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1

Acidification of Lower St. Lawrence Estuary Bottom Waters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Accumulation of metabolic CO2 can acidify marine waters above and beyond the ongoing acidification of the ocean by anthropogenic CO2. The impact of respiration on carbonate chemistry and pH is most acute in hypoxic and anoxic basins, where metabolic CO2 accumulates to high concentrations. The bottom waters of the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE), where persistently severe hypoxia has developed

Alfonso Mucci; Michel Starr; Denis Gilbert; Bjorn Sundby

2011-01-01

2

Anguilla rostrata glass eel migration and recruitment in the estuary and Gulf of St Lawrence.  

PubMed

This study describes catches of Anguilla rostrata glass eels and associated oceanographic conditions in the St Lawrence Estuary and Gulf. Ichthyoplankton survey data suggest that they enter the Gulf primarily in May, migrate at the surface at night, and disperse broadly once they have passed Cabot Strait. They arrive in estuaries beginning at about mid-June and through the month of July. Migration extends west up to Québec City, in the freshwater zone of the St Lawrence Estuary, 1000 km west of Cabot Strait. Anguilla rostrata glass eels travel between Cabot Strait and receiving estuaries at a straight-line ground speed of c. 10-15 km day(-1). Catches of fish per unit effort in estuaries in the St Lawrence system are much lower than those reported for the Atlantic coast of Canada. Low abundance of A. rostrata glass eels in the St Lawrence system may be due to cold surface temperatures during the migration period which decrease swimming capacity, long distances from the spawning ground to Cabot Strait and from Cabot Strait to the destination waters (especially the St Lawrence River), complex circulation patterns, and hypoxic conditions in bottom waters of the Laurentian Channel and the St Lawrence Estuary. PMID:20735683

Dutil, J-D; Dumont, P; Cairns, D K; Galbraith, P S; Verreault, G; Castonguay, M; Proulx, S

2009-06-01

3

Cancer in beluga from the St. Lawrence estuary.  

PubMed Central

Martineau et al. (2002) reported that St. Lawrence beluga (SLB) have high cancer rates. Unfortunately, errors in their interpretation of the data have led them to overstate the importance of cancer and its links to environmental sources.

Hammill, Mike O; Lesage, Veronique; Kingsley, Michael C S

2003-01-01

4

Cancer in Wildlife, a Case Study: Beluga from the St. Lawrence Estuary, Québec, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

A population of approximately 650 beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) inhabits a short segment of the St. Lawrence estuary (SLE). Over 17 years (1983-1999), we have examined 129 (or 49%) of 263 SLE beluga carcasses reported stranded. The major primary causes of death were respiratory and gastrointestinal infections with metazoan parasites (22%), cancer (18%), and bacterial, viral, and protozoan infections (17%). We

Daniel Martineau; Karin Lemberger; André Dallaire; Philippe Labelle; Thomas P. Lipscomb; Pascal Michel; Igor Mikaelian

2002-01-01

5

Organic matter reactivity indicators in sediments of the St. Lawrence Estuary  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here we report multiple parameters used to describe the diagenetic state of sediments, including total hydrolyzable amino acid (THAA), amino acid enantiomer, chlorin (CI) and amino acid degradation (DI, RI) indices, along a transect between the Upper St. Lawrence Estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada. The study area is characterized by gradients in water oxygen concentration, water depth, organic matter (OM) source, primary productivity, and sedimentation rate. Both CI and DI indicate a decline in OM reactivity, with the transition from a more terrestrial to a more marine-dominated sedimentation regime as one moves from the shallow Upper Estuary (23-95 m) to the hypoxic, mid-depth Lower Estuary and to the deep (>400 m), well-oxygenated Gulf. Whereas the CI more accurately reflected OM reactivity in surface sediments and sediments down to 5 cm, the amino acid-based degradation indices (DI and RI) better described degradation in sediments down to 35 cm. Systematic variations in the amino acid composition along the Laurentian Channel confirmed the increased diagenesis of OM with distance from the Upper St. Lawrence Estuary. The ratio of D/L-stereoisomers of alanine increased along the transect, and the co-variation between DI and the D/L-Ala suggest a close coupling between the extent of diagenesis and the accumulation and selective preservation of bacterially-derived cell wall material in the sediments. The same patterns that we observed along the estuarine transect were present down-core in two sediment cores, confirming the robustness of our reactivity indices. Oxygen exposure time of the sediments appears to strongly determine sediment OM reactivity in the St. Lawrence Estuary. The sediment oxygen regime itself is related to the interplay between water column depth, vertical OM flux, and reactivity of settling OM.

Alkhatib, Mohammad; Schubert, Carsten J.; del Giorgio, Paul A.; Gelinas, Yves; Lehmann, Moritz F.

2012-05-01

6

PCBs and OCPs in male harbour, grey, harp and hooded seals from the Estuary and Gulf of St Lawrence, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Blubber samples from adult male harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) from the St Lawrence Estuary, and from grey (Halichoerus grypus), harp (Phoca groenlandica) and hooded (Cystophora cristata) seals from the Gulf of St Lawrence, were analysed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and organochlorinated pesticides (OCP). All seals were between 5 and 19 years of age, and mean ages were not statistically different

Karen E. Hobbs; Michel Lebeuf; Mike O. Hammill

2002-01-01

7

Trophic interactions in the St. Lawrence Estuary (Canada): Must the blue whale compete for krill?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Inverse methodology was used to construct a mass-balance model of the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE) for the 2008–2010 time period. Our first objective was to make an overall description of community structure, trophic interactions, and the effects of fishing and predation on the vertebrate and invertebrate communities of the ecosystem. A second objective was to identify other important predators of krill, and to assess if these compete with blue whales, listed as endangered under the Canadian Species at Risk Act in 2005 (northwest Atlantic population). The Estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence are summer feeding grounds for blue whales and other marine mammals. Blue whales eat only euphausiids (krill) and require dense concentrations of prey to meet their energy requirements, which makes them particularly vulnerable to changes in prey availability. In the LSLE, many species from secondary producers (hyperiid amphipods, other macrozooplankton) to top predators (fish, birds, and marine mammals) consumed euphausiids. Consequently, krill predators were found at all consumer trophic levels. However, our results showed that only about 35% of the estimated euphausiid production was consumed by all predator species combined. Euphausiid did not seem to be a restricted resource in the LSLE ecosystem, at least during the study period. The blue whale did not appear to have to compete for krill in the LSLE.

Savenkoff, C.; Comtois, S.; Chabot, D.

2013-09-01

8

Hypoxia in the bottom water of the St. Lawrence Estuary: Is this ecosystem on borrowed time?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When the rate of oxygen consumption in water exceeds the rate of supply, the oxygen concentration decreases and may reach levels that threaten the survival of many aquatic organisms. Waters with such low oxygen levels are termed severely hypoxic ([O2] < 62.5 µmol L-1). In 2011, the World Resources Institute identified 479 hypoxic coastal zones around the world, including fjords, estuaries, bays, shelves, as well as enclosed and semi-enclosed seas. These hypoxic environments are mainly found in coastal areas as a result of industrial and agricultural fertilizer discharge (i.e. eutrophication), and they develop during summer when the water column is strongly stratified; but hypoxia may also occur naturally and persist year-round. Historical records reveal that the dissolved oxygen concentration has progressively decreased in the bottom water of the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE) during the last century and reached the severe hypoxic threshold in the 1980s where it has hovered ever since. The development of severe hypoxia in the LSLE has been mostly attributed to a gradual change in the properties (e.g. higher temperature, lower dissolved oxygen concentration) of the bottom water that enters the Laurentian Channel (Gulf of St. Lawrence, Eastern Canada). In addition, evidence of eutrophication has been reported in the LSLE, possibly increasing the oxygen demand in the water column and sediment. Increased respiration rates in the bottom water, in response to warming (from 3.3 to 5°C), has also been proposed to explain the increased depletion of oxygen in the Gulf. Nevertheless, whether hypoxia in the bottom water of the Laurentian Channel results from anthropogenic or natural forcings or both remain unclear. This presentation will examine the processes that govern the spatial distribution of dissolved oxygen in the water column and identify the causes that led to the development of large-scale hypoxia in the bottom waters of the LSLE. A laterally integrated advection-diffusion two-dimensional model was implemented to simulate the spatial distribution of dissolved oxygen and the development of hypoxic conditions in the deep waters of the Laurentian Channel (Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence). Our simulations reveal that the horizontal distribution of dissolved oxygen in the bottom waters of the Laurentian Channel is determined by a combination of physical and biogeochemical processes, whereas its vertical distribution is governed by the deep water circulation. This result strongly suggests that the physics of the system and the source water properties are mostly responsible for the oxygen depletion and its distribution pattern in the deep water column.

Lefort, S.; Gratton, Y.; Mucci, A.; Dadou, I.; Gilbert, D.

2012-04-01

9

Tris (4-chlorophenyl) methane and tris (4-chlorophenyl) methanol in marine mammals from the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Levels of tris (4-chlorophenyl) methanol (TCPM) and its presumed precursor tris (4-chlorophenyl) methane (TCPMe) are reported in marine mammals from the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada. These compounds were measured in blubber samples of seals and whales using ion trap mass spectrometry (MS\\/MS) detection. Detectable concentrations of both TCPM and TCPMe were observed in all of the samples

M Lebeuf; K. E Bernt; S Trottier; M Noël; M. O Hammill; L Measures

2001-01-01

10

Community development following removal of urchins, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis , from the rocky subtidal zone of the St. Lawrence Estuary, Eastern Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, in structuring the rocky subtidal community was examined at Anse aux Basques on the north shore of the St. Lawrence Estuary, Québec. In an experimental area, measuring 20x20 m and extending from 0 to 10 m in depth, we greatly reduced the intensity of urchin grazing by eliminating all urchins larger than 10

John H. Himmelman; André Cardinal; Edwin Bourget

1983-01-01

11

Electrolyte changes of serum and muscle, and related mortalities in maturing Anguilla rostrata migrating down the St. Lawrence Estuary (Canada)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study was made to investigate changes in serum and muscle ion concentrations and related mortalities in maturing Anguilla rostrata migrating down the St. Lawrence Estuary. Mortalities take place in the freshwater portion of the St. Lawrence. Electrolyte concentrations of moribund eels taken in freshwater were compared to those of freshwater and salt water controls. Moribund eels had a much lower serum osmolality (270 mOsm/kg) than the controls (328 and 358 mOsm/kg). This resulted from low sodium (125 mEq/l) and particularly low chloride (69 mEq/l) contents in the moribund eels compared to the freshwater controls (153 and 117 mEq/l) and the salt water controls (179 and 137 mEq/l). There was also a general decrease in muscle ion concentrations in moribund eels though the percentage water was similar to that of the freshwater controls (64.0 and 63.7%). The changes measured between the freshwater controls and the salt water controls in nature are similar to those measured on Anguilla anguilla in laboratory. These results suggest that mortalities are related to failure by some of the maturing eels to maintain their mineral balance in freshwater. Hypothesis is made that maturing eels migrating long distances in freshwater or retarded by physical or chemical barriers, start to excrete sodium and chloride under hormonal control before they have reached brackish water. In the conditions that prevail in the St. Lawrence Estuary, this results in mineral unbalance and possibly in mortalities.

Dutil, J.-D.

1984-03-01

12

Cancer in wildlife, a case study: beluga from the St. Lawrence estuary, Qu?bec, Canada.  

PubMed Central

A population of approximately 650 beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) inhabits a short segment of the St. Lawrence estuary (SLE). Over 17 years (1983-1999), we have examined 129 (or 49%) of 263 SLE beluga carcasses reported stranded. The major primary causes of death were respiratory and gastrointestinal infections with metazoan parasites (22%), cancer (18%), and bacterial, viral, and protozoan infections (17%). We observed cancer in 27% of examined adult animals found dead, a percentage similar to that found in humans. The estimated annual rate (AR) of all cancer types (163/100,000 animals) is much higher than that reported for any other population of cetacean and is similar to that of humans and to that of hospitalized cats and cattle. The AR of cancer of the proximal intestine, a minimum figure of 63 per 100,000 animals, is much higher than that observed in domestic animals and humans, except in sheep in certain parts of the world, where environmental contaminants are believed to be involved in the etiology of this condition. SLE beluga and their environment are contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) produced by the local aluminum smelters. The human population living in proximity of the SLE beluga habitat is affected by rates of cancer higher than those found in people in the rest of Québec and Canada, and some of these cancers have been epidemiologically related to PAHs. Considered with the above observations, the exposure of SLE beluga to PAHs and their contamination by these compounds are consistent with the hypothesis that PAHs are involved in the etiology of cancer in these animals.

Martineau, Daniel; Lemberger, Karin; Dallaire, Andre; Labelle, Philippe; Lipscomb, Thomas P; Michel, Pascal; Mikaelian, Igor

2002-01-01

13

Seasonal variations in dimethylsulfoniopropionate and dimethylsulfide concentrations in relation to the plankton community in the St. Lawrence Estuary  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Weekly variations in total dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSPt) and dimethylsulfide (DMS) were investigated in relation to the phytoplankton assemblage from spring to fall 1994 at a coastal fixed station in the St. Lawrence Estuary. DMSPt and DMS concentrations showed a strong seasonality and were tightly coupled in time. Maximum concentrations of DMSPt and DMS were observed in July and August, during a period of warm water and low nutrient concentrations. Seasonal maxima of 365.4 nmol l-1 for DMSPt and 14.2 nmol l-1 for DMS in early August coincided with the presence of many phytoplankton species, such as Alexandrium tamarense, Dinophysis acuminata, Gymnodinium sp., Heterocapsa rotundata, Protoperidinium ovatum, Scrippsiella trochoidea, Chrysochromulina sp. (6 ?m), Cryptomonas sp. (6 ?m), a group of microflagellates smaller than 5 ?m (mf < 5), many tintinnids, and Mesodinium rubrum. The abundance of mf < 5 followed the general trend of DMS concentrations. The temporal occurrence of high P. ovatum abundance and DMSPt concentrations suggests that this heterotrophic dinoflagellate can either synthesize DMSP or acquire it from DMSP-rich prey. The calculated sea-to-air DMS flux reached a maximum of 8.36 ?mol -2 d-1 on August 1. The estimated annual emission from the St. Lawrence Estuary is 77.2 tons of biogenic sulfur to the atmosphere.

Michaud, Sonia; Levasseur, Maurice; Cantin, Guy

2007-02-01

14

Levels and patterns of PCBs and OC pesticides in harbour and grey seals from the St Lawrence Estuary, Canada.  

PubMed

Blubber samples from harbour (Phoca vitulina) and grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) captured in the St Lawrence Estuary were analysed for PCBs and OC pesticides. Concentrations of sigma PCB, sigma DDT, sigma CHLOR and mirex were higher in harbour than in grey seals, while sigma HCH and HCB were similar in the two species. Age vs. concentration plots showed that sigma PCB, sigma DDT and sigma CHLOR concentrations increased with age in males, but plateaued at sexual maturity in females. Concentrations of sigma HCH decreased and mirex increased with age for post-weaning animals, regardless of gender. HCB did not show age-related trends. PCB congener and OC pesticide patterns varied within harbour seals (based on gender and maturity) and between harbour and grey seals. PCB and OC concentrations in harbour seals were lower than those seen in a sample of significantly older beluga whales. Both species remain in the Estuary year-round. PCB and OC pesticide concentrations were higher in resident harbour seals than in either grey or harp seals that visit the Estuary seasonally. PCB and OC pesticide concentrations in harbour seals from the Estuary were generally higher than in harbour seals from other regions of North America. They were comparable to, or higher than those from the NE Atlantic Ocean and the North Sea, and lower than those from the Wadden and Baltic Seas. PMID:10635597

Bernt, K E; Hammill, M O; Lebeuf, M; Kovacs, K M

1999-12-15

15

Linking a linear pockmark train with a buried Palaeozoic structure: a case study from the St. Lawrence Estuary  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 15-km-long Matane pockmark train belongs to a series of NNE-striking alignments of pockmarks mapped on the seafloor of the St. Lawrence Estuary. It includes 109 pockmarks that show a complete transition from well-defined, relatively deep (up to 8.6 m), crater-like depressions to subtle, partly buried morphological features, suggesting that pockmarks have formed at different periods along the whole alignment and that the location of fluid release has changed through time. On seismic profiles, pockmarks are characterized by vertical seismic chimneys that root in the (fractured?) hinge zone of an open anticline within the autochthonous Palaeozoic rocks of the St. Lawrence Platform. In absence of a geochemical characterization of expelled gas, the relationship between the Matane pockmark train and the anticline in a domain characterized by mature source rocks is the strongest evidence for the genetic link between pockmarks and the release of gas from an active hydrocarbon system or a reservoir located in the Palaeozoic succession.

Pinet, Nicolas; Duchesne, Mathieu; Lavoie, Denis

2010-10-01

16

PCBs and OCPs in male harbour, grey, harp and hooded seals from the Estuary and Gulf of St Lawrence, Canada.  

PubMed

Blubber samples from adult male harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) from the St Lawrence Estuary, and from grey (Halichoerus grypus), harp (Phoca groenlandica) and hooded (Cystophora cristata) seals from the Gulf of St Lawrence, were analysed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and organochlorinated pesticides (OCP). All seals were between 5 and 19 years of age, and mean ages were not statistically different among the seal species. Mean concentrations of sigmaPCB and mirex were significantly higher in harbour seals, while sigmaDDT concentrations were significantly higher in hooded seals than in the other species examined. Harbour and hooded seals had similar concentrations of sigmaCHLOR, which were higher than in grey and harp seals. SigmaHCH concentrations were significantly higher in harp seals than in harbour and hooded seals and they were significantly higher in harbour and grey seals than in hooded seals. Harp and grey seals had similar levels of HCB, which were significantly higher than in either hooded or harbour seals. Patterns of PCB congeners and individual OCPs varied considerably between the four species. In PCA plots harbour, harp and hooded seals were well separated from each other, while grey seals were separated from the other species by a smaller degree. Between species variations may be explained by their dissimilar migratory patterns, habitat use and proximity to sources of industrial and agricultural pollution, their dietary regime (trophic level and individual prey items) as well as possible variations in the seals' abilities to eliminate these compounds. PMID:12398323

Hobbs, Karen E; Lebeuf, Michel; Hammill, Mike O

2002-09-16

17

Tris (4-chlorophenyl) methane and tris (4-chlorophenyl) methanol in marine mammals from the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence.  

PubMed

Levels of tris (4-chlorophenyl) methanol (TCPM) and its presumed precursor tris (4-chlorophenyl) methane (TCPMe) are reported in marine mammals from the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada. These compounds were measured in blubber samples of seals and whales using ion trap mass spectrometry (MS/MS) detection. Detectable concentrations of both TCPM and TCPMe were observed in all of the samples analysed. Concentrations of these compounds varied with species ranging from 1.7 to 153 and from 1.3 to 50.6 ng/g lipid wt. for TCPM and TCPMe, respectively. TCPM was from 1.3 to 10 times more concentrated than TCPMe. The highest levels of both TCPM and TCPMe were observed in adult male beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence Estuary, while adult female beluga whales from the same area showed levels similar to those in the seals examined. Among the four seal species investigated, TCPM and TCPMe levels were the highest in grey (Halichoerus grypus) and hooded (Cystophora cristata) seals, and lowest in harp seals (Phoca groenlandica). Intermediate levels were found in harbour seals (Phoca vitulina); however, their concentrations might be underestimated considering the younger mean age of these animals. Ratios of both 4,4'-DDE/sigma DDT and TCPM/sigma TCP were very similar between animals from the same species. Strong correlations between sigma TCP and sigma DDT were also observed for each species of mammals, most likely indicating that both sigma TCP and sigma DDT are bioaccumulated in marine mammals. The relationships between sigma DDT and sigma TCP also demonstrate that sigma TCP are less bioaccumulated than sigma DDT by the marine mammal species examined. PMID:11202713

Lebeuf, M; Bernt, K E; Trottier, S; Noël, M; Hammill, M O; Measures, L

2001-01-01

18

Chronology of Land Use Change and Industrial Activity in the St. Lawrence Estuary and Saguenay Fjord From the European Settlement to the Present  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geochemical (organic and inorganic carbon contents), isotopic (13C content of organic matter, 210Pb, 14C), micropaleontological (foraminifera, pollen) and sedimentological analysis of several sedimentary sequences (box and piston cores) were used to determine the chronology of land use change and industrial activity in the St. Lawrence Estuary and Saguenay Fjord from the European settlement to the present. In the St. Lawrence Estuary, the chronostratigraphy was derived from 210Pb and AMS 14C measurements, geochemical and isotopic correlations and the relative abundance of the pollen Ambrosia, whereas the Saguenay Fjord chronological framework was derived from chronostratigraphic markers associated with the 1663 (M~7) earthquake, 1971 St-Jean-Vianney landslide and the flood of 1996. In both area, paper mill and industrial activity during the 20th century is reflected by the organic carbon (OC) and 13C content profiles and has resulted in terrestrial OC contents growing almost exponentially until the 1970's, when major changes in industrial practices and the implementation of environmental regulations reduced the amount of industrial OC discharged into the Fjord and St. Lawrence River. This reduction of industrial waste inputs is also depicted in the Saguenay Fjord sediments by the decline in the relative abundance of the benthic foraminifera Spiroplectammina biformis, an opportunistic and tolerant species previously associated with polluted benthic environments. In addition, major changes in grain size are recorded in a core sampled at the head of the Fjord and probably reflect the impact of dam construction on the Saguenay River discharge. Finally, the chronology of deforestation and agricultural development linked to the European settlement in the St. Lawrence Lowlands as well as the industrial development of the second half of the 20th century are highlighted in the St. Lawrence Estuary sediments by the increase in the relative abundance of the pollen Ambrosia and by the two-step increase in sedimentation rates from 0.15 to 0.28 cm/yr and finally to 0.74 cm/yr.

St-Onge, G.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.; de Vernal, A.; Leduc, J.; Mucci, A.

2004-05-01

19

Recent transfer of coastal sediments to the Laurentian Channel, Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (Eastern Canada), through submarine canyon and fan systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multibeam sonar data, acoustic sub-bottom profiles and box cores were used to study the activity of submarine canyons and\\u000a fans near the city of Les Escoumins, on the North Shore of the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (Eastern Canada). The multibeam\\u000a data were used to generate a high-resolution digital terrain model that reveals the presence of a large number of canyons

Hubert Gagné; Patrick Lajeunesse; Guillaume St-Onge; Andrée Bolduc

2009-01-01

20

Distribution and Growth of Young-of-the-Year Striped Bass in the Miramichi River Estuary, Gulf of St. Lawrence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Distribution and growth of young-of-the-year striped bass Morone saxatilis were determined at the northern edge of the species' range in the Miramichi River, Gulf of St. Lawrence, between May and December 1992, from samples obtained from ichthyoplankton, beach seine, trawling, and bycatch surveys. Shortly after yolk absorption, catches declined in offshore plankton surveys, and young-of-the-year appeared in nearshore areas. As

Kimberly A. Robichaud-Leblanc; Simon C. Courtenay; Tillmann J. Benfey

1998-01-01

21

Levels of C{sub 10}-C{sub 13} polychloro-n-alkanes in marine mammals from the Arctic and the St. Lawrence River estuary  

SciTech Connect

Marine mammals from various regions of the Arctic and the St. Lawrence River estuary were examined for the first time for levels of C{sub 10}--C{sub 13} polychloro-n-alkanes (sPCAs). Respective mean total sPCA concentrations in the blubber of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from Saqqaq and Nuussuaq, western Greenland, were 0.23 {+-} 0.02 (n = 2) and 0.164 {+-} 0.06 {micro}g/g (n = 2), similar to that in beluga from the Mackenzie Delta in the western Canadian Arctic 0.21 {+-} 0.08 {micro}g/g (m = 3). sPCAs levels were higher in beluga blubber from the St. Lawrence River (0.37 to 1.4 {micro}g/g). Mean sPCA concentrations in the blubber samples from walruses (Odobenus rosmarus) (Thule, northwest Greenland) and ringed seal (Phoca hispida) (Eureka, southwest Ellesmere Island) were 0.43 {+-} 0.06 (n = 2) and 0.53 {+-} 0.2 {micro}g/g (n = 6), respectively. Relative to commercial sPCA formulations, samples from the Arctic marine mammals showed a predominance of the shorter chain length lower percent chlorinated PCA congeners, the more volatile components of industrial formulations. This observation is consistent with long-range atmospheric transport of sPCAs to this region. The profiles of the belugas from the St. Lawrence River estuary, however, had higher proportions of the less volatile sPCA congeners, implying that contamination to this region is probably from local sources.

Tomy, G.T.; Muir, D.C.G.; Stern, G.A.; Westmore, J.B.

2000-05-01

22

Seasonal, geographical and size-induced variability in mercury content of Mytilus edulis in an estuarine environment: a re-assessment of mercury pollution level in the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seasonal variability of mercury content of Mytilus edulis (L.) was studied at monthly intervals for 18 mo (June 1978–December 1979) in a natural population from a typical estuarine environment (St. Lawrence Estuary). Body-size-induced variability was observed in the same population in spring 1980. The regression coefficients of log-log relationships between mercury content and body size of the mussels varied with

D. Cossa; J.-G. Rondeau

1985-01-01

23

Recent transfer of coastal sediments to the Laurentian Channel, Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (Eastern Canada), through submarine canyon and fan systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Multibeam sonar data, acoustic sub-bottom profiles and box cores were used to study the activity of submarine canyons and fans near the city of Les Escoumins, on the North Shore of the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (Eastern Canada). The multibeam data were used to generate a high-resolution digital terrain model that reveals the presence of a large number of canyons and fans along the northern slopes of the Laurentian Channel. This paper focuses on two of the larger canyons, and their associated submarine fans. The sub-bottom profiles on the fans reveal high-amplitude reflections at the sediment/water interface and near the seafloor surface, indicating the occurrence of layers of coarse material. A turbidite was observed in a box core sampled in one of the fans, confirming the nature of the coarse layer. Geophysical and sedimentological data indicate that the canyons and fans play an important role in transferring coastal sandy sediments to the deeper marine environments by longshore drift-initiated turbidity flows, and thereby contribute to the negative sediment budget along the coast. The morphology of the canyons indicates that they were produced by a combination of erosive turbidity flows and retrogressive failures. The two box cores sampled on the fans reveal a recent (~last 60 years) quasi-exponential increase in sand content near the surface of the cores, possibly reflecting recent deforestation and/or increased coastal erosion.

Gagné, Hubert; Lajeunesse, Patrick; St-Onge, Guillaume; Bolduc, Andrée

2009-06-01

24

Reproductive System Impairment of Mice Fed Diets Containing Beluga Whale Blubber from the St. Lawrence Estuary and Arctic Populations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The toxic potential of naturally relevant mixtures of PCBs and other organohalogens on the reproductive system of C57Bl\\/6 female mice was assessed. Mice were fed diets in which lipids were replaced by blubber of beluga whales from a highly contaminated population of the Saint Lawrence River, and a less contaminated population from the Arctic Ocean. Ratios of blubber from both

Sylvia Ruby; Luz Tavera Mendoza; Michel Fournier; Pauline Brousseau; V. Dégas

2003-01-01

25

Immunosuppression in mice fed on diets containing beluga whale blubber from the St Lawrence Estuary and the Arctic populations  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to assess the immunotoxic potential of naturally relevant mixtures of PCBs and other organohalogens, C57Bl\\/6 mice were fed on diets in which lipids were replaced by blubber of beluga whales from the highly contaminated population of the Saint-Lawrence River, and the less contaminated population from the Arctic. Different ratios of blubber from both sources were mixed in order

M Fournier; V Dégas; T Colborn; F. O Omara; F Denizeau; E. F Potworowski; P Brousseau

2000-01-01

26

Reproductive system impairment of mice fed diets containing beluga whale blubber from the St Lawrence estuary and arctic populations.  

PubMed

The toxic potential of naturally relevant mixtures of PCBs and other organohalogens on the reproductive system of C57Bl/6 female mice was assessed. Mice were fed diets in which lipids were replaced by blubber of beluga whales from a highly contaminated population of the Saint Lawrence River, and a less contaminated population from the Arctic Ocean. Ratios of blubber from both sources were mixed in order to perform a dose-response study. Control mice were fed diets for 90 d in which fat was replaced by corn oil or beef tallow. There were no significant effects of diets on body, liver, spleen or thymus weights. Similarly ovulation occurred in all control and experimental groups. However, Graafian follicles from ovaries of mice fed contaminated diets showed abnormal development of oocytes. Cumulus granulosa cells bind normally to the oocyte prior to ovulation and are essential for sperm penetration and fertilization. These cells were absent in both Graafian follicles and ovulated oocytes in the oviduct of all groups fed contaminated diets. Oviducts of these mice revealed evidence of epithelial degeneration. These results suggest the female mouse reproductive system is sensitive to organohalogens and illustrate the toxic potential of contaminant mixtures as found in the less contaminated Arctic population. PMID:12775517

Ruby, Sylvia; Mendoza, Luz Tavera; Fournier, Michel; Brousseau, Pauline; Dégas, V

2003-06-13

27

Immunosuppression in mice fed on diets containing beluga whale blubber from the St Lawrence estuary and the Arctic populations.  

PubMed

In order to assess the immunotoxic potential of naturally relevant mixtures of PCBs and other organohalogens, C57Bl/6 mice were fed on diets in which lipids were replaced by blubber of beluga whales from the highly contaminated population of the Saint-Lawrence River, and the less contaminated population from the Arctic. Different ratios of blubber from both sources were mixed in order to allow a dose-response study. Mice were fed for a period of 90 days at the end of which their immunological status was monitored. For general parameters such as body weight, weight of the spleen and the thymus no significant effect of diets were observed. The immunological endpoints such as the blastic transformation of splenocytes and the spleen NK cell activity were not significantly affected by any of the diets compared to control diets. While the different cell subpopulations of peripheral blood and thymus were not affected by the diets, a significant decrease was noted in the CD8+ T cell population in the spleen of mice fed with most of the diets containing beluga blubber. Moreover, the ability of splenic cells to elicit humoral response against sheep red blood cells as well as the potential of peritoneal macrophages to perform phagocytosis were suppressed by all diets containing beluga blubbers. In summary, there was no differences between the groups fed with a blubber diet with low and high organochlorine contamination. However, a clear immunosuppression was demonstrated when these groups were compared to the group fed with beef oil. Despite the fact that we cannot exclude a possible contribution of the fatty acid composition of the beluga blubber to the immunosupression, these results suggest the sensitivity of mouse immune system towards organohalogens, and point out the toxic potential of contaminant mixtures as found in the less contaminated Arctic population. PMID:10720746

Fournier, M; Dégas, V; Colborn, T; Omara, F O; Denizeau, F; Potworowski, E F; Brousseau, P

2000-03-15

28

Dissolved mercury behaviour in the Saint Lawrence estuary  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dissolved mercury concentrations have been measured in the waters of the St Lawrence estuary. The typical concentration of the riverine end-member is 12·0±3·0 p M; the oceanic end-member samples exhibit a mean mercury concentration of 2·4 p M. The graphical pattern of the relationship between mercury concentration and salinity shows a departure from a dilution line. We suggest that a removal of mercury from the dissolved phase during the estuarine mixing is responsible for this observation. Based on the results, the actual input of dissolved mercury from the St Lawrence River to the Gulf is evaluated to be approximately 0·52 T a -1.

Cossa, Daniel; Gobeil, Charles; Courau, Philippe

1988-02-01

29

Temporal trends (1987-2002) of persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT) chemicals in beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence Estuary, Canada.  

PubMed

Temporal trends of persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT) chemicals were examined in beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence Estuary (SLE), Canada. Blubber samples of 86 adult belugas were collected from animals stranded on the shore of the SLE between 1987 and 2002 and analyzed for several regulated PBTs, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), p,p'dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites, chlordane (CHL) and related compounds, hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers, hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and Mirex. In addition, time trends of tris(4-chlorophenyl)methane (TCPMe) and tris(4-chlorophenyl)methanol (TCPMOH), two compounds that may origin from DDT formulations, were also examined. Concentrations of most of the PBTs examined had exponentially decreased by at least a factor of two (half-life time (t(1/2))<15 years) in beluga between 1987 and 2002 while no increasing trends were observed for any of the PBTs measured. The decreasing trends of PBT concentrations in SLE beluga may be due to a decline in contamination of its diet following North American and international regulations on the use and production of these compounds or by a change in its diet itself or by a combination of both. Some PBTs did not exhibit any significant trends in beluga possibly because the most intense elimination phase subsequent to legislative regulations occurred prior to the 1987-2002 time period. Other chemicals, such gamma-HCH, did not significantly decrease likely because they are still currently used in some restricted applications. Conversely, alpha-HCH showed a significant decreasing trend indicating that SigmaHCHs is not representative of all HCHs. Both TCPMe and TCPMOH exhibited no trends in beluga during the time period examined. The metabolic capacity of SLE beluga has apparently accelerated the depletion of at least one PBT, namely CB-28/31. A significant relationship between the half-life of PBTs in beluga and log Kow was observed for most of the chemicals examined. Several factors are expected to have influenced the temporal changes of PBT concentrations in beluga which limit the usefulness of this species as a bioindicator of changes in PBT contamination in the SLE ecosystem. PMID:17560630

Lebeuf, Michel; Noël, Michelle; Trottier, Steve; Measures, Lena

2007-06-08

30

Cooling in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and estuary region at 9.7 to 7.2 14C ka (11.2–8.0 cal ka): Palynological response to the PBO and 8.2 cal ka cold events, Laurentide Ice Sheet air-mass circulation and enhanced freshwater runoff  

Microsoft Academic Search

An examination of post-Younger Dryas (YD) pollen stratigraphies in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and St. Lawrence estuary region reveals features in the pollen records that represent breaks in the normal vegetation succession, widespread vegetation suppression, and a delay in migration of plant taxa between 9.7 and 7.2 14C ka (11.2 and 8.0 cal ka). The domination of Alnus crispa at

Thane W. Anderson; Elisabeth Levac; C. F. Michael Lewis

2007-01-01

31

Invasion of the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence by the clubbed tunicate ( Styela clava Herdman): Potential mechanisms for invasions of Prince Edward Island estuaries  

Microsoft Academic Search

All but one of the nine non-native marine species that established populations in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence (sGSL) in the past decade initially invaded the sGSL via coastal and estuarine waters of Prince Edward Island (PEI). Almost half of these species are tunicates, and all but one still occur only in PEI. Recent introductions include Styela clava Herdman

Andrea Locke; J. Mark Hanson; Karla M. Ellis; Jason Thompson; Rémy Rochette

2007-01-01

32

Upper St. Lawrence River Hydraulic Transient Model.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A hydraulic transient model of the upper St. Lawrence River, is designed to simulate river profiles and flows on the St. Lawrence River from Lake Ontario to the Moses-Saunders powerhouse near Massena, NY. It is capable of simulation on varying time increm...

A. J. Potok

1978-01-01

33

Evaluation of the Contamination of Marine Algae (Seaweed) from the St. Lawrence River and Likely to Be Consumed by Humans  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of the study was to assess the contamination of marine algae (seaweeds) growing in the St. Lawrence River estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence and to evaluate the risks to human health from the consumption of these algae. Algae were collected by hand at low tide. A total of 10 sites on the north and south shores of

Denise Phaneuf; Isabelle Côté; Pierre Dumas; Liliane A. Ferron; Alain LeBlanc

1999-01-01

34

Assessment of Salinity-Related Mortality of Freshwater Bacteria in the Saint Lawrence Estuary  

Microsoft Academic Search

ThegrowthresponseoffreshwaterbacteriafromtheSt.LawrenceRiver,exposedtobrackishwaters(salinity of 0 to 20‰) from the upper estuary, was assessed by a methodology requiring the combined use of dilution cultures and diffusion chambers. The longitudinal distribution of bacterial abundance in waters within this salinityrangewasalsoexamined.Growthofthefreshwaterbacteriawasreducedby15and50%afterexposure tosalinitiesof10and20‰,respectively.Atlowersalinities,nogrowthreductionwasobserved,andatasalinity of 2‰, growth was even stimulated. Longitudinal distribution data showed that bacterial abundance also peaked at this salinity. In contrast with an earlier hypothesis,

JEAN PAINCHAUD; JEAN-CLAUDE THERRIAULT; ANDLOUIS LEGENDRE

1995-01-01

35

Sivuqam Ungipaghaatangi (St. Lawrence Island Legends).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Transmitted orally for generations until the Eskimo language became a written one, the eleven St. Lawrence Island legends compiled in this volume for high school students tell of feats that were accomplished through supernatural power. Meant for both entertainment and instruction, the tales convey wise council indirectly through the conversations…

Slwooko, Grace

36

Modeling of dissolved oxygen levels in the bottom waters of the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary: Coupling of benthic and pelagic processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent measurements of dissolved oxygen (DO) along the Laurentian Channel in Eastern Canada revealed the presence of hypoxic waters in the bottom 50 m of the water column. At hypoxic oxygen levels, many fish species cannot survive or reproduce, and the microbial life community undergoes significant modifications. The cumulative effect of a substantial sediment oxygen demand along the Lower St.

Philippe Benoit; Yves Gratton; Alfonso Mucci

2006-01-01

37

Contamination and Biomarkers in the Great Blue Heron, an Indicator of the State of the St. Lawrence River  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1996–1997, nine breeding colonies of the great blue heron on the St. Lawrence River and its estuary (Québec, Canada) were\\u000a investigated in the framework of a biomonitoring program. Fledglings from colonies in freshwater were more contaminated with\\u000a mercury, PCBs and many organic contaminants than those from estuarine colonies. The level of contamination in the St. Lawrence\\u000a River is generally below the

Louise Champoux; Jean Rodrigue; Suzanne Trudeau; Monique H. Boily; Philip A. Spear; Alice Hontela

2006-01-01

38

Toxic compounds and health and reproductive effects in St. Lawrence Beluga Whales  

SciTech Connect

An epidemiologic study was carried out over a period of 9 years on an isolated population of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) residing in the St. Lawrence estuary (Quebec, Canada). More than 100 individual deaths were aged, and/or autopsied and analyzed for toxic compounds, and the population was surveyed for size and structure. Arctic belugas and other species of whales and seals from the St. Lawrence were used for comparison. Population dynamics: Population size appeared to be stable and modeling showed this stable pattern to result from low calf production and/or low survival to adulthood. Toxicology: St. Lawrence belugas had higher or much higher levels of mercury, lead, PCBs, DDT, Mirex, benzo[a]pyrene metabolites, equivalent levels of dioxins, furans, and PAH metabolites, and much lower levels of cadmium than Arctic belugas. In other St. Lawrence cetaceans, levels of PCBs and DDT were inversely related to body size, as resulting from differences in metabolic rate, diet, and trophic position, compounded by length of residence in the St. Lawrence basin. St. Lawrence belugas had much higher levels than predicted from body size alone; levels increased with age in both sexes, although unloading by females through the placenta and/or lactation was evidenced by overall lower levels in females and very high burdens in some calves. 45 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Beland, P.; Michaud, R. (St. Lawrence National Inst. of Ecotoxicology, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)); DeGuise, S. (St. Lawrence National Inst. of Ecotoxicology, Montreal, Quebec (Canada) Faculte de Medecine Veterinaire, St-Hyacinthe, Quebec (Canada)); Girard, C.; Lagace, A. (Faculte de Medecine Veterinaire, St-Hyacinthe, Quebec (Canada)); Martineau, D. (St. Lawrence National Inst. of Ecotoxicology, Montreal, Quebec (Canada) Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)); Muir, D.C.G. (Freshwater Inst., Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)); Norstorm, R.J. (National Wildlife Research Center, Hull, Quebec (Canada)); Pelletier, E. (INRS-Oceanologie, Rimouski, Quebec (Canada)); Ray, S. (Fisheries and Oceans Canada, St. John's, Newfoundland (Canada)) (and others)

1993-01-01

39

New York Landscape Regions in Google Earth: St. Lawrence Lowlands  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The St. Lawrence Lowlands tour is part of the New York Landscape Regions Collection of Google Earth Tours. This tour allows students to explore the Thousand Islands, formed of granite which has withstood the erosive energy of the St. Lawrence River, creating thousands of islands ranging in size from single rocks to over 25 square miles. There is also an activity in which students map some of the many shipwrecks that have accumulated at the entrance to the St. Lawrence Seaway.

40

An empirical approach to the remote sensing of the chlorophyll in the optically complex waters of the Estuary and Gulf of Saint-Lawrence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data from five research cruises performed between 1997 and 2001 were processed in order to investigate the potential for improving remote sensing algorithms in the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence. Measured in situ parameters included concentration-dependent indicators of the three critical, optically-active constituents, chlorophyll, Coloured Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) and Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM). The radiometric dataset used to

K. Mehmet Yayla

2009-01-01

41

Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Seaway Navigation Season Extension.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Winter Navigation Board, a multiagency organization, has initiated a 'Winter Navigation Program' to study and test the feasibility of means to extend the navigation season for the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway. The ultimate objective is to deter...

1973-01-01

42

Multiproxy Evidence of Late Glacial Laurentide Ice Sheet Meltwater Re-routing From the Gulf of St. Lawrence to Hudson Strait  

Microsoft Academic Search

The IMAGES cores MD99-2220 (48° 38.32'N\\/68° 37.93'W, 320 m) and MD99-2221 (48° 10.60'N\\/69° 30.35'W, 212 m) collected in the lower St. Lawrence Estuary provide a unique record for the reconstruction of large scale (sub-continental) hydrological changes and oceanographic variations because of its location, at the mouth of the St. Lawrence River watershed. An absolute calendar chronology spanning the last ~9400

A. de Vernal; C. Hillaire-Marcel; X. Meng; R. K. Stevenson

2004-01-01

43

Evaluation of the contamination of marine algae (seaweed) from the St. Lawrence River and likely to be consumed by humans  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the study was to assess the contamination of marine algae (seaweeds) growing in the St. Lawrence River estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence and to evaluate the risks to human health from the consumption of these algae. Algae were collected by hand at low tide. A total of 10 sites on the north and south shores of the St. Lawrence as well as in Baie des Chaleurs were sampled. The most frequently collected species of algae were Fucus vesiculosus, Ascophyllum nodosum, Laminaria Longicruris, Palmaria palmata, Ulva lactuca, and Fucus distichus. Alga samples were analyzed for metals iodine, and organochlorines. A risk assessment was performed using risk factors. In general, concentrations in St. Lawrence algae were not very high. Consequently, health risks associated with these compounds in St. Lawrence algae were very low. Iodine concentration, on the other hand, could be of concern with regard to human health. Regular consumption of algae, especially of Laminaria sp., could result in levels of iodine sufficient to cause thyroid problems. For regular consumers, it would be preferable to choose species with low iodine concentrations, such as U. lactuca and P. palmata, in order to prevent potential problems. Furthermore, it would also be important to assess whether preparation for consumption or cooking affects the iodine content of algae. Algae consumption may also have beneficial health effects. Scientific literature has shown that it is a good source of fiber and vitamins, especially vitamin B{sub 12}.

Phaneuf, D.; Cote, I.; Dumas, P.; Ferron, L.A.; LeBlanc, A. [CHUQ, Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada). Centre de Toxicologie du Quebec

1999-02-01

44

A Study of the St. Lawrence River Ecological Habitat  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Save the River, a grassroots advocacy group established in 1978, lobbies for policies to preserve the upper St. Lawrence River and uses the community's help to keep an eye on the existing habitats. Recently, they procured the Fresh Sound Foundation grant

Mesires, Maria

2010-03-01

45

Spending Time and Money: Memories of Life in St. Lawrences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Mabel Cooper and Gloria Ferris spent their early adult life in St. Lawrence's Hospital in Caterham. This was in the late 1950s to early 1970s. This is their memories of how they spent their time. It includes the work they did and leisure. They also write about the tokens that were used in the hospital instead of money.|

Abraham, Jane; Cooper, Mabel; Ferris, Gloria

2010-01-01

46

Basis of Comparison Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A 90-year set of lake levels and flows has been developed that reflects a consistent hydraulic regime in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Riversystem. The hydraulic regime is defined by the diversion rates into and out of the system, consumptive use withdrawa...

D. H. Lee

1993-01-01

47

Spending Time and Money: Memories of Life in St. Lawrences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mabel Cooper and Gloria Ferris spent their early adult life in St. Lawrence's Hospital in Caterham. This was in the late 1950s to early 1970s. This is their memories of how they spent their time. It includes the work they did and leisure. They also write about the tokens that were used in the hospital instead of money.

