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Sample records for stability analysis model

  1. Stability analysis of an autocatalytic protein model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Julian

    2016-05-01

    A self-regulatory genetic circuit, where a protein acts as a positive regulator of its own production, is known to be the simplest biological network with a positive feedback loop. Although at least three components—DNA, RNA, and the protein—are required to form such a circuit, stability analysis of the fixed points of this self-regulatory circuit has been performed only after reducing the system to a two-component system, either by assuming a fast equilibration of the DNA component or by removing the RNA component. Here, stability of the fixed points of the three-component positive feedback loop is analyzed by obtaining eigenvalues of the full three-dimensional Hessian matrix. In addition to rigorously identifying the stable fixed points and saddle points, detailed information about the system can be obtained, such as the existence of complex eigenvalues near a fixed point.

  2. Mathematical modelling and linear stability analysis of laser fusion cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, Torsten; Schulz, Wolfgang; Vossen, Georg; Thombansen, Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    A model for laser fusion cutting is presented and investigated by linear stability analysis in order to study the tendency for dynamic behavior and subsequent ripple formation. The result is a so called stability function that describes the correlation of the setting values of the process and the process' amount of dynamic behavior.

  3. Influence of pipeline modeling in stability analysis for severe slugging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, G. R.; Baliño, J. L.; Burr, K. P.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper a numerical linear stability analysis is performed to a mathematical model for the two-phase flow in a pipeline-riser system. Most of stability criteria and most of the models are based on a simplified pipeline, where it is assumed that the void fraction fluctuation can be neglected. It is evident that a pipeline with a constant void fraction would not be able to capture the flow pattern transition or void fraction propagation waves. Three different models for the pipeline are considered: a lumped parameter model with constant void fraction; a lumped parameter model with time dependent void fraction; a distributed parameter model, with void fraction dependent on time and position. The results showed that a simplified model would lose some stable region for operational conditions, but the complete models would not. As result, a more general modeling is necessary to capture all the influence of the stratified flow over stability and over the pipeline dynamics.

  4. Linear stability analysis of swirling turbulent flows with turbulence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vikrant; Juniper, Matthew

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we consider the growth of large scale coherent structures in turbulent flows by performing linear stability analysis around a mean flow. Turbulent flows are characterized by fine-scale stochastic perturbations. The momentum transfer caused by these perturbations affects the development of larger structures. Therefore, in a linear stability analysis, it is important to include the perturbations' influence. One way to do this is to include a turbulence model in the stability analysis. This is done in the literature by using eddy viscosity models (EVMs), which are first order turbulence models. We extend this approach by using second order turbulence models, in this case explicit algebraic Reynolds stress models (EARSMs). EARSMs are more versatile than EVMs, in that they can be applied to a wider range of flows, and could also be more accurate. We verify our EARSM-based analysis by applying it to a channel flow and then comparing the results with those from an EVM-based analysis. We then apply the EARSM-based stability analysis to swirling pipe flows and Taylor-Couette flows, which demonstrates the main benefit of EARSM-based analysis. This project is supported by EPSRC and Rolls-Royce through a Dorothy Hodgkin Research Fellowship.

  5. Surrogate models for efficient stability analysis of brake systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechak, Lyes; Gillot, Frédéric; Besset, Sébastien; Sinou, Jean-Jacques

    2015-07-01

    This study assesses capacities of the global sensitivity analysis combined together with the kriging formalism to be useful in the robust stability analysis of brake systems, which is too costly when performed with the classical complex eigenvalues analysis (CEA) based on finite element models (FEMs). By considering a simplified brake system, the global sensitivity analysis is first shown very helpful for understanding the effects of design parameters on the brake system's stability. This is allowed by the so-called Sobol indices which discriminate design parameters with respect to their influence on the stability. Consequently, only uncertainty of influent parameters is taken into account in the following step, namely, the surrogate modelling based on kriging. The latter is then demonstrated to be an interesting alternative to FEMs since it allowed, with a lower cost, an accurate estimation of the system's proportions of instability corresponding to the influent parameters.

