are compared to field observations from the Atlantic Zonal Monitoring Program. Particular attention is directed towards the influence of climatic and hydrologic factors that exert a control on the nutrient distribution, seasonal plankton biomass, timing and magnitude of the spring bloom and primary production. Our results highlight the strong influence of winter hydrographic processes on the inter-annual variability in the St. Lawrence productivity. Le Fouest, V., Zakardjian, B., Saucier, F. J., Starr, M. 2004. Physical and climatic induced subregional variability of planktonic production in a high latitude marginal sea : the Gulf of St. Lawrence (Canada), in preparation. Saucier, F. J., Roy, F., Gilbert, D., Pellerin, P., Ritchie H. 2003. Modeling the formation and circulation processes of water masses and sea ice in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada. J. Geophys. Res., 108(C8):1-20.

  20. Spending Time and Money: Memories of Life in St. Lawrences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Jane; Cooper, Mabel; Ferris, Gloria

    2010-01-01

    Mabel Cooper and Gloria Ferris spent their early adult life in St. Lawrence's Hospital in Caterham. This was in the late 1950s to early 1970s. This is their memories of how they spent their time. It includes the work they did and leisure. They also write about the tokens that were used in the hospital instead of money.

  1. St. Lawrence River Freeze-Up Forecast Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assel, R. A.

    A standard operating procedure (SOP) is presented for calculating the date of freeze-up on the St. Lawrence River at Massena, N.Y. The SOP is based on two empirical temperature decline equations developed for Kingston, Ontario, and Massena, N.Y., respectively. Input data needed to forecast freeze-up consist of the forecast December flow rate and…

  2. The influence of wind and ice on spring walrus hunting success on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Jinlun

    The influence of wind and ice on spring walrus hunting success on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska Henry Available online 14 March 2013 Keywords: Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) Hunting St. Lawrence Yupik hunters on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska, take hundreds of Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus

  3. Paleoceanography and glacial runoff along the St. Lawrence valley system

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, C.G. (Univ. of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Geology); Vilks, G. (Bedford Inst. of Oceanography, Dartmouth, NS (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Radiocarbon-dated foraminiferal zones in cores from the Gulf of St. Lawrence show that cold saline bottom-water was present in the Goldthwait Sea between 13.6 and 12.9 ka BP and was followed by a salinity minimum from ca. 12.1 to 8.6 ka BP, and then increasing salinity and temperature resulting in the modern, deep, watermass layer by 8 ka BP. During the salinity minimum, glacial Lake St. Lawrence drained east into the Goldthwait Sea before the beginning of the Champlain Sea (11.6--11.4 ka BP). Meltwater flowed through the Champlain and Goldthwait seas between 11 and 10 ka BP when Lake Agassiz water was diverted to the North Atlantic Ocean through Ottawa and St. Lawrence valleys and Gulf of St. Lawrence; this coincides with the decrease in salinity of the Champlain Sea between 10.7 and 10.4 ka BP. A later discharge of meltwater to the North Atlantic Ocean (9.5--8 ka BP) occurred during the final stage of the salinity minimum in the Goldthwait Sea and postdates or coincides with the end of the Champlain Sea. The discharge of meltwater to the North Atlantic Ocean may have cause the freshening of the Champlain Sea. However, it does not appear to have affected the deep water in the Goldthwait Sea and was probably part of the surface outflow to the North Atlantic Ocean through the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The variations in salinity of the deep water of the Goldthwait Sea are related to changes in the composition of the water entering the sea from the North Atlantic Ocean.

  4. Invasion by stages in the St Louis River estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    The St. Louis River estuary is recognized as an invasive species “hotspot” - the harbor ranks among the top locations in the Great Lakes reporting the first occurrence of new, aquatic non-native species. To date, 18 non-native benthic invertebrate, 4 non-native crusta...

  5. Credit: Michael Anderson. NOAA Selects St. Louis River Estuary as

    E-print Network

    alteration and degradation. What Can NOAA Do? NOAA's expertise in flood and weather forecasting, integrated, and recreational opportunities. U.S. Department of Commerce | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | www working on these issues in the St. Louis River estuary. Within NOAA, the National Ocean Service, NOAA

  6. Delayed gametogenesis and progesterone levels in soft-shell clams ( Mya arenaria) in relation to in situ contamination to organotins and heavy metals in the St. Lawrence River (Canada)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Siah; J Pellerin; J.-C Amiard; E Pelletier; L Viglino

    2003-01-01

    There is a growing awareness that contaminants in the aquatic environment may alter steroid hormone levels and affect the reproductive success of the invertebrates. To verify if heavy metals and organotins affect sexual maturation in Mya arenaria, individuals were collected from July to November 1998, at different sites along the South coast of the St. Lawrence maritime estuary. Near the

  7. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-104 GREAT LAKES AND ST. LAWRENCE RIVER MEDIUM RESOLUTION VECTOR

    E-print Network

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-104 GREAT LAKES AND ST. LAWRENCE RIVER MEDIUM RESOLUTION VECTOR SHORELINE DATA D.H. LEE NOAA, Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI C. MORSE, and S ............................................................................................................................................. 4 2. Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Vector Shoreline Data

  8. First Record of the Chinese Mitten Crab ( Eriocheir sinensis) in the St. Lawrence River, Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yves de Lafontaine

    2005-01-01

    In September 2004, one live and healthy female specimen of the Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis) was captured in a fishing trap on the south shore of the St. Lawrence River, opposite Quebec City. This is the first report of this non-indigenous and invasive species in the St. Lawrence River or any river on the Eastern Seaboard of North America.

  9. Estimating the Climatic Impact of an Early Holocene Meltwater Event Around the Gulf of St. Lawrence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Levac

    2004-01-01

    An early Holocene episode of meltwater drainage from the Great Lake region through the St. Lawrence River (sometimes referred to as the Middle Stanley) was previously shown to cause important changes in sea surface temperature (SST) in Bay of Islands (west coast of Newfoundland) and a reversal in the postglacial vegetation succession along the shores of the St. Lawrence River

  10. 50 CFR Table 45 to Part 679 - St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area 45 Table 45 to Part 679 Wildlife and...679, Table 45 Table 45 to Part 679—St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 16824.00W...

  11. 50 CFR Table 45 to Part 679 - St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area 45 Table 45 to Part 679 Wildlife and...679, Table 45 Table 45 to Part 679—St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 16824.00W...

  12. 50 CFR Table 45 to Part 679 - St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area 45 Table 45 to Part 679 Wildlife and...679, Table 45 Table 45 to Part 679—St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 16824.00W...

  13. Tidal currents in the St. Lawrence Island region Seth Danielson1

    E-print Network

    Kowalik, Zygmunt

    Tidal currents in the St. Lawrence Island region Seth Danielson1 Zygmunt Kowalik*1 1 Institute: Danielson, S.; Kowalik, Z.; (2005), Tidal currents in the St. Lawrence Island region, J. Geophys. Res., Vol. 110, No. C10, C10004, 10.1029/2004JC002463 Keywords: Bering Sea, tidal currents, spatial and temporal

  14. Wildlife as sentinels of human health effects in the Great Lakes--St. Lawrence basin.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, G A

    2001-01-01

    There is no existing formal, long-term program for gathering evidence of the incidence and severity of the health effects of toxic substances in wildlife. However, research-based studies of bald eagles, herring gulls, night herons, tree swallows, snapping turtles, mink, and beluga over the past 30 years have revealed a broad spectrum of health effects in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence basin including thyroid and other endocrine disorders, metabolic diseases, altered immune function, reproductive impairment, developmental toxicity, genotoxicity, and cancer. These effects occurred most often and were most severe in the most contaminated sites (Green Bay, Saginaw Bay, Lake Ontario, the St. Lawrence estuary, and more recently, Lake Erie), some of which are International Joint Commission-designated Areas of Concern (AOCs). In all cases, a strong argument can be made for an environmental etiology, and in many cases for the involvement of persistent organic pollutants, particularly polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzo-(italic)p(/italic)-dioxins, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. For some, the association with particular contaminants is consistent with controlled studies, and in some, dose-response relationships were documented. The biologic significance of these health impairments to the affected species is currently unclear, but they resemble those observed with increased incidence in human subpopulations in one or more AOCs. Formalizing health effects monitoring of sentinel wildlife species by the parties to the Canada-USA Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement is required. This would facilitate the optimal use of sentinel wildlife health data in a larger, epidemiologic weight-of-evidence context upon which to base decisions and policies regarding the effects of chemical exposures on human populations. PMID:11744503

  15. Circulation and Mixing in the St. Lawrence Estuary

    E-print Network

    Bourgault, Daniel

    2001 A thesis submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research in partial fulfillment and a realistic topography while forced with a large seasonal change in the river discharge. The model is able Ile-aux- Coudres. During the spring freshet, when the river discharge is 40% higher than normal

  16. Characterization of St. Lawrence blue whale vocalizations and their correlation with field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berchok, Catherine L.

    During four field seasons from 1998--2001, 115 hours of acoustic recordings were made in the presence of the well-studied St. Lawrence population of blue whales. The primary field site for this study was the estuary region of the St. Lawrence River (Quebec, Canada) with most recordings made between mid-August and late October. Effort was concentrated in the daylight hours, although occasionally extending past nightfall. An inexpensive and portable recording system was built that was easy to deploy and provided quality recordings in a variety of sea conditions. It consisted of a calibrated omni-directional hydrophone with a flat (+/-3dB) response from 5Hz to 800Hz; and a surface isolation buoy to minimize the vertical movement of the sensor. During the recording sessions detailed field notes were taken on all blue whales within sight, with individual identities confirmed through photo-identification work between sessions. Notes were also taken on all other species sighted during the recording sessions. Characterization of the more than one-thousand blue whale calls detected during this study revealed that the St. Lawrence repertoire is much more extensive than previously reported. Three infrasonic (<20Hz) and four audible range (30--200Hz) call types were detected in this study, with much time/frequency variation seen within each type. The infrasonic calls were long (5--30s) in duration and arranged into regularly patterned series. These calls were similar in call characteristics and spacing to those detected in the North Atlantic, but had much shorter and more variable patterned series. The audible call types were much shorter (1--4s), and occurred singly or in irregularly spaced clusters, although a special patterning was seen that contained both regular and irregular spaced components. Comparison of the daily, seasonal, and spatial distributions of calling behavior with those of several biological parameters revealed interesting differences between the three call types examined. The trends seen suggest a migratory, reproductive, or foraging context for the infrasonic calls. A closer-range social context is suggested for the audible downsweeps, which have been detected in foraging situations as well as in courtship displays. The audible mixed-pattern call type appears to have a primarily reproductive context.

  17. Sediment salt-load in the St Lucia Estuary during the severe drought of 2002 2006

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. C. Bate; R. H. Taylor

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there was a sufficiently high residual salt load in the dry sediments of the St Lucia Estuary to cause salinity problems should it later fill up with either freshwater or seawater. The estuary lakes have suffered the effects of a severe drought since 2002 with the result that many areas were

  18. Comparison of St. Lawrence blue whale vocalizations with field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berchok, Catherine; Bradley, David; Gabrielson, Thomas; Sears, Richard

    2003-04-01

    During four field seasons from 1998-2001, vocalizations were recorded in the presence of St. Lawrence blue whales using a single omni-directional hydrophone. Both long duration infrasonic calls (~18 Hz, 5-20 s) as well as short duration higher frequency calls (85-25 Hz, ~2 s) were detected and compared with field observations. Two trends were noted. First, the long infrasonic call series were concentrated primarily in the deep (300 m) channel. These call series appear to compare well with blue whale vocalizations recorded by others in the deep open ocean. Second, the shorter audible calls were more evenly distributed over bathymetry and seem to be a form of short distance communication with at least one case occurring during an agonistic interaction. A comparison of these calls with biological parameters such as density of whales in the area, percentages of paired versus single whales, and numbers of males versus females will also be discussed. [Project supported by ARL/PSU, NSF, and the American Museum of Natural History.

  19. Time Series Analysis of Water Level and Temperature in the St Louis River Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pressure and temperature loggers were deployed at 9 sites in the St Louis River estuary between 6/23 10/31 2011. A reference sensor was place on the shore to correct pressure data. Sensors were paced at ...

  20. Automatic recognition of fin and blue whale calls for real-time monitoring in the St. Lawrence.

    PubMed

    Mouy, Xavier; Bahoura, Mohammed; Simard, Yvan

    2009-12-01

    Monitoring blue and fin whales summering in the St. Lawrence Estuary with passive acoustics requires call recognition algorithms that can cope with the heavy shipping noise of the St. Lawrence Seaway and with multipath propagation characteristics that generate overlapping copies of the calls. In this paper, the performance of three time-frequency methods aiming at such automatic detection and classification is tested on more than 2000 calls and compared at several levels of signal-to-noise ratio using typical recordings collected in this area. For all methods, image processing techniques are used to reduce the noise in the spectrogram. The first approach consists in matching the spectrogram with binary time-frequency templates of the calls (coincidence of spectrograms). The second approach is based on the extraction of the frequency contours of the calls and their classification using dynamic time warping (DTW) and the vector quantization (VQ) algorithms. The coincidence of spectrograms was the fastest method and performed better for blue whale A and B calls. VQ detected more 20 Hz fin whale calls but with a higher false alarm rate. DTW and VQ outperformed for the more variable blue whale D calls. PMID:20000904

  1. Vertical distribution and diel migration of macrozooplankton in the St. Lawrence marine system (Canada) in relation with the cold intermediate layer thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Michel; Galbraith, Peter S.; Descroix, Aurélie

    2009-01-01

    Vertical distribution of various species and stages of macrozooplankton (euphausiacea, chaetognatha, cnidaria, mysidacea, amphipoda) were determined for different times of the day and related to the physical environment. Stratified sampling with the BIONESS was carried out during seven cruises in spring and fall 1998, 2000, and 2001, and fall 1999, in two different habitats in the St. Lawrence marine system: the lower St. Lawrence Estuary and the NW Gulf of St. Lawrence. Our results indicate that the various macrozooplankton species were distributed throughout the whole water column including the surface layer, the cold intermediate layer (CIL), and the deep layer at different times of day and night in both areas during all periods. Moreover, three types of migrational patterns were observed within this zooplanktonic community: (1) nocturnal ascent by the whole population, (2) segregation into two groups; one which performed nocturnal accent and another which remained in the deep, and (3) no detectable migration. We also observed that the diel vertical migration (DVM) amplitude in most of the macrozooplankton species varied as a function of physical factors, in particular the spatio-temporal variations of the CIL thermal properties, including the upper and the lower limits of the CIL and the depth of the CIL core temperature. Finally, the different DVM patterns coupled with estuarine circulation patterns and bottom topography could place animals in different flow regimes by night and by day and contribute to their retention (aggregation) and/or dispersion in different areas, time of the day, and seasons.

  2. Basis of comparison Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River system. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.H.

    1993-04-01

    A 90-year set of lake levels and flows has been developed that reflects a consistent hydraulic regime in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Riversystem. The hydraulic regime is defined by the diversion rates into and out of the system, consumptive use withdrawals from the system, the time series of water supplies to the system, outlet conditions of each lake, flow retardation due to ice or weeds in the connecting channels, initial starting elevations for the simulation, the hydraulic condition of the St. Lawrence River, and tidal levels at its outlet. These levels and flows can be used as a reference for assessing the effects of modified lake regulation and climate change.

  3. The Oligochaeta (Annelida, Clitellata) of the St. Lawrence Great Lakes region: An update

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, Douglas R.; Hudson, Patrick L.

    2003-01-01

    An updated oligochaete species list for the Great Lakes region is provided. The list was developed through the reexamination of the taxa reported in a previous report in 1980, addition of new taxa or records collected from the region since 1980, and an update of taxonomy commensurate with systematic and nomenclatural changes over the intervening years since the last review. The authors found 74 papers mentioning Great Lakes oligochaete species. The majority of these papers were published in the 1980s. The literature review and additional collections resulted in 15 species being added to the previous list. Nine taxa were removed from the previous list due to misidentification, synonymies, level of identification, or inability to confirm the identity. Based on this review, 101 species of Oligochaeta are now known from the St. Lawrence Great Lakes watershed. Of these, 95 species are known from the St. Lawrence Great Lakes proper, with an additional 6 species recorded from the inland waters of the watershed. The greatest diversity of oligochaete species was found in the inland waters of the region (81) followed by Lake Huron (72), Lake Ontario (65), Lake Erie (64), Lake Superior (63), Lake Michigan (62), St. Marys River (60), Niagara River (49), Saginaw Bay (44), St. Clair River (37), Lake St. Clair (36), St. Lawrence River (27), and the Detroit River (21). Three species are suspected of being introduced, Branchiura sowerbyi, Gianius aquaedulcis, and Ripistes parasita, and two are believed to be endemic, Thalassodrilus hallae and Teneridrilus flexus.

  4. Community interactions affecting the relative abundances of native and invasive amphipods in the St. Lawrence River

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. E. Palmer; Anthony Ricciardi

    2005-01-01

    The Eurasian amphipod Echinogammarus ischnus is reportedly replacing the common native amphipod Gammarus fasciatus in the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence River system. A potential mechanism for this replacement is competition mediated by resident species. Other Eurasian invaders, dreissenid mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and Dreissena bugensis), dominate rocky substrates throughout the system and might be promoting the rapid expansion of E.

  5. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-24 UPPER ST. LAWRENCE RIVER HYDRAULIC TRANSIENT MODEL

    E-print Network

    , system diver- sions, and connecting channel changes. For example, hydraulic transient models developedNOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-24 UPPER ST. LAWRENCE RIVER HYDRAULIC TRANSIENT MODEL Alan J. COMPUTER REQUIREMENTS 3. MODEL DESCRIPTION 4. MATHEMATICAL THEORY 5. MODEL CALIBRATION 6. HYDRAULIC EFFECT

  6. Diel and lateral patterns of zooplankton distribution in the St. Lawrence River

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew F. Casper; James H. Thorp

    2007-01-01

    While the four-dimensional nature of river ecosystems has been recognized for nearly two decades, the role of lateral complexity has rarely been factored into studies of zooplankton ecology. We examined the importance of hydrologic retention areas (slackwaters) near islands and embayments of the St. Lawrence River for densities, fecundity, and diel migration of planktonic microcrustaceans. Densities of cladocera and copepods

  7. A Practical Grammar of the St. Lawrence Island/Siberian Yupik Eskimo Language. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Steven A.

    This book deals with the Central Siberian Yupik Eskimo language as spoken on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska, an island near the Bering Strait and on the tip of the Asian mainland opposite Russia. This book has been used with college-level classes composed of a mixture of Yupik speakers and well-prepared non-speakers (people who have studied other,…

  8. Factors affecting leech parasitism on four turtle species in St. Lawrence Islands National Park

    E-print Network

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    Factors affecting leech parasitism on four turtle species in St. Lawrence Islands National Park Islands National Park and their associated leeches. During the months of May to August 2008, leeches were), Common Musk Turtles (Sternotherus odoratus) and Painted Turtles (Chrysemys picta). Leech prevalence

  9. Invading the Invaders: Infestation of Zebra Mussels by Native Parasites in the St. Lawrence River

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Bruce Conn

    Between June and August, 1993, adult Dreissena polymorpha and Dreissena bugenis were collected from well-established populations at two sites along the international section of the St. Lawrence River. The mussels were taken to the laboratory for exhaustive examination for parasites by gross pathological and histological techniques. Seventy percent of the D. polymorpha at the site near Massena, New York were

  10. Binational GIS database of coastal wetlands for Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence: a demonstration project

    E-print Network

    McMaster University

    Binational GIS database of coastal wetlands for Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence: a demonstration In this project, I assembled a seamless binational GIS database that contains all available shapefiles of coastal (Wetland Inventory for Research and Education) website (http://www.wirenet.info). GIS was used to quantify

  11. Introduction The Coastal Change Analysis Project St. Croix Estuary Region CD-ROM data set

    E-print Network

    Introduction The Coastal Change Analysis Project St. Croix Estuary Region CD-ROM data set uses cover change detection analysis Each data set is approximately 16 megabytes in size (4212 pixels per row of the image. The positional accuracy and precision of this data set are based on the Landsat Thematic Mapper

  12. Distribution of submerged aquatic vegetation in the St. Louis River estuary: Maps and models

    EPA Science Inventory

    In late summer of 2011 and 2012 we used echo-sounding gear to map the distribution of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in the St. Louis River Estuary (SLRE). From these data we produced maps of SAV distribution and we created logistic models to predict the probability of occurr...

  13. ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH CONDUCTED WITHIN THE ST. LOUIS RIVER ESTUARY 1903-1982

    EPA Science Inventory

    This annotated bibliography reviews manuscripts and publications for content, not for results. It is thus intended as a tool for individuals attempting to locate specific types of studies conducted within the St. Louis River estuary. Each review includes the study dates, specific...

  14. EARLY MARINE LIFE OF ATIANTIC SALMON, SALMO SALAR, POSTSMOLTS IN THE NORmERN GULF OF ST. LAWRENCE

    E-print Network

    feeding areas should be reconsidered. Low sea temperature is hypothe- sized to trigger the movement out. Lawrence. From a back- calculated smolt length of 135 mm they had increased in length to 265 mm (212 gl movement out of the Gulf of St. Lawrence indicate the directional nature ofsmolt migration to distant

  15. Estuaries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Formerly entitled Chesapeake Science, Estuaries is the continuing journal of the Estuarine Research Federation (ERF), an international organization dedicated to promoting research in estuarine and coastal waters. Estuaries contains scientific articles detailing "research results and management studies on natural resources of the Chesapeake Bay region." Currently, the 1999 issues of Estuaries may be browsed online (or downloaded in .pdf format), and article titles may be searched for issues since 1996. Note that ERF expects to add the contents of "all remaining issues of Estuaries and Chesapeake Science" to the searchable database shortly.

  16. Impact of the( Dreissena ) invasion on native unionid bivalves in the upper St. Lawrence River

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Ricciardi; F. G. Whoriskey; J. B. Rasmussen

    1996-01-01

    Introduced Eurasian mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and Dreissena bugensis) colonized native unionid bivalves in the upper St. Lawrence River in the early 1990s. From 1992 to 1995, we examined the infestation and impact of Dreissena on unionids at several sites near the Island of MontrØal. Unionids suffered heavy (90ñ100%) mortality at sites where Dreissena occurred in high densities (i.e., 4000 ñ

  17. Annual Records of Toxic phytoplankton and PSP toxins in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Quebec.

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website provides access to annual records of the abundance of phytoplankton species and physical-chemical parameters of seawater at monitoring stations in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Quebec, Canada. Users may choose a particular station and the year to view the data (which are presented in MS-Excel format, in French). The webpage also provides a link to a map displaying the locations of the sampling stations.

  18. Diet and Feeding Periodicity of Ruffe in the St. Louis River Estuary, Lake Superior

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Derek H. Ogle; James H. Selgeby; Raymond M. Newman; Mary G. Henry

    1995-01-01

    Ruffe Gymnocephalus cernuus, a percid native to Europe and Asia, is established in the Lake Superior drainage and could have negative impacts on native fish through competition for forage and predation on fish eggs. We investigated the diet of ruffes in the 4,654-ha St. Louis River estuary in May–October 1989–1990 and the feeding periodicity of ruffes in two adjacent habitats

  19. Diet and Feeding Periodicity of Ruffe in the St. Louis River Estuary, Lake Superior

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DEREK H. OGLE; JAMES H. SELGEBY; RAYMOND M. NEWMAN; MARY G. HENRY

    1995-01-01

    Ruffe Gymnocephalus cernuus, a percid native to Europe and Asia, is established in the Lake Superior drainage and could have negative impacts on native fish through competition for forage and predation on fish eggs. We investigated the diet of ruffes in the 4,654-ha St. Louis River estuary in May-October 1989-1990 and the feeding periodicity of ruffes in two adjacent habitats

  20. Mapping ecosystem services in the St. Louis River estuary (presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of ecosystems for sustainable provision of services beneficial to human communities requires reliable data about from where in the ecosystem services flow. Our objective is to map ecosystem services in the St. Louis River with the overarching EPA goal of community sust...

  1. Mapping ecosystem services in the St. Louis River Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainable management of ecosystems for the perpetual flow of services beneficial to human communities requires reliable data about from where in the ecosystem services flow. Our objective is to map ecosystem services in the St. Louis River with the overarching U.S. EPA goal of ...

  2. Research management in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River basins: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, C T; Rosemond, Z A; Cibulas, W; Gilman, A P

    1999-04-01

    Research management in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River basins is both challenging and filled with opportunities. From the perspective of public health practice, research management is more than just research managers managing discrete programs; it requires everyone involved in the process to become active participants, including researchers, communities, potential interest groups, policymakers, and other stakeholders. Agencies, organizations, and individuals responsible for managing research and resources in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River basins are facing problems of decreased research funding, data gaps, and research quality. Managers of research and resources in the basins face many challenges as they address these problems. They are challenged with strengthening the link between research and management in the face of decreasing resources and increasing expectations of results and findings while extending those results and findings to public health practice. A number of actions and activities have been proposed that can lead to better management of constrained programs, pooled resources, partnerships, targeted priorities, and improved effectiveness. With guidance and assistance from the International Joint Commission (IJC), research managers in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River basins who have initiated and maintained traditional research programs based on sound science are now adopting different and innovative management strategies. The research community must be proactive in articulating the role of science in bridging the gaps in knowledge between public health practice and regulatory programs. Supported by a firm foundation of credible science, critical assessment, and public service, basin research managers are recognizing the need to move outside the comfort zone and extend to areas previously unwelcomed or uncomfortable. PMID:10092446

  3. Age and growth of lake sturgeon in the upper St. Lawrence River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J.H.; Dropkin, D.S.; LaPan, S.R.; McKenna, J.E., Jr.; Klindt, R.M.

    1998-01-01

    The growth of lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) over time in the upper St. Lawrence River was examined. Growth of lake sturgeon collected during 1993 and 1994 below Robert Moses Dam near Massena, New York, was compared to that reported for the same population almost 25 years earlier. The data suggest that lake sturgeon growth was similar to that reported in the previous study. However, significant differences in the elevations of regression models between males and fish of unknown sex in both data sets suggest possible sexual dimorphism in growth at younger ages.

  4. Estuaries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    New Jersey

    2006-01-01

    An estuary is a body of water that is created when freshwater from rivers and streams flows into the saltwater of an ocean. To understand this mixing of fresh and salt water, learners go through several activities: 1) in Salt and Water, learners dissolve salt crystals in water to observe their effects on water; 2) in Making a Salt Wedge, learners make a model of a salt wedge estuary, which occurs in nature when the mouth of a river flows directly into seawater; 3) in Plant Dehydration learners observe the effects of salinity (salt content in the water) on live plants. Includes a wrap-up guide for group discussions.

  5. Sediment salt-load in the St Lucia Estuary during the severe drought of 2002–2006

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. C. Bate; R. H. Taylor

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there was a sufficiently high residual salt load in the dry sediments of\\u000a the St Lucia Estuary to cause salinity problems should it later fill up with either freshwater or seawater. The estuary lakes\\u000a have suffered the effects of a severe drought since 2002 with the result that many areas were

  6. Organochlorine and metal contaminants in traditional foods from St. Lawrence Island, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Welfinger-Smith, Gretchen; Minholz, Judith L; Byrne, Sam; Waghiyi, Vi; Gologergen, Jesse; Kava, Jane; Apatiki, Morgan; Ungott, Eddie; Miller, Pamela K; Arnason, John G; Carpenter, David O

    2011-01-01

    Marine mammals (bowhead whale, walrus, and various seals) constitute the major component of the diet of the Yupik people of St. Lawrence Island, Alaska. St. Lawrence Island residents have higher serum concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) than in the general U.S. population. In order to determine potential sources, traditional food samples were collected from 2004 to 2009 and analyzed for PCBs, three chlorinated pesticides, and seven heavy metals (mercury, copper, zinc, arsenic, selenium, cadmium, and lead). Concentrations of PCB in rendered oils (193-421 ppb) and blubber (73-317 ppb) from all marine mammal samples were at levels that trigger advisories for severely restricted consumption, using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) fish consumption advisories. Concentrations of pesticides were lower, but were still elevated. The highest PCB concentrations were found in polar bear (445 ppb) and the lowest in reindeer adipose tissue (2 ppb). Marine mammal and polar bear meat in general have PCB concentrations that were 1-5% of those in rendered oils or adipose tissue. PCB concentrations in organs were higher than meat. Concentrations of metals in oils and meats from all species were relatively low, but increased levels of mercury, cadmium, copper, and zinc were present in some liver and kidney samples. Mercury and arsenic were found in lipid-rich samples, indicating organometals. These results show that the source of the elevated concentrations of these contaminants in the Yupik population is primarily from consumption of marine mammal blubber and rendered oils. PMID:21797772

  7. A REVISED GEOMORPHIC, SHORE PROTECTION AND NEARSHORE CLASSIFICATION OF THE CANADIAN AND UNITED STATES SHORELINES OF LAKE ONTARIO AND THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian J. Stewart

    In 2000, the International Joint Commission (IJC) initiated the Lake Ontario - St. Lawrence River Water Level Regulation Study (LOSLRS), a comprehensive study to examine changes to the 1956 criteria for Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River water levels and flow regulation. As part of this activity, the LOSLRS Study Board established the Coastal Processes Technical Working Group (CWG), whose goals are

  8. Modeling the timing of spring phytoplankton bloom and biological production of the Gulf of St. Lawrence (Canada): Effects of colored dissolved organic matter and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Zhi-Ping; Saucier, François J.; Le Fouest, Vincent; Zakardjian, Bruno; Sennville, Simon; Xie, Huixiang; Starr, Michel

    2010-11-01

    The effects of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) from freshwater runoff and seasonal cycle of temperature on the dynamic of phytoplankton and zooplankton biomass and production in the Gulf of St. Lawrence (GSL) are studied using a 3-D coupled physical-plankton ecosystem model. Three simulations are conducted: (1) the reference simulation based on Le Fouest et al. (2005), in which light attenuation by CDOM is not considered and maximum growth rate ( ?max) of phytoplankton and zooplankton are not temperature-dependent (REF simulation); (2) light attenuation by CDOM is added to REF simulation (CDOM simulation); and (3) in addition to CDOM, the ?max of phytoplankton and zooplankton are regulated by temperature (CDOM+TEMP simulation). CDOM simulation shows that CDOM substantially reduces phytoplankton biomass and production in the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE), but slightly reduces overall primary production in the GSL. In the LSLE, the spring phytoplankton bloom is delayed from mid-March to mid-April, resulted from light attenuation by CDOM. The CDOM+TEMP simulation shows that the spring phytoplankton bloom in the LSLE is further delayed to July, which is more consistent with observations. Annual primary production is reduced by 33% in CDOM+TEMP simulation from REF and CDOM simulations. Zooplankton production is the same in all three simulations, and export of organic matter to depth is reduced in CDOM+TEMP simulation, suggesting that temperature controlled growth of phytoplankton and zooplankton enhances the coupling between primary production and zooplankton production under the seasonal temperature cycle of the GSL.

  9. ?-carotene and retinoids in eggs of Great Blue Herons (Ardea herodias) in relation to St Lawrence River contamination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. H. Boily; L. Champoux; D. H. Bourbonnais; J. L. Granges; J. Rodrigue; P. A. Spear

    1994-01-01

    The potential use of retinoids and ß-carotene as biomarkers in the eggs of the Great Blue Heron was investigated. In the spring of 1991, 65 eggs were collected from nine heronries (seven along the St Lawrence River and two reference sites). A method was specifically developed for the extraction and analysis of ß-carotene and the retinoids in heron egg yolks

  10. Effects of salinity and temperature on ex situ germination of the threatened Gulf of St. Lawrence Aster,

    E-print Network

    Heard, Stephen B.

    Effects of salinity and temperature on ex situ germination of the threatened Gulf of St. Lawrence of salinity (0­20 g/L) and temperature (16­30°C) on germination of S. laurentianum seeds over 32 days. The time-course of germination was significantly affected by both salinity and temperature. At lower

  11. Trophic structure and mercury distribution in a Gulf of St. Lawrence (Canada) food web using stable isotope analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raphael A. Lavoie; Craig E. Hebert; Jean-François Rail; Birgit M. Braune; Emmanuel Yumvihoze; Laura G. Hill; David R. S. Lean

    2010-01-01

    Even at low concentrations in the environment, mercury has the potential to biomagnify in food chains and reaches levels of concern in apex predators. The aim of this study was to relate the transfer of total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in a Gulf of St. Lawrence food web to the trophic structure, from primary consumers to seabirds, using stable

  12. Distribution and fluxes of metals in the St. Lawrence River from the outflow of Lake Ontario to Québec City

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ken R. Lum; K. L. E. Kaiser; C. Jaskot

    1991-01-01

    Six anchor stations in the St. Lawrence River from the outflow of Lake Ontario to Quebec City, were occupied for ca. 24 hours in June 1987 during low flow conditions. Samples of water and suspended particulate matter were separated by continuous-flow centrifugation, and were collected every two hours.

  13. Operational coupled atmosphere - ocean - ice forecast system for the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher, M.; Roy, F.; Desjardins, S.; Fogarty, C.; Pellerin, P.; Ritchie, H.; Denis, B.

    2009-09-01

    A fully interactive coupled atmosphere-ocean-ice forecasting system for the Gulf of St. Lawrence (GSL) has been running in experimental mode at the Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC) for the last two winter seasons. The goal of this project is to provide more accurate weather and sea ice forecasts over the GSL and adjacent coastal areas by including atmosphere-oceanice interactions in the CMC operational forecast system using a formal coupling strategy between two independent modeling components. The atmospheric component is the Canadian operational GEM model (Côté et al. 1998) and the oceanic component is the ocean-ice model for the Gulf of St. Lawrence developed at the Maurice Lamontagne Institute (IML) (Saucier et al. 2003, 2004). The coupling between those two models is achieved by exchanging surface fluxes and variables through MPI communication. The re-gridding of the variables is done with a package developed at the Recherche en Prevision Numerique centre (RPN, Canada). Coupled atmosphere - ocean - ice forecasts are issued once a day based on 00GMT data. Results for the past two years have demonstrated that the coupled system produces improved forecasts in and around the GSL during all seasons, proving that atmosphere-ocean-ice interactions are indeed important even for short-term Canadian weather forecasts. This has important implications for other coupled modeling and data assimilation partnerships that are in progress involving EC, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) and the National Defense (DND). Following this experimental phase, it is anticipated that this GSL system will be the first fully interactive coupled system to be implemented at CMC.

  14. A survey of the St. Louis River estuary with emphasis on non-indigenous species and habitat structure

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a larger study to develop a monitoring network for aquatic non-indigenous species (NIS), a comprehensive multi-gear survey of larval fish and macroinvertebrates in the St. Louis River estuary was conducted during summer 2012. A total of 139 larval fish samples and 118...

  15. Shoreline Classification of the St. Louis River Estuary using Geographic Information Systems and Standard Landuse/Landcover Data Sets

    EPA Science Inventory

    The St. Louis River Estuary (SLRE) shoreline is ~300 km in length and borders MN and WI from the MN highway 23 downstream to Lake Superior. The shoreline is a complex and diverse mixture of many features from industrial docks and slips in the lower SLRE to complex wetlands and na...

  16. Trace metals in the Columbia River Estuary following the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Riedel, G.F.; Wilson, S.L.; Holton, R.L.

    1984-10-01

    Dissolved and suspended concentrations of cadmium, copper, iron, manganese, nickel, lead, and zinc were measured in the Columbia River Estuary following the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Soluble concentrations of these trace elements were not substantially elevated by the influx of volcanic ash and mud into the estuary during this period, except for somewhat higher than usual concentrations of manganese and copper. A laboratory experiment indicates that manganese leached from volcanic debris in fresh water and in the transition from fresh to slightly saline water probably caused the elevated Mn leaching from the material into fresh water.

  17. Establishment Patterns of Non-native Fishes: Lessons from the Duluth-Superior Harbor and Lower St. Louis River, an Invasion-prone Great Lakes Freshwater Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    The St. Louis River freshwater estuary which drains into western Lake Superior and includes the Duluth-Superior (MN-WI) harbor, has a long history of non-native fish introductions. From 1985 to 2002, seven new fishes were identified in the estuary, an unprecedented rate of non-n...

  18. Modelling wetland bird response to water level changes in the Lake Ontario - St. Lawrence River hydrosystem.

    PubMed

    Desgranges, Jean-Luc; Ingram, Joel; Drolet, Bruno; Morin, Jean; Savage, Caroline; Borcard, Daniel

    2006-02-01

    Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River (LOSL) wetland bird abundance and diversity are greatly influenced by lake and river hydrology. Our study used an interdisciplinary ecosystem approach, blending avian and plant ecology, ecohydraulic, statistical ecology and modelling to evaluate potential impacts of water level fluctuations on indicator species representative of the wetland breeding bird assemblages in the entire LOSL freshwater system. Multi-year (2000-2003) bird surveys captured bird distribution and density in wetland habitats under varying degrees of water inandation, depth and fluctuation. Analyses revealed strong associations between estimated breeding pair densities and plant communities, water depth, and degree of water level fluctuation during the breeding season for a suite of wetland bird species using marsh, wet meadow, shrub swamp and treed swamp habitats. These quantitative associations were used to develop wetland bird performance indicators for use in a LOSL water regulation review study. Several bird species also nest at or near the water surface and are thus vulnerable to nest flooding or stranding. Changes to the seasonal hydrology of Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River that result in an increased frequency or magnitude of these nest failure events may have a significant impact on regional population sustainability. Long term nest record databases were analyzed to create nesting flooding and stranding probability equations based on water level increases and decreases during the breeding season. These species-specific nesting relationships were incorporated into a reproduction index. Many breeding bird species were strongly associated with specific wetland plant communities. Predicted habitat suitability, as measured by estimated breeding pair density, can also change significantly within a specific wetland plant community based solely on changes in water depth during the breeding season. Three indicator species, Black Tern, Least Bittern and Virginia Rail were selected as key environmental performance indicators for alternate regulation plan comparisons. Water regulation criteria should be such that the long term diversity and abundance of wetland plant communities and frequency of spring flooding in marsh habitats during breeding are not reduced. Magnitude and frequency of water level change during the nesting season (May-July) can also adversely impact reproductive success of many wetland bird species. As such, regulation criteria that increase the seasonal magnitude and frequency of water level change may be detrimental to the long term viability of certain regional breeding bird populations. PMID:16518674

  19. Parasite fauna of Etheostoma nigrum (Percidae: Etheostomatinae) in localities of varying pollution stress in the St. Lawrence River, Quebec, Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rachel J. Krause; J. Daniel McLaughlin; David J. Marcogliese

    2010-01-01

    Parasite communities were examined in johnny darters (Etheostoma nigrum) collected from five localities in the St. Lawrence River in southwestern Quebec: two reference localities, one polluted\\u000a locality upstream of the Island of Montreal and downstream of industrial and agricultural activity, and two polluted localities\\u000a downstream of the Island of Montreal in the plume from the wastewater treatment facility. Twenty-four helminth

  20. Novel brominated flame retardants and dechloranes in three fish species from the St. Lawrence River, Canada.

    PubMed

    Houde, Magali; Berryman, David; de Lafontaine, Yves; Verreault, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    Restrictions in the utilization of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) mixtures have led to the increased usage of alternative flame retardant additives in a wide range of commercial applications. The present study examined the occurrence of established and emerging flame retardants (FRs) in fish from a densely-populated urbanized sector of the St. Lawrence River (Montreal, Quebec, Canada). Thirty-eight PBDE congeners and sixteen emerging FRs were determined in fish belonging to three predatory species (yellow perch, northern pike, and muskellunge). The ?PBDE in fish were up to 24,115 ng/g lipid weight (l.w.) in the apex predator muskellunge. Twelve emerging FRs including bis(2-ethylhexyl)-tetrabromophthalate (BEHTBP), pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), Dechlorane Plus (anti and syn), dechloranes (Dec) 602, Dec 604, Dec 604 Compound B (Dec 604 CB), and Chlordene Plus (CP) were detected (>0.01 ng/gl.w.) in the liver of muskellunge and northern pike but not in yellow perch homogenates. This is the first report of Dec 604 CB in any fish species. The bioavailability of these FRs in human-impacted aquatic ecosystems warrants further environmental assessment and toxicity testing. PMID:24534698

  1. Toxicity of sediments near an aluminum smelter on the St. Lawrence river to aquatic organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe-Smith, J.L. [National Water Research Inst., Burlington, Ontario (Canada); Sirota, G.R.; Holtze, K.E.; Reid, J.J. [B.A.R. Environmental Inc., Guelph, Ontario (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    Under a US EPA Superfund Administrative Order, over 50,000 cu yds of bottom sediments contaminated with fluoride, cyanide, PCBs, PAHs and Al will be dredged from the St. Lawrence River near the Reynolds Metals plant at Massena, NY in 1994. The purpose of this study was to determine the toxicity of these sediments to aquatic organisms and the potential for remobilizing sediment-bound contaminants into the water column during dredging. Sediment was collected from 7 sites along a gradient from the outfall in October 1993. Sediment from the most contaminated site ``B2`` (1,500 {mu}g/g fluoride, 30 {mu}g/g cyanide, 450 {mu}g/g PCBs, 3,500 {mu}g/g PAHs, 90,000 {mu}g/g Al), caused complete mortality of mayflies, Hexagenia limbata, and avoidance, considerable weight loss and some mortality in fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, after 21 d exposure. Mortality was not observed at other sites, but growth of both organisms decreased with increasing contamination. LOECs of B2 elutriate were 13% for survival and reproduction of Ceriodaphnia dubia, and 6% for survival and 1.5% for growth of larval fatheads. Elutriates of other sediments were nontoxic. TIE testing suggested organic contaminants as the primary toxicants. Over 2,000 cu yds of sediment are highly toxic and 18,000 cu yds somewhat toxic. Toxicity of B2 elutriate shows that contaminants enter the water column when sediments are disturbed and may harm indigenous biota.