Abraham, Jane; Cooper, Mabel; Ferris, Gloria

2010-01-01

48

Subsistence hunting and natural resource extraction: St. Lawrence island, Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

Even though modern technology has eased the burden and reduced some of the risks associated with marine mammal hunting in the Bering Sea, the Yupik?speaking Eskimos of St. Lawrence Island, Alaska, confront the harsh and threatening Arctic environment in much the same way as their ancestors did 20 centuries ago. These Eskimo hunters still obtain more than two?thirds of their

Lynn A. Robbins; Ronald L. Little

1988-01-01

49

Paleoceanography and glacial runoff along the St. Lawrence valley system  

SciTech Connect

Radiocarbon-dated foraminiferal zones in cores from the Gulf of St. Lawrence show that cold saline bottom-water was present in the Goldthwait Sea between 13.6 and 12.9 ka BP and was followed by a salinity minimum from ca. 12.1 to 8.6 ka BP, and then increasing salinity and temperature resulting in the modern, deep, watermass layer by 8 ka BP. During the salinity minimum, glacial Lake St. Lawrence drained east into the Goldthwait Sea before the beginning of the Champlain Sea (11.6--11.4 ka BP). Meltwater flowed through the Champlain and Goldthwait seas between 11 and 10 ka BP when Lake Agassiz water was diverted to the North Atlantic Ocean through Ottawa and St. Lawrence valleys and Gulf of St. Lawrence; this coincides with the decrease in salinity of the Champlain Sea between 10.7 and 10.4 ka BP. A later discharge of meltwater to the North Atlantic Ocean (9.5--8 ka BP) occurred during the final stage of the salinity minimum in the Goldthwait Sea and postdates or coincides with the end of the Champlain Sea. The discharge of meltwater to the North Atlantic Ocean may have cause the freshening of the Champlain Sea. However, it does not appear to have affected the deep water in the Goldthwait Sea and was probably part of the surface outflow to the North Atlantic Ocean through the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The variations in salinity of the deep water of the Goldthwait Sea are related to changes in the composition of the water entering the sea from the North Atlantic Ocean.

Rodrigues, C.G. (Univ. of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Geology); Vilks, G. (Bedford Inst. of Oceanography, Dartmouth, NS (United States))

1992-01-01

50

Predispersal seed predation by a coleophorid on the threatened Gulf of St. Lawrence aster  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Gulf of St. Lawrence aster, Symphyotrichum laurentianum (Fernald) G.L. Nesom (Asteraceae), a small annual halophyte endemic to disturbed and highly transient habitats in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, is classified as \\

Royce Steeves; Vazrick Nazari; Jean-François Landry; Christian R. Lacroix

2008-01-01

51

Groundwater quality in the Delaware and St. Lawrence River Basins, New York, 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water quality in both study areas is generally good, but concentrations of some constituents equaled or exceeded current or proposed Federal or New York State drinking-water standards. The standards exceeded are color (one sample in the St. Lawrence study area), pH (three samples in the Delaware study area), sodium (one sample in the St. Lawrence study area), total dissolved solids (one sample in the St. Lawrence study area), aluminum (one sample in the Delaware study area and one sample in the St. Lawrence study area), iron (seven samples in the St. Lawrence study area), manganese (one sample in the Delaware study area and five samples in the St. Lawrence study area), gross alpha radioactivity (one sample in the St. Lawrence study area), radon-222 (10 samples in the Delaware study area and 14 samples in the St. Lawrence study area), and bacteria (

Nystrom, Elizabeth A.

2012-01-01

52

Knowing, mapping and understanding St. Lawrence biodiversity, with special emphasis on bird assemblages.  

PubMed

Environment Canada and the Québec Department of the Environment, partners in the St Lawrence Vision 2000 Action Plan, set out to prepare a compendium of knowledge of the flora and fauna of the St Lawrence and to identify potential conservation sites. The resulting Portrait is an Internet site that presents the current knowledge base of the river's ecological and biological diversity (http://lavoieverte.qc.ec.gc.ca/faune/biodiv/index.html). The Portrait provides information on over 5,000 species of flora and fauna. On the website, you will find a detailed ecological analysis of the richness, rarity and vulnerability of several broad groups of plant and animal species. Furthermore, you will find a list of species for each of the 700 survey units and a distribution map for 2,500 species recorded along the St Lawrence., in atlas form, along with a detailed conservation plan. The plan encompasses the most unique and heterogeneous landscapes of the St Lawrence, some of which have no protection at present. The Portrait provides an overview of the sites that are currently protected by public agencies and private-sector organisations and identifies new sites of interest for conserving biodiversity and protecting species at risk. This paper exposes the content of this extensive compendium on the biodiversity of the St. Lawrence. For conciseness, it presents some of the analyses conducted on birds to illustrate a few of the analytical approaches that were used. Then, the information on species richness and concentration areas for priority species of vascular plants, breeding birds and herpetofauna will serve to identify the terrestrial sites of significance for biodiversity. Finally, a similar approach having been applied to the aquatic environnement, we will conclude with a conservation plan that identifies the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and the geographic sites where the most important elements of St. Lawrence biodiversity are concentrated. Our analysis of the biodiversity of the most thoroughly studied taxa of the St. Lawrence clearly shows the importance of wetlands, particularly those located at the mouths of rivers or within archipelagos or delta complexes, such as the groups of islands and channels found at both ends of the Montreal Archipelago. These aquatic landscapes are sites of intense biological production, combining in a small geographical area spawning, nursery and feeding grounds for a large number of fish species and breeding, rearing and foraging areas for aquatic birds. Variable flooding conditions, associated with seasonal flooding or daily tidal fluctuations, create a complex mosaic of wetland and aquatic habitats. Although wetlands occupy only a small area in comparison with terrestrial habitats, they support a large number of rare plant and animal species in relation to their size. At present, 10% of the vascular flora and 27% of the herpetofauna of the St. Lawrence are at risk. In the case of reptiles and amphibians, the situation is especially worrisome because nearly all of the most threatened species live in a narrow band along the river corridor. Not only is this the sector that is under the greatest pressure from human development, very little public land remains here, making it difficult to create protected areas. Increased participation by non-governmental organisations and individuals, through private stewardship arrangements, is an essential precondition for completing the network of conservation areas in this part of the St. Lawrence. Along the estuary and the Gulf, habitat integrity has not been affected as much by the expansion of Québec's human population. This is a vast territory, and sites have been identified with a view to making up for the deficiencies in the present network of protected sites in terms of representing biodiversity. PMID:14570415

Desgranges, Jean-Luc; Jobin, Benoît

53

77 FR 42642 - Safety Zone; City of Ogdensburg Fireworks, St. Lawrence River, Ogdensburg, NY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Fireworks, St. Lawrence River, Ogdensburg, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary...on the St. Lawrence River, Ogdensburg, NY. This safety zone is intended to restrict...the St. Lawrence River near Ogdensburg, NY. The Captain of the Port Buffalo has...

2012-07-20

54

77 FR 30443 - Safety Zone; Alexandria Bay Chamber of Commerce, St. Lawrence River, Alexandria Bay, NY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...St. Lawrence River, Alexandria Bay, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice...the St. Lawrence River, Alexandria Bay, NY. This proposed rule is intended to restrict...St. Lawrence River near Alexandria Bay, NY. The Captain of the Port Buffalo has...

2012-05-23

55

77 FR 38488 - Safety Zone; Alexandria Bay Chamber of Commerce, St. Lawrence River, Alexandria Bay, NY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...St. Lawrence River, Alexandria Bay, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary...St. Lawrence River, Alexandria Bay, NY in the Federal Register (77 FR 30443...the St. Lawrence River, Alexandria Bay, NY within a 1,120 FT radius of position...

2012-06-28

56

St. Lucie Estuary and Indian River Lagoon conceptual ecological model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The St. Lucie Estuary is one of the largest brackish water bodies on the east coast of Florida, USA and a major tributary\\u000a to southern Indian River Lagoon. The Indian River Lagoon is a biogeographic transition zone, rich in habitats and species,\\u000a with the greatest species diversity of any estuary in North America. Habitats and species diversity in the lagoon

Patti Sime

2005-01-01

57

Relationships between metallothionein induction, cadmium, copper and zinc levels and environmental parameters in the soft shell clam Mya arenaria in the Saguenay fjord and the St. Lawrence River maritime estuary  

Microsoft Academic Search

Physiological status of Mya arenaria is threatened in the Saguenay-Saint Lawrence system due to inputs of many kinds of pollutants from anthropogenic and industrial origins. Investigations of the health of M. arenaria were carried out using metallothioneins concentrations as biomarkers of metallic contamination in relation with concentrations of metals.

Jocelyne Pellerin; Jean-Claude Amiard

2008-01-01

58

Benthic nutrient fluxes along the Laurentian Channel: Impacts on the N budget of the St. Lawrence marine system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water column concentrations and benthic fluxes of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and oxygen (DO) were measured in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the Upper and Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (USLE and LSLE, respectively) to assess the nitrogen (N) budget in the St. Lawrence (SL) system, as well as to elucidate the impact of bottom water hypoxia on fixed-N removal in the LSLE. A severe nitrate deficit, with respect to ambient phosphate concentrations (N*˜-10 ?mol L -1), was observed within and in the vicinity of the hypoxic bottom water of the LSLE. Given that DO concentrations in the water column have remained above 50 ?mol L -1, nitrate reduction in suboxic sediments, rather than in the water column, is most likely responsible for the removal of fixed N from the SL system. Net nitrate fluxes into the sediments, derived from pore water nitrate concentration gradients, ranged from 190 ?mol m -2 d -1 in the hypoxic western LSLE to 100 ?mol m -2 d -1 in the Gulf. The average total benthic nitrate reduction rate for the Laurentian Channel (LC) is on the order of 690 ?mol m -2 d -1, with coupled nitrification-nitrate reduction accounting for more than 70%. Using average nitrate reduction rates derived from the observed water column nitrate deficit, the annual fixed-N elimination within the three main channels of the Gulf of St. Lawrence and LSLE was estimated at 411 × 10 6 t N, yielding an almost balanced N budget for the SL marine system.

Thibodeau, Benoît; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Kowarzyk, Jacqueline; Mucci, Alfonso; Gélinas, Yves; Gilbert, Denis; Maranger, Roxane; Alkhatib, Mohammad

2010-12-01

59

Invasion by stages in the St Louis River estuary  

EPA Science Inventory

The St. Louis River estuary is recognized as an invasive species “hotspot” - the harbor ranks among the top locations in the Great Lakes reporting the first occurrence of new, aquatic non-native species. To date, 18 non-native benthic invertebrate, 4 non-native crusta...

60

Evaluation of the contamination of marine algae (Seaweed) from the St. Lawrence River and likely to be consumed by humans.  

PubMed

The goal of the study was to assess the contamination of marine algae (seaweeds) growing in the St. Lawrence River estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence and to evaluate the risks to human health from the consumption of these algae. Algae were collected by hand at low tide. A total of 10 sites on the north and south shores of the St. Lawrence as well as in Baie des Chaleurs were sampled. The most frequently collected species of algae were Fucus vesiculosus, Ascophyllum nodosum, Laminaria longicruris, Palmaria palmata, Ulva lactuca, and Fucus distichus. Alga samples were analyzed for metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn), iodine, and organochlorines. A risk assessment was performed using risk factors (e.g., RfD of the U.S. EPA, ADI of Health Canada, etc.). In general, concentrations in St. Lawrence algae were not very high. This was especially true for mercury and the organochlorines, concentrations of which were very low or below detection limits. Consequently, health risks associated with these compounds in St. Lawrence algae were very low. Iodine concentration, on the other hand, could be of concern with regard to human health. Regular consumption of algae, especially of Laminaria sp., could result in levels of iodine sufficient to cause thyroid problems. For regular consumers, it would be preferable to choose species with low iodine concentrations, such as U. lactuca and P. palmata, in order to prevent potential problems. Furthermore, it would also be important to assess whether preparation for consumption or cooking affects the iodine content of algae. Algae consumption may also have beneficial health effects. Scientific literature has shown that it is a good source of fiber and vitamins, especially vitamin B12. PMID:10092431

Phaneuf, D; Côté, I; Dumas, P; Ferron, L A; LeBlanc, A

1999-02-01

61

Sources and fluxes of mercury in the St. Lawrence River  

SciTech Connect

A mass balance approach, based essentially on the reconstruction of daily fluxes and circumscribed by strict error calculations, was designed to quantify the main mercury sources for the St. Lawrence and its tributaries, which constitute a large river system. High-frequency samplings were performed over an 18-month period (1955--1996) at the main water inputs and the mouth of the river. Minor tributaries and the Montreal effluent were also sampled. This strategy allowed models to be obtained that relate mercury concentrations in solution and in particles to the hydrological regime. The calculated budget was balanced relative to the calculated errors of the estimates. Gross mercury export from the river was found to be 5.9 kmol yr{sup {minus}1}. Tributaries and internal erosion of the river contributed equally for a total of 75% of this gross load, whereas the Upper St. Lawrence River, which is almost exclusively composed of Lake Ontario waters, accounted for less than 10%, and inventoried anthropogenic point sources accounted for about 5%. Dissolved mercury was mainly from north shore tributaries, and particulate mercury was largely from erosion of the river bed and banks. On the basis of the present results as well as estimates of atmospheric deposition from the literature it can be inferred that at least 88% of deposited mercury was retained in the watersheds.

Quemerais, B.; Rondeau, B.; Pham, T.T.; Gagnon, P.; Fortin, B. [Environment Canada, Montreal, Quebec (Canada). St. Lawrence Centre; Cossa, D. [Inst. Francais de Recherche pour l`Exploitation de la Mer, Nantes (France)

1999-03-15

62

Genotoxic substances in the St. Lawrence system. 1: Industrial genotoxins sorbed to particulate matter in the St. Lawrence, St. Maurice, and Saguenay rivers, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous investigations of organic genotoxins in industrial effluents discharged into the St. Lawrence River system (Quebec, Canada) indicated that a substantial fraction of the genotoxicity is adsorbed to suspended particulate matter. This study used the SOS Chromotest to investigate the presence, potency, and behavior of particle-bound genotoxins in the downstream ecosystem. The results indicate that although extracts of both suspended

Paul A. White; Joseph B. Rasmussen; Christian Blaise

1998-01-01

63

Canadian theatre: The battle of St. Lawrence and its aftermath, May-October 1942  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Battle of the St. Lawrence is one of the least discussed engagements in Canadian naval history. The vast majority of those who have dealt with it write off the battle as simply a defeat for the Canadian war effort. On closer examination, however, it becomes clear that the Battle of the St. Lawrence and its aftermath, the closure of

Andrew Paul Burtch

2003-01-01

64

Bioassessment of Benthic Macroinvertebrates in Wetland Habitats of Lake Saint-Pierre (St. Lawrence River)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluated the potential of vegetation and sediment habitats in wetlands of the St. Lawrence River for developing a macroinvertebrate bioassessment program with reference conditions. During September 2004, we collected macroinvertebrates in emergent vegetation and sediment in both fluvial sites (reference) and tributary-plume sites (impacted) in waters of the north and south shores of Lake Saint-Pierre (St. Lawrence River). In

Laure Tall; Ginette Méthot; Alain Armellin; Bernadette Pinel-Alloul

2008-01-01

65

Pristine Lake Saint-François, St. Lawrence River: Hydrodynamic Simulation and Cumulative Impact  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lake Saint-François is a fluvial lake of the St. Lawrence system which is used for hydropower production and commercial navigation. For 150 years, it was dredged and dammed regularly without any impact analysis being made. The cumulative impact of dredging and damming on large rivers such as the St. Lawrence is an issue with only qualitative answers. Bidimensional hydrodynamics was

Jean Morin; Paul Boudreau; Yves Secretan; Michel Leclerc

2000-01-01

66

An Economic Analysis of Improvement Alternatives to the St. Lawrence Seaway System, Appendices.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The St. Lawrence Seaway System, as defined for this research, includes the waterway network extending from the mouth of the St. Lawrence River to the head of Lake Superior. The commodities which move in significant volume in the System are analyzed indivi...

1969-01-01

67

Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway System. Cruise Vessel Information and Reference Guide.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report advices vessel operators of the requirements for transiting the St. Lawrence Seaway/Great Lakes. All commercial vessels transiting the Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway System are required to have a current copy of the Seaway Regulations on board...

2004-01-01

68

Sensitivity of tributaries to water-level fluctuations along the St-Lawrence corridor, Québec, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the course of the last century, variations in the St-Lawrence water levels, caused by different uses of the river and the Great Lakes, have already had major impacts on riparian habitats and on a number of tributaries. Anticipated changes caused by climate change will only accentuate these impacts. At present, climate change scenarios forecast a decrease of the St-Lawrence

I. Charron; A. Roy; C. Boyer; P. Verhaar; P. Biron; J. Morin

2006-01-01

69

Wildlife as sentinels of human health effects in the Great Lakes--St. Lawrence basin.  

PubMed Central

There is no existing formal, long-term program for gathering evidence of the incidence and severity of the health effects of toxic substances in wildlife. However, research-based studies of bald eagles, herring gulls, night herons, tree swallows, snapping turtles, mink, and beluga over the past 30 years have revealed a broad spectrum of health effects in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence basin including thyroid and other endocrine disorders, metabolic diseases, altered immune function, reproductive impairment, developmental toxicity, genotoxicity, and cancer. These effects occurred most often and were most severe in the most contaminated sites (Green Bay, Saginaw Bay, Lake Ontario, the St. Lawrence estuary, and more recently, Lake Erie), some of which are International Joint Commission-designated Areas of Concern (AOCs). In all cases, a strong argument can be made for an environmental etiology, and in many cases for the involvement of persistent organic pollutants, particularly polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzo-(italic)p(/italic)-dioxins, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. For some, the association with particular contaminants is consistent with controlled studies, and in some, dose-response relationships were documented. The biologic significance of these health impairments to the affected species is currently unclear, but they resemble those observed with increased incidence in human subpopulations in one or more AOCs. Formalizing health effects monitoring of sentinel wildlife species by the parties to the Canada-USA Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement is required. This would facilitate the optimal use of sentinel wildlife health data in a larger, epidemiologic weight-of-evidence context upon which to base decisions and policies regarding the effects of chemical exposures on human populations.

Fox, G A

2001-01-01

70

The presence, characteristics and earthquake implications of the St. Lawrence fault zone within and near Lake Ontario (Canada–USA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Questions persist concerning the earthquake potential of the populous and industrial Lake Ontario (Canada–USA) area. Pertinent to those questions is whether the major fault zone that extends along the St. Lawrence River valley, herein named the St. Lawrence fault zone, continues upstream along the St. Lawrence River valley at least as far as Lake Ontario or terminates near Cornwall (Ontario,

J. L Wallach

2002-01-01

71

Origin of particulate organic carbon in the upper St. Lawrence: isotopic constraints  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seven sampling locations in the upper St. Lawrence River near the city of Cornwall (Ontario, Canada), including the main river and six near-shore ecosystems (a creek, embayments and a wetland) were studied in order to determine the origin of particulate organic carbon. Parameters studied included chlorophyll-a (chl-a), particulate organic carbon (POC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), as well as the isotopic compositions of the latter two (?13CPOC, ?13CDIC). The results show that in situ photosynthesis and detrital inputs are both significant contributors to the POC pool in the isolated embayments. The former dominates during warm seasons, with POC concentrations up to 2663 ?g/l and chl-a concentrations up to 26.1 ?g/l. Near-shore ecosystems have a wide range of ?13CPOC values (-31.5 to -16.3‰), but this variability is not reflected in the `Main Channel'. There, the ?13CPOC signal is uniformly close to -27‰, in accord with estimates from earlier studies on the river's estuary. This suggests that the POC contribution from near-shore ecosystems is minor. Although the `Main Channel' has low chl-a concentrations, model calculations suggest that most of its POC originates from photosynthetic activity, probably within the Great Lakes.

Barth, J. A. C.; Veizer, J.; Mayer, B.

1998-10-01

72

Water Pollution Problems and Improvement Needs Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River Basins.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report summarizes the water pollution problems of the United States water of Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River and their tributaries. It identifies the causes of these problems or sources of pollution, discusses the improvements needed, and pres...

1968-01-01

73

A Detailed Magnetic Survey of the St. Lawrence River: Oak Point to Lake Ontario, New York.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Measurements of the total intensity of the earth's magnetic field in the St. Lawrence River between Oak Point and Lake Ontario indicate magnetic anomalies of high magnitude and steep gradients due to rocks of varying magnetic susceptibility in the Precamb...

F. Revetta J. Cardinal

1979-01-01

74

Field measurements of ship waves along the St. Lawrence river waterway, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Coastal erosion along the St. Lawrence river waterway in Quebec, Canada, represents a hazard to local communities living along the river banks, as well as to the local fauna habitat. The purpose of this study is to assess the potential impact of longer containerships on riverbank erosion and recession at critical sites along the Saint Lawrence river waterway. A field

S. Gharbi; S. Hamdi; G. Valkov; I. Nistor

2008-01-01

75

Time Series Analysis of Water Level and Temperature in the St Louis River Estuary  

EPA Science Inventory

Pressure and temperature loggers were deployed at 9 sites in the St Louis River estuary between 6/23 10/31 2011. A reference sensor was place on the shore to correct pressure data. Sensors were paced at ...

76

Analytical Modeling of Groundwater Seepages to St. Lucie Estuary  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, six analytical models describing hydraulic interaction of stream-aquifer systems were applied to St Lucie Estuary (SLE) River Estuaries. These are analytical solutions for: (1) flow from a finite aquifer to a canal, (2) flow from an infinite aquifer to a canal, (3) the linearized Laplace system in a seepage surface, (4) wave propagation in the aquifer, (5) potential flow through stratified unconfined aquifers, and (6) flow through stratified confined aquifers. Input data for analytical solutions were obtained from monitoring wells and river stages at seepage-meter sites. Four transects in the study area are available: Club Med, Harbour Ridge, Lutz/MacMillan, and Pendarvis Cove located in the St. Lucie River. The analytical models were first calibrated with seepage meter measurements and then used to estimate of groundwater discharges into St. Lucie River. From this process, analytical relationships between the seepage rate and river stages and/or groundwater tables were established to predict the seasonal and monthly variation in groundwater seepage into SLE. It was found the seepage rate estimations by analytical models agreed well with measured data for some cases but only fair for some other cases. This is not unexpected because analytical solutions have some inherently simplified assumptions, which may be more valid for some cases than the others. From analytical calculations, it is possible to predict approximate seepage rates in the study domain when the assumptions underlying these analytical models are valid. The finite and infinite aquifer models and the linearized Laplace method are good for sites Pendarvis Cove and Lutz/MacMillian, but fair for the other two sites. The wave propagation model gave very good agreement in phase but only fairly agreement in magnitude for all four sites. The stratified unconfined and confined aquifer models gave similarly good agreements with measurements at three sites but poorly at the Club Med site. None of the analytical models presented here can fit the data at this site. To give better estimates at all sites numerical modeling that couple river hydraulics and groundwater flow involving less simplifications of and assumptions for the system may have to be adapted.

Lee, J.; Yeh, G.; Hu, G.

2008-12-01

77

Report on the Immediate Water Pollution Control Needs for the Interstate and Intrastate Waters of the St. Lawrence Region.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report reviews the water pollution problems in the St. Lawrence Region, which is defined to include all streams draining to the St. Lawrence River from the St. Regis River in New York on the west to Lake Memphremagog in Vermont on the east. The major ...

1967-01-01

78

Basis of comparison Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River system. Technical memo  

SciTech Connect

A 90-year set of lake levels and flows has been developed that reflects a consistent hydraulic regime in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Riversystem. The hydraulic regime is defined by the diversion rates into and out of the system, consumptive use withdrawals from the system, the time series of water supplies to the system, outlet conditions of each lake, flow retardation due to ice or weeds in the connecting channels, initial starting elevations for the simulation, the hydraulic condition of the St. Lawrence River, and tidal levels at its outlet. These levels and flows can be used as a reference for assessing the effects of modified lake regulation and climate change.

Lee, D.H.

1993-04-01

79

Influence of summer water-level variability on St. Lawrence River-wetland fish assemblages  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-level and associated variability are substantial influences on wetland and shallow aquatic communities. The Akwesasne Wetland Complex is an extensive St. Lawrence River system affected by water regulation. The responses of fish assemblages to short-term summer water-level variation were examined throughout this section of the St. Lawrence River and its tributaries. An influence of water-level variability was detected on abundance of three common species [bluntnose minnow (Pimephales notatus), rock bass (Amboplites rupestris), and white sucker (Catastomus commersonii)] and explained 30-44% of variation. This influence has implications for water regulation and natural resource management, and a larger scope evaluation may reveal more extensive effects.

McKenna, Jr. , J. E.; Barkley, J. L.; Johnson, J. H.

2008-01-01

80

The St. Lawrence polynya and the Bering shelf circulation: New observations and a model comparison  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using 14 yearlong instrumented moorings deployed south of St. Lawrence Island, along with oceanographic drifters, we investigate the circulation over the central Bering shelf and the role of polynyas in forming and disseminating saline waters over the shelf. We focus also on evaluating the Gawarkiewicz and Chapman (1995) model of eddy production within coastal polynyas. Principal results include the following.

S. Danielson; K. Aagaard; T. Weingartner; S. Martin; P. Winsor; G. Gawarkiewicz; D. Quadfasel

2006-01-01

81

Environmental factors as predictors of epibenthic assemblage biomass in the St. Lawrence system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The distribution of epibenthic invertebrate biomass in relation to environmental factors was examined in the St. Lawrence system. Biomass estimates for epibenthos sampled yearly for 9 years on 102 suspended collectors (navigation buoys), were related to environmental data from the literature (surface water temperature, water salinity, water transparency, current velocity, chlorophyll a and primary production) using a weighted multiple linear

E. Bourget; P.-L. Ardisson; L. Lapointe; G. Daigle

2003-01-01

82

Mixing Patterns and Plankton Biomass of the St. Lawrence Great Lakes under Climate Change Scenarios  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study is part of an assessment of potential effects of climate change on the St. Lawrence Great Lakes. Its purpose is to investigate potential future lake mixing patterns and primary production. Nested physical and biological models were applied to seasonal mixed layer depth, heat content, primary productivity, and to algal biomass measured as particulate chlorophyll. Two independent second generation

John T. Lehman

2002-01-01

83

Community interactions affecting the relative abundances of native and invasive amphipods in the St. Lawrence River  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Eurasian amphipod Echinogammarus ischnus is reportedly replacing the common native amphipod Gammarus fasciatus in the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence River system. A potential mechanism for this replacement is competition mediated by resident species. Other Eurasian invaders, dreissenid mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and Dreissena bugensis), dominate rocky substrates throughout the system and might be promoting the rapid expansion of E.

M. E. Palmer; Anthony Ricciardi

2005-01-01

84

Physical factors affecting the relative abundance of native and invasive amphipods in the St. Lawrence River  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Ponto-Caspian amphipod Echinogammarus ischnus (Stebbing, 1899) is reportedly replacing the North American amphipod Gammarus fasciatus Say, 1818, in the lower Great Lakes, but the two species appear to coexist in the upper St. Lawrence River several years after invasion by E. ischnus. A multi-site survey in the river between Lake Ontario and Montreal (Quebec) found that E. ischnus and

M. E. Palmer; A. Ricciardi

2004-01-01

85

A Practical Grammar of the St. Lawrence Island/Siberian Yupik Eskimo Language. Second Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book deals with the Central Siberian Yupik Eskimo language as spoken on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska, an island near the Bering Strait and on the tip of the Asian mainland opposite Russia. This book has been used with college-level classes composed of a mixture of Yupik speakers and well-prepared non-speakers (people who have studied other,…

Jacobson, Steven A.

86

Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway New Cargoes/New Vessels Market Assessment Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway System (GLSLS) has long played a key role in North Americas transportation system by providing a vital transportation link for the movement of bulk traffic. The success of the GLSLS System in moving bulk cargo but n...

2007-01-01

87

Dynamics of the Arctic Fox Population on St. Lawrence Island, Bering Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

English abstract: We hypothesized that the arctic fox, Alopex lagopus (Linnaeus), population on St. Lawrence Island was cyclic and that its fluctuations in size. structure, and productivity were correlated with the relative size of the population of northern voles, Microtus oeconomus Pallas, the primary prey. Based on a nine-year study, we determined that the variations in size of the fox

Francis H. Fay; Robert L. Rausch

1992-01-01

88

Modelling Wetland Bird Response to Water Level Changes in the Lake Ontario – St. Lawrence River Hydrosystem  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River (LOSL) wetland bird abundance and diversity are greatly influenced by lake and river hydrology. Our study used an interdisciplinary ecosystem approach, blending avian and plant ecology, ecohydraulic, statistical ecology and modelling to evaluate potential impacts of water level fluctuations on indicator species representative of the wetland breeding bird assemblages in the entire LOSL freshwater

Jean-Luc Desgranges; Joel Ingram; Bruno Drolet; Jean Morin; Caroline Savage; Daniel Borcard

2006-01-01

89

Late quaternary paleohydrology of the Gulf of St. Lawrence (Québec, Canada) based on diatom analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Postglacial sediments from three cores raised from the Gulf of St. Lawrence along the path of the Laurentian Channel, were analyzed for diatoms. A sequence of four distinct zones was defined from oldest to youngest:1.Characterized by low diatom concentrations, this zone is mainly represented by heavily silicified species Delphineis surirella, Stephanopyxis turris, Coscinodiscus radiatus and Paralia ornata that were probably

Martine Lapointe

2000-01-01

90

Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway New Cargoes/New Vessels Market Assessment Report. Executive Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway (GLSLS) system of waterways have long played a key role in developing North America's economy. In the past century, the success and importance of these waterways in moving bulk and neobulk cargo has been critical in the...

2007-01-01

91

Genotoxic substances in the St. Lawrence system. 1: Industrial genotoxins sorbed to particulate matter in the St. Lawrence, St. Maurice, and Saguenay rivers, Canada  

SciTech Connect

Previous investigations of organic genotoxins in industrial effluents discharged into the St. Lawrence River system (Quebec, Canada) indicated that a substantial fraction of the genotoxicity is adsorbed to suspended particulate matter. This study used the SOS Chromotest to investigate the presence, potency, and behavior of particle-bound genotoxins in the downstream ecosystem. The results indicate that although extracts of both suspended and sedimented particulate matter are genotoxic, suspended particulate matter samples are more potent in the absence of S9 activation, with the reverse being true for bottom sediments. The results confirmed a positive relationship between the genotoxicity of bottom sediment extracts and sediment organic matter content. A similar relationship between organic matter content and total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentration indicates that putative genotoxins have physicochemical properties similar to the PAH class of contaminants. Conversion of PAH values to benzo[a]pyrene equivalents indicates that measured PAHs only account for a small fraction ({approximately}10%) of the observed SOS Chromotest response. Sites that receive discharges from foundries, aluminum refineries, and petroleum refineries yielded several of the most genotoxic samples. Further analyses revealed that the genotoxicity of suspended and sedimented particulate matter extracts is empirically related to the genotoxicity of industrial discharges. Comparisons of total genotoxicity levels in suspended particulates and bottom sediments suggest that direct-acting substances adsorbed to suspended matter are rapidly degraded and/or converted to more stable progenotoxins upon deposition. Further research is required to test this hypothesis and investigate effects on indigenous biota.

White, P.A.; Rasmussen, J.B. [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Blaise, C. [Environment Canada, Montreal, Quebec (Canada). St. Lawrence Center

1998-02-01

92

Population structure of the ribbed mussel Geukensia demissa in salt marshes in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ribbed mussel, Geukensia demissa, is highly dependent on the cordgrass Spartina alterniflora for amelioration from environmental stress and substrate stabilization. Spartina alterniflora is a foundation species in marshes, and G. demissa is typically associated with cordgrass beds. Marshes in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence are experiencing erosion and degradation, presumably as a result of increases in sea level, which increases salinity exposure and negatively impacts S. alterniflora. The population structure of the ribbed mussel, Geukensia demissa, was studied at nine sites in six estuaries in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence in Nova Scotia, Canada, where marsh degradation is occurring. Mussel length was used as a proxy for age of G. demissa in three salt marsh zones characterized by density and elevation of Spartina alterniflora: (1) a lower zone in which the S. alterniflora was dead, but where the basal mat was coherent, (2) a zone of living, but low density S. alterniflora at the margin of the living marsh, and (3) a zone of dense S. alterniflora one to three meters back from the edge. Mussel length was significantly different across the three zones in seven of the nine sites. Mean length decreased as elevation increased, and small mussels (i.e., 1-3 cm) were absent at seven sites. The smallest mussels occurred in the dense S. alterniflora zone, higher in the marsh. Mussel length in the two western sites did not differ between zones, and small mussels (i.e., 1-3 cm) were present, but rare. The absence of small mussels in seven of the nine sites, and the size frequency distribution at remaining sites, suggests a lack of recent recruitment and a long-term threat to the survival of G. demissa. Salt marsh degradation and the death of S. alterniflora have negatively impacted G. demissa recruitment, and population decline is evident.

Watt, Cortney; Garbary, David J.; Longtin, Caroline

2011-09-01

93

Constraints on Lake Agassiz discharge through the late-glacial Champlain Sea (St. Lawrence Lowlands, Canada) using salinity proxies and an estuarine circulation model  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During the last deglaciation, abrupt freshwater discharge events from proglacial lakes in North America, such as glacial Lake Agassiz, are believed to have drained into the North Atlantic Ocean, causing large shifts in climate by weakening the formation of North Atlantic Deep Water and decreasing ocean heat transport to high northern latitudes. These discharges were caused by changes in lake drainage outlets, but the duration, magnitude and routing of discharge events, factors which govern the climatic response to freshwater forcing, are poorly known. Abrupt discharges, called floods, are typically assumed to last months to a year, whereas more gradual discharges, called routing events, occur over centuries. Here we use estuarine modeling to evaluate freshwater discharge from Lake Agassiz and other North American proglacial lakes into the North Atlantic Ocean through the St. Lawrence estuary around 11.5 ka BP, the onset of the Preboreal oscillation (PBO). Faunal and isotopic proxy data from the Champlain Sea, a semi-isolated, marine-brackish water body that occupied the St. Lawrence and Champlain Valleys from 13 to 9 ka, indicate salinity fell about 7-8 (range of 4-11) around 11.5 ka. Model results suggest that minimum (1600 km3) and maximum (9500 km3) estimates of plausible flood volumes determined from Lake Agassiz paleoshorelines would produce the proxy-reconstructed salinity decrease if the floods lasted <1 day to 5 months and 1 month to 2 years, respectively. In addition, Champlain Sea salinity responds very quickly to the initiation (within days) and cessation (within weeks) of flooding events. These results support the hypothesis that a glacial lake flood, rather than a sustained routing event, discharged through the St. Lawrence Estuary during the PBO. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

Katz, B.; Najjar, R. G.; Cronin, T.; Rayburn, J.; Mann, M. E.

2011-01-01

94

Phallodrilus hallae, a new tubificid oligochaete from the St. Lawrence Great Lakes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The predominantly marine tubificid genus Phallodrilus is defined, a key to its nine species constructed, and an illustrated description of Phallodrilus hallae n. sp. from the St. Lawrence Great Lakes presented. The species is distinguished from other members of the genus by its well-developed atrial musculature, extensions of which ensheath the posterior prostatic ducts. Phallodrilus hallae n. sp. is a small worm which is widely distributed in the sublittoral and profundal benthos of Lake Superior; lakewide it occurred in mean densities of 50 individuals per square metre. Available records indicate a more restricted distribution in Lake Huron and Georgian Bay. We suggest that P. hallae n. sp. is either a glaciomarine relict species, or that it entered the Great Lakes system at the time of the marine transgression of the St. Lawrence valley. The apparent restriction of P. hallae n. sp. to waters of high quality suggests that it may be a sensitive oligotrophic indicator species.

Cook, David G.; Hiltunen, Jarl K.

1975-01-01

95

Ice ridging and ice drift in southern Gulf of St Lawrence, Canada, during winter storms  

Microsoft Academic Search

During February and March 2004, satellite-tracked ice beacons and helicopter-borne sensors collected ice-drift and ice-thickness data from the southern Gulf of St Lawrence, Canada, to study the region's ice-thickness evolution and ice-drift behavior in response to winter storms. Three northeasterly storms passed through the area during the observation period, pushing the pack ice against the north shore of Prince Edward

S. J. Prinsenberg; A. van der Baaren; I. K. Peterson

2006-01-01

96

Patterns in invertebrate and periphyton size distributions from navigation buoys in the St. Lawrence River  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the purposes of conducting environmental assessments, it has been suggested that benthic size distributions could serve\\u000a as complementary or alternative measures to traditional taxonomic descriptions, which are labour intensive and require much\\u000a expertise. Consequently, temporal patterns of invertebrate and algal size distributions, along a trophic gradient from St.\\u000a Lawrence River navigational buoys, were investigated in this study. It was

Vincent Mercier; Chantal Vis; Antoine Morin; Christiane Hudon

1999-01-01

97

Ocean response to attenuation of visible light by phytoplankton in the Gulf of St. Lawrence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The presence of phytoplankton affects the attenuation of the visible range of solar radiation in the upper ocean. An optically-coupled circulation model is used to examine the impact of phytoplankton on sea-surface temperature, stratification, circulation and air–sea non-solar heat fluxes in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The attenuation coefficients are calculated by a spectral model of irradiance in the visible

Li Zhai; Charles Tang; Trevor Platt; Shubha Sathyendranath

2011-01-01

98

Ship to Shore: Inuit, Early Europeans, and Maritime Landscapes in the Northern Gulf of St. Lawrence  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Archaeological excavations have been conducted since 2002 at a complex multicomponent European whaling and fishing site at\\u000a Hare Harbor, Petit Mécatina Island, on the Quebec Lower North Shore in the northeastern Gulf of St. Lawrence. European facilities\\u000a so far identified include a cookhouse, a blacksmith shop, a wood processing area, and a charcoal storage or production area.\\u000a The site also

William W. Fitzhugh; Anja Herzog; Sophia Perdikaris; Brenna McLeod

99

Feeding Ecology of Juvenile Lake Sturgeon in the St. Lawrence River System  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the diet of juvenile lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens at five sites in the St. Lawrence River, including two sites in major tributaries (Des Prairies and L'Assomption rivers), two main-stem sites located upstream (Verchères and Sorel-Berthier islands), and one site located downstream in the estuarine transition zone (ETZ). The benthic fauna was sampled at all sites except in the

Pedro Nilo; Serge Tremblay; Aline Bolon; Julian Dodson; Pierre Dumont; Réjean Fortin

2006-01-01

100

Impact of the( Dreissena ) invasion on native unionid bivalves in the upper St. Lawrence River  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduced Eurasian mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and Dreissena bugensis) colonized native unionid bivalves in the upper St. Lawrence River in the early 1990s. From 1992 to 1995, we examined the infestation and impact of Dreissena on unionids at several sites near the Island of MontrØal. Unionids suffered heavy (90ñ100%) mortality at sites where Dreissena occurred in high densities (i.e., 4000 ñ

A. Ricciardi; F. G. Whoriskey; J. B. Rasmussen

1996-01-01

101

Budget and sources of suspended sediment transported in the St. Lawrence River, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mass balance budget of the suspended sediment in the St. Lawrence River was established for the sector stretching from Cornwall, Ontario, to Quebec City, Quebec, for the period 1989-1993. The approach consisted of analysing the amount of sediment contributed by the different tributaries, on a watershed-by-watershed basis, through sediment concentration-discharge models incorporating more than 4000 data points collected since

Bernard Rondeau; D. Cossa; P. Gagnon; L. Bilodeau

2000-01-01

102

Temporal changes in wetland landscapes of a section of the St. Lawrence River, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Historical aerial photographs (from 1946 through 1983) were used to study and describe the nature and extent of changes in\\u000a wetland vegetation of a section of the St. Lawrence River and to evaluate the relative importance of water level, fire, and\\u000a vegetational development as causal factors of these historical changes. Data were encoded and analyzed using a geographical\\u000a information system,

Martin Jean; André Bouchard

1991-01-01

103

Annual Records of Toxic phytoplankton and PSP toxins in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Quebec.  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website provides access to annual records of the abundance of phytoplankton species and physical-chemical parameters of seawater at monitoring stations in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Quebec, Canada. Users may choose a particular station and the year to view the data (which are presented in MS-Excel format, in French). The webpage also provides a link to a map displaying the locations of the sampling stations.

2010-07-06

104

Storms and shoreline retreat in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Storms play a major role in shoreline recession on transgressive coasts. In the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence (GSL), southeastern Canada, long-term relative sea-level rise off the North Shore of Prince Edward Island has averaged 0.3 m\\/century over the past 6000 years (>0.2 m\\/century over 2000 years). This has driven long-term coastal retreat at mean rates >0.5 m\\/a but the

Donald L. Forbes; George S. Parkes; Gavin K. Manson; Lorne A. Ketch

2004-01-01

105

Twentieth century warming in deep waters of the Gulf of St. Lawrence: A unique feature of the last millennium  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The impact of human activities on Earth's climate is still subject to debate and the pattern of a sharp recent global temperature increase contrasting with much lesser variable temperatures during preceding centuries has often been challenged, partly due to the lack of unquestionable evidence. In this paper, oxygen isotope compositions of benthic foraminifer shells recovered from sediments of the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary and the Gulf are used to reconstruct temperature changes in a water mass originating from ˜400 m deep North Atlantic waters. The data demonstrate that the 1.7 ± 0.3°C warming measured during the last century corresponds to a ?18O shift of 0.4 ± 0.05‰, encompassing the temperature effect and related change in the isotopic composition of the corresponding water mass. In contrast, ?18O values remained nearly constant over the last millennium, except for a small positive shift which we attribute to the Little Ice Age. We conclude that the 20th century warming of the incoming intermediate North Atlantic water has had no equivalent during the last thousand years.

Thibodeau, Benoît; de Vernal, Anne; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; Mucci, Alfonso

2010-09-01

106

Research management in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River basins: Challenges and opportunities  

SciTech Connect

Research management in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River basins is both challenging and filled with opportunities. From the perspective of public health practice, research management is more than just research managers managing discrete programs; it requires everyone involved in the process to become active participants, including researchers, communities,l potential interest groups, policymakers, and other stakeholders. Agencies, organizations, and individuals responsible for managing research and resources in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River basins are facing problems of decreased research funding, data gaps, and research quality. Managers of research and resources in the basins face many challenges as they address these problems. They are challenged with strengthening the link between research and management in the face of decreasing resources and increasing expectations of results and findings while extending those results and findings to public health practice. A number of actions and activities have been proposed that can lead to better management of constrained programs, pooled resources, partnerships, targeted priorities, and improved effectiveness. With guidance and assistance from the International Joint Commission (IJHC), research managers in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River basins who have initiated and maintained traditional research programs based on sound science are now adopting different and innovative management strategies.

Rosa, C.T. de; Rosemond, Z.A.; Cibulas, W. [Dept. of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, GA (United States). Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry; Gilman, A.P. [Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Environmental Health Directorate

1999-04-01

107

North East Coast False Color Time Lapse from SeaWiFS (Gulf of St. Lawrence to Cape Cod)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Transitions between relatively cloud free scenes of the northeast coast from the Gulf of St. Lawrence to Cape Cod, using true color land and clouds with false color-chlorophyll water images, all from SeaWiFS

Allen, Jesse; Feldman, Gene

1998-09-09

108

Holocene Vegetation Dynamics of an Upper St. Lawrence River Wetland: Paleoecological Evidence for a Recent Increase in Cattail ( Typha )  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cattails (Typha latifolia L., Typha angustifolia L., and Typha x glauca Godr.) are the predominant emergent vegetation of upper St. Lawrence River coastal wetlands. We sought to describe Holocene\\u000a vegetation in a St. Lawrence River wetland to assess patterns of succession and examine the timing and potential causes of\\u000a a historic cattail invasion. Paleoecological analysis indicated presence of four distinct

Molly Beland Rippke; Matthew T. Distler; John M. Farrell

2010-01-01

109

Relating macroinvertebrate community structure to environmental characteristics and sediment contamination at the scale of the St. Lawrence River  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is still no assessment of the impact of sediment chemicals and environmental conditions on macroinvertebrates at the\\u000a scale of the St. Lawrence River. In order to assess these impacts in the fluvial section of the St. Lawrence River including\\u000a the Montreal harbour, the community structure of macroinvertebrates using different taxonomic aggregations (genus and family)\\u000a and taxa attributes (abundance, presence–absence,

Stéphane Masson; Mélanie Desrosiers; Bernadette Pinel-Alloul; Louis Martel

2010-01-01

110

estuaries.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Need for a more comprehensive understanding of estuaries and their surroundings and the lack of an adequate means to exchange information concerning estuarine research stimulated the organization of the Conference on Estuaries, held at Jekyll Island, Geor...

G. H. Lauff

1967-01-01

111

Application of Acoustic and Optic Methods for Estimating Suspended-Solids Concentrations in the St. Lucie River Estuary, Florida.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Acoustic and optic methods were applied to estimate suspended-solids concentrations in the St. Lucie River Estuary, southeastern Florida. Acoustic Doppler velocity meters were installed at the North Fork, Speedy Point, and Steele Point sites within the es...