  6. Stability and Perturbation Analysis on a Model of Cell Chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Colin; Skupsky, Ron; Losert, Wolfgang; Nossal, Ralph

    2006-03-01

    Many eukaryotic cells respond with directional movement to spatial and/or temporal gradients of small molecules that bind to cell surface receptors. The computational model of a chemotaxing cell developed in [1], which models cells such as neutrophils or Dictyostelium discoideum, is investigated with regard to stability and response to perturbations. A formal stability analysis finds that, when placed in an initial linear gradient, the model is most sensitive to perturbations at a 60-90 degree offset from the direction of the initial gradient. The model also responds most quickly and strongly to external point sources placed in that direction. These responses hold for all four of the model variants developed in [1]. This suggests that the observed `zigzag' behavior of real cell movement in a gradient may be influenced by the nature of the biochemical reactions that control a cell's chemotactic response. This research was funded in by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). [1] Skupsky, R., W. Losert, and R.J. Nossal. 2005. ``Distinguishing modes of eukaryotic gradient sensing''. Biophys. J. 89:2806--2823

  7. A Coupled Aeroelastic Model for Launch Vehicle Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.

    2010-01-01

    A technique for incorporating distributed aerodynamic normal forces and aeroelastic coupling effects into a stability analysis model of a launch vehicle is presented. The formulation augments the linear state-space launch vehicle plant dynamics that are compactly derived as a system of coupled linear differential equations representing small angular and translational perturbations of the rigid body, nozzle, and sloshing propellant coupled with normal vibration of a set of orthogonal modes. The interaction of generalized forces due to aeroelastic coupling and thrust can be expressed as a set of augmenting non-diagonal stiffness and damping matrices in modal coordinates with no penalty on system order. While the eigenvalues of the structural response in the presence of thrust and aeroelastic forcing can be predicted at a given flight condition independent of the remaining degrees of freedom, the coupled model provides confidence in closed-loop stability in the presence of rigid-body, slosh, and actuator dynamics. Simulation results are presented that characterize the coupled dynamic response of the Ares I launch vehicle and the impact of aeroelasticity on control system stability margins.

  8. Models and Stability Analysis of Boiling Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    John Dorning

    2002-04-15

    We have studied the nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic stability of boiling water reactors (BWRs) using a model that includes: space-time modal neutron kinetics based on spatial w-modes; single- and two-phase flow in parallel boiling channels; fuel rod heat conduction dynamics; and a simple model of the recirculation loop. The BR model is represented by a set of time-dependent nonlinear ordinary differential equations, and is studied as a dynamical system using the modern bifurcation theory and nonlinear dynamical systems analysis. We first determine the stability boundary (SB) - or Hopf bifurcation set- in the most relevant parameter plane, the inlet-subcooling-number/external-pressure-drop plane, for a fixed control rod induced external reactivity equal to the 100% rod line value; then we transform the SB to the practical power-flow map used by BWR operating engineers and regulatory agencies. Using this SB, we show that the normal operating point at 100% power is very stable, that stability of points on the 100% rod line decreases as the flow rate is reduced, and that operating points in the low-flow/high-power region are least stable. We also determine the SB that results when the modal kinetics is replaced by simple point reactor kinetics, and we thereby show that the first harmonic mode does not have a significant effect on the SB. However, we later show that it nevertheless has a significant effect on stability because it affects the basin of attraction of stable operating points. Using numerical simulations we show that, in the important low-flow/high-power region, the Hopf bifurcation that occurs as the SB is crossed is subcritical; hence, growing oscillations can result following small finite perturbations of stable steady-states on the 100% rod line at points in the low-flow/high-power region. Numerical simulations are also performed to calculate the decay ratios (DRs) and frequencies of oscillations for various points on the 100% rod line. It is

  9. Stability analysis of the Euler discretization for SIR epidemic model

    SciTech Connect

    Suryanto, Agus

    2014-06-19

    In this paper we consider a discrete SIR epidemic model obtained by the Euler method. For that discrete model, existence of disease free equilibrium and endemic equilibrium is established. Sufficient conditions on the local asymptotical stability of both disease free equilibrium and endemic equilibrium are also derived. It is found that the local asymptotical stability of the existing equilibrium is achieved only for a small time step size h. If h is further increased and passes the critical value, then both equilibriums will lose their stability. Our numerical simulations show that a complex dynamical behavior such as bifurcation or chaos phenomenon will appear for relatively large h. Both analytical and numerical results show that the discrete SIR model has a richer dynamical behavior than its continuous counterpart.