  2. Late Quaternary history of the southwestern St. Lawrence Lowlands and adjacent Adirondack Highlands

    SciTech Connect

    Pair, D.L. (Univ. of Dayton, OH (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The reconstruction of Late Wisconsinan ice retreat, proglacial lakes, and Champlain Sea history from the northwest Adirondack slope and adjacent St. Lawrence Lowlands is critical to the synthesis of a regional picture of deglacial events in the eastern Great Lakes region. Unfortunately, these same areas are well known for their limited exposures, landforms covered by thick forest, large tracts of land inaccessible to detailed field mapping, and the overall paucity of glacial materials preserved on upland surfaces. Despite these limitations, a model which utilizes multiple and field-truthed evidence has been used to designate areas where ice border deposits indicate a substantial recessional position. It employs the following criteria in this analysis: sedimentology and morphostratigraphy of morainal landform segments and related sediments; orientation and continuity of ice border drainage channels; and the relationship of ice borders and drainage systems to well documented local and regional water bodies which accompanied ice retreat. The results of this approach have provided a unique regional picture of deglaciation. Despite the inherent limitations of working in upland areas to reconstruct glacial events, detailed morphostratigraphic correlations based on multiple lines of evidence can yield important information. The positions of five former ice borders have been reconstructed from the available data. These ice margins correspond closely with those documented previously by others adjoining areas. This type of study, utilizing multiple and field-truthed lines of evidence, constitutes a tangible step towards understanding the nature and history of ice retreat along this portion of the Laurentide Ice Sheet.

  3. Temporal changes in wetland landscapes of a section of the St. Lawrence River, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, Martin; Bouchard, André

    1991-03-01

    Historical aerial photographs (from 1946 through 1983) were used to study and describe the nature and extent of changes in wetland vegetation of a section of the St. Lawrence River and to evaluate the relative importance of water level, fire, and vegetational development as causal factors of these historical changes. Data were encoded and analyzed using a geographical information system, autocorrelation, and Mantel tests. Results show three temporal patterns in wetland dynamics. First, some wetland zones have been reduced by human activities (urbanization, landfilling, canal dredging). The second group consists of wetland areas that remain stable and do not change over time. They are generally protected sites artificially maintained by water-level control. A third situation has occurred in the Lake Saint-François National Wildlife Area, where no significant wetland losses were detected, but where landscape structure has changed greatly. Modeling with Mantel tests suggests that, in the latter case, these changes in wetland landscape are related to the suppression of burning (fires set deliberately by Indians) since the purchase of the territory by the Canadian federal government. This situation has caused rapid replacement of wet meadows by Alnus rugosa scrub and a possible decline in habitat diversity.

  4. Ebullition rates and mercury concentrations in St. Lawrence river sediments and a benthic invertebrate.

    PubMed

    Razavi, N Roxanna; Ridal, Jeffrey J; de Wit, William; Hickey, M Brian C; Campbell, Linda M; Hodson, Peter V

    2013-04-01

    Ebullition, the release of gas from anaerobic decomposition in sediments, was recorded in a mercury-contaminated depositional zone (Zone 1) of the St. Lawrence River Area of Concern in Cornwall, Ontario, Canada. The aim of the present study was to test if this disturbance affected the bioavailability of total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in surficial sediments to a benthic invertebrate (Echinogammarus ischnus). Ebullition rates ranged from <1 to 2,800?ml/m(2) daily, with methane gas comprising 29 to 84% of the total. No direct effects of ebullition were found on either abiotic (sediment or pore water THg or MeHg concentrations) or biotic (amphipod THg or MeHg concentrations) variables measured. Instead, amphipod MeHg concentrations were best predicted by pore water THg and MeHg concentrations, organic matter of surficial sediments, and water depth and location. Trend surface analyses demonstrated that a shallow, southwestern part of Zone 1 was most contaminated with pore water mercury, which decreased in a gradient toward the northeast. Further study is needed to determine if the amount of sediment resuspended by ebullition affects the spatial distribution of mercury. PMID:23296404

  5. Characterization of turbidity in Florida's Lake Okeechobee and Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie estuaries using MODIS-Aqua measurements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Menghua; Nim, Carl J; Son, Seunghyun; Shi, Wei

    2012-10-15

    This paper describes the use of ocean color remote sensing data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard the Aqua satellite to characterize turbidity in Lake Okeechobee and its primary drainage basins, the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie estuaries from 2002 to 2010. Drainage modification and agricultural development in southern Florida transport sediments and nutrients from watershed agricultural areas to Lake Okeechobee. As a result of development around Lake Okeechobee and the estuaries that are connected to Lake Okeechobee, estuarine conditions have also been adversely impacted, resulting in salinity and nutrient fluctuations. The measurement of water turbidity in lacustrine and estuarine ecosystems allows researchers to understand important factors such as light limitation and the potential release of nutrients from re-suspended sediments. Based on a strong correlation between water turbidity and normalized water-leaving radiance at the near-infrared (NIR) band (nL(w)(869)), a new satellite water turbidity algorithm has been developed for Lake Okeechobee. This study has shown important applications with satellite-measured nL(w)(869) data for water quality monitoring and measurements for turbid inland lakes. MODIS-Aqua-measured water property data are derived using the shortwave infrared (SWIR)-based atmospheric correction algorithm in order to remotely obtain synoptic turbidity data in Lake Okeechobee and normalized water-leaving radiance using the red band (nL(w)(645)) in the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie estuaries. We found varied, but distinct seasonal, spatial, and event driven turbidity trends in Lake Okeechobee and the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie estuary regions. Wind waves and hurricanes have the largest influence on turbidity trends in Lake Okeechobee, while tides, currents, wind waves, and hurricanes influence the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie estuarine areas. PMID:22858282

  6. Aquatic Vegetation of the St. Louis River Estuary: Initial Analysis of Point-intercept Data Collected in 2010 for Restoration Modeling.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new effort to model aquatic vegetation patterns in the St. Louis River Estuary was initiated in summer of 2010 for the purpose of informing wetland restoration planning in the St. Louis River Area of Concern (AOC) at 40th Avenue West in Duluth. Aquatic vascular plants were doc...

  7. Reconnaissance investigation of high-calcium marble in the Beaver Creek area, St. Lawrence County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, C. Ervin

    1978-01-01

    Three belts of marble of the Grenville Series were mapped in the Beaver Creek drainage basin, St. Lawrence County, N.Y. One of these, on the west side of Beaver Creek, consists of coarsely crystalline pure calcitic marble that occurs in a zone at least 10 by 0.8 km in extent. Samples of marble show CaCO3 content to be greater than 93 percent, and some samples contain greater than 96 percent, and only small amounts of MgO and Fe203 are present. Marble in two other belts to the east of Beaver Creek are variable in composition, but locally have high content of calcium carbonate material. The marble deposit west of Beaver Creek has a chemical composition favorable for specialized chemical, industrial, and metallurgical uses. Another favorable aspect of the deposit is its proximity to inexpensive water transportation on the St. Lawrence Seaway only 27.5 km away by road, at Ogdensburg, N.Y.

  8. Distribution of submerged aquatic vegetation in the St. Louis River estuary: Maps and models (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAV provides the biophysical basis for several ecosystem services in Great Lakes estuaries including rearing and adult habitat for commercially and recreationally important fishes, foraging habit for waterfowl, and nutrient retention. Understanding sources of variation in SAV in ...

  9. Sediment trap observations from the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the continental margin of eastern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Nancy; Silverberg, Norman; Roy, Suzanne; Lovejoy, Connie

    2000-04-01

    Sediment trap samples have provided the first direct observations of the sinking particles that account for the export of material out of the photic zone in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, as well as their relationship to variations in the trophic regime. Particles were collected at several sites over 24-h periods using 0.03 m 2 (collecting surface) and 0.5 m 2 free-drifting sediment traps at 50 and 150 m. Total mass flux varied widely (80-1500 mg/m 2/d), as did carbon flux (16-300 mg C/m 2/d). Small cylinders consistently oversampled with respect to big cylinders, regardless of depth or drifter design. Also, 6-month time series were obtained with a moored, 0.125 m 2 trap at two sites. In the Anticosti Gyre, time-series fluxes were consistent with those obtained from the big drifting trap (means: 480 mg dry wt/m 2/d; 39 mg C/m 2/d), and with independently measured sediment accumulation rates. Numeric fluxes of phytoplankton cells were similar to moderately productive ocean margins during the April 1994 bloom, but otherwise resembled those from oligotrophic regimes. Fecal pellet numeric fluxes, in contrast, were always high, similar to other continental margins. The composition of the material collected by the small and big traps is a good indicator of the changing trophic regime in the water column. Relative numeric abundances suggest three distinctly different periods. A "bloom" period (represented by April 1994, but including a weaker late-fall bloom over a shelf valley), when a variety of centric and pennate diatom cells made up 70-95% of the particle numbers; a transitional or "post-bloom" period (June 1994), when phytoplankton were less abundant, pennate forms were scarce and a single species dominated the centric diatoms; and a "non-bloom" period (May to December, 1993) when fecal pellets and microzooplankton accounted for greater numbers than the phytoplankton cells, including abundant dinoflagellates. The time-series Anticosti Gyre trap showed continued large-particle settling throughout the winter with total mass and carbon fluxes similar to the ice-free seasons. The most frequent fecal pellets were 50-109 ?m diameter compact and loose rods, produced by the dominant calanoid copepods. Large macrozooplankton fecal pellets occurred only sporadically. Many pellets <49 ?m were collected in December 1993, probably produced by Microcalanus, which was unusually abundant at this time. Oval pellets occurred over a broad range of diameters, suggesting multiple origins. The bulk of the settling material produced by the pelagic food web in the Gulf appears to be of zooplanktonic origin (mainly fecal pellets and abundant microzooplankton). Diatom frustules were the most frequently encountered particles, numerically, but phytoplankton rarely made up more than 35% of the 2D projected area of all particles. Much of the organic matter produced photosynthetically must thus be transformed by heterotrophs before escaping from the surface and intermediate waters in this region.

  10. Health of Tree Swallow (Tachycineta Bicolor) Nestlings Exposed to Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in the St. Lawrence River Basin. Part I. Renal and Hepatic Vitamin A Concentrations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara Martinovic; D. R. S Lean; Christine Bishop; Erinn Birmingham; Anne Secord; Ken Jock

    2003-01-01

    Sixteen-day-old tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor), near fledging, were collected in 1999 and 2000 from nine sites representing a gradient of dioxin concentrations, within the vicinity of the St. Lawrence River in Canada and the United States, to determine if organochlorine contaminants correlated with vitamin A levels measured as retinol and retinyl palmitate. Mean concentrations of hepatic retinol ranged from 3mg

  11. Endocrine and metabolic dysfunction in yellow perch, Perca flavescens, exposed to organic contaminants and heavy metals in the St. Lawrence River

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alice Hontela; D. Duclos; R. Fortin; P. Dumont

    1995-01-01

    The endocrine and biochemical responses to the acute stress of capture and handling were investigated in sexually mature and in immature male and female yellow perch, Perca flavescens, from a site contaminated by organic contaminants (PAHs and PCBs) and heavy metals (Hg, Cd, As, and Zn) and from a reference site in the St. Lawrence River. Following a standardized capture

  12. Estimation of Emissions of ?-Hexachlorcyclohexane from the Great Lakes–St. Lawrence Ecosystem Using a Coupled Efficient Kalman Filter–Atmospheric Transport–Soil Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jiainmin Ma; Yi-fan Li; Laurier Poissant

    2003-01-01

    An efficient linear Kalman filter has been combined with a coupled atmospheric transport and soil–air exchange model to determine organochlorine pesticides emissions on the regional scale. In this study, results of ?-HCH emissions from the Great Lakes–St. Lawrence ecosystem, estimated from the coupled model, are presented and discussed. A source receptor technique is used to identify a priori the locations

  13. Evaluation of HVDC cables for the St. Lawrence River crossing of Hydro-Quebec's 500kV DC line. Part 3; Thermal behavior

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Chaaban; J. Leduc; D. Couderc; N. G. Trinh; M. Belec

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the thermal analyses conducted during the different stages of Hydro-Quebec's St. Lawrence river crossing project. It reveals the important impact of the thermal studies on the choice of HVDC cable and the design of the installations. It also describes the numerous problems faced during the cable prototype and demonstration tests and the solutions obtained by numerical analysis

  14. Plankton ecosystem response to freshwater-associated bulk turbidity in the subarctic Gulf of St. Lawrence (Canada): A modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Fouest, V.; Zakardjian, B.; Saucier, F. J.

    2010-04-01

    We present a three-dimensional physical-biological modelling study aiming to infer the effect of freshwater-associated bulk turbidity on the Gulf of St. Lawrence (Canada) plankton ecosystem. Bulk turbidity is parameterised using an inverse relationship derived from an extensive in situ dataset linking salinity to the diffuse attenuation coefficient of photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) due to nonchlorophyllous matter. Embedding bulk turbidity in the model led to shallowing of the photic zone in the estuarine plume in accordance with coincident observations and allowed a better discrimination between Case 1 (chlorophyll-mediated variability of the photosynthetic available radiation attenuation) and Case 2 waters. The spring bloom was delayed, and primary and secondary production rates as well as the export of biogenic matter at depth decreased in the freshwater-influenced subregions. Comparisons with literature and coincident in situ measurements showed that nitrates were over- and underestimated in the run with and without bulk turbidity, respectively. A sensitivity analysis was performed with a relatively simple but robust parameterisation of photoacclimation, i.e. the adjustment of the phytoplankton photosynthetic efficiency to local underwater light conditions. Photoacclimation allowed simulated chlorophyll and nitrate concentrations as well as lateral fluxes of nitrate to achieve the best agreement with coincident measurements and literature estimates, respectively. This study showed that accounting for the freshwater-associated bio-optical variability and phytoplankton response in terms of photosynthetic efficiency improved the model's ability to predict the plankton ecosystem dynamics and associated biogeochemical fluxes in the river-influenced Gulf of St. Lawrence.

  15. Intra-annual variability of water quality and phytoplankton in the North Fork of the St. Lucie River Estuary, Florida (USA): a quantitative assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. F. Millie; H. J. Carrick; P. H. Doering; K. A. Steidinger

    2004-01-01

    Water quality and phytoplankton were examined within the North Fork of the St. Lucie River Estuary, Florida (USA) from March 2000 to March 2001. Alterations in water-quality parameters and phytoplankton assemblages mirrored salinity regimes resulting from the ‘wet’\\/‘dry’ seasonality of south Florida. Salinity was greatest during the ‘dry’, winter months whereas water temperature and nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were greatest

  16. ST. LAWRENCE ISLANDS NATIONAL PARK OF CANADA MALLORYTOWN LANDING, ONTARIOVOL. 1, NO. 2 FALL 2006

    E-print Network

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    . Park interpreter Emily LaBonté explores the shoreline with visitor Kayla Morin of Cornwall. Through on your doorstep. #12;THE PITCH PINE POST2 - FALL 2006 The Superintendent Says... By Gord Giffin, St

  17. Intra- and inter-species differences in persistent organic contaminants in the blubber of blue whales and humpback whales from the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris Metcalfe; Brenda Koenig; Tracy Metcalfe; Gordon Paterson; Richard Sears

    2004-01-01

    Biopsy samples of blubber from adult male and female blue whales, and from female and young-of-the-year humpback whales were collected during the summers of 1992–1999 in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada. In blue whales, concentrations of 25 PCB congeners, DDT and metabolites and several other organochlorine compounds were present at higher concentrations in the blubber of males relative to

  18. Evaluation of HVDC cables for the St. Lawrence crossing of Hydro-Quebec 500 kV DC Line. Part 1; Dielectric and accelerated aging tests on prototypes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Coudere; N. G. Trinh; M. Belec; M. Chaaban; J. Leduc; Y. Beausejour

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the dielectric and accelerated aging tests on prototype {plus minus}500 kV dc oil-filled self-contained cables. The extensive test program was required to evaluate the High-Voltage cables for the St. Lawrence river crossing of the {plus minus}500 kV Quebec-New England HVDC power transmission system. The paper relates the main elements of the test program. It describes the required

  19. Evaluation of HVDC cables for the St. Lawrence crossing of Hydro Quebec 500 kV DC line. I. Dielectric and accelerated aging tests on prototypes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Couderc; N. G. Trinh; M. Belec; M. Chaaban; J. Leduc; Y. Beausejour

    1991-01-01

    The dielectric and accelerated aging tests on prototype ±500 kV DC oil-filled self-contained cables are discussed. The extensive test program was required to evaluate the high-voltage cables for the St. Lawrence river crossing of the ±500 kV Quebec-New England HVDC power transmission system. The main elements of the test program are related. The required insulation levels, the characteristics of the

  20. Evaluation of HVDC cables for the St. Lawrence river crossing of Hydro-Quebec's 500 kV DC line. III. Thermal behaviour

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Chaaban; J. Leduc; D. Corderc; N. G. Trinh; M. Belec

    1991-01-01

    For pt.II see ibid., p.110-16 (1991). The thermal analyses conducted during the different stages of Hydro-Quebec's St. Lawrence river crossing project are presented. The important impact of the thermal studies on the choice of cable is described, and the design of the installation is presented. The numerous problems faced during the cable prototype are detailed, and demonstration tests and the

  1. Historical records of atmospheric metal deposition along the St. Lawrence Valley (eastern Canada) based on peat bog cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratte, Steve; Mucci, Alfonso; Garneau, Michelle

    2013-11-01

    The recent history of atmospheric As, Cd, Ni, Pb and Zn deposition and the stable Pb isotope signatures were reconstructed from short cores collected at three peat bogs along the St. Lawrence Valley (SLV). The onset of industrial activity was recorded around 1810-1850 AD. As, Cd, Pb and, to a certain extent, Ni deposition rates reached maxima between 1940 and the early 1970s. Trace metals likely originated from coal-burning and ore smelting between 1850 and 1950 AD, and were replaced thereafter, at least in the case of Pb, by the combustion of leaded gasolines until the mid-1980s. Trace metal contents and accumulation rates were greater in the two cores recovered from the southwestern SLV than further northeast, as expected from their proximity to urban and industrial centers of eastern Canada and the U.S. Mid-West and the direction of the prevalent winds. A rapid decrease in metal accumulation rates since the 1970s suggests that mitigation policies were effective in reducing atmospheric metal emissions. Nevertheless, metal accumulation rates and stable Pb isotope signatures have not yet returned to their pre-industrial values.

  2. Passive acoustic detection and localization of whales: effects of shipping noise in Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park.

    PubMed

    Simard, Yvan; Roy, Nathalie; Gervaise, Cédric

    2008-06-01

    The performance of large-aperture hydrophone arrays to detect and localize blue and fin whales' 15-85 Hz signature vocalizations under ocean noise conditions was assessed through simulations from a normal mode propagation model combined to noise statistics from 15 960 h of recordings in Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park. The probability density functions of 2482 summer noise level estimates in the call bands were used to attach a probability of detection/masking to the simulated call levels as a function of whale depth and range for typical environmental conditions. Results indicate that call detection was modulated by the calling depth relative to the sound channel axis and by modal constructive and destructive interferences with range. Masking of loud infrasounds could reach 40% at 30 km for a receiver at the optimal depth. The 30 dB weaker blue whale D-call were subject to severe masking. Mapping the percentages of detection and localization allowed assessing the performance of a six-hydrophone array under mean- and low-noise conditions. This approach is helpful for optimizing hydrophone configuration in implementing passive acoustic monitoring arrays and building their detection function for whale density assessment, as an alternative to or in combination with the traditional undersampling visual methods. PMID:18537362

  3. ?-carotene and retinoids in eggs of Great Blue Herons (Ardea herodias) in relation to St Lawrence River contamination.

    PubMed

    Boily, M H; Champoux, L; Bourbonnais, D H; Des Granges, J L; Rodrigue, J; Spear, P A

    1994-12-01

    : The potential use of retinoids and ?-carotene as biomarkers in the eggs of the Great Blue Heron was investigated. In the spring of 1991, 65 eggs were collected from nine heronries (seven along the St Lawrence River and two reference sites). A method was specifically developed for the extraction and analysis of ?-carotene and the retinoids in heron egg yolks by reversed-phase HPLC. When results were expressed either as the molar ratio of retinol: retinyl palmitate or as retinyl palmitate concentration, significant differences were found between colonies; however, retinyl palmitate concentration was deemed the better biomarker because it was not significantly influenced by embryonic stage of development. Retinyl palmitate concentrations in freshwater colonies were negatively related to PCB congeners Nos 105 and 118 as well as their TCDD-EQ values (p < 0.02, r (2)=0.78). Egg tetrachloro-mono-ortho biphenyl concentrations were also negatively related to retinyl palmitate (p < 0.005, r (2)=0.90). With the exception of the two mono-ortho co-planar congeners detected in the present study, the contamination levels found in heron eggs were well below those found for other bird species in the Great Lakes area and, so far, no detrimental effects have been reported in Great Blue Heron populations in Quebec. These results suggest that retinyl palmitate may be useful as a sensitive and non-invasive biomarker for monitoring organochlorine contaminant effects in the Great Blue Heron in freshwater sites. PMID:24202125

  4. Comparing pristine and depleted ecosystems: The Sørfjord, Norway versus the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada. Effects of intense fisheries on marine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morissette, Lyne; Pedersen, Torstein; Nilsen, Marianne

    2009-04-01

    The Sørfjord, Norway, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada, are two sub-arctic ecosystems with similar trophic structure. However, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, severe exploitation of groundfish stocks has lead to important shifts in the trophic structure. In the Sørfjord, the situation is different: fishing pressure is much lighter. Our hypothesis is that overexploitation leads to changes in the trophic structure and severely alters the resilience of ecosystems. Based on the same modelling approach ( Ecopath with Ecosim) the food web structure was compared, using different ecosystem indicators. Patterns of food web structure and trophodynamics were contrasted. Cod was the keystone species in both ecosystems, and forage fish were also important. Even after similar environmental changes in both ecosystems, and after a reduction of fishing pressure in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, there is no recovery of cod stocks in this ecosystem. In the Sørfjord, after different perturbations (but not from the fishery), the ecosystem seems to return to its equilibrium.

  5. Rewriting the history of an extinction-was a population of Steller's sea cows (Hydrodamalis gigas) at St Lawrence Island also driven to extinction?

    PubMed

    Crerar, Lorelei D; Crerar, Andrew P; Domning, Daryl P; Parsons, E C M

    2014-11-01

    The Kommandorskiye Islands population of Steller's sea cow (Hydrodamalis gigas) was extirpated ca 1768 CE. Until now, Steller's sea cow was thought to be restricted in historic times to Bering and Copper Islands, Russia, with other records in the last millennium from the western Aleutian Islands. However, Steller's sea cow bone has been obtained by the authors from St Lawrence Island, Alaska, which is significantly further north. Bone identity was verified using analysis of mitochondrial DNA. The nitrogen-15 (?(15)N)/carbon-13 (?(13)C) values for bone samples from St Lawrence Island were significantly (p ? 0.05) different from Bering Island samples, indicating a second population. Bone samples were dated to between 1030 and 1150 BP (approx. 800-920 CE). The samples date from close to the beginning of the mediaeval warm period, which could indicate that the population at St Lawrence Island was driven to extinction by climate change. A warming of the climate in the area may have changed the availability of kelp; alternatively or in addition, the animals may have been driven to extinction by the expansion of the Inuit from the Bering Strait region, possibly due to opening waterways, maybe following bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus), or searching for iron and copper. This study provides evidence for a previously unknown population of sea cows in the North Pacific within the past 1000 years and a second Steller's sea cow extirpation event in recent history. PMID:25428930

  6. Hazard assessment of a simulated oil spill on intertidal areas of the St. Lawrence River with SPMD-TOX

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, B.T.; Petty, J.D.; Huckins, J.N.; Lee, Kenneth; Gauthier, J.

    2004-01-01

    Phytoremediation in a simulated crude oil spill was studied with a "minimalistic" approach. The SPMD-TOX paradigm - a miniature passive sorptive device to collect and concentrate chemicals and microscale tests to detect toxicity - was used to monitor over time the bioavailability and potential toxicity of an oil spill. A simulated crude oil spill was initiated on an intertidal freshwater grass-wetland along the St. Lawrence River southwest of Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. Several phytoremediation treatments were investigated; to dissipate and ameliorate the spill, treatments included nutrient amendments with inorganic nitrogen sources (ammonium nitrate and sodium nitrate) and phosphate (super triple phosphate) with and without cut plants, with natural attenuation (no phytoremedial treatment) as a control. Sequestered oil residues were bioavailable in all oil-treated plots in Weeks 1 and 2. Interestingly, the samples were colored and fluoresced under ultraviolet light. In addition, microscale tests showed that sequestered residues were acutely toxic and genotoxic, as well as that they induced hepatic P450 enzymes. Analysis of these data suggested that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were among the bioavailable residues sequestered. In addition, these findings suggested that the toxic bioavailable fractions of the oil spill and degradation products dissipated rapidly over time because after the second week the water column contained no oil or detectable degradation products in this riverine intertidal wetland. SPMD-TOX revealed no evidence of bioavailable oil products in Weeks 4, 6, 8, and 12. All phytoremediation efforts appeared to be ineffective in changing either the dissipation rate or the ability to ameliorate the oil toxicity. SPMD-TOX analysis of the water columns from these riverine experimental plots profiled the occurrence, dissipation, and influence of phytoremediation on the bioavailability and toxicity of oil products (parent or degradation products. ?? 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Biogeochemical factors influencing net mercury methylation in contaminated freshwater sediments from the St. Lawrence River in Cornwall, Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Avramescu, Mary-Luyza; Yumvihoze, Emmanuel; Hintelmann, Holger; Ridal, Jeff; Fortin, Danielle; Lean, David R S

    2011-02-01

    The activity of various anaerobic microbes, including sulfate reducers (SRB), iron reducers (FeRP) and methanogens (MPA) has been linked to mercury methylation in aquatic systems, although the relative importance of each microbial group in the overall process is poorly understood in natural sediments. The present study focused on the biogeochemical factors (i.e. the relative importance of various groups of anaerobic microbes (FeRP, SRB, and MPA) that affect net monomethylmercury (MMHg) formation in contaminated sediments of the St. Lawrence River (SRL) near Cornwall (Zone 1), Ontario, Canada. Methylation and demethylation potentials were measured separately by using isotope-enriched mercury species ((200)Hg(2+) and MM(199)Hg(+)) in sediment microcosms treated with specific microbial inhibitors. Sediments were sampled and incubated in the dark at room temperature in an anaerobic chamber for 96h. The potential methylation rate constants (K(m)) and demethylation rates (K(d)) were found to differ significantly between microcosms. The MPA-inhibited microcosm had the highest potential methylation rate constant (0.016d(-1)), whereas the two SRB-inhibited microcosms had comparable potential methylation rate constants (0.003d(-1) and 0.002d(-1), respectively). The inhibition of methanogens stimulated net methylation by inhibiting demethylationand by stimulating methylation along with SRB activity. The inhibition of both methanogens and SRB was found to enhance the iron reduction rates but did not completely stop MMHg production. The strong positive correlation between K(m) and Sulfate Reduction Rates (SRR) and between K(d) and Methane Production Rates (MPR) supports the involvement of SRB in Hg methylation and MPA in MMHg demethylation in the sediments. In contrast, the strong negative correlation between K(d) and Iron Reduction Rates (FeRR) shows that the increase in FeRR corresponds to a decrease in demethylation, indicating that iron reduction may influence net methylation in the SLR sediments by decreasing demethylation rather than favouring methylation. PMID:21176945

  8. Recent Carbon Accumulation Rates in Ombrotrophic Peatlands on the North Shore of the Gulf of the St. Lawrence, Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, N. K.; Charman, D.; Garneau, M.; Hartley, I. P.

    2013-12-01

    In Eastern Canada, permafrost reached its southernmost extent for the Holocene during the Little Ice Age. Recent warming and degradation along the southern limit of the discontinuous permafrost zone is altering the microtopography, hydrology and carbon cycling in ombrotrophic peatlands; this trend is projected to continue. However, the understanding of multi-decadal and centennial scale change in peatlands is limited. This study aims to quantify changes in carbon accumulation rates for the last millennium in ombrotrophic peatlands from three regions along the North Shore of the Gulf of the St Lawrence, Canada. In each region, three peatlands were cored and 3-4 microforms were sampled per peatland. This replication allows changes in accumulation rates to be examined on two scales: 1) between regions along a N-S climatic gradient, and 2) within peatlands in the same region along a microtopography gradient. Recent carbon accumulation rates for last 150-200 years were calculated with lead-210 dates. Some initial estimates are also available for the last millennium using radiocarbon dates. Carbon accumulation rates were higher for all sites in the southernmost region, with sphagnum hummocks having the recent highest accumulation rates overall. In more northern peatlands, rates were found to differ between microforms, and between sites. This variability may be due to local differences in wind exposure and winter snow cover between sites. A high-resolution (0.5 cm) multi-proxy analysis using testate amoebae and plant macrofossils will be performed around key periods of accumulation change to evaluate peatland sensitivity and carbon accumulation to hydrological change.

  9. Contaminant residues in snapping turtle (Chelydra s. serpentina) eggs from the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River basin (1999 to 2000).

    PubMed

    Ashpole, S L; Bishop, C A; Brooks, R J

    2004-08-01

    To determine temporal and geographic variations of environmentally persistent pollutants, the concentrations of several contaminants were measured in snapping turtle eggs in 1999 and 2000. Contaminants included polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), non- ortho PCBs, polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and furans, organochlorine pesticides, and total mercury. Egg collection sites within the St. Lawrence Area of Concern (AOC) and the Territory of Akwesasne included Turtle Creek, Snye Marsh, and Raquette River. Additional contaminated sites were Gray's Creek (within the St. Lawrence AOC boundary), Coote's Paradise (Hamilton Harbour AOC), and the Territory of Walpole Island (St. Clair AOC). Reference sites were Lake Sasajewun, Algonquin Provincial Park in central Ontario, and in close proximity to the St. Lawrence Area AOC, Hoasic Creek and Cooper Marsh. Eggs from clutches collected from Akwesasne contained the highest concentrations of contaminants. Mean total PCB concentrations for Akwesasne clutches ranged from 1,900 to 61,000 ng/g wet weight (w.w.), which was 360 to 3,100 times higher than the mean concentrations at the reference sites. The high levels of contaminants in eggs, from sites within Akwesasne, were consistent with trends reported in the past and reflect the influence of the proximity of heavy industry. Current contaminant concentrations in clutches from Coote's Paradise are comparable with those recorded in 1989 and 1990 but are 200 to 800 times lower than concentrations reported in 1984 and 1988. Eggs from Lake Sasajewun contained relatively low contaminant levels, which is consistent with atmospheric deposition. Our results support that snapping turtles are good indicators of temporal and geographic contaminant trends. PMID:15386150

  10. Application of Acoustic and Optic Methods for Estimating Suspended-Solids Concentrations in the St. Lucie River Estuary, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patino, Eduardo; Byrne, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic and optic methods were applied to estimate suspended-solids concentrations in the St. Lucie River Estuary, southeastern Florida. Acoustic Doppler velocity meters were installed at the North Fork, Speedy Point, and Steele Point sites within the estuary. These sites provide varying flow, salinity, water-quality, and channel cross-sectional characteristics. The monitoring site at Steele Point was not used in the analyses because repeated instrument relocations (due to bridge construction) prevented a sufficient number of samples from being collected at the various locations. Acoustic and optic instruments were installed to collect water velocity, acoustic backscatter strength (ABS), and turbidity data that were used to assess the feasibility of estimating suspended-solids concentrations in the estuary. Other data collected at the monitoring sites include tidal stage, salinity, temperature, and periodic discharge measurements. Regression analyses were used to determine the relations of suspended-solids concentration to ABS and suspended-solids concentration to turbidity at the North Fork and Speedy Point sites. For samples used in regression analyses, measured suspended-solids concentrations at the North Fork and Speedy Point sites ranged from 3 to 37 milligrams per liter, and organic content ranged from 50 to 83 percent. Corresponding salinity for these samples ranged from 0.12 to 22.7 parts per thousand, and corresponding temperature ranged from 19.4 to 31.8 ?C. Relations determined using this technique are site specific and only describe suspended-solids concentrations at locations where data were collected. The suspended-solids concentration to ABS relation resulted in correlation coefficients of 0.78 and 0.63 at the North Fork and Speedy Point sites, respectively. The suspended-solids concentration to turbidity relation resulted in correlation coefficients of 0.73 and 0.89 at the North Fork and Speedy Point sites, respectively. The adequacy of the empirical equations seems to be limited by the number and distribution of suspended-solids samples collected throughout the expected concentration range at the North Fork and Speedy Point sites. Additionally, the ABS relations for both sites seem to overestimate at the low end and underestimate at the high end of the concentration range. Based on the sensitivity analysis, temperature had a greater effect than salinity on estimated suspended-solids concentrations. Temperature also appeared to affect ABS data, perhaps by changing the absorptive and reflective characteristics of the suspended material. Salinity and temperature had no observed effects on the turbidity relation at the North Fork and Speedy Point sites. Estimates of suspended-solids concentrations using ABS data were less 'erratic' than estimates using turbidity data. Combining ABS and turbidity data into one equation did not improve the accuracy of results, and therefore, was not considered.

  11. Glacially-megalineated limestone terrain of Anticosti Island, Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada; onset zone of the Laurentian Channel Ice Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyles, Nick; Putkinen, Niko

    2014-03-01

    Anticosti is a large elongate island (240 km long, 60 km wide) in eastern Canada within the northern part of a deep water trough (Gulf of St. Lawrence) that terminates at the Atlantic continental shelf edge. The island's Pleistocene glaciological significance is that its long axis lay transverse to ice from the Quebec and Labrador sectors of the Laurentide Ice Sheet moving south from the relatively high-standing Canadian Shield. Recent glaciological reconstructions place a fast-flowing ice stream along the axis of the Gulf of St. Lawrence but supporting geologic evidence in terms of recognizing its hard-bedded onset zone and downstream streamlined soft bed is limited. Anticosti Island consists of gently southward-dipping limestone plains composed of Ordovician and Silurian limestones (Vaureal, Becscie and Jupiter formations) with north-facing escarpments transverse to regional ice flow. Glacial deposits are largely absent and limestone plains in the higher central plateau of the island retain a relict apparently ‘preglacial’ drainage system consisting of deeply-incised dendritic bedrock valleys. In contrast, the bedrock geomorphology of the lower lying western and eastern limestone plains of the island is strikingly different having been extensively modified by glacial erosion. Escarpments are glacially megalineated with a distinct ‘zig-zag’ planform reflecting northward-projecting bullet-shaped ‘noses’ (identified as rock drumlins) up to 2 km wide at their base and 4 km in length with rare megagrooved upper surfaces. Drumlins are separated by southward-closing, funnel-shaped ‘through valleys’ where former dendritic valleys have been extensively altered by the streaming of basal ice through gaps in the escarpments. Glacially-megalineated bedrock terrain such as on the western and eastern flanks of Anticosti Island is elsewhere associated with the hard-bedded onset zones of fast flowing ice streams and provides important ground truth for the postulated Laurentian Channel Ice Stream (LCIS) within the Gulf of St. Lawrence sector of the Laurentide Ice Sheet.

  12. 46 CFR 401.405 - Basic rates and charges on the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Lawrence River and Lake Ontario. 401.405 Section 401.405 Shipping COAST GUARD (GREAT LAKES PILOTAGE), DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GREAT LAKES PILOTAGE REGULATIONS Rates, Charges, and Conditions for Pilotage Services §...

  13. Evaluation of HVDC cables for the St. Lawrence River crossing of Hydro-Quebec's 500-kV DC line. Part 3; Thermal behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Chaaban, M.; Leduc, J.; Couderc, D.; Trinh, N.G.; Belec, M. (Inst. de Recherche d'Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S1 (CA))

    1992-04-01

    This paper presents the thermal analyses conducted during the different stages of Hydro-Quebec's St. Lawrence river crossing project. It reveals the important impact of the thermal studies on the choice of HVDC cable and the design of the installations. It also describes the numerous problems faced during the cable prototype and demonstration tests and the solutions obtained by numerical analysis using the finite-element method. These problems were related in part to the temperature controls of the cable and its accessories, and in particular to the control of the temperature gradient across the dielectric material at various locations along the test loop.