E. Patino M. J. Byrne

2004-01-01

112

Shark Predation on Migrating Adult American Eels (Anguilla rostrata) in the Gulf of St. Lawrence  

PubMed Central

In an attempt to document the migratory pathways and the environmental conditions encountered by American eels during their oceanic migration to the Sargasso Sea, we tagged eight silver eels with miniature satellite pop-up tags during their migration from the St. Lawrence River in Québec, Canada. Surprisingly, of the seven tags that successfully transmitted archived data, six were ingested by warm-gutted predators, as observed by a sudden increase in water temperature. Gut temperatures were in the range of 20 to 25°C—too cold for marine mammals but within the range of endothermic fish. In order to identify the eel predators, we compared their vertical migratory behavior with those of satellite-tagged porbeagle shark and bluefin tuna, the only endothermic fishes occurring non-marginally in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. We accurately distinguished between tuna and shark by using the behavioral criteria generated by comparing the diving behavior of these two species with those of our unknown predators. Depth profile characteristics of most eel predators more closely resembled those of sharks than those of tuna. During the first days following tagging, all eels remained in surface waters and did not exhibit diel vertical migrations. Three eels were eaten at this time. Two eels exhibited inverse diel vertical migrations (at surface during the day) during several days prior to predation. Four eels were eaten during daytime, whereas the two night-predation events occurred at full moon. Although tagging itself may contribute to increasing the eel's susceptibility to predation, we discuss evidence suggesting that predation of silver-stage American eels by porbeagle sharks may represent a significant source of mortality inside the Gulf of St. Lawrence and raises the possibility that eels may represent a reliable, predictable food resource for porbeagle sharks.

Beguer-Pon, Melanie; Benchetrit, Jose; Castonguay, Martin; Aarestrup, Kim; Campana, Steven E.; Stokesbury, Michael J. W.; Dodson, Julian J.

2012-01-01

113

The influence of wind and ice on spring walrus hunting success on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

St. Lawrence Island Yupik hunters on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska, take hundreds of Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) each year. The harvest and associated effort (hunting trips taken), however, are variable from year to year and also from day to day, influenced by physical environmental factors among other variables. We used data from 1996 to 2010 to construct generalized additive models (GAMs) to examine several relationships among the variables. Physical factors explained 18% of the variability in harvest in Savoonga and 25% of the variability in effort; the corresponding figures for Gambell were 24% and 32%. Effort alone explained 63% of the harvest in Savoonga and 59% in Gambell. Physical factors played a relatively smaller role in determining hunting efficiency (walrus taken per hunting trip), explaining 15% of the variability in efficiency in Savoonga and 22% in Gambell, suggesting that physical factors play a larger role in determining whether to hunt than in the outcome of the hunt once undertaken. Combining physical factors with effort explained 70% of the harvest variability in Savoonga and 66% in Gambell. Although these results indicate that other factors (e.g. fuel prices, socioeconomic conditions) collectively cause a greater share of variability in harvest and effort than ice and wind, at least as indicated by the measures used as predictors in the GAMs, they also suggest that environmental change is also likely to influence future harvest levels, and that climate models that yield appropriately scaled data on ice and wind around St. Lawrence Island may be of use in determining the magnitude and direction of those influences.

Huntington, Henry P.; Noongwook, George; Bond, Nicholas A.; Benter, Bradley; Snyder, Jonathan A.; Zhang, Jinlun

2013-10-01

114

Research management in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River basins: challenges and opportunities.  

PubMed

Research management in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River basins is both challenging and filled with opportunities. From the perspective of public health practice, research management is more than just research managers managing discrete programs; it requires everyone involved in the process to become active participants, including researchers, communities, potential interest groups, policymakers, and other stakeholders. Agencies, organizations, and individuals responsible for managing research and resources in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River basins are facing problems of decreased research funding, data gaps, and research quality. Managers of research and resources in the basins face many challenges as they address these problems. They are challenged with strengthening the link between research and management in the face of decreasing resources and increasing expectations of results and findings while extending those results and findings to public health practice. A number of actions and activities have been proposed that can lead to better management of constrained programs, pooled resources, partnerships, targeted priorities, and improved effectiveness. With guidance and assistance from the International Joint Commission (IJC), research managers in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River basins who have initiated and maintained traditional research programs based on sound science are now adopting different and innovative management strategies. The research community must be proactive in articulating the role of science in bridging the gaps in knowledge between public health practice and regulatory programs. Supported by a firm foundation of credible science, critical assessment, and public service, basin research managers are recognizing the need to move outside the comfort zone and extend to areas previously unwelcomed or uncomfortable. PMID:10092446

De Rosa, C T; Rosemond, Z A; Cibulas, W; Gilman, A P

1999-04-01

115

Age and growth of lake sturgeon in the upper St. Lawrence River  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The growth of lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) over time in the upper St. Lawrence River was examined. Growth of lake sturgeon collected during 1993 and 1994 below Robert Moses Dam near Massena, New York, was compared to that reported for the same population almost 25 years earlier. The data suggest that lake sturgeon growth was similar to that reported in the previous study. However, significant differences in the elevations of regression models between males and fish of unknown sex in both data sets suggest possible sexual dimorphism in growth at younger ages.

Johnson, J. H.; Dropkin, D. S.; LaPan, S. R.; McKenna, J. E. , Jr.; Klindt, R. M.

1998-01-01

116

The St. Lawrence polynya and the Bering shelf circulation: New observations and a model comparison  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using 14 yearlong instrumented moorings deployed south of St. Lawrence Island, along with oceanographic drifters, we investigate the circulation over the central Bering shelf and the role of polynyas in forming and disseminating saline waters over the shelf. We focus also on evaluating the Gawarkiewicz and Chapman (1995) model of eddy production within coastal polynyas. Principal results include the following. (1) The northern central shelf near-surface waters exhibit westward flow, carrying low-salinity waters from the Alaskan coast in fall and early winter, with consequences for water mass formation and biological production. (2) Within the St. Lawrence polynya the freshening effect of winter advection is about half as large as the salting effect of surface brine flux resulting from freezing. (3) Brine production over the Bering shelf occurs primarily offshore, rather than within coastal polynyas, even though ice production per unit area is much larger within the polynyas. (4) We find little evidence for the geostrophic flow adjustment predicted by recent polynya models. (5) In contrast to the theoretical prediction that dense water from the polynya is carried offshore by eddies, we find negligible cross-shelf eddy density fluxes within and surrounding the polynya and very low levels of eddy energy that decreased from fall to winter, even though dense water accumulated within the polynya and large cross-shore density gradients developed. (6) It is possible that dense polynya water was advected downstream of our array before appreciable eddy fluxes materialized.

Danielson, S.; Aagaard, K.; Weingartner, T.; Martin, S.; Winsor, P.; Gawarkiewicz, G.; Quadfasel, D.

2006-09-01

117

Middle pleistocene mollusks from St. Lawrence Island and their significance for the paleo-oceanography of the Bering Sea  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Drift, evidently of Illinoian age, was deposited on St. Lawrence Island at the margin of an ice cap that covered the highlands of the Chukotka Peninsula of Siberia and spread far eastward on the continental shelf of northern Bering Sea. Underlying the drift on the northwestward part of the island are mollusk-bearing beds deposited during the Kotzebuan Transgression. A comparison of mollusk faunas from St. Lawrence Island, Chukotka Peninsula, and Kotzebue Sound suggests that the present northward flow through Bering and Anadyr Straits was reversed during the Kotzebuan Transgression. Cold arctic water penetrated southward and southwestward bringing an arctic fauna to the Gulf of Anadyr. Warmer Pacific water probably entered eastern Bering Sea, passed eastward and northeastward around eastern and northern St. Lawrence Island, and then became entrained in the southward currents that passed through Anadyr Strait. ?? 1972.

Hopkins, D. M.; Rowland, R. W.; Patton, Jr. , W. W.

1972-01-01

118

Crustal strain rates and seismic hazard from seismicity and GPS measurements along the St Lawrence Valley, Quebec  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The St Lawrence Valley, Quebec, presents one of the largest concentration of earthquakes in eastern North America. Background seismicity extends over 900 km from the Gulf of St Lawrence to Montreal following the Paleozoic Iapetan Rift system. Two main seismic zones are defined along this trend: Charlevoix, the most active in eastern Canada and the locus of at least five M6+ earthquakes in the last 350 years; and Lower St Lawrence, where the largest known earthquakes are about M5. Integration of earthquake statistics in both zones indicates that the equivalent seismic deformation rates are 1.0 +/- 0.5 mm/yr and 0.2 +/- 0.3 mm/yr, respectively. Based on high-precision GPS measurements at 16 sites surrounding the St Lawrence Valley, we estimate the current rate of crustal strain across both the Charlevoix and Lower St Lawrence seismic zones. Our GPS results are based on 3-4 campaign occupations over the last 7-9 years. On a regional scale, horizontal strain rates are 0.5-2 nanostrain per year of roughly NNW-SSE shortening. This strain pattern agrees well with earthquake focal mechanisms. Horizontal velocity vectors on both sides of the St Lawrence River suggest that this shortening corresponds to a maximum convergence of 0.5 +/- 0.5 mm/yr between the north and south shores, in general agreement with the rate from earthquake statistics. Assuming that seismicity in Charlevoix follows typical b-value statistics, our GPS results constrain the maximum magnitude of large earthquakes to be less than or equal to M7.6. Alternatively these strain rates are equivalent to one characteristic M7 earthquake per ~170 years.

Mazzotti, S.; Henton, J.; Adams, J.

2004-05-01

119

Field and laboratory evaluation of habitat use by rainwater killifish ( Lucania parva ) in the St. Johns River estuary, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

I examined the relative importance of beds of tapegrass (Vallisneria americana) and adjacent unvegetated habitats to juvenile and adult (6–35 mm standard length) rainwater killifish (Lucania parva) over a large spatial scale within the St. Johns River estuary, Florida. Abundance of rainwater killifish did not differ\\u000a between oligohaline and tidal freshwater portions of the estuary and this species was relatively

Frank Jordan

2002-01-01

120

A REVISED GEOMORPHIC, SHORE PROTECTION AND NEARSHORE CLASSIFICATION OF THE CANADIAN AND UNITED STATES SHORELINES OF LAKE ONTARIO AND THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2000, the International Joint Commission (IJC) initiated the Lake Ontario - St. Lawrence River Water Level Regulation Study (LOSLRS), a comprehensive study to examine changes to the 1956 criteria for Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River water levels and flow regulation. As part of this activity, the LOSLRS Study Board established the Coastal Processes Technical Working Group (CWG), whose goals are

Christian J. Stewart

121

POTASSIC MAGMATISM ON ST. LAWRENCE ISLAND, ALASKA, AND CAPE DEZHNEV, NORTHEAST RUSSIA: EVIDENCE FOR EARLY CRETACEOUS SUBDUCTION IN THE BERING STRAIT REGION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Field mapping, geochemical investigations, and geochronology of Cretaceous igneous rocks on St. Lawrence Island were initiated to elucidate the geologic relationships between Russia and Alaska. These data suggest that the Cretaceous magmatic history of St. Lawrence Island can be divided into an early phase of potassic plutonism around 113 Ma and a subsequent phase of larger-volume subalkaline magmatism between 110

Jeffrey M. Amato; Elizabeth L. Miller; Andrew T. Calvert; Jaime Toro; James E. Wright

122

Population structure of the ribbed mussel Geukensia demissa in salt marshes in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ribbed mussel, Geukensia demissa, is highly dependent on the cordgrass Spartina alterniflora for amelioration from environmental stress and substrate stabilization. Spartina alterniflora is a foundation species in marshes, and G. demissa is typically associated with cordgrass beds. Marshes in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence are experiencing erosion and degradation,\\u000a presumably as a result of increases in sea level,

Cortney Watt; David J. Garbary; Caroline Longtin

2011-01-01

123

An heuristic model of transformations of the aquatic ecosystems of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seminal works of the 1960s on open systems by Arthur Koestler, Ramon Margalef and Richard Vollenweider are interrelated here, with many other works on the science of aquatic ecosystems, in a heuristic model of selected manifestations and transformations of the aquatic ecosystems of the rivers and lakes of the Great Lakes — St. Lawrence River Basin, here perceived as a

Henry A. Regier; James J. Kay

1996-01-01

124

Strike-slip interpretation of basin-bounding faults of the St. Lawrence lowlands basin the Quebec City area, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Traditional structural interpretations of faults identified in the autochthonous, Ordovician platform rocks of the St. Lawrence Lowlands basin of Quebec, Canada, assert that the primary sense of faulting is normal, extensional, and dip-slip in motion. Interpretation of field observations such as the offset of facies boundaries in outcrop, fault surface features, fracture patterns, and fault volume considerations lead directly to

Shaw

1993-01-01

125

Marine boating habits and the potential for spread of invasive species in the Gulf of St. Lawrence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The potential for boating to disperse the clubbed tunicate Styela clava Herdman, 1881 and green crab Carcinus maenas (Linnaeus, 1758) in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence was investigated using interviews with recreational and commercial boaters in eastern Prince Edward Island (PEI). Boaters were asked how long their boat had been at the present location; the primary use of the

Emily Darbyson; Andrea Locke; John Mark Hanson; J. H. Martin Willison

2009-01-01

126

Comparative study of contaminants in the mudpuppy (amphibia) and the common snapping turtle (reptilia), St. Lawrence River, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Levels of organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and mercury were measured in mudpuppy bodies, livers and gonads and in snapping turtle eggs to determine how the composition and concentration of these bioaccumulated contaminants differ between the two species. Furthermore, the geographic variation in contamination patterns were examined between the highly polluted St. Lawrence River and the much less polluted

J. Bonin; J.-L. DesGranges; C. A. Bishop; J. Rodrigue; A. Gendron; J. E. Elliott

1995-01-01

127

EARLY MARINE LIFE OF ATIANTIC SALMON, SALMO SALAR, POSTSMOLTS IN THE NORmERN GULF OF ST. LAWRENCE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Postsmolts of Atlantic salmon. Salmo salar. having spent some 2-4 months in the marine environ· ment were collected in the nearshore zone of the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence. From a back­ calculated smolt length of 135 mm they had increased in length to 265 mm (212 gl on 1 September, and 306 mm (320 gl on 30 September. The

J.-D. DUTIL; M. COUTUI

128

Simulation of Ice-Cover Growth and Decay in One Dimension on the Upper St. Lawrence River.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A series of models are presented for simulating the growth and decay of channel ice in one dimension on the upper St. Lawrence River. A general description of ice growth and decay is given for the reach of the river between the Moses-Saunders Power Dam at...

G. M. Greene

1981-01-01

129

Ground-water quality and data on wells and springs in Pennsylvania; Volume I, Ohio and St. Lawrence River basins  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Volume I of the Groundwater Quality and Data on Wells and Springs in Pennsylvania presents groundwater quality and physical data on about 1,200 well and spring sites in the Ohio and St. Lawrence River basins. Locations are shown on site-location maps derived from the hydrologic unit map. Codes showing the geologic age and aquifer are provided. (USGS)

Koester, Harry E.; Miller, Denise R.

1980-01-01

130

Quagga mussels ( Dreissena bugensis) as biomonitors of metal contamination: A case study in the upper St. Lawrence River  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, the utility of quagga mussels (Dreissena bugensis) as biomonitors was investigated by measuring total concentrations of three trace metals, cadmium, copper, and zinc, in soft tissues. Quagga mussels were sampled from five sites along the upper St. Lawrence River, including one industrially influenced site, from 1999 through 2007. Mussels were collected from near-shore areas, divided into 5

Carolyn Johns

2011-01-01

131

Development of a 3-D geological model towards natural hazards mitigation, St. Lawrence River Valley, Eastern Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the Canadian Government's main goals to ensure safe and strong communities for its citizens, the Geological Survey of Canada has recently undertaken the development of a 3-D geological model and a seamless surficial geology map of the St. Lawrence River valley in Eastern Canada. This paper summarizes the initial phase of this project, which consists of gathering,

RÉJEAN COUTURE; DOMINIQUE GAUVREAU; J. ROBERT BÉLANGER

132

Spatial Distribution of Total Cadmium, Copper, and Zinc in the Zebra Mussel ( Dreissena polymorpha) Along the Upper St. Lawrence River  

Microsoft Academic Search

The zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) was utilized to assess the spatial distribution of three trace metals, cadmium, copper, and zinc, in the upper St. Lawrence River and to test the hypothesis that outflow from Lake Ontario influenced levels of these metals in near-shore biota. Zebra mussels, collected from twelve sites along the southern shore, were analyzed for total cadmium, copper,

Carolyn Johns

2001-01-01

133

?-carotene and retinoids in eggs of Great Blue Herons (Ardea herodias) in relation to St Lawrence River contamination  

Microsoft Academic Search

The potential use of retinoids and ß-carotene as biomarkers in the eggs of the Great Blue Heron was investigated. In the spring of 1991, 65 eggs were collected from nine heronries (seven along the St Lawrence River and two reference sites). A method was specifically developed for the extraction and analysis of ß-carotene and the retinoids in heron egg yolks

M. H. Boily; L. Champoux; D. H. Bourbonnais; J. L. Granges; J. Rodrigue; P. A. Spear

1994-01-01

134

Modeling Wetland Plant Community Response to Assess Water-Level Regulation Scenarios in the Lake Ontario – St. Lawrence River Basin  

Microsoft Academic Search

The International Joint Commission has recently completed a five-year study (2000–2005) to review the operation of structures controlling the flows and levels of the Lake Ontario – St. Lawrence River system. In addition to addressing the multitude of stakeholder interests, the regulation plan review also considers environmental sustainability and integrity of wetlands and various ecosystem components. The present paper outlines

Christiane Hudon; Douglas A. Wilcox; Joel Ingram

2006-01-01

135

Multiproxy Evidence of Late Glacial Laurentide Ice Sheet Meltwater Re-routing From the Gulf of St. Lawrence to Hudson Strait  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The IMAGES cores MD99-2220 (48° 38.32'N/68° 37.93'W, 320 m) and MD99-2221 (48° 10.60'N/69° 30.35'W, 212 m) collected in the lower St. Lawrence Estuary provide a unique record for the reconstruction of large scale (sub-continental) hydrological changes and oceanographic variations because of its location, at the mouth of the St. Lawrence River watershed. An absolute calendar chronology spanning the last ~9400 years was established based on calibrated AMS-14C dates on mollusc shells and constraints from rock-magnetic and paleomagnetic secular variation data. By ~8.5 ka cal BP (~7.7 14C kyr BP), a major change of the sedimentation rates was recorded, from > 33 m/ka to ~1.5 m/ka, as a consequence of the re-routing of meltwater-freshwater outflow, from the St. Lawrence River pathway to the Hudson Bay and Strait, after the collapse of the residual Hudson Bay ice dome. Reconstruction of sea-surface conditions based on dinocyst transfer functions in core MD99-2220 permitted a few paleoclimatic conclusions on a regional scale. The ~8.5 ka cal BP transition was followed by a drastic decrease of sea-ice cover, together with increased salinity and winter sea-surface temperatures. Maximum February temperatures (well above the freezing point) and salinity (~34) in surface waters characterized the 8.3-7.5 ka cal BP interval. Additional information are provided by data from the IMAGES core MD95-2033 (44° 39.87'N/55° 37.21'W, 1412 m) collected on the Laurentian Fan off Cabot Strait, near the outlet of the Laurentian Trough into the North Atlantic. A few AMS-14C measurements in planktonic foraminifers and the oxygen isotope stratigraphy permitted the establishment of a chronostratigraphy, which also indicate a major change in sedimentation rate during the early Holocene, from a late glacial rate of ~120 cm/ka to a postglacial rate of ~40 cm/ka. Sm-Nd isotopic analyses in sediment provide important information about the source of sediment supplies, thus about freshwater-meltwater routes. In core MD95-2033, LGM sediment depicts the most radiogenic signatures (? Nd = -10 to -11) and the main change is recorded after ~8.5 ka cal BP (~7.7 14C kyr BP). The sediment spanning the deglaciation until about 8.5 ka cal BP yielded ? Nd values between -12 and -13, whereas the overlying postglacial sediment yielded values ranging from -15 to -20. The change in ? Nd values after ca. 8.5 ka cal BP and the decrease in sediment accumulation rates together indicate reduction in meltwater flux and sedimentary supplies from the Paleozoic-dominated southeastern sector of the Laurentide ice sheet margin through the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The re-routing of meltwaters, from the Gulf of St. Lawrence to the Hudson Strait, resulted in a relative increase of low ? Nd sediments from Precambrian shield rocks carried by the Labrador Current to the slope site.

St-Onge, G.; de Vernal, A.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Meng, X.; Stevenson, R. K.

2004-05-01

136

Estuaries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

An estuary is a body of water that is created when freshwater from rives and streams flows into the saltwater of an ocean. To understand this mixing of fresh and salt water, learners go through several activities: 1) in Salt and Water, learners dissolve salt crystals in water to observe their effects on water; 2) in Making a Salt Wedge, learners make a model of a salt wedge estuary, which occurs in nature when the mouth of a river flows directly into seawater; 3) in Plant Dehydration learners observe the effects of salinity (salt content in the water) on live plants. Includes a wrap-up guide for group discussions.

Jersey, New; Center, Liberty S.; Coalition, New J.

2006-01-01

137

Late Quaternary history of the southwestern St. Lawrence Lowlands and adjacent Adirondack Highlands  

SciTech Connect

The reconstruction of Late Wisconsinan ice retreat, proglacial lakes, and Champlain Sea history from the northwest Adirondack slope and adjacent St. Lawrence Lowlands is critical to the synthesis of a regional picture of deglacial events in the eastern Great Lakes region. Unfortunately, these same areas are well known for their limited exposures, landforms covered by thick forest, large tracts of land inaccessible to detailed field mapping, and the overall paucity of glacial materials preserved on upland surfaces. Despite these limitations, a model which utilizes multiple and field-truthed evidence has been used to designate areas where ice border deposits indicate a substantial recessional position. It employs the following criteria in this analysis: sedimentology and morphostratigraphy of morainal landform segments and related sediments; orientation and continuity of ice border drainage channels; and the relationship of ice borders and drainage systems to well documented local and regional water bodies which accompanied ice retreat. The results of this approach have provided a unique regional picture of deglaciation. Despite the inherent limitations of working in upland areas to reconstruct glacial events, detailed morphostratigraphic correlations based on multiple lines of evidence can yield important information. The positions of five former ice borders have been reconstructed from the available data. These ice margins correspond closely with those documented previously by others adjoining areas. This type of study, utilizing multiple and field-truthed lines of evidence, constitutes a tangible step towards understanding the nature and history of ice retreat along this portion of the Laurentide Ice Sheet.

Pair, D.L. (Univ. of Dayton, OH (United States). Dept. of Geology)

1993-03-01

138

Environmental factors as predictors of epibenthic assemblage biomass in the St. Lawrence system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The distribution of epibenthic invertebrate biomass in relation to environmental factors was examined in the St. Lawrence system. Biomass estimates for epibenthos sampled yearly for 9 years on 102 suspended collectors (navigation buoys), were related to environmental data from the literature (surface water temperature, water salinity, water transparency, current velocity, chlorophyll a and primary production) using a weighted multiple linear regression analysis. Regression models were generated for total biomass and the biomass of the single dominant sessile species: Mytilus edulis, Semibalanus balanoides, Balanus crenatus, Obelia longissima and Hiatella arctica. Water temperature and water transparency, as well as some biogeographic groups of buoys represented by dummy variables, collectively explained 90.6% of the variance in total biomass. Water temperature, water transparency, biogeographic groups and, to a lesser degree, primary production, were the variables having a significant influence on the biomass of individual species. The lognormal weighted multiple regression model explained up to 84.5% of the variance in M. edulis biomass data and 67.9, 70.0, 71.6 and 38.9%, respectively, of the variance in S. balanoides, O. longissima, B. crenatus and H. arctica biomass data. The need to consider simultaneous biological and environmental sampling at the relevant temporal and spatial scales to model large marine coastal ecosystems is discussed.

Bourget, E.; Ardisson, P.-L.; Lapointe, L.; Daigle, G.

2003-07-01

139

Giardia and Cryptosporidium in harp and hooded seals from the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada.  

PubMed

Giardia and Cryptosporidium are protozoan parasites known to cause enteric disease in terrestrial wildlife species (mammals, reptiles and birds). Few surveys for Giardia and Cryptosporidium in marine wildlife species, such as pinnipeds, have been reported. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and genotype of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in two species of pinnipeds, harp seal (Phoca groenlandica) and hooded seal (Cystophora cristata), from the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada. Faecal samples were collected from pup and adult seals and examined for the presence of cysts of Giardia and oocysts of Cryptosporidium using microscopy and immunofluorescent staining. Tissues from the small intestine of adult seals were also collected and examined for infections using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. Giardia cysts were found in the faeces of 42% (16/38) of adult harp seals, but in none of the harp seal pups (0/20). Although Giardia cysts were not detected in faeces of adult hooded seals (0/10) using microscopy, 80% tested positive for Giardia using PCR of intestinal tissue indicative of a true replicating infection. Both harp and hooded seals harboured infections with the zoonotic strain, Giardia duodenalis Assemblage A, as determined using a nested-PCR technique to amplify a small subunit ribosomal (SSU-rRNA) gene of Giardia. Cryptosporidium was not detected by microscopy, nor using the PCR technique on intestinal tissues from any of the 68 seals examined. PMID:20594649

Appelbee, A J; Thompson, R C A; Measures, L M; Olson, M E

2010-06-11

140

Lake sturgeon spawning on artificial habitat in the St Lawrence River  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 1996, lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) spawning was documented for the third consecutive year on an artificially placed gravel bed in the St Lawrence River. Two distinct spawning periods were observed in 1996. Spawning initially commenced on 17 June, when water temperature reached 15??C. A second spawning event was documented from 28 June to 1 July (16??C). Sturgeon egg densities were monitored in three transects on egg trays, on the gravel surface, and within interstitial spaces in the gravel. Counts of developing eggs in the gravel bed during both spawning periods were used to estimate a total of 275000 eggs on the study area (0.075 ha). Average egg density was highest in the transect with the highest water velocities. Lake sturgeon fry were first observed in the gravel on 24 June (15.5??C), and first emergence from the gravel was documented on 28 June. Hatching following the second spawning event commenced on 3 July. Based on assessment of average embryo viability (61.6%) and egg-to-emergent fry survival (17.6%) an estimate of about 171000 sturgeon eggs hatched, producing over 49000 emergent fry. Current velocity, substrate particle size, depth of substrate, and maintenance of sediment-free interstitial spaces are important considerations in planning future spawning habitat enhancement projects. ?? Journal compilation 2006 Blackwell Verlag, Berlin.

Johnson, J. H.; Lapan, S. R.; Klindt, R. M.; Schiavone, A.

2006-01-01

141

Temporal changes in wetland landscapes of a section of the St. Lawrence River, Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Historical aerial photographs (from 1946 through 1983) were used to study and describe the nature and extent of changes in wetland vegetation of a section of the St. Lawrence River and to evaluate the relative importance of water level, fire, and vegetational development as causal factors of these historical changes. Data were encoded and analyzed using a geographical information system, autocorrelation, and Mantel tests. Results show three temporal patterns in wetland dynamics. First, some wetland zones have been reduced by human activities (urbanization, landfilling, canal dredging). The second group consists of wetland areas that remain stable and do not change over time. They are generally protected sites artificially maintained by water-level control. A third situation has occurred in the Lake Saint-François National Wildlife Area, where no significant wetland losses were detected, but where landscape structure has changed greatly. Modeling with Mantel tests suggests that, in the latter case, these changes in wetland landscape are related to the suppression of burning (fires set deliberately by Indians) since the purchase of the territory by the Canadian federal government. This situation has caused rapid replacement of wet meadows by Alnus rugosa scrub and a possible decline in habitat diversity.

Jean, Martin; Bouchard, André

1991-03-01

142

Spatial and temporal variation in abundance of Diplostomum spp. in walleye ( Stizostedion vitreum ) and white suckers ( Catostomus commersoni ) from the St. Lawrence River  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abundances of eye flukes (Diplostomum spp.) were compared between walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) and white suckers (Catostomus commersoni ) collected in late summer 1997 from Lake St. Louis and Lake St. Pierre, two expansions of the St. Lawrence River in Quebec, Canada. The white sucker, a benthic consumer, was more heavily in- fected than the walleye, a pelagic piscivore, in both

David J. Marcogliese; Pierre Dumont; Andrée D. Gendron; Yves Mailhot; Emmanuelle Bergeron; J. Daniel McLaughlin

2001-01-01

143

Biomarkers in zebra mussels ( Dreissena polymorpha) for the assessment and monitoring of water quality of the St Lawrence River (Canada)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five biomarkers (MT: metallothionein-like proteins, EROD: ethoxyresorufin ortho-dééthylase, DNA strand breaks, LPO: peroxidation of lipids, VG: vitellogenin-like protiens) were measured in the soft tissues of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) in order to assess the spatial variation of exposure to contaminants along the St Lawrence River (Canada). Fifteen mussels >25 mm shell length were analyzed from each of the 13 sampling

Yves de Lafontaine; François Gagné; Christian Blaise; Georges Costan; Pierre Gagnon; H. M. Chan

2000-01-01

144

Historical changes in herbaceous wetland distribution induced by hydrological conditions in Lake Saint-Pierre (St. Lawrence River, Quebec, Canada)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Historical changes (1961–2002) in the distribution of herbaceous wetland plant associations were inferred from the hydrological regime of Lake Saint-Pierre, a 312 km2 broadening of the St. Lawrence River (Quebec, Canada), to assess the cumulative effects of human interventions and climatic variability. Relative abundance index (height × percent cover) of wetland plants in 630 field quadrats sampled at 13 sites (1999–2002)

Christiane Hudon; Pierre Gagnon; Jean-Pierre Amyot; Guy Létourneau; Martin Jean; Céline Plante; Daniel Rioux; Martin Deschênes

2005-01-01

145

Parasite fauna of Etheostoma nigrum (Percidae: Etheostomatinae) in localities of varying pollution stress in the St. Lawrence River, Quebec, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Parasite communities were examined in johnny darters (Etheostoma nigrum) collected from five localities in the St. Lawrence River in southwestern Quebec: two reference localities, one polluted\\u000a locality upstream of the Island of Montreal and downstream of industrial and agricultural activity, and two polluted localities\\u000a downstream of the Island of Montreal in the plume from the wastewater treatment facility. Twenty-four helminth

Rachel J. Krause; J. Daniel McLaughlin; David J. Marcogliese

2010-01-01

146

Ground-Water Quality in the St. Lawrence River Basin, New York, 2005-06  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Federal Clean Water Act requires that States monitor and report on the quality of ground water and surface water. To satisfy part of these requirements, the U.S. Geological Survey and New York State Department of Environmental Conservation have developed a program in which ground-water quality is assessed in 2 to 3 of New York State's 14 major river basins each year. To characterize the quality of ground water in the St. Lawrence River Basin in northern New York, water samples were collected from 14 domestic and 11 production wells between August 2005 and January 2006. Eight of the wells were finished in sand and gravel and 17 wells were finished in bedrock. Ground-water samples were collected and processed using standard U.S. Geological Survey procedures and were analyzed for 229 constituents and physical properties, including inorganic constituents, nutrients, trace elements, radon-222, pesticides and pesticide degradates, volatile organic compounds, and bacteria. Sixty-six constituents were detected above laboratory reporting levels. Concentrations of most compounds at most sites were within drinking water standards established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and New York State Department of Health, but a few compounds exceeded drinking water standards at some sites. Water in the basin is generally hard to very hard (hardness equal to 121 mg/L as CaCO3 or greater); hardness and alkalinity were generally higher in the St. Lawrence Valley than in the Adirondack Mountains. The cation with the highest median concentration was calcium; the anion with the highest median concentration was bicarbonate. The concentration of chloride in one sample exceeded the 250 milligrams per liter U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Secondary Drinking Water Standard; the concentration of sulfate in one sample also exceeded the 250 milligrams per liter U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Secondary Drinking Water Standard. Nitrate was the predominant nutrient detected but no sample exceeded the 10 mg/L U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Maximum Contaminant Level. The trace elements detected with the highest median concentrations were strontium, barium, and iron. Concentration of trace elements in several samples exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Secondary Drinking Water Standards, including aluminum (50 micrograms per liter, 4 samples), iron (300 micrograms per liter, 5 samples), and manganese (50 micrograms per liter, 4 samples). The concentration of uranium in one sample from a domestic well finished in crystalline bedrock was three times the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Maximum Contaminant Level of 30 micrograms per liter. The median concentration of radon-222 was 600 picoCuries per liter, but concentrations as high as 18,800 picoCuries per liter were detected; two wells with high radon concentrations also had high uranium concentrations. Radon-222 is not currently regulated, but the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has proposed a Maximum Contaminant Level of 300 picoCuries per liter along with an Alternative Maximum Contaminant Level of 4,000 picoCuries per liter, to be in effect in states that have programs to address radon in indoor air. Concentrations of radon-222 exceeded the proposed Maximum Contaminant Level in 60 percent of samples and exceeded the proposed Alternative Maximum Contaminant Level in 8 percent of samples. Six pesticides and pesticide degradates were detected; all were amide or triazine herbicides or degradates. Five volatile organic compounds were detected, including disinfection byproducts such as trichloromethane and gasoline components or additives such as methyl tert-butyl ether. No pesticides, pesticide degradates, or volatile organic compounds were detected above established limits. Coliform bacteria, including Escherichia coli, were detected in three wells finished in carbonate bedrock.

Nystrom, Elizabeth A.

2007-01-01

147

Recent sediments of the St. Marks River coast, northwest Florida, a low-energy, sediment-starved estuary  

SciTech Connect

The St. Marks river of northwest Florida drains parts of the central panhandle of northwestern Florida, and a small area in southwestern Georgia. It traverses nearly 56.3 kilometers through a watershed of 1,711 square kilometers. The slow-moving river carries little sediment and terminates in Apalachee Bay, a low-energy embayment in the northeasternmost Gulf of Mexico. The coastal region is characterized by mudflats, seagrass beds, and an absence of sandy beaches and barrier islands. Clastic sediments of the coast and shelf rest on a shallow-dipping carbonate platform. The upper surface of the platform is locally karstic. As a result, like other rivers in this region of northwest Florida, the St. Marks watershed is marked by sinkholes and disappearing streams. The fact that the river travels underground through part of its lower watershed serves to trap or sieve some of its clastic load. In the estuary, the undulating karst topography causes the estuarine sediments to vary in thickness from 0 to 4+ meters. The concave shape of the coastline and its orientation with respect to prevailing winds result in low average wave energy. Sedimentation is therefore controlled by riverine and tidal forces. The relatively low energy conditions result in good preservation of the sedimentary record in the St. Marks estuary. A suite of sediment cores has been collected in the lower river, estuary and adjacent Gulf of Mexico. Lead-210 dating results indicate a slow average sedimentation rate ([approximately] 1mm/yr). Investigation of sedimentation rates and sediment characteristics over time in the St. Marks estuary indicate that sedimentologic conditions in this low-energy environment have been relatively stable during the recent geologic history of the estuary.

Highly, A.B. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee (United States). Dept. of Geology Florida Geological Survey, Tallahassee, FL (United States)); Donoghue, J.F. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Geology); Garrett, C.; Hoenstine, R.W.; Hertler, H. (Florida Geological Survey, Tallahassee, FL (United States))

1994-03-01

148

Index of surface-water records, part 4, St. Lawrence River Basin, to September 30, 1950  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The index lists the stream-flow and reservoir stations in the St. Lawrence River Basin for which records have been or are to be published for periods prior to September 30, 1950. The stations are listed in downstream order. Tributary streams are indicated by indention. Station names are given in their most recently published forms. Parentheses around part of a station name indicate that the inclosed word or words were used in an earlier published name or the station or in a name under which records were published by same agency other than the Geological Survey. The drainage areas, in square miles, are the latest figures published or otherwise available at this time. Drainage areas that were obviously inconsistent with other drainage areas on the same stream have been omitted. Some drainage areas not published by the Geological Survey are listed with an appropriate footnote stating the published source or the figure or drainage area. Under "period of record" breaks of less than a 12-month period are not shown. A dash not followed immediately by a closing date shows that the station was in operation on September 30, 1950. The years given are calendar years. Periods of records published by agencies other than the Geological Survey are listed in parentheses only when they contain more detailed information or are for periods not reported in publications to the Geological Survey. Records both of gage height and of discharge are listed for stream-flow stations, and records of gage height and of contents (or of change in contents) are listed for stations on reservoirs. Records of gage heights only and records consisting only of monthly figures either of stream flow or reservoir contents are designated by symbols and footnotes. For early years when daily discharges were not generally published by the Geological Survey, published daily gage heights and a published rating table are considered to be equivalent to daily discharges. An alphabetical index of streams. canals. and reservoirs is given on pages 12 to 14.

U.S. Geological Survey

1951-01-01

149

The benthic macrofauna of the St. Lucia Estuary during the 2005 drought year  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The St. Lucia Estuary is the largest estuarine system in Africa. The estuary is part of the Greater St. Lucia Wetland Park, which has been declared a World Heritage Site. This ecosystem has been subjected to severe drought conditions over the last four to five years, resulting in its mouth being closed off from the ocean in June 2002 for a period of over four years. The main aim of this study was to document the effects of the prevailing drought on the macrofauna of the system, since the last work on this benthic component had been undertaken over a decade ago, during a normal-to-wet phase. Macrofauna samples together with physico-chemical data were collected at representative sites in the Narrows, and the South and North lakes in February, April, August and October 2005. The drought exerted a strong influence on the system, leading to hypersaline conditions developing in its northern regions (maximum of 126 at Hell's Gate), and to the loss of aquatic habitat. Ordinations and clustering indicated that the macrofauna of the system could generally be separated into three clusters viz. (1) the Narrows and the southern portion of South Lake, (2) the northern half of South Lake, and (3) the North Lake-False Bay complex. Multivariate correlations indicated weak relationships between macrofaunal community structure and physico-chemical parameters. The distinction in macrofaunal assemblages between these clusters was probably caused by these habitats being physically separated at the peak of the drought, with no water flow between them, thereby preventing exchange of planktonic larvae and retarding colonisation of habitats. There was a northward decline in taxonomic richness and diversity of macrofauna in the system, which correlated positively with water depth and negatively with the biomass of microphytobenthos. It is evident that the drought structured macrofauna communities primarily through its effects on water depth and habitat fragmentation. The results of this investigation provide valuable information regarding the effects of droughts on estuarine-lake systems and the possible mechanisms by which they occur.

Pillay, D.; Perissinotto, R.

2008-03-01

150

Sediment trap observations from the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the continental margin of eastern Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sediment trap samples have provided the first direct observations of the sinking particles that account for the export of material out of the photic zone in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, as well as their relationship to variations in the trophic regime. Particles were collected at several sites over 24-h periods using 0.03 m 2 (collecting surface) and 0.5 m 2 free-drifting sediment traps at 50 and 150 m. Total mass flux varied widely (80-1500 mg/m 2/d), as did carbon flux (16-300 mg C/m 2/d). Small cylinders consistently oversampled with respect to big cylinders, regardless of depth or drifter design. Also, 6-month time series were obtained with a moored, 0.125 m 2 trap at two sites. In the Anticosti Gyre, time-series fluxes were consistent with those obtained from the big drifting trap (means: 480 mg dry wt/m 2/d; 39 mg C/m 2/d), and with independently measured sediment accumulation rates. Numeric fluxes of phytoplankton cells were similar to moderately productive ocean margins during the April 1994 bloom, but otherwise resembled those from oligotrophic regimes. Fecal pellet numeric fluxes, in contrast, were always high, similar to other continental margins. The composition of the material collected by the small and big traps is a good indicator of the changing trophic regime in the water column. Relative numeric abundances suggest three distinctly different periods. A "bloom" period (represented by April 1994, but including a weaker late-fall bloom over a shelf valley), when a variety of centric and pennate diatom cells made up 70-95% of the particle numbers; a transitional or "post-bloom" period (June 1994), when phytoplankton were less abundant, pennate forms were scarce and a single species dominated the centric diatoms; and a "non-bloom" period (May to December, 1993) when fecal pellets and microzooplankton accounted for greater numbers than the phytoplankton cells, including abundant dinoflagellates. The time-series Anticosti Gyre trap showed continued large-particle settling throughout the winter with total mass and carbon fluxes similar to the ice-free seasons. The most frequent fecal pellets were 50-109 ?m diameter compact and loose rods, produced by the dominant calanoid copepods. Large macrozooplankton fecal pellets occurred only sporadically. Many pellets <49 ?m were collected in December 1993, probably produced by Microcalanus, which was unusually abundant at this time. Oval pellets occurred over a broad range of diameters, suggesting multiple origins. The bulk of the settling material produced by the pelagic food web in the Gulf appears to be of zooplanktonic origin (mainly fecal pellets and abundant microzooplankton). Diatom frustules were the most frequently encountered particles, numerically, but phytoplankton rarely made up more than 35% of the 2D projected area of all particles. Much of the organic matter produced photosynthetically must thus be transformed by heterotrophs before escaping from the surface and intermediate waters in this region.

Romero, Nancy; Silverberg, Norman; Roy, Suzanne; Lovejoy, Connie

2000-04-01

151

Strike-slip interpretation of basin-bounding faults of the St. Lawrence lowlands basin the Quebec City area, Canada  

SciTech Connect

Traditional structural interpretations of faults identified in the autochthonous, Ordovician platform rocks of the St. Lawrence Lowlands basin of Quebec, Canada, assert that the primary sense of faulting is normal, extensional, and dip-slip in motion. Interpretation of field observations such as the offset of facies boundaries in outcrop, fault surface features, fracture patterns, and fault volume considerations lead directly to difficulties with a mobile crustal bulge model for normal faulting. Newly reprocessed seismic data and well-log correlations support this interpretation and indicate a need for a different model for the deformation of the platform margin. A left-lateral, basement-involved wrench system resolves stratigraphic discordances across fault zones, contradictions in the observed geometry of hanging-wall blocks, problems concerning timing of tectonic events, and the difficulty of using extensional deformation models in a compressional setting. This reinterpretation places the timing of the platform faulting just prior to the arrival of the Taconic thrust sheet. The lateral offset of subsurface and surface depositional facies, fault trace features, well correlations, and seismic expressions document approximately 60 km of left-lateral strike-slip motion in the St. Lawrence Lowlands basin. 30 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

Shaw, B.R. (BHP Petroleum (Americas), Houston, TX (United States))

1993-05-01

152

Reconnaissance investigation of high-calcium marble in the Beaver Creek area, St. Lawrence County, New York  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Three belts of marble of the Grenville Series were mapped in the Beaver Creek drainage basin, St. Lawrence County, N.Y. One of these, on the west side of Beaver Creek, consists of coarsely crystalline pure calcitic marble that occurs in a zone at least 10 by 0.8 km in extent. Samples of marble show CaCO3 content to be greater than 93 percent, and some samples contain greater than 96 percent, and only small amounts of MgO and Fe203 are present. Marble in two other belts to the east of Beaver Creek are variable in composition, but locally have high content of calcium carbonate material. The marble deposit west of Beaver Creek has a chemical composition favorable for specialized chemical, industrial, and metallurgical uses. Another favorable aspect of the deposit is its proximity to inexpensive water transportation on the St. Lawrence Seaway only 27.5 km away by road, at Ogdensburg, N.Y.

Brown, C. Ervin

1978-01-01

153

Modeling wetland plant community response to assess water-level regulation scenarios in the Lake Ontario - St. Lawrence River Basin.  