  10. Stability analysis of traffic flow with extended CACC control models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ya-Zhou, Zheng; Rong-Jun, Cheng; Siu-Ming, Lo; Hong-Xia, Ge

    2016-06-01

    To further investigate car-following behaviors in the cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC) strategy, a comprehensive control system which can handle three traffic conditions to guarantee driving efficiency and safety is designed by using three CACC models. In this control system, some vital comprehensive information, such as multiple preceding cars’ speed differences and headway, variable safety distance (VSD) and time-delay effect on the traffic current and the jamming transition have been investigated via analytical or numerical methods. Local and string stability criterion for the velocity control (VC) model and gap control (GC) model are derived via linear stability theory. Numerical simulations are conducted to study the performance of the simulated traffic flow. The simulation results show that the VC model and GC model can improve driving efficiency and suppress traffic congestion. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 71571107 and 11302110). The Scientific Research Fund of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant Nos. LY15A020007, LY15E080013, and LY16G010003). The Natural Science Foundation of Ningbo City (Grant Nos. 2014A610030 and 2015A610299), the Fund from the Government of the Hong Kong Administrative Region, China (Grant No. CityU11209614), and the K C Wong Magna Fund in Ningbo University, China.

  11. [Stability Analysis of Susceptible-Infected-Recovered Epidemic Model].

    PubMed

    Pan, Duotao; Shi, Hongyan; Huang, Mingzhong; Yuan, Decheng

    2015-10-01

    With the range of application of computational biology and systems biology gradually expanding, the complexity of the bioprocess models is also increased. To address this difficult problem, it is required to introduce positive alternative analysis method to cope with it. Taking the dynamic model of the epidemic control process as research object, we established an evaluation model in our laboratory. Firstly, the model was solved with nonlinear programming method. The results were shown to be good. Based on biochemical systems theory, the ODE dynamic model was transformed into S-system. The eigen values of the model showed that the system was stable and contained oscillation phenomenon. Next the sensitivities of rate constant and logarithmic gains of the three key parameters were analyzed, as well as the robust of the system. The result indicated that the biochemical systems theory could be applied in different fields more widely. PMID:26964304

  12. Stability analysis of a stochastic logistic model with infinite delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Meng; Fan, Dejun; Wang, Ke

    2013-09-01

    This report is concerned with a stochastic logistic equation with infinite delay. We establish the sufficient conditions for global asymptotical stability of the zero solution and the positive equilibrium. Some classical results are improved and extended. Several numerical simulations are introduced to illustrate the main results.

  13. Floquet stability analysis of the longitudinal dynamics of two hovering model insects

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiang Hao; Sun, Mao

    2012-01-01

    Because of the periodically varying aerodynamic and inertial forces of the flapping wings, a hovering or constant-speed flying insect is a cyclically forcing system, and, generally, the flight is not in a fixed-point equilibrium, but in a cyclic-motion equilibrium. Current stability theory of insect flight is based on the averaged model and treats the flight as a fixed-point equilibrium. In the present study, we treated the flight as a cyclic-motion equilibrium and used the Floquet theory to analyse the longitudinal stability of insect flight. Two hovering model insects were considered—a dronefly and a hawkmoth. The former had relatively high wingbeat frequency and small wing-mass to body-mass ratio, and hence very small amplitude of body oscillation; while the latter had relatively low wingbeat frequency and large wing-mass to body-mass ratio, and hence relatively large amplitude of body oscillation. For comparison, analysis using the averaged-model theory (fixed-point stability analysis) was also made. Results of both the cyclic-motion stability analysis and the fixed-point stability analysis were tested by numerical simulation using complete equations of motion coupled with the Navier–Stokes equations. The Floquet theory (cyclic-motion stability analysis) agreed well with the simulation for both the model dronefly and the model hawkmoth; but the averaged-model theory gave good results only for the dronefly. Thus, for an insect with relatively large body oscillation at wingbeat frequency, cyclic-motion stability analysis is required, and for their control analysis, the existing well-developed control theories for systems of fixed-point equilibrium are no longer applicable and new methods that take the cyclic variation of the flight dynamics into account are needed. PMID:22491980

  14. SAS applications for Tai's stability analysis and AMMI model in genotype x environmental interaction (GEI) effects.

    PubMed

    Thillainathan, M; Fernandez, G C

    2001-01-01

    A user-friendly graphical data analysis to perform stability analysis of genotype x environmental interactions, using Tai's stability model and additive main effects and multiplicative interaction (AMMI) biplots, are presented here. This practical approach integrates statistical and graphical analysis tools available in SAS systems and provides user-friendly applications to perform complete stability analyses without writing SAS program statements or using pull-down menu interfaces by running the SAS macros in the background. By using this macro approach, the agronomists and plant breeders can effectively perform stability analysis and spend more time in data exploration, interpretation of graphs, and output, rather than debugging their program errors. The necessary MACRO-CALL files can be downloaded from the author's home page at http://www.ag.unr.edu/gf. The nature and the distinctive features of the graphics produced by these applications are illustrated by using published data. PMID:11535655