  14. Community-based participatory research projects and policy engagement to protect environmental health on St Lawrence Island, Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Pamela K.; Waghiyi, Viola; Welfinger-Smith, Gretchen; Byrne, Samuel Carter; Kava, Jane; Gologergen, Jesse; Eckstein, Lorraine; Scrudato, Ronald; Chiarenzelli, Jeff; Carpenter, David O.; Seguinot-Medina, Samarys

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This article synthesizes discussion of collaborative research results, interventions and policy engagement for St Lawrence Island (SLI), Alaska, during the years 2000–2012. Methods As part of on-going community-based participatory research (CBPR) studies on SLI, 5 discrete exposure-assessment projects were conducted: (a) a biomonitoring study of human blood serum; (b–d) 3 investigations of levels of contaminants in environmental media at an abandoned military site at Northeast Cape – using sediment cores and plants, semi-permeable membrane devices and blackfish, respectively; and (e) a study of traditional foods. Results Blood serum in residents of SLI showed elevated levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) with higher levels among those exposed to the military site at Northeast Cape, an important traditional subsistence-use area. Environmental studies at the military site demonstrated that the site is a continuing source of PCBs to a major watershed, and that clean-up operations at the military site generated PCB-contaminated dust on plants in the region. Important traditional foods eaten by the people of SLI showed elevated concentrations of PCBs, which are primarily derived from the long-range transport of persistent pollutants that are transported by atmospheric and marine currents from more southerly latitudes to the north. Interventions An important task for all CBPR projects is to conduct intervention strategies as needed in response to research results. Because of the findings of the CBPR projects on SLI, the CBPR team and the people of the Island are actively engaging in interventions to ensure cleanup of the formerly used military sites; reform chemicals policy on a national level; and eliminate persistent pollutants internationally. The goal is to make the Island and other northern/Arctic communities safe for themselves and future generations. Conclusions As part of the CBPR projects conducted from 2000 to 2012, a series of exposure assessments demonstrate that the leaders of SLI have reason to be concerned about the health of people due to the presence of carcinogenic chemicals as measured in biomonitoring and environmental samples and important traditional foods. PMID:23977641

  15. St. Lawrence Cattaraugus

    E-print Network

    Keinan, Alon

    Demographics. March 2012. Data Source: 2010 Census TIGER/Line® Shapefiles. PENNSYLVANIA VERMONT NEW HAMPSHIRE on Applied Demographics. March 2012. Data Source: 2010 Census TIGER/Line® Shapefiles. 0 10 Miles ¯ New York by Cornell Program on Applied Demographics. March 2012. Data Source: 2010 Census TIGER/Line® Shapefiles. 0 10

  16. CHINESE MITTEN CRABS (ERIOCHEIR SINENSIS) IN THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER (CANADA): NEW RECORDS AND RISK OF INVASION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis, is an internationally renowned aquatic invader. Native to China and North/South Korea, this catadromous crab has successfully invaded several rivers and estuaries in eleven countries in Western Europe as well as the San Francisco Bay ...

  17. Chlorinated hydrocarbons and mercury in sediments, red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) and tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) from wetlands in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River basin

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, C.A. [Environment Canada, Burlington, Ontario (Canada); Koster, M.D. [Springborn Labs. (Europe) AG, Seestrasse (Switzerland); Chek, A.A. [Univ. of Guelph, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Zoology; Hussell, D.J.T. [Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Maple, Ontario (Canada); Jock, K. [St. Regis Mohawk Health Service, Hogansburg, NY (United States)

    1995-03-01

    In 1991, the authors collected red-winged blackbird (Agelauis phoeniceus) eggs and tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) eggs and nestlings, and sediment samples from 2 wetland sites in the Great lakes and St. Lawrence River basin. They analyzed for chlorinated hydrocarbons and total mercury and found that biota contained contaminant concentrations which were one to two orders of magnitude above those in sediments. Maximum concentrations of contaminants were found in Akwesasne, St. Lawrence river (PCBs = 18,558.8 ng/g in red-winged blackbird eggs, oxychlordane = 58.8/g and mirex = 40.1 ng/g in tree swallow eggs); Mud Creek, Lake Erie and Cootes Paradise. Despite the migratory habits of red-winged blackbirds and tree swallows, agreement among biota and sediment in geographic variation of contaminant concentrations supports the use of these animals as biomonitors of persistent chemicals. Although chlorinated hydrocarbon concentrations in red-winged blackbird eggs were significantly correlated with sediment contamination, the local nature of the tree swallow chick diet suggests that nestlings would be the best indicator of local contaminant trends.

  18. Toxicity of waters from the St. Lawrence River at Massena Area-of-Concern to the plankton species Selenastrum capricornutum and Ceriodaphnia dubia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldigo, Barry P.; Duffy, Brian T.; Nally, Christopher J.; David, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    In 1972, the US and Canada committed to restore the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Great Lakes Ecosystem under the first Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. During subsequent amendments, part of the St. Lawrence River at Massena NY, and segments of three tributaries, were designated as one Area of Concern (AOC) due to various beneficial use impairments (BUIs). Plankton beneficial use was designated impaired within this AOC because phytoplankton and zooplankton population data were unavailable or needed “further assessment”. Contaminated sediments from industrial waste disposal have been largely remediated, thus, the plankton BUI may currently be obsolete. The St. Lawrence River at Massena AOC remedial action plan established two criteria which may be used to assess the plankton BUI; the second states that, “in the absence of community structure data, plankton bioassays confirm no toxicity impact in ambient waters”. This study was implemented during 2011 to determine whether this criterion was achieved. Acute toxicity and chronic toxicity of local waters were quantified seasonally using standardized bioassays with green alga Selenastrum capricornutum and water flea Ceriodaphnia dubia to test the hypothesis that waters from sites within the AOC were no more toxic than were waters from adjacent reference sites. The results of univariate and multivariate analyses confirm that ambient waters from most AOC sites (and seasons) were not toxic to both species. Assuming both test species represent natural plankton assemblages, the quality of surface waters throughout most of this AOC should not seriously impair the health of resident plankton communities.

  19. Detection and confirmation of saxitoxin analogues in freshwater benthic Lyngbya wollei algae collected in the St. Lawrence River (Canada) by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lajeunesse, André; Segura, Pedro A; Gélinas, Malorie; Hudon, Christiane; Thomas, Krista; Quilliam, Michael A; Gagnon, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The presence of cyanotoxins in benthic Lyngbya wollei algae samples collected in a fluvial lake along the St. Lawrence River, Canada, was investigated using a multi-toxins method. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and reverse phased liquid chromatography (RPLC) were coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-QqQMS) for quantification and to quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-QqTOFMS) for screening and confirmation. The presence of two saxitoxin analogues, LWTX-1 and LWTX-6, was confirmed in benthic Lyngbya wollei algae samples. Concentration of LWTX-1 was between 209±5 and 279±9 ?g g(-1). No other targeted cyanotoxin (such as anatoxin-a, nodularin, microcystin-LR, microcystins-RR and saxitoxin) was found in the samples. The presence of LWTX-6 was observed by using a screening approach based on an in-house database of cyanotoxins, an algorithm of identification and high resolution mass spectrometry measurements on the precursor and product ions. This work demonstrates the need for more research on the fate of benthic cyanotoxins in aquatic ecosystems such the St. Lawrence River. PMID:22169195

  20. Endocrine and metabolic dysfunction in yellow perch, Perca flavescens, exposed to organic contaminants and heavy metals in the St. Lawrence River

    SciTech Connect

    Hontela, A.; Duclos, D.; Fortin, R. [Univ. du Quebec, Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. Sciences Biologiques; Dumont, P. [Ministere du Loisir, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1995-04-01

    The endocrine and biochemical responses to the acute stress of capture and handling were investigated in sexually mature and in immature male and female yellow perch, Perca flavescens, from a site contaminated by organic contaminants (PAHs and PCBs) and heavy metals (Hg, Cd, As, and Zn) and from a reference site in the St. Lawrence River. Following a standardized capture and handling stress, fish from the contaminated site did not exhibit the expected physiological stress response observed in fish from the reference site. Blood cortisol and thyroxine levels were lower, and liver glycogen stores were greater in mature males and females, as well as in the immature fish from the contaminated site, compared to the reference site. Fish from the contaminated site also had smaller gonads and lower condition factor. The impaired ability to elevate blood cortisol in response to an acute stress may be used as a biomarker of toxic stress in health assessment of feral fish from polluted environments.

  1. Changes in the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence ecosystem estimated by inverse modelling: Evidence of a fishery-induced regime shift?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenkoff, Claude; Castonguay, Martin; Chabot, Denis; Hammill, Mike O.; Bourdages, Hugo; Morissette, Lyne

    2007-07-01

    Mass-balance models have been constructed using inverse methodology for the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence for the mid-1980s, the mid-1990s, and the early 2000s to describe ecosystem structure, trophic group interactions, and the effects of fishing and predation on the ecosystem for each time period. Our analyses indicate that the ecosystem structure shifted dramatically from one previously dominated by demersal (cod, redfish) and small-bodied forage (e.g., capelin, mackerel, herring, shrimp) species to one now dominated by small-bodied forage species. Overfishing removed a functional group in the late 1980s, large piscivorous fish (primarily cod and redfish), which has not recovered 14 years after the cessation of heavy fishing. This has left only marine mammals as top predators during the mid-1990s, and marine mammals and small Greenland halibut during the early 2000s. Predation by marine mammals on fish increased from the mid-1980s to the early 2000s while predation by large fish on fish decreased. Capelin and shrimp, the main prey in each period, showed an increase in biomass over the three periods. A switch in the main predators of capelin from cod to marine mammals occurred, while Greenland halibut progressively replaced cod as shrimp predators. Overfishing influenced community structure directly through preferential removal of larger-bodied fishes and indirectly through predation release because larger-bodied fishes exerted top-down control upon other community species or competed with other species for the same prey. Our modelling estimates showed that a change in predation structure or flows at the top of the trophic system led to changes in predation at all lower trophic levels in the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence. These changes represent a case of fishery-induced regime shift.

  2. Intra-annual variability of water quality and phytoplankton in the North Fork of the St. Lucie River Estuary, Florida (USA): a quantitative assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millie, D. F.; Carrick, H. J.; Doering, P. H.; Steidinger, K. A.

    2004-09-01

    Water quality and phytoplankton were examined within the North Fork of the St. Lucie River Estuary, Florida (USA) from March 2000 to March 2001. Alterations in water-quality parameters and phytoplankton assemblages mirrored salinity regimes resulting from the 'wet'/'dry' seasonality of south Florida. Salinity was greatest during the 'dry', winter months whereas water temperature and nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were greatest during the 'wet', summer months. A seasonal dissimilarity in phytoplankton occurred; cell abundance of cyanobacterial picoplankton ( Synechocystis sp., Synechococcus sp.) and a diatom ( Skeletonema costatum (Greville) Cleve) and cell carbon of a dinoflagellate ( Gyrodinium sp.) and S. costatum were greatest during summer whereas abundance of chrysophytes ( Chrysochromulina parva Lackey, Chromulina sp.) and carbon of dinoflagellates ( Gymnodinium spp., Heterocapsa rotundata (Lohmann) Hansen) and a diatom ( Cyclotella sp.) were greatest during winter. Water-column chlorophyll a concentrations reached up to 29 ?g L -1 and were negatively associated with salinity. Diatom chlorophyll comprised the majority and at times, greater than 90% of the total chlorophyll a. Picoplanktonic cyanobacteria comprised up to 5% and 1.4% of total phytoplankton carbon and chlorophyll a, respectively throughout the estuary; as such, its impact on overall assemblage rate processes and system-level function appeared minimal. Sediment and whole-water incubations confirmed the presence of heterotrophic dinoflagellates within the estuary. Dissolved oxygen concentrations did not correspond with total chlorophyll a concentrations and salinity, indicating that hypoxia within bottom waters during summer was not solely attributable to phytoplankton biomass or water-column stratification but likely, a result of multiple, interacting physical/chemical and biological factors.

  3. Temporal and seasonal variation in acetylcholinesterase activity and glutathione-S-transferase in amphipods collected in mats of Lyngbya wollei in the St-Lawrence River (Canada).

    PubMed

    Gélinas, Malorie; Lajeunesse, André; Gagnon, Christian; Gagné, François

    2013-08-01

    Mats of filamentous algae Lyngbya wollei cover large areas on top of the sediments along the St-Lawrence River. Like most cyanobacteria, L. wollei produce toxins, named lyngbyatoxin (LYNGTX), an analog of saxitoxin. In order to verify the neurotoxic potential of these filamentous cyanobacteria, we collected amphipods within local vegetation at three sites in summer months: a site rich in L. wollei (Lake St-Louis [LSL]) and two urban sites composed of macrophytes but devoid of L. wollei mats (Richelieu River [RICH] and L'Assomption River [ASSO] outlets). The body weight of each amphipod was measured, and the neurotoxicity was estimated with the measurement of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and glutathione-s-transferase (GST) activities. Levels of protein-bound phosphates were also evaluated, to rule out contamination by Microcystis sp. The results showed that the activity of acetylcholinesterase measured in amphipods in ASSO and RICH was lower than the activity found in amphipods collected in L. wollei mats in LSL. In addition, amphipods found in L. wollei mats at the LSL site have significantly higher GST activity than those located at the two devoid sites, RICH and ASSO. No significant change was observed for protein-bound phosphate levels. This study suggests that the presence of L. wollei triggers potential toxicity. PMID:23702304

  4. Speciation and transformation of phosphorus and its mixing behavior in the Bay of St. Louis estuary in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Peng; Chen, Min; Guo, Laodong

    2012-06-01

    Water samples were collected for measurements of dissolved, colloidal, and particulate inorganic and organic phosphorus (P) from the Bay of St. Louis estuary in the northern Gulf of Mexico during August 2008 and October 2009. Laboratory mixing experiments were also carried out using end-member river water and seawater to examine key processes and mechanisms controlling the behavior of P during estuarine mixing. Dissolved organic P (DOP) was the dominant species in the total dissolved P (TDP) pool in both lower (S < 10) and higher salinity (S > 25) regions, while dissolved inorganic P (DIP) predominated in mid-salinity regions (S of 10˜20) comprising up to 75% of the TDP. Both DIP and DOP behaved non-conservatively during estuarine mixing showing dramatic changes and transformation between different P species. The total particulate phosphorus (TPP) accounted for up to 85% of total phosphorus (TP = TDP + TPP) in the low-salinity areas but fell to about 38% in higher salinity regions. The quasi-negative correlation between TDP and TPP and the similarity in mixing behavior between field observations and laboratory experiments supported our hypothesis that physicochemical processes, such as dynamic repartitioning between water and particles or adsorption/desorption, are the predominant mechanisms controlling the biogeochemical cycling of P species in the Bay of St. Louis. River export fluxes of DIP could be significantly underestimated without the quantification of particulate P species, especially in more pristine river basins. The value of the distribution coefficient (in terms of logKd) ranged from 4.4 to 5.6 and decreased with increasing suspended particulate matter concentration and salinity, indicating that P is highly particle reactive and the presence of colloidal P may play an important role in the cycling of P in estuarine environments. Colloidal inorganic P (CIP) and colloidal organic P (COP), as quantified by an ultrafiltration permeation model, comprised 0-62% of the DIP and 34-93% of the DOP with the highest values in the river mouth area, suggesting a river source for colloidal P. The % CIP dropped to below the detection limit as salinity increased, whereas % COP first decreased but increased again with increasing salinity, reflecting different sources for CIP and COP in the lower estuary. The DOC/DOP ratio decreased rapidly with increasing salinity indicating a diagenetically older dissolved organic matter pool from the river and a dynamic change in sources and chemical speciation of P in the estuary.

  5. Temporal variation of blood and hair mercury levels in pregnancy in relation to fish consumption history in a population living along the St. Lawrence River.

    PubMed

    Morrissette, Joëlle; Takser, Larissa; St-Amour, Genevieve; Smargiassi, Audrey; Lafond, Julie; Mergler, Donna

    2004-07-01

    Fish consumption from the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence River has been decreasing over the last years due to advisories and increased awareness of the presence of several contaminants. Methylmercury (MeHg), a well-established neurotoxicant even at low levels of exposure, bioaccumulates to differing degrees in various fish species and can have serious adverse effects on the development and functioning of the human central nervous system, especially during prenatal exposure. Most studies on MeHg exposure have focussed on high-level consumers from local fish sources, although mercury (Hg) is also present in fresh, frozen, and canned market fish. Moreover, little information exists on the temporal variation of blood and hair Hg in pregnant women, particularly in populations with low levels of Hg. The aim of the present study was to characterize the temporal variation of Hg during pregnancy and to investigate the relation between fish consumption from various sources prior to and during pregnancy and maternal cord blood and mother's hair Hg levels. We recruited 159 pregnant women from Southwest Quebec through two prenatal clinics of the Quebec Public Health System. All women completed two detailed questionnaires concerning their fish consumption (species and frequency) prior to and during pregnancy. The women also provided blood samples for all three trimesters of pregnancy and hair samples after delivery of up to 9 cm in length. Blood and hair Hg levels were analyzed by cold-vapor atomic-absorption and -fluorescence spectrometry methods, respectively. Results showed that maternal blood and hair Hg levels decreased significantly between the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. However, cord blood Hg was significantly higher than maternal blood at birth. Maternal hair was correlated with Hg blood concentration and was highly predictive of the organic fraction in cord blood. A strong dose relation was observed between the frequency of fish consumption before and during pregnancy and Hg exposure in mothers and newborns. Fish consumption prior to and during pregnancy explained 26% and 20% of cord blood Hg variance, respectively. For this population, detailed multivariate analyses showed that during pregnancy market fish (fresh, canned, and frozen) were more important sources of Hg exposure than were fish from the St. Lawrence River. These results should be taken into account for future advisories and intervention strategies, which should consider Hg levels in different species from all sources in order to maximize the nutritional input from fish and minimize the toxic risk. PMID:15220070

  6. Detection of viral hemorrhagic septicemia in round gobies in New York State (USA) waters of Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groocock, G.H.; Getchell, R.G.; Wooster, G.A.; Britt, K.L.; Batts, W.N.; Winton, J.R.; Casey, R.N.; Casey, J.W.; Bowser, P.R.

    2007-01-01

    In May 2006 a large mortality of several thousand round gobies Neogobius melanostomus (Pallas, 1814) occurred in New York waters of the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario. Necropsies of sampled fish from these areas showed pallor of the liver and gills, and hemorrhagic areas in many organs. Histopathologic examination of affected tissues revealed areas of necrosis and hemorrhage. Inoculations of fathead minnow Pimephales promelas (Rafinesque, 1820) cell cultures with dilutions of tissue samples from the necropsied gobies produced a cytopathic effect within 5 d post-inoculation. Samples of cell culture supernatant were tested using RT-PCR and confirmed the presence of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). Sequence analysis of the VHSV isolate resulted in its assignment to the type-IVb subgroup. The detection of VHSV in a relatively recent invasive fish species in the Great Lakes and the potential impact of VHSV on the ecology and economy of the area will require further investigation and careful management considerations. ?? Inter-Research 2007.

  7. Intra- and inter-species differences in persistent organic contaminants in the blubber of blue whales and humpback whales from the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Chris; Koenig, Brenda; Metcalfe, Tracy; Paterson, Gordon; Sears, Richard

    2004-05-01

    Biopsy samples of blubber from adult male and female blue whales, and from female and young-of-the-year humpback whales were collected during the summers of 1992-1999 in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada. In blue whales, concentrations of 25 PCB congeners, DDT and metabolites and several other organochlorine compounds were present at higher concentrations in the blubber of males relative to females; reflecting maternal transfer of these persistent contaminants from females into young. Sex-related differences in concentrations were not observed with less persistent contaminants, such as HCHs. In humpback whale samples, there were no significant differences in the concentrations of PCBs and organochlorine compounds in the blubber of females and calves. These data indicate that calves quickly bioaccumulate contaminants by transplacental and lactational routes to concentrations that are in equilibrium with females. In comparisons between contaminant concentrations and patterns in the blubber of female blue and humpback whales, there were no significant differences in concentrations, but the proportions of some PCB congeners, HCH isomers, and DDT and its metabolites were different in the two baleen whale species. These may reflect differences in the diet of the two species, since fish comprise a large part of the diet of humpback whales and blue whales feed exclusively on euphausiid crustaceans (i.e. krill). PMID:14749058

  8. Influence of species and sex on metal residues in freshwater mussels (Family Unionidae) from the St. Lawrence River, with implications for biomonitoring programs

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe-Smith, J.L. (Environment Canada, Burlington, Ontario (Canada). Rivers Research Branch)

    1994-09-01

    The implementation of freshwater mussel watch programs has been hindered by a lack of information on biological factors affecting the levels of contaminants accumulated by these organisms. This study investigated the influence of species and sex on metal residues in Elliptio complanata and Lampsilis radiata radiata (Family Unionidae) from the St. Lawrence River. Mussels were collected from sites representing a wide range of types and degrees of metal pollution. Composite samples of five specimens (males and females combined) per species per site and five specimens per sex per species per site were analyzed for residues of 12 metals in the soft tissues to determine the effects of species and sex, respectively, on variability in the data. Interspecific differences in bioaccumulation were observed for most metals; however, concentrations were frequently correlated between species and the differences could therefore be quantified. Elliptio complanata demonstrated a broader response range to the same exposures than Lampsilis radiata radiata for most metals, suggesting that it may be more sensitive to changes in pollution status. Differences in metal uptake between the sexes were less pronounced than differences between species, and male specimens displayed less variability than females. Consideration of these factors in mussel biomonitoring programs should greatly improve sensitivity and precision.

  9. Evaluation of a new Gulf of St. Lawrence coupled environmental prediction system based on the GEM atmospheric model and on the NEMO-CICE ocean-ice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellerin, Pierre; Roy, François; Dick, Sarah; Smith, Greg; Dupont, Fred; Pilon, Mark; Senneville, Simon; Chanut, Jerome

    2015-04-01

    The Canadian operational Gulf of St. Lawrence (GSL) coupled environmental forecast system has been updated with a new ocean-ice component (NEMO-CICE) and coupling methodology. The use of NEMO-CICE will facilitate future advances toward an increase in resolution and the introduction of new scientific developments. Indeed NEMO and CICE are supported by a large scientific community and are based on more efficient computing technologies than the current system. An ensemble of hindcasts over previous years demonstrate that recent developments in the NEMO-CICE model make it possible to meet the high quality standards of the ocean model by Saucier et al. (2009) used in the previous operational system in terms of the tides, circulation and water mass properties. We present results from these hindcasts as well as from an experimental run for the winter of 2014 and compare them with the operational system. The experimental run includes a pseudo-analysis cycle producing daily initial ice-ocean conditions and their subsequent coupled atmosphere-ice-ocean 48 hr forecasts. We first examine extreme weather event cases, and then present results from a subjective evaluation as well as objective skill scores for SST analyses and for ice, surface air temperature and wind forecasts. The importance of the two-way coupling will also be assessed.

  10. Estuary Live!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Classrooms and individuals can log on to participate in a real-time field trip to a National Estuary Research Reserve. Ask questions, view live video and still images, and learn about estuaries from experts. Topics range from geology to water quality, estuary plants and animals, and cultural heritage. Includes: references and lesson plans, classroom activities and teachers' guides. Archives of previous years are available, featuring sessions from East, West and Gulf Coast estuaries.

  11. A multi-level biological approach to evaluate impacts of a major municipal effluent in wild St. Lawrence River yellow perch

    E-print Network

    Bernatchez, Louis

    . Lawrence River yellow perch (Perca flavescens) Magali Houde a, , Maeva Giraudo a , Mélanie Douville activities to histological changes. Yellow perch (Perca flavescens) were selected based on their wide

  12. Water Quality Monitoring of the Upper St Lawrence River Using Remote Sensor Arrays Placed in a Hydropower Dam Combined with Hydrodynamic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, F.; Sprague, H. M.; Skufca, J. D.; Twiss, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    There are limited long-term data available on the ecological health and environmental state of the Upper St. Lawrence River (CA,US; average discharge 6,910 m3/s). Our research objective is to establish long-term remote water quality monitoring stations in the Moses-Saunders hydroelectric power dam at Massena, New York using a network of sensors. Such a placement of sensors allows for year-round monitoring of water and hence, the ability to measure at times of year and during extreme weather events that previously made monitoring infeasible. The sensor array was installed on 17 June 2014 and draws water from the penstock at a rate of 6-10 L per minute. Sensors in flow through chambers collect data on temperature, turbidity, color dissolved organic material (CDOM), phycocyanin, chlorophyll-a, and specific conductivity at one minute intervals. In combination with a hydrodynamic flow model we are able to hind-cast water movements so that the quality of water passing through the dam can be related to environmental conditions in the river upstream from the sensor array. We conducted field surveys using sensors in a ferry box on a vessel moving upstream (40 km) at a velocity providing a spatial resolution of 100 m and determined that main channel water is more homogenous than water along the shorelines (2 m isopleth) of the river, despite the high turbulence in this river. The sensor array located in the turbine unit nearest the US shore is able to discern tributary inputs for CDOM from the Oswegatchie River (discharge 40-120 m3/s), located 67 km upstream. This research is an important proof-of-concept for installing similar arrays in dams throughout the Great Lakes region and is applicable to smaller rivers containing power dams.

  13. Environmental contamination and human exposure assessment to manganese in the St-Lawrence River ecozone (Quebec, Canada) using an environmental fate/exposure model: GEOTOX.

    PubMed

    Loranger, S; Zayed, J

    1997-01-01

    Methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) is an organic derivative of manganese (Mn) used as an additive in unleaded gasoline. The combustion of MMT leads to the formation of oxides of manganese. The objective of the present study is to predict the environmental levels of Mn and the human exposure in the St-Lawrence ecozone (fluvial section, Quebec, Canada) using an environmental fate/exposure model: GEOTOX. The results of our MMT research program on abiotic and biotic components of the ecosystem and on the human exposure were used to validate the model estimations. Air and surface soil were selected as source terms with an annual Mn input rate in each compartment of 0.083-0.113 mol km-2 d-1 and 0.44-0.87 mol km-2 d-1 respectively (Mn3O4 equivalent). The predicted air, soil, plant, surface water and sediment concentrations were similar (+/- 50%) to values measured in the Montreal region. As expected, the ingestion pathway was the main absorption route for adults (> 99%), with vegetables and fruits contributing almost 80% of the dietary intake of Mn. The multimedia exposure doses for adult men predicted by the model ranged between 0.04 and 0.08 mg kg-1 d-1 compared to 0.004 and 0.201 mg kg-1 d-1 (average = 0.05) for workers from the MMT study. Considering the landscape configuration and the source vectors (air and soil) included in the model, GEOTOX estimations were in good agreement with measured values. PMID:9241868

  14. Morpho-dynamics of an alongshore drift fed shallow-water channel-lobe complex, Moisie River delta, NW Gulf of St. Lawrence (Eastern Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normandeau, A.; Lajeunesse, P.; St-Onge, G.

    2012-12-01

    Canyon and channel systems are known to transport large volumes of coastal and shelf sediments to the deep-sea. Most studies on canyons and channels have focused on large systems (hundred of km) occurring in >1000 m water depth. Some of these systems can have an important role in transferring eroded coastal sediment to the deeper marine environment, thus contributing to a negative sediment budget along the coast. Along the Moisie River delta (NW Gulf of St. Lawrence, Eastern Canada), an area strongly affected by coastal erosion, high resolution multibeam echosounder data acquired in shallow-water (<60 m) reveal a small scale channel-lobe complex (<3 km long) connected to the nearshore environment and oblique sand bars. The channel-lobe system is located in a sector where the coastal shelf narrows from 3000 m to 300 m wide. The oblique bars are oriented to the west near the head of the channel-lobe complex. Repeated multibeam surveys in 2007 and 2012 show that the crests of the oblique bars have prograded between 25 and 50 m westwards during the last five years. The 2007 and 2012 multibeam data at the head of the channel shows a loss of more than 1.5 m of sediment in the thalweg. Sandwaves observed in the channel on the 2012 data are located eastward of where they were located in 2007. These results indicate that the oblique bars currently transfer eroded coastal sediment towards the head of the channel-lobe complex. We therefore conclude that this channel-lobe complex is currently active by gravity flows due to recent change in sandwave location and is fed by the westwards alongshore drift currents.

  15. Gill and head kidney antioxidant processes and innate immune system responses of yellow perch (Perca flavescens) exposed to different contaminants in the St. Lawrence River, Canada.

    PubMed

    Dautremepuits, Claire; Marcogliese, David J; Gendron, Andrée D; Fournier, Michel

    2009-01-15

    Biomarkers of oxidative stress metabolism and the innate immune response were examined in gill and head kidney tissue of wild-caught yellow perch (Perca flavescens) collected from four sites ranging in type and degree of metal pollution in the St. Lawrence River, Quebec, Canada. Sites were ranked as follows: Ile Dorval

  16. A multi-level biological approach to evaluate impacts of a major municipal effluent in wild St. Lawrence River yellow perch (Perca flavescens).

    PubMed

    Houde, Magali; Giraudo, Maeva; Douville, Mélanie; Bougas, Bérénice; Couture, Patrice; De Silva, Amila O; Spencer, Christine; Lair, Stéphane; Verreault, Jonathan; Bernatchez, Louis; Gagnon, Christian

    2014-11-01

    The development of integrated ecotoxicological approaches is of great interest in the investigation of global concerns such as impacts of municipal wastewater effluents on aquatic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of a major wastewater municipal effluent on fish using a multi-level biological approach, from gene transcription and enzyme activities to histological changes. Yellow perch (Perca flavescens) were selected based on their wide distribution, their commercial and recreational importance, and the availability of a customized microarray. Yellow perch were sampled upstream of a major municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and 4 km and 10 km downstream from its point of discharge in the St. Lawrence River (Quebec, Canada). Concentrations of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and metals/trace elements in whole body homogenates were comparable to those from other industrialized regions of the world. Genomic results indicated that the transcription level of 177 genes was significantly different (p<0.024) between exposed and non-exposed fish. Among these genes, 38 were found to be differentially transcribed at both downstream sites. Impacted genes were associated with biological processes and molecular functions such as immunity, detoxification, lipid metabolism/energy homeostasis (e.g., peroxisome proliferation), and retinol metabolism suggesting impact of WWTP on these systems. Moreover, antioxidant enzyme activities were more elevated in perch collected at the 4 km site. Biomarkers of lipid metabolism, biosynthetic activity, and aerobic capacities were significantly lower (p<0.05) in fish residing near the outfall of the effluent. Histological examination of the liver indicated no differences between sites. Correlations between PFAS, PBDE, and metal/trace element tissue concentrations and markers of peroxisomal proliferation, oxidative stress, and retinoid metabolism were found at the gene and cellular levels. Present results suggest that relating transcriptomic analyses to phenotypic responses is important to better understand impacts of environmental contamination on wild fish populations. PMID:25137380

  17. Annual dissolved nitrite plus nitrate and total phosphorous loads for the Susquehanna, St. Lawrence, Mississippi-Atchafalaya, and Columbia River basins, 1968-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aulenbach, Brent T.

    2006-01-01

    Annual stream-water loads were calculated near the outlet of four of the larger river basins (Susquehanna, St. Lawrence, Mississippi-Atchafalaya, and Columbia) in the United States for dissolved nitrite plus nitrate (NO2 + NO3) and total phosphorus using LOADEST load estimation software. Loads were estimated for the period 1968-2004; although loads estimated for individual river basins and chemical constituent combinations typically were for shorter time periods due to limitations in data availability. Stream discharge and water-quality data for load estimates were obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) with additional stream discharge data for the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River Basin from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The loads were estimated to support national assessments of changes in stream nutrient loads that are periodically conducted by Federal agencies (for example, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency) and other water- and land-resource organizations. Data, methods, and results of load estimates are summarized herein; including World Wide Web links to electronic ASCII text files containing the raw data. The load estimates are compared to dissolved NO2 + NO3 loads for three of the large river basins from 1971 to 1998 that the USGS provided during 2001 to The H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics and the Environment (The Heinz Center) for a report The Heinz Center published during 2002. Differences in the load estimates are the result of using the most up-to-date monitoring data since the 2001 analysis, differences in how concentrations less than the reporting limit were handled by the load estimation models, and some errors and exclusions in the 2001 analysis datasets (which resulted in some inaccurate load estimates).

  18. Exploring Estuaries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Defines estuaries and related habitats, reviews their roles in coastal ecology and in supporting human activities. Virtual tours provide history and introduce ecology of representative plans and animals. Presents current threats to estuaries and their wildlife and explains the role of EPA's National Estuary Program in protecting these important coastal resources. Includes: teachers' page with resources and links; games, coloring sheets and glossary for kids.

  19. Contribution of active and passive acoustics to study oceanographic processes feeding whales in a critical habitat of the St. Lawrence Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, Yvan; Roy, Nathalie; Simard, Yvan; Cotté, Cédric

    2001-05-01

    The head of the main channel of the continent in eastern Canada is the site of particular oceanographic processes that are responsible for the creation of a persistent feeding ground regularly visited by baleen whales from the Atlantic for centuries. Multifrequency acoustics coupled with ADCP and hydrographic measurements has been used to map the krill and capelin aggregations in 3D and visualize their local concentration process under tidal forcing and upwelling at the channel head. The krill scattering layers, pumped into the area by the strong two-layer estuarine circulation, appear to be concentrated during flood by tidal currents forced against the slopes and upwelling, to which depth-keeping krill is reacting by swimming down. Capelin also tends to concentrate on slopes and neighboring shallows. This highly recurrent process generates rich patches that are contributing with the mean circulation to make this area the richest krill aggregation in Northwest Atlantic. This critical habitat is located in a major continental seaway. Passive acoustics techniques are explored to locate whale calls and map the use of this area in continuing months, especially by blue and fin whales, with the aim of understanding their movements to improve their protection.

  20. Detection and quantitation of benzo(a)pyrene-DNA adducts in brain and liver tissues of Beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence and Mackenzie Estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    It should be noted that there are few analytical techniques available for the detection and quantitation of chemical adducts in the DNA of living organisms. The reasons for this are: the analytical technique often has to accommodate the unique chemical and/or physical properties of the individual chemical or its metabolite; the percentage of total chemical that becomes most of the parent compound is usually detoxified and excreted; not all adducts that form between the genotoxic agent and DNA are stable or are involved in the development of subsequent deleterious events in the organism; and the amount of DNA available for analysis is often quite limited. 16 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Exploring Estuaries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Exploring Estuaries introduces students of various ages to the ecology of estuaries, places where freshwater rivers and streams flow into the ocean, mixing with the seawater. It is part of a broader effort by the National Estuary Program to educate the general public about estuaries and to restore and protect these sensitive ecosystems. It offers interactive games and activities as well as virtual tours of Long Island Sound and the Barataria-Terrebonne Estuarine Complex near New Orleans. A glossary page defines technical terms used throughout the site. Resources also are provided for teachers and students interested in learning more about related organizations, publications, and websites.

  2. Evaluation of HVDC cables for the St. Lawrence River crossing of Hydro-Quebec's 500 kV DC line. Part 2; Cable testing facility for dielectric and accelerated aging

    SciTech Connect

    Trinh, N.G.; Couderc, D.; Faucher, P.; Chaaban, M.; Belec, M.; Leduc, J. (Inst. de Recherche d'Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S1 (CA))

    1992-04-01

    This paper describes the new cable testing facility at IREQ for long-term accelerated aging tests on HV cables. This test facility was required as part of an extensive program to evaluate the high-voltage cables for the river crossing of Hydro-Quebec's new transmission lines rated 800 kV AC and {plus minus}500 kV DC. The first application was for the evaluation of self-contained oil-filled (SCOF) cables for the St. Lawrence river crossing of the {plus minus}500 kV Quebec-New England HVDC power transmission system. The paper also describes the specific dielectric constraints resulting from the insertion of a short length of cable into a long line and, also, the circuits developed for the special tests, which reproduce the specific cable test conditions.

  3. Estuary Live!!!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Intended for elementary, middle, and high school students, this electronic estuary excursion, Estuary Live!!!, will take place May 8-12, 2000. Free to participants (but please sign up in advance), the field trip will explore the Rachel Carson Site of the North Carolina National Estuarine Research Reserve, covering four islands and salt marshes off the North Carolina coast. The site features useful educational materials, including a photo-illustrated field guide (of the "ecology, habitats and specific plants and animals found in North Carolina's estuaries"); lesson plans (covering highschool biology, estuary habitats, species interactions, and adaptations and communities); and a series of related links. The interactive field trip will require a java-enabled browser, RealVideo (to see a moving image and hear sound), and/or Chatvideo, to see a moving image, ask questions of the naturalist leading the trip, and receive responses via a chat window. Note that ChatVideo requires Netscape 4.0 or better and will not work with AOL or Internet Explorer, and pages "look best" on a screen with resolution of 800x600. The Estuary Live!!! Website is provided by the North Carolina National Estuarine Research Reserve Program, and The Center for Science, Mathematics and Technology Education at East Carolina University.

  4. Occurrence of alkylphenols and alkylphenol mono- and diethoxylates in natural waters of the Laurentian Great Lakes basin and the upper St. Lawrence River

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. T. Bennie; C. A. Sullivan; H.-B. Lee; T. E. Peart; R. J. Maguire

    1997-01-01

    Nonylphenol and its ethoxylates are on the second priority substances list (PSL2) to determine if they are ‘toxic’ as defined under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act. This study addresses the need for data on their occurrence in surface waters and sediments in Canada. Samples of surface water from 35 sites in the Laurentian Great Lakes basin and the upper St.

  5. The Social Nature of Saintliness and Moral Action: A View of William James's "Varieties" in Relation to St Ignatius and Lawrence Kohlberg

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins-D'Alessandro, Ann; Cecero, John J.

    2003-01-01

    This article argues that William James's thinking in "The Varieties" and elsewhere contains the view that social institutions, such as religious congregations and schools, are mediators between the private and public spheres of life, and are necessary for transforming personal feelings, ideals and beliefs into moral action. The Exercises of St

  6. Classification of Estuaries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Oberrecht, Kenn

    This text states that although all estuaries are similar in that they are semi-enclosed bodies of brackish water, they are categorized with regard to geological characteristics, and further distinguished on the basis of stratification and circulation patterns. According to their geological characteristics, estuaries are classified as: drowned river valleys or coastal-plain estuaries, bar-built estuaries or lagoons, fjord-type estuaries, and tectonically caused estuaries. Each type is explained in detail and examples are given for each.

  7. Estuaries: Finding the Balance

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Xpeditions NatGeo (National Geographic Society; )

    2008-04-30

    Students can use this resource from the National Geographic to examine the conflict between development and the environment by focusing on estuaries across the United States. Its objectives are for students to learn about the environmental and economic importance of estuaries, consider the conflicts that arise because of the many uses of estuaries, research a specific estuary and the problems and solutions that have developed around it, and suggest compromises that might be made in order to protect both estuaries and economic development. To meet these objectives, students are directed to review a number of websites about estuaries and then to answer questions concerning environmental issues (e.g., What are the specific ecological characteristics of estuaries? What are some of the signs that an estuary is in trouble as a habitat?) and economic issues (e.g., How might proximity to major cities impact estuaries? To what degree should economic activity dictate the outcome of estuaries?).

  8. National Estuaries Day

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Get the most out of National Estuaries Day (October 5, 2002) by visiting this Web site from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Follow a link to Estuary Live!, which offers online interactive fieldtrips through a number of estuaries around the nation. Guided tours of eight estuaries will be webcast live October 3 and 4, supplemented by videos from a number of other estuaries. Internet participants "will have an opportunity to see the fascinating creatures that make estuaries their home and experience the diversity of estuarine ecosystems." Viewers may submit questions during the webcasts or videos, which will be answered by tour guides and educators from the featured estuaries. Click on About Estuaries for an introduction to estuarine ecosystems and for links to a number of Web sites that "provide general information, curriculums and helpful references on estuaries."