PubMed

The International Joint Commission has recently completed a five-year study (2000-2005) to review the operation of structures controlling the flows and levels of the Lake Ontario - St. Lawrence River system. In addition to addressing the multitude of stakeholder interests, the regulation plan review also considers environmental sustainability and integrity of wetlands and various ecosystem components. The present paper outlines the general approach, scientific methodology and applied management considerations of studies quantifying the relationships between hydrology and wetland plant assemblages (% occurrence, surface area) in Lake Ontario and the Upper and Lower St. Lawrence River. Although similar study designs were used across the study region, different methodologies were required that were specifically adapted to suit the important regional differences between the lake and river systems, range in water-level variations, and confounding factors (geomorphic types, exposure, sediment characteristics, downstream gradient of water quality, origin of water masses in the Lower River). Performance indicators (metrics), such as total area of wetland in meadow marsh vegetation type, that link wetland response to water levels will be used to assess the effects of different regulation plans under current and future (climate change) water-supply scenarios. PMID:16502038

Hudon, Christiane; Wilcox, Douglas; Ingram, Joel

2006-02-01

154

ASSESSMENT OF WATER QUALITY USING EPIPHYTIC DIATOM ASSEMBLAGES ON CLADOPHORA FROM THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER (CANADA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diatoms epiphytic on Cladophora were examined from 36 sites in the Saint Lawrence River between Salaberry-de-Valleyfield and Ile d'Orleans (Quábec, Canada). A total of 129 diatom taxa were identified from Cladophora in June 1995, and of these, 34 species were present at a relative abundance ? 1% at three or more sites. The four most abundant taxa were Cocconeis pediculus,

Jacqueline M. OConnell; Euan D. Reavie; John P. Smol

1997-01-01

155

Genetic Divergence among Northern Pike from Spawning Locations in the Upper St. Lawrence River  

Microsoft Academic Search

To assess the ecological consequences associated with the degradation of riparian wetlands that historically provided spawning and rearing habitat for northern pike Esox lucius, annual spawning migrations and genetic structure were used to examine this species' dependence on four specific spawning areas in the Thousand Islands region of the Saint Lawrence River. Tagging and recapture over three consecutive spawning seasons

Aaron Bosworth; John M. Farrell

2006-01-01

156

Holocene environmental and parasequence development of the St. Jones Estuary, Delaware (USA): Foraminiferal proxies of natural climatic and anthropogenic change  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The benthic foraminiferal record of marshes located along western Delaware Bay (St. Jones Estuary, USA) reflects the response of estuaries to sea-level and paleoclimate change during the Holocene. System tracts are recognized and within them parasequences based on sedimentological and foraminiferal assemblages identification. The parasequences defined by foraminiferal assemblages appear correlative with rapid Holocene climate changes that are of worldwide significance: 6000-5000, 4200-3800, 3500-2500, 1200-1000, and 600??cal years BP. Following postglacial sea-level rise, modern subestuaries and marshes in the region began to develop between 6000 and 4000??years BP, depending on their proximity to the mouth of Delaware Bay and coastal geomorphology. Initial sediments were fluvial in origin, with freshwater marshes established around 4000??years BP. The subsequent sea-level transgression occurred sufficiently slowly that freshwater marshes alternated with salt marshes at the same sites to around 3000??years BP. Locally another two transgressions are identified at 1800 and 1000??years BP respectively. Marine influence increased in the estuaries until 600??years BP (Little Ice Age), when regression occurred. Sea-level began to rise again during the mid-19th Century at the end of the Little Ice Age, when marshes became established. The presence of a sand lens in the upper and middle estuary and the reduction in the number of tests in the top samples in cores from the same area also suggest an anthropogenic influence. The estuary infill resulted in a sharp transgressive sequence, represented by salt marsh foraminiferal assemblages in the upper part of the cores. The increase in marsh foraminifera in both areas suggests an increase in marine influence that might be due to the transgression beginning at the end of the Little Ice Age about 150-180??years ago coupled with anthropogenic straightening of the channel in 1913. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Leorri, E.; Martin, R.; McLaughlin, P.

2006-01-01

157

Chemical dynamics of the “St. Lawrence” riverine system: ?DH2O, ?18OH2O, ?13CDIC, ?34Ssulfate, and dissolved 87Sr/86Sr  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Chemical and stable isotope analyses of the St. Clair, Detroit, Niagara, and St. Lawrence rivers (“St. Lawrence” system) and their tributaries show that the chemical and isotopic compositions of the waters are strongly controlled by the geology of their drainage basins. Tributaries draining the Canadian Shield have very low TDS, HCO3-, SO42-, Ca2+, Mg2+, NO3-, Sr2+, higher Si and Fetotal, and high 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.710 0.713). The Grand and Thames rivers that drain Paleozoic limestones, dolostones, and evaporites are characterized by opposite attributes. The “St. Lawrence” and the tributaries draining the Canadian Appalachians fall between these two endmembers. The St. Clair, Detroit, and Niagara rivers do not show any pronounced seasonal variations in major component chemistry due to buffering by the Great Lakes. In contrast, pronounced seasonal variations characterize the lower St. Lawrence mainly because of significant tributary inputs into the overall water budget. The ?D and ?18O in the “St. Lawrence” range from -60.9 to -44.5‰ and from -8.5 to -6.1‰ SMOW, respectively, much heavier than the comparative values measured for the tributaries (-92.8 to -58.3‰ and -13.1 to -8.5‰). This is a consequence of evaporative loss that, over the residence time of water of 102 years, equals about 7% of the water volume in the Great Lakes. The strontium and sulfur isotopic values for the “St. Lawrence” system are relatively uniform, with measured values from 0.70927 to 0.71112 for 87Sr/86Sr and from 4.3 to 5.6‰ for sulfate ?34S. Their seasonal variations are also minor. The strontium and sulfur fluxes of the St. Lawrence river are calculated to be 7.84 × 108 and 1.09 × 1011 mol/a, respectively. The relative contributions of the Great Lakes, tributaries, and other sources to these fluxes are 73:16:11% for strontium and 64:13:23% for sulfur. Isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (?13CDIC) in the “St. Lawrence” system ranges from -4.7 to +0.7‰, considerably heavier than the values for the tributaries (-16.5 to -6.7‰). The light ?13CDIC values for the tributaries suggest that CO2 from bacterial respiration plays an important role in the isotopic composition of riverine DIC. However, in the main stem river(s), this bacterial signal is masked by isotopic equilibration with atmospheric CO2 due to the long residence time of water in the Great Lakes. Seasonally, the main stem river(s) have heavier ?13C values in the fall than in the spring, a consequence of preferential 12C consumption by photosynthetic plants in the epilimnion of the Great Lakes during the growth season. In the down-stream portion of the St. Lawrence river, influx of isotopically light tributary waters causes progressive 13C depletion, from -1.3 to -2.0‰ and -1.4 to -3.0‰ in the fall and spring, respectively. The total DIC carbon flux of the St. Lawrence river is calculated to be 3.9 × 1011 mol/a. Mass balance calculations show that the relative contributions of the Great Lakes, tributaries, decay of organic matter, exchange with the atmosphere, and dissolution of carbonates to this total DIC flux are 81:13:2:-6:10% in the spring, and 83:15:-2:4:0% in the fall, respectively.

Yang, Chao; Telmer, Kevin; Veizer, Ján

1996-03-01

158

Mesozoic fault reactivation along the St. Lawrence Rift System as constrained by (U-Th/He) thermochronology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Saint Lawrence Rift System (SLRS) is a half-graben, extending for 1000 km along St. Lawrence River valley. Late Proterozoic-Early Paleozoic faults of the graben form the contact with the metamorphic Grenvillian basement to the northwest and extend under the Paleozoic sedimentary sequences of the St. Lawrence Lowlands to the southeast. The SLRS is the second most seismically active area in Canada, but the causes of this activity remain unclear. Reactivation of the SLRS is believed to have occurred along Late Proterozoic to Early Paleozoic normal faults related to the opening of the Iapetus Ocean. The absence of strata younger than the Ordovician makes difficult to determine when the faults reactivated after the Ordovician. Field relations between the normal faults bordering the SLRS and those produced by the Charlevoix impact crater suggest a reactivation of the rift younger than the Devonian, the estimated age of the impact. Apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology is an adequate tool to recognize thermal events related to fault movements. A thermochronology study was then started along three transects across the SLRS, from Québec up to Charlevoix. Apatites were extracted and separated from five granitic to charnockitic gneisses and an amphibolite of Grenvillian age. The samples were exposed on hanging wall and footwall of the Montmorency and Saint-Laurent faults at three different locations along the SLRS. For precision and accuracy, each of the six samples was analyzed for radiogenic 4He and U-Th contents at least twice. Apatite grains were isolated by heavy liquids and magnetic separation. For each sample, ten apatite grains were selected under optical microscope and inserted into Pt capsules. Particular care was taken to isolate apatite free of mineral and fluid inclusions. Indeed, SEM investigations showed that some inclusions are U-rich monazite, which is a supplementary source of 4He to be avoided. The 4He content was determined by using a static noble gas mass spectrometer in CRPG-Nancy and duplicates using a quadrupole mass spectrometer at GEOTOP-UQAM. 4He was measured against internal He gas standards and Durango apatite, with the reference U-Th/He age of 31.13 ± 1.01 Ma. U and Th contents were determined at CRPG-Nancy and duplicated at McGill University by ICP-MS. Preliminary results of U-Th/He on St.-Laurent fault yield an age of 137±12 Ma for the hanging wall, at Sault-au-Cochon and 118±10 Ma for a sample from the footwall, at Cap-aux-oies. Previous Apatite Fission Track (AFT) performed for the two locations gave expected older ages at 149±16 Ma and 196±19 Ma for the hanging wall and the footwall, respectively. These preliminary U-Th/He results are consistent with AFT ages of the area (i.e. as expected, U-Th/He ages are younger than AFT ages) but do not yet provide new constraints for the structural evolution of the St. Lawrence rift system. We are determining further U-Th/He ages and these ages will constrain an exhumation model of the region.

Bouvier, L.; Pinti, D. L.; Tremblay, A.; Minarik, W. G.; Roden-Tice, M. K.; Pik, R.

2011-12-01

159

Occurrence of a Syngamus sp. in tundra voles (Microtus oeconomus) collected on St. Lawrence Island, Bering Sea.  

PubMed

A species of syngamid nematode belonging to the genus Syngamus was found in the respiratory tract (terminal trachea to bronchi) of tundra voles (Microtus oeconomus) collected on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska (USA). Its prevalence in June 1989 was greater than 29% (12 of 41 male voles and seven of 24 females) in the village of Savoonga, while no nematodes were found from 41 voles collected in the village of Gambell. Lesions included dilatation of parasitized respiratory ducts and peribronchial and perivascular cuffing by lymphoid cells, mainly plasma cells, in parasitized lobes. Morphologically, this syngamid species differed from S. microtinae reported previously from the same host species as well as from other syngamids known from avian hosts. PMID:1548793

Sato, H; Kamiya, M

1992-01-01

160

Bioaccumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the marine pelagic food web, based on a seasonal study in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence, 1976–1977  

Microsoft Academic Search

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were quantified in bulk seawater (3.1 ± 1.0 ngl?1, N = 3) in 1976, in plankton (2.9 ± 3.3 ng g?1 wet weight, N = 176) in 1976 and 1977 and in fish (155 ± 194 ng g?1 wet weight, N = 135) in 1977 collected from St. Georges Bay in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence.

Gareth C. Hording; Raynald J. LeBlanc; W. Peter Vass; Richard F. Addison; Barry T. Hargrave; Sifford Pearre; Annie Dupuis; Paul F. Brodie

1997-01-01

161

Comparison of the interannual variability of spring heavy floods characteristics of tributaries of the St. Lawrence River in Quebec (Canada)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Comparison of the interannual variability of five characteristics (magnitude, duration, timing, frequency, and variability) of spring heavy floods was carried out for 17 natural rivers in Quebec for the period from 1934 to 2004 to detect any effect of climate warming on these characteristics. This was done using the Lombard method and Copula. Changes in the mean and variance of all characteristics of streamflow were observed, and all these changes are abrupt. Whereas little significant change was observed in the magnitude, duration and variability (CV) series of spring flood flows. A significant change was noted in the frequency (diminution) for five rivers and in the timing of spring floods for six rivers. However, the change in mean timing is the only one that has a hydroclimatic significance in time and space. This change was observed, on the one hand, in the Eastern hydrological region, located on the south shore of the St. Lawrence River, north of 47°N, and characterized by a maritime climate and, on the other hand, in the South-west hydrological region, located on the north shore and characterized by a continental climate. In both cases, the change took place after the second half of the 1970s and is characterized by the early occurrence of spring floods. In addition, in both hydrological regions, the timing of spring floods is correlated with the same hydroclimatic indices, showing a positive correlation with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and a negative correlation with the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). Frequency is the only characteristic for which mean and variance changed significantly over time for the same rivers (4), all located north of 48°N, on both shores of the St. Lawrence. For all flow characteristics, the change in variance can predate, postdate or be synchronous with the change in mean. Finally, the dependence between the various characteristics of spring floods as determined using the Kendall tau statistic remained constant in time for most of the rivers.

Mazouz, Rabah; Assani, Ali A.; Quessy, Jean-François; Légaré, Guillaume

2012-01-01

162

Fossil brines preserved in the St-Lawrence Lowlands, Québec, Canada as revealed by their chemistry and noble gas isotopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Brines in Cambrian sandstones and Ordovician dolostones of the St-Lawrence Lowlands at Bécancour, Québec, Canada were sampled for analysis of all stable noble gases in order to trace their origin and migration path, in addition to quantifying their residence time. Major ion chemistry indicates that the brines are of Na-Ca-Cl type, possibly derived from halite dissolution. 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios and Ca excess indicate prolonged interactions with silicate rocks of the Proterozoic Grenville basement or the Cambrian Potsdam sandstone. The brines constrain a 2-3% contribution of mantle 3He and large amounts of nucleogenic 21Ne ? and 38Ar ? and radiogenic 4He and 40Ar ?. 4He/ 40Ar ? and 21Ne ?/ 40Ar ? ratios, corrected for mass fractionation during incomplete brine degassing, are identical to their production ratios in rocks. The source of salinity (halite dissolution), plus the occurrence of large amounts of 40Ar ? in brines constrain the residence time of Bécancour brines as being older than the Cretaceous. Evaporites in the St-Lawrence Lowlands likely existed only during Devonian-Silurian time. Brines might result from infiltration of Devonian water leaching halite, penetrating into or below the deeper Cambrian-Ordovician aquifers. During the Devonian, the basin reached temperatures higher than 250 °C, allowing for thermal maturation of local gas-prone source rocks (Utica shales) and possibly facilitating the release of radiogenic 40Ar ? into the brines. The last thermal event that could have facilitated the liberation of 40Ar ? into fluids and contributed to mantle 3He is the Cretaceous Monteregian Hills magmatic episode. For residence times younger than the Cretaceous, it is difficult to find an appropriate source of salinity and of nucleogenic/radiogenic gases to the Bécancour brines.

Pinti, Daniele L.; Béland-Otis, Catherine; Tremblay, Alain; Castro, Maria Clara; Hall, Chris M.; Marcil, Jean-Sébastien; Lavoie, Jean-Yves; Lapointe, Raynald

2011-08-01

163

Assessing rock aquifer vulnerability using downward advective times from a 3D model of surficial geology: A case study from the St. Lawrence Lowlands, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

An aquifer vulnerability assessment method which relates vulnerability directly to groundwater Downward Advective Time (DAT) from a 3D geologic model is tested over a 1400 km 2 area in the St. Lawrence Lowlands in SW Québec. The goal was to assess the vulnerability of the regional rock aquifer which is overlain by discontinuous and unconsolidated Quaternary units. Hydrogeologic parameters such

Martin Ross; Richard Martel; René Lefebvre; Michel Parent; Martine M. Savard

164

Annual Dissolved Nitrite Plus Nitrate and Total Phosphorous Loads for the Susquehanna, St. Lawrence, Mississippi-Atchafalaya, and Columbia River Basins, 1968-2004.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Annual stream-water loads were calculated near the outlet of four of the larger river basins (Susquehanna, St. Lawrence, Mississippi-Atchafalaya, and Columbia) in the United States for dissolved nitrite plus nitrate (NO2 + NO3) and total phosphorus using ...

B. T. Aulenbach

2006-01-01

165

A processing plant survey of external lesions of American eels ( Anguilla rostrata) from Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Signs of decreasing landing and recruitment were observed in the last decade in American eels (Anguilla rostrata) from the St. Lawrence River basin, Canada. In order to verify if the declines were associated with high prevalence of diseases among commercial catches, a total of 12243 eels captured in five commercial fishing sites were inspected at two processing plants in 1992.

Lucie T Dutil; Catherine M Couillard; Denise Bélanger

1997-01-01

166

Contrasting shell\\/tissue characteristics of Dreissena polymorpha and Dreissena bugensis in relation to environmental heterogeneity in the St. Lawrence River  

Microsoft Academic Search

The zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, is widespread in the St. Lawrence River while the conspecific quagga mussel, Dreissena bugensis, is found only in the Lake Ontario outflow region of the river. This situation provided an opportunity to evaluate in situ environmental and interspecific heterogeneity in shell and tissue growth. Shell dry weight, carbon content, and shell strength of D. polymorpha

Andrew F. Casper; Ladd E. Johnson

2010-01-01

167

A telephone survey of eel fishermen regarding external lesions and mortalities of American eels ( Anguilla rostrata) from Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River basin, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Signs of decreasing landings and recruitment have been observed during the last decade in American eels (Anguilla rostrata) from the St. Lawrence River basin, Canada. A study was undertaken to examine whether important manifestational diseases among commercial catches could be associated with these declines. During this survey, 56 fishermen from Lakes Ontario, Saint-François and Saint-Pierre, the Richelieu River, the Québec

Lucie Dutil; Denise Bélanger; Catherine M Couillard

1997-01-01

168

Contaminant Residues in Snapping Turtle ( Chelydra s. serpentina ) Eggs from the Great Lakes–St. Lawrence River Basin (1999 to 2000)  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine temporal and geographic variations of environmentally persistent pollutants, the concentrations of several contaminants were measured in snapping turtle eggs in 1999 and 2000. Contaminants included polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), non- ortho PCBs, polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and furans, organochlorine pesticides, and total mercury. Egg collection sites within the St. Lawrence Area of Concern (AOC) and the Territory of Akwesasne included Turtle

S. L. Ashpole; C. A. Bishop; R. J. Brooks

2004-01-01

169

Temporal variation of blood and hair mercury levels in pregnancy in relation to fish consumption history in a population living along the St. Lawrence River  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fish consumption from the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence River has been decreasing over the last years due to advisories and increased awareness of the presence of several contaminants. Methylmercury (MeHg), a well-established neurotoxicant even at low levels of exposure, bioaccumulates to differing degrees in various fish species and can have serious adverse effects on the development and functioning

Joëlle Morrissette; Larissa Takser; Genevieve St-Amour; Audrey Smargiassi; Julie Lafond; Donna Mergler

2004-01-01

170

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 2): General Motors/Central Foundry Division Site, St. Lawrence County, Massena, NY. (Second remedial action), March 1992. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The 270-acre General Motors/Central Foundry Division site is an aluminum casting plant in Massena, St. Lawrence County, New York. From 1985 to 1989, General Motors investigations detected contamination in soil, sludge, debris, sediment, ground water and surface water. In 1988, an interim cap was placed over the industrial landfill. A 1990 ROD addressed most affected areas of the site, including the St. Lawrence River System sediments, contaminated ground water, soils on the facility and the St. Regis Mohawk Indian Reservation, and material at four lagoons and the North Disposal Area. The ROD provides the final remedy for the contaminated soil, sludge, debris, and groundwater at the East Disposal Area and the Industrial Lagoon. The primary contaminants of concern are VOCs, including TCE; and other organics, including PCBs, phenols, and PAHs. The selected remedial action for the site are included.

Not Available

1992-03-31

171

Chemical dynamics of the ``St. Lawrence'' riverine system: deltaDH2O, delta18OH2O, delta13CDIC, delta34Ssulfate, and dissolved 87Sr\\/86Sr  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chemical and stable isotope analyses of the St. Clair, Detroit, Niagara, and St. Lawrence rivers (``St. Lawrence'' system) and their tributaries show that the chemical and isotopic compositions of the waters are strongly controlled by the geology of their drainage basins. Tributaries draining the Canadian Shield have very low TDS, HCO3-, SO42-, Ca2+, Mg2+, NO3-, Sr2+, higher Si and Fetotal,

Chao Yang; Kevin Telmer; Ján Veizer

1996-01-01

172

Chemical dynamics of the “St. Lawrence” riverine system: ?D H 2O , ? 18O H 2O , ? 13C DIC, ? 34S sulfate, and dissolved 87Sr\\/ 86Sr  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chemical and stable isotope analyses of the St. Clair, Detroit, Niagara, and St. Lawrence rivers (“St. Lawrence” system) and their tributaries show that the chemical and isotopic compositions of the waters are strongly controlled by the geology of their drainage basins. Tributaries draining the Canadian Shield have very low TDS, HCO3?, SO42?, Ca2+, Mg2+, NO3?, Sr2+, higher Si and Fetotal,

Chao Yang; Kevin Telmer; Ján Veizer

1996-01-01

173

Analyses of Lake Superior Seiche Activity for Estimating Effects on Pollution Transport in the St. Louis River Estuary under Extreme Conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cleanup of toxic residues within the Great Lakes basin requires the assessment of various cleanup options. An important tool for such evaluations is water quality modeling where impacts under hypothetical hydrodynamic conditions can be simulated. In assessing various options for a contaminated site in the St. Louis River estuary at the western end of Lake Superior, it was found that

John Sorensen; Mike Sydor; Hubert Huls; Mike Costello

2004-01-01

174

Crocodiles count on it: Regulation of discharge to Lake St Lucia Estuary by a South African peatland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Mfabeni mire is located within the iSimangaliso Wetland Park in north-eastern KwaZulu-Natal Province on the Indian Ocean sea-board of South Africa. This mire complex includes open peatland with occurrences of sedge communities, Sphagnum (rare in South Africa), and swamp forest which is common in the region (but rare in South Africa). It is one of the largest (1650 ha), thickest (10.8 m of peat) and the oldest (~45,000 years Before Present) known peatlands in South Africa. The mire is almost pristine, with very few disturbances. In the past the surrounding area supported pine plantations but these alien trees were recently removed, with conservation and tourism the primary designated activities. Surface and groundwater exchanges to and within the mire and its surrounding coastal dune landscape were studied. Profiles of electrical conductivity and major cations and anions, as well as natural isotopes (?2H and ?18O) in water samples of ground and surface water were also analysed to develop a conceptual model of the system’s hydrological function. Water efflux from an inland dune complex provides substantial recharge towards Mfabeni, while coastward hydraulic gradients from the dune complex through the wetland are evident. Consequently, the linkages between the dune system and Mfabeni, and the peatland’s water regulation function, dictate the nature and magnitude of the local freshwater discharge to the estuary, and internal water exchanges that control peatland ecological function. The hydrograph from the stream outlet indicate an initial rapid response in increased flows after major rainfall events but with a delayed drawdown over time reflecting the contribution of the relatively large size of the mire (comprising 38% of the catchment) in attenuating flood events and ensuring sustained flow to the estuary. Freshwater discharge from the Mfabeni mire to the St. Lucia estuary, which has provided refuge for aquatic species during periods of drought, may become crucial under a more erratic climate.

Price, J. S.; Grundling, P.; Grootjans, A.

2010-12-01

175

Steady-state mass balance model for mercury in the St. Lawrence River near Cornwall, Ontario, Canada.  

PubMed

We have developed a local mass balance model for the St. Lawrence River near Cornwall, Ontario that describes the fate and transport of mercury in three forms, elemental, divalent, and methylated, in a five compartment environment (air, water, sediments, periphyton, and benthos). Our objective was to construct a steady-state mass balance model to determine the dominant sources and sinks of mercury in this environment. We compiled mercury concentrations, fluxes, and transformation rates from previous studies completed in this section of the river to develop the model. The inflow of mercury was the major source to this system, accounting for 0.42 mol month(-1), or 95.5% of all mercury inputs, whereas outflow was 0.28 mol month(-1), or 63.6% of all losses, and sediment deposition was 0.12 mol month(-1), or 27.3% of all losses. Uncertainty estimates were greatest for advective fluxes in surface water, porewater, periphyton, and benthic invertebrates. PMID:23287073

Lessard, Charlotte R; Poulain, Alexandre J; Ridal, Jeffrey J; Blais, Jules M

2012-12-31

176

Historical records of atmospheric metal deposition along the St. Lawrence Valley (eastern Canada) based on peat bog cores  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recent history of atmospheric As, Cd, Ni, Pb and Zn deposition and the stable Pb isotope signatures were reconstructed from short cores collected at three peat bogs along the St. Lawrence Valley (SLV). The onset of industrial activity was recorded around 1810-1850 AD. As, Cd, Pb and, to a certain extent, Ni deposition rates reached maxima between 1940 and the early 1970s. Trace metals likely originated from coal-burning and ore smelting between 1850 and 1950 AD, and were replaced thereafter, at least in the case of Pb, by the combustion of leaded gasolines until the mid-1980s. Trace metal contents and accumulation rates were greater in the two cores recovered from the southwestern SLV than further northeast, as expected from their proximity to urban and industrial centers of eastern Canada and the U.S. Mid-West and the direction of the prevalent winds. A rapid decrease in metal accumulation rates since the 1970s suggests that mitigation policies were effective in reducing atmospheric metal emissions. Nevertheless, metal accumulation rates and stable Pb isotope signatures have not yet returned to their pre-industrial values.

Pratte, Steve; Mucci, Alfonso; Garneau, Michelle

2013-11-01

177

Estimation, analysis, sources, and verification of consumptive water use data in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River basin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River basin provides water for many uses and for wildlife habitat; thus many groups have developed strategies to manage the basin 's water resource. The International Joint Commission (IJC) is reviewing and comparing available consumptive-use data to assess the magnitude and effect of consumptive uses under present projected economic and hydraulic conditions on lake levels. As a part of this effort, the U.S. Geological Survey compared its own estimates of consumptive use in the United States with those generated by (1) the International Great Lakes Diversions and (2) the IJC. The U.S. Geological Survey also developed two methods of calculating consumptive-use projections for 1980 through 2000; one method yields an estimate of 6,490 cu ft/s for the year 2000; the other yields an estimate of 8,330 cu ft/s. These two projections could be considered the upper and lower limits for the year 2000. The reasons for the varying estimates are differences in (1) methods by which base year values were developed, and (2) the methods or models that were used to project consumptive-use values for the future. Acquisition of consumptive-use data from water users or governmental agencies or ministries would be desirable to minimize reliance on estimates. (USGS)

Snavely, D. S.

1988-01-01

178

Fish community changes in the St. Louis River estuary, Lake Superior, 1989-1996: Is it ruffe or population dynamics?  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernuus) have been implicated in density declines of native species through egg predation and competition for food in some European waters where they were introduced. Density estimates for ruffe and principal native fishes in the St. Louis River estuary (western Lake Superior) were developed for 1989 to 1996 to measure changes in the fish community in response to an unintentional introduction of ruffe. During the study, ruffe density increased and the densities of several native species decreased. The reductions of native stocks to the natural population dynamics of the same species from Chequamegon Bay, Lake Superior (an area with very few ruffe) were developed, where there was a 24-year record of density. Using these data, short- and long-term variations in catch and correlations among species within years were compared, and species-specific distributions were developed of observed trends in abundance of native fishes in Chequamegon Bay indexed by the slopes of densities across years. From these distributions and our observed trend-line slopes from the St. Louis River, probabilities of measuring negative change at the magnitude observed in the St. Louis River were estimated. Compared with trends in Chequamegon Bay, there was a high probability of obtaining the negative slopes measured for most species, which suggests natural population dynamics could explain, the declines rather than interactions with ruffe. Variable recruitment, which was not related to ruffe density, and associated density-dependent changes in mortality likely were responsible for density declines of native species.

Bronte, Charles R.; Evrard, Lori M.; Brown, William P.; Mayo, Kathleen R.; Edwards, Andrew J.

1998-01-01

179

Variations in water temperatures and levels in the St. Lawrence River (Québec, Canada) and potential implications for three common fish species  

Microsoft Academic Search

The implications for fish populations of long- (multi-decadal, 1919–2007), medium- (inter-annual) and short- (seasonal, daily)\\u000a term variations in water temperatures and levels were examined in the St. Lawrence River (SLR). The effects of the seasonal\\u000a thermal regime of the SLR and its tributaries on the thermal budgets of resident and migrating fish were contrasted. Over\\u000a the 1919–2007 period, the mean

Christiane Hudon; Alain Armellin; Pierre Gagnon; Alain Patoine

2010-01-01

180

Meltwater discharge and the triggering of Younger Dryas : new data on the chronology of Champlain Sea transgression in the St-Lawrence River Valley  

Microsoft Academic Search

Accurate chronology of ice retreat is crucial to understand the Ocean-Atmosphere couple at the end of the Pleistocene. The St-Lawrence River Valley is key in this regard, and two sedimentary sequences from Mount Saint-Hilaire, in the middle of the valley, contain a record that sheds new lignt on ice retreat and the penecontemporaneous proglacial marine invasion. Basal AMS-dates on terrestrial

P. Richard; S. Occhietti

2004-01-01

181

Water-level regulation and coastal wetland vegetation in the upper St. Lawrence River: inferences from historical aerial imagery, seed banks, and Typha dynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluated habitat changes of tributary (drowned river mouth) wetlands in the upper St. Lawrence River with analysis of\\u000a pre-and post-regulation water levels and historical vegetation reconstruction from aerial photographs. In addition, the germination\\u000a response of transplanted wetland soil was compared to understand responses to moist versus saturated hydrology. Typha stem density was sampled in reference sites under the influence

John M. Farrell; Brent A. Murry; Donald J. Leopold; Alison Halpern; Molly Beland Rippke; Kevin S. Godwin; Sasha D. Hafner

2010-01-01

182

Potential causes of enhanced transfer of mercury to St. Lawrence River Biota: implications for sediment management strategies at Cornwall, Ontario, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined factors and pathways involved in the transfer of mercury (Hg) to the food web in St. Lawrence River embayments\\u000a near Cornwall, Ontario, where natural remediation of contaminated sediments (eventual burial by settling of cleaner sediments)\\u000a has been adopted as a management strategy. Yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from one of the study zones (Zone 1) along the river by

J. J. RidalL; L. E. Yanch; A. R. Fowlie; N. R. Razavi; T. M. Delongchamp; E. S. Choy; M. Fathi; P. V. Hodson; L. M. Campbell; J. M. Blais; M. B. C. Hickey; E. Yumvihoze; D. R. S. Lean

2010-01-01

183

Hazard assessment of a simulated oil spill on intertidal areas of the St. Lawrence River with SPMD-TOX.  

PubMed

Phytoremediation in a simulated crude oil spill was studied with a "minimalistic" approach. The SPMD-TOX paradigm-a miniature passive sorptive device to collect and concentrate chemicals and microscale tests to detect toxicity-was used to monitor over time the bioavailability and potential toxicity of an oil spill. A simulated crude oil spill was initiated on an intertidal freshwater grass-wetland along the St. Lawrence River southwest of Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. Several phytoremediation treatments were investigated; to dissipate and ameliorate the spill, treatments included nutrient amendments with inorganic nitrogen sources (ammonium nitrate and sodium nitrate) and phosphate (super triple phosphate) with and without cut plants, with natural attenuation (no phytoremedial treatment) as a control. Sequestered oil residues were bioavailable in all oil-treated plots in Weeks 1 and 2. Interestingly, the samples were colored and fluoresced under ultraviolet light. In addition, microscale tests showed that sequestered residues were acutely toxic and genotoxic, as well as that they induced hepatic P(450) enzymes. Analysis of these data suggested that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were among the bioavailable residues sequestered. In addition, these findings suggested that the toxic bioavailable fractions of the oil spill and degradation products dissipated rapidly over time because after the second week the water column contained no oil or detectable degradation products in this riverine intertidal wetland. SPMD-TOX revealed no evidence of bioavailable oil products in Weeks 4, 6, 8, and 12. All phytoremediation efforts appeared to be ineffective in changing either the dissipation rate or the ability to ameliorate the oil toxicity. SPMD-TOX analysis of the water columns from these riverine experimental plots profiled the occurrence, dissipation, and influence of phytoremediation on the bioavailability and toxicity of oil products (parent or degradation products). PMID:15269903

Johnson, B Thomas; Petty, James D; Huckins, James N; Lee, Ken; Gauthier, Joanne

2004-08-01

184

Trophic structure and mercury distribution in a Gulf of St. Lawrence (Canada) food web using stable isotope analysis.  

PubMed

Even at low concentrations in the environment, mercury has the potential to biomagnify in food chains and reaches levels of concern in apex predators. The aim of this study was to relate the transfer of total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in a Gulf of St. Lawrence food web to the trophic structure, from primary consumers to seabirds, using stable nitrogen (?(15)N) and carbon (?(13)C) isotope analysis and physical environmental parameters. The energy reaching upper trophic level species was principally derived from pelagic primary production, with particulate organic matter (POM) at the base of the food chain. We developed a biomagnification factor (BMF) taking into account the various prey items consumed by a given predator using stable isotope mixing models. This BMF provides a more realistic estimation than when using a single prey. Lipid content, body weight, trophic level and benthic connection explained 77.4 and 80.7% of the variation in THg and MeHg concentrations, respectively in this food web. When other values were held constant, relationships with lipid and benthic connection were negative whereas relationships with trophic level and body weight were positive. Total Hg and MeHg biomagnified in this food web with biomagnification power values (slope of the relationship with ?(15)N) of 0.170 and 0.235, respectively on wet weight and 0.134 and 0.201, respectively on dry weight. Values of biomagnification power were greater for pelagic and benthopelagic species compared to benthic species whereas the opposite trend was observed for levels at the base of the food chain. This suggests that Hg would be readily bioavailable to organisms at the base of the benthic food chain, but trophic transfer would be more efficient in each trophic level of pelagic and benthopelagic food chains. PMID:20810146

Lavoie, Raphael A; Hebert, Craig E; Rail, Jean-François; Braune, Birgit M; Yumvihoze, Emmanuel; Hill, Laura G; Lean, David R S

2010-10-15

185

Vertical distribution and water solubility of phosphorus and heavy metals in sediments of the St. Lucie Estuary, South Florida, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Accumulation and distribution of heavy metals and phosphorus in sediments impact water quality. There has been an increasing concern regarding fish health in the St. Lucie Estuary, which is related to increased inputs of nutrients and metals in recent decades. To investigate vertical changes of contaminants (P, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, and Mn) in sediments of the St. Lucie Estuary in South Florida, 117 layer samples from six of the 210 to 420 cm depth cores were analyzed for their total and water-soluble P and heavy metals, clay, total Fe, Al, K, Ca, Mg, Na, and pH. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used in two sets of analytical data (total and water-soluble contaminant concentrations) to document changes of contaminants in each core of sediments. The PCA of total contaminants and minerals resulted in two factors (principal components). The first and second factors accounted for 61.7 and 17.2 % of the total variation in all variables, and contrast indicators associated with contaminants of P, Cd, Co, Cr, Ni, Pb, Zn, and Mn and accumulation of Fe and Al oxides, respectively. The first factor could be used for overall assessment of P and heavy metal contamination, and was higher in the upper 45-90 cm than the lower depths of each core. The concentrations of P and heavy metals in the surface layers of sediments significantly increased, as compared with those in the sediments deeper than 45-90 cm. The PCA of water-soluble contaminants developed two factors. The second factor (Cu-P) was higher in the upper than the lower depths of the sediment, whereas the highest score of the first factor (Cd-Co-Cr-Ni-Pb-Zn-Mn) occurred below 100 cm. The water-soluble Cu and P concentrations were mainly dependent on their total concentrations in the sediments, whereas the water-soluble Cd, Co, Cr, Ni, Pb, Zn, and Mn concentrations were mainly controlled by pH.

He, Z. L.; Zhang, M.; Stoffella, P. J.; Yang, X. E.

2006-05-01

186

46 CFR 401.405 - Basic rates and charges on the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Lawrence River and Lake Ontario. 401.405 Section 401.405 Shipping COAST GUARD (GREAT LAKES PILOTAGE), DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GREAT LAKES PILOTAGE REGULATIONS Rates, Charges, and Conditions for Pilotage Services §...

2011-10-01

187

Toxicity of waters from the St. Lawrence River at Massena Area-of-Concern to the plankton species Selenastrum capricornutum and Ceriodaphnia dubia  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 1972, the US and Canada committed to restore the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Great Lakes Ecosystem under the first Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. During subsequent amendments, part of the St. Lawrence River at Massena NY, and segments of three tributaries, were designated as one Area of Concern (AOC) due to various beneficial use impairments (BUIs). Plankton beneficial use was designated impaired within this AOC because phytoplankton and zooplankton population data were unavailable or needed “further assessment”. Contaminated sediments from industrial waste disposal have been largely remediated, thus, the plankton BUI may currently be obsolete. The St. Lawrence River at Massena AOC remedial action plan established two criteria which may be used to assess the plankton BUI; the second states that, “in the absence of community structure data, plankton bioassays confirm no toxicity impact in ambient waters”. This study was implemented during 2011 to determine whether this criterion was achieved. Acute toxicity and chronic toxicity of local waters were quantified seasonally using standardized bioassays with green alga Selenastrum capricornutum and water flea Ceriodaphnia dubia to test the hypothesis that waters from sites within the AOC were no more toxic than were waters from adjacent reference sites. The results of univariate and multivariate analyses confirm that ambient waters from most AOC sites (and seasons) were not toxic to both species. Assuming both test species represent natural plankton assemblages, the quality of surface waters throughout most of this AOC should not seriously impair the health of resident plankton communities.

Baldigo, Barry P.; Duffy, Brian T.; Nally, Christopher J.; David, Anthony M.

2012-01-01

188

Trends of total cadmium, copper, and zinc in the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) along the upper reach of the St. Lawrence River: 1994-2005.  

PubMed

This study examines spatial and temporal variability of bioaccumulation of cadmium, copper, and zinc in tissues of zebra mussels in the upper reach of the St. Lawrence River which originates at the outflow of Lake Ontario. It was hypothesized that concentrations of these metals in mussel tissues would decline over time and decrease with increasing distance from the outlet of Lake Ontario as a result of on-going efforts to reduce contaminant discharges into the lake. Size of mussels was also evaluated as a factor influencing bioaccumulation. Mussels were collected annually in October from six sites from 1994 to 2005, including one site near a local industry. Individuals were grouped into five or more size classes per site in each year. Soft tissues were analyzed for total cadmium, copper and zinc. Concentrations of cadmium and copper in tissues varied significantly both spatially and temporally. Cadmium concentrations were elevated at most sites; copper concentrations were moderately elevated compared with other studies in the Lake Ontario basin and St. Lawrence River. Zinc showed the most uniformity in mussels possibly due to internal regulation and to low levels of environmental exposure. Animal size correlated with copper concentrations of tissues in approximately 30% of samples but infrequently for cadmium and zinc. Cadmium and copper levels were found to decline downstream over time. Inter-annual variability of metal concentrations in mussel tissues suggests utilization in long-term monitoring programs to discern significant trends. PMID:21922178

Johns, Carolyn

2011-09-16

189

Modeling wetland plant community response to assess water-level regulation scenarios in the Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River basin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The International Joint Commission has recently completed a five-year study (2000-2005) to review the operation of structures controlling the flows and levels of the Lake Ontario - St. Lawrence River system. In addition to addressing the multitude of stakeholder interests, the regulation plan review also considers environmental sustainability and integrity of wetlands and various ecosystem components. The present paper outlines the general approach, scientific methodology and applied management considerations of studies quantifying the relationships between hydrology and wetland plant assemblages (% occurrence, surface area) in Lake Ontario and the Upper and Lower St. Lawrence River. Although similar study designs were used across the study region, different methodologies were required that were specifically adapted to suit the important regional differences between the lake and river systems, range in water-level variations, and confounding factors (geomorphic types, exposure, sediment characteristics, downstream gradient of water quality, origin of water masses in the Lower River). Performance indicators (metrics), such as total area of wetland in meadow marsh vegetation type, that link wetland response to water levels will be used to assess the effects of different regulation plans under current and future (climate change) water-supply scenarios.

Hudon, Christiane; Wilcox, Douglas; Ingram, Joel

2006-01-01

190

Temporal trends and spatial variability of mercury in four fish species in the Ontario segment of the St. Lawrence River, Canada.  

PubMed

The Massena (New York) and Cornwall (Ontario) region has a long history of Hg discharge into the St. Lawrence River. The objectives of this study were to evaluate if Hg levels have declined in this portion of the river since 1975 and to compare Hg level in fish species upstream and downstream of this area in order to evaluate the anthropogenic contribution to Hg levels in fish. Mercury levels in four fish species were monitored over a 20-year period (1975-1995). A general linear model and an analysis of covariance were used to extract temporal trends and spatial variability, respectively, while correcting the data for fish length. Over time, Hg levels declined in most fish species. In the four regions studied, Hg levels in fish were similar, which suggests that other sources like atmospheric deposition and Hg loading from the Great Lakes may also contribute to the Hg burden in fish in the St. Lawrence River. This indicates that fish, with large home range, are good biomonitors of temporal Hg releases but their ability to avoid point sources makes them less appealing as biomonitors to address spatial variability in Hg releases. PMID:18040593

Goulet, Richard R; Lalonde, J D; Chapleau, F; Findlay, S C; Lean, D R S

2008-05-01

191

An Examination of the Influence of Freshwater Canal Discharges on Salinity in Selected Southeastern Florida Estuaries.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Monthly determinations of surface and bottom water salinity were made within the canal (or stream) estuary complexes of six southeastern Florida coastal zones (St. Lucie River and Estuary, Loxahatchee River and Estuary, West Palm Beach Canal and Estuary, ...

B. I. Birnhak

1974-01-01

192

Temporal and spatial distribution and production of dissolved gaseous mercury in the Bay St. François wetland, in the St. Lawrence River, Quebec, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wetlands are valued for their high biodiversity and for their ecosystem services. However, we still do have a poor understanding of their role in the redox transformation of contaminants such as mercury, particularly in fluvial settings. Seasonal and spatial variations in dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) distribution and production were studied in the Bay St. François, a wetland in the St.

Edenise Garcia; Jerôme Laroulandie; Xavier R. Saint-Simon; Marc Amyot

2006-01-01

193

Continuous analysis of dissolved gaseous mercury and mercury volatilization in the upper St. Lawrence River: exploring temporal relationships and UV attenuation.  

PubMed

The formation and volatilization of dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) is an important mechanism by which freshwaters may naturally reduce their mercury burden. Continuous analysis of surface water for diurnal trends in DGM concentration (ranging from 0 to 60.4 pg L(-1); n=613), mercury volatilization (ranging from 0.2 to 1.1 ng m(-2) h(-1); n=584), and a suite of physical and chemical measurements were performed during a 68 h period in the St. Lawrence River near Cornwall (Ontario, Canada) to examine the temporal relationships governing mercury volatilization. No lag-time was observed between net radiation and OGM concentrations (highest cross-correlation of 0.817), thus supporting previous research indicating faster photoreduction kinetics in rivers as compared to lakes. A significant lag-time (55-145 min; maximum correlation = 0.625) was observed between DGM formation and mercury volatilization, which is similar to surface water Eddy diffusion times of 42-132 min previously measured in the St. Lawrence River. A depth-integrated DGM model was developed using the diffuse integrated vertical attenuation coefficients for UVA and UVB (K(dI UVA) = 1.45 m(-1) K(dI UVB)= 3.20 m(-1)) Low attenuation of solar radiation was attributed to low concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (mean = 2.58 mg L(-1) and particulate organic carbon (mean = 0.58 mg L(-1) in the St. Lawrence River. The depth-integrated DGM model developed found that the top 0.3 m of the water column accounted for only 26% of the total depth-integrated DGM. A comparison with volatilization data indicated that a large portion (76% or 10.5 ng m(-2) of the maximum depth-integrated DGM (13.8 ng m(-2))is volatilized over a 24 h period. Therefore, at least 50% of all DGM volatilized was produced at depths below 0.3 m. These results highlight the importance of solar attenuation in regulating DGM formation with depth. The results also demonstrate both the fast formation of DGM in rivers and the importance of understanding DGM dynamics with depth as opposed to surface waters. PMID:17822100

O'Driscoll, N J; Poissant, L; Canário, L; Ridal, J; Lean, D R S

2007-08-01

194

Endocrine and metabolic dysfunction in yellow perch, Perca flavescens, exposed to organic contaminants and heavy metals in the St. Lawrence River  

SciTech Connect

The endocrine and biochemical responses to the acute stress of capture and handling were investigated in sexually mature and in immature male and female yellow perch, Perca flavescens, from a site contaminated by organic contaminants (PAHs and PCBs) and heavy metals (Hg, Cd, As, and Zn) and from a reference site in the St. Lawrence River. Following a standardized capture and handling stress, fish from the contaminated site did not exhibit the expected physiological stress response observed in fish from the reference site. Blood cortisol and thyroxine levels were lower, and liver glycogen stores were greater in mature males and females, as well as in the immature fish from the contaminated site, compared to the reference site. Fish from the contaminated site also had smaller gonads and lower condition factor. The impaired ability to elevate blood cortisol in response to an acute stress may be used as a biomarker of toxic stress in health assessment of feral fish from polluted environments.

Hontela, A.; Duclos, D.; Fortin, R. [Univ. du Quebec, Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. Sciences Biologiques; Dumont, P. [Ministere du Loisir, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

1995-04-01

195

Changes in the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence ecosystem estimated by inverse modelling: Evidence of a fishery-induced regime shift?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mass-balance models have been constructed using inverse methodology for the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence for the mid-1980s, the mid-1990s, and the early 2000s to describe ecosystem structure, trophic group interactions, and the effects of fishing and predation on the ecosystem for each time period. Our analyses indicate that the ecosystem structure shifted dramatically from one previously dominated by demersal (cod, redfish) and small-bodied forage (e.g., capelin, mackerel, herring, shrimp) species to one now dominated by small-bodied forage species. Overfishing removed a functional group in the late 1980s, large piscivorous fish (primarily cod and redfish), which has not recovered 14 years after the cessation of heavy fishing. This has left only marine mammals as top predators during the mid-1990s, and marine mammals and small Greenland halibut during the early 2000s. Predation by marine mammals on fish increased from the mid-1980s to the early 2000s while predation by large fish on fish decreased. Capelin and shrimp, the main prey in each period, showed an increase in biomass over the three periods. A switch in the main predators of capelin from cod to marine mammals occurred, while Greenland halibut progressively replaced cod as shrimp predators. Overfishing influenced community structure directly through preferential removal of larger-bodied fishes and indirectly through predation release because larger-bodied fishes exerted top-down control upon other community species or competed with other species for the same prey. Our modelling estimates showed that a change in predation structure or flows at the top of the trophic system led to changes in predation at all lower trophic levels in the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence. These changes represent a case of fishery-induced regime shift.