  15. Stability analysis of an extended intelligent driver model and its simulations under open boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhipeng; Li, Wenzhong; Xu, Shangzhi; Qian, Yeqing

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents an extended intelligent driver traffic flow model, in which the power of the considered vehicle is strengthened in proportion to that of the immediately preceding vehicle. We analyze the stability against a small perturbation by use of the linear stability method for the proposed traffic flow model on a single lane under open boundary condition, with the finding that the traffic flow stability can be improved by increasing the proportion of the direct power cooperation of the preceding vehicle. The participation of forward power cooperation can help to stabilize the traffic flow and suppress the traffic jams. In addition, the simulations under open boundary single lane are conducted to validate the correctness on theoretical deduction, which shows that numerical results in large-wave and short-wave stability are in good agreement with those of theoretical analysis.

  16. Stability and Bifurcation Analysis of a Three-Species Food Chain Model with Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Nikhil; Samanta, Sudip; Biswas, Santanu; Alquran, Marwan; Al-Khaled, Kamel; Chattopadhyay, Joydev

    In the present paper, we study the effect of gestation delay on a tri-trophic food chain model with Holling type-II functional response. The essential mathematical features of the proposed model are analyzed with the help of equilibrium analysis, stability analysis, and bifurcation theory. Considering time-delay as the bifurcation parameter, the Hopf-bifurcation analysis is carried out around the coexisting equilibrium. The direction of Hopf-bifurcation and the stability of the bifurcating periodic solutions are determined by applying the normal form theory and center manifold theorem. We observe that if the magnitude of the delay is increased, the system loses stability and shows limit cycle oscillations through Hopf-bifurcation. The system also shows the chaotic dynamics via period-doubling bifurcation for further enhancement of time-delay. Our analytical findings are illustrated through numerical simulations.

  17. Stability analysis of the homogeneous hydrodynamics of a model for a confined granular gas.

    PubMed

    Brey, J Javier; Buzón, V; García de Soria, M I; Maynar, P

    2016-06-01

    The linear hydrodynamic stability of a model for confined quasi-two-dimensional granular gases is analyzed. The system exhibits homogeneous hydrodynamics, i.e., there are macroscopic evolution equations for homogeneous states. The stability analysis is carried out around all these states and not only the homogeneous steady state reached eventually by the system. It is shown that in some cases the linear analysis is not enough to reach a definite conclusion on the stability, and molecular dynamics simulation results are presented to elucidate these cases. The analysis shows the relevance of nonlinear hydrodynamic contributions to describe the behavior of spontaneous fluctuations occurring in the system, that lead even to the transitory formation of clusters of particles. The conclusion is that the system is always stable. The relevance of the results for describing the instabilities of confined granular gases observed experimentally is discussed. PMID:27415347

  18. The application of cause-and-effect analysis to mathematical models of geophysical phenomena. II - Stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronova, Nataliia G.; Schlesinger, Michael E.

    1992-04-01

    The 'cause-and-effect analysis' (CEA) technique is applied to investigate the stability of mathematical models of geophysical phenomena. It is shown that the ith coefficient of p(lambda) is equal to -PL sup (i), the ith order loop effect of the graph analog of matrix B - I, where I is the identity matrix. The classical conditions for stability for both discrete process (DP) and continuous process (CP) systems are then reformulated in terms of the PL sup (i) determined from the graph analog of the system. The use of the result graph analog stability conditions is illustrated by application to two CP systems, the Chapman photochemical cycle and an energy balance climate model, and to a DP system, a finite-differenced differential equation. CEA stability analysis elucidates the interactions among a system's internal variables and thus determines the cause of an instability and facilitates modification of the system to make it stable.