  9. Estuary Restoration Act Estuary Habitat Restoration Council

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Estuary Restoration Act Estuary Habitat Restoration Council Ranked Proposal Recommendation May 13, 2011 Project Name Description 1. Riverside Ranch Restoration Will restore 356 acres of estuarine ditches, re-contouring, and channel excavaton. Recommend USACE fund. 2. Sears Point Tidal Restoration

  10. Eutrophication of the St. Lawrence Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeton, Alfred M.

    1965-01-01

    Lakes Huron, Michigan, and Superior are classified as oligotrophic lakes on the basis of their biological, chemical, and physical characteristics. Lake Ontario, although rich in nutrients, is morphometrically oligotrophic or mesotrophic because of its large area of deep water. Lake Erie, the most productive of the lakes and the shallowest, is eutrophic. Several changes commonly associated with eutrophication in small lakes have been observed in the Great Lakes. These changes apparently reflect accelerated eutrophication in the Great Lakes due to man's activity. Chemical data compiled from a number of sources, dating as early as 1854, indicate a progressive increase in the concentrations of various major ions and total dissolved solids in all of the lakes except Lake Superior. The plankton has changed somewhat in Lake Michigan and the plankton, benthos, and fish populations of Lake Erie are greatly different today from those of the past. An extensive area of hypolimnetic water of Lake Erie has developed low dissolved oxygen concentrations in late summer within recent years.

  11. Driving Innovation Michael Lawrence

    E-print Network

    Driving Innovation Michael Lawrence Head of Special Projects michael.lawrence@tsb.gov.uk Driving Innovation in Space #12;Driving Innovation Astrium Services DMCii Infoterra #12;Driving Innovation Astrium Services DMCii Infoterra Avanti Inmarsat #12;Driving Innovation Astrium Services DMCii Infoterra Avanti

  12. Distribution, abundance, and range of the round goby, Apollina melanostoma, in the Duluth-Superior Harbor and St. Louis River estuary, 1998-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergstrom, M.A.; Evrard, L.M.; Mensinger, A.F.

    2008-01-01

    Round gobies were first discovered in the Duluth-Superior Harbor, Lake Superior, in 1995. Anecdotal sightings by anglers and others suggested that the infestation was growing and expanding; however, direct evidence of the distribution and expansion rate in the harbor was largely unknown. Distribution and range of the round goby, Apollonia melanostoma, (formerly Neogobius melanostomus) was assessed using bottom trawl sampling throughout the Duluth-Superior Harbor, and portions of the lower St. Louis River from 1998 to 2004. Previous to 1998, round gobies only were reported to occupy the harbor between the two shipping entries (river kilometer 1 to 7). By 2004, they expanded throughout the harbor and upstream to river kilometer 13, but remained absent in western Lake Superior. The number of round gobies captured per 5 minutes of trawling (catch per unit effort, CPUE) increased from less than 1 fish in 1998 to an average 5.4 ?? 1.2 SE fish in 2004, indicating a large increase in the population. The median yearly fish total length varied from 56.0 to 81.5 mm and wet weight varied from 2.3 to 7.0 g. As nest guarding male round gobies were located in rocky habitats inaccessible to trawling, the initial years were dominated by female round gobies with a 16:1 female to male ratio, but by 2002 the maximum ratio was 2:1. The ratio change may be indicative of the increasing population forcing males from their preferred rocky habitat onto open substrates that were more accessible to trawling.

  13. Linking Species Traits to the Abiotic Template of Flowing Waters: Contrasting Eco physiologies Underlie Displacement of Zebra Mussels by Quagga Mussels in a Large River-Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, A. F.

    2005-05-01

    The St. Lawrence River-Estuary was the gateway of entry for dreissenids to North America and holds some of the oldest populations. The St. Lawrence also has four distinct physical-chemical water masses (a regional scale abiotic template) that both species inhabit. Despite their ecological similarities, quagga mussels are supplanting zebra mussels in much of their shared range. In order to try to better understand the changing distributions of these two species we compared glycogen, shell mass and tissue biomass in each of the water masses. This comparative physiological combined with experimental approaches (estuarine salinity experiments and reciprocal transplants) showed that while quagga mussels should dominate in most habitats, that abiotic/bioenergetic constraints in two regions (the Ottawa River plume and the freshwater-marine transition zone) might prevent them from dominating these locations. These findings are an example of how the interaction of landscape scale abiotic heterogeneity and a species-specific physiology can have strong impacts of distribution of biota large rivers.

  14. Curriculum Vitae Lawrence Chung

    E-print Network

    Chung, Lawrence

    Curriculum Vitae Lawrence Chung 3012 Chippenham Dr., Plano, Texas, USA. 75093 Telephone: (972) 758 1994{Summer 2000. Visiting Scholar Center for Strategic Technology Research (CSTaR), Andersen- ture, Electronic Commerce/Business, Information Systems (Re-)Engineering. Membership Institute

  15. National Estuary Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Estuaries are places where rivers meet the sea and are critical to the health of coastal environments and our enjoyment of them. Website features abundant information on the legal and scientific aspects of estuary preservation. Includes guidelines, program profiles, and a shorter version in Spanish. Resources for teachers and students include games and activities. External links to additional programs also provided.

  16. Biogeochemistry of Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdige, David J.

    2007-12-01

    Whether you are interested in material flux from the continents to the oceans or whether the oysters set down in front of you at a waterfront restaurant may have come from polluted waters, we know estuaries are important places. However, anyone attempting to summarize and synthesize the long and rich literature of estuarine research is presented with a daunting task. This is because beyond the concept of an estuary being the transition zone where ``fresh water meets seawater,'' the exact definition of an estuary is not uniformly agreed upon by scientists in this field. Also, estuaries-regardless of how they are defined-tend to be highly heterogeneous, in both space and time. Against this backdrop, Thomas Bianchi's Biogeochemistry of Estuaries successfully tackles its subject matter and is an exciting addition to the field of estuarine research.

  17. LBNL-6288E ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE

    E-print Network

    1 LBNL-6288E ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Reprint version of journal article Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron

  18. Learning Lessons from Estuaries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Christine Schnittka

    2006-01-01

    There is something that draws us all to the sea and especially to the fertile estuaries that nuzzle up to its shores. An estuary serves as both a nursery and a grave for sea creatures. This article describes annual trips to three islands in the Chesapeake Bay and the long-term impact these trips have had on students. Although the activities described in this article are centered around the Bay, this example of an immersive field experience could be duplicated in other ecosystems around the country (see "On the web" at the end of this article for information on planning an estuary field trip).

  19. Volunteer Estuary Monitoring

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This online method manual from EPA describes how to conduct estuary monitoring programs, with step-by-step guides for chemical, physical and biological sampling and data interpretation. Also describes how to plan and maintain a volunteer force, with tips on liability and financial issues, volunteer recruiting training and retention. Addresses quality assurance so that results have weight. Provides an overview of estuarine science, threats to estuaries and some solutions.

  20. Louisiana estuary loss reviewed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackett, Bill

    The state of Louisiana loses ˜80 km2 or about 1% of the state's coastal wetlands from its estuaries each year, according to Donald F. Boesch, executive director of the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium. Boesch was the cooordinator and a speaker at the seventh in a series of seminars on the nation's estuaries, sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Estuarine Programs Office, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service.

  1. Estuarine Science: All About Estuaries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Estuaries are partially enclosed bodies of water along coastlines where fresh water and salt water meet and mix. They act as a transition zone between oceans and continents. This site examines various aspects of estuaries, focusing on the geological features that make an estuary, as well as the water circulation patterns by which they are classified. It also has a section that allows the user to access additional text and graphics on many of the estuaries of the world.

  2. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Center for Science and Engineering Education One Cyclotron Road MS7R0222 Berkeley, California 94720 Tel: 510.486.5511 Fax: 510.486.4813

    E-print Network

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Center for Science and Engineering Education One Cyclotron, please be sure to select Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) as your 1ST or only lab choice; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Center for Science and Engineering Education One Cyclotron Road MS

  3. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    LBNL 58752 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Laboratory Evaluation of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. 3 #12;Abstract A testing program was undertaken at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and an electric utility

  4. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Environment, Health, and Safety Division of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Site Environmental Report for 2004 Volume I SEPTEMBER 2005 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

  5. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division July Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Site Environmental Report for 2002 Volume I JULY 2003 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Prepared

  6. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    LBNL-6607E ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Measurement-Based Evaluation. Singer Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory April 3, 2014 thereof, or The Regents of the University of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National

  7. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division July Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Site Environmental Report for 2002 Volume II July 2003 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Prepared

  8. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Environment, Health, and Safety Division of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Site Environmental Report for 2004 Volume II SEPTEMBER 2005 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

  9. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    LBNL-58252 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Rationale for Measuring Duct Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, California thereof, or The Regents of the University of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National

  10. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    LBNL-254E ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY ALDEHYDE AND OTHER VOLATILE ORGANIC of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;LBNL Environment Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

  11. LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY NIGHT!

    E-print Network

    Knowles, David William

    LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY NIGHT! Saturday March 22, 2008 ARENA FOOTBALL Game time - 7 of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory along with their friends and families to come out and enjoy a night for further information at mnieves@sanjosesabercats.com *Tickets MUST be purchased through the SaberCats Front

  12. Wolfgang Langhans Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    Wolfgang Langhans Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Earth Science Division 1 Cyclotron Road 84R Professional experience Jan 2013 ­ present Postdoctoral fellow, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley

  13. Lawrence Denny Lindsley Photographs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2006-01-01

    Lawrence Denny Lindsley was born in 1878 in a house on scenic Lake Union, right in the middle of the relatively young city of Seattle, Washington. As a descendant of the early Seattle pioneer David Denny, Lindsley began to wander around the city and its environs from a young age. Like many men in the Pacific Northwest during the late 19th century, he enjoyed the outdoors, and soon developed a skill for photography. He later went on to work for Edward Curtis, and he continued on by documenting such landscapes as Mount Rainer, Lake Chelan, and the Olympic Peninsula. Many of these excellent photographs can be viewed in this latest offering from the University of Washington Libraries Digital Collection. All told, there are 472 photographs here, complete with detailed records. The King County section is a real highlight, as visitors will get a real sense of the area before it became heavily urbanized during the 20th century.

  14. Ecology of estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kennish, M.J. (Rutgers--the State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Ecology of Estuaries: Anthropogenic Effects represents the most definitive and comprehensive source of reference information available on the human impact on estuarine ecosystems. The book discusses both acute and insidious pollution problems plaguing these coastal ecotones. It also provides a detailed examination of the deleterious and pervasive effects of human activities on biotic communities and sensitive habitat areas in estuaries. Specific areas covered include organic loading, oil pollution, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, heavy metals, dredging and dredge-spoil disposal, radionuclides, as well as other contaminants and processes. The diverse components of these anthropogenic influences are assembled in an organized framework and presented in a clear and concise style that will facilitate their understanding.

  15. Ecology of estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kennish, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book is a summary of information available on estuarine ecology, that reviews concepts and problems of estuaries and assesses the value of these coastal systems. It investigates such topics as water circulation and mixing, trace elements, nutrients, organic matter, and sedimentary processes, with reviews on more than two decades of intense study. Chapters reflect contributions from a variety of interdisciplinary sciences including botany, chemistry, ecology, geology, physics, and zoology.

  16. Monitoring and Managing Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary San Francisco Estuary Institute and the

    E-print Network

    Monitoring and Managing Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary San Francisco Estuary Institute and the Regional Monitoring Program for Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary #12;www.sfei.org #12;Contribution 517 Monitoring and Managing Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary San Francisco Estuary

  17. Estuary Restoration Act of 2000 Title I of Estuaries and Clean Waters Act of 2000

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Estuary Restoration Act of 2000 Title I of Estuaries and Clean Waters Act of 2000 Public Law 106 of the Estuary Restoration Act, Title I of P.L. 106-457 (Act). The contents reflect the views of the Estuary). Background: The purposes of the Act are to promote the restoration of estuary habitat; develop a national

  18. Ecology of estuaries: Anthropogenic effects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kennish; Michael J. Kennish

    1992-01-01

    Estuaries and near-shore oceanic water are subjected to a multitude of human wastes. The principal objective of this book is to examine anthropogenic effects on estuaries, and it focuses primarily on contaminants in coastal systems. Covered within various chapters are the following topics: waste disposal strategies; definition and classification of pollutants (including organic loading, oil pollution, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons; chlorinated

  19. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Arguably the most famous government research laboratory in the United States, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and managed by the University of California. Scientists associated with the laboratory have received a number of accolades over the years, including 13 Nobel Prizes and 13 National Medals of Science. The materials on the site are divided into five primary sections, including About the Lab, For Staff and Guests, and Visitor's Guide. First-time users may wish to start with the News Center. Here they can read press releases and features, and watch videos of scientists talking about their work. The Video Glossary contains wonderful clips of scientists talking about atmospheric aerosols, energy efficiency, and myriad other topics. The general public won't want to miss the "$ Ways to Save Money on Energy" section and the equally compelling area on Globally Transformative Technologies. The site is rounded out by a place where visitors can follow the Laboratory's activities via Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

  20. Revelations CallenderSt

    E-print Network

    Müller, Jens-Dominik

    Ave Donegall Rd Lisburn Rd Blythe St Rowland Wy FeltSt Westlink Westlink CullingtreeRd ServiaSt RossSt Shankill Rd TownsendSt BoundarySt BrownsSq GardinerSt BoydSt DoverSt Peters Hill Brown St Donegall Rd Mary's St Malachy's May St Presbyterian St Peter's Cathedral First Presbyterian Victoria Square St

  1. Lawrence R. Wiencke, Ph.D. Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines

    E-print Network

    (Japan/United States R&D project) (1998) CRAYS (Calibration by Rayleigh Scattering) Kashiwa, Japan (2002­2003Lawrence R. Wiencke, Ph.D. Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines 1523 Illinois St, Golden.Phil. Columbia University, 1986 M.A., Columbia University, 1985 A.B., Dartmouth College, 1983 (cum laude, honors

  2. JAMES A. DAVIS Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Hazen, Terry

    JAMES A. DAVIS Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Mail Stop 90-1106 1 Cyclotron Road Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1980-2010: Senior Research Scientist, U.S. Geological Survey, Water

  3. LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY REPORT NO. LBNL-59202 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE

    E-print Network

    LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY REPORT NO. LBNL- 59202 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY REPORT NO. LBNL- 59202 Air Tightness of US Homes: Model Development1

  4. Toward delisting of the water quality beneficial use impairment in the St. Louis River, MN: A monitoring approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water quality in the St. Louis River Estuary (SLRE), a great lakes area of concern (AOC), is improving. A significant leap forward followed the opening of the Western Lake Superior Sanitary District in 1978. However, desire for continued improvement throughout the estuary was the...

  5. Seasonal dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus budgets for two sub-tropical estuaries in south Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzelli, C.; Wan, Y.; Doering, P. H.; Boyer, J. N.

    2013-02-01

    Interactions among watershed nutrient loading, circulation, and biogeochemical cycling determine the capacity of estuaries to accommodate introduced nutrients. Baseline quantification of loading, flushing time, export, and internal processes is essential to understand responses of sub-tropical estuaries to variable climate and nutrient loading. The goal of this study was to develop seasonal dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and phosphorus (DIP) budgets for the two estuaries in south Florida, the Caloosahatchee River Estuary (CRE) and the St. Lucie Estuary (SLE), from 2002-2008 spanning various climatic conditions. The Land Ocean Interactions in the Coastal Zone (LOICZ) Biogeochemical Model was used to generate water, salt, and (DIN and DIP) budgets. The predicted increase in internal DIN production for the CRE vs. the SLE was associated with increased external DIN loading. Water column DIN concentrations decreased and stabilized in both estuaries as flushing time increased to > 10 d. The CRE demonstrated heterotrophy or balanced metabolism across all seasonal budgets. Although the SLE was also sensitive to DIN loading, system autotrophy and net ecosystem metabolism increased with DIP loading to this estuary. This included a huge DIP consumption and bloom of a cyanobacterium (Microcystis aeruginosa) following hurricane-induced discharge in 2005. Additionally, while denitrification offered a loss pathway for inorganic nitrogen in the CRE, this potential was not evident for the smaller and more anthropogenically altered St. Lucie Estuary. Disparities between total and inorganic loading ratios suggested that management actions should examine the role of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) in attempts to reduce both nitrogen and phosphorus inputs to the SLE. Establishment of quantitative loading limits for anthropogenically impacted estuaries requires an understanding of the inter-seasonal and inter-annual relationships for both N and P, circulation and flushing, variability in plankton community composition, and the dynamics of DON.

  6. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    LBNL-62078 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Air Leakage of U.S. Homes: Model of the University of California or any other sponsor. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the ventilation used to control IAQ. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been gathering residential air

  7. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Eisen, Michael

    Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory January 4, 2013 State of California Office, MS76-225 Berkeley, California 94720 #12;#12;1 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory projects and activities managed or led by the University of California Lawrence Berkeley National

  8. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division July Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under thereof or The Regents of the University of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National

  9. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division July Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract thereof or The Regents of the University of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National

  10. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    LBNL 54696 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY A Systems Approach to Retrofitting of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;AWilliams, Energy Performance of Buildings Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA ABSTRACT A Best

  11. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory LBL-27170 (2009) Volume I Site Environmental of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Site Environmental Report for 2008 Volume I September 2009 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

  12. Dissolved oxygen in two Oregon estuaries: Importance of the ocean-estuary connection

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the role of the ocean ?estuary connection in influencing periodic reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in Yaquina and Yachats estuaries, Oregon, USA. In the Yaquina Estuary, there is close coupling between the coastal ocean and the estuary. As a result, low DO ...

  13. Dissolved oxygen in two Oregon estuaries: The importance of the ocean-estuary connection

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the role of the ocean ?estuary connection in influencing periodic reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in Yaquina and Yachats estuaries, Oregon, USA. In the Yaquina Estuary, there is close coupling between the coastal ocean and the estuary. As a result, low DO ...

  14. Estuary Restoration Act of 2000 Title I of Estuaries and Clean Waters Act of 2000

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Estuary Restoration Act of 2000 Title I of Estuaries and Clean Waters Act of 2000 Public Law 106 of Section 108 of the Estuary Restoration Act, Title I of P.L. 106-457 (Act). This report covers the fiscal years 2004 through 2006 and reflects the views of the Estuary Habitat Restoration Council (Council

  15. Dissolved oxygen in two Oregon estuaries: Importance of the ocean-estuary connection - March 2011

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the role of the ocean?estuary connection in influencing periodic reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in Yaquina and Yachats estuaries, Oregon, USA. In the Yaquina Estuary, there is close coupling between the coastal ocean and the estuary. As a result, low DO w...

  16. Estuaries and Clean Water Act of 2000

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Office of Water at the Environmental Protection Agency has posted online this document on the new Estuaries and Clean Water Act of 2000. Available in .pdf format, the document summarizes the Act, which emphasizes restoration of estuary habitat.

  17. PECONIC ESTUARY EELGRASS HABITAT CRITERIA STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    PECONIC ESTUARY EELGRASS HABITAT CRITERIA STUDY The main objective of this study is to develop criteria for eelgrass habitat establishment and persistence within the Peconic Estuary utilizing various environmental analyses. The Program evaluated water and sediment quality data to...

  18. EXHIBIT OF EMPACT ESTUARY MONITORING HANDBOOKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Related EMPACT documents were displayed at the National Estuary Day Celebration held in Washington, DC, September 30-Octuber 4, 2002. The estuary monitoring technology transfer handbooks displayed were prepared based on information and monitoring technologies developed from selec...

  19. RAPID COMMUNICATION Microplastic pollution in St. Lawrence River sediments

    E-print Network

    Ricciardi, Anthony

    . Francis to Québec City by passing sediment collected from a benthic grab through a 500 m sieve. Microbeads) has been recognized since the 1970s (Carpenter and Smith 1972; Cole et al. 2011; Lusher et al. 2013 be ingested by benthic invertebrates (Browne et al. 2008; Graham and Thompson 2009; Murray and Cowie 2011

  20. Mary Garden Plant List for the St. Clare Garden Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, California

    E-print Network

    Schwarz, Thomas

    Carpet Bugle, St. Lawrence's Plant Alchemilla mollis Lady's Mantle, Mary's Mantle Aquilegia hybrid Bells Lilium hyb. Lily, Easter Lily Lilium formosanum Formosa Lily, Easter Lily Lilium regale Regal Lily

  1. Assessing the application of an airborne intensified multispectral video camera to measure chlorophyll a in three Florida estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Dierberg, F.E. [DB Environmental Labs., Inc., Rockledge, FL (United States); Zaitzeff, J. [National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Adminstration, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-08-01

    After absolute and spectral calibration, an airborne intensified, multispectral video camera was field tested for water quality assessments over three Florida estuaries (Tampa Bay, Indian River Lagoon, and the St. Lucie River Estuary). Univariate regression analysis of upwelling spectral energy vs. ground-truthed uncorrected chlorophyll a (Chl a) for each estuary yielded lower coefficients of determination (R{sup 2}) with increasing concentrations of Gelbstoff within an estuary. More predictive relationships were established by adding true color as a second independent variable in a bivariate linear regression model. These regressions successfully explained most of the variation in upwelling light energy (R{sup 2}=0.94, 0.82 and 0.74 for the Tampa Bay, Indian River Lagoon, and St. Lucie estuaries, respectively). Ratioed wavelength bands within the 625-710 nm range produced the highest correlations with ground-truthed uncorrected Chl a, and were similar to those reported as being the most predictive for Chl a in Tennessee reservoirs. However, the ratioed wavebands producing the best predictive algorithms for Chl a differed among the three estuaries due to the effects of varying concentrations of Gelbstoff on upwelling spectral signatures, which precluded combining the data into a common data set for analysis.

  2. Exploring Physical and Biological Mechanisms for Zooplankton Retention in the Estuarine Transition Zone of a Riverine Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, R. D.; Monismith, S. G.

    2002-12-01

    In this study, we use a coupled three-dimensional physical-biological model to investigate zooplankton retention in the estuarine transition zone (ETZ) of the St. Lawrence Estuary (SLE). Varying from well-mixed to partially stratified, the hydrodynamic environment of the SLE is defined by a large tidal range, strong salinity gradients, a large freshwater river flow, and complex bathymetry. The physical-biological model used for this study consisted of two parts: a circulation model and a zooplankton transport model. The circulation model is a three-dimensional Eulerian hydrodynamic model (TRIM3D) driven by the wind, tides, and freshwater outflow. The zooplankton transport model is a three-dimensional Lagrangian particle tracking model which simulates zooplankton movement using velocity fields derived from the three-dimensional circulation model. The circulation model is calibrated using field data such as salinity, pressure, and current time series from different locations in the ETZ. The transport and distribution of three zooplankton taxa, non-native zebra mussel veligers, resident mysids, and larval smelt, were simulated for this study. By simulating these three taxa, we were able to investigate the effect of a range of swimming speeds on zooplankton retention in the ETZ. We present the results of simulations exploring the efficiency of tidal vertical migration, a commonly described biological retention mechanism that is characterized by zooplankton migration up to the surface on flood and down to the bottom on ebb. Tidal vertical migration, also known as selective tidal stream transport, was investigated for several swimming speeds and endogenous rhythms.

  3. Future variability of solute transport in a macrotidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, Peter E.; Lewis, Matt J.; Simpson, John H.; Howlett, Eleanor R.; Malham, Shelagh K.

    2014-12-01

    The physical controls on salt distribution and river-sourced conservative solutes, including the potential implications of climate change, are investigated referring to model simulations of a macrotidal estuary. In the UK, such estuaries typically react rapidly to rainfall events and, as such, are often in a state of non-equilibrium in terms of solute transport; hence are particularly sensitive to climate extremes. Sea levels are projected to rise over the 21st century, extending the salinity maximum upstream in estuaries, which will also affect downstream solute transport, promoting estuarine trapping and reducing offshore dispersal of material. Predicted 'drier summers' and 'wetter winters' in the UK will influence solute transport further still; we found that projected river flow climate changes were more influential than sea-level rise, especially for low flow conditions. Our simulations show that projected climate change for the UK is likely to increase variability in estuarine solute transport and, specifically, increase the likelihood of estuarine trapping during summer, mainly due to drier weather conditions. Future changes in solute transport were less certain during winter, since increased river flow will to some extent counter-act the effects of sea-level rise. Our results have important implications for non-conservative nutrient transport, water quality, coastal management and ecosystem resilience.

  4. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Internships

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Internships -- The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) hosts 300 to 400 undergraduate and graduate students and some faculty every summer in support of its world-class scientific facilities and staff and in an effort to help train the nation's next generation of scientists and engineers.

    Involvement in world-class research provides participants with a set of experiences that support their education and career goals. Typically, participants gain hands-on experience and the opportunity to apply learned theory to real life problems. An experience of this type, and with these resources at a premier state-of-the-art research laboratory is not available in an academic research lab.

  5. Carbon dioxide emission from european estuaries

    PubMed

    Frankignoulle; Abril; Borges; Bourge; Canon; Delille; Libert; Theate

    1998-10-16

    The partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) in surface waters and related atmospheric exchanges were measured in nine European estuaries. Averaged fluxes over the entire estuaries are usually in the range of 0.1 to 0.5 mole of CO2 per square meter per day. For wide estuaries, net daily fluxes to the atmosphere amount to several hundred tons of carbon (up to 790 tons of carbon per day in the Scheldt estuary). European estuaries emit between 30 and 60 million tons of carbon per year to the atmosphere, representing 5 to 10% of present anthropogenic CO2 emissions for Western Europe. PMID:9774261

  6. Jacob Lawrence: Over the Line

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    An accompaniment to the special exhibition entitled Over the Line: The Art and Life of Jacob Lawrence, the Over the Line Web site features the paintings of Jacob Lawrence, along with photographs and a brief synopsis of his life. The site is divided into three sections -- Beginnings, Young Artist, and Over the Line -- and covers the period between 1917 (the year of his birth) to 2000 (the year of his death). The site also contains suggested classroom activities, discussion questions, teaching strategies, and recommended books in the areas of social studies, language arts, math, science, and visual arts. It also includes a collection of paintings by secondary students in the Washington, DC area. Users can choose to view the exhibit in Flash (which requires a Flash 4.0 plug-in) or HTML (which has been optimized for low bandwidth computers). A part of the Phillips Collection located in Washington, DC, this is an excellent online exhibit that delves into the life of painter and educator Jacob Lawrence.

  7. Ecology of estuaries: Anthropogenic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kennish, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    Estuaries and near-shore oceanic water are subjected to a multitude of human wastes. The principal objective of this book is to examine anthropogenic effects on estuaries, and it focuses primarily on contaminants in coastal systems. Covered within various chapters are the following topics: waste disposal strategies; definition and classification of pollutants (including organic loading, oil pollution, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons; chlorinated hydrocarbons; heavy metals; radionuclides) biological impacts; waste management; impacts of power plants; dredging and spoil disposal; case studies, primarily Chesapeake Bay. The book serves as a text and as a reference.

  8. The Modification of an Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Frederic H.; Cloern, James E.; Luoma, Samuel N.; Peterson, David H.

    1986-02-01

    The San Francisco Bay estuary has been rapidly modified by human activity. Diking and filling of most of its wetlands have eliminated habitats for fish and waterfowl; the introduction of exotic species has transformed the composition of its aquatic communities; reduction of freshwater inflow by more than half has changed the dynamics of its plant and animal communities; and wastes have contaminated its sediments and organisms. Continued disposal of toxic wastes, the probable further reduction in freshwater inflow, and the possible synergy between the two provide the potential for further alteration of the estuary's water quality and biotic communities.

  9. A historical review and bibliometric analysis of research on estuary pollution.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jinshui; Wang, Ming-Huang; Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2012-01-01

    A bibliometric method based on Science Citation Index-Expanded published by the Thomson Reuters was used to quantitatively assess the global estuary pollution research from 1991 to 2010. The main results were as follows: there had been a notable growth trend in publication outputs. Marine Pollution Bulletin was the most active journal. Environmental sciences were top popular subject categories. USA produced the most single, internationally collaborative, first authored and corresponding authored articles. The Chinese Academy of Sciences was the most productive institute for the total articles. Sediment was the most active research topic, which ranked 1st in article title, article abstract, author keyword, and KeyWords Plus analysis, respectively. Heavy metals received stable focus on a high degree in the field of estuary pollution research. Mostly refractory organic compounds (e.g. PAHs) became more active. Biomarkers and bioaccumulation both were active issues. Eutrophication of estuarine waters receives increasing concern in estuary pollution research. PMID:22119413

  10. DELAWARE ESTUARY A MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR THE DELAWARE ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wise conservation and management of the Delaware Estuary is arguably the most important cooperative environmental initiative ever jointly undertaken by the States of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware. While much has been accomplished over the past few decades to improve wate...

  11. The historical record of metal enrichment in two Florida estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, C.R.; Smith, R.G. (Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, Savannah, GA (United States)); Calder, F.D.; Schropp, S.J. (Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Tallahassee, FL (United States)); Windom H.L. (Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, Savannah, GA (United States))

    1993-12-01

    Historical profiles of metal accumulation have been generated for the lower St. Johns River and Hillsborough Bay, Florida, in cores representing approximately 50 yr of sediment and metal accumulation. These profiles demonstrate that Cd, Pb, and Zn are enriched in these Florida estuarine sediments. Pb enrichment has decreased since the mid 1970s because of reduced use of leaded gasoline. In the St. Johns River, most metals exhibit a trend of increasing enrichment with time. Cd enrichment significantly decreased between 1970 and 1975 as a result of reduced discharges into the river and control of aquatic vegetation. In Hillsborough Bay, enrichment factors for most metals are relatively high and show little change downcore. Cr, Cu, and Ni border on enrichment and Pb, Cd, and Zn are enriched. The results of this study are consistent with other studies of surficial-sediment metal concentration in other Florida estuaries. 39 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. The Value of Healthy Estuaries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Robert Christian (Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences; )

    2009-03-22

    Healthy estuaries are critical to humans and wildlife. They provide food, supporting both commercial and recreational fisheries, treat waste and runoff to maintain water quality, protect coastal areas from natural hazards, connect bodies of water for transportation and marine operations, and nurture a balance of the food web upon which all life depends.

  13. The Value of Healthy Estuaries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Robert Christian (East Carolina University; )

    2009-03-15

    The article explores why healthy estuaries are critical to humans and wildlife: supporting both commercial and recreational fisheries, treating waste and runoff, protecting coastal areas from natural hazards, connect bodies of water for transportation, and nurturing a balance of the food web

  14. Food Webs in an Estuary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunne, Barbara B.

    The Maryland Marine Science Education Project has produced a series of mini-units in marine science education for the junior high/middle school classroom. This unit focuses on food chains in an estuary. Although the unit specifically treats the Chesapeake Bay, it may be adapted for use with similar estuarine systems. In addition, the unit may be…

  15. The Modification of an Estuary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frederic H. Nichols; James E. Cloern; Samuel N. Luoma; David H. Peterson

    1986-01-01

    The San Francisco Bay estuary has been rapidly modified by human activity. Diking and filling of most of its wetlands have eliminated habitats for fish and waterfowl; the introduction of exotic species has transformed the composition of its aquatic communities; reduction of freshwater inflow by more than half has changed the dynamics of its plant and animal communities; and wastes

  16. Variation of baroclinicity over the spring-neap cycle in the Sumjin River estuary, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Eun-Byeol; Cho, Yang-Ki; Seo, Gwang-Ho; Tak, Yong-Jin; Kim, Bong-Kuk

    2015-04-01

    Vertical velocity profiles and hydrography were intensively observed using Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers and CTD to understand the variation of baroclinicity over the spring-neap tidal cycle in the Sumjin River estuary, Korea. The Sumjin River estuary is a natural estuary in Korea. The river is 212km long, a drainage area is nearly 4,896km2 and the yearly mean discharge is 86.3m3/s. The Sumjin River estuary experiences a transition from partially- or well-mixed during spring tides (St < 0.15), but stratified conditions during neap tides (St > 0.32) based on the stratification parameter (St) which is the salinity difference between surface and bottom (?S) divided by the depth averaged salinity . The CTD observation cruises were taken at flood and ebb during neap tide and spring tide. The horizontal density gradient changes over fortnightly tidal cycle. The horizontal density gradient is small during neap tide. However it during spring tide dramatically increases about six to ten times larger than neap tide. The mean flow in the Sumjin River estuary displayed typical estuarine circulation which the surface layer flows seaward and the bottom layer flows landward. However, the snapshots of the velocity profiles showed dramatic changes with the tide. Velocity shear is strong during spring tides when the tidal range was at a maximum, while velocity shear is weak during neap tides when the tidal range was at a minimum. The change of tidal range induces baroclinic variations. An analytical model was applied to evaluate the effect of horizontal density on the velocity profile variation. The velocity profiles are determined by river discharge, horizontal density variations, and tide. Density variations act as a baroclinic pressure gradient, whereas the river discharge and tides act as a horizontal barotropic pressure gradient. The velocity profiles calculated by the analytical model suggest that the variation of baroclinicity over the spring-neap cycle is mainly caused by the horizontal density gradient.

  17. Macrobenthos composition, distribution and abundance within Sungai Pulai estuary, Johor, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guan Wan; Min, Lee Di; Ghaffar, Mazlan Abd; Ali, Masni Md; Cob, Zaidi Che

    2014-09-01

    Macrobenthos are very useful organisms for monitoring marine environmental and widely use in marine ecology research. They are able to monitor the difference phase in the recovery stage of disturbed sites by appear different species macrobenthos after the cessation of the impact. Univariate and multivariate methods were use to study the macrobenthos community within Sungai Pulai estuary, Johor, Malaysia. Five sub-samples were taken at each sampling sites by using 10 cm diameter corer. Crustaceans were the most abundant at Tanjung Adang (St. 1) and the station of non-seagrass area (St. 2) while polychaetes were the most abundant at Merambong Shoal (St. 3). Higher density of macrobenthos was found at St.3 followed by St. 1 and St. 2. The commonly used population indices such as diversity, richness, evenness and dominance were employed to determine the differences in diversity and abundance of macrobenthos. The diversity, richness and evenness index values showed slight increment from Station 1 to Station 3, while the dominance index decreasing trend from Station 1 to Station 3. A total 21 polychaete families were collected in Sungai Pulai estuary, which was dominated by the Spionidae, Capitellidae and Glyceridae. Cluster (Bray-Curtis similarities) analyses revealed that the Tanjung Adang and Merambong Shoal population were clearly separated from the station non-seagrass. For the time being factors that influence the pattern of distribution of the macrobenthos cannot be determined and subjected to further studies.

  18. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: VISTA

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A very comprehensive and well-organized offering from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, VISTA offers "suite of programs and databases for comparative analysis of genomic sequences. There are two ways of using VISTA - you can submit your own sequences and alignments for analysis (VISTA servers) or examine pre-computed whole-genome alignments of different species (VISTA browser)." The site also offers up-to-date updates on genomic sequences. Included in the April 2004 update are the Human-Chimpanzee, Human-Chicken, and D.melanogaster-Honey Bee whole genome alignments. VISTA is definitely a site for researchers and students involved in genomic research.

  19. Lawrence University: Images & Digital Collections

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Appleton, Wisconsinâ??s, Lawrence University continues to work diligently to digitize its library holdings that might be of interest to the general public. These collections include items from the department of theatre arts, along with items from Lux, the online home for the universityâ??s scholarly and creative works. It's a great way to learn about some of its most compelling projects, including wonderful honor projects, such as "Learning from Experience: A Philosophical Perspective." Moving on, the theatre arts area contains images, programs and other bits of ephemera from shows like Cabaret, Cinderella, and much more.

  20. MAPPING BATHYMETRY AND BOTTOM TYPE IN A SHALLOW ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bathymetry and bottom type are important in characterizing estuaries and their ecology but hard to map, especially in shallow estuaries. Acoustic backscattering was used to remotely sense these properties in the shallow Slocums River Estuary of Massachusetts. Acoustic pulses were...

  1. Comparison of Nutrient Drivers and Response Metrics in Oregon Estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the goal of assessing sensitivity to nutrient enrichment, we present a cross-estuary comparison of nutrient sources, levels, and biological responses (phytoplankton and macroalgae) for thirteen Oregon estuaries. Nitrogen levels in the upstream portions of the estuaries are ...

  2. 75 FR 34975 - Notice of Estuary Habitat Restoration Council's Intent to Revise its Estuary Habitat Restoration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ...Policy task force goals and in identifying focus areas for the estuary habitat restoration strategy, such as: climate adaptation restoration, socio-economic benefits of estuary habitat restoration, and geographic restoration...

  3. 14. Historic American Buildings Survey PHOTOCOPY OF EVERETT MILLS, LAWRENCE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Historic American Buildings Survey PHOTOCOPY OF EVERETT MILLS, LAWRENCE, MASS., INSURANCE SURVEY DRAWING n. d. From the collection of Factory Mutual Insurance Company, Norwood, Mass. - Lawrence Machine Shop, Union & Canal Streets, Lawrence, Essex County, MA

  4. SCFA LEAD LAB TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE AT LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Hazen, Terry

    LBNL-51386 SCFA LEAD LAB TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE AT LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY: BASELINE Assistance #114 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory ­ Baseline Review of Three Groundwater Plumes #12;LBNL Lead Lab Technical Assistance #114 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory ­ Baseline Review of Three

  5. Osni A. Marques Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory phone: (510) 4865290

    E-print Network

    Marques, Osni

    Osni A. Marques Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory phone: (510) 4865290 1 Cyclotron Road Laboratory, 2003 Computer Systems Engineer III, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 19962003 Assistant University of Londrina, Brazil, 1983 Professional Experience Staff Scientist, Lawrence Berkeley National

  6. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering

    E-print Network

    ' & $ % Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering Beckner Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keith­in­Progress Poster, 26th International Symposium on Combustion #12; ' & $ % Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

  7. LAWRENCE RISK-BASED AIR SCREENING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pediatric asthma rate in the city of Lawrence is the highest in the state of Massachusetts. This project will evaluate whether the cumulative risks due to the air pollution in Lawrence is contributing to the high asthma rates and other respiratory problems. The project will...

  8. HARVARD YARD Cambridge St.

    E-print Network

    A B C D 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 A B C D HARVARD YARD Cambridge St. Cambridge St. PeabodySt. Broadway PrescottSt. PrescottSt. QuincySt. FeltonSt. WareSt. Harvard St. Rem ington St. Arrow St. LindenSt. Holyoke HOUSEELIOT HOUSE KIRKLAND HOUSE HARVARD KENNEDY SCHOOL GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION CAMBRIDGE COMMON CABOT

  9. A Climate Ready Estuaries Vulnerability Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the the Climate Ready Estuaries program is to build capacity in the National Estuary Programs (NEPs) for local leadership and expertise to adapt to the effects of climate change through a joint effort with the NEPs and EPA. Background The Climate Ready...

  10. AFS Estuaries Section - A Successful Partnership

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Estuaries Section of the American Fisheries Society offers travel awards to students in support of their attendance and presentations at the AFS meeting. Since 2007, the Southern Association of Marine Laboratories has partnered with the Estuaries Section to sponsor two stude...

  11. NEW HAMPSHIRE ESTUARIES PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan of the New Hampshire Estuaries Project presents a broad framework and specific list of actions to protect and enhance the environmental quality of the estuaries of the State of New Hampshire. It is intended to be a guide for all...