Savenkoff, Claude; Castonguay, Martin; Chabot, Denis; Hammill, Mike O.; Bourdages, Hugo; Morissette, Lyne

2007-07-01

196

Les échanges surface-atmosphère du mercure gazeux dans l'écosystème lac Ontario\\/fleuve Saint-Laurent Mercury Surface-Atmosphère Gas Exchange in Lake Ontario\\/St. Lawrence River Ecosystem  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY This paper présents and discusses mercury surface-atmosphère gas exchange in Lake Ontario\\/St. Lawrence River ecosystem. Atmospheric sources are recognised to be significant in the cycling of global mercury. Being volatile in its elemental and dimethylated forms, mercury is distributed Worldwide. The dominant form of mercury in the atmosphère is gaseous elemental mercury (Hg(°) (- 98%). Cycling of atmospheric mercury

L. POISSANT

197

Inverse modelling of trophic flows through an entire ecosystem: the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence in the mid-1980s  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mass-balance models using inverse methodology have been constructed for the northern Gulf of St. Law- rence ecosystem in the mid-1980s, before the groundfish collapse. The results highlight the effects of the major mortal- ity sources (fishing, predation, and other sources of mortality) on the fish and invertebrate communities. Main predators of fish were large cod (Gadus morhua) followed by redfish

Claude Savenkoff; Martin Castonguay; Alain F. Vézina; Simon-Pierre Despatie; Denis Chabot; Lyne Morissette; Mike O. Hammill

2004-01-01

198

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): General Motors/Central Foundry Division site, St. Lawrence County, Massena, NY. (First remedial action), December 1990  

SciTech Connect

The 270-acre General Motors/Central Foundry Division site is an active aluminum casting plant in Massena, St. Lawrence County, New York. The site overlies a surficial alluvial aquifer and is adjacent to wetlands, both of which have been contaminated. Additional onsite features of concern include the unlined North and East Disposal Areas and the Industrial Landfill, which contain contaminated soil, debris, sludge; four unlined Industrial Lagoons, which contain contaminated liquids, sludge, and soil; the rivers and creek which contains contaminated sediment; contaminated soil on the St. Regis Mohawk Reservation and on General Motors property; and contaminated associated wetlands. The Record of Decision (ROD) provides a final remedy for all site areas and media except the East Disposal Area and the Industrial Landfill, which will be addressed in a subsequent ROD. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sediment, sludge, debris, ground water, and surface water are PCBs, and to a much lesser degree, VOCs including TCE; and other organics including PAHs, and phenols. The selected remedial action for this site is included.

Not Available

1990-12-17

199

Observations of ice thickness and frazil ice in the St. Lawrence Island polynya from satellite imagery, upward looking sonar, and salinity/temperature moorings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the 1999 winter, this paper examines the behavior of the Bering Sea St. Lawrence Island polynya using a combination of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), RADARSAT synthetic aperture radar (SAR), meteorological data, over-winter moored upward looking sonars (ULS) and SeaBird salinity/temperature sensors. We define a thermal ice thickness from the AVHRR retrieval of ice surface temperature combined with meteorological observations and a heat flux model. South of the island, we compare the ULS and thermal thicknesses for congelation and frazil ice. When the satellites observe congelation ice over the ULSs, the ULS and thermal ice thicknesses generally agree. When SAR observes Langmuir plumes over the ULSs, which indicate frazil ice formation, the ULSs show scatterers at 5-20 m depths in the water column and the seawater temperatures are either within 0.01°C of freezing or are slightly supercooled. This suggests that during frazil events, crystals either nucleate at depth or are transported to depth by the Langmuir circulation. The combination of the SAR imagery and ULS observations also allow measurement of the pack ice advection velocity, the polynya width and the downwind frazil accumulation thickness, giving widths of 10 to 30 km and thicknesses of 0.1-0.2 m. Substitution of these observed values with the heat flux into the Pease polynya model yields polynya widths that approximately agree with the observed.

Drucker, Robert; Martin, Seelye; Moritz, Richard

2003-05-01

200

Detection of viral hemorrhagic septicemia in round gobies in New York State (USA) waters of Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River.  

PubMed

In May 2006 a large mortality of several thousand round gobies Neogobius melanostomus (Pallas, 1814) occurred in New York waters of the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario. Necropsies of sampled fish from these areas showed pallor of the liver and gills, and hemorrhagic areas in many organs. Histopathologic examination of affected tissues revealed areas of necrosis and hemorrhage. Inoculations of fathead minnow Pimephales promelas (Rafinesque, 1820) cell cultures with dilutions of tissue samples from the necropsied gobies produced a cytopathic effect within 5 d post-inoculation. Samples of cell culture supernatant were tested using RT-PCR and confirmed the presence of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). Sequence analysis of the VHSV isolate resulted in its assignment to the type-IVb subgroup. The detection of VHSV in a relatively recent invasive fish species in the Great Lakes and the potential impact of VHSV on the ecology and economy of the area will require further investigation and careful management considerations. PMID:17803104

Groocock, G H; Getchell, R G; Wooster, G A; Britt, K L; Batts, W N; Winton, J R; Casey, R N; Casey, J W; Bowser, P R

2007-07-16

201

Health assessment for General Motors Central Foundry, St. Lawrence County, Massena, New York, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NYD091972554. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The General Motors Central Foundry Division is an aluminum casting plant on 270 acres located on the south bank of the St. Lawrence River in Massena, New York. The plant has been in operation since 1959. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were used in the hydraulic fluids for die-casting machines from 1968-1973. Sludges containing PCBs were landfilled in on-site disposal pits, in an industrial landfill, and in several lagoons on-site. Soils, ground water and river sediments are known to be contaminated. PCB contaminated sludges and soils are estimated to be in excess of 370,000 cubic yards at concentrations greater than 25 mg/kg (dry weight). Ground water and surface water standards for PCBs were exceeded. Potential environmental pathways include contaminated ground water, surface water, soil, and air. The consumption of contaminated fish and wildlife of the food chain is particularly significant at this site because of the close proximity of the Mohawk Indian Reservation, whose residents include large amounts of local fish and wildlife in their diets.

Not Available

1989-06-30

202

Speciation and transformation of phosphorus and its mixing behavior in the Bay of St. Louis estuary in the northern Gulf of Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water samples were collected for measurements of dissolved, colloidal, and particulate inorganic and organic phosphorus (P) from the Bay of St. Louis estuary in the northern Gulf of Mexico during August 2008 and October 2009. Laboratory mixing experiments were also carried out using end-member river water and seawater to examine key processes and mechanisms controlling the behavior of P during estuarine mixing. Dissolved organic P (DOP) was the dominant species in the total dissolved P (TDP) pool in both lower (S < 10) and higher salinity (S > 25) regions, while dissolved inorganic P (DIP) predominated in mid-salinity regions (S of 10˜20) comprising up to 75% of the TDP. Both DIP and DOP behaved non-conservatively during estuarine mixing showing dramatic changes and transformation between different P species. The total particulate phosphorus (TPP) accounted for up to 85% of total phosphorus (TP = TDP + TPP) in the low-salinity areas but fell to about 38% in higher salinity regions. The quasi-negative correlation between TDP and TPP and the similarity in mixing behavior between field observations and laboratory experiments supported our hypothesis that physicochemical processes, such as dynamic repartitioning between water and particles or adsorption/desorption, are the predominant mechanisms controlling the biogeochemical cycling of P species in the Bay of St. Louis. River export fluxes of DIP could be significantly underestimated without the quantification of particulate P species, especially in more pristine river basins. The value of the distribution coefficient (in terms of logKd) ranged from 4.4 to 5.6 and decreased with increasing suspended particulate matter concentration and salinity, indicating that P is highly particle reactive and the presence of colloidal P may play an important role in the cycling of P in estuarine environments. Colloidal inorganic P (CIP) and colloidal organic P (COP), as quantified by an ultrafiltration permeation model, comprised 0-62% of the DIP and 34-93% of the DOP with the highest values in the river mouth area, suggesting a river source for colloidal P. The % CIP dropped to below the detection limit as salinity increased, whereas % COP first decreased but increased again with increasing salinity, reflecting different sources for CIP and COP in the lower estuary. The DOC/DOP ratio decreased rapidly with increasing salinity indicating a diagenetically older dissolved organic matter pool from the river and a dynamic change in sources and chemical speciation of P in the estuary.

Lin, Peng; Chen, Min; Guo, Laodong

2012-06-01

203

Meltwater discharge and the triggering of Younger Dryas : new data on the chronology of Champlain Sea transgression in the St-Lawrence River Valley  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Accurate chronology of ice retreat is crucial to understand the Ocean-Atmosphere couple at the end of the Pleistocene. The St-Lawrence River Valley is key in this regard, and two sedimentary sequences from Mount Saint-Hilaire, in the middle of the valley, contain a record that sheds new lignt on ice retreat and the penecontemporaneous proglacial marine invasion. Basal AMS-dates on terrestrial plant macrofossils coupled with an extrapolation from the pollen content of underlying postglacial lake sediments at Hemlock Carr (243 m), show that local ice retreat occurred around 11 350 14C yr BP. Cross-dating of such macrofossils (10 510 ± 60 14C yr BP) with shells from marine sediments (~12 200 14C yr BP) catched in the neighbouring Lake Hertel's basin (169 m) show a ca. 1700 14C years difference mainly ascribed to the effect of old, glacially-derived carbon in the upper shallow waters of the Champlain Sea. The pollen-based chronological extrapolation at Lake Hertel indicates that the marine invasion occurred around 11 100 ± 100 14C yr BP. This result supports the chronology based on deep-water invertebrate marine fauna (Rodrigues, 1988). The 14C assessment of the New-England varve chronology (Ridge et al., 1999) is thus confirmed. Deglaciation of the entire Saint-Lawrence River Valley took place within 1000 14C years. The chronology of ice retreat in southern Québec is shortened and made younger. This prompts major revision of all the associated paleohydrological events. Routing of the glacial meltwaters to the North Atlantic was impossible before 11 100 14C yr BP. The abrupt transition from Glacial Lake Candona (ca. 220 m) to the proglacial phase of the Champlain Sea (ca. 190 m) at 11 100 14C yr BP implies an input of glacial meltwater to the ocean estimated at 1500 km3. This may well have affected the thermohaline circulation in the North Atlantic and triggered the Younger Dryas oscillation.

Richard, P.; Occhietti, S.

2004-05-01

204

Dark production of carbon monoxide (CO) from dissolved organic matter in the St. Lawrence estuarine system: Implication for the global coastal and blue water CO budgets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigated the thermal (dark) production of carbon monoxide (CO) from dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the water column of the St. Lawrence estuarine system in spring 2007. The production rate, Qco, decreased seaward horizontally and downward vertically. Qco exhibited a positive, linear correlation with the abundance of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). Terrestrial DOM was more efficient at producing CO than marine DOM. The temperature dependence of Qco can be characterized by the Arrhenius equation with the activation energies of freshwater samples being higher than those of salty samples. Qco remained relatively constant between pH 4-6, increased slowly between pH 6-8 and then rapidly with further rising pH. Ionic strength and iron chemistry had little influence on Qco. An empirical equation, describing Qco as a function of CDOM abundance, temperature, pH, and salinity, was established to evaluate CO dark production in the global coastal waters (depth < 200 m). The total coastal CO dark production from DOM was estimated to be from 0.46 to 1.50 Tg CO-C a-1 (Tg carbon from CO a-1). We speculated the global oceanic (coastal plus open ocean) CO dark production to be in the range from 4.87 to 15.8 Tg CO-C a-1 by extrapolating the coastal water-based results to blue waters (depth > 200 m). Both the coastal and global dark source strengths are significant compared to the corresponding photochemical CO source strengths (coastal: ˜2.9 Tg CO-C a-1; global: ˜50 Tg CO-C a-1). Steady state deepwater CO concentrations inferred from Qco and microbial CO uptake rates are <0.1 nmol L-1.

Zhang, Yong; Xie, Huixiang; Fichot, CéDric G.; Chen, Guohua

2008-12-01

205

Environmental contamination and human exposure assessment to manganese in the St-Lawrence River ecozone (Quebec, Canada) using an environmental fate/exposure model: GEOTOX.  

PubMed

Methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) is an organic derivative of manganese (Mn) used as an additive in unleaded gasoline. The combustion of MMT leads to the formation of oxides of manganese. The objective of the present study is to predict the environmental levels of Mn and the human exposure in the St-Lawrence ecozone (fluvial section, Quebec, Canada) using an environmental fate/exposure model: GEOTOX. The results of our MMT research program on abiotic and biotic components of the ecosystem and on the human exposure were used to validate the model estimations. Air and surface soil were selected as source terms with an annual Mn input rate in each compartment of 0.083-0.113 mol km-2 d-1 and 0.44-0.87 mol km-2 d-1 respectively (Mn3O4 equivalent). The predicted air, soil, plant, surface water and sediment concentrations were similar (+/- 50%) to values measured in the Montreal region. As expected, the ingestion pathway was the main absorption route for adults (> 99%), with vegetables and fruits contributing almost 80% of the dietary intake of Mn. The multimedia exposure doses for adult men predicted by the model ranged between 0.04 and 0.08 mg kg-1 d-1 compared to 0.004 and 0.201 mg kg-1 d-1 (average = 0.05) for workers from the MMT study. Considering the landscape configuration and the source vectors (air and soil) included in the model, GEOTOX estimations were in good agreement with measured values. PMID:9241868

Loranger, S; Zayed, J

1997-01-01

206

Relative weathering intensity of calcite versus dolomite in carbonate-bearing temperate zone watersheds: Carbonate geochemistry and fluxes from catchments within the St. Lawrence and Danube river basins  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Calcite and dolomite solubilities in open weathering environments are proportional to pCO2 and inversely proportional to temperature, and dolomite solubility is progressively greater than calcite below 25°C. The continent-scale weathering budget reveals the significance of the Northern Hemisphere (NH) to globally integrated riverine fluxes of Ca2+, Mg2+, and HCO3-. The NH contributes 70% of the global HCO3- flux while only 54% of the riverine discharge. We present results of a comparative hydrogeochemical study of carbonate mineral equilibria and weathering fluxes in two NH carbonate-rich river basins. Surface water geochemistry and discharge were determined for headwater streams in Michigan and Slovenia within the St. Lawrence and Danube river basins. Michigan watersheds are established atop carbonate-bearing glacial drift deposits derived from erosion of Paleozoic strata with thick soil horizons (100-300 cm). Slovenia watersheds drain Mesozoic bedrock carbonates in alpine and dinaric karst environments with thin soil horizons (0-70 cm). Carbonate weathering intensity is a parameter that normalizes river runoff and HCO3- concentration to catchment area (meq HCO3- km-2 s-1), summing calcite and dolomite contributions, and is used to gauge the effects of climate, land use, and soil thickness on organic-inorganic carbon processing rates. Importantly, Michigan riverine discharge is one-tenth of Slovenian rivers, providing the opportunity to evaluate the kinetics of carbonate mineral equilibration. The study rivers are HCO3- - Ca2+ - Mg2+ waters, supersaturated for calcite at pCO2 values in excess of the atmosphere. As discharge varies, HCO3- concentrations differ by less than 20% for any location, and Mg2+/Ca2+ remains relatively fixed for Michigan (0.5) and Slovenia streams (0.4), requiring that dolomite dissolution exceed calcite on a mole basis. The ability of calcite and dolomite dissolution to keep pace with increased discharge indicates carbonate weathering is limited only by water flux and temperature-dependent solubility in these watersheds. Carbonate weathering intensity in Michigan and Slovenia exceeds the world average by factors between 2 and 20, and dolomite weathering intensity, estimated from riverine Mg2+ fluxes, exceeds the world average by factors between 2 and 15. Thus global fluxes of carbonate-related weathering products appear heavily skewed toward carbonate-bearing environments at higher latitudes with relatively low mean annual temperatures and high discharge.

Szramek, Kathryn; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Williams, Erika L.; Kanduc, Tjasa; Ogrinc, Nives; Walter, Lynn M.

2007-04-01

207

Water resources data for Pennsylvania, water year 1992. Volume 3. Ohio river and St. Lawrence River Basins. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1991-30 September 1992  

SciTech Connect

Water resources data for the 1992 water year for Pennsylvania consists of records of discharge and water quality of streams; contents and elevations of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels of ground-water wells. The report, Volume 3, includes records from the Ohio and St. Lawrence River basins. Specifically, it contains: (1) discharge records for 69 continuous record streamflow-gaging stations and 12 partial-record stations; (2) elevation and contents records for 3 lakes and reservoirs; (3) water-quality records for 3 streamflow-gaging stations and 36 partial-record stations; and (4) water-level records for 20 network observation wells.

Lescinsky, J.B.; Coll, M.B.; Siwicki, R.W.

1993-01-01

208

Detection and quantitation of benzo(a)pyrene-DNA adducts in brain and liver tissues of Beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence and Mackenzie Estuaries  

SciTech Connect

It should be noted that there are few analytical techniques available for the detection and quantitation of chemical adducts in the DNA of living organisms. The reasons for this are: the analytical technique often has to accommodate the unique chemical and/or physical properties of the individual chemical or its metabolite; the percentage of total chemical that becomes most of the parent compound is usually detoxified and excreted; not all adducts that form between the genotoxic agent and DNA are stable or are involved in the development of subsequent deleterious events in the organism; and the amount of DNA available for analysis is often quite limited. 16 refs., 1 tab.

Shugart, L.R.

1988-01-01

209

Lawrence Block  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hollywood films owe much of their sparkle to atmospheric effects, including the lighting, shading, and color lent by character-actors. Their counterparts in the genre of literary gumshoes may be found in a certain breed of character-detectives. Among them, Lawrence Block, a versatile exemplar of the hard-boiled school of detective fiction, has given readers two notable repeat offenders from New York:

Steven Alan Samson

1994-01-01

210

Exploring Estuaries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Exploring Estuaries introduces students of various ages to the ecology of estuaries, places where freshwater rivers and streams flow into the ocean, mixing with the seawater. It is part of a broader effort by the National Estuary Program to educate the general public about estuaries and to restore and protect these sensitive ecosystems. It offers interactive games and activities as well as virtual tours of Long Island Sound and the Barataria-Terrebonne Estuarine Complex near New Orleans. A glossary page defines technical terms used throughout the site. Resources also are provided for teachers and students interested in learning more about related organizations, publications, and websites.

211

Water and sediment dynamics at Saint Lawrence River mouth  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main features of the hydrological regime and morphological structure of the estuarine-type mouth area of the Saint Lawrence\\u000a River are considered. Data on the structure of water masses, thermal and ice regimes in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence, which\\u000a has a significant effect on the estuary, are given. The major attention is paid to water mixing processes, water and

E. N. Dolgopolova; M. V. Isupova

2011-01-01

212

Water resources data for Pennsylvania, water year 1994. Volume 3. Ohio river and St. Lawrence River basins. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1993-30 September 1994  

SciTech Connect

Water resources data for the 1994 water year for Pennsylvania consists of records of discharge and water quality of streams; contents and elevations of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels of ground-water wells. This report, Volume 3, includes records from the Ohio and St. Lawrence River Basins. Specifically, it contains: (1) discharge records for 69 continuous record streamflow-gaging staions and 17 partial-record stations; (2) elevation and contents records for 3 lakes and reservoirs; (3) water-quality records for 3 streamflow-gaging stations and 37 partial-record stations; and (4) water-level records for 20 network observation wells. Locations of these sites are shown on figures 4-5. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data, together with the data in Volume 1 and 2, represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, Local, and Federal agencies in Pennsylvania.

Lescinsky, J.B.; Coll, M.B.; Siwicki, R.W.

1995-09-01

213

Exploring Estuaries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site offers several ways to explore the importance of estuaries. Virtual tours of the Barataria-Terrebone Estuarine Complex and the Long Island Sound offer photos and text of each area explain their importance to humans, wildlife, and larger ecosystems. Additional resources for kids and adults are linked. A glossary page offers a list of vocabulary associated with estuaries. The site also offers a games and activities section for kids that has coloring sheets for young children, and inquiry-based interactive games for older kids. The games include a "Who Am I" animal identification game, and a game called "Solve a Mystery" where players must follow and investigation into what's wrong with an estuary, and make a decision on the cause of the problem. There are several possible mysteries to solve, each with a different solution.

214

Classification of Estuaries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This text states that although all estuaries are similar in that they are semi-enclosed bodies of brackish water, they are categorized with regard to geological characteristics, and further distinguished on the basis of stratification and circulation patterns. According to their geological characteristics, estuaries are classified as: drowned river valleys or coastal-plain estuaries, bar-built estuaries or lagoons, fjord-type estuaries, and tectonically caused estuaries. Each type is explained in detail and examples are given for each.

215

Classification of Estuaries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This text states that although all estuaries are similar in that they are semi-enclosed bodies of brackish water, they are categorized with regard to geological characteristics, and further distinguished on the basis of stratification and circulation patterns. According to their geological characteristics, estuaries are classified as: drowned river valleys or coastal-plain estuaries, bar-built estuaries or lagoons, fjord-type estuaries, and tectonically caused estuaries. Each type is explained in detail and examples are given for each.

Oberrecht, Kenn

2007-01-30

216

In vitro biotransformation of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) and Dechlorane Plus flame retardants: a case study of ring-billed gull breeding in a pollution hotspot in the St. Lawrence River, Canada.  

PubMed

Decabromodiphenyl ether (deca-BDE) mixture (~97% of BDE-209) is now facing usage restrictions worldwide, which is leading to increased utilization of a series of alternative, replacement flame retardant (FR) products. Among these, Dechlorane Plus (DP) is receiving growing attention as this FR is increasingly being detected in wildlife samples, including birds from North America, Europe and Asia. Recent survey conducted in a known FR hotspot in the St. Lawrence River basin near Montreal (QC, Canada) revealed unexpectedly high detection frequencies and concentrations of BDE-209 and DP isomers (syn- and anti-DP) in the liver of breeding ring-billed gulls (Larus delawarensis) (RBGUs). Despite the global distribution of these current-use FRs, there is to our knowledge no study that has addressed the in vitro biotransformation of BDE-209 and DP isomers in birds. This study aimed at understanding the in vitro metabolism of BDE-209 and syn- and anti-DP using liver microsomes of Montreal-breeding RBGUs. Although BDE-15 (positive assay control) was consistently and positively depleted over the 90-min time frame of the in vitro assay, no depletion was observed for BDE-209 and DP isomers. These results suggest that CYP isoenzyme-mediated reductive dehalogenation of BDE-209 and DP is not likely to be a substantial metabolic pathway in RBGUs. However, investigations on deiodinases (expression, activity) should be considered in future studies as these enzymes have been suggested to be involved in the sequential debromination of BDE-209 in fish and human studies. High levels of BDE-209 determined in liver of RBGUs that strongly correlated with those of known or suggested BDE-209 debromination products (hepta- through nona-BDEs) may thus be indicative of concomitant dietary (e.g., fish consumption) and environmental exposure in the greater Montreal area, combined with poor or lack of metabolic capability toward these FRs. PMID:23542572

Chabot-Giguère, Bernice; Letcher, Robert J; Verreault, Jonathan

2013-03-27

217

Estuaries: Finding the Balance  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students can use this resource from the National Geographic to examine the conflict between development and the environment by focusing on estuaries across the United States. Its objectives are for students to learn about the environmental and economic importance of estuaries, consider the conflicts that arise because of the many uses of estuaries, research a specific estuary and the problems and solutions that have developed around it, and suggest compromises that might be made in order to protect both estuaries and economic development. To meet these objectives, students are directed to review a number of websites about estuaries and then to answer questions concerning environmental issues (e.g., What are the specific ecological characteristics of estuaries? What are some of the signs that an estuary is in trouble as a habitat?) and economic issues (e.g., How might proximity to major cities impact estuaries? To what degree should economic activity dictate the outcome of estuaries?).

Xpeditions NatGeo (National Geographic Society;)

2008-04-30

218

Measurements of shoaling internal waves and turbulence in an estuary  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AbstractThe shoaling of horizontally propagating internal waves may represent an important source of mixing and transport in <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> and coastal seas. Including such effects in numerical models demands improvements in the understanding of several aspects of the energetics, especially those relating to turbulence generation, and observations are needed to build this understanding. To address some of these issues in the estuarine context, we undertook an intensive field program for 10 days in the summer of 2008 in the <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>. The sampling involved shore-based photogrammetry, ship-based surveys, and an array of moorings in the shoaling region that held both conventional and turbulence-resolving sensors. The measurements shed light on many aspects of the wave shoaling process. Wave arrivals were generally phase-locked with the M2 tide, providing hints about far-field forcing. In the deeper part of the study domain, the waves propagated according to the predictions of linear theory. In intermediate-depth waters, the waves traversed the field site perpendicularly to isobaths, a pattern that continued as the waves transformed nonlinearly. Acoustic Doppler velocimeters permitted inference of the turbulent energetics, and two main features were studied. First, during a period of shoaling internal waves, turbulence dissipation rates exceeded values associated with tidal shear by an order of magnitude. Second, the evolving spectral signatures associated with a particular wave-shoaling event suggest that the turbulence is at least partly locally generated. Overall, the results of this study suggest that parameterizations of wave-induced mixing could employ relatively simple dynamics in deep water, but may have to handle a wide suite of turbulence generation and transport mechanisms in inshore regions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Richards, Clark; Bourgault, Daniel; Galbraith, Peter S.; Hay, Alex; Kelley, Dan E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://estuaries.gov"> <span id="translatedtitle">National <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> Day</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Get the most out of National <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> Day (October 5, 2002) by visiting this Web site from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Follow a link to <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Live!, which offers online interactive fieldtrips through a number of <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> around the nation. Guided tours of eight <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> will be webcast live October 3 and 4, supplemented by videos from a number of other <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>. Internet participants "will have an opportunity to see the fascinating creatures that make <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> their home and experience the diversity of estuarine ecosystems." Viewers may submit questions during the webcasts or videos, which will be answered by tour guides and educators from the featured <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>. Click on About <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> for an introduction to estuarine ecosystems and for links to a number of Web sites that "provide general information, curriculums and helpful references on <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>."</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/58040427"> <span id="translatedtitle">Brown and <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Brown and <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>: One year shy of the fiftieth anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education, the justices issued another equality ruling that is also likely to become an historical landmark. In <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> v. Texas, the Court invalidated a state law that criminalized same-sex sodomy. This essay contrasts these two historic rulings along several dimensions, with the aim of shedding</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Michael Klarman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a 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class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.3394/0380-1330(2008)34[535:DAARO"> <span id="translatedtitle">Distribution, abundance, and range of the round goby, Apollina melanostoma, in the Duluth-Superior Harbor and <span class="hlt">St</span>. Louis River <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, 1998-2004</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Round gobies were first discovered in the Duluth-Superior Harbor, Lake Superior, in 1995. Anecdotal sightings by anglers and others suggested that the infestation was growing and expanding; however, direct evidence of the distribution and expansion rate in the harbor was largely unknown. Distribution and range of the round goby, Apollonia melanostoma, (formerly Neogobius melanostomus) was assessed using bottom trawl sampling throughout the Duluth-Superior Harbor, and portions of the lower <span class="hlt">St</span>. Louis River from 1998 to 2004. Previous to 1998, round gobies only were reported to occupy the harbor between the two shipping entries (river kilometer 1 to 7). By 2004, they expanded throughout the harbor and upstream to river kilometer 13, but remained absent in western Lake Superior. The number of round gobies captured per 5 minutes of trawling (catch per unit effort, CPUE) increased from less than 1 fish in 1998 to an average 5.4 ?? 1.2 SE fish in 2004, indicating a large increase in the population. The median yearly fish total length varied from 56.0 to 81.5 mm and wet weight varied from 2.3 to 7.0 g. As nest guarding male round gobies were located in rocky habitats inaccessible to trawling, the initial years were dominated by female round gobies with a 16:1 female to male ratio, but by 2002 the maximum ratio was 2:1. The ratio change may be indicative of the increasing population forcing males from their preferred rocky habitat onto open substrates that were more accessible to trawling.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bergstrom, M. A.; Evrard, L. M.; Mensinger, A. F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA147119"> <span id="translatedtitle">Saint <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> River--Past and Present. A Review of Historical Natural Resource Information and Habitat Changes in the International Section of the Saint <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> River.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report provides a review of historical natural resource data and habitat changes in the international section of the <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> River. The report is keyed to both published and unpublished natural resource information and includes an extensive bibl...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. P. Hamilton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23122270"> <span id="translatedtitle">Three dimensional water quality modeling of a shallow subtropical <span class="hlt">estuary</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Knowledge of estuarine hydrodynamics and water quality comes mostly from studies of large estuarine systems. The processes affecting algae, nutrients, and dissolved oxygen (DO) in small and shallow subtropical <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> are relatively less studied. This paper documents the development, calibration, and verification of a three dimensional (3D) water quality model for the <span class="hlt">St</span>. Lucie <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> (SLE), a small and shallow <span class="hlt">estuary</span> located on the east coast of south Florida. The water quality model is calibrated and verified using two years of measured data. Statistical analyses indicate that the model is capable of reproducing key water quality characteristics of the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> within an acceptable range of accuracy. The calibrated model is further applied to study hydrodynamic and eutrophication processes in the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. Modeling results reveal that high algae concentrations in the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> are likely caused by excessive nutrient and algae supplies in freshwater inflows. While algal blooms may lead to reduced DO concentrations near the bottom of the waterbody, this study indicates that stratification and circulation induced by freshwater inflows may also contribute significantly to bottom water hypoxia in the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. It is also found that high freshwater inflows from one of the tributaries can change the circulation pattern and nutrient loading, thereby impacting water quality conditions of the entire <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. Restoration plans for the SLE ecosystem need to consider both a reduction of nutrient loading and regulation of the freshwater discharge pattern. PMID:23122270</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wan, Yongshan; Ji, Zhen-Gang; Shen, Jian; Hu, Guangdou; Sun, Detong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUSMNB31F..03C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Linking Species Traits to the Abiotic Template of Flowing Waters: Contrasting Eco physiologies Underlie Displacement of Zebra Mussels by Quagga Mussels in a Large River-<span class="hlt">Estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> River-<span class="hlt">Estuary</span> was the gateway of entry for dreissenids to North America and holds some of the oldest populations. The <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> also has four distinct physical-chemical water masses (a regional scale abiotic template) that both species inhabit. Despite their ecological similarities, quagga mussels are supplanting zebra mussels in much of their shared range. In order to try to better understand the changing distributions of these two species we compared glycogen, shell mass and tissue biomass in each of the water masses. This comparative physiological combined with experimental approaches (estuarine salinity experiments and reciprocal transplants) showed that while quagga mussels should dominate in most habitats, that abiotic/bioenergetic constraints in two regions (the Ottawa River plume and the freshwater-marine transition zone) might prevent them from dominating these locations. These findings are an example of how the interaction of landscape scale abiotic heterogeneity and a species-specific physiology can have strong impacts of distribution of biota large rivers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Casper, A. F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/nt0585118844r126.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Great Lakes <span class="hlt">estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Conclusions  According to the geomorphology and physiography classification scheme for <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> proposed by Pritchard (1967) and presented\\u000a in Kennish (1986), Great Lakes <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> can be classified as Type A: drowned river valleys or rias. The termination of Wisconsinian\\u000a glaciation, which resulted in a eustatic rise in sea level of somewhat over 100 m and the formation of such Atlantic coast\\u000a <span class="hlt">estuaries</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Charles E. Herdendorf</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=estuary&id=EJ758625"> <span id="translatedtitle">Learning Lessons from <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|There is something that draws all people to the sea and especially to the fertile <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> that nuzzle up to its shores. An <span class="hlt">estuary</span> serves as both a nursery and a grave for sea creatures. If life evolved from some primordial sea, it may well have been an <span class="hlt">estuary</span>--a place where ocean and rivers meet and fresh and salty waters mingle in the…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schnittka, Christine</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22climate+change+matters%22+OR+macpherson&id=EJ607496"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Stephen <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Effect.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Discusses the effect of the Macpherson Inquiry Report into the murder of Stephen <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>, a black man, on efforts to reduce institutional bias in Great Britain, claiming that there has been much more institutional indifference than institutional change since the report was published. Notes the need to rid society of racism in education. (SM)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ouseley, Herman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60793462"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ernest Orlando <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In his relatively short life of 57 years, Ernest Orlando <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> accomplished more than one might believe possible in a life twice as long. The important ingredients of his success were native ingenuity and basic good judgement in science, great stamina, an enthusiastic and outgoing personality, and a sense of integrity that was overwhelming. Many articles on the life and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Luis W</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1967-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=40402"> <span id="translatedtitle">DYNAMIC <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span> MODEL PERFORMANCE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Applications of the Dynamic <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Model (DEM) to both the Delaware and Potomac <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> by the Environmental Protection Agency during the 1970s are summarized and evaluated. Methods for calibrating, refining, and validating this model, and statistics for evaluating its perform...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.lawrencehallofscience.org/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Hall of Science</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Hall of Science is a resource center for preschool through high school science and mathematics education, and a public science center with hands-on experiences for learners of all ages. Home of the William Knox Holt Planetarium, there is extensive educational programming centered on astronomy, including Planetarium Activities for Student Success kits for purchase that illustrate basic principles of astronomy. Earthquakes, erosion, wind and weather are the focus of the Forces that Shape the Bay exhibits, and there are also a number of exhibits highlighting math and physics. The website provides many online games and home activities available for download. The <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Hall of Science Center for Curriculum Innovation creates instructional materials in mathematics and science for preschool through 12th graders for use by students, teachers and other educators, parents and families, and the website provides an array of information on the various programs. Title II funding for professional development is available.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/35890904"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sex alteration in soft-shell clams ( Mya arenaria) in an intertidal zone of the Saint <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> River (Quebec, Canada)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of this study was to verify whether any changes in sex ratio might occur in soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria) located in an intertidal harbor zone located at the mouth of the Saguenay Fjord in the Saint <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> <span class="hlt">estuary</span> (Baie Sainte-Catherine (BSC), Québec, Canada) likely to be contaminated by organotin compounds. Bivalves were harvested at the BSC harbor site</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">F Gagné; C Blaise; J Pellerin; E Pelletier; M Douville; S Gauthier-Clerc; L Viglino</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002HMR....56..198S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Decline of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) and common goldeneye (Bucephala clangula) associated with a collapse of eelgrass (Zostera marina) in a Nova Scotia <span class="hlt">estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mean numbers of migrant Canada geese (Branta canadensis) in Antigonish Harbour in the southern Gulf of <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> (Canada) during October to December were similar (approx. 450-500 birds) for the period 1998-2000. Similarly, during this period, geese used two foraging sites. However, in 2001, the average number of birds decreased by half and the primary foraging sites were used only rarely. This coincided with a decline of about 95% in the biomass of roots and rhizomes of eelgrass (Zostera marina) that occurred between October 2000 and 2001. Eelgrass is the principal food of geese in this <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. In addition, there was a reduction of around 50% in the numbers of common goldeneye (Bucephala clangula), which feed on invertebrates associated with eelgrass. Lower than usual weekly abundances of geese and goldeneye are probably the result of an unusually short residence time in the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, rather than a decline in the total number of visiting migrants. We attribute these changes in the distribution and abundance of geese and goldeneyes to the dramatic decline in eelgrass.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Seymour, Norman; Miller, Anthony; Garbary, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB269784"> <span id="translatedtitle">Brunswick <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Study.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Intensive surveys of the Brunswick and Medway <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> were conducted from August 4 through August 6, 1976 by the Environmental Protection Division of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. The purpose of the surveys was to determine present dissol...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.epa.gov/owow/estuaries/monitor/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Volunteer <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Monitoring</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This online method manual from EPA describes how to conduct <span class="hlt">estuary</span> monitoring programs, with step-by-step guides for chemical, physical and biological sampling and data interpretation. Also describes how to plan and maintain a volunteer force, with tips on liability and financial issues, volunteer recruiting training and retention. Addresses quality assurance so that results have weight. Provides an overview of estuarine science, threats to <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> and some solutions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40008344"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characteristics of Danish <span class="hlt">estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We review various aspects of the structure and functioning of Danish <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> from data collected by the National Monitoring\\u000a Program and from information in published sources. We present data on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics\\u000a of <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> in Denmark, we evaluate the functioning of these systems as filters and transformers of nutrients and we evaluate\\u000a the outlook for Danish</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Daniel J. Conley; Hanne Kaas; Flemming Møhlenberg; Bjarke Rasmussen; Jørgen Windolf; Flemming Mohlenberg; Jorgen Windolf</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5111973"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aging and sediment characteristics of northern Gulf of Mexico <span class="hlt">estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Eight major estuarine systems present along the northern margin of the Gulf of Mexico serve as primary depositional basins for all rivers draining into the gulf from central Louisiana eastward to the Florida peninsula. These <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> consist of Apalachicola Bay, <span class="hlt">St</span>. Andrews Bay, Choctawhatchee Bay, Pensacola Bay, Perdido Bay, Mobile Bay, Mississippi sound, and Lake Pontchartrainn. Because each receives sediment from a different river system (or systems), each <span class="hlt">estuary</span> is characterized by sediments that are both physically and mineralogically distinct. <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> in the eastern Gulf, for example, possess a clay mineral suite dominated by kaolinite (derived from deeply weathered piedmont rocks), whereas those from the western Gulf are rich in smectite and mixed layer clays (reflecting a Western Interior or provenance from Paleozoic or older coastal plain sources). Similarly, weathering of rocks in the southern piedmont has provided eastern Gulf estuarine sediments with a suite of largely metamorphic rock-derived heavy minerals, whereas those in the western Gulf contain a mixed suite of both igneous- and metamorphic-derived minerals. Equally distinctive, however, are the textures of the bottom sediments themselves for each <span class="hlt">estuary</span> when plotted on standard sand-silt-clay ternary diagrams. The relative percentages of these components are uniquely different for most of the <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> and reflect both natural and anthropogenic conditions that exist in the watershed areas that drain into each <span class="hlt">estuary</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Isphording, W.C. (Univ. of South Alabama, Mobile (USA)); Imsand, F.D. (Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile, AL (USA)); Flowers, G.C. (Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (USA))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://content.lib.washington.edu/llweb/index.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Denny Lindsley Photographs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Denny Lindsley was born in 1878 in a house on scenic Lake Union, right in the middle of the relatively young city of Seattle, Washington. As a descendant of the early Seattle pioneer David Denny, Lindsley began to wander around the city and its environs from a young age. Like many men in the Pacific Northwest during the late 19th century, he enjoyed the outdoors, and soon developed a skill for photography. He later went on to work for Edward Curtis, and he continued on by documenting such landscapes as Mount Rainer, Lake Chelan, and the Olympic Peninsula. Many of these excellent photographs can be viewed in this latest offering from the University of Washington Libraries Digital Collection. All told, there are 472 photographs here, complete with detailed records. The King County section is a real highlight, as visitors will get a real sense of the area before it became heavily urbanized during the 20th century.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=72156"> <span id="translatedtitle">DELAWARE <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span> PCB MODEL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Delaware River Basin Commission recently completed the first phase of a program to develop and implement Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for toxic pollutants for the Delaware <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>. This complex body of water extends from the head of tide at Trenton, NJ (River Mile 133.2...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://homepages.see.leeds.ac.uk/%7eearscb/index_files/Mesnage,%20Bonneville%20et%20al%20(2002).pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Filling of a wetland (Seine <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, France): natural eutrophication or anthropogenic process? A sedimentological and geochemical study of wetland organic sediments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">For over a century the Seine <span class="hlt">estuary</span> has been highly affected by human activities, resulting in a reduction of the surface of wetland habitat. Several ponds of the Vernier Marsh, one of the main wetlands of the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, are being filled in by sediment. The <span class="hlt">St</span>. Aubin canal, the only inlet from the Seine to the wetland, has regularly been</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">V. Mesnage; S. Bonneville; B. Laignel; D. Lefebvre; J.-P. Dupont; D. Mikes</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB83214932"> <span id="translatedtitle">Production of Invertebrates in the Tidewater Zone of a Coastal River and Adjacent <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>: Distribution and Implications for Environmental Impact Assessment.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The tidewater area of the Satilla River, and the adjacent <span class="hlt">St</span>. Andrews Sound <span class="hlt">estuary</span> were sampled to determine the distribution and production of estuarine invertebrates. Sampling in the Satilla tidewater area was carried out from December 1975 through Nov...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. M. Gillespie J. C. Hodges</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA412652"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ice Storms in the <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Valley Region.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The severe ice storm in January 1998 in Quebec, eastern Ontario, northern New York, and New England disrupted the lives of millions of people. The ice that accreted on trees and wires damaged electrical transmission and distribution lines, causing power o...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. F. Jones</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7190424"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ecology of <span class="hlt">estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This book is a summary of information available on estuarine ecology, that reviews concepts and problems of <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> and assesses the value of these coastal systems. It investigates such topics as water circulation and mixing, trace elements, nutrients, organic matter, and sedimentary processes, with reviews on more than two decades of intense study. Chapters reflect contributions from a variety of interdisciplinary sciences including botany, chemistry, ecology, geology, physics, and zoology.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kennish, M.J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40172341"> <span id="translatedtitle">North Sea <span class="hlt">estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Studies of the North Sea in the past two decades have shown that its <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> and associated areas, such as the Wadden Sea,\\u000a are important as nursery grounds for young fish and as feeding grounds for seabirds. These same areas are also those most\\u000a likely to be affected by the highest inputs and concentrations of contaminants. The development of agriculture,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Donald S. McLusky</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40007722"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ecology of <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>: Anthropogenic effects</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> and near-shore oceanic water are subjected to a multitude of human wastes. The principal objective of this book is to examine anthropogenic effects on <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>, and it focuses primarily on contaminants in coastal systems. Covered within various chapters are the following topics: waste disposal strategies; definition and classification of pollutants (including organic loading, oil pollution, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons; chlorinated</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kennish; Michael J. Kennish</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.fda.gov/downloads/drugs/guidancecomplianceregulatoryinformation/enforcementactivitiesbyfda/warninglettersandnoticeofviolationletterstopharmaceuticalcompanies/ucm053623.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Warning Letter: E. Clinton <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>, MD</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://google2.fda.gov/search?client=FDAgov&site=FDAgov&lr=&proxystylesheet=FDAgov&output=xml_no_dtd&&proxycustom=%3CADVANCED/%3E">Center for Drug Evaluation (CDER)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Text Version... CERTIFIED MAIL RETURN RECEIPT REOUESTED E. Clinton <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>, MD Ref: 06-HFD-45-0804 ... Page 2. Page 2 - E. Clinton <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>, MD ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/drugs/guidancecomplianceregulatoryinformation</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title49-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title49-vol1-sec1-52.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">49 CFR 1.52 - Delegations to Saint <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Seaway Development Corporation Administrator.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...a) Carry out the functions vested in the Secretary by sections 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 12 and 13 of section 2 of the Port and Tanker Safety Act of 1978 (92 Stat. 1471) as they relate to the operation of the <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Seaway. (b) Carry out...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://sgnis.org/publicat/papers/jglr839.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Organotins in Zebra Mussels ( Dreissena polymorpha) from the Saint <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> River</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Toxic antifouling compounds such as organotins have been released in the aquatic ecosystems throughout the world and can be bioaccumulating in biota. The purpose of this study was to assess the use of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) as a biomonitor for investigating the geographical variations of organotin bioavailability along the <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> River. The presence of organotins (tributyltins (TBT) and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lidia Regoli; Hing Man Chan; Yves de Lafontaine</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55783809"> <span id="translatedtitle">A detailed magnetic survey of the Saint <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> River: Oak Point to Lake Ontario, New York</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Measurements of the total intensity of the Earth's magnetic field in the <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> River between Oak Point and Lake Ontario indicated magnetic anomalies of high magnitude and steep gradients due to rocks of varying magnetic susceptibility in the Precambrian basement complex. The anomalies and magnetic contours that trend continuously across the river indicated no large lateral offset in this</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">F. Revetta; J. Cardinal</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://internships.llnl.gov/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory Internships</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory Internships -- The <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) hosts 300 to 400 undergraduate and graduate students and some faculty every summer in support of its world-class scientific facilities and staff and in an effort to help train the nation's next generation of scientists and engineers. Involvement in world-class research provides participants with a set of experiences that support their education and career goals. Typically, participants gain hands-on experience and the opportunity to apply learned theory to real life problems. An experience of this type, and with these resources at a premier state-of-the-art research laboratory is not available in an academic research lab.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.phillipscollection.org/lawrence/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Jacob <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>: Over the Line</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An accompaniment to the special exhibition entitled Over the Line: The Art and Life of Jacob <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>, the Over the Line Web site features the paintings of Jacob <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>, along with photographs and a brief synopsis of his life. The site is divided into three sections -- Beginnings, Young Artist, and Over the Line -- and covers the period between 1917 (the year of his birth) to 2000 (the year of his death). The site also contains suggested classroom activities, discussion questions, teaching strategies, and recommended books in the areas of social studies, language arts, math, science, and visual arts. It also includes a collection of paintings by secondary students in the Washington, DC area. Users can choose to view the exhibit in Flash (which requires a Flash 4.0 plug-in) or HTML (which has been optimized for low bandwidth computers). A part of the Phillips Collection located in Washington, DC, this is an excellent online exhibit that delves into the life of painter and educator Jacob <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.llnl.gov/nanoscience/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory: Nanoscience</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National LaboratoryÂs nanotechnology programs focus on issues relevant to national security. Lab researchers Âdrive the future of homeland security through innovations in biosensing and radiation detector materials, chemical absorbants, and biofunctional materials and other materials research. The website divides their work into three main areas: Bionanoscience, Nanofabrication, and Theory, Simulation, and Modeling. The website includes a brief description of each research area and links to related articles. The section on Bionanoscience includes links to journal publications, most of which require a paid subscription. Links to various laboratories housed within LLNL highlight additional contributions and research programs from those labs as well as information on their educational programs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www-gsd.lbl.gov/VISTA/index.shtml"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley National Laboratory: VISTA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A very comprehensive and well-organized offering from <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley National Laboratory, VISTA offers "suite of programs and databases for comparative analysis of genomic sequences. There are two ways of using VISTA - you can submit your own sequences and alignments for analysis (VISTA servers) or examine pre-computed whole-genome alignments of different species (VISTA browser)." The site also offers up-to-date updates on genomic sequences. Included in the April 2004 update are the Human-Chimpanzee, Human-Chicken, and D.melanogaster-Honey Bee whole genome alignments. VISTA is definitely a site for researchers and students involved in genomic research.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=233570"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dissolved oxygen in two Oregon <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>: Importance of the ocean-<span class="hlt">estuary</span> connection - March 2011</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examined the role of the ocean?<span class="hlt">estuary</span> connection in influencing periodic reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in Yaquina and Yachats <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>, Oregon, USA. In the Yaquina <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, there is close coupling between the coastal ocean and the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. As a result, low DO w...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=219544"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dissolved oxygen in two Oregon <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>: The importance of the ocean-<span class="hlt">estuary</span> connection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examined the role of the ocean ?<span class="hlt">estuary</span> connection in influencing periodic reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in Yaquina and Yachats <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>, Oregon, USA. In the Yaquina <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, there is close coupling between the coastal ocean and the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. As a result, low DO ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=209616"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dissolved oxygen in two Oregon <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>: Importance of the ocean-<span class="hlt">estuary</span> connection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examined the role of the ocean ?<span class="hlt">estuary</span> connection in influencing periodic reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in Yaquina and Yachats <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>, Oregon, USA. In the Yaquina <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, there is close coupling between the coastal ocean and the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. As a result, low DO ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://fishdb.sinica.edu.tw/pdf/124.pdf?PHPSESSID=prplo9a1o4ltq1fi5bfm7h8st0"> <span id="translatedtitle">A trophic model for the Danshuei River <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, a hypoxic <span class="hlt">estuary</span> in northern Taiwan</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">estuary</span> of the Danshuei River, a hypoxic subtropical <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, receives a high rate of untreated sewage effluent. The Ecopath with Ecosim software system was used to construct a mass-balanced trophic model for the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, and network analysis was used to characterize the structure and matter flow in the food web. The <span class="hlt">estuary</span> model was comprised of 16 compartments, and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hsing-Juh Lin; Kwang-Tsao Shao; Rong-Quen Jan; Hwey-Lian Hsieh; Chang-Po Chen; Li-Yung Hsieh; Yi-Ting Hsiao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE94704044"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Estuary</span> wader capacity following severe weather mortality.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The building of a tidal power barrage across an <span class="hlt">estuary</span> may lead to substantial changes in its ecology. Many of Britain's <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> hold internationally important numbers of waders. Careful consideration, therefore, needs to be given to the likely effects...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. A. Clark S. R. Baillie N. A. Clark R. H. W. Langston</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2011108825"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hampton-Seabrook <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Habitat Restoration Compendium.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Hampton-Seabrook <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Habitat Restoration Compendium (HSEHRC) is a compilation of information on the historic and current distributions of salt marsh and sand dune habitats and diadromous fishes within the Hampton-Seabrook <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> watershed. These ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. L. Eberhardt D. M. Burdick</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=85729"> <span id="translatedtitle">PECONIC <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span> EELGRASS HABITAT CRITERIA STUDY</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">PECONIC <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span> EELGRASS HABITAT CRITERIA STUDY The main objective of this study is to develop criteria for eelgrass habitat establishment and persistence within the Peconic <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> utilizing various environmental analyses. The Program evaluated water and sediment quality data to...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.epa.gov/owow/estuaries/2000bill/s835.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> and Clean Water Act of 2000</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Office of Water at the Environmental Protection Agency has posted online this document on the new <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> and Clean Water Act of 2000. Available in .pdf format, the document summarizes the Act, which emphasizes restoration of <span class="hlt">estuary</span> habitat.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' 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onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=127748"> <span id="translatedtitle">EXHIBIT OF EMPACT <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span> MONITORING HANDBOOKS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Related EMPACT documents were displayed at the National <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Day Celebration held in Washington, DC, September 30-Octuber 4, 2002. The <span class="hlt">estuary</span> monitoring technology transfer handbooks displayed were prepared based on information and monitoring technologies developed from selec...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB86189560"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nakdong <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> and Land Reclamation Morphological Aspects.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The construction of the barrage will change the flow conditions in the entire <span class="hlt">estuary</span> which will interfere in the present equilibrium between channel dimensions and flow conditions. Consequently, morphological changes in the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> have to be taken into ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. D. Eysink</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.estuaries.gov"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Estuaries</span>: Where Rivers Meet the Sea</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Take your students on an <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>Live telecast! <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>Live brings free, live internet field trips in four different <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> around the country, right to your classroom. These online field trips are the next best thing to an actual trip to an <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, providing students with an exciting and new way to learn about unique estuarine ecosystems. The site also includes archived webcasts and teacher resources including classroom activities and a glossary.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://estuaries.noaa.gov/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Estuaries</span>: Where Rivers Meet the Sea</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Take your students on an <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>Live telecast! <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>Live brings free, live internet field trips in four different <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> around the country, right to your classroom. These online field trips are the next best thing to an actual trip to an <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, providing students with an exciting and new way to learn about unique estuarine ecosystems. The site also includes archived webcasts and teacher resources including classroom activities and a glossary.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-05-16</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=85723"> <span id="translatedtitle">PECONIC <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span> STORMWATER ASSESSMENT AND PLANNING TOOL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">PECONIC <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span> STORMWATER ASSESSMENT AND PLANNING TOOL Horsley & Witten, Inc. was contracted by the Peconic <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Program to create a Regional Stormwater Runoff Management Plan designed to mitigate loadings of fecal coliform bacteria and nitrogen to the Peconic <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>. The pu...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.clallam.net/ccmrc/cllallam%207-07/fish%20use%20of%20the%20elwha%20estuaryandnsrev.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fish use of the Elwha <span class="hlt">estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The fish use of three main areas (east, west, and impounded west sections) of the Elwha <span class="hlt">estuary</span> was assessed using standard seining techniques from March-September 2007. Species diversity, richness, and evenness were all highest in the connected section of the west <span class="hlt">estuary</span> which constitutes only 20% of the total Elwha <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. Further, over 60% of total fish, 90% of salmonids,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Anne; J. Schilke; R. Paradis; D. Barry; P. Crain</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41329219"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ecotone or Ecocline: Ecological Boundaries in <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two main ecological boundaries, ecotone and ecocline, have been defined in landscape ecology. At this scale, the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> represents a boundary between rivers and the sea, but there has been no attempt to fit empirical data for <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> to these boundary models. An extensive data set from the Thames <span class="hlt">estuary</span> was analysed using multivariate techniques and species-range analysis, in order</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. J Attrill; S. D Rundle</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=73482"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">LAWRENCE</span> RISK-BASED AIR SCREENING</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The pediatric asthma rate in the city of <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> is the highest in the state of Massachusetts. This project will evaluate whether the cumulative risks due to the air pollution in <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> is contributing to the high asthma rates and other respiratory problems. The project will...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFMOS22B0262S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Exploring Physical and Biological Mechanisms for Zooplankton Retention in the Estuarine Transition Zone of a Riverine <span class="hlt">Estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this study, we use a coupled three-dimensional physical-biological model to investigate zooplankton retention in the estuarine transition zone (ETZ) of the <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> (SLE). Varying from well-mixed to partially stratified, the hydrodynamic environment of the SLE is defined by a large tidal range, strong salinity gradients, a large freshwater river flow, and complex bathymetry. The physical-biological model used for this study consisted of two parts: a circulation model and a zooplankton transport model. The circulation model is a three-dimensional Eulerian hydrodynamic model (TRIM3D) driven by the wind, tides, and freshwater outflow. The zooplankton transport model is a three-dimensional Lagrangian particle tracking model which simulates zooplankton movement using velocity fields derived from the three-dimensional circulation model. The circulation model is calibrated using field data such as salinity, pressure, and current time series from different locations in the ETZ. The transport and distribution of three zooplankton taxa, non-native zebra mussel veligers, resident mysids, and larval smelt, were simulated for this study. By simulating these three taxa, we were able to investigate the effect of a range of swimming speeds on zooplankton retention in the ETZ. We present the results of simulations exploring the efficiency of tidal vertical migration, a commonly described biological retention mechanism that is characterized by zooplankton migration up to the surface on flood and down to the bottom on ebb. Tidal vertical migration, also known as selective tidal stream transport, was investigated for several swimming speeds and endogenous rhythms.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Simons, R. D.; Monismith, S. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9774261"> <span id="translatedtitle">Carbon dioxide emission from european <span class="hlt">estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) in surface waters and related atmospheric exchanges were measured in nine European <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>. Averaged fluxes over the entire <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> are usually in the range of 0.1 to 0.5 mole of CO2 per square meter per day. For wide <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>, net daily fluxes to the atmosphere amount to several hundred tons of carbon (up to 790 tons of carbon per day in the Scheldt <span class="hlt">estuary</span>). European <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> emit between 30 and 60 million tons of carbon per year to the atmosphere, representing 5 to 10% of present anthropogenic CO2 emissions for Western Europe. PMID:9774261</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Frankignoulle; Abril; Borges; Bourge; Canon; Delille; Libert; Theate</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-10-16</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-09-13/pdf/2013-22270.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 56609 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>, NY</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...0.4, across Reynolds Channel, at <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>, New York. The owner of the...Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>, NY'', in...Bridge, across Reynolds Channel, mile 0.4, at <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>, New York. The owner of...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-13</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-09-13/pdf/2013-22266.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 56610 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>, NY</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>, NY AGENCY...0.4, across Reynolds Channel, at <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>, New York. This temporary deviation...Bridge, across Reynolds Channel, mile 0.4, at <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>, New York, has a vertical...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-13</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-06-11/pdf/2013-13852.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 34893 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>, NY</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>, NY AGENCY...0.4, across Reynolds Channel, at <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>, New York. This temporary deviation...Bridge, across Reynolds Channel, mile 0.4, at <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>, New York, has a vertical...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=55548"> <span id="translatedtitle">DELAWARE <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span> A MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR THE DELAWARE <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Wise conservation and management of the Delaware <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> is arguably the most important cooperative environmental initiative ever jointly undertaken by the States of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware. While much has been accomplished over the past few decades to improve wate...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6409052"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Estuary</span> program primer. National <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Program. Draft report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The manual provides an overview of the National <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Program and its functions and management structure. The manual also describes the Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan, a framework that can be used to help in prevention and control of pollution, land over-use, and man-environment conflicts.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cig.ensmp.fr/%7Eiahs/redbooks/a092/093028.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Monthly water balance in tributary watersheds of the Great Lakes Saint <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> River basin as influenced by climatic factors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">SUMMARY: We observe in this basin the variation of the climate from pure oceanic at the Atlantic shores to continental at the west shores of Lake Michigan and the west extremity of Lake Superior. The type of hydrology generated by tributaries to the Great Lakes and to the <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> River is Lhe product of the climate dominating the tributary</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boris S. Browzin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.actionbioscience.org/environment/christian.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Value of Healthy <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The article explores why healthy <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> are critical to humans and wildlife: supporting both commercial and recreational fisheries, treating waste and runoff, protecting coastal areas from natural hazards, connect bodies of water for transportation, and nurturing a balance of the food web</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robert Christian (East Carolina University;)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-03-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=N8313774"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wave Motion in an <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Wave climate in an <span class="hlt">estuary</span> with a strongly changing topography was investigated. Wave effects on coastal engineering works, on morphology and on the vertical movements of large ships by long-period waves were measured by wave-rider buoys and wave gages. D...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">V. Barthel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://actionbioscience.org/environment/christian.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Value of Healthy <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Healthy <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> are critical to humans and wildlife. They provide food, supporting both commercial and recreational fisheries, treat waste and runoff to maintain water quality, protect coastal areas from natural hazards, connect bodies of water for transportation and marine operations, and nurture a balance of the food web upon which all life depends.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robert Christian (Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences;)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-03-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=estuary&pg=4&id=ED225838"> <span id="translatedtitle">Food Webs in an <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|The Maryland Marine Science Education Project has produced a series of mini-units in marine science education for the junior high/middle school classroom. This unit focuses on food chains in an <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. Although the unit specifically treats the Chesapeake Bay, it may be adapted for use with similar estuarine systems. In addition, the unit may be…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dunne, Barbara B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return 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<a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=estuary&id=EJ827700"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simulated Sampling of <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Plankton</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|To find out about the microscopic life in the valuable <span class="hlt">estuary</span> environment, it is usually necessary to be near the water. This dry lab offers an alternative, using authentic data and a simulation of plankton sampling. From the types of organisms found in the sample, middle school students can infer relationships in the biological and physical…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fortner, Rosanne W.; Jenkins, Deborah Bainer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012GeoRL..39.3602S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Carbon dioxide emissions from Indian monsoonal <span class="hlt">estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> are known to be strong source for atmospheric CO2, however, little information is available from Indian <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>. In order to quantify CO2 emissions from the Indian <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>, samples were collected at 27 <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> all along the Indian coast during discharge (wet) period. The emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere from Indian <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> were 4-5 times higher during wet than dry period. The pCO2 ranged between ˜300 and 18492 ?atm which are within the range of world <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>. The mean pCO2 and particulate organic carbon (POC) showed positive relation with rate of discharge suggesting availability of high quantities of organic matter that led to enhanced microbial decomposition. The annual CO2 fluxes from the Indian <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>, together with dry period data available in the literature, amounts to 1.92 TgC which is >10 times less than that from the European <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>. The low CO2 fluxes from the Indian <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> are attributed to low flushing rates and less human settlements along the banks of the Indian <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sarma, V. V. S. S.; Viswanadham, R.; Rao, G. D.; Prasad, V. R.; Kumar, B. S. K.; Naidu, S. A.; Kumar, N. A.; Rao, D. B.; Sridevi, T.; Krishna, M. S.; Reddy, N. P. C.; Sadhuram, Y.; Murty, T. V. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=80317"> <span id="translatedtitle">MAPPING BATHYMETRY AND BOTTOM TYPE IN A SHALLOW <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bathymetry and bottom type are important in characterizing <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> and their ecology but hard to map, especially in shallow <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>. Acoustic backscattering was used to remotely sense these properties in the shallow Slocums River <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> of Massachusetts. Acoustic pulses were...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2011107176"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lower Columbia River <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Partnership: Habitat Restoration Case Studies.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Partnership was established in 1995, when the lower Columbia River and <span class="hlt">estuary</span> were accepted into the US Environmental Protection Agency National <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Program. As the coordinating body for efforts to enhance and restore the lower Columbia R...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB80114317"> <span id="translatedtitle">Saint <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> River Ice Boom Modification Study.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The objective of this study was to prepare designs and specifications for improvements to existing ice booms in the international portion of the Saint <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> River to allow extended season navigation through 31 December of each year. The study involved ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. W. Lewis D. L. Benze R. A. Etzel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE95012378"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory Affirmative Action Program. Revised.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory's Affirmative Action Program (AAP) serves as a working document that describes current policies, practices, and results in the area of affirmative action. It represents the Laboratory's framework for n affirmative approach...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41344290"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chemical tracers of Lusitanian amphorae kilns from the Tagus <span class="hlt">estuary</span> (Portugal)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, the characterization of Roman amphorae from the Porto dos Cacos (PC) and Quinta do Rouxinol (QR) workshops, in the Tagus <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, dating to a period between the 1<span class="hlt">st</span> and 5th century AD was carried out on the basis of instrumental neutron activation analysis data on 260 amphorae fragments, together with mineralogical compositional studies obtained by X-ray diffraction.Special</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. I. Dias; M. I. Prudêncio; M. A. Gouveia; M. J. Trindade; R. Marques; D. Franco; J. Raposo; C. S. Fabião; A. Guerra</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012cosp...39.2064S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Carbon dioxide emissions from Indian monsoonal <span class="hlt">estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The oceans act as a net sink for atmospheric CO2, however, the role of coastal bodies on global CO2 fluxes remains unclear due to lack of data. The estimated absorption of CO2 from the continental shelves, with limited data, is 0.22 to 1.0 PgC/y, and of CO2 emission by <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> to the atmosphere is 0.27 PgC/y. The estimates from the <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> suffer from large uncertainties due to large variability and lack of systematic data collection. It is especially true for Southeast Asian <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> as the biogeochemical cycling of material are different due to high atmospheric temperature, seasonality driven by monsoons, seasonal discharge etc. In order to quantify CO2 emissions from the Indian <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>, samples were collected at 27 <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> all along the Indian coast during discharge wet and dry periods. The emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere from Indian <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> were 4-5 times higher during wet than dry period. The pCO2 ranged between ~300 and 18492 microatm which were within the range of world <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>. The mean pCO2 and particulate organic carbon (POC) showed positive relation with rate of discharge suggesting availability of high quantities of organic matter that led to enhanced microbial decomposition. The annual CO2 fluxes from the Indian <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>, together with dry period data available in the literature, amounts to 1.92 TgC which is >10 times less than that from the European <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>. The low CO2 fluxes from the Indian <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> are attributed to low flushing rates and less human settlements along the banks of the Indian <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sarma Vedula, VSS</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999ECSS...48..307G"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Propagation of Tides up Rivers With Special Considerations on the Upper Saint <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> River</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The hydrodynamics of rivers affected by tides is dominated by the damping and the distortion induced by quadratic bottom friction. A compact and accurate approximation to the deceleration term, standing for the frictional effect, allows the retention of the concept of harmonics and separation of the time and space variations. It then becomes possible to explain, in terms of basic physics, the transformation of the tide from the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, to the zone where it becomes extinct. The theoretical reasoning is supported by pertinent observations collected in the Saint <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> river; numerical relations are derived to demonstrate the existence of non-linear effects and to quantitatively link various relevant physical parameters. This analysis, in turn, helps outline approaches to improve the tide predictions in such rivers which happen to have such great economic and strategic importance.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Godin, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=117503"> <span id="translatedtitle">NEW HAMPSHIRE'S <span class="hlt">ESTUARIES</span>, THE STATE OF</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The State of the New Hampshire <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Report describes the region's valuable natural resources, explains how natural resources are linked to the cultural and economic well being of New Hampshire, and identifies threats to these resources. This State of the <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> Report summa...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=55521"> <span id="translatedtitle">NEW HAMPSHIRE <span class="hlt">ESTUARIES</span> PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLAN</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan of the New Hampshire <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> Project presents a broad framework and specific list of actions to protect and enhance the environmental quality of the <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> of the State of New Hampshire. It is intended to be a guide for all...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/tutorial_estuaries/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Estuaries</span>: Where Rivers Meet the Sea</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This website is the educational site for NOAA's National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS), managed and maintained by NERRS education staff. This site provides, primarily, an avenue for elementary, middle and high school students, and their teachers, to learn more about <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>, research, and explore NOAAâs âliving laboratoriesâ - the National Estuarine Research Reserves. The <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Video Gallery offers a collection of short video clips. The main content themes include relationships between <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> and humans, life in an <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, impacts of society upon <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> and current research and equipment used in monitoring <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> in video format. Also included are E-Live Backpacks designed to extend and enhance specific <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> 101 High-School Curriculum activities by using video clips from our Video Gallery, and relating them to important <span class="hlt">estuary</span> principles and concepts. Students are asked to review the materials in the E-Live Backpacks, to construct their own compelling questions, actively research those questions, and share their learning through final products. By going through these steps, you will lead students through a project-based learning experience. this site is also available in Spanish.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ian.umces.edu/pdfs/stevenson_1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">MARSH LOSS IN NANTICOKE <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span>, CHESAPEAKE BAY</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Marsh loss in the Nanticoke <span class="hlt">estuary</span> dates from the 1920s. Since 1938 overall rate of loss has averaged 49.6 ha annually, with rates increasing down <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. Most losses have occurred in submerged upland marshes; tidal freshwater marshes are stable. Interior ponding has been the primary mechanism of loss. Rising water levels are postulated to be the underlying force behind marsh</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">MICHAEL S. KEARNEYO; RUSSELL E. GRACE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=236156"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dissolved oxygen in two Oregon <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>: The importance of the ocean-<span class="hlt">estuary</span> connection - May 16, 2011</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examined the role of the ocean ?<span class="hlt">estuary</span> connection in influencing periodic reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in Yaquina and Yachats <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>, Oregon, USA. In the Yaquina <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, there is close coupling between the coastal ocean and the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. As a result, low DO ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=elitism&pg=3&id=EJ911561"> <span id="translatedtitle">Struggle for the Soul: John <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Childs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|John <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Childs was born in Eau Claire, Wisconsin on January 11, 1889, the second child of John Nelson Childs and Helen Janette (Nettie) Smith. In childhood Childs absorbed the values of industry, democracy, and a traditional, but socially conscious, religion. Childs was a Methodist and an intensely private person not given to talking about…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stallones, Jared</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27544639"> <span id="translatedtitle">Justice Kennedy's Libertarian Revolution: <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> v. Texas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This brief article explains why <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> v. Texas could be a revolutionary case if the Supreme Court follows Justice Kennedy's reasoning in the future. As in Planned Parenthood v. Casey, Justice Kennedy finds a statute to be unconstitutional, not because it infringes a right to privacy (which is mentioned but once), but because it infringes \\</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Randy E. Barnett</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60588785"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory 2007 Annual Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory's many outstanding accomplishments in 2007 are a tribute to a dedicated staff, which is shaping the Laboratory's future as we go through a period of transition and transformation. The achievements highlighted in this annual report illustrate our focus on the important problems that affect our nation's security and global stability, our application of breakthrough science and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P Chrzanowski; K Walter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40203413"> <span id="translatedtitle">Photosynthesis in Codium fragile (Chlorophyta) from a Nova Scotia <span class="hlt">estuary</span>: responses to desiccation and hyposalinity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Codium fragile ssp. tomentosoides from Caribou Harbour, an estuarine site in the southern Gulf of <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>, was extremely tolerant to stresses from desiccation\\u000a and reduced salinity. Photosynthetic responses of both rhizomatous and erect growth forms were measured using pulse amplitude\\u000a modulation (PAM) fluorometry of chlorophyll a fluorescence to determine effective quantum yield (?PSII) and relative electron transport rate (rETR).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kwang Young Kim; David J. Garbary</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39884059"> <span id="translatedtitle">Plankton dynamics along a 180 km reach of the Saint <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> River from its headwaters in Lake Ontario</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We test the hypothesis that phytoplankton biomass decrease upon entry into the <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> River from headwaters in Lake\\u000a Ontario is attributable to a range of causal factors including, decreased photosynthetic fitness due to turbulence, cell loss\\u000a due to increased flocculation and subsequent sedimentation, decreases in nutrients, and loss due to grazing. In order to test\\u000a this, changes in phytoplankton</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Michael R. Twiss; Carmen Ulrich; Stefanie A. Kring; Jessica Harold; Matthew R. Williams</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=85727"> <span id="translatedtitle">PECONIC <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span> PROGRAM TIDAL CREEK STUDY</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">EEA evaluated ten tidal creeks throughout the Peconic <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> representing a wide range of watershed variables. Primary focus was directed towards the collection and analysis of the macrobenthic invertebrate communities of these ten tidal creeks. Analysis of the macrobenthic comm...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return 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<a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=155444"> <span id="translatedtitle">EPA'S BENTHIC HABITAT DATA FOR YAQUINA <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Scientists at EPA's National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Western Ecology Division (WED) have been studying seafloor (benthic) habitats in Yaquina <span class="hlt">estuary</span> for several years. Those studies were conducted as parts of several research projects, including: e...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=64500"> <span id="translatedtitle">ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF SOUTH FLORIDA <span class="hlt">ESTUARIES</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An assessment of the ecological condition of south Florida <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> based on regional probabilistic monitoring was conducted during the summer of 1995. Samples and data were collected on water and sediment quality, benthos, and fish tissue contaminants. Elevated concentrations o...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB297163"> <span id="translatedtitle">Algal Nutrient Studies of the Potomac <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The nutrient requirements of the phytoplankton of the Potomac <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> were studied during the summer of 1977 employing the following laboratory tests: NH4(t)-N uptake, alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity; extractable surplus orthophosphate; tissue analys...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. L. Slayton E. R. Trovato</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2011103217"> <span id="translatedtitle">Columbia River <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Regional Management Plan, 1979.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Columbia River <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Regional Management Plan contains the following information: Part I, Background: Explains how the plan may be used, how public and private interests were involved in developing the plan, what issues and problems were central in ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=COM7101050"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tidal Study of Three Oregon <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the summer of 1969 the Civil Engineering Department at Oregon State University measured tidal elevations and current velocities in the Yaquina, Alsea, and Siletz <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>. Data were gathered on the physical characteristics (depths, areas, volumes,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. R. Goodwin E. W. Emmett B. Glenne</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1970-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=estuary&pg=2&id=EJ213232"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Peel Inlet-Harvey <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Study.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Describes how the department of physics of the Western Australian Institute of Technology (WAIT) has been involved in the Peel Inlet-Harvey <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> study. An appendix which presents the departmental approach to curriculum matters is also included. (HM)|</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Walker, Warren; Black, Ronald</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JMS....94...74D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Water renewal timescales in the Scheldt <span class="hlt">Estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using the concepts of the Constituent-oriented Age and Residence time Theory (CART), we compute timescales related to the water renewal in the Scheldt <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> (The Netherlands/Belgium). Three different timescales are used to better understand and characterize the dynamics of the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>: the age of the renewing water, the residence time and the exposure time. The residence time is the time taken by a water parcel to leave the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> for the first time while the exposure time is the total time spent by a water parcel in the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> including re-entries. The age of a renewing water parcel is defined as the time elapsed since it entered the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. The renewing water was split into three types: the water originating from the sea, the water originating from the upstream fresh tidal rivers and the water originating from the different canals and docks connected to the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. Every timescale is computed at any time and position by means of the finite-element, unstructured-mesh model SLIM. This results in movies of the timescale fields (shown as Supplementary material), allowing a detailed analysis of their spatial and temporal variabilities. The effect of the M2 tide and the discharge regime (winter, summer or average situation) on the timescales is also investigated.Tidally-averaged timescales vary little over the width of the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> and hence exhibit a virtually one-dimensional behaviour. However, around these average values, the timescales can vary hugely over a tidal cycle, with amplitudes that significantly depend on the space coordinates. The reason thereof has yet to be elucidated. These results underscore the need for two- or three-dimensional models with high temporal resolution for investigating the dynamics of the Scheldt <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">de Brye, Benjamin; de Brauwere, Anouk; Gourgue, Olivier; Delhez, Eric J. M.; Deleersnijder, Eric</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/6133594"> <span id="translatedtitle">Residual Exchange Flows in Subtropical <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Observations of residual exchange flows at the entrance to four subtropical <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>, two of them semiarid, indicate that\\u000a these flows are mainly tidally driven, as they compare favorably with theoretical patterns of tidal residual flows. In every\\u000a <span class="hlt">estuary</span> examined, the tidal behavior was that of a standing or near-standing wave, i.e., tidal elevation and tidal currents\\u000a were nearly in quadrature.