  12. Estuary Habitat Restoration Council ACTION PLAN

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Estuary Habitat Restoration Council ACTION PLAN 2012 The purpose of this Action Plan is to support the 2012 Estuary Habitat Restoration (EHR) Strategy by identifying specific actions and milestones Service (NRCS). Several federal agencies fund and implement coastal and estuarine habitat restoration

  13. Estuaries: Where Rivers Meet the Sea

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website is the educational site for NOAA's National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS), managed and maintained by NERRS education staff. This site provides, primarily, an avenue for elementary, middle and high school students, and their teachers, to learn more about estuaries, research, and explore NOAA’s “living laboratories” - the National Estuarine Research Reserves. The Estuary Video Gallery offers a collection of short video clips. The main content themes include relationships between estuaries and humans, life in an estuary, impacts of society upon estuaries and current research and equipment used in monitoring estuaries in video format. Also included are E-Live Backpacks designed to extend and enhance specific Estuaries 101 High-School Curriculum activities by using video clips from our Video Gallery, and relating them to important estuary principles and concepts. Students are asked to review the materials in the E-Live Backpacks, to construct their own compelling questions, actively research those questions, and share their learning through final products. By going through these steps, you will lead students through a project-based learning experience. this site is also available in Spanish.

  14. Dissolved Oxygen Data for Coos Estuary (Oregon)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this product is the transmittal of dissolved oxygen data collected in the Coos Estuary, Oregon to Ms. Molly O'Neill (University of Oregon), for use in her studies on the factors influencing spatial and temporal patterns in dissolved oxygen in this estuary. These d...

  15. RMP Annual Monitoring Results San Francisco Estuary Institute and the

    E-print Network

    for Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary · #12;#12;RMP Annual Monitoring Results San Francisco Estuary Institute and the Regional Monitoring Program for Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary · December 2006-2005 Annual Monitoring Results. The Regional Monitoring Program for Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary

  16. CCD DEVELOPMENT PROGRESS AT LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL

    E-print Network

    CCD DEVELOPMENT PROGRESS AT LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY W. F. Kolbe, S. E. Holland and C-300 µm results in good near-infrared quantum efficiency #12;2 W. F. Kolbe, S. E. Holland and C. J. Bebek

  17. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab April 21, 2009

    E-print Network

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    resolution (Computationally expensive to extend a cloud- resolvingPrabhat Lawrence Berkeley National Lab DOECGF April 21, 2009 1 #12; Science Global Cloud Resolving Global Cloud Resolving Models Geodesic Grids Our Work Efficient Parallel I/O Data Model

  18. Dissolved oxygen in two Oregon estuaries: The importance of the ocean-estuary connection - May 16, 2011

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the role of the ocean ?estuary connection in influencing periodic reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in Yaquina and Yachats estuaries, Oregon, USA. In the Yaquina Estuary, there is close coupling between the coastal ocean and the estuary. As a result, low DO ...

  19. Water Column Methylation in Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartup, A. T.; Calder, R.; Soerensen, A. L.; Mason, R. P.; Balcom, P. H.; Sunderland, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a neurotoxin that bioaccumulates in aquatic food webs and affects humans and wildlife through fish consumption. Many studies have measured active methylation/demethylation in ocean margin sediments but few have reported similar rates for the marine water column. This presentation will review available evidence for water column methylation in estuaries, including new experimental measurements of methylation/demethylation rates from a deep subarctic fjord in Labrador Canada collected in Spring and Fall of 2012-2013. We used these and other data to construct a mass budget for MeHg in the estuary and show that water column methylation (with rates ranging from 1.5 to 2.8 % day-1), is the largest contributor, followed by inputs from rivers (4.9 mol year-1), to the in situ pool of MeHg available for uptake by biota. By contrast, the sediment in this system is a net sink for MeHg (-1.5 mol year-1). We discuss the relationship between observed MeHg and other ancillary environmental factors (organic carbon, sulfur and nutrients) as well as implications for the response time of fish to future changes in mercury inputs.

  20. US Environmental Protection Agency: National Estuary Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Established in 1987 by amendments to the Clean Water Act and administered by the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds (OWOW), the National Estuary Program (NEP) identifies, restores and protects estuaries along the coasts of the United States. Unlike the traditional regulatory approaches to environmental protection, the NEP targets a wide range of issues and engages local communities in the process. At the site users can find descriptions of the NEP, specific NEP projects, estuaries involved in the NEP (including location, size, presence of threatened and endangered species, major habitat types, etc.), a current awareness section, links to related sites, and the full text of NEP's newsletter, Coastlines.

  1. The Mackenzie Estuary of the Arctic Ocean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robie W. Macdonald; Yanling Yu

    The Mackenzie Estuary is a seasonally ice covered, deltaic estuary. It receives over 300 km3\\u000a of freshwater and 125?×?106 t of sediment annually\\u000a in a strongly modulated seasonal cycle. Ice cover plays a crucial role in the physical\\u000a setting by limiting air--sea interaction (energy and gas exchange), reducing mixing, and withdrawing\\u000a freshwater from the estuary while leaving behind the bulk of the dissolved components. Few

  2. Late Summer Trophic Conditions in the North-east Gulf of Finland and the River Neva Estuary, Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitkänen, H.; Tamminen, T.; Kangas, P.; Huttula, T.; Kivi, K.; Kuosa, H.; Sarkkula, J.; Eloheimo, K.; Kauppila, P.; Skakalsky, B.

    1993-11-01

    Trophic conditions and hydrography of the whole north-east Gulf of Finland in both the Finnish and the Russian waters, including the Neva Estuary, were for the first time extensively explored in August 1990. The Neva Estuary was defined on the basis of hydrographical and geomorphological characteristics. The results revealed extensive and strong increasing gradients in nutrients, bio-masses of phytoplankton (especially filamentous blue-green algae) and primary productivity, as well as in the bio-masses of several heterotrophic organisms from the open Gulf towards the inner Neva Estuary. The basic cause of these phenomena is the high and continuous load of nutrients and organic matter from St Petersburg and the River Neva, together with the typical estuarine hydrography and huge reserves of inorganic nutrients immediately below the mixed surface layer. Under typical late summer conditions immediate effects of the River Neva and the St Petersburg region cover the whole estuary ( c. 3000 km 2), i.e. 10% of the surface area of the whole Gulf, but do not reach the open parts of the Gulf or the Finnish territorial waters. However, recycled effects, as well as effects of the huge sub-thermocline nutrient resources, clearly increase the productivity of the whole north-east Gulf and cause the general tendency of increasing eutrophy towards east in the whole Gulf of Finland.

  3. Estimating bankfull discharge and depth in ungauged estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisen, Jacqueline Isabella Anak; Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    2015-04-01

    It is difficult to measure river discharge accurately in an estuary, and particularly, in the region where the tidal flow dominates over the river discharge. River discharge is important for the morphology and hydrodynamics of estuaries as it influences the salt intrusion process, tidal dynamics, freshwater supply (water resources management), and the occurrence of floods. Here we try to derive river regime characteristics from the seaward end: the estuary. It is found that there are empirical relationships that link the geometry of an estuary to its river regime, which can be used to estimate river discharge characteristics with the least of data available. The aims of this study are: (1) to derive empirical relations between geometrical characteristics of estuaries and the bankfull discharge; (2) to explore a physical explanation for this relation; and (3) to estimate the bankfull discharge in estuaries. The physical connection between an estuary and its river regime is found by combining estuary shape analysis, tidal dynamic analysis, and Lacey's hydraulic geometry theory. The relationships found between the estuary depth, width, and bankfull river discharge have been tested in 23 estuaries around the world (including seven recently surveyed estuaries). From the analysis, it shows that the depth of an estuary is a function of the bankfull flood discharge to the power of 1/3, which is in agreement with Lacey's formula. This finding not only provides a method to estimate estuary depth, it also allows estimating flood discharge characteristics from readily available estuary shape indicators.

  4. EPA'S BENTHIC HABITAT DATA FOR YAQUINA ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientists at EPA's National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Western Ecology Division (WED) have been studying seafloor (benthic) habitats in Yaquina estuary for several years. Those studies were conducted as parts of several research projects, including: e...

  5. The Peel Inlet-Harvey Estuary Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Warren; Black, Ronald

    1979-01-01

    Describes how the department of physics of the Western Australian Institute of Technology (WAIT) has been involved in the Peel Inlet-Harvey Estuary study. An appendix which presents the departmental approach to curriculum matters is also included. (HM)

  6. Copper speciation in estuaries and coastal waters

    E-print Network

    Kogut, Megan Brook, 1972-

    2002-01-01

    The goals of this dissertation are to better understand the sources and the Cu binding ability of ligands that control Cu toxicity in estuaries and harbors, where elevated Cu concentrations have caused documented toxic ...

  7. PECONIC ESTUARY PROGRAM TIDAL CREEK STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    EEA evaluated ten tidal creeks throughout the Peconic Estuary representing a wide range of watershed variables. Primary focus was directed towards the collection and analysis of the macrobenthic invertebrate communities of these ten tidal creeks. Analysis of the macrobenthic comm...

  8. Health of white sucker within the St. Louis River area of concern associated with habitat usage as assessed using stable isotopes

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Spring 2011, 200 adult white sucker were collected in four areas of the St. Louis River Area of Concern (AOC), located in Minnesota and Wisconsin, USA. The areas included the upper AOC as a reference area, the upper estuary, St. Louis Bay and Superior Bay. Grossly visible abno...

  9. The zooplankton of the forth estuary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. J. L. Taylor

    1993-01-01

    Regular samples at nine stations ranging from fresh water to fully marine conditions in the Forth Estuary and Firth, on the\\u000a East coast of Scotland, allow a description of the community structure, composition and distribution of the zooplankton over\\u000a an eighteen month period. A transition gradient in the occurrence of species along the length of the estuary was clearly identified

  10. Water renewal timescales in the Scheldt Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Brye, Benjamin; de Brauwere, Anouk; Gourgue, Olivier; Delhez, Eric J. M.; Deleersnijder, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Using the concepts of the Constituent-oriented Age and Residence time Theory (CART), we compute timescales related to the water renewal in the Scheldt Estuary (The Netherlands/Belgium). Three different timescales are used to better understand and characterize the dynamics of the estuary: the age of the renewing water, the residence time and the exposure time. The residence time is the time taken by a water parcel to leave the estuary for the first time while the exposure time is the total time spent by a water parcel in the estuary including re-entries. The age of a renewing water parcel is defined as the time elapsed since it entered the estuary. The renewing water was split into three types: the water originating from the sea, the water originating from the upstream fresh tidal rivers and the water originating from the different canals and docks connected to the estuary. Every timescale is computed at any time and position by means of the finite-element, unstructured-mesh model SLIM. This results in movies of the timescale fields (shown as Supplementary material), allowing a detailed analysis of their spatial and temporal variabilities. The effect of the M2 tide and the discharge regime (winter, summer or average situation) on the timescales is also investigated. Tidally-averaged timescales vary little over the width of the estuary and hence exhibit a virtually one-dimensional behaviour. However, around these average values, the timescales can vary hugely over a tidal cycle, with amplitudes that significantly depend on the space coordinates. The reason thereof has yet to be elucidated. These results underscore the need for two- or three-dimensional models with high temporal resolution for investigating the dynamics of the Scheldt Estuary.

  11. THE ElTECTS OF WIDE-BAND SIGNALS ON RADAR ANTENNA DESIGN Lawrence R. ~ a u ~ i n ,lht, USAF

    E-print Network

    Pratt, Vaughan

    THE ElTECTS OF WIDE-BAND SIGNALS ON RADAR ANTENNA DESIGN Lawrence R. ~ a u ~ i n ,lht, USAF Kenneth r wide-band signals by a simpler illuminationfunction. Some examples of the theory are given be reduced if s(t) i s a wide-band signal. Kock and Stone2havepointedout t h a t bycross- correlation

  12. GLEBE POINT ROAD ABERCROMBIE ST

    E-print Network

    Viglas, Anastasios

    Light rail Lightrail PYRMONT BRIDGE ROAD WATTLE ST GLEBE POINT ROAD WIGRAM ROAD HARRIS ST CHALMERSST PHILLIP ST BOURKE ST ANZACPDE KING ST McEVOY ST WYNDHAM RAILWAY HENDERSON ROAD ST PITTST YORKST KING ST BRIDGE ST MALLETTST SALISBURY RD ENMORE RD STANMORE RD BOOTH ST MOORE ST BALMAINRD BALMAIN RD

  13. Age validation and variation in growth, mortality and population structure of Liza argentea and Myxus elongatus (Mugilidae) in two temperate Australian estuaries.

    PubMed

    Kendall, B W; Gray, C A; Bucher, D

    2009-12-01

    This study investigated variation in the rates of growth and mortality, and age and fork-length (L(F)) compositions of two exploited species of Mugilidae, Liza argentea and Myxus elongatus, in two south-east Australian estuaries (Lake Macquarie and St Georges Basin). An ageing protocol was developed by counting opaque growth zones on sectioned otoliths which was validated by periodically examining the otoliths of captive-reared young-of-the-year fishes, and marginal increment analysis of wild fishes. The maximum recorded age was 17 years for L. argentea and 12 years for M. elongatus, which is greater than generally observed in other species of mugilids. Growth models of each species significantly differed between sexes and, except for male L. argentea, between estuaries. Fishes from Lake Macquarie generally had a greater mean L(F) at age than those from St Georges Basin and females of both species generally attained a greater maximum L(F) and age than males. Gillnet catches of L. argentea were of similar L(F) and age compositions in both estuaries, whereas the age composition of catches of M. elongatus in Lake Macquarie contained a greater proportion of younger fish. Estimates of total, natural and fishing mortality were greater for M. elongatus than L. argentea across both estuaries, and estimates of total mortality were greatest for both species in Lake Macquarie. The data indicate that neither species has been overfished in these estuaries. PMID:20738524

  14. Session III: Estuary Columbia River Estuary overview of physical features and habitats

    E-print Network

    influenced by surface salinity (the lower estuary) has been estimated at 373 km2 . Less is known about but there are fewer data from this reach. Detritus (the complex of decomposing plant material and microbes) from the wetland plants is the basis for the food web in the estuary, supplemented by algal production from

  15. The Estuary Book: A Guide to Promoting Understanding and Regional Management of Maine's Estuaries and Embayments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffing, Jenny

    The objective of this document is to provide information about estuaries, the impact of uses on the environmental health of an estuary, and what communities and concerned individuals can do to manage and protect their local estuarine resources successfully. Much of the information presented here pertains to other embayments along the Maine coast…

  16. Distribution and migration of pesticide residues in mosquito control impoundments St. Lucie County, Florida, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. W. Parkinson; T. C. Wang; J. R. White; J. R. David; M. E. Hoffman

    1993-01-01

    This project was designed to: (1) document the distribution and migration of organochlorine pesticide residues within marsh substrates of 18 St. Lucie County mosquito control impoundments located along the Indian River Lagoon estuary, and (2) evaluate the impact of water management techniques on residue mobility. Our results indicate that detectible concentrations of organochlorine compounds, applied between the late 1940s and

  17. Estuaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awkerman, Gary L.

    This publication is designed for use in standard science curricula to develop oceanologic manifestations of certain science topics. Included are teacher guides, student activities, and demonstrations designed to impart ocean understanding to high school students. When the student has completed this unit, he should be able to: (1) define an…

  18. Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan For: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Computation;Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) LBNL CRTF UC Project No.912314 LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL........................................................................................... 9 2.5 Potential Construction Site Pollutant Sources

  19. Estuaries. Estuaries are places where fresh and salt water mix. Typically they occur where rivers enter the sea. Estero Limantour, Drakes' Bay, Point Reyes National Seashore.

    E-print Network

    Richerson, Peter J.

    Estuaries Lecture 18 #12;Estuaries. Estuaries are places where fresh and salt water mix. Typically;Estuary development is quite pronounced in to today's world. During the Pleistocene, low sea level stands,000 years ago, these valleys flooded to form estuaries like the Chesapeake and Delaware Bays. If the sea

  20. MOBILE BAY NATIONAL ESTUARY PROGRAM COMPREHENSIVE CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    In simplest terms, an estuary is defined as an area where rivers meet the sea. They are transitional zones where freshwater rivers meet tidally influenced marine waters. Estuaries are considered environmentally and economically important because of their exceptional biological di...

  1. From Berkeley Lab to the Marketplace Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Eisen, Michael

    From Berkeley Lab to the Marketplace Smart Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Technology Transfer with Partner #12;Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Technology Transfer at Berkeley Lab Partnering with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, also known as Berkeley Lab, is located in the hills

  2. Draft Environmental Impact Report LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Lee, Jason R.

    Draft Environmental Impact Report LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LONG-RANGE DEVELOPMENT PLAN Prepared for: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory January 22, 2007 #12;225 Bush Street Suite 1700 San Seattle Tampa 201074 Draft Environmental Impact Report LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LONG

  3. FORTWASHINGTONAVE. ST.NICHOLASAVE.

    E-print Network

    St. 124 St. A B C D MORNINGSIDEAVE. MARTIN LUTHER KING BLVD. FREDERICKDOUGLASBLVD. CUMC Stops 137 St St. A B C D MORNINGSIDEAVE. MARTIN LUTHER KING BLVD. FREDERICKDOUGLASBLVD. A Train Stops 137 St. 135 St. A B C D MORNINGSIDEAVE. MARTIN LUTHER KING BLVD. FREDERICKDOUGLASBLVD. Harlem Hospital Stop 137

  4. Lawrence, Board of Education of the Lawrence Union Free School District and Educational Secretaries Association

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janet McEnearey

    2009-01-01

    In the Matter of the Impasse between The Board of Education of the Lawrence Union Free School District And Educational Secretaries Association. PERB Case No. 2007-016. Before: Janet McEneaney, Fact Finder.

  5. The Critical Writings of Lawrence Alloway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sun-Young; Barrett, Terry

    1991-01-01

    Argues that studying professional art critics can provide material for studying art criticism in the classroom. Focuses on the published work of Lawrence Alloway. Describes how his work covered a wide range of artists and movements and how he was politically proactive in promoting underrepresented populations of artists. (KM)

  6. KAYA Nobuyuki Lawrence Wong System Informatics

    E-print Network

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    KAYA Nobuyuki Lawrence Wong System Informatics The Graduate School of System Informatics (which) was established on April 1, 2010. System Informatics strives to contribute to the development, processing organisms, social activities, artificial products, space, and The Master's program is geared toward

  7. Radiological Work Authorization Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Knowles, David William

    Radiological Work Authorization Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health and is not authorized by this Radiological Work Authorization (RWA). If work in fields greater than 100 mrem/h at 30 cm is necessary, a separate Radiological Work Permit (RWP) is required. Experiment Description (cont

  8. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Lee, Jason R.

    i LBNL-2829E ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY The Impact of Wind Power Projects Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;ii LBNL-2829E The Impact of Wind Power Berkeley National Laboratory Mark Thayer San Diego State University Gautam Sethi Bard College 1 Cyclotron

  9. LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY CONTROLLER'S OFFICE

    E-print Network

    LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY CONTROLLER'S OFFICE Accounts Payable Mail Stop: 90J0109 Voice such payments if: The recipient has not provided a taxpayer identification number (TIN) in the required manner (form W-9). The taxpayer identification number provided does not match the IRS TIN matching database

  10. LAWRENCE JOHN HUTCHINGS Energy and Environmental Sciences

    E-print Network

    Hazen, Terry

    (UmbriaMarcha sequence), Italy earthquake. Tectonophysics 476, 145158. Gok, Rengin, Lawrence Hutchings to characterize geothermal reservoirs. Research on synthesizing ground motion for earthquake hazard analysis. 4 earthquake ground motion for design of structures and site response analysis for engineering applications

  11. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    LBNL-57236 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Review of Literature Related. It also examines the literature related to these standards such as occupant surveys of attitudes reviews current ventilation codes and standards for residential buildings in Europe and North America

  12. St. Lucia.

    PubMed

    1987-06-01

    The population of St Lucia was 123,000 in 1986, with an annual growth rate of 2%. The infant mortality rate stands at 22.2/1000 live births, and life expectancy is 70.3 years for males and 74.9 years for females. The literacy rate is 78%. St Lucia's labor force is allocated as follows: agriculture, 36.6%; industry and commerce, 20.1%; and services, 18.1%. The gross national product (GNP) was US$146 million in 1985, with an annual growth rate of 3% and a per capita GNP of $1071. St Lucia is a parliamentary democracy modeled on the British Westminster system. The island is divided into 16 parishes and 1 urban area (the capital, Castries). St Lucia is currently a politically stable country, although the high level of youth unemployment is a cause for concern. Ongoing stability may depend on the government's ability to provide services such as jobs and housing. The economy has evolved from a monocrop sugar plantation type to a diversified economy based on agriculture, industry, and tourism. Agriculture, dominated by the banana industry, is characterized by the participation of a large number of small and medium-sized enterprises. Industry is being encouraged through the provision of incentives such as tax rebates. The government is attempting to maintain a sound investment climate through a tripartite dialogue with the private sector and trade unions. Overall economic policy is predicated on the attraction of sound investments, by both local and foreign entities, to accelerate the rate of economic growth, solve the unemployment problem, and generate a solid balance-of-payments position. PMID:12177918

  13. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 03/8/2001 E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-print Network

    0 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 03/8/2001 E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, & Safety Division Environmental Protection Group United States Department Year 2000 Site Name: Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Operation Office

  14. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 06/12/2000 E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-print Network

    0 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 06/12/2000 E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, & Safety Division Environmental Protection Group United States Department Year 1999 Site Name: Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Operation Office

  15. SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY PROJECT COMPREHENSIVE CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Estuary, a significant natural resource, San Francisco Bay and the Delta combine to form the West Coast's largest estuary. The Estuary conveys the waters of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers to the Pacific Ocean. It encompasses roughly 1,600 square miles, drains over 40 p...

  16. Extended abstract to International conference of estuaries and coastal seas

    E-print Network

    Schuttelaars, Henk

    Extended abstract to 10th International conference of estuaries and coastal seas October 7-11, 2000, the marine part of the Scheldt estuary, a large dredging operation is needed to maintain the shipping channel about 60 km inland from the estuary mouth near Vlissingen in the Netherlands. In addition

  17. The Estuary Guide. Level 3: High School. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Glen; And Others

    Estuaries are marine systems that serve as nurseries for animals, links in the migratory pathways, and habitat for a complex community of organisms. This curriculum guide intended for use at the high school level seeks to teach what estuaries are; provide opportunities to practice decision-making that affects estuaries; and encourage students to…

  18. UNCORRECTED 2 Iron isotope fractionation in subterranean estuaries

    E-print Network

    UNCORRECTED PROOF 1 2 Iron isotope fractionation in subterranean estuaries 3 Olivier Rouxel a estuaries, like their river-seawater counterparts, are strongly controlled by 10 non-conservative behavior estuary of Waquoit Bay on Cape Cod, USA demonstrate extensive precipitation of groundwater-borne dissolved

  19. Seasonal dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus budgets for two sub-tropical estuaries in south Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzelli, C.; Wan, Y.; Doering, P. H.; Boyer, J. N.

    2013-10-01

    Interactions among geomorphology, circulation, and biogeochemical cycling determine estuary responses to external nutrient loading. In order to better manage watershed nutrient inputs, the goal of this study was to develop seasonal dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and phosphorus (DIP) budgets for the two estuaries in south Florida, the Caloosahatchee River estuary (CRE) and the St. Lucie Estuary (SLE), from 2002 to 2008. The Land-Ocean Interactions in the Coastal Zone (LOICZ) approach was used to generate water, salt, and DIN and DIP budgets. Results suggested that internal DIN production increases with increased DIN loading to the CRE in the wet season. There were hydrodynamic effects as water column concentrations and ecosystem nutrient processing stabilized in both estuaries as flushing time increased to >10 d. The CRE demonstrated heterotrophy (net ecosystem metabolism or NEM < 0.0) across all wet and dry season budgets. While the SLE was sensitive to DIN loading, system autotrophy (NEM > 0.0) increased significantly with external DIP loading. This included DIP consumption and a bloom of a cyanobacterium (Microcystis aeruginosa) following hurricane-induced discharge to the SLE in 2005. Additionally, while denitrification provided a microbially-mediated N loss pathway for the CRE, this potential was not evident for the SLE where N2 fixation was favored. Disparities between total and inorganic loading ratios suggested that the role of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) should be assessed for both estuaries. Nutrient budgets indicated that net internal production or consumption of DIN and DIP fluctuated with inter- and intra-annual variations in freshwater inflow, hydrodynamic flushing, and primary production. The results of this study should be included in watershed management plans in order to maintain favorable conditions of external loading relative to internal material cycling in both dry and wet seasons.

  20. Prediction in ungauged estuaries: An integrated theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    2015-04-01

    Many estuaries in the world are ungauged. The International Association of Hydrological Sciences completed its science decade on Prediction in Ungauged Basins (PUB) in 2012 (Hrachowitz et al.). Prediction on the basis of limited data is a challenge in hydrology, but not less so in estuaries, where data on fundamental processes are often lacking. In this paper, relatively simple, but science-based, methods are presented that allow researchers, engineers, and water managers to obtain first-order estimates of essential process parameters in estuaries, such as the estuary depth, the tidal amplitude, the tidal excursion, the phase lag, and the salt water intrusion, on the basis of readily obtainable information, such as topographical maps and tidal tables. These apparently simple relationships are assumed to result from the capacity of freely erodible water bodies to adjust themselves to external drivers and to dissipate the free energy from these drivers as efficiently as possible. Thus, it is assumed that these systems operate close to their thermodynamic limit, resulting in predictable patterns that can be described by relatively simple equations. Although still much has to be done to develop an overall physics-based theory, this does not prevent us from making use of the empirical "laws" that we observe in alluvial estuaries.

  1. Estuaries and coastal waters need help

    SciTech Connect

    Levenson, H.

    1987-11-01

    For years, our marine environments-estuaries, coastal waters, and the open ocean-have been used extensively by coastal communities and industries for the disposal of various wastes. Historically, marine waste disposal has been relatively cheap and has solved some short-term waste-management problems; however, its consequences include a general trend toward environmental degradation, particularly in estuaries and coastal waters. Thus, without protective measures, the next few decades will witness degradation in many estuaries and some coastal waters around the country. The extent of current degradation varies greatly around the country. Although it is difficult to ascertain cause and effect relationships, enough evidence exists to conclude that the pollutants in question include disease-causing microorganisms, oxygen-demanding substances, particulate material, metals, and organic chemicals. Two statutes form the basis of most federal regulatory efforts to combat marine pollution: the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA) and the Clean Water Act (CWA). The MPRSA regulates the dumping of wastes in coastal and open-ocean waters, whereas the CWA has jurisdiction over pipeline discharges in all marine waters, wastes dumped in estuaries, and runoff. Many people consider that the passage and implementation of these two acts and their ensuing amendments established a statutory structure sufficient to protect the nation's waters from pollution. However, these provisions have not protected some estuaries and coastal waters from degradation.

  2. Impact of the Clean Water Act on the levels of toxic metals in urban estuaries: The Hudson River estuary revisited

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. A. Sanudo-Wilhelmy; Gary A. Gill

    1999-01-01

    To establish the impact of the Clean Water Act on the water quality of urban estuaries, dissolved trace metals and phosphate concentrations were determined in surface waters collected along the Hudson River estuary between 1995 and 1997 and compared with samples collected in the mid-1970s by Klinkhammer and Bender. The median concentrations along the estuary have apparently declined 36--56% for

  3. National estuary program guidance: Technical characterization in the National Estuary Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    Estuaries are waterways, such as bays and sounds, where fresh water drained from the surrounding watershed mixes with salt water from the ocean. Section 320 of the Clean Water Act established the National Estuary Program (NEP) to identify nationally significant estuaries threatened by pollution, development, or overuse and to promote the preparation of comprehensive management plans to ensure their ecological integrity. The program's goals are protection and improvement of water quality and enhancement of living resources. To reach these goals, the Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) convenes management conferences for each estuary in the NEP to provide a forum for consensus building and problem solving among interested agencies and user groups.

  4. PECONIC ESTUARY: AN ASSESSMENT OF SHELLFISH RESOURCES IN THE TRIBUTARIES AND EMBAYMENTS OF THE PECONIC ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Executive Summary Historically, the Peconic Estuary's shellfish resources have supported significant fisheries for a number of species including hard clams, oysters and bay scallops. However, distribution and abundance data for the tributaries and embayments within the Peconic Es...

  5. The geothermal program at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.

    1987-06-01

    The main purpose of the geothermal program at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is to develop, improve and validate methods and instrumentation to: (1) determine geothermal reservoir parameters; (2) detect and characterize reservoir fractures and boundaries; and (3) identify and evaluate the importance of reservoir processes. The ultimate objective of the program, which includes field, theoretical and modeling activities, is to advance the state-of-the-art for characterizing geothermal systems and evaluating their productive capacity and longevity under commercial exploitation.

  6. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1993 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This annual Site Environmental Report summarizes Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s (LBL`s) environmental activities in calendar year (CY) 1993. The purpose of this report is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. Its format and content are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  7. Radiographic testing at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bossi, R.H.

    1982-04-21

    Radiographic testing is a nondestructive inspection technique which uses penetrating radiation. The Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Section at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a broad spectrum of equipment and techniques for radiographic testing. These resources include low-energy vacuum systems, low- and mid-energy cabinet and cell radiographic systems, high-energy linear accelerators, portable x-ray machines and radioisotopes for radiographic inspections. For diagnostic testing the NDE Section also has real-time and flash radiographic equipment.

  8. The geomorphological evolution of a wave-dominated barrier estuary: Burrill Lake, New South Wales, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloss, Craig R.; Jones, Brian G.; McClennen, Charles E.; de Carli, John; Price, David M.

    2006-06-01

    The geomorphological evolution of the Holocene wave-dominated barrier estuary at Burrill Lake on the New South Wales coast, Australia, has been investigated using a combination of seismic stratigraphy and lithostratigraphic analysis of vibracores collected from the back-barrier estuarine environment. A combination of radiocarbon and aspartic acid racemisation-derived ages obtained on Holocene fossil molluscs, and the thermoluminescent signal in remnant the Last Interglacial barrier provides the chronological framework for this investigation. Results from this paper show that the barrier estuary occupies a relatively narrow (< 1.5 km wide) and shallow (< 40 m deep) incised bedrock valley formed during sea-level lowstands. Late Pleistocene sedimentary successions and remnants of the Last Interglacial barrier have been preserved within the incised valley axis and at the mouth of the incised valley. These sediments, deposited during the Last Interglacial sea-level highstand, were partially removed during the last glacial maximum. Overlying the antecedent Late Pleistocene landsurface is a near basin-wide basal marine sand deposited in response to rising sea level associated with the most recent post-glacial marine transgression, which inundated the shallow incised valley ca. 7800 years ago. More open marine conditions, with a diverse assemblage of estuarine and marine mollusc species, persisted until ca. 4500 years ago when the emerging Holocene barrier resulted in the development of a low-energy back-barrier lagoonal environment. A Late Holocene 1-2 m regression of sea level ca. 3000 years ago further restricted oceanic circulation, increased the rate of fluvial bay-head delta progradation and the extension of the back-barrier central basin mud facies. The model of barrier estuary evolution developed for Burrill Lake is consistent with recent research conducted in Lake Illawarra and St. Georges Basin and can be applied to other estuaries that have formed in relatively shallow and narrow incised bedrock valleys on tectonically stable, wave-dominated coastlines.

  9. Proceedings of the 1st conference on nuclear structure data evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, R.B.; Shirley, V.S.; Dairiki, J.M. (eds.)

    1982-04-01

    The 1st Conference on Nuclear Structure Data Evaluation was organized by the Isotopes Project of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in order to encourage the open discussion of the scientific aspects of ENSDF production and usage. Summaries of the roundtable discussion sessions, abstracts of the presented papers, and additional contributed papers are contained in these Proceedings.

  10. Predicting Bankfull Discharge in Ungauged Estuaries by Explaining the Physical Relation Between the Morphology and Hydrology of Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisen, J.; Savenije, H.

    2013-12-01

    River discharge is a very important parameter in morphological and hydrodynamic studies of estuaries. However, it is always difficult to accurately measure river discharge, and in particular the bankfull discharge in estuaries where the tidal discharge dominates over river discharge. Until today, little research has been done in finding a simple and useful approach to estimate the river discharge in the tidal region, and most of the previous studies focused on the river regime. In this study, we found that there appear to be empirical relations that link together the morphology and hydrology of estuaries, which can be used to estimate river discharge with the least amount of data available. The aims of this study are: 1) to discover the physical explanation for the empirical relation that exists between geometrical characteristics of estuaries and the bankfull flood discharge; and 2) to estimate bankfull discharge in estuaries from the relationship. The physical connection between the estuaries and river regime is found by incorporating the estuary shape analysis and tidal dynamic analysis to Lacey's hydraulic geometry theory. Relationship between the estuary depth and the bankfull river discharge has been analyzed in 19 estuaries around the world (with 9 recently surveyed estuaries). In this study, the discharge data (from gauging station located further upstream) were adjusted by a projection approach to improve the discharge measurement. The outcome of the relationship was compared to Lacey's theory of hydraulic geometry. From the analysis, it shows that the depth of an estuary is a function of the bankfull flood discharge to the power of 1/3 which indicates an agreement with Lacey's formula. With the physical explanation, engineers would be able to estimate flood discharge characteristics from estuary shape indicators. This could be very useful to estimate the flood discharge in ungauged estuaries on the basis of readily available data. In order to verify the accuracy of the relation, existing and new measurement data from estuaries worldwide will be collected and compiled to strengthen the reliability of this finding.

  11. INDICATORS OF ECOSYSTEM INTEGRITY FOR ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Jordan, Stephen J. and Lisa M. Smith. In press. Indicators of Ecosystem Integrity for Estuaries. In: Proceedings of the Estuarine Indicators Workshop, 29-31 October 2003, Sanibel Island, FL. Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation, Sanibel, FL. 23 p. (ERL,GB 1194). Ideal ...

  12. Bacterioplankton dynamics in the Mondego estuary (Portugal)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Bacelarnicolau; L. B. Nicolau; J. C. Marques; F. Morgado; R. Pastorinho; U. M. Azeiteiro

    2003-01-01

    In this work, the density of bacterioplankton and environmental parameters were monitored over a 11 month period (July 1999-June 2000), and also during one tidal cycle (15 June 2000), at two sampling stations, in the estuary of River Mondego. These data were treated by multivariate analyses methods in order to identify the key factors that control the dynamics of the

  13. Kaua'i: Streams and Estuaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, John, Ed.; Murakami, Colleen, Ed.

    Designed to help teachers develop students' awareness and understanding of some of Hawaii's endangered aquatic resources, this module contains activities and instructional suggestions for use with intermediate as well as high school students. The module is divided into two sections which explore the streams and estuaries of Kauai. Activities in…

  14. BATHYMETRY FOR ALBEMARLE AND PAMLICO ESTUARIES, NC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bathymetry for the Albemarle and Pamlico Estuaries obtained from National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration-National Ocean Service (NOAA-NOS). See the metadata within the files from NOAA-NOS for more details and warnings concerning merging with US Geolgoical Survey Dig...

  15. THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF VERACRUZ, MEXICO ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    During June and July, 2002, forty-seven stations were sampled within estuaries along the gulf coast of the state of Veracruz, MX, using a probabilistic survey design and a common set of response indicators. The objective of the study was to collect information to assess the condi...

  16. Listening to Estuary English in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deterding, David

    2005-01-01

    In Singapore, many people are not familiar with Estuary English (EE), the variety of English becoming popular in much of southern England. In the current study, when students listened to interviews with EE speakers and were asked to transcribe orthographically what they heard, most of them had severe problems. Features of pronunciation that…

  17. Padilla Bay: The Estuary Guide. Level 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesem, Judy; Lynn, Valerie, Ed.

    Estuaries are marine systems that serve as nurseries for animals, links in the migratory pathways, and habitat for a complex community of organisms. This curriculum guide intended for use at the middle school level is designed for use with the on-site program developed by the Padilla Bay National Esturine Research Reserve (Washington). The guide…

  18. BCG Approaches for Improved Management of Estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuaries and other complex aquatic systems are exposed to a variety of stressors that act at several scales, but are managed piecemeal - - often resulting in a ?death by 1000 cuts? caused by cumulative impacts to these valued resources. To address this, managers need tools that...

  19. Climate change and its impacts on estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Past, present, and future research by WED scientists in the TEP region will be described to lay the foundation for examination of potential climate change effects on estuaries and the broader coastal zone in the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Results from National Coastal Assessments,...

  20. MODELING FINE SEDIMENT TRANSPORT IN ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A sediment transport model (SEDIMENT IIIA) was developed to assist in predicting the fate of chemical pollutants sorbed to cohesive sediments in rivers and estuaries. Laboratory experiments were conducted to upgrade an existing two-dimensional, depth-averaged, finite element, coh...

  1. NE Pacific St. NE Pacific St.

    E-print Network

    Lake W ashington Ship Canal NE Pacific St. NE Pacific St. NE Boat St. 15th Ave NE 15thAveNE UniversityWayNE BrooklynAveNE NE Pacific St. MontlakeBlvdNE MontlakeBlvdNE Pacific Place NE University Burke-Gilman Trail METRO NW A CD D EF F GHI H J RR BB CC EE AA Rotunda Cafe Ocean Sciences Hitchcock

  2. Lawrence and His Laboratory: A Historian's View of the Lawrence Years

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Heilbron, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory celebrated its 65th anniversary, and created this web site as a tribute to its founder. Ernest Orlando Lawrence, who invented the cyclotron, opened the way to "a Golden Age of particle physics and revolutionary discoveries about the nature of the universe." The story was originally told by the lab's public information department in 1981. All in all, this site provides a personal look into one of the foremost physics labs in the world, at a time when its discoveries were literally shaking the world.