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Arnoldo Valle-Levinson; Guillermo Gutierrez de Velasco; Armando Trasviña; Alejandro J. Souza; Reginaldo Durazo; Ashish J. Mehta</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40557408"> <span id="translatedtitle">Iodine speciation in the Nile River <span class="hlt">estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">During high- and low-flood periods, surface and bottom water samples were collected along the Nile River <span class="hlt">estuary</span> for the voltammetric determination of dissolved iodine species. Iodine occurs in the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> as iodate, iodide and organic iodine. Total iodine increases with salinity, showing a source feature in surface and bottom waters during high-flow indicating iodine input. During low-flow, total iodine showed</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. A. R Abdel-Moati</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48399752"> <span id="translatedtitle">Methane distribution in European tidal <span class="hlt">estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Methane concentrations have been measured along salinity profilesin nine tidal <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> in Europe (Elbe, Ems, Thames, Rhine,Scheldt, Loire, Gironde, Douro and Sado). The Rhine, Scheldt andGironde <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> have been studied seasonally. A number ofdifferent methodologies have been used and they yieldedconsistent results. Surface water concentrations ranged from0.002 to 3.6 µM, corresponding to saturation ratios of 0.7 to1580 with a median</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jack J. Middelburg; Joop Nieuwenhuize; Niels Iversen; Nana Høgh; Hein de Wilde; Wim Helder; Richard Seifert; Oliver Christof</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6051021"> <span id="translatedtitle">The geothermal program at <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The main purpose of the geothermal program at <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory is to develop, improve and validate methods and instrumentation to: (1) determine geothermal reservoir parameters; (2) detect and characterize reservoir fractures and boundaries; and (3) identify and evaluate the importance of reservoir processes. The ultimate objective of the program, which includes field, theoretical and modeling activities, is to advance the state-of-the-art for characterizing geothermal systems and evaluating their productive capacity and longevity under commercial exploitation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lippmann, M.J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10180673"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory 1993 Site Environmental Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This annual Site Environmental Report summarizes <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory`s (LBL`s) environmental activities in calendar year (CY) 1993. The purpose of this report is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. Its format and content are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/7145811"> <span id="translatedtitle">Life sciences: <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory, 1988</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Life Sciences Research at LBL has both a long history and a new visibility. The physics technologies pioneered in the days of Ernest O. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> found almost immediate application in the medical research conducted by Ernest's brother, John <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>. And the tradition of nuclear medicine continues today, largely uninterrupted for more than 50 years. Until recently, though, life sciences research has been a secondary force at the <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). Today, a true multi-program laboratory has emerged, in which the life sciences participate as a full partner. The LBL Human Genome Center is a contribution to the growing international effort to map the human genome. Its achievements represent LBL divisions, including Engineering, Materials and Chemical Sciences, and Information and Computing Sciences, along with Cell and Molecular Biology and Chemical Biodynamics. The Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center will comprise not only beamlines and experimental end stations, but also supporting laboratories and office space for scientists from across the US. This effort reflects a confluence of scientific disciplines --- this time represented by individuals from the life sciences divisions and by engineers and physicists associated with the Advanced Light Source project. And finally, this report itself, the first summarizing the efforts of all four life sciences divisions, suggests a new spirit of cooperation. 30 figs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..1214594B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mixing in the Amazon <span class="hlt">estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The research area of this work is located at the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> of the Amazon River (Brazil), near the river mouth. The results of air movement analysis on the surface atmospheric circulation over the Mouth of the Amazonas River, salinity and temperature measures as well as measurements of currents, carried out along a longitudinal section in the navigation canal region of the Northern Bar of the Amazon River (Barra Norte do Rio Amazonas) in June 2006, during the river flood season in the quadrature tide. The dynamics effects affect hydrodynamic,meteorological and hydrographical parameters at the river mouth. The conclusion drawn include that: a) the saline wedge-type stratification can be detected approximately 100km away from the mouth of the Amazon River during the end of the rainy season in the quadrature tide; b) probably, at the Amazon <span class="hlt">estuary</span> the quadrature entrainment processes are dominant and they are the ones responsible for increased salinity detected in the surface layer, whereas turbulence scattering mixing is not so important. c) The large flow of fresh water from the Amazon River at the end of the rainy season implies the displacement of the saline front position over the internal Amazon continental platform, and d) The tidal wave shows a positive asymmetry in the canal, with floods lasting less than in the ebb tide. This asymmetry decreases towards the ocean, eventually becoming reversed in the presence of a saline wedge. The speeds, however, have a negative asymmetry, with more intense ebb tides, due to the river flow and is more evident by the existence of quadrature tides.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bezerra, M. O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=estuary&pg=2&id=ED340599"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Book: A Guide to Promoting Understanding and Regional Management of Maine's <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> and Embayments.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|The objective of this document is to provide information about <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>, the impact of uses on the environmental health of an <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, and what communities and concerned individuals can do to manage and protect their local estuarine resources successfully. Much of the information presented here pertains to other embayments along the Maine coast…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ruffing, Jenny</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ocean+AND+Fishing&pg=2&id=ED086554"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Estuaries</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This publication is designed for use in standard science curricula to develop oceanologic manifestations of certain science topics. Included are teacher guides, student activities, and demonstrations designed to impart ocean understanding to high school students. When the student has completed this unit, he should be able to: (1) define an…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Awkerman, Gary L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57791716"> <span id="translatedtitle">Life History and Population Characteristics of Striped Bass in Atlantic Canada</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Populations of striped bass Morone saxatilis occur in three regions of Atlantic Canada: the <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> River and <span class="hlt">estuary</span> in Quebec; the Gulf of <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> from Chaleur Bay through Northumberland Strait; and rivers in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia draining into the Bay of Fundy. At least nine rivers are known or believed to sustain spawning populations: the <span class="hlt">St</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Roger A. Rulifson; Michael J. Dadswell</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB90126574"> <span id="translatedtitle">Manganese and Suspended Matter in the Yaquina <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, Oregon.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The longitudinal distribution of total suspended matter and total, dissolved, and particulate manganese in a small coastal plain <span class="hlt">estuary</span> is described. The distribution of manganese is a consequence of estuarine circulation; a within-<span class="hlt">estuary</span> maximum is inv...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. J. Callaway D. T. Specht G. R. Ditsworth</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.lbl.gov/Science-Articles/Research-Review/Magazine/1981/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> and His Laboratory: A Historian's View of the <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Years</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory celebrated its 65th anniversary, and created this web site as a tribute to its founder. Ernest Orlando <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>, who invented the cyclotron, opened the way to "a Golden Age of particle physics and revolutionary discoveries about the nature of the universe." The story was originally told by the lab's public information department in 1981. All in all, this site provides a personal look into one of the foremost physics labs in the world, at a time when its discoveries were literally shaking the world.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wheaton, Bruce R.; Seidel, Robert W.; Heilbron, J. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6572331"> <span id="translatedtitle">Technology transfer at <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is dedicated to commercializing new technology in such fields as advanced materials, biotechnology, and electronics. Technology transfer between national laboratories and the industrial community is important in maintaining America's competitive edge. This document examines opportunities to establish working relationships with LBL. Streamlined methods for technology transfer are available with the aid of the Technology Transfer Department and the Patent Department at LBL. Research activities at LBL are concentrated in three major program areas: Energy Sciences, General Sciences, and Biosciences. Each program area consists of three research divisions. LBL welcomes both requests for information and proposals to conduct research.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Johnson, D. (ed.)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10139226"> <span id="translatedtitle">Technology transfer at <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is dedicated to commercializing new technology in such fields as advanced materials, biotechnology, and electronics. Technology transfer between national laboratories and the industrial community is important in maintaining America`s competitive edge. This document examines opportunities to establish working relationships with LBL. Streamlined methods for technology transfer are available with the aid of the Technology Transfer Department and the Patent Department at LBL. Research activities at LBL are concentrated in three major program areas: Energy Sciences, General Sciences, and Biosciences. Each program area consists of three research divisions. LBL welcomes both requests for information and proposals to conduct research.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Johnson, D. [ed.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/146705"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory 1994 site environmental report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=55540"> <span id="translatedtitle">SAN FRANCISCO <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span> PROJECT COMPREHENSIVE CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT PLAN</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, a significant natural resource, San Francisco Bay and the Delta combine to form the West Coast's largest <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. The <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> conveys the waters of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers to the Pacific Ocean. It encompasses roughly 1,600 square miles, drains over 40 p...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48902709"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tidal asymmetry in <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> with mixed semidiurnal\\/diurnal tides</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Tidal asymmetry in <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> with mixed, mainly semidiurnal tides arises from both the interaction of principal tides and the higher harmonics generated by distortions within the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. The duration asymmetry in rise and fall of water level caused by principal tides on the west coast of the continental United States is ebb-dominant, and so the tide entering <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> is also</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nicholas J. Nidzieko</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/10115030"> <span id="translatedtitle">Biological effects of anthropogenic contaminants in the San Francisco <span class="hlt">Estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Concentrations of many anthropogenic contaminants in the San Francisco <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> exist at levels that have been associated with biological effects elsewhere, so there is a potential for them to cause biological effects in the <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>. The purpose of this paper is to summarize information about biological effects on the <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>'s plankton, benthos, fish, birds, and mammals, gathered since the early</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bruce Thompson; Terry Adelsbach; Cynthia Brown; Jennifer Hunt; James Kuwabara; Jennifer Neale; Harry Ohlendorf; Steve Schwarzbach; Robert Spies; Karen Taberski</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=list+AND+organisms&pg=5&id=ED361198"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Guide. Level 3: High School. Draft.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> are marine systems that serve as nurseries for animals, links in the migratory pathways, and habitat for a complex community of organisms. This curriculum guide intended for use at the high school level seeks to teach what <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> are; provide opportunities to practice decision-making that affects <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>; and encourage students to…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alexander, Glen; And Others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=estuary&pg=2&id=ED361198"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Guide. Level 3: High School. Draft.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|<span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> are marine systems that serve as nurseries for animals, links in the migratory pathways, and habitat for a complex community of organisms. This curriculum guide intended for use at the high school level seeks to teach what <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> are; provide opportunities to practice decision-making that affects <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>; and encourage students to…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alexander, Glen; And Others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/680058"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rapid barium removal in the Delaware <span class="hlt">estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Six profiles of dissolved barium covering the entire salinity range of the Delaware River and Bay <span class="hlt">estuary</span> from March through September 1996 were collected and analyzed. The profiles are similar to one another in both shape and magnitude except for one attribute. A sudden ({le} 24 days), nearly complete (>90%) removal of dissolved Ba in midestuary occurs in mid-May followed by an 80% recovery in early June. This removal appears to be temporally and spatially coupled to the end of the spring bloom. Based on such episodic behavior, and on recent work with flocculation of diatom exudates, the authors conclude that the Ba depletion is caused by barite precipitation in the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> during the late stages of the bloom. This would imply that lower <span class="hlt">estuary</span> and inner coastal margin sediments associated with eutrophic <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> receive a seasonal pulse of barite. The suddenness of this event also implies that sedimentary barite is strongly influenced by high productivity events. Comparison of the riverine Ba concentration with the effective riverine end member after desorptive barium release yields an estimated 30--40 nM Ba available from the suspended sediments as they enter the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. This estimate is supported by excess barium in unfiltered samples over filtered samples taken from the river and also by calculations done elsewhere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stecher, H.A. III [Univ. of Delaware, Lewes, DE (United States). College of Marine Studies]|[Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Dept. of Geology; Kogut, M.B. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). School of Oceanography</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985ECSS...20..183F"> <span id="translatedtitle">A comparative study of mercury contamination in the Tagus <span class="hlt">estuary</span> (Portugal) and major French <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> (Gironde, Loire, Rhône)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Concentrations of mercury were determined for the waters, suspended matter and sediments of the Tagus and of major French <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>. The Tagus <span class="hlt">estuary</span> is one of the most contaminated by mercury derived from the outfalls of a chloralkali plant and from other industrial sources. In deposited sediments the median level, 1·0 ?g Hg g -1, is twenty times higher than the natural background and Hg contents depend on the sediment grain-size, age and the distance from waste-outfalls. Suspended matter is more regularly and highly contaminated (median value: 4·5 ?g Hg g -1). In the French <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> Hg levels in the suspended material decrease with salinity due to dilution and/or remobilization processes. In June 1982, in the Loire <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, high values of Hg are observed in the middle <span class="hlt">estuary</span> and attributed to urban and industrial sources. In the Tagus <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, the general distribution of total dissolved Hg confirms the contamination: it increases seaward from 10 ng 1 -1 in the river to 80 ng 1 -1 in the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> outlet. The dissolved Hg is almost totally organic in the river, inorganic in the middle <span class="hlt">estuary</span> due to inorganic Hg effluents and again organic in the lower <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. This variation is related to the dissolved organic carbon values. The dissolved Hg levels in the Loire <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> (5-300 ng 1 -1) are much higher than in the Gironde <span class="hlt">estuary</span> (3-6 ng 1 -1) and of the same order as those observed in the Tagus <span class="hlt">estuary</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Figueres, G.; Martin, J. M.; Meybeck, M.; Seyler, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984WRR....20..531B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stratigraphic Evidence of Eutrophication in an <span class="hlt">Estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Vertical changes in chlorophyll degradation products preserved in sediments deposited in an urban <span class="hlt">estuary</span> show a significant increase in algal productivity with the introduction of sewage effluent into the river. By comparison, algal production during intensive agriculture of the watershed, including heavy applications of fertilizers, was less by an order of magnitude where there was no sewage discharge from a point source. Concentrations of orthophosphorus correspond with concentrations of algal cells and chlorophyll in the water column and are greater by an order of magnitude where sewage is discharged into an <span class="hlt">estuary</span> draining an urban-agricultural watershed than where there is no sewage. The response of the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> to short- and long-term changes in the amount of sewage discharged is reflected by similar changes in chlorophyll production. However, chlorophyll production does not correspond with increases in the amount of fertilizers used in recent years over the amount used in the middle to late nineteenth century.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brush, Grace S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986GeCoA..50..835B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geochemistry of tin in rivers and <span class="hlt">estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On the basis of measurements from a large number of rivers from pristine and polluted regions, we estimate the riverine fluxes of tin to the oceans to be 0.76 × 10 6molyr-1 for the dissolved fraction and 300-600 × 10 6 mol yr -1 for the paniculate fraction. The paniculate flux agrees with the flux calculated from denudation rates. <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> were found not to have a large effect upon the transport of tin to the oceans. Evidence for the remobilization of tin was found in an <span class="hlt">estuary</span> that is highly polluted with tin from mining and smelting activities. Monobutyltin was found to be present in polluted <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> and is presumed to be a degradation product of tributyltin additives to antifouling paint.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Byrd, James T.; Andreae, Meinrat O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7007361"> <span id="translatedtitle">National <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Program after four years: A report to congress</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The National <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Program After Four Years: A Report to Congress is a status report on the National <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Program (NEP) and the seventeen Management Conferences that are part of the NEP. The Report is divided into: Part I Meeting a Need: The National <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Program; Part II Understanding <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span>: The Key to Better Management; Part III Managing <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span>: The Best Methods; Part IV Assessing the NEP: What Has Been Learned; Part V Looking to the Future: Trends and Needs; and Part VI Moving Ahead: The NEP Projects.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/imagepages/19306.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">St</span>. John's Wort (image)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The herb <span class="hlt">St</span>. John's Wort is believed to be helpful in relieving mild to moderate depression, but should only be taken under a physician's supervision. <span class="hlt">St</span>. John's Wort may clash with other medications or ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.spartina.org/index.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle">San Francisco <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>: Invasive Spartina Project</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Invasive Spartina Project was developed by the California State Coastal Conservancy to determine the extent and address the problem of invasive Spartina in the San Francisco <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>. This Web site describes the efforts of the Invasive Spartina Project and the risk that Spartina poses. A variety of maps and photos are used to describe the results of the 2000-2001 survey of Spartina populations within the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. A host of other documents regarding Spartina and this project are also available in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=85732"> <span id="translatedtitle">PECONIC <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span>: AN ASSESSMENT OF SHELLFISH RESOURCES IN THE TRIBUTARIES AND EMBAYMENTS OF THE PECONIC <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Executive Summary Historically, the Peconic <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>'s shellfish resources have supported significant fisheries for a number of species including hard clams, oysters and bay scallops. However, distribution and abundance data for the tributaries and embayments within the Peconic Es...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7005746"> <span id="translatedtitle">National <span class="hlt">estuary</span> program guidance: Technical characterization in the National <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Program</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> are waterways, such as bays and sounds, where fresh water drained from the surrounding watershed mixes with salt water from the ocean. Section 320 of the Clean Water Act established the National <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Program (NEP) to identify nationally significant <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> threatened by pollution, development, or overuse and to promote the preparation of comprehensive management plans to ensure their ecological integrity. The program's goals are protection and improvement of water quality and enhancement of living resources. To reach these goals, the Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) convenes management conferences for each <span class="hlt">estuary</span> in the NEP to provide a forum for consensus building and problem solving among interested agencies and user groups.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56147919"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">estuary</span> part of low-inflow <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>: stratification and residence in a Tomales Bay tributary <span class="hlt">estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Flow continues in Lagunitas Creek throughout the summer, delivering freshwater to the hypersaline Tomales Bay <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. The freshwater-saltwater interface is found in the narrow estuarine channel that connects the creek and the bay, with minimal freshwater influence being found seaward of the broad shallow deltaic region at the head of the deeper sections of Tomales Bay. Observations of salinity, temperature,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. M. Abe; J. Largier</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/2895421"> <span id="translatedtitle">Control of phytoplankton biomass in <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>: A comparative analysis of microtidal and macrotidal <span class="hlt">estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Macrotidal <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> (mean tidal range >2m) generally exhibit a tolerance to pollution with nitrogen-containing nutrients\\u000a despite high loadings originating from freshwater outflows. These systems, which are characterized by high tidal energy, generally\\u000a exhibit lower levels of chlorophylla than systems with lower tidal energy. A comparative analysis of data from 40 microtidal and macrotidal <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> shows that\\u000a mean annual chlorophylla levels</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yves Monbet</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49274197"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of intermittent <span class="hlt">estuary</span> outflow on coastal sediments of adjacent sandy beaches</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Outflows from <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> potentially contribute to the productivity of adjacent coastal waters, although most previous work has been on <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> with considerable river discharge. We investigated the influence of <span class="hlt">estuary</span> outflow on aspects of coastal sediments adjacent to two seasonally intermittent <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>, the Curdies and Anglesea Rivers, in southwest Victoria, Australia. For each <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, we measured sediment organic matter, microphytobenthic</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jessica L. McKenzie; Gerry P. Quinn; Ty G. Matthews; Jan Barton; Alecia Bellgrove</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10177755"> <span id="translatedtitle">Guidelines for metrication at <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This document provides a set of guidelines for the metric transition process already under way at <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory. LBL has embarked upon this course in response to Section 5164 of the Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988, Executive Order 12770 of 1991, and DOE Order 5900.2. The core provision of DOE Order 5900.2 is Section 7b, which states: {open_quotes}Metric usage shall be required except to the extent that such use is impractical, or is likely to cause significant inefficiencies to, or loss of markets by United States firms, or an inability of the Department to fulfill its responsibilities under the laws of the Federal Government and the United States.{close_quotes} LBL`s metrication policy is meant to comply with this requirement by aggressively fostering metrication. The purpose of these guidelines is to optimize the coherence and the cost-effectiveness of the metrication process.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return 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onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6603198"> <span id="translatedtitle">Public attitudes toward <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Charlton Research Company is pleased to present the following summary of findings report for research conducted under contract with <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory. This section provides a brief introduction to the specifications of the study, and a guide to the organization of this report. Although the most sophisticated procedures have been used to collect and analyze the information presented here, it must be remembered that qualitative and quantitative research are not predictions. They are designed to measure public opinion within identifiable statistical limits or accuracy at specific points in time. This research is in no way a prediction of opinion or action at any future point in time. Among the topics covered in the surveys are: openness; National Laboratory; health hazards; radioactivity; uses of plutonium; hazardous waste; groundwater pollution; nuclear weapons; Ballistic Missile Defense; and earthquakes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15006844"> <span id="translatedtitle">Adaptive Optics at <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Adaptive optics enables high resolution imaging through the atmospheric by correcting for the turbulent air's aberrations to the light waves passing through it. The <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory for a number of years has been at the forefront of applying adaptive optics technology to astronomy on the world's largest astronomical telescopes, in particular at the Keck 10-meter telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The technology includes the development of high-speed electrically driven deformable mirrors, high-speed low-noise CCD sensors, and real-time wavefront reconstruction and control hardware. Adaptive optics finds applications in many other areas where light beams pass through aberrating media and must be corrected to maintain diffraction-limited performance. We describe systems and results in astronomy, medicine (vision science), and horizontal path imaging, all active programs in our group.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gavel, D T</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-03-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ma1598.photos.320459p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">4. Long view of west half of site from <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">4. Long view of west half of site from <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> General Hospital parking deck (former location of coating mill) showing north side of rear portion of Wilder Mill and Paper Machine Building; view to southwest. - Champion-International Paper Company, West bank of Spicket River at Canal Street, <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>, Essex County, MA</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22jacobs%22&pg=7&id=EJ642043"> <span id="translatedtitle">Jacob <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>'s "The Great Migration." Integrating the Curriculum.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Presents an assignment where students write their own word-problems that incorporate parts of the book "The Great Migration: An American Story" by Jacob <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> and then illustrate their word-problems in the style of <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>. Explains that the book focuses on the Great Migration when African Americans moved to northern U.S. cities. (CMK)|</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hodges, Alecia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6458664"> <span id="translatedtitle">Trace metal sources in two Malaysian <span class="hlt">estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The natural background concentrations of trace metals associated with suspended sediments in the non-urbanized upper reaches of the Kelang, Selangor, and Linggi rivers (West Malaysia) have been determined. These watersheds are underlain by weathered granite and covered, generally, by tropical jungle. The mean trace metal concentrations of the sediments in ..mu..-g/g are: Mn, 396; Zn, 92; Pb, 74; Cu, 24; Cr, 37; Ni, 21, and V, 45. These values are low compared to those reported from river sediments in North American and Europe. The spectra of trace metal abundances of the suspended sediments are very similar to the spectrum of source area granites. Thus, the granites impose a strong provenance control, in spite of intense weathering processes that have converted primary minerals to clay. Suspended sediments in the non-urbanized Selangor <span class="hlt">estuary</span> have the same trace metal concentrations as above and exhibit no effects due to human activities. Suspended sediments in the Kelange <span class="hlt">estuary</span> show Cu, Zn, and Pb concentrations of nearly three times the natural background levels and comparable to values reported from river sediments in North America and Europe. This <span class="hlt">estuary</span> receives inputs from the urbanized area of Kuala Lumpur and the industrialized lower Kelang valley. Pb concentrations in the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> are higher than for many northern hemisphere rivers. Furthermore, its concentration in the tributary sediments is higher than in the source area granites. This suggests airborne dispersal of Pb from the urban source and concentration in the suspended sediments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nelson, B.W.; Kahn, I.S.A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40681726"> <span id="translatedtitle">Restoration of the Golden Horn <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> (Halic)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Restoration of the iconic Golden Horn <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> in Istanbul, Turkey was a substantial political, logistical, ecological, and social challenge. Forty years of uncontrolled industrial and urban growth resulted in thick layers of anoxic sediment, toxic bacteria, strong hydrogen sulfide odor, and ecologically unlivable conditions. The major components of restoration, spanning two decades, have included (1) demolition and relocation of industries</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heather M. Coleman; Gurdal Kanat; F. Ilter Aydinol Turkdogan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19781731"> <span id="translatedtitle">Restoration of the Golden Horn <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> (Halic).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Restoration of the iconic Golden Horn <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> in Istanbul, Turkey was a substantial political, logistical, ecological, and social challenge. Forty years of uncontrolled industrial and urban growth resulted in thick layers of anoxic sediment, toxic bacteria, strong hydrogen sulfide odor, and ecologically unlivable conditions. The major components of restoration, spanning two decades, have included (1) demolition and relocation of industries and homes along the shore, (2) creation of wastewater infrastructure, (3) removal of anoxic sludge from the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, (4) removal of a floating bridge that impeded circulation, and (5) creation of cultural and social facilities. Although Turkey is not known as an environmental leader in pollution control, the sum of these efforts was largely successful in revitalizing the area through dramatic water quality improvement. Consequently, the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> is once again inhabitable for aquatic life as well as amenable to local resource users and foreign visitors, and Istanbul has regained a lost sense of cultural identity. This paper focuses on literature review and personal interviews to discuss the causes of degradation, solutions employed to rehabilitate the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, and subsequent physicochemical, ecological, and social changes. PMID:19781731</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Coleman, Heather M; Kanat, Gurdal; Aydinol Turkdogan, F Ilter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-09-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jc/jc0310/2003JC001786/2003JC001786.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reversing circulation patterns in a tropical <span class="hlt">estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A combination of current velocity and water density measurements was used to characterize the basic patterns of water exchange in the Gulf of Fonseca, a tropical <span class="hlt">estuary</span> on the Pacific Ocean side of Central America. The measurements were obtained during spring and neap tides in March (dry season) and June (wet season) of 2001 and consisted of profiles of current</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Arnoldo Valle-Levinson; Kathryn T. Bosley</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=plant+AND+nutrient&pg=6&id=ED265042"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> and Tidal Marshes. Habitat Pac.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This educational packet consists of an overview, three lesson plans, student data sheets, and a poster. The overview examines <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> and tidal or salt marshes by discussing the plants and animals in these habitats, marsh productivity, benefits and management of the habitats, historical aspects, and development and pollution. A glossary and list…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/5540720"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bacterioplankton dynamics in the Mondego <span class="hlt">estuary</span> (Portugal)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this work, the density of bacterioplankton and environmental parameters were monitored over a 11 month period (July 1999-June 2000), and also during one tidal cycle (15 June 2000), at two sampling stations, in the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> of River Mondego. These data were treated by multivariate analyses methods in order to identify the key factors that control the dynamics of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. Bacelarnicolau; L. B. Nicolau; J. C. Marques; F. Morgado; R. Pastorinho; U. M. Azeiteiro</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=animals+AND+islands&pg=4&id=ED275550"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kaua'i: Streams and <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Designed to help teachers develop students' awareness and understanding of some of Hawaii's endangered aquatic resources, this module contains activities and instructional suggestions for use with intermediate as well as high school students. The module is divided into two sections which explore the streams and <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> of Kauai. Activities in…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hawkins, John, Ed.; Murakami, Colleen, Ed.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=137604"> <span id="translatedtitle">VOLUNTEER <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span> MONITORING: A METHOD MANUAL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Executive Summary: This manual focuses on volunteer <span class="hlt">estuary</span> monitoring. As concern over the well-being of the environment has increased during the past couple of decades, volunteer monitoring has become an integral part of the effort to assess the health of our nation’s wat...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=203485"> <span id="translatedtitle">BCG Approaches for Improved Management of <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> and other complex aquatic systems are exposed to a variety of stressors that act at several scales, but are managed piecemeal - - often resulting in a â??death by 1000 cutsâ? caused by cumulative impacts to these valued resources. To address this, managers need tools that...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1980HM.....33..111E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mercury pollution in the Ems <span class="hlt">estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">From approximately 1960 to 1975 the Ems <span class="hlt">estuary</span> received several tons of mercury per year from a chlor-alkali plant, a pesticide factory and some minor sources. The discharge has been reduced drastically from 1976 onwards. In 1975 and 1976 measurements were made on the distribution of mercury in the sediment. The horizontal distribution revealed a strong local enrichment of the sediment near the point of discharge. The vertical distribution was found to be in accordance with the local deposition rates. In the water phase no significant change in mercury content from 1975 to 1978/79 could be demonstrated. In 1978/79 a difference between Ems <span class="hlt">estuary</span> and Dutch Wadden Sea was not significant. In 1978 mercury contents of eelpout Zoarces viviparus in the Ems <span class="hlt">estuary</span> were about twice as high as in the Wadden Sea. In the Ems <span class="hlt">estuary</span> a decrease of these contents was found between 1974/75 and 1978. A similar decline in the Wadden Sea may be related to a decreased mercury discharge by the River Rhine.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Essink, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003JGRC..108.3331V"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reversing circulation patterns in a tropical <span class="hlt">estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A combination of current velocity and water density measurements was used to characterize the basic patterns of water exchange in the Gulf of Fonseca, a tropical <span class="hlt">estuary</span> on the Pacific Ocean side of Central America. The measurements were obtained during spring and neap tides in March (dry season) and June (wet season) of 2001 and consisted of profiles of current velocity and density along four transects. From mid-March to mid-April a time series of hourly surface current velocity maps was also obtained with a high-frequency radar system of two antennas. The sampling transects and the radar coverage concentrated in the portion of the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> that has open communication with the ocean. During the dry season, water exchange at the entrance to the gulf suggested an inverse estuarine circulation that was more robust, and its dynamics were closer to geostrophy during neap than during spring tides. It is likely that salinity increased toward the tributaries of the system and then decreased within those tributaries because of the persistent influence of fresh water. In contrast, during the wet season, salinity decreased into the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, and the circulation resembled that of a typical <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. In this season the fortnightly modulation of exchange flows was masked by wind effects, which also played a relevant role in the dynamics. The net volume inflows measured in both seasons suggested that the residence time of the Gulf of Fonseca varies from 2 weeks to 1 month.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo; Bosley, Kathryn T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=116344"> <span id="translatedtitle">TAMPA BAY <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span> PROGRAM, 2004 IMPLEMENTATION REVIEW</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Tampa Bay <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Program and its partners have made measurable progress toward implementation of the adopted CCMP goals. Progress has occurred in the following areas: bay habitats, with an increase in seagrass, estuarine habitat restoration and preservation; water and sedime...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=117413"> <span id="translatedtitle">DELAWARE <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span> PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION STREAMLINE REVIEW, 2002</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The primary purpose of the Delaware <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Program implementation review (formerly known as the biennial review) has been to assist EPA in. making funding decisions for those NEPs that are in the post-CCMP, or implementation, phase, and to evaluate implementation progress. The i...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=estuary&pg=2&id=ED275550"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kaua'i: Streams and <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Designed to help teachers develop students' awareness and understanding of some of Hawaii's endangered aquatic resources, this module contains activities and instructional suggestions for use with intermediate as well as high school students. The module is divided into two sections which explore the streams and <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> of Kauai. Activities in…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hawkins, John, Ed.; Murakami, Colleen, Ed.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=estuary&id=EJ752935"> <span id="translatedtitle">Listening to <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> English in Singapore</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|In Singapore, many people are not familiar with <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> English (EE), the variety of English becoming popular in much of southern England. In the current study, when students listened to interviews with EE speakers and were asked to transcribe orthographically what they heard, most of them had severe problems. Features of pronunciation that…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Deterding, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=estuary&pg=3&id=ED265042"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> and Tidal Marshes. Habitat Pac.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This educational packet consists of an overview, three lesson plans, student data sheets, and a poster. The overview examines <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> and tidal or salt marshes by discussing the plants and animals in these habitats, marsh productivity, benefits and management of the habitats, historical aspects, and development and pollution. A glossary and…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=estuary&pg=3&id=ED371941"> <span id="translatedtitle">Padilla Bay: The <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Guide. Level 2.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|<span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> are marine systems that serve as nurseries for animals, links in the migratory pathways, and habitat for a complex community of organisms. This curriculum guide intended for use at the middle school level is designed for use with the on-site program developed by the Padilla Bay National Esturine Research Reserve (Washington). The guide…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Friesem, Judy; Lynn, Valerie, Ed.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=151534"> <span id="translatedtitle">THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF VERACRUZ, MEXICO <span class="hlt">ESTUARIES</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During June and July, 2002, forty-seven stations were sampled within <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> along the gulf coast of the state of Veracruz, MX, using a probabilistic survey design and a common set of response indicators. The objective of the study was to collect information to assess the condi...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=98233"> <span id="translatedtitle">INDICATORS OF ECOSYSTEM INTEGRITY FOR <span class="hlt">ESTUARIES</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Jordan, Stephen J. and Lisa M. Smith. In press. Indicators of Ecosystem Integrity for <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span>. In: Proceedings of the Estuarine Indicators Workshop, 29-31 October 2003, Sanibel Island, FL. Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation, Sanibel, FL. 23 p. (ERL,GB 1194). Ideal ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=12702"> <span id="translatedtitle">BATHYMETRY FOR ALBEMARLE AND PAMLICO <span class="hlt">ESTUARIES</span>, NC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bathymetry for the Albemarle and Pamlico <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> obtained from National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration-National Ocean Service (NOAA-NOS). See the metadata within the files from NOAA-NOS for more details and warnings concerning merging with US Geolgoical Survey Dig...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6811006"> <span id="translatedtitle">A chemical survey of the Mississippi <span class="hlt">estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A snap shot survey of the Mississippi <span class="hlt">estuary</span> was made during a period of low river discharge, when the estuarine mixing zone was within the deltaic channels. Concentrations of H{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, inorganic phosphorus and inorganic carbon suggest that the waters of the river and the low salinity (<5%) portion of the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> are near saturation with respect to calcite and sedimentary calcium phosphate. An input of oxidized nitrogen species and N{sub 2}O was observed in the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> between O and 4{per thousand} salinity. The concentrations of dissolved NH{sub 4}{sup +} and O{sub 2}, over most of the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, appeared to be influenced by decomposition of terrestrial organic matter in bottom sediments. The estuarine bottom also appears to be a source of CH{sub 4} which has been suggested to originate from petroleum shipping and refining operations. Estuarine mixing with offshore Gulf waters was the dominant influence on distributions of dissolved species over most of the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> (i.e., from salinities > 5%). The phytoplankton abundance (measured as chlorophyll a) increased as the depth of the mixed layer decreased in a manner consistent with the expected for a light-limited ecosystem. Fluxes of NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} + NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} and soluble inorganic phosphorus to the Gulf of Mexico were estimated to be 3.4 {plus minus} 0.2 {times} 10{sup 3} g N s{sup {minus}1} and 1.9 {plus minus} g P s{sup {minus}1}, respectively, at the time of this study.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fox, L.E.; Lipschultz, R.; Kerkhof, L.; Wofsy, S.C. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (USA))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..1113363B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Current Characterization at the Amazon <span class="hlt">estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">At the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> there are several mechanisms that cause turbulence: influence of solid contours (<span class="hlt">estuary</span> bottom and shores), speed vertical shearing (fluid inside), wind shearing stress (free surface) and surface and internal gravity waves. Turbulence intensity controls vertical distribution of <span class="hlt">estuary</span> water mass property concentration. As flow into the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> takes place during the transition or turbulent regimen, produced by small space and time scale movements, entrainment, turbulent scattering and advection are the processes responsible for fresh water mixing up with the sea and for local salinity variation, as well as for concentration of natural properties and man-made ones. According to this focus, we shall describe general circulation, conveyance and mixing characteristics of the Amazon low <span class="hlt">estuary</span> waters. Amazon <span class="hlt">estuary</span> shows unusual characteristics: it is of vast length and enormous outflow. It is extremely wide - 150 Km - and its discharge into the Atlantic amounts to 180,000 m3s-1 (Otman, 1968, Figueiredo et al, 1991), which means 18% of all water discharged by rivers into oceans; this is the largest punctual source of fresh water for oceans (Milliman and Meade, 1983). Maximum outflow is 2.5 x 105 m3s-1, and it happens at the end of May. Minimum outflow is 1.2 x 105 m3 s-1, and it takes place in November. At Amazon River, the Mixing Zone occurs where the Coastal Zone usually is. The reason for that is the extension of fresh water plume moves Northeast for over 1000 Km (Gibbs, 1970; Muller-Karger et al 1988). This is the most extensive estuarine plume ever found in the ocean. During low fluvial discharge (June-November) plume reaches 300 Km; however, on high discharge (November-May) plume reaches 500 Km. Plume already is 3 to 10 m thick and 80 to 300 Km wide (Lentz and Limeburner, 1995). From June to January plume moves towards Africa, from whence 70% of it goes east carried by North Brazil Current retroflection and 30% goes towards the Caribbean. From February to May, the plume goes northwest towards the Caribbean. As to classification according to salinity stratification, at the quadrature the Amazon <span class="hlt">estuary</span> is considered as "Saline Wedge" type (highly stratified <span class="hlt">estuary</span>), salinity at 120 Km way from river moth standing out, whereas at sysygy it can be classified as well mixed (Limeburner et al. 1991e 1992; Patchineelam, 2004). Fresh water is everywhere in the river area, salty or mixed water is located in the ocean. In this <span class="hlt">estuary</span> 90 Km away from the mouth surface water salinity is less than 0.05 and bottom salinity at 14 m deep is about 19 at high water on quadrature at the end of the rainy season. This behavior produces marked difference in the vertical salinity profile, showing the current is moving in the opposite direction (river fresh water and salty water brought by the tide). In this scenario, speed shearing at the interface produces interfacial friction stress that, from the entrainment process carries portions of water from the sea to the upper part. Usually, therefore, in "saline wedge" (highly stratified <span class="hlt">estuary</span>) type <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>, when river discharge is more intensive than the tide wave, entrainment is the predominant mechanism; and the greater tide amplitude is, the greater will its influence be to produce turbulent scattering and mixing be. Probably, at Amazon <span class="hlt">estuary</span> quadrature entrainment processes are predominant and are the ones responsible for increased salinity in surface layer, whereas turbulence scattering mixing is secondary to it. "Saline wedge" (highly stratified <span class="hlt">estuary</span>) type <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> are typical of large fluvial discharge and microtide regions. But although the Amazon <span class="hlt">estuary</span> is a macrotide region, this stratification is due to the river's exceptional discharge. Due to the remarkable river plume discharge on the platform, the tide - a dominant in macrotide region estuarine circulation - now has a secondary role, albeit not a negligible one, with quadrature amplitudes varying from 2 m to 90 Km from the mouth. It is important to point out that tide-ind</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bezerra, M. O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol2/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol2-sec165-1190.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 165.1190 - Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, Alameda, CA.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, Alameda, CA. 165.1190 Section...Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, Alameda, CA. (a) Location. ...zone: All navigable waters of the Oakland <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, California, from the surface to...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title33-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title33-vol2-sec165-1190.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 165.1190 - Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, Alameda, CA.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, Alameda, CA. 165.1190 Section...Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, Alameda, CA. (a) Location. ...zone: All navigable waters of the Oakland <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, California, from the surface to...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10131991"> <span id="translatedtitle">Second International Symposium on the Biogeochemistry of Model <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span>: Estuarine processes in global change. Final report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report summarizes <span class="hlt">estuary</span> events discussed at the symposium on biogeochemistry. Topics include; sedimentation, salinity, inputs and outputs of the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, effects of global change, and the need for effective sampling and modeling of <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Windom, H.L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2009-title33-vol2/pdf/CFR-2009-title33-vol2-sec165-1190.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 165.1190 - Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, Alameda, CA.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, Alameda, CA. 165.1190 Section...Security Zone; San Francisco Bay, Oakland <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, Alameda, CA. (a) Location. ...zone: All navigable waters of the Oakland <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, California, from the surface to...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3164166"> <span id="translatedtitle">Population Structure of an Invasive Parthenogenetic Gastropod in Coastal Lakes and <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> of Northern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> and coastal lakes receive little attention despite being heavily invaded by non-indigenous invasive species (NIS). In these situations, studies of population dynamics in invaded habitats can provide valuable insights into how NIS interact with new environments. Tarebia granifera is a prosobranch gastropod from south-east Asia which has invaded other sub-tropical parts of the world. This study addresses whether a small number of key environmental factors influences gastropod communities, and specifically how the population density and size structure of T. granifera were influenced by environmental change in <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> and coastal lakes in southern Africa. Methodology/Principal Findings T. granifera's density, number of brooded juveniles and size structure were measured at the <span class="hlt">St</span>. Lucia <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, Mgobozeleni <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, Lake Sibaya and Lake Nhlange. Size structure was classified according to shell height (SH). All dissected individuals were found to be female and free from trematode infection. Salinity, water depth, temperature, and pH were the main factors correlated with population density of gastropod communities. T. granifera often reached densities well over 1000 ind. m?2, displacing indigenous gastropods and becoming a dominant component of the benthic community. T. granifera successfully invaded <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> despite frequent exposure to high salinity and desiccation, which could together eliminate >97% of the population. The persistence of T. granifera was ensured due to its high fecundity and the environmental tolerance of large adults (20–30 mm SH) which carried an average of 158±12.8 SD brooded juveniles. Repeat introductions were not essential for the success of this parthenogenetic NIS. Conclusion/Significance There is a need for a broader study on the reproductive biology of T. granifera (including the previously overlooked “brood pouch ecology”), which affects population dynamics and may be relevant to other parthenogenetic NIS, such as Melanoides tuberculata and Potamopyrgus antipodarum.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Miranda, Nelson A. F.; Perissinotto, Renzo; Appleton, Christopher C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2007112144"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ground-Water Quality in the <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> River Basin, New York, 2005-2006.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Federal Clean Water Act requires that States monitor and report on the quality of ground water and surface water. To satisfy part of these requirements, the U.S. Geological Survey and New York State Department of Environmental Conservation have develo...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. A. Nystrom</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=67867"> <span id="translatedtitle">PCB-DECHLORINATING MICROBIAL POPULATIONS IN <span class="hlt">ST</span>. <span class="hlt">LAWRENCE</span> RIVER SEDIMENTS. (R825449)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB205200D"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Recommended Transportation Plan, Ogdensburg and Town of Oswegatchie, <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> County, New York.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The recommended transportation plan is located in the city of Ogdensburg and the town of Oswegatchie, New York, for a total length of 5.3 miles. Environmental impact includes temporary water pollution caused by construction of a new bridge over the Oswega...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1971-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41401078"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Oligochaeta (Annelida, Clitellata) of the <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Great Lakes Region: an Update</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An updated oligochaete species list for the Great Lakes region is provided. The list was developed through the reexamination of the taxa reported in a previous report in 1980, addition of new taxa or records collected from the region since 1980, and an update of taxonomy commensurate with systematic and nomenclatural changes over the intervening years since the last review.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Douglas R. Spencer; Patrick L. Hudson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996JNav...49..362S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evolution of Intelligent Shipboard Piloting Systems: A Distributed System for the <span class="hlt">St</span> <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Seaway</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Safe navigation in restricted waters continues to be a perennial concern for ship owners, operators, navigators, and citizens. The Nieuw Amsterdam, a cruise ship which ran aground in Southeast Alaska in August 1994; the Royal Majesty, another cruise ship which ran aground 10 miles east of Nantucket Island in June 1995; and the Regent Star, which caught fire in Prince William Sound, Alaska on 22 July, 1995, are just a few of the recent incidents which remind us of the importance of safe navigation in restricted waters. Clearly, the Braer, the World Prodigy, and the Exxon Valdez provide other examples of the importance of safe navigation in close waters. Fire, collision, allisions and groundings can result if vessels navigating in such waters stray.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sudhendar, H.; Grabowski, Martha</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/structure04/activities/4078.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Petrology/Geochemistry/Mineralogy/Structure of Shear zones in <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> County</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">These rocks were collected from outcrops frequented by structural geology field trips. CCM 42 is from the town of Clare, CCM 43 is from Russell; although labeled CCM, neither is from the Carthoage Colton Mylonite Zone, but both are from shear zones. DEK is from the world famous DeKalb anticline. In this lab we try to pull together material from petrology, geochemistry, mineralogy and structure.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Badger, Robert</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40915112"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fire and canopy species composition in the Great Lakes-<span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> forest of Témiscamingue, Québec</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Large severe fires are typically rare in the northern hardwood forests of eastern North America, with estimated return intervals as high as 1400–4500 years. We investigated the history of large severe fires in western Québec, Canada, where sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.), yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis Britt.), and eastern hemlock ((Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr.) dominate a landscape at northern limit</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Ronnie Drever; Christian Messier; Yves Bergeron; Frédérik Doyon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18609141"> <span id="translatedtitle">Anthropogenic sound exposure of marine mammals from seaways: Estimates for Lower <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Seaway, eastern Canada</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The impact of shipping noise on marine life and quality of marine mammal habitats in oceans and coastal environments has become a major concern worldwide. Background noise can also limits detection of marine mammal sounds in passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) systems. Characterisation of this noise over long time periods and estimates of the exposure of the different marine mammal groups</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Y. Simard; R. Lepage; C. Gervaise</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40119581"> <span id="translatedtitle">Energetics of lactation in harp seals ( Phoca groenlandica ) from the gulf of <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>, Canada</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study reports the findings of an integrated, comprehensive analysis of lactation energetics in harp seals conducted using\\u000a longitudinal measurements of mass, body composition and milk composition from mother-pup pairs in conjunction with water flux\\u000a measurements in pups. The nursing period of harp seals is a short, intense and relatively efficient period of energy transfer\\u000a from mothers to pups. The</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Lydersen; K. M. Kovacs</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.usgs.gov/wri/1987/4133/plate-1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ground-water availability from the unconsolidated deposits of the <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> River Basin, New York</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Protection of New York State 's aquifers has become an increasingly important issue among water resource managers at all levels of State and Local government. Aquifer delineation is necessary as an initial phase in the effective management of the State 's groundwater resources. Many of New York 's productive aquifers consist of unconsolidated deposits. In an effort to obtain complete coverage of all the significant unconsolidated aquifers in New York, the U.S. Geological Survey and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation began a cooperative study in 1985 to compile groundwater availability maps of each major river basin. This map delineates the unconsolidated aquifers that underlie the State 's northernmost eight counties and gives the estimated potential yield of properly constructed wells completed in these aquifers. Additional well locations and delineation of the aquifers were obtained through a well inventory conducted during the study. (Lantz-PTT)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bugliosi, Edward F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23544059"> <span id="translatedtitle">Marine mammal strandings and environmental changes: a 15-year study in the <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> ecosystem.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Understanding the effects of climatic variability on marine mammals is challenging due to the complexity of ecological interactions. We used general linear models to analyze a 15-year database documenting marine mammal strandings (1994-2008; n?=?1,193) and nine environmental parameters known to affect marine mammal survival, from regional (sea ice) to continental scales (North Atlantic Oscillation, NAO). Stranding events were more frequent during summer and fall than other seasons, and have increased since 1994. Poor ice conditions observed during the same period may have affected marine mammals either directly, by modulating the availability of habitat for feeding and breeding activities, or indirectly, through changes in water conditions and marine productivity (krill abundance). For most species (75%, n?=?6 species), a low volume of ice was correlated with increasing frequency of stranding events (e.g. R(2)adj?=?0.59, hooded seal, Cystophora cristata). This likely led to an increase in seal mortality during the breeding period, but also to increase habitat availability for seasonal migratory cetaceans using ice-free areas during winter. We also detected a high frequency of stranding events for mysticete species (minke whale, Balaenoptera acutorostrata) and resident species (beluga, Delphinapterus leucas), correlated with low krill abundance since 1994. Positive NAO indices were positively correlated with high frequencies of stranding events for resident and seasonal migratory cetaceans, as well as rare species (R(2)adj?=?0.53, 0.81 and 0.34, respectively). This contrasts with seal mass stranding numbers, which were negatively correlated with a positive NAO index. In addition, an unusual multiple species mortality event (n?=?114, 62% of total annual mortality) in 2008 was caused by a harmful algal bloom. Our findings provide an empirical baseline in understanding marine mammal survival when faced with climatic variability. This is a promising step in integrating stranding records to monitor the consequences of environmental changes in marine ecosystems over long time scales. PMID:23544059</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Truchon, Marie-Hélène; Measures, Lena; L'Hérault, Vincent; Brêthes, Jean-Claude; Galbraith, Peter S; Harvey, Michel; Lessard, Sylvie; Starr, Michel; Lecomte, Nicolas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59185664"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Multi-Scale Analysis of Grassland Bird Habitat Relationships in the <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> River Valley</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">I used a combination of 10 vegetation variables and 10 landscape variables to model abundance and occurrence of six grassland bird species in agricultural grassland (n=55) throughout Jefferson County, NY during the 2004 and 2005 field seasons. Landscape composition was quantified by classifying the proportion of land use within a 1 km radius from the center of all survey fields.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sarah A. Lazazzero</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18371988"> <span id="translatedtitle">137Cs and 210Po in Pacific walrus and bearded seal from <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Island, Alaska.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The activity concentration of Cesium-137 ((137)Cs) and naturally-occurring Polonium-210 ((210)Po) were measured in the muscle tissue, kidney and liver of Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) and bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus) collected by native hunters from the Bering Sea during May 1996. The mean (137)Cs concentrations in muscle, liver and kidney of Pacific walrus were 0.07, 0.09 and 0.07 Bq kg(-1) (n=5, wet weight), respectively, and 0.17, 0.10, and 0.17 Bq kg(-1) (n=2, wet weight), respectively, in bearded seal. In general, (137)Cs tissue concentrations are significantly lower than those previously reported for mammals from other regions. By comparison, (210)Po activity concentrations are more variable and appear to be higher level compared with mammal data from other regions. The mean (210)Po concentration in the muscle tissue, liver and kidney of Pacific walrus (n=5, wet weight) were 28.7, 189, and 174 Bq kg(-1), respectively. This compares with (210)Po concentration values (n=2, wet weight) of 27, 207 and 68 Bq kg(-1) measured in the muscle tissue, liver and kidney, of bearded seal, respectively. Estimated concentration factors--as defined by the radionuclide concentration ratio between the target tissue to that in sea water--were two to three orders of magnitude higher for (210)Po that those of (137)Cs. We conclude from radiological dose estimates that ingestion of (137)Cs in foods derived from walrus and seal will pose no threat to human health. This work has important implications for assessment of risks of Alaskan coastal communities concerned about the dumping of nuclear waste in the Russia Arctic. PMID:18371988</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hamilton, Terry; Seagars, Dana; Jokela, Terry; Layton, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-03-26</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005ECSS...62..301P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geomorphologic and physical characteristics of a human impacted <span class="hlt">estuary</span>: Quequén Grande River <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, Argentina</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Even though the Quequén Grande River <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> has economic and strategic importance from an oceanographic point of view, it has been ignored until recently. Nevertheless, many anthropogenic modifications (i.e., dredging, jetty and harbour construction, etc.) have taken place in the last 100 years which, most of them, have resulted in significative economic expenses to the harbour and city authorities due to the lack of adequate prior studies. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the present status of the geomorphology and main physical characteristics of the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> and describe the effects of these man-made modifications upon the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. Data were gathered in several field cruises from 1994 to 2000 plus from continuous recording devices installed at or near the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> directed to define the present geomorphologic and oceanographic conditions of the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> and to establish a monitoring program. The ultimate goal is to provide some practical solutions in diminishing the maintenance of the harbour and to provide pollution-control devices. The <span class="hlt">estuary</span> is classified as a microtidal, primary, coastal-plain system. It can be considered as a partly-mixed system 2 km from the mouth up to its head (15 km inland). Artificial dredging to accommodate the Quequén harbour in the last 2 km of the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> has induced a highly stratified water column where the upper 2 3 m concentrates low salinity water and the lower layer is filled by water of the same or slightly higher salinity than the inner shelf waters. Due to the presence of a step at the head of the harbour, water circulation is very reduced and in some cases nonexistent, producing strong reductive and even anoxic conditions. The foot of the step is a sediment and organic matter trap that must be dredged periodically to insure adequate navigability.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Perillo, G. M. E.; Perez, D. E.; Piccolo, M. C.; Palma, E. D.; Cuadrado, D. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA209001"> <span id="translatedtitle">Importance of Boundary-Layer Flows in Supplying Phytoplankton to the Benthnic Suspension Feeder, Mytilus edulis L.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Measurements of vertical gradients in phytoplankton fluorescence over an intertidal mussel bed in the <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> River <span class="hlt">estuary</span> (Quebec) indicate a significant reduction in phytoplankton concentration close to the bed. Furthermore, measurements of near-b...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Frechette C. A. Butman W. R. Geyer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008GeCoA..72.3413R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Iron isotope fractionation in subterranean <span class="hlt">estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dissolved Fe concentrations in subterranean <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>, like their river-seawater counterparts, are strongly controlled by non-conservative behavior during mixing of groundwater and seawater in coastal aquifers. Previous studies at a subterranean <span class="hlt">estuary</span> of Waquoit Bay on Cape Cod, USA demonstrate extensive precipitation of groundwater-borne dissolved ferrous iron and subsequent accumulation of iron oxides onto subsurface sands. Waquoit Bay is thus an excellent natural laboratory to assess the mechanisms of Fe-isotope fractionation in redox-stratified environments and determine potential Fe-isotope signatures of groundwater sources to coastal seawater. Here, we report Fe isotope compositions of iron-coated sands and porewaters beneath the intertidal zone of Waquoit Bay. The distribution of pore water Fe shows two distinct sources of Fe: one residing in the upward rising plume of Fe-rich groundwater and the second in the salt-wedge zone of pore water. The groundwater source has high Fe(II) concentration consistent with anoxic conditions and yield ?56Fe values between 0.3 and -1.3‰. In contrast, sediment porewaters occurring in the mixing zone of the subterranean <span class="hlt">estuary</span> have very low ?56Fe values down to -5‰. These low ?56Fe values reflect Fe-redox cycling and result from the preferential retention of heavy Fe-isotopes onto newly formed Fe-oxyhydroxides. Analysis of Fe-oxides precipitated onto subsurface sands in two cores from the subterranean <span class="hlt">estuary</span> revealed strong ?56Fe and Fe concentration gradients over less than 2m, yielding an overall range of ?56Fe values between -2 and 1.5‰. The relationship between Fe concentration and ?56Fe of Fe-rich sands can be modeled by the progressive precipitation of Fe-oxides along fluid flow through the subterranean <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. These results demonstrate that large-scale Fe isotope fractionation (up to 5‰) can occur in subterranean <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>, which could lead to coastal seawater characterized by very low ?56Fe values relative to river values.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rouxel, Olivier; Sholkovitz, Edward; Charette, Matthew; Edwards, Katrina J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6303245"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory earthquake safety program</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Within three minutes on the morning of January 24, 1980, an earthquake and three aftershocks, with Richter magnitudes of 5.8, 5.1, 4.0, and 4.2, respectively, struck the Livermore Valley. Two days later, a Richter magnitude 5.4 earthquake occurred, which had its epicenter about 4 miles northwest of the <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Although no one at the Laboratory was seriously injured, these earthquakes caused considerable damage and disruption. Masonry and concrete structures cracked and broke, trailers shifted and fell off their pedestals, office ceilings and overhead lighting fell, and bookcases overturned. We suddenly found ourselves immersed in a site-wide program of repairing earthquake-damaged facilities, and protecting our many employees and the surrounding community from future earthquakes. Over the past four years, LLNL has spent approximately $10 million on its earthquake restoration effort for repairs and upgrades. The discussion in this paper centers upon the earthquake damage that occurred, our clean-up and restoration efforts, the seismic review of LLNL facilities, our site-specific seismic design criteria, computer-floor upgrades, ceiling-system upgrades, unique building seismic upgrades, geologic and seismologic studies, and seismic instrumentation. 9 references, 37 figures, 2 tables.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Freeland, G.E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-08-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6048157"> <span id="translatedtitle">Benthic primary production in the Columbia River <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>. Final report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The general objective of the research associated with the Benthic Primary Production Work Unit of Columbia River <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Development Program was to determine mechanisms that control the production dynamics and species composition of benthic plant assemblages in the Columbia River <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>. In particular, the work was concerned with effects of selected physical variables on structural and functional attributes of micro- and macro- vegetation, and on the productivity and biomass of benthic autotrophs on the tidal flats of the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McIntire, C.D.; Amspoker, M.C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/l56r68g2r58j2316.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Biological components from the Seine <span class="hlt">estuary</span>: first results</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Seine <span class="hlt">estuary</span> plays an important role in the dynamics of the eastern English Channel ecosystem. Nevertheless, its biological\\u000a compartment is poorly known. This constitutes an important handicap to establish the precise state of the health of this major\\u000a European <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. The objectives of this study were to identify the life resources of the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>: macrobenthos, mesozooplankton,\\u000a suprabenthos, and fish</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pascal Mouny; Jean Claude Dauvin; Christophe Bessineton; Bernard Elkaim; Serge Simon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/680434l0v7188536.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Driving forces and management strategies for <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> in northern China</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Estuaries</span>, which lie at the end of rivers, belong to the interlocking area between marine ecosystems and terrestrial ecosystems.\\u000a In the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> region, there are plenty of biological resources that carry many important ecosystem services. However, severe\\u000a degradation of the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> ecosystem in northern China has been caused by anthropogenic disturbances, including water pollution\\u000a from upstream area, change of marine</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anning Suo; Dongzhi Zhao; Fengshou Zhang; Huaru Wang; Fengqiao Liu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/w5v214737353k660.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mercury pollution in the Ems <span class="hlt">estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">From approximately 1960 to 1975 the Ems <span class="hlt">estuary</span> received several tons of mercury per year from a chlor-alkali plant, a pesticide\\u000a factory and some minor sources. The discharge has been reduced drastically from 1976 onwards. In 1975 and 1976 measurements\\u000a were made on the distribution of mercury in the sediment. The horizontal distribution revealed a strong local enrichment of\\u000a the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. Essink</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://222.aslo.org/lo/toc/vol_7/issue_3/0354.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">SUCCESSION OF TWO ACARTIA SPECIES IN <span class="hlt">ESTUARIES</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In New England and Middle Atlantic <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> ,&art&x cZu24si, a winter-spring copepod, and A. tonsa, a summer-fall form, alternate cycles of dominance. Succession from clnusi to tonsa during spring starts near the head of an embaymcnt and spreads seaward. Concurrent observation in Narragansett Bay, Raritan Bay, and the York River plus an additional program in two Rhode Island lagoons indicated</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.aslo.org/lo/toc/vol_38/issue_6/1227.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mercury biogeochemical cycling in a stratified <span class="hlt">estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Total Hg in the permanently stratified Pettaquamscutt <span class="hlt">estuary</span> was <25 pM throughout the water column, even in highly sulfidic bottom waters. Particulate Hg was typically >40% of the total Hg. Reactive Hg (Hg[sub R]) was generally <3 pM and decreased with depth, but there is Hg[sub R] even in the anoxic bottom waters. Elemental Hg (Hg[sup 0]) was highest in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. P. Mason; W. F. Fitzgerald; J. Hurley; A. K. Jr. Hanson; P. L. Donaghay; J. M. Sieburth</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/5336023"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Dynamics of a Partially Mixed <span class="hlt">Estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">ABSTRACT Measurements of velocity, density, and pressure gradient in the lower Hudson River <span class="hlt">estuary</span> were used to quantify the dominant,terms in the momentum,equation and to characterize their variations at tidal and spring? neap timescales. The vertical momentum,flux (assumed to be due mainly to turbulent shear stress) was estimated indirectly, based on the residual from the acceleration and pressure gradient terms.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. Rockwell Geyer; John H. Trowbridge; Melissa M. Bowen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41182571"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nutrient elements in large Chinese <span class="hlt">estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Based on comprehensive observations since 1983, this study summarizes major features of nutrient elements (nitrogen, phosphorus and silicon) in large Chinese river\\/<span class="hlt">estuary</span> systems. Elevated nutrient element levels were observed in Chinese rivers, when compared to large and less disturbed aquatic systems (e.g. the Amazon, Zaire and Orinoco). Data from this study are similar to those obtained from the polluted and\\/or</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jing Zhang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=UCRL78374"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seismic Evaluation of Critical Facilities at the <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore Laboratory.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The performance of critical facilities at the <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore Laboratory (LLL) are being evaluated for severe earthquake loading. Facilities at Livermore, Site-300 and the Nevada Test Site are included in this study. These facilities are identified, th...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. C. Murray F. J. Tokarz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6444660"> <span id="translatedtitle">Annual environmental monitoring report of the <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory, 1980</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Environmental Monitoring Program of the <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data on air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring for 1980 are presented, and general trends are discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schleimer, G.E. (ed.)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB271388"> <span id="translatedtitle">Health Team Effectiveness on Health Status in <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> County, Alabama.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The study sought to evaluate the effectiveness of health teams in <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> County, Alabama. Three measures of physical function were evaluated: Function Status Index (FSI), Index of Well-Being (IWB) and Sickness Impact Profile (SIP). Each scale was found ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. L. Miles</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE91002500"> <span id="translatedtitle">Environmental Survey preliminary report, <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of this report is to present the preliminary findings made during the Environmental Survey, February 22--29, 1988, at the US Department of Energy (DOE) <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in Berkeley, California. The University of California op...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return 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<a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE92000642"> <span id="translatedtitle">Life sciences. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory, 1989-1990.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This document is the 1989--1990 Annual Report for the Life Sciences Divisions of the University of California/<span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory. Specific progress reports are included for the Cell and Molecular Biology Division, the Research Medicine and Radia...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. Day</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=EGG11831693"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aerial Radiological Survey of the <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore Laboratory (Livermore, California).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An airborne radiological survey was conducted during August 1975 over several selected sites in the vicinity of Livermore, California. These sites included the <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore Laboratory, Sandia Livermore Laboratories, LLL Site 300, the Livermore Munic...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. J. Tipton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE86012736"> <span id="translatedtitle">Biology and Medicine Division (<span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory) Annual Report, 1985.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This book briefly describes the activities of the Biology and Medicine Division of the <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory. During the past year the Donner Pavilion program on the treatment of arteriovenous malformations in the brain has chalked up very signific...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ga0185.photos.054442p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">10. Historic American Buildings Survey <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Bradley Photographer April, ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">10. Historic American Buildings Survey <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Bradley - Photographer April, 18, 1936 DETAIL OF INTERIOR TRIM LOOKING ACROSS MAIN ENTRANCE HALL - Ware-Sibley-Clark House, 506 Telfair Street, Augusta, Richmond County, GA</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6417762"> <span id="translatedtitle">Annual environmental monitoring report of the <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a multiprogram national laboratory managed by the University of California (UC) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). LBL's major role is to conduct basic and applied science research that is appropriate for an energy research laboratory. The Environmental Monitoring Program of the <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1989 are presented, and general trends are discussed. 17 refs., 12 figs., 23 tabs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schleimer, G.E.; Pauer, R.O. (eds.)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59040127"> <span id="translatedtitle">Morgantown: High <span class="hlt">St</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">View of High <span class="hlt">St</span>. in Morgantown on a rainy afternoon in 1981. Morgantown is the largest town in the North-Central region of West Virginia and is home to West Virginia University. At the left is the Monongahela Building, an apartment complex on High <span class="hlt">St</span>. designed in the Art Deco style.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chet Smolski</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59826954"> <span id="translatedtitle">D. H. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>, 'An opportunity and a test': The Leavis“Eliot Controversy Revisited</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The dispute between F. R. Leavis and T. S. Eliot over the literary remains of D. H. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> has strongly influenced the critical response to <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>'s work. Leavis frames his response to Eliot and <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> in the form of a dichotomy, siding with <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> to repudiate Eliot. Leavis's reiterated assaults on Eliot lack discrimination and perspective, and his use of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brian Crick; Michael DiSanto</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=138943"> <span id="translatedtitle">WATER QUALITY MODELING IN THE RIO CHONE <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Water quality in the Rio Chone <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, a seasonally inverse, tropical <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, in Ecuador was characterized by modeling the distribution of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) within the water column. These two variables are modeled using modif...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=63024"> <span id="translatedtitle">YAQUINA BAY AND BEYOND: WHAT SHAPE ARE OUR <span class="hlt">ESTUARIES</span> IN?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The great natural beauty of Oregon's <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> gives an impression of systems that are far less altered than those in other areas of the US. However, over the years, Yaquina Bay and other western <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> have been variously affected by habitat loss and alteration, over harvest...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=55534"> <span id="translatedtitle">LOWER COLUMBIA RIVER <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span> PROGRAM COMPREHENSIVE CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT PLAN</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An <span class="hlt">estuary</span> is the area where the fresh water of a river meets the salt water of an ocean. In the Columbia River system, this occurs in the lower 46 river miles. In an <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, the river has a direct, natural connection with the open sea. This transition from fresh to salt water c...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60369817"> <span id="translatedtitle">The ecology of Tijuana <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, California: An estuarine profile</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This is the first attempt to synthesize and interpret a rapidly growing data base on the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>'s diverse biota - its vegetation, algae, birds, fishes, and invertebrates. Because so many changes have occurred in response to recent catastrophic events, we describe how each aspect of the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> appeared before 1980 and how it has responded to several perturbations. The experimental</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. B. Zedler; C. S. Nordby</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/j578g47g07676112.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Behavior of metals in the Amur River <span class="hlt">estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Biogeochemical processes in <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> determine to a significant extent the further life of chemical compounds, including metals transported by rivers. Therefore, the characteristics of the behavior of metals in waters with intermediate salinity at the river?sea interface have both scientific and practical significance [1?5]. In terms of estimation of the concentrations of dissolved metals, the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> of the Amur River,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">V. M. Shul’kin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/m2176hx140616381.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dissolved Oxygen Conditions in Northern Gulf of Mexico <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Because deficient dissolved oxygen (DO) levels may have severe detrimental effects on estuarine and marine life, DO has been widely used as an indicator of ecological conditions by environmental monitoring programs. The U.S. EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program for <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> (EMAP-E) monitored DO conditions in the <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> of the Gulf of Mexico from 1991 to 1994. DO was measured</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Virginia D. Engle; J. Kevin Summers; John M. Macauley</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=42845"> <span id="translatedtitle">LIMNETIC LARVAL FISH OF THE MAUMEE AND SANDUSKY RIVER <span class="hlt">ESTUARIES</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A total of 17 taxa were collected in the Maumee River <span class="hlt">estuary</span> during sampling periods in 1975, 1976, and 1977. A total of 11 taxa were collected from the Sandusky River <span class="hlt">estuary</span> in 1976. Gizzard shad/alewife, Dorosoma cepedianum/Alosa pseudoharengus, white bass/white perch, Morone...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26900886"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dissolved oxygen in lower Hudson <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>: 1978--93</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">During summer months, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in the lower Hudson <span class="hlt">estuary</span> were usually lower than atmospheric equilibrium values. Distributions of DO along the axis of the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> can be described by three general characteristics. Firstly, surface and bottom values lie on a single trend when plotted against salinity. Secondly, maximum DO concentrations were observed 50--75 km upstream of Manhattan</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jordan F. Clark; H. James Simpson; Richard F. Bopp; Bruce L. Deck</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53239034"> <span id="translatedtitle">Contrasting Behavior of Osmium in the Godavari River <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, India</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the Os concentrations and isotopic compositions of surface samples collected along salinity gradients from two main channels within the Godavari River <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>. <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> are potential a site for biogeochemical reactions affecting the flux of elements from rivers into the oceans. Given that the seawater Os isotopic composition reflects a balance between the radiogenic continental input and unradiogenic mantle</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Sharma; K. Balakrishna; A. Hofmann; R. Shankar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">417</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41328769"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Hydrography of the Chupa <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, White Sea, Russia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study was undertaken to determine the fate and fluxes of materials from Arctic <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> to the coastal zone. The paper is the first of a series addressing questions relating to the physics and chemistry of the region. Three seasonal cruises were undertaken in the Chupa <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, White Sea, Russia; in summer (July 1994), autumn (September, 1995) and spring (May\\/June</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. J. M. Howland; A. N. Pantiulin; G. E. Millward; R. Prego</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">418</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=55522"> <span id="translatedtitle">PECONIC <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span> PROGRAM COMPREHENSIVE CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT PLAN</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Peconic <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, situated between the North and South Forks of eastern Long Island, New York, consists of more than 100 distinct bays, harbors, embayments, and tributaries. The area surrounding the Peconic <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>'s watershed is rich in rolling farmland, scenic beaches and cr...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">419</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60395810"> <span id="translatedtitle">Real time simulation of nitrogen cycle in an <span class="hlt">estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A water quality model containing seven nitrogen storage variables appropriate to an aerobic, nitrogen limited, aquatic ecosystem is described. An idealized <span class="hlt">estuary</span> is used to demonstrate coupling between hydrodynamic transport, mixing, and biochemical transformations. Nutrient concentrations are highly sensitive to the representation of real time (intratidal cycle) transport. Application of the model to the Potomac <span class="hlt">estuary</span> illustrates the large temporal</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. O. Najarian; D. R. F. Harleman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">420</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41012456"> <span id="translatedtitle">The occurrence of selected human pharmaceutical compounds in UK <span class="hlt">estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report describes a scoping study conducted in order to establish whether pharmaceutical compounds may be present in UK <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>. Surface water samples collected from five UK <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> were analysed for the presence of 14 pharmaceutical compounds selected from the priority lists of the UK Environment Agency and the Oslo and Paris Commission (OSPAR). The pharmaceutical compounds\\/metabolites clofibric acid, clotrimazole,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kevin V. Thomas; Martin J. Hilton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">421</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=60137"> <span id="translatedtitle">INDEX OF ESTUARINE BENTHIC INTEGRITY FOR GULF OF MEXICO <span class="hlt">ESTUARIES</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A benthic index for northern Gulf of Mexico <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> has been developed and successfully validated by the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program for <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> (EMAP-E) in the Louisianian Province. The benthic index is a useful indicator of estuarine condition that provi...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">422</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB252064"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Submersed Macrophytes of the Pamlico River <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, North Carolina.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The ecology of the submersed aquatic macrophytes (including filamentous algae) of the Pamlico River, NC <span class="hlt">estuary</span> was studied from the summer of 1973 through the summer of 1975. Rooted macrophytes were not found in the lower half of the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> proper. The ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. J. Davis M. M. Brinson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">423</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5143041"> <span id="translatedtitle">The behavior of trace metals in the Geum <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, Korea</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The distributions of trace metals in the Geum <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> of western Korea were studied with regard to changes in other estuarine chemical parameters. Dissolved oxygen, pH, and alkalinity increased with increasing salinity. Dissolved aluminum concentrations increased at low salinities and were perhaps influenced by the solubility of particulate aluminosilicate phases. Iron, manganese, cobalt, and zinc are removed from solution in the low salinity end of the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. Cobalt and nickel have mid-<span class="hlt">estuary</span> concentration maxima that may be due to an anthropogenic source. Cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc concentrations also increased in the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, possibly as th result of remobilization in the sediments. Cadmium increases are also linked to remineralization from tidal flat sediments in the outer <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. The source of an increase in dissolved lead at low salinity is unclear, but may be due to release from particles.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Byrd, J.T.; Smith, R.G.; Windom, H.L. (Skidaway Inst. of Oceanography, Savannah, GA (United States)); Lee, Kwang, W. (Hanyang Univ. Ansan, Kyunggi (Korea)); Lee, Dong, S. (Korea Ocean Research and Development Inst., Ansan, Kyunggi (Korea))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">424</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ia.usu.edu/viewproject.php?project=ia:19290"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">St</span>. Patrick's Day Activity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Utah State 4th Grade Social Studies Core Standard 4: Objective 1- Demonstrate cultural understanding, by showing appreciation for the uniqueness of other cultures, identifying the contributions of various cultures in Utah, and demontrating respect for cultural differences. ~In groups of 6-7 students, search the link provided on your specific topic (Kwanzaa, <span class="hlt">St</span>. Patrick's Day, or Pioneer Day). KWANZAA: http://holidays.kaboose.com/kwanzaa-index.html <span class="hlt">ST</span>. PATRICKS DAY: http://www.lilesnet.com/<span class="hlt">St</span>_Patricks/stpaddy.htm PIONEER DAY: http://heritage.uen.org/ ~Each group member is to present a part of their holiday presentation to the class. You will receive ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Missnguyen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-13</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">425</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.epoc.u-bordeaux.fr/indiv/Abril/documents/publi/Lemaire_et_al_2002_biogeochem.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Distribution of phytoplankton pigments in nine European <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> and implications for an estuarine typology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Phytoplankton pigments were studied by Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) in nine West European <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>. Three <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>, i.e. the Rhine, Scheldt and the Gironde were sampled four times to cover the different seasons, whereas the other six <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> were sampled once. Pigment distributions in <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> reflect both riverine inputs as well as autochthonous blooms. Fucoxanthin was the most common accessory photosynthetic pigment</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">EMMANUELLE LEMAIRE; GWENAËL ABRIL; RUTGER DE WIT; HENRI ETCHEBER</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">426</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42561197"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterizing the san Francisco <span class="hlt">estuary</span>: A case study of science management in the national <span class="hlt">estuary</span> program</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The San Francisco <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Project sought to “characterize”; environmental conditions in the San Francisco Bay and Sacramento?San Joaquin Delta. This task involved systematic description and analysis of conditions, to provide the scientific basis for policy reform. The focus of this paper is on activities of environmental scientists who participated on the project's Technical Advisory Committee (TAC), and their involvement on</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">William S. Tuohy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">427</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/ofr20131081"> <span id="translatedtitle">Final report for sea-level rise response modeling for San Francisco Bay <span class="hlt">estuary</span> tidal marshes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The International Panel on Climate Change has identified coastal ecosystems as areas that will be disproportionally affected by climate change. Current sea-level rise projections range widely with 0.57 to 1.9 meters increase in mea sea level by 2100. The expected accelerated rate of sea-level rise through the 21<span class="hlt">st</span> century will put many coastal ecosystems at risk, especially those in topographically low-gradient areas. We assessed marsh accretion and plant community state changes through 2100 at 12 tidal salt marshes around San Francisco Bay <span class="hlt">estuary</span> with a sea-level rise response model. Detailed ground elevation, vegetation, and water level data were collected at all sites between 2008 and 2011 and used as model inputs. Sediment cores (taken by Callaway and others, 2012) at four sites around San Francisco Bay <span class="hlt">estuary</span> were used to estimate accretion rates. A modification of the Callaway and others (1996) model, the Wetland Accretion Rate Model for Ecosystem Resilience (WARMER), was utilized to run sea-level rise response models for all sites. With a mean sea level rise of 1.24 m by 2100, WARMER projected that the vast majority, 95.8 percent (1,942 hectares), of marsh area in our study will lose marsh plant communities by 2100 and to transition to a relative elevation range consistent with mudflat habitat. Three marshes were projected to maintain marsh vegetation to 2100, but they only composed 4.2 percent (85 hectares) of the total marsh area surveyed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Takekawa, John Y.; Thorne, Karen M.; Buffington, Kevin J.; Spragens, Kyle A.; Swanson, Kathleen M.; Drexler, Judith Z.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Overton, Cory T.; Casazza, Michael L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">428</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20347454"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ecosystem changes in the Neva <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> (Baltic Sea): natural dynamics or response to anthropogenic impacts?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Neva <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> situated in the eastern Gulf of Finland is one of the largest <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> of the Baltic Sea with a large conurbation, <span class="hlt">St</span>. Petersburg, situated on its coast. Eutrophication, alien species and large-scale digging and dumping of bottom sediment are the most prominent anthropogenic impacts on its ecosystem. However, many ecosystem responses, which are traditionally attribute to these impacts, are related to natural dynamics of the ecosystem. Fluctuations in discharge of the Neva River, intrusions of bottom hypoxic waters from the western part of the Gulf of Finland, higher summer temperatures and a shorter period of ice cover are climatic mediated factors inducing adverse changes in its ecosystem from the 1980s onwards. The main ecosystem responses to these factors are 2-3-fold increase of trophic status, deterioration of native zoobenthic communities and establishment of alien species, as well as the many fold decrease of fish catch and the population of ringed seal in the region. PMID:20347454</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Golubkov, Sergey; Alimov, Alexander</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-03-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">429</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41330473"> <span id="translatedtitle">Feeding preferences of estuarine mysids Neomysis integer and Rhopalophthalmus tartessicus in a temperate <span class="hlt">estuary</span> (Guadalquivir <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, SW Spain)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mysid shrimps are an important component of estuarine food webs because they play a key role in energy transfer as intermediate prey. We investigated the seasonal, tidal and depth specific variation in the diet of the estuarine mysids Neomysis integer and Rhopalophthalmus tartessicus and explored its implications for the planktonic community structure of a temperate <span class="hlt">estuary</span> (Guadalquivir <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, SW Spain).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">César Vilas; Pilar Drake; Nancy Fockedey</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">430</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=80550"> <span id="translatedtitle">SENSITIVITY OF NITROGEN CONCENTRATIONS IN <span class="hlt">ESTUARIES</span> TO LOADING AND WATER RESIDENCE TIME: APPLICATION TO THE POTOMAC <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We use a simple nitrogen budget model to analyze concentrations of total nitrogen (TN) in <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> for which both nitrogen inputs and water residence time are correlated with freshwater inflow rates. While the nitrogen concentration of an <span class="hlt">estuary</span> varies linearly with TN loading ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">431</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cancer.gov/images/documents/f69cebbb-fe0b-4f89-bee3-1609c2f5197b/StJudePLAN"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">St</span>JudePLAN</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.cancer.gov">Cancer.gov</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">St</span>. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Cancer Center Institutional Data and Safety Monitoring Plan August 17, 2001 For further information concerning this document or to obtain Appendix 4, please contact: David Irwin, Ph.D. Vice President</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">432</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.stpauls.co.uk/rindex.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">St</span>. Paul's Cathedral</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Perhaps one of the finest neo-Classical cathedrals in the world, the current <span class="hlt">St</span>. Paul's cathedral is an example of the outstanding architecture of Christopher Wren, and a testimony to his dogged persistence and passion for his life's work. In keeping with the attention to detail that is indicative of Mr. Wren's work, the <span class="hlt">St</span>. Paul's Web site has detailed information on visiting the cathedral, the various musical performances that it hosts, and an interactive timeline detailing the history of <span class="hlt">St</span>. Paul's that extends back to the year 604. Along with this information, the site also tells visitors about upcoming events at the cathedral, along with an extensive online gift shop that offers a diverse set of <span class="hlt">St</span>. Paul's related material for purchase.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">433</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/329.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">St</span>. John's wort</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... Procainamide<span class="hlt">St</span>. John's wort extract might increase how much procainamide the body absorbs. This could increase the effects and side effects of procainamide. But the significance of this potential interaction is ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">434</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/913553"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory Annual Report 2006</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">For the Laboratory and staff, 2006 was a year of outstanding achievements. As our many accomplishments in this annual report illustrate, the Laboratory's focus on important problems that affect our nation's security and our researchers breakthroughs in science and technology have led to major successes. As a national laboratory that is part of the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), Livermore is a key contributor to the Stockpile Stewardship Program for maintaining the safety, security, and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. The program has been highly successful, and our annual report features some of the Laboratory's significant stockpile stewardship accomplishments in 2006. A notable example is a long-term study with Los Alamos National Laboratory, which found that weapon pit performance will not sharply degrade from the aging effects on plutonium. The conclusion was based on a wide range of nonnuclear experiments, detailed simulations, theoretical advances, and thorough analyses of the results of past nuclear tests. The study was a superb scientific effort. The continuing success of stockpile stewardship enabled NNSA in 2006 to lay out Complex 2030, a vision for a transformed nuclear weapons complex that is more responsive, cost efficient, and highly secure. One of the ways our Laboratory will help lead this transformation is through the design and development of reliable replacement warheads (RRWs). Compared to current designs, these warheads would have enhanced performance margins and security features and would be less costly to manufacture and maintain in a smaller, modernized production complex. In early 2007, NNSA selected <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore and Sandia National Laboratories-California to develop ''RRW-1'' for the U.S. Navy. Design efforts for the RRW, the plutonium aging work, and many other stockpile stewardship accomplishments rely on computer simulations performed on NNSA's Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program supercomputers at Livermore. ASC Purple and BlueGene/L, the world's fastest computer, together provide nearly a half petaflop (500 trillion operations per second) of computer power for use by the three NNSA national laboratories. Livermore-led teams were awarded the Gordon Bell Prize for Peak Performance in both 2005 and 2006. The winning simulations, run on BlueGene/L, investigated the properties of materials at the length and time scales of atomic interactions. The computing power that makes possible such detailed simulations provides unprecedented opportunities for scientific discovery. Laboratory scientists are meeting the extraordinary challenge of creating experimental capabilities to match the resolution of supercomputer simulations. Working with a wide range of collaborators, we are developing experimental tools that gather better data at the nanometer and subnanosecond scales. Applications range from imaging biomolecules to studying matter at extreme conditions of pressure and temperature. The premier high-energy-density experimental physics facility in the world will be the National Ignition Facility (NIF) when construction is completed in 2009. We are leading the national effort to perform the first fusion ignition experiments using NIF's 192-beam laser and prepare to explore some of the remaining important issues in weapons physics. With scientific colleagues from throughout the nation, we are also designing revolutionary experiments on NIF to advance the fields of astrophysics, planetary physics, and materials science. Mission-directed, multidisciplinary science and technology at Livermore is also focused on reducing the threat posed by the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction as well as their acquisition and use by terrorists. The Laboratory helps this important national effort by providing its unique expertise, integration analyses, and operational support to the Department of Homeland Security. For this vital facet of the Laboratory's national security mission, we are developing advanced technologies, such as</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chrzanowski, P; Walter, K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-05-24</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">435</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6903866"> <span id="translatedtitle">Near coastal program plan for 1991: <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Environmental regulatory programs in the United States have been estimated to cost more than $70 billion annually. The Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) is a nationwide initiative being implemented by EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD). It was developed in response to the demand for information on the condition of the nation's ecological resources. The goal of EMAP is to assess and document the status and trends in the condition of the nation's forests, wetlands, <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>, coastal waters, lakes, rivers, and streams, Great Lakes, agricultural lands, and arid lands on an integrated and continuing basis.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">436</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.lawrencehallofscience.org/kidsite/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Hall of Science: 24/7 Science</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Hall of Science at the University of California, Berkeley is a resource center for mathematics education, providing "innovative materials and programs for students, teachers, families, and the public at large." This section of the website provides several online games and activities that parents or care givers can try with their children at home. For example, kids can read about the Tower of Hanoi and then play a Tower of Hanoi math game. Some activities are part of the <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Hall of Science Showcase (see also Scout Report for Physical Science, November 15, 2002) and require Shockwave to run.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">437</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987E%26PSL..86..214S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dissolved vanadium in rivers and <span class="hlt">estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">New measurements of dissolved vanadium in a variety of rivers and <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> are presented here. The data indicate that the average concentration of dissolved vanadium in major rivers entering the ocean is ˜ 15 nmol/kg. Weathering rate and type of source rock, rather than solution chemistry or anthropogenic influences, appear to be the important factors in determining fluvial dissolved vanadium concentrations. Laboratory experiments suggest that in oxic waters vanadium is found predominantly in its most oxidized, anionic form (V(V)). Complexation with organic matter and formation of large colloidal species appear to be unimportant. Adsorption also appears to be a less important influence for vanadium than for some other trace elements such as zinc. In <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>, vanadium behaves as a bioactive element, showing a close correspondence with the distribution of phosphate. The extent of estuarine vanadium removal is presently uncertain but may be low due to rapid remineralization of this element. Based on the river flux, the oceanic residence time for dissolved vanadium is estimated to be 100,000 years.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shiller, Alan M.; Boyle, Edward A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">438</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ECSS...92...59M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of intermittent <span class="hlt">estuary</span> outflow on coastal sediments of adjacent sandy beaches</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Outflows from <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> potentially contribute to the productivity of adjacent coastal waters, although most previous work has been on <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> with considerable river discharge. We investigated the influence of <span class="hlt">estuary</span> outflow on aspects of coastal sediments adjacent to two seasonally intermittent <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>, the Curdies and Anglesea Rivers, in southwest Victoria, Australia. For each <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, we measured sediment organic matter, microphytobenthic chlorophyll a and microbial utilization of carbon sources at three locations associated with each <span class="hlt">estuary</span>: (1) inside <span class="hlt">estuary</span> mouth, (2) <span class="hlt">estuary</span> swash and (3) control swash (an open beach distant from any estuarine influences). Sampling occurred one week before and at one and nine weeks after both an artificial mouth opening and a separate natural flood at both <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>. Significant temporal changes were detected for all three variables at the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> mouth and <span class="hlt">estuary</span> swash but the direction of change was inconsistent across the two <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> and between the artificial mouth opening and natural flood. Organic matter in both <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> showed no difference after the artificial mouth openings. Only Anglesea showed an increase in organic matter in the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> mouth and <span class="hlt">estuary</span> swash after the floods. Microphytobenthic chlorophyll a concentrations were highest when the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> mouths were closed. Concentrations decreased at all locations at Curdies after the mouth was artificially opened. The <span class="hlt">estuary</span> mouth at Anglesea sustained high chlorophyll concentrations and the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> swash increased one week post artificial opening. The flood event resulted in an increase in chlorophyll a at the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> mouth and swash at both <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>, one week post flood. At Curdies, the microbial utilization of different carbon sources changed after both mouth events; <span class="hlt">estuary</span> mouth and <span class="hlt">estuary</span> swash showed similar patterns at one and nine weeks post opening. At Anglesea, the bacteria utilized different carbon sources between locations and the only significant interaction between location and time was post flood with change in carbon sources utilized by bacteria in the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> mouth and <span class="hlt">estuary</span> swash for one and nine weeks post flood. The southern coastline of Australia is characterized by <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> with small catchments. This study highlights the spatial and temporal variability in the effects of the output of relatively small, intermittent <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> on coastal sediment of adjacent beaches, particularly during prolonged periods of drought.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McKenzie, Jessica L.; Quinn, Gerry P.; Matthews, Ty G.; Barton, Jan; Bellgrove, Alecia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">439</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14727073"> <span id="translatedtitle">Resolving conflict and building cooperation in the National <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> program.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Since its beginning in 1987, researchers and policymakers have touted the US Environmental Protection Agency National <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> program (NEP) as one of the leading examples of collaborative institutions designed to resolve conflict and build cooperation at the watershed level. Using the NEP as an example, I summarize the advantages and disadvantages of collaborative institutions. Using data gathered from focused surveys of policy elites in 22 <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>, I estimate statistical models that show the NEP does a better job of resolving conflict and building project-level cooperation than similar <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> without the NEP. I also describe the activities of the NEP mentioned by respondents as contributing to this outcome. PMID:14727073</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lubell, Mark</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">440</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40171647"> <span id="translatedtitle">Decline of Canada geese ( Branta canadensis ) and common goldeneye ( Bucephala clangula ) associated with a collapse of eelgrass ( Zostera marina ) in a Nova Scotia <span class="hlt">estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">.   Mean numbers of migrant Canada geese (Branta canadensis) in Antigonish Harbour in the southern Gulf of <span class="hlt">St</span>. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> (Canada) during October to December were similar (approx. 450–500\\u000a birds) for the period 1998–2000. Similarly, during this period, geese used two foraging sites. However, in 2001, the average\\u000a number of birds decreased by half and the primary foraging sites were used</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Norman R. Seymour; Anthony G. Miller; David J. Garbary</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">441</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=235391"> <span id="translatedtitle">Use of the USEPA <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Nitrogen Model to Estimate Concentrations of Total Nitrogen in <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> Using Loads Calculated by Watershed Models and Monitoring Data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We use USEPAâ??s <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Nitrogen Model (ENM) to calculate annual average concentrations of total nitrogen (TN) in ten <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> or sub-<span class="hlt">estuaries</span> along the Atlantic coast from New Hampshire to Florida. These include a variety of systems, ranging from strongly-flushed bays to weakly...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">442</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6176104"> <span id="translatedtitle">Annual environmental monitoring report of the <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory, 1986</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Environmental Monitoring Program of the <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1986 are presented and general trends are discussed. Topics include radiation monitoring, wastewater discharge monitoring, dose distribution estimates, and ground water monitoring. 9 refs., 8 figs., 20 tabs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schleimer, G.E. (ed.)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">443</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/61377562"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore Laboratoy two-stage, light-gas gun</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore Laboratory two-stage gun was obtained from General Motors Corporation in the early 1970's. The operation and performance of the gun are described. The facility is used primarily for high pressure and high temperature material property studies and can achieve pressures about twice what can be realized with high-explosive planewave systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. C. Mitchell; W. J. Nellis</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">444</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22greenberg%22&pg=3&id=EJ591009"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Interview with <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Greenberg about Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Presents an interview with pediatrician and adult and child psychiatrist Dr. <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Greenberg, researcher, clinician, and expert on attention deficit, hyperactivity, impulsivity, and related concerns. Discusses the TOVA (Test of Variables of Attention), a continuous performance test for clinical use developed by Dr. Greenberg; diagnostic…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shaughnessy, Michael F.; Martin, Jeremy; Rivera, Hipolito</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">445</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/7040185"> <span id="translatedtitle">Waste management study: Process development at <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report presents the results of an evaluation of the present Toxic Waste Control Operations at the <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory, evaluates the technologies most applicable to the treatment of toxic and hazardous wastes and presents conceptual designs of processes for the installation of a new decontamination and waste treatment facility (DWTF) for future treatment of these wastes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">446</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=47128"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">LAWRENCE</span> AVENUE UNDERFLOW SEWER SYSTEM: MONITORING AND EVALUATION</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new and bold concept in design of urban drainage systems was developed as a step forward in the solution of combined sewer overflow problems. A deep tunnel in bed rock about 200 to 250 feet (61 to 76 m) below the surface was designed and constructed for the <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Avenue drai...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">447</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=49614"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">LAWRENCE</span> AVENUE UNDERFLOW SEWER SYSTEM. INTERIM REPORT: PLANNING AND CONSTRUCTION</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new and bold concept in design of urban drainage systems was developed as a step forward in the solution of combined sewer overflow problems. A deep tunnel in bed rock about 200 to 250 feet (61 to 76 m) below the surface was designed and constructed for the <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Avenue drai...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">448</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/76199"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1995--2000</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report presents the details of the mission and strategic plan for <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Berkeley Laboratory during the fiscal years of 1995--2000. It presents summaries of current programs and potential changes; critical success factors such as human resources; management practices; budgetary allowances; and technical and administrative initiatives.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">449</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/61248871"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory Underground Coal Gasification project</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been actively developing Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) technology for 15 years. The goal of the project has been to develop a fundamental technological understanding of UCG and foster the commercialization of the process. In striving to achieve this goal the LLNL project has carried out laboratory experiments, developed mathematical models, actively participated in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. B. Thorsness; J. A. Britten</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">450</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22Public+Domain%22&pg=5&id=EJ656034"> <span id="translatedtitle">Copyright in the Balance: LJ Talks with <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Lessig.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Discusses copyright issues of interest to librarians with <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Lessig, a legal scholar on copyright, technology, and the Constitution. Topics include Eldred v. Ashcroft; copyright extensions; balancing interests of copyright owners with future creators and the public; privacy, fair use, and public domain; and the Digital Millennium Copyright…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Albanese, Andrew Richard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">451</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60591162"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory Surface Water Protection: A Watershed Approach</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This surface water protection plan (plan) provides an overview of the management efforts implemented at <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that support a watershed approach to protect surface water. This plan fulfills a requirement in the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A to demonstrate a watershed approach for surface water protection that protects the environment and public health. This plan</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Coty</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">452</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10140250"> <span id="translatedtitle">Management of hazardous wastes <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), during the course of numerous research activities, generates hazardous, radioactive, and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. The management of these waste materials is highly regulated in the United States (US). This paper focuses on the hazardous waste regulations that limit and prescribe waste management at LLNL.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jackson, C.S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">453</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sample+AND+plans&pg=3&id=EJ776289"> <span id="translatedtitle">Jacob <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>'s "The Migration Series": Art as Narrative History</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Because art is a reflection of cultural heritage, a natural affinity exists between art and social studies. In Jacob <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span>'s "The Migration Series," art serves as narrative history, with visual images telling the story of the Great Migration, a movement of African American people from the South to the North around World War I. Social studies…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Laney, James D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">454</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.apsa.org/Portals/1/docs/JAPA/532/Nussbaum-P-377-383.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">ANALYTIC LOVE AND HUMAN VULNERABILITY: A COMMENT ON <span class="hlt">LAWRENCE</span> FRIEDMAN'S \\</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">have much admiration for <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Friedman's article. He reviews a complicated literature with exemplary lucidity, and he makes a cogent and creative proposal of his own. Friedman needs to negotiate a delicate balance between various unacceptable extremes. The love of analyst for patient needs, it seems, to be really felt as love, and yet not as some inappropriate form of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">PSYCHOANALYTIC LOVE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">455</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60746012"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reuse of waste cutting sand at <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) examined the waste stream from a water jet cutting operation, to evaluate the possible reuse of waste garnet sand. The sand is a cutting agent used to shape a variety of materials, including metals. Nearly 70,000 pounds of waste sand is generated annually by the cutting operation. The Environmental Protection Department evaluated two potential reuses</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">456</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://computation.llnl.gov/casc/people/critchlow/pubs/abl-2000.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Overview of Bioinformatics Research at <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Depending on who you ask, bioinformatics can refer to almost any collaborative effort between biologists or geneticists and computer scientists - from database development, to simulating the chemical reaction between proteins, to automatically identifying tumors in MRI images. At <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), we have come to use a slightly more restrictive definition. We consider bioinformatics to refer to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Terence Critchlow; Ron Musick; Tom Slezak</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">457</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=COM7410165"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Salinity Gradient and Vegetation in the Saugatucket River <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Saugatucket River in South Kingstown, RI, discharges freshwater into Point Judith (Salt) Pond, diluting the seawater along the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. To locate the region of greatest salinity change in the Saugatucket River-Point Judith Pond system, 20 stations wer...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. M. Smith R. D. Wood</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">458</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=116335"> <span id="translatedtitle">CASCO BAY <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span> PROJECT TRIENNIAL IMPLEMENTATION REVIEW MARCH, 2004</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Casco Bay <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Project has seven primary goals/priorities which include: minimize pollutant loading from stormwater; open and protect shellfish beds; protect and restore habitat; reduce toxic pollution; promote responsible stewardship; sustain and promote the continued eff...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">459</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2011103221"> <span id="translatedtitle">Columbia River <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Study Taskforce (CREST) Project Completion Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The following is a list of major activities for the period of July 1, 1985, through June 30, 1985: Dredged Material Disposal at Area D, First Quarter through Fourth Quarter Activities; Coastal Barrier Designations; Dredging, Columbia River <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>; Dredge...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">460</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=201750"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluating Causes of Ecological Impairments in the <span class="hlt">Estuaries</span> of Ukraine</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ukrainian <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> have not undergone a systematic evaluation of the causes of ecological impairments caused by anthropogenic contamination. The objective of this evaluation is to use recently developed diagnostic tools to determine the causes of benthic ecological impairments. ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return 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showDiv("page_25");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">461</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=242303"> <span id="translatedtitle">MODIS water quality algorithms for northwest Florida <span class="hlt">estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Synoptic and frequent monitoring of water quality parameters from satellite is useful for determining the health of aquatic ecosystems and development of effective management strategies. Northwest Florida <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> are classified as optically-complex, or waters influenced by chlo...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">462</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=60026"> <span id="translatedtitle">SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF BURROWING SHRIMP POPULATIONS IN TWO OREGON <span class="hlt">ESTUARIES</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thalassinid burrowing shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis and Upogebia pugettensis) inhabit large expanses of Pacific estuarine tide flats, from British Columbia to Baja California. The spatial distribution of shrimp populations within <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> has rarely been quantified because ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">463</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22770533"> <span id="translatedtitle">Environmental forcing on jellyfish communities in a small temperate <span class="hlt">estuary</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The impact of biological, hydrodynamic and large scale climatic variables on the jellyfish community of Mondego <span class="hlt">estuary</span> was evaluated from 2003 to 2010. Plankton samples were collected at the downstream part of the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. Siphonophora Muggiaea atlantica and Diphyes spp. were the main jellyfish species. Jellyfish density was generally higher in summer and since 2005 densities had increased. Summer community analysis pointed out Acartia clausi, estuarine temperature and salinity as the main driven forces for the assemblage's structure. Also, Chl a, estuarine salinity, runoff and SST were identified as the major environmental factors influencing the siphonophores summer interannual variability. Temperature influenced directly and indirectly the community and fluctuation of jellyfish blooms in the Mondego <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. This study represents a contribution to a better knowledge of the gelatinous plankton communities in small temperate <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>. PMID:22770533</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Primo, Ana Lígia; Marques, Sónia C; Falcão, Joana; Crespo, Daniel; Pardal, Miguel A; Azeiteiro, Ulisses M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">464</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=65436"> <span id="translatedtitle">BACTERIOPLANKTON DYNAMICS IN A SUBTROPICAL <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span>: EVIDENCE FOR SUBSTRATE LIMITATION</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bacterioplankton abundance and metabolic characteristics were measured along a transect in Pensacola Bay, Florida, USA, to examine the factors that control microbial water column processes in this subtropical <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. The microbial measures included 3 H-L-leucine incorporation, e...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">465</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=85731"> <span id="translatedtitle">OXYGEN UPTAKE AND NUTRIENT REGENERATION IN THE PECONIC <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: OXYGEN UPTAKE AND NUTRIENT REGENERATION IN THE PECONIC <span class="hlt">ESTUARY</span> Rates of oxygen consumption and nutrient regeneration were measured annually throughout the Peconic Estuarine System. Sediment and water column oxygen uptake were measured to determine the potential...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">466</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/45905052"> <span id="translatedtitle">Biogeochemistry of the Kem' River <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, White Sea (Russia)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The biogeochemistry of the river-sea interface was studied in the Kem' River (the largest river flowing to the White Sea from Karelian coast) <span class="hlt">estuary</span> and adjacent area of the White Sea onboard the RV \\</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">V. R. Shevchenko; Y. S. Dolotov; N. N. Filatov; T. N. Alexeeva; A. S. Filippov; E.-M. Nöthig; A. N. Novigatsky; L. A. Pautova; A. V. Platonov; N. V. Politova; T. N. Rat'kova; R. Stein</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">467</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB227896"> <span id="translatedtitle">Water Quality and Wastewater Loadings, Upper Potomac <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> during 1969.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The report has been developed to provide the conferees and others interested the current status of the water quality, wastewater loading and control needs. The scope of this report is limited to current conditions (1969) in the Potomac <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N. A. Jaworski</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1969-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">468</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2011103213"> <span id="translatedtitle">Columbia River <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> Inventory of Physical, Biological and Cultural Characteristics.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This inventory contains summaries of the physical, biological and cultural characteristics of the Columbia River <span class="hlt">estuary</span> area. It is intended to be a primary resource for the development of the CREST Land and Water Use Plan and contains information pertin...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">469</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB87177861"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ecology of Tijuana <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, California: An Estuarine Profile.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Tijuana <span class="hlt">Estuary</span> in southern California is characterized by a high degree of environmental variability resulting primarily from unpredictable freshwater inputs. The report discusses these habitats and synthesizes data amassed on the vegetation, algae, inve...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. B. Zedler C. S. Nordby</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">470</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB229797"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mathematical Model Studies of Water Quality in the Potomac <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mathematical models are becoming an increasingly important 'tool' for predicting, under a variety of conditions, water quality behavior in an <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. The purpose of this report is to present recent Chesapeake Technical Support Laboratory studies on use o...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. D. Feigner L. J. Clark</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">471</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6710842"> <span id="translatedtitle">The ecology of Tijuana <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>, California: An estuarine profile</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This is the first attempt to synthesize and interpret a rapidly growing data base on the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>'s diverse biota - its vegetation, algae, birds, fishes, and invertebrates. Because so many changes have occurred in response to recent catastrophic events, we describe how each aspect of the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> appeared before 1980 and how it has responded to several perturbations. The experimental tests of these cause-effect relationships have not been completed, and there is little reason to expect that environmental conditions have stabilized or that new types of disturbances won't occur. Thus, this profile should be viewed as a stage in the process of understanding Tijuana <span class="hlt">Estuary</span>. Like the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> itself, our knowledge is continuously evolving.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zedler, J.B.; Nordby, C.S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">472</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=171946"> <span id="translatedtitle">DOWNSTREAM MIGRATION OF SALMONID SMOLTS IN OREGON RIVERS AND <span class="hlt">ESTUARIES</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Migratory fish passage is an important designated use for many Oregon <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>. Acoustic transmitters were implanted in coho smolts in 2004 and 2006 to evaluate how estuarine habitat, and habitat loss, might affect population health. Acoustic receivers that identified individu...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">473</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40008394"> <span id="translatedtitle">Macroalgal bloom dynamics in a highly eutrophic southern California <span class="hlt">estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 16-mo long monitoring study was carried out in Upper Newport Bay <span class="hlt">estuary</span> (UNB), Orange County, California, to quantify the\\u000a macroalgal community of a southern California <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. Quarterly sampling began December 1996 at 8 stations along the main\\u000a channel and tidal creeks ranging from the head to the lower end of UNB. At each station, two strata (one at high</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Krista Kamer; Karleen A. Boyle; Peggy Fong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">474</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.usgs.gov/wsp/1532h/report.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sediment transport by streams draining into the Delaware <span class="hlt">Estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The quantity of sediment transported by streams draining into the Delaware <span class="hlt">estuary</span> from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware varies areally according to geology, physiography, and land use. Of the estimated total sediment load of 1.6 million tons entering the Delaware <span class="hlt">estuary</span> annually, about 48 percent is contributed by the Delaware River main stem at Trenton, NJ; 34 percent by Pennsylvania tributaries; and 18 percent by New Jersey and Delaware tributaries.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mansue, Lawrence J.; Commings, Allen B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">475</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40558287"> <span id="translatedtitle">Particle–water interactions of organic nitrogen in turbid <span class="hlt">estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The hypothesis that particle–water interactions of organic nitrogen (ON) in turbid <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> are controlled by specific fractions of suspended particulate matter (SPM) has been tested. Suspended particles from the turbidity maximum zone of a temperate, macro-tidal <span class="hlt">estuary</span> were separated by gravitational settling to yield permanently suspended (PSPM; 46–51% of the total SPM load) and resuspendable (RSPM) particle fractions. Abiotic and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. D. Tappin; G. E. Millward; M. F. Fitzsimons</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">476</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007EOSTr..88Q.318S"> <span id="translatedtitle">In Brief: Eutrophication stresses U.S. <span class="hlt">estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 31 July NOAA report on estuarine eutrophication, or nutrient pollution, indicates moderate to high level nutrient-related impacts in 64 of 99 U.S. <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> that had adequate data for evaluation. Lead author Suzanne Bricker of NOAA's Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment said that most problems in the <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> are related to human activities. The report, completed in partnership with the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, calls for improved management, monitoring, research, and communication efforts.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Showstack, Randy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">477</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57472526"> <span id="translatedtitle">A century of fish research in South African <span class="hlt">estuaries</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The history of South African estuarine ichthyology from 1910–2010 is reviewed. The first survey of fishes in a South African <span class="hlt">estuary</span> was undertaken by Gilchrist in the early 1900s, followed by an extended period between the two world wars when little or no work was conducted in South African <span class="hlt">estuaries</span>. In the 1940s and 1950s a series of surveys initiated</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A K Whitfield</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">478</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012GeCoA..96..105A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Attenuation of rare earth elements in a boreal <span class="hlt">estuary</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study focuses on attenuation of rare earth elements (REE) when a boreal creek, acidified and loaded with REE and other metals as a result of wetland drainage, empties into a brackish-water <span class="hlt">estuary</span> (salinity < 6‰). Surface water was collected in a transect from the creek mouth to the outer <span class="hlt">estuary</span>, and settling (particulate) material in sediment traps moored at selected locations in the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. Ultrafiltration, high-resolution ICP-MS and modeling were applied on the waters, and a variety of chemical reagents were used to extract metals from the settling material. Aluminium, Fe and REE transported by the acidic creek were extensively removed in the inner/central <span class="hlt">estuary</span> where the acidic water was neutralised, whereas Mn was relatively persistent in solution and thus redistributed to particles and deposited further down the <span class="hlt">estuary</span>. The REE removal was caused by several contemporary mechanisms: co-precipitation with oxyhydroxides (mainly Al but also Fe), complexation with flocculating humic substances and sorption to suspended particles. Down <span class="hlt">estuary</span> the dissolved REE pool, remaining after removal, was fractionated: the <1 kDa pool became depleted in the middle REE and the colloidal (0.45 ?m-1 kDa) pool depleted in the middle and heavy REE. This fractionation was controlled by the removal process, such that those REE with highest affinity for the settling particles became most depleted in the remaining dissolved pool. Modeling, based on Visual MINTEQ version 3.0 and the Stockholm Humic Model after revision and updating, predicted that the dissolved (<0.45 ?m) REE pool in the <span class="hlt">estuary</span> is bound almost entirely to humic substances. Acid sulphate soils, the source of the REE and other metals in the creek water, are widespread on coastal plains worldwide and therefore the REE attenuation patterns and mechanisms identified in the studied <span class="hlt">estuary</span> are relevant for recognition of similar geochemical processes and conditions in a variety of coastal locations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Åström, Mats E.; Österholm, Peter; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Nystrand, Miriam; Peltola, Pasi; Nordmyr, Linda; Boman, Anton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">479</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39710462"> <span id="translatedtitle">Factors affecting longitudinal dispersion in <span class="hlt">estuaries</span> of different scale</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Traditionally, the overall diluting capacity of an <span class="hlt">estuary</span> is characterized using a coefficient of longitudinal dispersion, K xe, which is given by the ratio of the dispersive flux of a dissolved substance to its tidally averaged longitudinal gradient. A steady-state model, which assumes a balance between the dispersive and non-dispersive fluxes and an exponential increase in <span class="hlt">estuary</span> cross-sectional area towards</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Roy E. Lewis; Reginald J. Uncles</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">480</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA242726"> <span id="translatedtitle">Structural Evaluation of Eisenhower and Snell Locks, Saint <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Seaway, Massena, New York.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Eisenhower and Snell Locks were constructed between 1955 and 1958 as part of an international cooperative effort to build the Saint <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Seaway. In February 1990, the Saint <span class="hlt">Lawrence</span> Seaway Development Corporation requested that the Corps of Engine...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. D. Neeley R. L. Mosher T. L. Bevins</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" al