  3. Clusiaceae (St. Johnswort family) Common St. Johnswort

    E-print Network

    Clusiaceae (St. Johnswort family) Common St. Johnswort Hypericum perforatum L. Life cycle to identifying Christmas tree weeds. #12;Clusiaceae (St. Johnswort family) Stems Erect with numerous branches.75 inch wide, often with several black dots along the petal margins. Fruit are capsules with three cells

  4. Current Characterization at the Amazon estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, M. O.

    2009-04-01

    At the estuary there are several mechanisms that cause turbulence: influence of solid contours (estuary bottom and shores), speed vertical shearing (fluid inside), wind shearing stress (free surface) and surface and internal gravity waves. Turbulence intensity controls vertical distribution of estuary water mass property concentration. As flow into the estuary takes place during the transition or turbulent regimen, produced by small space and time scale movements, entrainment, turbulent scattering and advection are the processes responsible for fresh water mixing up with the sea and for local salinity variation, as well as for concentration of natural properties and man-made ones. According to this focus, we shall describe general circulation, conveyance and mixing characteristics of the Amazon low estuary waters. Amazon estuary shows unusual characteristics: it is of vast length and enormous outflow. It is extremely wide - 150 Km - and its discharge into the Atlantic amounts to 180,000 m3s-1 (Otman, 1968, Figueiredo et al, 1991), which means 18% of all water discharged by rivers into oceans; this is the largest punctual source of fresh water for oceans (Milliman and Meade, 1983). Maximum outflow is 2.5 x 105 m3s-1, and it happens at the end of May. Minimum outflow is 1.2 x 105 m3 s-1, and it takes place in November. At Amazon River, the Mixing Zone occurs where the Coastal Zone usually is. The reason for that is the extension of fresh water plume moves Northeast for over 1000 Km (Gibbs, 1970; Muller-Karger et al 1988). This is the most extensive estuarine plume ever found in the ocean. During low fluvial discharge (June-November) plume reaches 300 Km; however, on high discharge (November-May) plume reaches 500 Km. Plume already is 3 to 10 m thick and 80 to 300 Km wide (Lentz and Limeburner, 1995). From June to January plume moves towards Africa, from whence 70% of it goes east carried by North Brazil Current retroflection and 30% goes towards the Caribbean. From February to May, the plume goes northwest towards the Caribbean. As to classification according to salinity stratification, at the quadrature the Amazon estuary is considered as "Saline Wedge" type (highly stratified estuary), salinity at 120 Km way from river moth standing out, whereas at sysygy it can be classified as well mixed (Limeburner et al. 1991e 1992; Patchineelam, 2004). Fresh water is everywhere in the river area, salty or mixed water is located in the ocean. In this estuary 90 Km away from the mouth surface water salinity is less than 0.05 and bottom salinity at 14 m deep is about 19 at high water on quadrature at the end of the rainy season. This behavior produces marked difference in the vertical salinity profile, showing the current is moving in the opposite direction (river fresh water and salty water brought by the tide). In this scenario, speed shearing at the interface produces interfacial friction stress that, from the entrainment process carries portions of water from the sea to the upper part. Usually, therefore, in "saline wedge" (highly stratified estuary) type estuaries, when river discharge is more intensive than the tide wave, entrainment is the predominant mechanism; and the greater tide amplitude is, the greater will its influence be to produce turbulent scattering and mixing be. Probably, at Amazon estuary quadrature entrainment processes are predominant and are the ones responsible for increased salinity in surface layer, whereas turbulence scattering mixing is secondary to it. "Saline wedge" (highly stratified estuary) type estuaries are typical of large fluvial discharge and microtide regions. But although the Amazon estuary is a macrotide region, this stratification is due to the river's exceptional discharge. Due to the remarkable river plume discharge on the platform, the tide - a dominant in macrotide region estuarine circulation - now has a secondary role, albeit not a negligible one, with quadrature amplitudes varying from 2 m to 90 Km from the mouth. It is important to point out that tide-ind

  5. 75 FR 17382 - Small Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Russian River Estuary Water...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-06

    ...Specified Activities; Russian River Estuary Water Level Management Activities, California...Authorization (IHA) to the Sonoma County Water Agency (herein after ``Agency...incidental to Russian River Estuary (Estuary) water level management and monitoring...

  6. 33 CFR 165.1190 - Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland Estuary, Alameda, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland Estuary, Alameda, CA. 165.1190 Section...Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland Estuary, Alameda, CA. (a) Location. ...zone: All navigable waters of the Oakland Estuary, California, from the surface to...

  7. 78 FR 9887 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; National Estuaries Restoration Inventory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ...Collection; Comment Request; National Estuaries Restoration Inventory AGENCY: National...information collection. Collection of estuary habitat restoration project information...restoration project database mandated by the Estuary Restoration Act of 2000. The...

  8. 33 CFR 165.1190 - Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland Estuary, Alameda, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland Estuary, Alameda, CA. 165.1190 Section...Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland Estuary, Alameda, CA. (a) Location. ...zone: All navigable waters of the Oakland Estuary, California, from the surface to...

  9. 33 CFR 165.1190 - Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland Estuary, Alameda, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland Estuary, Alameda, CA. 165.1190 Section...Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland Estuary, Alameda, CA. (a) Location. ...zone: All navigable waters of the Oakland Estuary, California, from the surface to...

  10. 33 CFR 165.1190 - Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland Estuary, Alameda, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland Estuary, Alameda, CA. 165.1190 Section...Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland Estuary, Alameda, CA. (a) Location. ...zone: All navigable waters of the Oakland Estuary, California, from the surface to...

  11. Net loss rates and distribution of molecular hydrogen (H 2) in mid-latitude coastal waters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen Punshon; Robert M. Moore; Huixiang Xie

    2007-01-01

    We present the first reported net loss-rate constants of molecular hydrogen, H2, in seawater. Net loss rates and depth profiles of hydrogen were measured in coastal seawater at two mid-latitude sites in eastern Canada: the St. Lawrence Estuary and Halifax Harbour, between November 2005 and July 2006. Net loss-rate constants ranged between 0.29 d?1 and 6.07 d?1 in the St. Lawrence Estuary,

  12. Estuaries Vol. 21, No. 2, p. 291-293 June 1998 Multiple T-S States for Estuaries, Shelves, and Marginal Seas

    E-print Network

    Olver, Peter

    Estuaries Vol. 21, No. 2, p. 291-293 June 1998 Multiple T-S States for Estuaries, Shelves of estuaries can develop such multiple temperaturesalhritystates. The same may be true of continentalshelves estuary and ocean would be dominated by salinityif the inlet is sufficientlysmall (such as inland seas

  13. Scales of variation in Pacific Northwest outer-coast estuaries This chapter provides an overview of the small, coastal-plain estuaries of the

    E-print Network

    Hickey, Barbara

    1 CHAPTER I Scales of variation in Pacific Northwest outer-coast estuaries This chapter provides an overview of the small, coastal-plain estuaries of the U.S. Pacific Northwest, a system of estuaries that, freshwater forcing, and tidal regime of these estuaries is described, with comparison to the more commonly

  14. Technology transfer at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D. [ed.

    1992-09-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is dedicated to commercializing new technology in such fields as advanced materials, biotechnology, and electronics. Technology transfer between national laboratories and the industrial community is important in maintaining America`s competitive edge. This document examines opportunities to establish working relationships with LBL. Streamlined methods for technology transfer are available with the aid of the Technology Transfer Department and the Patent Department at LBL. Research activities at LBL are concentrated in three major program areas: Energy Sciences, General Sciences, and Biosciences. Each program area consists of three research divisions. LBL welcomes both requests for information and proposals to conduct research.

  15. Technology transfer at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D. (ed.)

    1992-09-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is dedicated to commercializing new technology in such fields as advanced materials, biotechnology, and electronics. Technology transfer between national laboratories and the industrial community is important in maintaining America's competitive edge. This document examines opportunities to establish working relationships with LBL. Streamlined methods for technology transfer are available with the aid of the Technology Transfer Department and the Patent Department at LBL. Research activities at LBL are concentrated in three major program areas: Energy Sciences, General Sciences, and Biosciences. Each program area consists of three research divisions. LBL welcomes both requests for information and proposals to conduct research.

  16. Micro network unburdens Lawrence Livermore's supercomputers

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, A.

    1983-03-01

    Many program-development installations that rely on time-sharing systems are distributing some of the programming tasks to microcomputer networks. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, for example, has installed several microcomputer local networks as front-ends to its massive Octopus network, composed of Cray-1 and Control Data Corp. 7600 mainframes. One local network, which incorporated terminals from different vendors, is used by the programming group for nuclear weapons simulation. It allows programmers to perform local text editing, which reduces the time necessary to retrieve, modify and verify code, and frees the central host for compilation and execution. It also facilitates job resubmission and user scheduling.

  17. Research News at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    From the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's (LBL) Public Information Department, the Research News Website contains a store of news on physics, chemistry, and life science research. Written in a layperson's language, this resource accesses current news releases and the lab's newspaper (Currents) and magazine (Research Review). The highlight of this site is the searchable Science Articles Archive which holds over 900 articles from the above-mentioned news sources. The archives include sections on Accelerator and Fusion Research, Chemical Sciences, General Physics, and X-ray Research, among many others. A "News Release Delivery Service" emails the latest LBL news to subscribers.

  18. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1994 site environmental report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  19. A statistical–dynamical method for predicting estuary morphology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dominic E. Reeve; Harshinie Karunarathna

    2011-01-01

    A statistical–dynamical model for estuary morphodynamics is presented and demonstrated with a case study on the Humber Estuary,\\u000a UK. The model presented here is hybrid in nature where simplified process dynamics are combined with a data-driven approach.\\u000a The modelling methodology uses an inverse technique to construct an unknown source function in the model-governing equation,\\u000a using historic measurements of estuary bathymetry.

  20. Benthic primary production in the Columbia River Estuary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McIntire, C.D.; Amspoker, M.C.

    1984-02-01

    The general objective of the research associated with the Benthic Primary Production Work Unit of Columbia River Estuary Development Program was to determine mechanisms that control the production dynamics and species composition of benthic plant assemblages in the Columbia River Estuary. In particular, the work was concerned with effects of selected physical variables on structural and functional attributes of micro- and macro- vegetation, and on the productivity and biomass of benthic autotrophs on the tidal flats of the estuary.

  1. Geographic signatures of North American West Coast estuaries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Emmett; ROBERTO LLANSO ´; Jan Newton; Ron Thom; Michelle Hornberger; Cheryl Morgan; Colin Levings; Andrea Copping; Paul Fishman

    2000-01-01

    West Coast estuaries are geologically young and composed of a variety of geomorphological types. These estuaries range from\\u000a large fjords to shallow lagoons; from large to low freshwater flows. Natural hazards include E1 Niños, strong Pacific storms,\\u000a and active tectonic activity. West Coast estuaries support a wide range of living resources: five salmon species, harvestable\\u000a shellfish, waterfowl and marine birds,

  2. A fully predictive model for salt intrusion in estuaries applied to the Yangtze estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Huayang; Savenije, Hubert H. G.; Zuo, Shuhua; Jiang, Chenjuan; Chua, Vivien P.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the way the salinity distribution in an estuary reacts to external drivers (e.g., tide, fresh water discharge, dredging etc.) is important for both water quality and water resources management in estuaries. The salinity distribution depends strongly on the geometry of an estuary, but also on the fresh water discharge that counteracts the salt intrusion. In estuaries it is notoriously hard to estimate this discharge and subsequently to predict the parameters that determine the mixing behaviour depending on it. Recently a method has been developed to predict the fresh water discharge on the basis of water level observations. In addition predictive equations for tidal mixing have been updated and revised. In this paper, these two predictive methods are combined and subsequently applied to the Yangtze estuary under a wide variation of fresh water discharge. The predicted salt distribution appears to be in good agreement with observations. To provide insight into the optimum use of water resources (e.g., to determine the amount of fresh water discharge required to maintain a specific salt intrusion length), we further studied the salt intrusion pattern under different fresh water discharge conditions.

  3. Dirty Air Conditioners: Energy Implications of Coil Fouling Jeffrey Siegel, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/ UC Berkeley

    E-print Network

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    National Laboratory/ UC Berkeley Iain Walker, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Max Sherman, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory ABSTRACT Residential air conditioning is responsible for a substantial amountDirty Air Conditioners: Energy Implications of Coil Fouling Jeffrey Siegel, Lawrence Berkeley

  4. CAREER PROFILE Lawrence E. Jones, Ph.D.

    E-print Network

    Paderborn, Universität

    April 2013 CAREER PROFILE Lawrence E. Jones, Ph.D. Vice President, Utility Innovations & Infrastructure Resilience, Alstom Grid North America Dr. Lawrence E. Jones has over 20 years of experience Management Systems business and led its global Renewable Energy Integration activities. Dr. Jones

  5. The Dynamics of a Partially Mixed Estuary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Rockwell Geyer; John H. Trowbridge; Melissa M. Bowen

    2000-01-01

    ABSTRACT Measurements of velocity, density, and pressure gradient in the lower Hudson River estuary were used to quantify the dominant,terms in the momentum,equation and to characterize their variations at tidal and spring? neap timescales. The vertical momentum,flux (assumed to be due mainly to turbulent shear stress) was estimated indirectly, based on the residual from the acceleration and pressure gradient terms.

  6. Mercury biogeochemical cycling in a stratified estuary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. P. Mason; W. F. Fitzgerald; J. Hurley; A. K. Jr. Hanson; P. L. Donaghay; J. M. Sieburth

    1993-01-01

    Total Hg in the permanently stratified Pettaquamscutt estuary was <25 pM throughout the water column, even in highly sulfidic bottom waters. Particulate Hg was typically >40% of the total Hg. Reactive Hg (Hg[sub R]) was generally <3 pM and decreased with depth, but there is Hg[sub R] even in the anoxic bottom waters. Elemental Hg (Hg[sup 0]) was highest in

  7. Nutrient elements in large Chinese estuaries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jing Zhang

    1996-01-01

    Based on comprehensive observations since 1983, this study summarizes major features of nutrient elements (nitrogen, phosphorus and silicon) in large Chinese river\\/estuary systems. Elevated nutrient element levels were observed in Chinese rivers, when compared to large and less disturbed aquatic systems (e.g. the Amazon, Zaire and Orinoco). Data from this study are similar to those obtained from the polluted and\\/or

  8. PROCEEDINGS, TOUGH Symposium 2003 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California, May 1214, 2003

    E-print Network

    Rubin, Yoram

    PROCEEDINGS, TOUGH Symposium 2003 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California, May@lbl.gov 2 Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA ABSTRACT

  9. Saving Bays and Estuaries: A primer for establishing and managing Estuary programs. Appendices G, H, and I

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The appendix of Saving Bays and Estuaries is: A Primer for Establishing and Managing Estuary Projects. The Primer, which describes the National Estuary Program's origin, statutary provisions, and approach, is designed for EPA's program and Regional offices, coastal States, and other interested parties. For more information, contact an EPA Regional office. Section 320 of the Clean Water Act provides for the development of Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plans (CCMPs) for estuaries of National significance. To ensure the greatest return on resources spent, it is often necessary to document the economic benefits associated with alternative management strategies.

  10. Mercury biogeochemical cycling in a stratified estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.P.; Fitzgerald, W.F. (Univ. of Connecticut, Groton, CT (United States)); Hurley, J. (Wisconsin DNR, Fitchburg, WI (United States)); Hanson, A.K. Jr.; Donaghay, P.L.; Sieburth, J.M. (Univ. of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Total Hg in the permanently stratified Pettaquamscutt estuary was <25 pM throughout the water column, even in highly sulfidic bottom waters. Particulate Hg was typically >40% of the total Hg. Reactive Hg (Hg[sub R]) was generally <3 pM and decreased with depth, but there is Hg[sub R] even in the anoxic bottom waters. Elemental Hg (Hg[sup 0]) was highest in the mixed layer and below the detection limit at depth. Demethylation is not an important source of Hg[sup 0] in this estuary. Dimethylmercury was not detected. Monomethylmercury (MMHg) was near the detection limit in the mixed layer and increased rapidly in the low oxygen region. Dissolved MMHg correlated with bacteriochlorophyll pigments, suggesting that the microbial community plays an important role in MMHg production in the estuary. The overall distributions of dissolved and particulate Hg species result from the interaction with Fe and Mn redox cycling, particulate scavenging and sinking, and MMHg production in the pycnocline. The estimated rate of MMHg production from Hg[sub R] in the pycnocline region is 1.7% d[sup [minus]1]. Hg[sup 0] and MMHg are formed principally in the mixed layer and in the pycnocline region, respectively. Particulate scavenging is important, and sedimentation, methylation, and Hg[sup 0] production are the principal sinks for Hg[sub R].

  11. The occurrence of selected human pharmaceutical compounds in UK estuaries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin V. Thomas; Martin J. Hilton

    2004-01-01

    This report describes a scoping study conducted in order to establish whether pharmaceutical compounds may be present in UK estuaries. Surface water samples collected from five UK estuaries were analysed for the presence of 14 pharmaceutical compounds selected from the priority lists of the UK Environment Agency and the Oslo and Paris Commission (OSPAR). The pharmaceutical compounds\\/metabolites clofibric acid, clotrimazole,

  12. Macroalgae, pore water sulfides and eelgrass in Yaquina estuary, Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hypothesis that relatively high nutrients in estuaries of the Pacific Northwest (PNW) can lead to eutrophication and degradation of critical eelgrass habitat was examined. Yaquina estuary was surveyed for cover and above-ground biomass of benthic macroalgae (Ulva spp.) and n...

  13. Measurements of shoaling internal waves and turbulence in an estuary

    E-print Network

    Kelley, Dan

    Measurements of shoaling internal waves and turbulence in an estuary Clark Richards,1 Daniel internal waves may represent an important source of mixing and transport in estuaries and coastal seas of the turbulent energetics, and two main features were studied. First, during a period of shoaling internal waves

  14. The Hydrography of the Chupa Estuary, White Sea, Russia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. M. Howland; A. N. Pantiulin; G. E. Millward; R. Prego

    1999-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the fate and fluxes of materials from Arctic estuaries to the coastal zone. The paper is the first of a series addressing questions relating to the physics and chemistry of the region. Three seasonal cruises were undertaken in the Chupa Estuary, White Sea, Russia; in summer (July 1994), autumn (September, 1995) and spring (May\\/June

  15. Trace metal concentrations in estuaries and coastal regions

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, C.D. [Battelle Ocean Sciences, Duxbury, MA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Estuaries and coastal regions are highly variable in the physical and hydrographic conditions. As a result of heavy urbanization and industrialization of the head waters of most estuaries, there are substantial localized inputs of contaminants to the estuary. These factors combined with the flushing characteristics of individual estuaries to create relatively unique features that result in variation in the typical levels of trace metals for these systems. This makes intercomparison of the estuaries difficult. Comparability among estuaries becomes even more difficult when metals analyses are conducted without proper control of field and laboratory contamination, now firmly established in the trace metal analytical literature as a prerequisite for reliable marine trace metals analysis. This paper compares the concentrations of selected trace metal (Ag, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) concentrations in the waters of several major estuaries of the United States. The basis of comparison is that all samples war collected under rigid trace metal clean collection and analysis procedures. Generally, metal concentrations within the estuaries are similar. Metal concentrations in the higher salinity coastal regions are more similar in concentration. The comparison provides a baseline of typical concentrations of these trace metals in the coastal waters against which future analytical results can be compared.

  16. PECONIC ESTUARY PROGRAM COMPREHENSIVE CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Peconic Estuary, situated between the North and South Forks of eastern Long Island, New York, consists of more than 100 distinct bays, harbors, embayments, and tributaries. The area surrounding the Peconic Estuary's watershed is rich in rolling farmland, scenic beaches and cr...

  17. Adaptive Optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D T

    2003-03-10

    Adaptive optics enables high resolution imaging through the atmospheric by correcting for the turbulent air's aberrations to the light waves passing through it. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for a number of years has been at the forefront of applying adaptive optics technology to astronomy on the world's largest astronomical telescopes, in particular at the Keck 10-meter telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The technology includes the development of high-speed electrically driven deformable mirrors, high-speed low-noise CCD sensors, and real-time wavefront reconstruction and control hardware. Adaptive optics finds applications in many other areas where light beams pass through aberrating media and must be corrected to maintain diffraction-limited performance. We describe systems and results in astronomy, medicine (vision science), and horizontal path imaging, all active programs in our group.

  18. Geologic map of Saint Lawrence Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, William W., Jr.; Wilson, Frederic H.; Taylor, Theresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Saint Lawrence Island is located in the northern Bering Sea, 190 km southwest of the tip of the Seward Peninsula, Alaska, and 75 km southeast of the Chukotsk Peninsula, Russia (see index map, map sheet). It lies on a broad, shallow-water continental shelf that extends from western Alaska to northeastern Russia. The island is situated on a northwest-trending structural uplift exposing rocks as old as Paleozoic above sea level. The submerged shelf between the Seward Peninsula and Saint Lawrence Island is covered mainly with Cenozoic deposits (Dundo and Egiazarov, 1982). Northeast of the island, the shelf is underlain by a large structural depression, the Norton Basin, which contains as much as 6.5 km of Cenozoic strata (Grim and McManus, 1970; Fisher and others, 1982). Sparse test-well data indicate that the Cenozoic strata are underlain by Paleozoic and Proterozoic rocks, similar to those exposed on the Seward Peninsula (Turner and others, 1983). Saint Lawrence Island is 160 km long in an east-west direction and from 15 km to 55 km wide in a north-south direction. The east end of the island consists largely of a wave-cut platform, which has been elevated as much as 30 m above sea level. Isolated upland areas composed largely of granitic plutons rise as much as 550 m above the wave-cut platform. The central part of the island is dominated by the Kookooligit Mountains, a large Quaternary shield volcano that extends over an area of 850 km2 and rises to an elevation of 630 m. The west end of the island is composed of the Poovoot Range, a group of barren, rubble-covered hills as high as 450 m that extend from Boxer Bay on the southwest coast to Taphook Mountain on the north coast. The Poovoot Range is flanked on the southeast by the Putgut Plateau, a nearly flat, lake-dotted plain that stands 30?60 m above sea level. The west end of the island is marked by uplands underlain by the Sevuokuk pluton (unit Kg), a long narrow granite body that extends from Gambell on the north to near Boxer Bay on the south. Headlands having rugged cliffs or narrow, boulder-strewn beaches characterize the southwest coastline. The geologic map of Saint Lawrence Island was prepared from published and unpublished field investigations carried out between 1966 and 1971 by W.W. Patton, Jr., Bela Csejtey, Jr., T.P. Miller, J.T. Dutro, Jr., J.M. Hoare, and W.H. Condon (Patton and Csejtey, 1971, 1980) and data from Ormiston and Fehlmann (1969). Fossils collected during these investigations are reported in the Alaska Paleontological Database (www.alaskafossil.org), and mineral resource information is summarized in the online Alaska Resource Data File (Hudson, 1998).

  19. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Affirmative Action Program. Revised

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Affirmative Action Program (AAP) serves as a working document that describes current policies, practices, and results in the area of affirmative action. It represents the Laboratory`s framework for an affirmative approach to increasing the representation of people of color and women in segments of our work force where they have been underrepresented and taking action to increase the employment of persons with disabilities and special disabled and Vietnam era veterans. The AAP describes the hierarchy of responsibility for Laboratory affirmative action, the mechanisms that exist for full Laboratory participation in the AAP, the policies and procedures governing recruitment at all levels, the Laboratory`s plan for monitoring, reporting, and evaluating affirmative action progress, and a description of special affirmative action programs and plans the Laboratory has used and will use in its efforts to increase the representation and retention of groups historically underrepresented in our work force.

  20. RMP ANNUAL MONITORING RESULTSRMP ANNUAL MONITORING RESULTS San Francisco Estuary Institute Contribution No. 629

    E-print Network

    Contribution No. 629 A Report of the Regional Monitoring Program for Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary Monitoring Program for Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary (RMP). San Francisco Estuary Institute A Report of the Regional Monitoring Program for Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary #12

  1. The link between water quality and tidal marshes in a highly impacted estuary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick Meire; Tom Maris; Stefan van Damme; Sander Jacobs; Tom Cox; Eric Struyf

    2010-01-01

    The Schelde estuary is one of the most heavily impacted estuaries in Europe. During several decades, untreated waste water from large cities (e.g. Brussels, Antwerp, Valenciennes, Lille) and industries was discharged in the river. As a result, the Schelde estuary has the reputation of being one of the most polluted estuaries in Europe. For a long time (approx. 1950 -

  2. Thank you to our sponsors Thinking about healthy estuaries in the Year 2111 and

    E-print Network

    #12;Thank you to our sponsors #12;Thinking about healthy estuaries in the Year 2111 and assuming support and resources: What is your vision of what an estuary should look like? Think about: What do you value in an estuary? How do you use estuaries? #12;Why

  3. Approaches for Development of Nutrient Criteria in Oregon Estuaries With a Focus on Tillamook Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development of nutrient criteria for all water body types of the US remains a top priority for EPA. Estuaries in the Pacific Northwest receive nutrients from both the watershed and the coastal ocean, and thus are particularly complex systems in which to establish water quality c...

  4. Suprabenthos distribution in a shallow temperate estuary (Mondego estuary, western Portugal)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Morgado; E. Rodrigues; U. M. Azeiteiro

    2003-01-01

    For this paper we studied the suprabenthos distribution in the Mondego estuary's southern arm. Samples were taken monthly at two stations from October 1999 to May 2000. The collections were made during high spring tides, using a suprabenthic net mounted on a sledge (40 cm di- ameter, 500 mm mesh) in suprabenthic tows. Mollusca and Crustacea, especially Mysidacea, dom- inated

  5. PECONIC ESTUARY: RECREATIONAL AND RESOURCE ECONOMIC VALUES FOR THE PECONIC ESTUARY SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental and natural resources ("natural assets") of the Peconic Estuary System--the bay waters, beaches, wetlands, ecosystems, habitats, and parks and watershed lands--provide many services to the public. Outdoor recreation, scenic views, and the productivity of wetland...

  6. St. John's Wort (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    The herb St. John's Wort is believed to be helpful in relieving mild to moderate depression, but should only be taken under a physician's supervision. St. John's Wort may clash with other medications or foods a ...

  7. Simulation of integrated surface-water/ground-water flow and salinity for a coastal wetland and adjacent estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langevin, C.; Swain, E.; Wolfert, M.

    2005-01-01

    The SWIFT2D surface-water flow and transport code, which solves the St Venant equations in two dimensions, was coupled with the SEAWAT variable-density ground-water code to represent hydrologic processes in coastal wetlands and adjacent estuaries. A sequentially coupled time-lagged approach was implemented, based on a variable-density form of Darcy's Law, to couple the surface and subsurface systems. The integrated code also represents the advective transport of salt mass between the surface and subsurface. The integrated code was applied to the southern Everglades of Florida to quantify flow and salinity patterns and to evaluate effects of hydrologic processes. Model results confirm several important observations about the coastal wetland: (1) the coastal embankment separating the wetland from the estuary is overtopped only during tropical storms, (2) leakage between the surface and subsurface is locally important in the wetland, but submarine ground-water discharge does not contribute large quantities of freshwater to the estuary, and (3) coastal wetland salinities increase to near seawater values during the dry season, and the wetland flushes each year with the onset of the wet season. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Columbia River Estuary data development program: tidal marsh plant production in the Columbia River Estuary. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. B. Macdonald; T. P. Winfield

    1984-01-01

    This report summarizes the final results of the Emergent Plant Primary Production Work Unit of the Columbia River Estuary Data Development Program (CREDDP). The report describes the species composition, standing crop, and production dynamics of the extensive areas of tidal marsh vegetation that fringe the shores of the Columbia River Estuary and form many of its islands. The role of

  9. Temporal and spatial structure in the suprabenthic community of a shallow estuary (western Portugal: Mondego river estuary)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ulisses M. M. Azeiteiro; João Carlos Marques

    1999-01-01

    The suprabenthic fauna of the Mondego river estuary (western Portugal) was sampled monthly between June 1996 and June 1997. Quantitative samples were taken, with a suprabenthic 500-?m mesh size net, at regularly spaced stations covering the entire south arm of the estuary. The diversity of the samples and the distribution of the species were assessed. Suprabenthic communities were identified using

  10. Final report for sea-level rise response modeling for San Francisco Bay estuary tidal marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takekawa, John Y.; Thorne, Karen M.; Buffington, Kevin J.; Spragens, Kyle A.; Swanson, Kathleen M.; Drexler, Judith Z.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Overton, Cory T.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The International Panel on Climate Change has identified coastal ecosystems as areas that will be disproportionally affected by climate change. Current sea-level rise projections range widely with 0.57 to 1.9 meters increase in mea sea level by 2100. The expected accelerated rate of sea-level rise through the 21st century will put many coastal ecosystems at risk, especially those in topographically low-gradient areas. We assessed marsh accretion and plant community state changes through 2100 at 12 tidal salt marshes around San Francisco Bay estuary with a sea-level rise response model. Detailed ground elevation, vegetation, and water level data were collected at all sites between 2008 and 2011 and used as model inputs. Sediment cores (taken by Callaway and others, 2012) at four sites around San Francisco Bay estuary were used to estimate accretion rates. A modification of the Callaway and others (1996) model, the Wetland Accretion Rate Model for Ecosystem Resilience (WARMER), was utilized to run sea-level rise response models for all sites. With a mean sea level rise of 1.24 m by 2100, WARMER projected that the vast majority, 95.8 percent (1,942 hectares), of marsh area in our study will lose marsh plant communities by 2100 and to transition to a relative elevation range consistent with mudflat habitat. Three marshes were projected to maintain marsh vegetation to 2100, but they only composed 4.2 percent (85 hectares) of the total marsh area surveyed.

  11. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy | Office of Science Programmable Information Highway

    E-print Network

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy | Office of Science Programmable Lawrence Berkeley National Lab #12;Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy | Office Is there an impedance mismatch? #12;Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy | Office of Science

  12. Near coastal program plan for 1991: Estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    Environmental regulatory programs in the United States have been estimated to cost more than $70 billion annually. The Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) is a nationwide initiative being implemented by EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD). It was developed in response to the demand for information on the condition of the nation's ecological resources. The goal of EMAP is to assess and document the status and trends in the condition of the nation's forests, wetlands, estuaries, coastal waters, lakes, rivers, and streams, Great Lakes, agricultural lands, and arid lands on an integrated and continuing basis.

  13. MAIA Estuaries 1997-98 Data

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Mid Atlantic Integrated Assessment program (MAIA) of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has released these estuaries data for 1997-98. Data and Metadata may be viewed or downloaded (text or .pdf) for the following variables: Sampling Station Location Data, Station Visit Data, Water Quality Physical Measurements, Water Quality- Nutrients Data, Sediment Grain Size Data, Sediment Toxicity Data, Sediment Chemistry Data, Benthic Community Grain Size Data, Benthic Abundance Data, Benthic Biomass Data, Benthic Community Summary Data, Chemical Analyte Code Table, and Benthic Taxon Code Table.

  14. Magnitude and extent of sediment toxicity in selected estuaries of South Carolina and Georgia. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Long, E.R.; Scott, G.I.; Kucklick, J.; Fulton, M.; Thompson, B.

    1998-04-01

    Surficial sediment samples were collected from 162 locations within five estuaries -- Charleston Harbor, Winyah Bay, Leadenwah Creek, Savannah River, and St. Simons Sound -- in coastal South Carolina and Georgia in a survey of sediment toxicity performed in 1993 and 1994. All samples were tested for toxicity with a battery of complimentary laboratory bioassays. The laboratory bioassays consisted of amphipod survival tests in solid-phase sediments, microbial bioluminescence (Microtox{trademark}) tests of organic solvent extracts, and sea urchin fertilization and embryo development tests of porewaters. Some samples also were tested in copepod reproduction and cytochrome P-450 RGS bioassays. Chemical analyses for a suite of trace metals, organic compounds, and sedimentological factors were performed with portions of most samples.

  15. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Schleimer, G.E. (ed.)

    1981-04-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data on air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring for 1980 are presented, and general trends are discussed.

  16. Poisson Compound and Empirical Bayes Estimation, Revisited1 Lawrence Brown

    E-print Network

    Brown, Lawrence D.

    1 Poisson Compound and Empirical Bayes Estimation, Revisited1 Lawrence investigate a classical non-parametric Poisson empirical Bayes estimation problem,!( )= EG R ",!( )( ). The Bayes procedure is !G y( )= E " Y = y( ) (with the conditional

  17. STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    After donning her launch and entry suit, STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence gives a 'thumbs up' to show shes ready to fly in a few hours on the Space Shuttle Atlantis. This will be Lawrences second spaceflight. She and the six other crew members will depart shortly from the Operations and Checkout Building for Launch Pad 39A, where Atlantis awaits liftoff on a 10-day mission slated to be the seventh docking of the Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Lawrence was given the nickname 'too short,' as shown on her orange spacesuit, because she was withdrawn from training for an extended stay aboard the Mir when it was determined that she was too short to fit into the Russian spacewalk suit. Lawrence remains a member of the STS-86 crew, but fellow Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will take her place for an approximate four-month stay aboard the Russian space station.

  18. Entropy and Partial Differential Equations Lawrence C. Evans

    E-print Network

    Evans, Lawrence Craig

    Entropy and Partial Differential Equations Lawrence C. Evans Department of Mathematics, UC Berkeley engines and refrigerators, reversibility and irreversibility, energy dissipation and entropy increase, bewilderingly, to talk about something called entropy . . . She did gather that there were two distinct kinds

  19. The HARP software library and utility package A E Lawrence

    E-print Network

    Lawrence, Adrian

    The HARP software library and utility package A E Lawrence March 18, 1996 #12; Contents 1 libraries 20 5.1 network.inc and harp1con : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 20 5.2 harp1dec : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 21 5.3 ispdec

  20. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, H E; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Cerruti, S J; Coty, J D; Dibley, V R; Doman, J L; Grayson, A R; MacQueen, D H; Wegrecki, A M; Armstrong, D H; Brigdon, S L; Heidecker, K R; Hollister, R K; Khan, H N; Lee, G S; Nelson, J C; Paterson, L E; Salvo, V J; Schwartz, W W; Terusaki, S H; Wilson, K R; Woods, J M; Yimbo, P O; Gallegos, G M; Terrill, A A; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Blake, R G; Woollett, J S; Kumamoto, G

    2011-09-14

    The purposes of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2010 are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL's environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites - the Livermore site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL's Environmental Protection Department. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1A, Environmental Safety and Health Reporting, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The report is distributed electronically and is available at https://saer.llnl.gov/, the website for the LLNL annual environmental report. Previous LLNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1994 are also on the website. Some references in the electronic report text are underlined, which indicates that they are clickable links. Clicking on one of these links will open the related document, data workbook, or website that it refers to. The report begins with an executive summary, which provides the purpose of the report and an overview of LLNL's compliance and monitoring results. The first three chapters provide background information: Chapter 1 is an overview of the location, meteorology, and hydrogeology of the two LLNL sites; Chapter 2 is a summary of LLNL's compliance with environmental regulations; and Chapter 3 is a description of LLNL's environmental programs with an emphasis on the Environmental Management System including pollution prevention. The majority of the report covers LLNL's environmental monitoring programs and monitoring data for 2010: effluent and ambient air (Chapter 4); waters, including wastewater, storm water runoff, surface water, rain, and groundwater (Chapter 5); and terrestrial, including soil, sediment, vegetation, foodstuff, ambient radiation, and special status wildlife and plants (Chapter 6). Complete monitoring data, which are summarized in the body of the report, are provided in Appendix A. The remaining three chapters discuss the radiological impact on the public from LLNL operations (Chapter 7), LLNL's groundwater remediation program (Chapter 8), and quality assurance for the environmental monitoring programs (Chapter 9). The report uses System International units, consistent with the federal Metric Conversion Act of 1975 and Executive Order 12770, Metric Usage in Federal Government Programs (1991). For ease of comparison to environmental reports issued prior to 1991, dose values and many radiological measurements are given in both metric and U.S. customary units. A conversion table is provided in the glossary.

  1. Scavenging Rate Ecoassay: A Potential Indicator of Estuary Condition

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Augustine G.; Scanes, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of estuary condition is essential due to the highly productive and often intensely impacted nature of these ecosystems. Assessment of the physico-chemical condition of estuaries is expensive and difficult due to naturally fluctuating water quality and biota. Assessing the vigour of ecosystem processes is an alternative method with potential to overcome much of the variability associated with physico-chemical measures. Indicators of estuary condition should have small spatial and temporal variability, have a predictable response to perturbation and be ecologically relevant. Here, we present tests of the first criterion, the spatio-temporal variability of a potential ecoassay measuring the rate of scavenging in estuaries. We hypothesised that the proposed scavenging ecoassay would not vary significantly among A) sites in an estuary, B) trips separated by weeks, or C) days in a trip. Because not all habitats are present in all estuaries, this test was undertaken in two habitats. When conducted over bare substrate there were occasional significant differences, but no discernible patterns, within levels of the experiment. When conducted over vegetated substrate, days within a trip did not vary significantly, but later trips experienced greater scavenging. This scavenging ecoassay shows potential as a tool for assessing the condition of estuarine ecosystems, and further exploration of this protocol is warranted by implementation in estuaries across a gradient of anthropogenic stress. PMID:26024225

  2. Lawrence hydroelectric project: resurrection of a low-head dam

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    The Lawrence Hydroelectric Project, located on the Merrimac River in Lawrence, Mass, is one of the first hydro projects completed since the oil crisis and has set an important precedent for the development of other low-head generation systems in New England. The hydroelectric project is built alongside the old 920-ft-long granite dam. The plant uses two bulb-type Kaplan turbine/generator units, each rated at 8.4 MW.

  3. Sediment Transport Processes In River Dominated Sub-Tropical Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DAquino, Carla; Schettini, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study is to present a comparative assessment of the largest three river dominated estuaries in the southern coast of the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil (Tubarão, Araranguá and Mampituba estuaries). The study was focused on mechanisms of transport of suspended sediments influenced by its morphologic and hydrodynamics characteristics. As shown in D'Aquino et al (2011), these estuaries share common attributes (climate and tides) and follow the basic conceptual model of fine sediment transport (presented by Toldo & Schettini (2006). However, each one has its own particularities regarding the geographical setting, land use, hypsometry, outfall, etc. The methodology used to the field measurements was the same for all estuaries, aiming at measuring the currents, water level, salinity, temperature and turbidity near the outfall for at least two complete tidal cycles (~25 hours). All the campaigns were carried on under syzygya tide conditions. During the sample collecting period, a longitudinal profile was conducted in each estuary, through acquisitions of salinity and temperature of the water column in every kilometer. In the Tubarão and Araranguá rivers estuaries, the concentration of suspended particulate matter (SPM) is mostly influenced by the periods of incoming tide, flood currents. In the Mampituba river estuary, the flocculation process was observed during the encounter of fresh and salt water in every tide entrance. It was possible to observe that the Araranguá river estuary, in what concerns the bottom SPM, responds to the variation of salinity and currents along the bottom. The Tubarão estuary presents a relation between the salinity and the bottom currents. In the Mampituba estuary no relevant correlation was found between the SPM, the salinity, and the bottom currents. Those aspects demonstrate that even sharing some characteristics there are significant differences among these estuaries. In addition, as a result of the comparative study, an analytical model was proposed that correlates the fluvial discharge, salt wedge, and SPM. This model might represent a tool to encourage discussions and help the scientific exploration of the estuaries in the south of Santa Catarina.

  4. Climatology of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gouveia, F.J.; Chapman, K.R.

    1989-09-01

    Meteorological data collected from 1979 to 1987 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are analyzed in this report. These data are 15-min averages of wind speed, wind direction, standard deviation of the wind direction, temperature, and relative humidity. Calculated values include crosswind turbulence, absolute humidity, and stability class. Hourly averages were computed and used for most of the analysis. Frequency distributions of wind speed and horizontal wind fluctuations as well as joint frequency distributions of wind speed, wind direction, and stability are presented. The data show a marked seasonal variability and this phenomenon is explored in depth. An example is presented to show how the data set may be queried to find the probability of a specific set of meteorological conditions. In addition, a comparison is made of these data and data from another tower located nearby. The data are very similar despite slight differences, which may be explained by differences between the sampling locations in surface roughness and proximity to buildings. 13 tabs.

  5. Population dynamics of Acartia clausi from a temperate estuary (Mondego Estuary, Western Portugal)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LUÍS VIEIRA; FERNANDO MORGADO; PEDRO RÉ; ANTÓNIO NOGUEIRA; RAMIRO PASTORINHO; MÁRIO PEREIRA; PAULA BACELAR-NICOLAU; JOÃO CARLOS MARQUES; ULISSES MIRANDA AZEITEIRO

    2003-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to estimate the distribution, production and production\\/biomass ratio values of Acartia clausi, one of the most representative taxa of the Copepoda community in the Mondego estuary. The following biomass\\/length relationship was estimated for specimens of Acartia clausi: AFDW = 2.27 BL . Length-weight relationships were used to estimate production taking into account cohort

  6. Structure and Dynamics of Minke Whale Surfacing Patterns in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Fredrik; Lusseau, David; Tscherter, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Animal behavioral patterns can help us understand physiological and ecological constraints on animals and its influence on fitness. The surfacing patterns of aquatic air-breathing mammals constitute a behavioral pattern that has evolved as a trade-off between the need to replenish oxygen stores at the surface and the need to conduct other activities underwater. This study aims to better understand the surfacing pattern of a marine top predator, the minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata), by investigating how their dive duration and surfacing pattern changes across their activity range. Activities were classified into resting, traveling, surface feeding and foraging at depth. For each activity, we classified dives into short and long dives and then estimated the temporal dependence between dive types. We found that minke whales modified their surfacing pattern in an activity-specific manner, both by changing the expression of their dives (i.e. density distribution) and the temporal dependence (transition probability) between dive types. As the depth of the prey layer increased between activities, the surfacing pattern of foraging whales became increasingly structured, going from a pattern dominated by long dives, when feeding at the surface, to a pattern where isolated long dives were followed by an increasing number of breaths (i.e. short dives), when the whale was foraging at depth. A similar shift in surfacing pattern occurred when prey handling time (inferred from surface corralling maneuvers) increased for surface feeding whales. The surfacing pattern also differed between feeding and non-feeding whales. Resting whales did not structure their surfacing pattern, while traveling whales did, possibly as a way to minimize cost of transport. Our results also suggest that minke whales might balance their oxygen level over multiple, rather than single, dive cycles. PMID:25970425

  7. Citizens' Guide to Biomonitoring in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Great Lakes United, Buffalo, NY.

    The purpose of this report is to present the issues surrounding biomonitoring of wastewaters discharged into the Great Lakes Basin. Biomonitoring is the process of using organisms to monitor the toxicity of a substance. The report reflects an interest in seeing zero discharge of toxic pollutants in the Great Lakes region. The report is organized…

  8. 137Cs and 210Po in Pacific Walrus and Bearded Seal from St. Lawrence Island, Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T F Hamilton; D J Seagars; T Jokela; D Layton

    2005-01-01

    The activity concentration of Cesium-137 (¹³Cs) and naturally-occurring Polonium-210 (²¹°Po) were measured in the muscle tissue, kidney and liver of Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) and bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus) collected by native hunters from the Bering Sea. The mean ¹³Cs concentrations in muscle, liver and kidney of Pacific walrus were 0.07, 0.09 and 0.07 Bq kg¹ (N= 5, wet

  9. 137Cs and 210Po in Pacific walrus and bearded seal from St. Lawrence Island, Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Terry Hamilton; Dana Seagars; Terry Jokela; David Layton

    2008-01-01

    The activity concentration of Cesium-137 (137Cs) and naturally-occurring Polonium-210 (210Po) were measured in the muscle tissue, kidney and liver of Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) and bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus) collected by native hunters from the Bering Sea during May 1996. The mean 137Cs concentrations in muscle, liver and kidney of Pacific walrus were 0.07, 0.09 and 0.07Bqkg?1 (n=5, wet

  10. Water resources data, Ohio: Water year 1991. Volume 2, St. Lawrence River Basin: Statewide project data

    SciTech Connect

    Shindel, H.L.; Klingler, J.H.; Mangus, J.P.; Trimble, L.E.

    1992-03-01

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of Ohio each water year. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for 131 streamflow-gaging stations, 95 miscellaneous sites; (2) stage and content records for 5 streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality for 40 streamflow-gaging stations, 378 wells, and 74 partial-record sites; and (4) water levels for 431 observation wells.

  11. Marine mammal strandings and environmental changes: a 15-year study in the St. Lawrence ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Truchon, Marie-Hélène; Measures, Lena; L'Hérault, Vincent; Brêthes, Jean-Claude; Galbraith, Peter S; Harvey, Michel; Lessard, Sylvie; Starr, Michel; Lecomte, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the effects of climatic variability on marine mammals is challenging due to the complexity of ecological interactions. We used general linear models to analyze a 15-year database documenting marine mammal strandings (1994-2008; n?=?1,193) and nine environmental parameters known to affect marine mammal survival, from regional (sea ice) to continental scales (North Atlantic Oscillation, NAO). Stranding events were more frequent during summer and fall than other seasons, and have increased since 1994. Poor ice conditions observed during the same period may have affected marine mammals either directly, by modulating the availability of habitat for feeding and breeding activities, or indirectly, through changes in water conditions and marine productivity (krill abundance). For most species (75%, n?=?6 species), a low volume of ice was correlated with increasing frequency of stranding events (e.g. R(2)adj?=?0.59, hooded seal, Cystophora cristata). This likely led to an increase in seal mortality during the breeding period, but also to increase habitat availability for seasonal migratory cetaceans using ice-free areas during winter. We also detected a high frequency of stranding events for mysticete species (minke whale, Balaenoptera acutorostrata) and resident species (beluga, Delphinapterus leucas), correlated with low krill abundance since 1994. Positive NAO indices were positively correlated with high frequencies of stranding events for resident and seasonal migratory cetaceans, as well as rare species (R(2)adj?=?0.53, 0.81 and 0.34, respectively). This contrasts with seal mass stranding numbers, which were negatively correlated with a positive NAO index. In addition, an unusual multiple species mortality event (n?=?114, 62% of total annual mortality) in 2008 was caused by a harmful algal bloom. Our findings provide an empirical baseline in understanding marine mammal survival when faced with climatic variability. This is a promising step in integrating stranding records to monitor the consequences of environmental changes in marine ecosystems over long time scales. PMID:23544059

  12. Petrology/Geochemistry/Mineralogy/Structure of Shear zones in St. Lawrence County

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Robert Badger

    These rocks were collected from outcrops frequented by structural geology field trips. CCM 42 is from the town of Clare, CCM 43 is from Russell; although labeled CCM, neither is from the Carthoage Colton Mylonite Zone, but both are from shear zones. DEK is from the world famous DeKalb anticline. In this lab we try to pull together material from petrology, geochemistry, mineralogy and structure.

  13. POTASSIC MAGMATISM ON ST. LAWRENCE ISLAND, ALASKA, AND CAPE DEZHNEV, NORTHEAST RUSSIA

    E-print Network

    Amato, Jeff

    a syenite pluton at Cape Dezhnev on the Chukotka Peninsula of Russia. These geochemical data are used of larger-volume subalkaline magmatism between 110 and 100 Ma (and possibly younger). A nepheline syenite but less potassic than the syenites. It has Nd of -0.35 and initial 87Sr/86Sr of 0.7063, and a biotite from

  14. POTASSIC MAGMATISM ON ST. LAWRENCE ISLAND, ALASKA, AND CAPE DEZHNEV, NORTHEAST RUSSIA

    E-print Network

    Toro, Jaime

    a syenite pluton at Cape Dezhnev on the Chukotka Peninsula of Russia. These geo-chemical data are used of larger-volume subalkaline magmatism between 110 and 100 Ma (and possibly younger). A nepheline syenite but less potassic than the syenites. It has Nd of -0.35 and initial 87Sr/86Sr of 0.7063, and a biotite from

  15. Author's personal copy Fossil brines preserved in the St-Lawrence Lowlands,

    E-print Network

    Long, Bernard

    as revealed by their chemistry and noble gas isotopes Daniele L. Pinti a, , Catherine Be´land-Otis a,1 , Alain*. 4 He/40 Ar* and 21 Ne*/40 Ar* ratios, corrected for mass fractionation dur- ing incomplete brine Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. INTRODUCTION Calcium/chloride brines (total dissolved salinity P300 g

  16. A Multi-Scale Analysis of Grassland Bird Habitat Relationships in the St. Lawrence River Valley

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah A. Lazazzero

    2006-01-01

    I used a combination of 10 vegetation variables and 10 landscape variables to model abundance and occurrence of six grassland bird species in agricultural grassland (n=55) throughout Jefferson County, NY during the 2004 and 2005 field seasons. Landscape composition was quantified by classifying the proportion of land use within a 1 km radius from the center of all survey fields.

  17. 137Cs and 210Po in Pacific walrus and bearded seal from St. Lawrence Island, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Terry; Seagars, Dana; Jokela, Terry; Layton, David

    2008-06-01

    The activity concentration of Cesium-137 ((137)Cs) and naturally-occurring Polonium-210 ((210)Po) were measured in the muscle tissue, kidney and liver of Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) and bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus) collected by native hunters from the Bering Sea during May 1996. The mean (137)Cs concentrations in muscle, liver and kidney of Pacific walrus were 0.07, 0.09 and 0.07 Bq kg(-1) (n=5, wet weight), respectively, and 0.17, 0.10, and 0.17 Bq kg(-1) (n=2, wet weight), respectively, in bearded seal. In general, (137)Cs tissue concentrations are significantly lower than those previously reported for mammals from other regions. By comparison, (210)Po activity concentrations are more variable and appear to be higher level compared with mammal data from other regions. The mean (210)Po concentration in the muscle tissue, liver and kidney of Pacific walrus (n=5, wet weight) were 28.7, 189, and 174 Bq kg(-1), respectively. This compares with (210)Po concentration values (n=2, wet weight) of 27, 207 and 68 Bq kg(-1) measured in the muscle tissue, liver and kidney, of bearded seal, respectively. Estimated concentration factors--as defined by the radionuclide concentration ratio between the target tissue to that in sea water--were two to three orders of magnitude higher for (210)Po that those of (137)Cs. We conclude from radiological dose estimates that ingestion of (137)Cs in foods derived from walrus and seal will pose no threat to human health. This work has important implications for assessment of risks of Alaskan coastal communities concerned about the dumping of nuclear waste in the Russia Arctic. PMID:18371988

  18. Marine Mammal Strandings and Environmental Changes: A 15-Year Study in the St. Lawrence Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Truchon, Marie-Hélène; Measures, Lena; L’Hérault, Vincent; Brêthes, Jean-Claude; Galbraith, Peter S.; Harvey, Michel; Lessard, Sylvie; Starr, Michel; Lecomte, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the effects of climatic variability on marine mammals is challenging due to the complexity of ecological interactions. We used general linear models to analyze a 15-year database documenting marine mammal strandings (1994–2008; n?=?1,193) and nine environmental parameters known to affect marine mammal survival, from regional (sea ice) to continental scales (North Atlantic Oscillation, NAO). Stranding events were more frequent during summer and fall than other seasons, and have increased since 1994. Poor ice conditions observed during the same period may have affected marine mammals either directly, by modulating the availability of habitat for feeding and breeding activities, or indirectly, through changes in water conditions and marine productivity (krill abundance). For most species (75%, n?=?6 species), a low volume of ice was correlated with increasing frequency of stranding events (e.g. R2adj?=?0.59, hooded seal, Cystophora cristata). This likely led to an increase in seal mortality during the breeding period, but also to increase habitat availability for seasonal migratory cetaceans using ice-free areas during winter. We also detected a high frequency of stranding events for mysticete species (minke whale, Balaenoptera acutorostrata) and resident species (beluga, Delphinapterus leucas), correlated with low krill abundance since 1994. Positive NAO indices were positively correlated with high frequencies of stranding events for resident and seasonal migratory cetaceans, as well as rare species (R2adj?=?0.53, 0.81 and 0.34, respectively). This contrasts with seal mass stranding numbers, which were negatively correlated with a positive NAO index. In addition, an unusual multiple species mortality event (n?=?114, 62% of total annual mortality) in 2008 was caused by a harmful algal bloom. Our findings provide an empirical baseline in understanding marine mammal survival when faced with climatic variability. This is a promising step in integrating stranding records to monitor the consequences of environmental changes in marine ecosystems over long time scales. PMID:23544059

  19. Are interactions among Ponto-Caspian invaders driving amphipod species replacement in the St. Lawrence River?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Åsa Kestrup; Anthony Ricciardi

    2009-01-01

    In Lake Erie and Lake Ontario, the Ponto-Caspian amphipod Echinogammarus ischnus has replaced the native amphipod Gammarus fasciatus on rocky substrates colonized by dreissenid mussels, which provide interstitial refugia for small invertebrates. Based on the premise that an invader's vulnerability to predation is influenced by its evolutionary experience with the predator and its ability to compete for refugia, we hypothesized

  20. PROCEEDINGS OF THE SECOND WORKSHOP ON EXPERIMENTS AND DETECTORS FOR A RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER (RHIC), LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY, MAY 25-29, 1987

    E-print Network

    Ritter, Hans Georg

    2010-01-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyCalifornia Institute of Technology Lawrence BerkeleyInstitute of Technology Oak Ridge National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Lawrence

  1. OXYGEN UPTAKE AND NUTRIENT REGENERATION IN THE PECONIC ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: OXYGEN UPTAKE AND NUTRIENT REGENERATION IN THE PECONIC ESTUARY Rates of oxygen consumption and nutrient regeneration were measured annually throughout the Peconic Estuarine System. Sediment and water column oxygen uptake were measured to determine the potential...

  2. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF BURROWING SHRIMP POPULATIONS IN TWO OREGON ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thalassinid burrowing shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis and Upogebia pugettensis) inhabit large expanses of Pacific estuarine tide flats, from British Columbia to Baja California. The spatial distribution of shrimp populations within estuaries has rarely been quantified because ...

  3. A PROBABILISTIC SURVEY OF SEDIMENT TOXICITY IN WEST COAST ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A probabalistic survey of coastal condition assessment was conducted in 1999 by participants in US EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP). The survey targeted estuaries along the outer coasts of Washington, Oregon and California, including the lower Columbi...

  4. Mixing processes and hydraulic control in a highly stratified estuary

    E-print Network

    MacDonald, Daniel George, 1970-

    2003-01-01

    This thesis utilizes field data from the Fraser River Estuary, a highly stratified system located in southwestern British Columbia, Canada, to investigate the nature of mixing processes in a highly stratified environment, ...

  5. MODIS water quality algorithms for northwest Florida estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Synoptic and frequent monitoring of water quality parameters from satellite is useful for determining the health of aquatic ecosystems and development of effective management strategies. Northwest Florida estuaries are classified as optically-complex, or waters influenced by chlo...

  6. Nekton community structure of the Rio Grande estuary 

    E-print Network

    Clark, Randall Dean

    1997-01-01

    Spatial and temporal trends in nekton community structure of the Rio Grande estuary were characterized quarterly during May 1989-February 1990. Bag seine, otter trawl, experimental gill net and hydrographic sampling was ...

  7. DOWNSTREAM MIGRATION OF SALMONID SMOLTS IN OREGON RIVERS AND ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Migratory fish passage is an important designated use for many Oregon estuaries. Acoustic transmitters were implanted in coho smolts in 2004 and 2006 to evaluate how estuarine habitat, and habitat loss, might affect population health. Acoustic receivers that identified individu...

  8. Biogeochemistry of the Kem' River estuary, White Sea (Russia)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. R. Shevchenko; Y. S. Dolotov; N. N. Filatov; T. N. Alexeeva; A. S. Filippov; E.-M. Nöthig; A. N. Novigatsky; L. A. Pautova; A. V. Platonov; N. V. Politova; T. N. Rat'kova; R. Stein

    2005-01-01

    The biogeochemistry of the river-sea interface was studied in the Kem' River (the largest river flowing to the White Sea from Karelian coast) estuary and adjacent area of the White Sea onboard the RV \\

  9. MAPPING BURROWING SHRIMP AND SEAGRASS IN YAQUINA ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Burrowing shrimp and seagrasses create extensive intertidal and shallow subtidal habitats within Pacific NW estuaries. Maps of their populations are useful to inform estuarine managers of locations that deserve special consideration for conservation, and to inform oyster farmers...

  10. Semidiurnal seiching in a shallow, micro-tidal lagoonal estuary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard A. Luettich; Sarah D. Carr; Janelle V. Reynolds-Fleming; Crystal W. Fulcher; Jesse E. McNinch

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of current meter data in the Neuse River Estuary (NRE) associates over half of the along channel velocity variance with roughly the semi-diurnal frequency band. Velocity in this frequency range is episodic, has a typical magnitude of 10cms?1 and often reaches twice this speed. The NRE is a sub-estuary of the Albemarle–Pamlico Estuarine System (APES), which is the second

  11. Bacterial and phytoplankton dynamics in a sub-tropical estuary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    José Juan Barrera-Alba; Sônia Maria Flores Gianesella; Gleyci Aparecida Oliveira Moser; Flávia Marisa Prado Saldanha-Corrêa

    2008-01-01

    Heterotrophic bacterial and phytoplankton biomass, production, specific growth rates and growth efficiencies were studied\\u000a in July 2001 and January 2002 during both spring and neap tides, along a tidal cycle, at three sites in a subtropical estuary.\\u000a Major freshwater inputs located in the Northern region led to differences in both phytoplankton and bacterioplankton biomass\\u000a and activity along the estuary. While

  12. Intertidal morphology change following Spartina anglica introduction, Tamar Estuary, Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Matthew R.; Ellison, Joanna C.

    2014-08-01

    The surface morphology and sediment characteristics of introduced Spartina anglica marshes of the Tamar Estuary were analysed using a combination of spatial mapping, land-based topographical surveys, sediment coring and identification of the pre-introduction surface. Such a morphological investigation of estuarine change following Spartina introduction has not been attempted elsewhere before. A difference was found between marshes in upper and lower estuary. Surface topography of Type-1 marshes of the upper estuary was found to be independent of the pre-Spartina surface morphology, with deeper vertical development and exhibiting a flat to slightly concave upper marsh, a convex ridge in the outer mid marsh, and a relatively steeply graded convex lower marsh. Type-2 marshes of the lower estuary were thinner in vertical development, and with surface topography dictated by the underlying pre-Spartina surface. The difference was found to be due to variations in environmental conditions in sediment supply and wave/current exposure between the two regions rather being an indication of relative maturity. The seaward edge of marshes was found to be 0.5 m lower at the seaward end of the Tamar relative to the landward, reflecting tidal amplification up this confined estuary. While Spartina marshes are accretionary, surveys demonstrated retreat of the seaward margins throughout the estuary over the past 17 years, and the development of erosional scarps in Type-1 marshes. Spatial mapping identified 374 ha of S. anglica infestation within the Tamar Estuary, with Type-1 marshes occupying 240 ha and Type-2 marshes occupying 134 ha. Topographic profiles and stratigraphic data were used to estimate total sediment volumes trapped by Spartina in the Tamar Estuary, finding approximately 1,193,441 m3 of material to have been trapped beneath Spartina since its introduction in 1947, of which between 14 and 28% has been Spartina-derived organic matter.

  13. Attenuation of rare earth elements in a boreal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, Mats E.; Österholm, Peter; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Nystrand, Miriam; Peltola, Pasi; Nordmyr, Linda; Boman, Anton

    2012-11-01

    This study focuses on attenuation of rare earth elements (REE) when a boreal creek, acidified and loaded with REE and other metals as a result of wetland drainage, empties into a brackish-water estuary (salinity < 6‰). Surface water was collected in a transect from the creek mouth to the outer estuary, and settling (particulate) material in sediment traps moored at selected locations in the estuary. Ultrafiltration, high-resolution ICP-MS and modeling were applied on the waters, and a variety of chemical reagents were used to extract metals from the settling material. Aluminium, Fe and REE transported by the acidic creek were extensively removed in the inner/central estuary where the acidic water was neutralised, whereas Mn was relatively persistent in solution and thus redistributed to particles and deposited further down the estuary. The REE removal was caused by several contemporary mechanisms: co-precipitation with oxyhydroxides (mainly Al but also Fe), complexation with flocculating humic substances and sorption to suspended particles. Down estuary the dissolved REE pool, remaining after removal, was fractionated: the <1 kDa pool became depleted in the middle REE and the colloidal (0.45 ?m-1 kDa) pool depleted in the middle and heavy REE. This fractionation was controlled by the removal process, such that those REE with highest affinity for the settling particles became most depleted in the remaining dissolved pool. Modeling, based on Visual MINTEQ version 3.0 and the Stockholm Humic Model after revision and updating, predicted that the dissolved (<0.45 ?m) REE pool in the estuary is bound almost entirely to humic substances. Acid sulphate soils, the source of the REE and other metals in the creek water, are widespread on coastal plains worldwide and therefore the REE attenuation patterns and mechanisms identified in the studied estuary are relevant for recognition of similar geochemical processes and conditions in a variety of coastal locations.

  14. Distribution of zooplankton in the Avon?Heathcote Estuary, Christchurch

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. S. Roper; M. J. Simons; M. B. Jones

    1983-01-01

    Zooplankton of the Avon?Heathcote Estuary (43°33'S, 172°44'E), Christchurch, was studied at approximately 2?weekly intervals for 6 months over the autumn?winter period. Samples were collected at high tide during the day at 5 stations distributed from the northern head to the estuary mouth. During the sampling period, water temperature varied between 8.0 and 20.5°C, salinity between S = 2.0 and S

  15. Biological effects of anthropogenic contaminants in the San Francisco Estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, B.; Adelsbach, T.; Brown, C.; Hunt, J.; Kuwabara, J.; Neale, J.; Ohlendorf, H.; Schwarzbach, S.; Spies, R.; Taberski, K.

    2007-01-01

    Concentrations of many anthropogenic contaminants in the San Francisco Estuary exist at levels that have been associated with biological effects elsewhere, so there is a potential for them to cause biological effects in the Estuary. The purpose of this paper is to summarize information about biological effects on the Estuary's plankton, benthos, fish, birds, and mammals, gathered since the early 1990s, focusing on key accomplishments. These studies have been conducted at all levels of biological organization (sub-cellular through communities), but have included only a small fraction of the organisms and contaminants of concern in the region. The studies summarized provide a body of evidence that some contaminants are causing biological impacts in some biological resources in the Estuary. However, no general patterns of effects were apparent in space and time, and no single contaminant was consistently related to effects among the biota considered. These conclusions reflect the difficulty in demonstrating biological effects due specifically to contamination because there is a wide range of sensitivity to contaminants among the Estuary's many organisms. Additionally, the spatial and temporal distribution of contamination in the Estuary is highly variable, and levels of contamination covary with other environmental factors, such as freshwater inflow or sediment-type. Federal and State regulatory agencies desire to develop biological criteria to protect the Estuary's biological resources. Future studies of biological effects in San Francisco Estuary should focus on the development of meaningful indicators of biological effects, and on key organism and contaminants of concern in long-term, multifaceted studies that include laboratory and field experiments to determine cause and effect to adequately inform management and regulatory decisions. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Continuous resistivity profiling data from the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, V.A.; Bratton, J.F.; Worley, C.R.; Crusius, J.; Kroeger, K.D.

    2011-01-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine its importance in nutrient delivery to the Chesapeake Bay. The Corsica River Estuary represents a coastal lowland setting typical of much of the eastern bay. An interdisciplinary U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) science team conducted field operations in the lower estuary in April and May 2007. Resource managers are concerned about nutrients that are entering the estuary via SGD that may be contributing to eutrophication, harmful algal blooms, and fish kills. Techniques employed in the study included continuous resistivity profiling (CRP), piezometer sampling of submarine groundwater, and collection of a time series of radon tracer activity in surface water. A CRP system measures electrical resistivity of saturated subestuarine sediments to distinguish those bearing fresh water (high resistivity) from those with saline or brackish pore water (low resistivity). This report describes the collection and processing of CRP data and summarizes the results. Based on a grid of 67.6 kilometers of CRP data, low-salinity (high-resistivity) groundwater extended approximately 50-400 meters offshore from estuary shorelines at depths of 5 to >12 meters below the sediment surface, likely beneath a confining unit. A band of low-resistivity sediment detected along the axis of the estuary indicated the presence of a filled paleochannel containing brackish groundwater. The meandering paleochannel likely incised through the confining unit during periods of lower sea level, allowing the low-salinity groundwater plumes originating from land to mix with brackish subestuarine groundwater along the channel margins and to discharge. A better understanding of the spatial variability and geological controls of submarine groundwater flow beneath the Corsica River Estuary could lead to improved models and mitigation strategies for nutrient over-enrichment in the estuary and in other similar settings.

  17. Nutrients, hypoxia and Mass Fishkill events in Tapi Estuary, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Anirudh; Jaiswar, Jiyalal Ram M.; Rokade, M. A.; Bharti, S.; Vishwasrao, C.; Majithiya, D.

    2014-07-01

    From 1983 to 2011, dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions in the Tapi Estuary changed from normoxic to hypoxic due to increased and untreated discharge of sewage. Both tidal and day-night variations of DO were best explained by hydrographic factors, sewage pollution and phytoplankton dynamics in upper, middle, lower estuary and the coastal water. Hypoxia/anoxia was associated with low-flow periods due to riverine restrictions and changing in climatic condition. The upper Tapi Estuary becomes anoxic during summer irrespective of tide while the middle estuary was anoxic (<0.2 mg O2 l-1) during post and premonsoon seasons and hypoxic (<2.0 mg O2 l-1) during monsoon season. Differences in the degree of stratification, sewage discharge and flushing accounted for differences in DO. Because of high nutrient concentrations (maximum NO3--N 103.1, NO2--N 26.0, NH4+-N 104.0 and PO43--P 99.0 ?mol l-1), the lower estuary remains DO deficient between 2.0 and 5.0 mg O2 l-1, most of the time. The environmental condition of Tapi Estuary has impacted the coastal water of the Arabian Sea in recent years with fish kills attributed to its hypoxic/anoxic condition. Enhanced concentrations of nutrients and organic matter from indiscriminate discharge of sewage into the Tapi Estuary and restricted flushing as a result of construction of a series of dams in the catchment area of the estuary are the primary factors that have lead to the development of hypoxia.

  18. Reprint of Water renewal timescales in the Scheldt Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Brye, Benjamin; de Brauwere, Anouk; Gourgue, Olivier; Delhez, Eric J. M.; Deleersnijder, Eric

    2013-12-01

    Using the concepts of the Constituent-oriented Age and Residence time Theory (CART), we compute timescales related to the water renewal in the Scheldt Estuary (The Netherlands/Belgium). Three different timescales are used to better understand and characterize the dynamics of the estuary: the age of the renewing water, the residence time and the exposure time. The residence time is the time taken by a water parcel to leave the estuary for the first time while the exposure time is the total time spent by a water parcel in the estuary including re-entries. The age of a renewing water parcel is defined as the time elapsed since it entered the estuary. The renewing water was split into three types: the water originating from the sea, the water originating from the upstream fresh tidal rivers and the water originating from the different canals and docks connected to the estuary. Every timescale is computed at any time and position by means of the finite-element, unstructured-mesh model SLIM. This results in movies of the timescale fields (shown as Supplementary material), allowing a detailed analysis of their spatial and temporal variabilities. The effect of the M2 tide and the discharge regime (winter, summer or average situation) on the timescales is also investigated.Tidally-averaged timescales vary little over the width of the estuary and hence exhibit a virtually one-dimensional behaviour. However, around these average values, the timescales can vary hugely over a tidal cycle, with amplitudes that significantly depend on the space coordinates. The reason thereof has yet to be elucidated. These results underscore the need for two- or three-dimensional models with high temporal resolution for investigating the dynamics of the Scheldt Estuary.

  19. Columbia Bay, Alaska: an 'upside down' estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Josberger, E.G.; Driedger, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    Circulation and water properties within Columbia Bay, Alaska, are dominated by the effects of Columbia Glacier at the head of the Bay. The basin between the glacier terminus and the terminal moraine (sill depth of about 22 m) responds as an 'upside down' estuary with the subglacial discharge of freshwater entering at the bottom of the basin. The intense vertical mixing caused by the bouyant plume of freshwater creates a homogeneous water mass that exchanges with the far-field water through either a two- or a three-layer flow. In general, the glacier acts as a large heat sink and creates a water mass which is cooler than that in fjords without tidewater glaciers. The predicted retreat of Columbia Glacier would create a 40 km long fjord that has characteristics in common with other fjords in Prince William Sound. ?? 1988.

  20. Monitoring Rehabilitation in Temperate North American Estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Casimir A.; Hood, W Gregory; Tear, Lucinda M.; Simenstad, Charles; Williams, Gregory D.; Johnson, L. L.; Feist, B. E.; Roni, P.

    2005-02-01

    In this chapter, we propose that monitoring rehabilitation in estuarine ecosystems by necessity requires quantifying relationships between dynamic estuarine processes and sensitive indicators of ecosystem function. While we do discuss temperate systems in general, emphasis is placed on anadromous salmon habitats in the Pacific Northwest because anadromous fishes are such a major focus of rehabilitation efforts, and present some of the greater challenges in linking function of one segment of their life history to conditions in a specific habitat. We begin with a basic overview of the ecological and socioeconomic significance of, as well as anthropogenic effects on, estuaries. Next, we briefly summarize the various kinds of estuarine rehabilitation historically practiced in temperate regions, and review estuarine rehabilitation monitoring design and methods, highlighting the unique challenges involved in monitoring estuarine systems. We then close with a summary and conclusions.

  1. St. John's Wort

    MedlinePLUS

    ... serious. St. John’s wort is not a proven therapy for depression. If depression is not adequately treated, it can ... MH, Nierenberg AA, Howland R, et al. The treatment of minor depression with St. John's wort or citalopram: Failure to ...

  2. HILLSBOROUGH ST FOUNDERS DR

    E-print Network

    Liu, Paul

    HILLSBOROUGH ST CATES AVE CLARK AVE DANALLENDR DUNN AVE FOUNDERS DR HORNE ST YARBROUGH DR Holladay Steam Plant Witherspoon Alexander Turlington Bowen Kamphoefner Gold Metcalf Winslow Welch West Dunn Hillsborough Bldg Carter Williams First Year College Bio Res Facility Lang & Comp Lab Bureau

  3. SPACE/TIME ANALYSIS OF FECAL POLLUTION AND RAINFALL IN AN EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA ESTUARY

    PubMed Central

    Coulliette, Angela D.; Money, Eric S.; Serre, Marc L.; Noble, Rachel T.

    2009-01-01

    The Newport River Estuary (NPRE) is a high priority shellfish harvesting area in eastern North Carolina (NC) that is impaired due to fecal contamination, specifically exceeding recommended levels for fecal coliforms. A hydrologic-driven mean trend model was developed, as a function of antecedent rainfall, in the NPRE to predict levels of E. coli (EC, measured as a proxy for fecal coliforms). This mean trend model was integrated in a Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) framework to produce informative Space/Time (S/T) maps depicting fecal contamination across the NPRE during winter and summer months. These maps showed that during dry winter months, corresponding to the oyster harvesting season in NC (October 1st to March 30th), predicted EC concentrations were below the shellfish harvesting standard (14 MPN per 100 ml). However, after substantial rainfall 3.81 cm (1.5 inches), the NPRE did not appear to meet this requirement. Warmer months resulted in the predicted EC concentrations exceeding the threshold for the NPRE. Predicted ENT concentrations were generally below the recreational water quality threshold (104 MPN per 100 ml), except for warmer months after substantial rainfall. Once established, this combined approach produces near real-time visual information on which to base water quality management decisions. PMID:19544880

  4. Ernest Orlando Lawrence (1901-1958), Cyclotron and Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, William T.

    2005-09-01

    On August 8, 2001, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory celebrated the centennial of the birth of its founder (and namesake), Ernest Orlando Lawrence. For the occasion, many speeches were given and old speeches were remembered. We recall the words of the late Luis Alvarez, a Nobel Laureate and one of the Lawrence's closest colleagues: ''Lawrence will always be remembered as the inventor of the cyclotron, but more importantly, he should be remembered as the inventor of the modern way of doing science''. J. L. Heilbron and R. W. Seidel, in the introduction of their book, ''Lawrence and His Laboratory'' stated, ''The motives and mechanisms that shaped the growth of the Laboratory helped to force deep changes in the scientific estate and in the wider society. In the entrepreneurship of its founder, Ernest Orlando Lawrence, these motives, mechanisms, and changes came together in a tight focus. He mobilized great and small philanthropists, state and local governments, corporations, and plutocrats, volunteers and virtuosos. The work they supported, from astrophysics and atomic bombs, from radiochemistry to nuclear medicine, shaped the way we observe, control, and manipulate our environment.'' Indeed, all over the civilized world, the ways we do science changed forever after Lawrence built his famed Radiation Laboratory. In this editorial, we epitomize his legacy of changing the way we do medicine, thereby affecting the health and well being of all humanity. This year marks the 75th anniversary of the invention of the cyclotron by Ernest Orlando Lawrence at the University of California at Berkeley. Lawrence conceived the idea of the cyclotron early in 1929 after reading an article by Rolf Wideroe on high-energy accelerators. In the spring of 1930 one of his students, Nels Edlefsen, constructed two crude models of a cyclotron. Later in the fall of the same year, another student, M. Stanley Livingston, constructed a 13-cm diameter model that had all the features of early cyclotrons, accelerating protons to 80,000 volts using less than 1,000 volts on a semi-circular accelerating electrode, now called the ''dee''. Following the discovery by J. D. Cockcroft and E. T. S. Walton of how to produce larger currents at higher voltages, Lawrence constructed the first two-dee 27-Inch (69-cm) Cyclotron, which produced protons and deuterons of 4.8 MeV. The 27-Inch Cyclotron was used extensively in early investigations of nuclear reactions involving neutrons and artificial radioactivity. In 1939, working with William Brobeck, Lawrence constructed the 60-Inch (150-cm) Cyclotron, which accelerated deuterons to 19 MeV. It was housed in the Crocker Laboratory, where scientists first made transmutations of some elements, discovered several transuranic elements, and created hundreds of radioisotopes of known elements. At the Crocker Laboratory the new medical modality called nuclear medicine was born, which used radioisotopes for diagnosis and treatment of human diseases. In 1939 Lawrence was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics, and later element 103 was named ''Lawrencium'' in his honor.

  5. Punchbowl St Ala Moana Blvd

    E-print Network

    St Dole St South St 2- Way Cycle Track Bike Lane Bike Path Bike Route Downtown Chinatown Government for people exiting parked cars. Watch for crossing vehicle tra c at intersections, even if you have the right

  6. Obituary: Fred Lawrence Whipple, 1906-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeomans, Donald Keith

    2004-12-01

    Fred Whipple, one of the founding fathers of planetary science, died on August 30, 2004 just two months shy of his 98th birthday. The breadth of Fred's published research from 1927 through 2000 is quite extraordinary. Although his collected works were published in two massive volumes in 1972, shortly before his retirement, Fred's research contributions continued for another three decades - and another volume is planned. Fred Lawrence Whipple was born on November 5, 1906 on a farm in Red Oak Iowa. His parents were Harry Lawrence and Celestia (MacFarl) Whipple. At the age of fifteen, the Whipple family moved to California where Fred studied mathematics at Occidental College and the University of California at Los Angeles. As a graduate student at the University of California at Berkeley in 1930, he was one of the first to compute an orbit for the newly discovered planet Pluto. Upon receiving his PhD in 1931, he joined the staff of the Harvard College Observatory. He was Chairman of the Harvard Department of Astronomy (1949 - 1956), Director or the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (1955 - 1973), Phillips Professor of Astronomy (1968 - 1977) and Emeritus Phillips Professor of astronomy (1977 - 2004). In 1928 he married Dorothy Woods and their son, Earle Raymond, survives him. The marriage ended in divorce in 1935. Eleven years later, he married Babette F. Samelson and she too survives him, as do their two daughters Laura and (Dorothy) Sandra. Shortly after arriving at Harvard in the early 1930's, Fred developed a photographic tracking network to determine meteor trajectories from simultaneous observations from two or more stations. The photographic trails, chopped by a rotating shutter, allowed their orbits in space to be determined accurately. With the strong involvement of Richard McCrosky and others, he concluded in the early 1960's that most of these meteors were on comet-like orbits and less than 1% of the naked eye, sporadic meteors could be traced to an origin outside the solar system. To fill the daytime gap when meteors could not be photographed, Fred organized a program for the radio detection of these objects. With the launch of Sputnik in October 1957, Whipple's visual network of amateur astronomers (Moon watch) was already in place to follow its progress and later on he developed an optical tracking system for meteors and artificial satellites using wide field, Baker-Nunn cameras. This latter system proved so successful that the precision tracking of these satellites could be used to model the Earth's shape and density variations from the observed gravitational effects upon these satellite orbits. He once noted that the highlight of his career was having his family and parents present at the White House while he received the President's Award for Distinguished Public Service from John F. Kennedy for this work. His seminal works in 1950-51 on the icy conglomerate model for the cometary nucleus prompted a complete paradigm switch. Until then, the current consensus model for a comet was a flying cloud of particles; it had been so since the second half of the nineteenth century when comets were identified with meteor showers. He envisaged the cometary nucleus as a conglomerate of ices (mostly water, ammonia, methane, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide ices) embedded within, and covered over with, a nonvolatile matrix of meteoric material. Part of his rationale for developing this "dirty snowball" model for the cometary nucleus was to provide an explanation of the so-called nongravitational forces acting upon comets. The rocket-like thrusting of a comet when the ices vaporize near the sun introduced a small, but noticeable, thrust on the comet itself and when this effect was properly modeled, the motions of active comets could be predicted far more accurately. Subsequent spacecraft ultraviolet observations showing enormous cometary hydrogen atmospheres confirmed that the major cometary ice was likely to be water. The 1986 Giotto spacecraft images, revealing a solid cometary nucleus (albeit far blacker

  7. 78 FR 14985 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Russian River Estuary Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ...using heavy equipment for the duration...the lagoon management period. Monitoring...to estuary management activities...training includes equipment operators...to estuary management activities...use of heavy equipment and...

  8. 77 FR 15722 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Russian River Estuary Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ...using heavy equipment for the duration...the lagoon management period. Monitoring...to estuary management activities...training includes equipment operators...to estuary management activities...use of heavy equipment and...

  9. Photo: TH DeWitt, USEPA EPA's benthic habitat data for Yaquina estuary

    E-print Network

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    -Aug Intertidal & subtidal lower & mid estuary SB Marina, OR Oyster docks Macro-infauna (>0.5mm) species & Subtidal Infauna Studies 2004/2005 #12;Burrowing Shrimp Populations in Yaquina R. Estuary (OR) Summer 2002

  10. 33 CFR 165.1190 - Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland Estuary, Alameda, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland Estuary, Alameda, CA. 165.1190 Section 165.1190 Navigation and Navigable...Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland Estuary, Alameda, CA. (a) Location. The following area is a security zone:...

  11. A DATA SYSTEM FOR INTEGRATING DATA FROM LANDSCAPES, STREAMS AND ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuaries are natural integrators of substances and processes that occur internally and externally (watersheds, ocean, atmosphere). Watershed activities that contribute fresh water, nutrients, contaminants, and suspended solids have a strong effect on the health of estuaries. Res...

  12. CLASSIFYING OREGON ESTUARIES BY HABITAT: ANALYSIS OF EXISTING DATA AND A PROPOSAL FOR A PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because many estuarine resources are linked to benthic habitats, classification of estuaries by habitat types may prove a relevant approach for grouping estuaries with similar ecological values and vulnerability to landscape alterations. As a first step, we evaluated whether pub...

  13. Small Town Germans: The Germans of Lawrence, Kansas, from 1854 to 1918

    E-print Network

    Rampelmann, Katja

    1993-01-01

    The thesis, Small town Germans examines the lives of German immigrants in Lawrence, Kansas, from 1854 to World War I. German-born immigrants arrived in Lawrence after the Kansas-Nebraska territory was opened for settlement. ...

  14. E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division

    E-print Network

    #12;#12;E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Address: MS 85B0198 One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720 Contact....................................................................................................37 3.4 CERTIFICATION

  15. Vol. 2004, No. 4 August 1, 2003 Periodical postage paid at Lawrence, KS 66045.

    E-print Network

    campus Barbara Atkinson, Vice Chancellor for Clinical Affairs, Medical Center Randy Attwood, Director. #12;Marilu Goodyear, Vice Provost for Information Services, Lawrence campus Theresa K. Klinkenberg, Chief Business and Financial Planning Officer, Lawrence campus James Long, Vice Provost for Facilities

  16. Hydrodynamic controls on oxygen dynamics in a riverine salt wedge estuary, the Yarra River estuary, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, L. C.; Cook, P. L. M.; Teakle, I.; Hipsey, M. R.

    2014-04-01

    Oxygen depletion in coastal and estuarine waters has been increasing rapidly around the globe over the past several decades, leading to decline in water quality and ecological health. In this study we apply a numerical model to understand how salt wedge dynamics, changes in river flow and temperature together control oxygen depletion in a micro-tidal riverine estuary, the Yarra River estuary, Australia. Coupled physical-biogeochemical models have been previously applied to study how hydrodynamics impact upon seasonal hypoxia; however, their application to relatively shallow, narrow riverine estuaries with highly transient patterns of river inputs and sporadic periods of oxygen depletion has remained challenging, largely due to difficulty in accurately simulating salt wedge dynamics in morphologically complex areas. In this study we overcome this issue through application of a flexible mesh 3-D hydrodynamic-biogeochemical model in order to predict the extent of salt wedge intrusion and consequent patterns of oxygen depletion. The extent of the salt wedge responded quickly to the sporadic riverine flows, with the strength of stratification and vertical density gradients heavily influenced by morphological features corresponding to shallow points in regions of tight curvature ("horseshoe" bends). The spatiotemporal patterns of stratification led to the emergence of two "hot spots" of anoxia, the first downstream of a shallow region of tight curvature and the second downstream of a sill. Whilst these areas corresponded to regions of intense stratification, it was found that antecedent conditions related to the placement of the salt wedge played a major role in the recovery of anoxic regions following episodic high flow events. Furthermore, whilst a threshold salt wedge intrusion was a requirement for oxygen depletion, analysis of the results allowed us to quantify the effect of temperature in determining the overall severity and extent of hypoxia and anoxia. Climate warming scenarios highlighted that oxygen depletion is likely to be exacerbated through changes in flow regimes and warming temperatures; however, the increasing risk of hypoxia and anoxia can be mitigated through management of minimum flow allocations and targeted reductions in organic matter loading. A simple statistical model (R2 > 0.65) is suggested to relate riverine flow and temperature to the extent of estuary-wide anoxia.

  17. CAS EE 348E Monitoring and Management of Coastal Wetlands, Lagoons and Estuaries

    E-print Network

    Hutyra, Lucy R.

    CAS EE 348E Monitoring and Management of Coastal Wetlands, Lagoons and Estuaries Spring 2014-two are located on estuaries, for a total population of about 350 million. Estuaries, lagoons and coastal wetlands provide resources, benefits, and services not just for humans but also for thousands of species of birds

  18. Understanding a Century of Change in an Estuary: Tampa Bay. Florida

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. J. Hearn; K. K. Yates

    2007-01-01

    During the 20th century, Tampa Bay on the west coast of Florida changed from a largely pristine subtropical estuary to a busy waterway with commercial ports and extensive coastal urbanization. The estuary has been physically altered through dredging and construction and its biogeochemical, sedimentary and hydrological balances have been changed. Environmental indicators show that the health of the estuary has

  19. REGIONAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR WATER QUALITY IN THE SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY

    E-print Network

    REGIONAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR WATER QUALITY IN THE SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY Bank by Susan Klosterhaus San Francisco Estuary Institute and the Regional Monitoring Program for Water Canada · Gunnar Lauenstein, NOAA Mussel Watch Program · Paul Salop, Applied Marine Sciences · RMP

  20. Scales of variability in the sediment chlorophyll content of the shallow Palmones River Estuary, Spain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Moreno; F. X. Niell

    2004-01-01

    A study on the spatial distribution of chlorophyll pigments (CP) at different scales in the sediments of the Palmones River Estuary was carried out. Intertidal and subtidal sediments were sampled across a range of spatial scales: centimetres (depth and replicate samples), meters (left and right banks, middle of the estuary) and kilometres (mouth to upper part of the estuary). CP

  1. NOAA's National Ocean Service: Estuaries NOS home NOS education home site index

    E-print Network

    NOAA's National Ocean Service: Estuaries NOS home NOS education home site index Welcome to Estuaries Estuarine habitats are typically found where rivers meet the sea. Mouse over the image to see some of the estuarine areas highlighted in this tutorial. Click on image for more details and a larger image. Estuaries

  2. An Idealized Model and Systematic Process Study of Oxygen Depletion in Highly Turbid Estuaries

    E-print Network

    Talke, Stefan

    An Idealized Model and Systematic Process Study of Oxygen Depletion in Highly Turbid Estuaries S. A The sensitivity of oxygen depletion in turbid estuaries to parameters like freshwater discharge, depth module of dissolved oxygen (DO). Based on the analysis of field data collected in the Ems estuary

  3. Estuaries are more and more called upon to act as repositories for immediate direct point

    E-print Network

    ! " # ! $ ! % & ' $ ( ) * + ,- , * Estuaries are more and more called upon to act as repositories and naturally suited set of tools to investigate and model the transport pathways, mixing and ocean-estuary residence time scales within the estuary? How dependent are exchanges and pathways on the existence

  4. Degree of Fragmentation Affects Fish Assemblage Structure in Andros Island (Bahamas) Estuaries

    E-print Network

    Langerhans, Brian

    Degree of Fragmentation Affects Fish Assemblage Structure in Andros Island (Bahamas) Estuaries-8106 ABSTRACT.--We used underwater visual census (UVC) to characterize fish assemblages among estuaries with different degrees of fragmentation on Andros Island, Bahamas. Estuaries were classified a priori into four

  5. 5612004 Estuarine Research Federation Estuaries Vol. 27, No. 4, p. 561570 August 2004

    E-print Network

    MacCready, Parker

    5612004 Estuarine Research Federation Estuaries Vol. 27, No. 4, p. 561­570 August 2004 Toward-averaged, width-averaged estuarine salinity and circulation in a rectangular estuary. Width and depth may vary-channel distribution of the diffusive fraction of up-estuary salt flux. It is shown that the Hansen and Rattray

  6. 8251999 Estuarine Research Federation Estuaries Vol. 22, No. 4, p. 825836 December 1999

    E-print Network

    Mallin, Michael

    8251999 Estuarine Research Federation Estuaries Vol. 22, No. 4, p. 825­836 December 1999 Alternation of Factors Limiting Phytoplankton Production in the Cape Fear River Estuary MICHAEL A. MALLIN1 Fear River Estuary, a riverine system originating in the North Carolina piedmont. Nutrient addition

  7. AN UNSTRUCTURED FINITE-VOLUME ALGORITHM FOR PREDICTING FLOW IN RIVERS AND ESTUARIES

    E-print Network

    Utah, University of

    AN UNSTRUCTURED FINITE-VOLUME ALGORITHM FOR PREDICTING FLOW IN RIVERS AND ESTUARIES P. A. SLEIGH1 two-dimen- sional river and estuary ¯ows, based on an adaptive triangular tessellation of the ¯ow in the solution of a complete estuary problem. # 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved 1. INTRODUCTION

  8. Determination of water mass ages using radium isotopes as tracers: Implications for phytoplankton dynamics in estuaries

    E-print Network

    dynamics in estuaries Gabrielle Tomasky-Holmes a , Ivan Valiela a , Matthew A. Charette b, a The Ecosystem-enclosed estuaries, phytoplankton blooms in nutrient enriched systems are a common phenomenon. This poses of shallow estuaries, if the water residence times are similar to cell division times? To address

  9. FISH LARVAE OF THE ESTUARIES AND COAST OF CENTRAL MAINE STANLEY B. CHENOWETH'

    E-print Network

    FISH LARVAE OF THE ESTUARIES AND COAST OF CENTRAL MAINE STANLEY B. CHENOWETH' ABSTRACT Seasonal in the winter and early spring. These hatched from demersal eggs and were concentrated in the upper estuaries. There is little information on the species com- position and abundance of larval fishes in the numerous estuaries

  10. Many fish species use estuaries of the southeastern United States as nurser-

    E-print Network

    443 Many fish species use estuaries of the southeastern United States as nurser- ies (e.g. Skud with respect to habitat in different estuaries. Associa- tions between abundance and habitat can assist inflows to estuaries of the southeast United States have been severely altered in the last 150 years

  11. A Simple Model of Nitrogen Concentration, Throughput, and Denitrification in Estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Estuary Nitrogen Model (ENM) is a mass balance model that includes calculation of nitrogen losses within bays and estuaries using system flushing time. The model has been used to demonstrate the dependence of throughput and denitrification of nitrogen in bays and estuaries on...

  12. Dynamics of intertidal flats in the Loire estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervella, Stephane; Sottolichio, Aldo; Bertier, Christine

    2014-05-01

    Tidal flats form at the edges of many tidal estuaries, and are found in broad climatic regions. Their evolution plays a fundamental role in maintaining the morphodynamic equilibrium of an estuary. The Loire estuary is one of the largest macrotidal systems of the french atlantic coast. Since 200 years, its geometry has been drastically modified through channeling, deepening, embanking, infilling of secondary channels, etc. These works altered many intertidal areas. In the recent years, efforts for the rectification of the morphology have been made in order to restore the ecology of the estuary. In this context, it is crucial to better understand the dynamics of intertidal flats, still poorly understood in this estuary. The aim of this work is to analyse a series of original observations conducted for the first time in two intertidal flats of the central Lore estuary between 2008 and 2010. The tidal flats are situated in the northern bank, at 12 and 17 km upstream from the mouth respectively. Six Altus altimeters were deployed at two cross shore transects, measuring continuously and at a high-frequency bed altimetry and water level, providing information on tide and waves. At the semi-diurnal tidal scale, the surficial sediment of intertidal flats is permanently mobilized. Altimetry variations are low, and their amplitude varies as a function of tides and river flow. At the scale of several months, the sedimentation is controlled by the position of the turbidity maximum (and therefore by the river flow) and also by the tidal amplitude. During low river flow periods, altimetry variations are only due to tidal cycles. During decaying tides, suspended sediment settle mainly on the lower part of the tidal flats, forming fluid mud layers of several cm thick, which can consolidate rapidly; under rising tides, the increasing of tidal currents promotes erosion. During periods of high river flow, the turbidity maximum shifts to the lower estuary. The higher suspended sediment concentration increases deposition and erosion rates, especially in the lower parts of the flats, where continuous sedimentary accretion is favoured by the proximity of the channel. During this period, reinforcement of current veolocities limits deposition in the central and high portion of the flats, where erosion is enhanced. The first rivers floods remove fluid mud in the upper estuary, previously deposited during the dry season, which is transported seawards. The transported suspended sediment settles massively in the lower parts of the flats and in the channels. The deposited mud is eroded a few days later. These results provide useful information to better understand the dynamics of the Loire estuary, as well as they give in situ data to be compared with numerical modelling.

  13. St. Patrick's Day Activity

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    MissNguyen

    2012-02-13

    Utah State 4th Grade Social Studies Core Standard 4: Objective 1- Demonstrate cultural understanding, by showing appreciation for the uniqueness of other cultures, identifying the contributions of various cultures in Utah, and demontrating respect for cultural differences. ~In groups of 6-7 students, search the link provided on your specific topic (Kwanzaa, St. Patrick's Day, or Pioneer Day). KWANZAA: http://holidays.kaboose.com/kwanzaa-index.html ST. PATRICKS DAY: http://www.lilesnet.com/St_Patricks/stpaddy.htm PIONEER DAY: http://heritage.uen.org/ ~Each group member is to present a part of their holiday presentation to the class. You will receive ...

  14. E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division

    E-print Network

    #12;E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Operation Office Information Office: U.S. Department of Energy Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is a multi-program national laboratory managed

  15. Developed by: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory with input from industry partners representing data

    E-print Network

    LBNL-53483 Developed by: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory with input from industry partners Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California 1 Cyclotron Road RROOAADDMMAAPP A 10-Year Research Plan For Data Center Buildings #12;DISCLAIMER The Lawrence Berkeley National

  16. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory report LBNL-54198-Journal Numerical Simulation of a Laboratory-Scale Turbulent

    E-print Network

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory report LBNL-54198-Journal Numerical Simulation Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Mail Stop 70-108B 1 Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA* V. E. Beckner* M. J. Lijewski* * Center for Computational Science and Engineering Lawrence Berkeley

  17. Counterpart List for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory ES&H Inspection January February 2009

    E-print Network

    Knowles, David William

    02/27/2009 Counterpart List for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory ES&H Inspection January ­ February 2009 1 LBNL Rev8 HSS Team Member Berkeley Site Office Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory ES&H Inspection January ­ February 2009 LBNL Rev8 3 Management

  18. E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, & Safety Division

    E-print Network

    E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, & Safety Division Environmental Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Address: 1 Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720 Contractor Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 06/09/99 #12;Section I. Facility Information Site

  19. E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division

    E-print Network

    E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division Environmental Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Address: One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720 Contractor Report (Subpart H of 40 CFR 61) Calendar Year 2001 Site Name: Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National

  20. The Estuary Restoration Act is Title I of Public Law 106-457, The Estuaries and Clean Waters Act of 2000. It has been amended by Section 5017 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2007,

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    The Estuary Restoration Act is Title I of Public Law 106-457, The Estuaries and Clean Waters Act 110-114. Only the Estuary Restoration Act, as amended, is presented on this page. An Act To encourage the restoration of estuary habitat through more efficient project financing and enhanced coordination of Federal

  1. From Berkeley Lab to the Marketplace Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Eisen, Michael

    From Berkeley Lab to the Marketplace Smart Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Technology technologies from the Lab to the marketplace to benefit society and the U. S. economy. We accomplish, and promotional mailings sent to both corporate executives and the media. What if I am interested in an area

  2. RESPONSE TO LAWRENCE SUMMERS' REMARKS ON WOMEN IN SCIENCE

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    reputable scholars who have devoted years of research to the question of women's achievements in scienceRESPONSE TO LAWRENCE SUMMERS' REMARKS ON WOMEN IN SCIENCE (Updated to reflect release of transcript of Summers' remarks) At a recent private, invitation-only conference on women and minorities in science

  3. DASLL: design automation system at Lawrence Livermore. User's reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Magnuson, W.G. Jr.; Willett, G.W.

    1980-04-01

    This manual shows how to use the DASLL system to lay out printed circuit boards using the OCTOPUS CDC 7600 computer system and other equipment at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. This information will also be found very useful for those converting or analyzing the DASLL system.

  4. LAWRENCE AVENUE UNDERFLOW SEWER SYSTEM. INTERIM REPORT: PLANNING AND CONSTRUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new and bold concept in design of urban drainage systems was developed as a step forward in the solution of combined sewer overflow problems. A deep tunnel in bed rock about 200 to 250 feet (61 to 76 m) below the surface was designed and constructed for the Lawrence Avenue drai...

  5. Image Deblurring and Denoising using Color Priors C. Lawrence Zitnick

    E-print Network

    Jaffe, Jules

    Image Deblurring and Denoising using Color Priors Neel Joshi C. Lawrence Zitnick Richard Szeliski David J. Kriegman Microsoft Research University of California, San Diego Abstract Image blur and noise are difficult to avoid in many situ- ations and can often ruin a photograph. We present a novel image

  6. An Overview of CCD Development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steve Holland

    2004-01-01

    Fully depleted, back-illuminated charge-coupled devices fabricated at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on high-resistivity\\u000a silicon are described. Device operation and technology are discussed, as well as the results on telescopes and future plans.

  7. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1997 Site Environmental Report Vol. I

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thorson

    1998-01-01

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy Order 231.1. The Site Environmental Report for 1997 is intended to summarize Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and require- ments, characterize environmental management efforts through surveillance and moni- toring activities, and highlight significant programs

  8. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1997 Site Environmental Report Vol. II

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thorson

    1998-01-01

    Volume II of the Site Environmental Report for 1997 is published by Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as a supplemental appendix to the report printed in volume I. Volume II contains the environmental monitoring and sampling data used to generate summary results in the main report for routine and nonroutine activities at the Laboratory (except for groundwater sampling data).

  9. An Overview of CCD Development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steve Holland

    2002-01-01

    Fully depleted, back-illuminated charge-coupled devices fabricated at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on high-resistivity\\u000a silicon are described. Device operation and technology are discussed, as well as the results on telescopes and future plans.

  10. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1995 site environmental report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Balgobin; I. Javandel; G. Lackner; C. Smith; P. Thorson; H. Tran

    1996-01-01

    The 1995 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the 1995 calendar year. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the environmental management programs. The report also discusses significant highlights and plans of these programs. Topics discussed include: environmental monitoring,

  11. GTO a Dataflow Graph to Occam Compiler Lawrence A. Coon

    E-print Network

    Zanibbi, Richard

    at the Rochester Institute of Technology to introduce basic concepts of parallel programming. RefreshmentsGTO ­­ a Dataflow Graph to Occam Compiler Lawrence A. Coon Department of Computer Science, RIT and Edith A. Lawson Department of Information Technology, RIT One approach to parallel programming is to use

  12. Thermochemical hydrogen production research at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. G. Hickman; O. H. Krikorian; W. J. Ramsey

    1975-01-01

    Three novel closed-cycle processes for the thermochemical production of hydrogen from water are under study at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The first cycle is based upon selenium and its compounds, the second on mercury, and the third on methane and methanol. None of these cycles involves halogens, and reaction temperatures are limited to 700 C. Although still in the conceptual

  13. Thermochemical hydrogen production research at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. G. Hickman; O. H. Krikorian; W. J. Ramsey

    1974-01-01

    From hydrogen economy Miami energy conference; Miami Beach, Florida, USA ; (18 Mar 1974). Three novel closed-cycle processes for the thermochemical ; production of hydrogen from water are under study at the Lawrence Livermore ; Laboratory. The first cycle is based upon selenium and its compounds, the second ; on mercury, and the third on methane and methanol. None of

  14. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Schleimer, G.E. (ed.)

    1987-04-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1986 are presented and general trends are discussed. Topics include radiation monitoring, wastewater discharge monitoring, dose distribution estimates, and ground water monitoring. 9 refs., 8 figs., 20 tabs.

  15. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. 1979 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, W.J.; Lindeken, C.L.; White, J.H.; Buddemeir, R.W.

    1980-04-25

    Information on monitoring activities is reported in two sections for EDB/ERA/INIS. The first section covers all information reported except Appendix D, which gives details of sampling and analytical procedures for environmental monitoring used at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. A separate abstract was prepared for Appendix D. (JGB)

  16. Waste management study: Process development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of the present Toxic Waste Control Operations at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, evaluates the technologies most applicable to the treatment of toxic and hazardous wastes and presents conceptual designs of processes for the installation of a new decontamination and waste treatment facility (DWTF) for future treatment of these wastes.

  17. Jacob Lawrence's The Migration Series: Art as Narrative History

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James D. Laney

    2007-01-01

    Because art is a reflection of cultural heritage, a natural affinity exists between art and social studies. In Jacob Lawrence's The Migration Series, art serves as narrative history, with visual images telling the story of the Great Migration, a movement of African American people from the South to the North around World War I. Social studies and the arts can

  18. Jacob Lawrence's "The Migration Series": Art as Narrative History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laney, James D.

    2007-01-01

    Because art is a reflection of cultural heritage, a natural affinity exists between art and social studies. In Jacob Lawrence's "The Migration Series," art serves as narrative history, with visual images telling the story of the Great Migration, a movement of African American people from the South to the North around World War I. Social studies…

  19. Emergency response to an anthrax attack Lawrence M. Wein*

    E-print Network

    Li, Fei-Fei

    Emergency response to an anthrax attack Lawrence M. Wein* , David L. Craft , and Edward H. Kaplan, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, and approved January 28, 2003 (received for review November 11, 2002 of an airborne anthrax attack. The system consists of an atmospheric dispersion model, an age- dependent dose

  20. Using Neural Networks to Forecast Stock Market Prices Ramon Lawrence

    E-print Network

    Lawrence, Ramon

    Using Neural Networks to Forecast Stock Market Prices Ramon Lawrence Department of Computer Science on the application of neural networks in forecasting stock market prices. With their ability to discover patterns in nonlinear and chaotic systems, neural networks offer the ability to predict market directions more

  1. Building Footprints (Shapefile) of University of Kansas, Lawrence Campus

    E-print Network

    Houser, Rhonda

    2011-02-18

    Data layer geneated with Intention to have basic building dataset for data analysis and generation of maps, for Lawrence Campus of the University of Kansas. Building outlines were digitized using ArcMap in ca. 2007 from aerial photograph to create...

  2. Fast Facts Year Founded 1847 (as the Lawrence Scientific School)

    E-print Network

    Overview 2011­2012 #12;Fast Facts Year Founded 1847 (as the Lawrence Scientific School) Dean Cherry Sciences Cherry A. Murray Area Dean for Applied Mathematics Tim Kaxiras Area Dean for Applied Physics Eric Mazur Area Dean for Bioengineering Cherry A. Murray Area Dean for Computer Science Michael Mitzenmacher

  3. PHOTOCOPY OF HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPH, "LAWRENCE LEVERING BECKEL (BRIDGE BUILT BY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PHOTOCOPY OF HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPH, "LAWRENCE LEVERING BECKEL (BRIDGE BUILT BY HIM AND HIS FATHER, CHAS. N. BECKEL AT EASTON)," original ca. 1885, photographer unknown. Collection of Historic Bethlehem Inc., Bethlehem, PA, Negative Nos. 3550 or 4504. - Walnut Street Bridge, Formerly spanning Saucon Creek, Hellertown, Northampton County, PA

  4. Numerical modeling of circulation in high-energy estuaries: A Columbia River estuary benchmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kärnä, Tuomas; Baptista, António M.; Lopez, Jesse E.; Turner, Paul J.; McNeil, Craig; Sanford, Thomas B.

    2015-04-01

    Numerical modeling of three-dimensional estuarine circulation is often challenging due to complex flow features and strong density gradients. In this paper the skill of a specific model is assessed against a high-resolution data set, obtained in a river-dominated mesotidal estuary with autonomous underwater vehicles and a shipborne winched profiler. The measurements provide a detailed view of the salt wedge dynamics of the Columbia River estuary. Model skill is examined under contrasting forcing conditions, covering spring freshet and autumn low flow conditions, as well as spring and neap tides. The data set provides a rigorous benchmark for numerical circulation models. This benchmark is used herein to evaluate an unstructured grid circulation model, based on linear finite element and finite volume formulations. Advection of momentum is treated with an Eulerian-Lagrangian scheme. After the model's sensitivity to grid resolution and time step is examined, a detailed skill assessment is provided for the best model configuration. The simulations reproduce the timing and tidal asymmetry of salinity intrusion. Sharp density gradients, however, tend to be smoothed out affecting vertical mixing and gravitational circulation. We show that gravitational salt transport is underestimated in the model, but is partially compensated through tidal effects. The discrepancy becomes most pronounced when the stratification is strongest, i.e., under high river discharge and neap tide conditions.

  5. Dissolved Humic Matter in Arctic Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitzy, A.; Koehler, H.; Ertl, S.

    2002-12-01

    As part of the German-Russian bilateral SIRRO(Siberian River Runoff)-project we studied the distribution of dissolved humic matter isolated by XAD-8 in the estuarine waters of the Ob and Yenisei rivers. The relative contributions of humic matter carbon to total DOC decreased from 61-77 percent in the river freshwater endmember to 35-40 percent in the marine waters of the open Kara Sea at salinities 33 psu. Humic carbon mixed conservatively in the Yenisei and non-conservatively in the Ob, where partial removal was indicated in the low salinity range. Changes in the relative contribution of humic matter to different molecular weight classes of DOM (ultrafiltration cutoffs 150 KDa, 450 KDa, 800 KDa) were studied along the salinity gradient in the Yenisei. High molecular weight DOM is relatively enriched in humics in fresh-water compared to sea-water HMW-DOM. Low molecular weight DOM is realtively enriched in humics in sea-water compared to fresh-water LMW-DOM. Throughout the estuary humic matter is depleted in 13C and nitrogen compared to total DOM, reflecting a dominant soil source. We estimate an annual input of 5 Tg humic matter carbon by the two rivers into the Kara Sea.

  6. St. Vrain Creek

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    St. Vrain Creek below Boulder Creek at Hwy 119 near Longmont, CO; Bob Brandle, Cory Stephens, Matt Nicotra, and Kevin Scofield measure discharge and install temporary streamgage replacing nearby damaged streamgage....

  7. CAMPUSDRIVEWEST SANTA TERESA ST

    E-print Network

    GALVEZST SERRA MALL CAM PU CAMPUSDRIVEWEST VIAORTEGA SANTA TERESA ST W ELCH SAND HILLRD SANDHILLRD Cen Safeway Munger Y2E2 Montag Hall Stock Farm lot Parking Structure 5 (PS5) EH&S Oak Creek Apartments

  8. St. Paul's Cathedral

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Perhaps one of the finest neo-Classical cathedrals in the world, the current St. Paul's cathedral is an example of the outstanding architecture of Christopher Wren, and a testimony to his dogged persistence and passion for his life's work. In keeping with the attention to detail that is indicative of Mr. Wren's work, the St. Paul's Web site has detailed information on visiting the cathedral, the various musical performances that it hosts, and an interactive timeline detailing the history of St. Paul's that extends back to the year 604. Along with this information, the site also tells visitors about upcoming events at the cathedral, along with an extensive online gift shop that offers a diverse set of St. Paul's related material for purchase.

  9. The frictional nature of tidal propagation in channelized estuaries, with applications to a tidal marsh in Delaware

    E-print Network

    Kirby, James T.

    The frictional nature of tidal propagation in channelized estuaries, with applications to a tidal the variable width of the estuary with rising and falling tides. A field study was conducted on the main of an estuary dominated by tidal variations in channel depth, rather than variations in estuary width

  10. Initial formation and evolution of channel-shoal patterns in estuaries , H.M. Schuttelaars1,2

    E-print Network

    Schuttelaars, Henk

    Initial formation and evolution of channel-shoal patterns in estuaries A. Hibma1* , H to simulate the formation of channels and shoals in a schematised estuary. The model set-up enables: estuaries, morphology, numerical model, shoals, channels, sand bars 1 INTRODUCTION Estuaries attract

  11. Simulating 90 Days of Wind and Tidally Driven Hydrodynamics from the Deep Ocean into the South Atlantic Bight Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacopoulos, P.; Hagen, S. C.

    2010-12-01

    A high-resolution shallow water equations model was used to provide boundary conditions in support of studying sedimentation changes due to navigational channel deepening of the St. Johns River. The model domain included the lower ~150 km of the St. Johns and Nassau Rivers together with the adjacent tidal marsh and the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway. The finite element mesh consisted of element sizes of 50 - 150 m for the local region of interest. Tidal forcing was applied on the open boundary located along the 60° west meridian in the western North Atlantic Ocean. Model parameterization, via spatially variable Manning’s roughness, utilized physically based geospatial data and no calibration (tuning) was performed. Simultaneous with the deep-ocean tidal forcing, we applied state-of-the-art modeled winds over the entire domain, which supplied surface stresses to the shallow water equations model for a 90-day time period, May 1 - July 31, 2009. This time period offered an interesting and challenging record to simulate because of a sea level anomaly that persisted through June and July 2009. There was also a storm event local to the study area that occurred in May 2009. Three offshore gaging stations provided continuous water level and current measurements. Six additional gaging stations provided continuous water level measurements within the St. Johns and Nassau Rivers. A final gaging station measured daily flows in the main navigational channel of the St. Johns River. All data were processed and used to validate the shallow water equations model. The validation results suggest that meteorological forcing plays a major role with respect to streamflow in the St. Johns River. Output from the shallow water equations model was then analyzed. The analysis demonstrates the tendency of daily flows in the St. Johns and Nassau Rivers to be ebb-dominated because of the large hydrological input. The tidal residual is also shown to contribute to the ebb dominance of the St. Johns and Nassau Rivers. However, pulses of flood do occur, which typically last on the order of days. We establish that such events are primarily driven by meteorology, both local and remote. The findings further the existing knowledge of longwave behavior, specifically to the St. Johns and Nassau Rivers and generally in terms of complex estuaries with interconnected channels and tidal marsh. Finally, we show that the shallow water equations model can serve as a basis for a rigorous transport model in the St. John River region.

  12. An analysis of the trophic network of a macrotidal estuary: the Seine Estuary (Eastern Channel, Normandy, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybarczyk, Hervé; Elka??m, Bernard

    2003-12-01

    A steady state, mass balance, trophic network has been constructed to illustrate the flow of energy in the Seine Estuary by using Network Analysis and Ecopath methods. This ecosystem shows 15 compartments from primary producers to the top consumers (fish and birds). This study has been compared with other ecosystems of comparable nature located in North America (Narragansett, Chesapeake, Delaware Bays), Europe (Ems Estuary, Dublin Bay and Bay of Somme), and South Africa (Swartkops Estuary) in which analysis of trophic network has been applied with similar methods. The Seine Estuary shows values of some global parameters and indices either close to large North American bays and a South African estuary characterised by the complexity of their trophic network, or values near European bays and estuaries, or else remain typical of the Seine estuary. All of this reflects specific functioning of the Seine Estuary which can be explained by the analysis of the dominant food web. In the upstream sector an important pelagic food web was found correlated with highest primary production, especially planktonic, which is rapidly consumed by an abundant zooplankton and suprabenthos (Mysidacae and Decapoda Crustacea). This reveals the dominant consumer role of this sector. The external fluvial inputs (277.80 gC m -2 y -1) are transferred to the downstream sector which produces the major export (548.43 gC m -2 y -1), in parallel with the low consumption and efficiency of dominant benthos component from its bentho-pelagic food web. This reflects the dominant exporter role of this sector. In the Seine Estuary low values of detritivory index D/ H (2.52), recycling index FCI (16.1%) and connectance (0.24) were found associated with high values of P/ B ratio (38.2%), sum of exports (548.43 gC m -2 y -1) and the great difference between ratio of ascendency to capacity development A/ C and internal ratio Ai/ Ci. This shows the lack of a dominant resource as in Delaware Bay, that the state of development is different from a mature ecosystem, and the dependance on external connections similar to the Bay of Somme, another ecosystem of Eastern Channel, France.

  13. Impact of the Clean Water Act on the levels of toxic metals in urban estuaries: The Hudson River estuary revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S.A.; Gill, G.A.

    1999-10-15

    To establish the impact of the Clean Water Act on the water quality of urban estuaries, dissolved trace metals and phosphate concentrations were determined in surface waters collected along the Hudson River estuary between 1995 and 1997 and compared with samples collected in the mid-1970s by Klinkhammer and Bender. The median concentrations along the estuary have apparently declined 36--56% for Cu, 55--89% for Cd, 53--85% for Ni, and 53--90% for Zn over a period of 23 years. These reductions appear to reflect improvements in controlling discharges from municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants since the Clean Water Act was enacted in 1972. In contrast, levels of dissolved nutrients (PO{sub 4}) have remained relatively constant during the same period of time, suggesting that wastewater treatment plant improvements in the New York/New Jersey Metropolitan area have not been as effective at reducing nutrient levels within the estuary. While more advanced wastewater treatment could potentially reduce the levels of Ag and PO{sub 4} along the estuary, these improvements would have a more limited effect on the levels of other trace metals.

  14. Methane in surface waters of Oregon estuaries and rivers

    SciTech Connect

    de Angelis, M.A.; Lilley, M.D. (Washington Univ., Seattle (USA))

    1987-05-01

    Methane concentrations in surface waters of Oregon rivers and estuaries were measured over a four-year period. Geographic variations in riverine CH{sub 4} were observed. Results from undisturbed forest streams indicate that rivers can contain high natural levels of CH{sub 4} not attributable to pollution. Lateral diffusion and runoff from saturated forest and fertilized agricultural soils may be important in determining methane levels in rivers. Methane concentrations in well-flushed estuaries appear to be controlled mainly by mixing between high CH{sub 4}-containing river water and low CH{sub 4}-containing seawater endmembers. Rivers and estuaries were found to be sources of methane to the atmosphere. Calculated daily fluxes to the atmosphere ranged from 1.2 to 71 mg CH{sub 4} sq m for rivers and from 0.04 to 21 mg CH{sub 4} sq m for estuarine samples. 24 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. From "Lawrence Kohlberg's Approach to Moral Education" by F. Clark Power, Ann Higgins, and Lawrence Kohlberg, with Judy Codding (1989)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schools: Studies in Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article is an excerpt from "Lawrence Kohlberg's Approach to Moral Education." It refers several times to Kohlberg's "six stages of moral development." Stages 3 and 4 belong to the second level of moral development, which Kohlberg calls "conventional." At stage 3, one becomes aware of conventions as one sees what is right in terms of living up…

  16. Information on Estuaries: National Estuarine Research Reserve System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Created by Congress in 1972, the National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS) is dedicated to fostering a system of estuary reserves that represents the wide range of coastal and estuarine habitats found in the United States and its territories. Currently 425,000 acres in 18 states and Puerto Rico are protected by NERRS. Following the brief introduction to estuaries on the homepage is a link to a clickable map of NERRS Sites in the United States. Each NERRS site maintains a homepage with information on the reserves such as the site description, current research, and educational and resource management projects.

  17. Impacts of pesticides in a Central California estuary.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian; Phillips, Bryn; Hunt, John; Siegler, Katie; Voorhees, Jennifer; Smalling, Kelly; Kuivila, Kathy; Hamilton, Mary; Ranasinghe, J Ananda; Tjeerdema, Ron

    2014-03-01

    Recent and past studies have documented the prevalence of pyrethroid and organophosphate pesticides in urban and agricultural watersheds in California. While toxic concentrations of these pesticides have been found in freshwater systems, there has been little research into their impacts in marine receiving waters. Our study investigated pesticide impacts in the Santa Maria River estuary, which provides critical habitat to numerous aquatic, terrestrial, and avian species on the central California coast. Runoff from irrigated agriculture constitutes a significant portion of Santa Maria River flow during most of the year, and a number of studies have documented pesticide occurrence and biological impacts in this watershed. Our study extended into the Santa Maria watershed coastal zone and measured pesticide concentrations throughout the estuary, including the water column and sediments. Biological effects were measured at the organism and community levels. Results of this study suggest the Santa Maria River estuary is impacted by current-use pesticides. The majority of water samples were highly toxic to invertebrates (Ceriodaphnia dubia and Hyalella azteca), and chemistry evidence suggests toxicity was associated with the organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos, pyrethroid pesticides, or mixtures of both classes of pesticides. A high percentage of sediment samples were also toxic in this estuary, and sediment toxicity occurred when mixtures of chlorpyrifos and pyrethroid pesticides exceeded established toxicity thresholds. Based on a Relative Benthic Index, Santa Maria estuary stations where benthic macroinvertebrate communities were assessed were degraded. Impacts in the Santa Maria River estuary were likely due to the proximity of this system to Orcutt Creek, the tributary which accounts for most of the flow to the lower Santa Maria River. Water and sediment samples from Orcutt Creek were highly toxic to invertebrates due to mixtures of the same pesticides measured in the estuary. This study suggests that the same pyrethroid and organophosphate pesticides that have been shown to cause water and sediment toxicity in urban and agriculture water bodies throughout California, have the potential to affect estuarine habitats. The results establish baseline data in the Santa Maria River estuary to allow evaluation of ecosystem improvement as management initiatives to reduce pesticide runoff are implemented in this watershed. PMID:24464329

  18. The Ob Estuary (Kara Sea) Coastal Dynamics Interannual Variability Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopa-Ovdienko, N.; Volobueva, N.; Ogorodov, S.

    2012-04-01

    There are several promising gas fields in the Ob Estuary. For their development comprehensive research, including coastal dynamics assessment, is required. To estimate current and speak about future coastal dynamics rates we need to investigate its interannual variability connecting it with variability of major coastal dynamics factors. It is known that in this region one of the main coastal dynamics factors is wave action, which, in turn, depends on wind velocity and direction. Wind data for ice-free period were derived from nearby hydro-meteorological stations. The research was conducted for two sections of the Ob Estuary coast. One section is located on the eastern coast of the estuary (Taz peninsula); the other is located on the western one (Yamal peninsula). Each of these sections is 10 km length. For key-sites of the coast wave-dangerous rhumbs were determined. For ice-free period of each year accumulated summer storm duration (ASSD) - number of hours with strong winds (?10 m/s) from wave-dangerous directions - was calculated for both sections of coast. Supposing that coast retreat rate is proportional to number of hours with strong winds from wave-dangerous rhumbs, we can approximately assess interannual variability of coast retreat rate. Our research revealed that: 1)There are significant (from hours to a few hundreds of hours) differences in ASSD from year to year due to short ice-free period and high variability of wind velocity and direction. So, we can expect sharp interannual differences in coastal retreat rate. 2)The duration of strong winds from wave-dangerous rhumbs during ice-free period is more on the eastern coast of the estuary than on the western. This goes from the predominance of northern and northwestern winds during ice-free period. These winds cause waves leading to coastal erosion on the eastern coast of estuary and don't cause such waves on the western one. However, we can't draw conclusions about the comparative rates of coastal erosion on the western and eastern coasts of the estuary, because they are significantly different in morphology and lithology. 3)The specific years with frequent strong winds from wave-dangerous rhumbs during ice-free period on the western and eastern coasts of the Ob Estuary don't concur. That means, that in the same year, we can see accelerated retreat rate on the one coast of the estuary and stabilization on the other.

  19. Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Tortorici, Cathy; Yerxa, Tracey; Leary, J.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-02-05

    The purpose ofthis document is to describe research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program. The intent of this RME effort is to provide data and information to evaluate progress toward meeting program goals and objectives and support decision-making in the Estuary Program. The goal of the Estuary Program is to understand, conserve, and restore the estuary ecosystem to improve the performance of listed salmonid populations. The Estuary Program has five general objectives, designed to fulfill the program goal, as follows. 1. Understand the primary stressors affecting ecosystem controlling factors, such as ocean conditions and invasive species. 2. Conserve and restore factors controlling ecosystem structures and processes, such as hydrodynamics and water quality. 3. Increase the quantity and quality of ecosystem structures, i.e., habitats, juvenile salmonids use during migration through the estuary. 4. Maintain the food web to benefit salmonid performance. 5. Improve salmonid performance in terms of life history diversity, foraging success, growth, and survival. The goal of estuary RME is to provide pertinent and timely research and monitoring information to planners, implementers, and managers of the Estuary Program. In conclusion, the estuary RME effort is designed to meet the research and monitoring needs of the estuary Program using an adaptive management process. Estuary RME's success and usefulness will depend on the actual conduct of adaptive management, as embodied in the objectives, implrementation, data, reporting, and synthesis, evaluation, and decision-making described herein.

  20. The recovery of oyster (Saccostrea glomerata) populations in Sydney estuary (Australia).

    PubMed

    Birch, G F; Scammell, M S; Besley, C H

    2014-01-01

    The current work documented a significant and widespread increase in the abundance of the Sydney rock oyster Saccostrea glomerata, in Sydney estuary (Australia) by undertaking surveys of oyster density in the estuary in 1989 and annually from 1994 to 2006. Oyster density at six control sites located in nearby National Parks unaffected by boating and stormwater discharges were compared to 17 study sites widely distributed within Sydney estuary. No oyster populations were evident in Sydney estuary in 1989; however, by 1994 oysters had colonised areas of the lower and central estuary and by 2002 densities were statistically similar to control sites. The timing of estuary-wide increases in oyster abundance suggests that the partial banning of tributyltin in 1989 for vessels under 25 m long may have played a major role in the increase of S. glomerata in this estuary. PMID:24062067