  19. Stochastic stability analysis of a reduced galactic dynamo model with perturbed α-effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Cónall

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the asymptotic behaviour of a reduced αΩ-dynamo model of magnetic field generation in spiral galaxies where fluctuation in the α-effect results in a system with state-dependent stochastic perturbations. By computing the upper Lyapunov exponent of the linearised model, we can identify regions of instability and stability in probability for the equilibrium of the nonlinear model; in this case the equilibrium solution corresponds to a magnetic field that has undergone catastrophic quenching. These regions are compared to regions of exponential mean-square stability and regions of sub- and super-criticality in the unperturbed linearised model. Prior analysis in the literature which focuses on these latter regions does not adequately address the corresponding transition in the nonlinear stochastic model. Finally we provide a visual representation of the influence of drift non-normality and perturbation intensity on these regions.

  20. Analytical model and stability analysis of the leading edge spar of a passively morphing ornithopter wing.

    PubMed

    Wissa, Aimy; Calogero, Joseph; Wereley, Norman; Hubbard, James E; Frecker, Mary

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the stability analysis of the leading edge spar of a flapping wing unmanned air vehicle with a compliant spine inserted in it. The compliant spine is a mechanism that was designed to be flexible during the upstroke and stiff during the downstroke. Inserting a variable stiffness mechanism into the leading edge spar affects its structural stability. The model for the spar-spine system was formulated in terms of the well-known Mathieu's equation, in which the compliant spine was modeled as a torsional spring with a sinusoidal stiffness function. Experimental data was used to validate the model and results show agreement within 11%. The structural stability of the leading edge spar-spine system was determined analytically and graphically using a phase plane plot and Strutt diagrams. Lastly, a torsional viscous damper was added to the leading edge spar-spine model to investigate the effect of damping on stability. Results show that for the un-damped case, the leading edge spar-spine response was stable and bounded; however, there were areas of instability that appear for a range of spine upstroke and downstroke stiffnesses. Results also show that there exist a damping ratio between 0.2 and 0.5, for which the leading edge spar-spine system was stable for all values of spine upstroke and downstroke stiffnesses. PMID:26502210

  1. Analysis and test evaluation of the dynamic response and stability of three advanced turboprop models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, P. N.; Arseneaux, P. J.; Smith, A. F.; Turnberg, J. E.; Brooks, B. M.

    1985-01-01

    Results of dynamic response and stability wind tunnel tests of three 62.2 cm (24.5 in) diameter models of the Prop-Fan, advanced turboprop, are presented. Measurements of dynamic response were made with the rotors mounted on an isolated nacelle, with varying tilt for nonuniform inflow. One model was also tested using a semi-span wing and fuselage configuration for response to realistic aircraft inflow. Stability tests were performed using tunnel turbulence or a nitrogen jet for excitation. Measurements are compared with predictions made using beam analysis methods for the model with straight blades, and finite element analysis methods for the models with swept blades. Correlations between measured and predicted rotating blade natural frequencies for all the models are very good. The IP dynamic response of the straight blade model is reasonably well predicted. The IP response of the swept blades is underpredicted and the wing induced response of the straight blade is overpredicted. Two models did not flutter, as predicted. One swept blade model encountered an instability at a higher RPM than predicted, showing predictions to be conservative.

  2. A brief review of models of DC-DC power electronic converters for analysis of their stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewniak, Piotr; Grzesik, Bogusław

    2014-10-01

    A brief review of models of DC-DC power electronic converters (PECs) is presented in this paper. It contains the most popular, continuous-time and discrete-time models used for PEC simulation, design, stability analysis and other applications. Both large-signal and small-signal models are considered. Special attention is paid to models that are used in practice for the analysis of the global and local stability of PECs.

  3. A comparative analysis of terrain stability models for predicting shallow landslides in colluvial soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisina, C.; Scarabelli, S.

    2007-06-01

    Most of the slopes of the hilly areas of the Apennines are composed of colluvial soils originating from the weathering of the bedrock and down slope transportation. Shallow slides affect this superficial cover, depend largely on the surface topography and are a recurrent problem. SINMAP and SHALSTAB are terrain stability models that combine steady state hydrology assumptions with the infinite slope stability model to quantify shallow slope stability. They have a similar physical basis but they use different indices to quantify instability. The purposes of this study are to test and compare the approaches of SINMAP and SHALSTAB models for slope stability analysis and to compare the results of these analyses with the locations of the shallow landslides that occurred on November 2002 in an area of the Oltrepo Pavese (Northern Apennines). The territory of S. Giuletta, characterized by clayey-silty colluvial soils, represents the test site. The Digital Elevation Model was constructed from a 1:5000 scale contour map and was used to estimate the slope of the terrain as well as the potential soil moisture conditions. In situ and laboratory tests provided the basis for measuring values for soil hydraulic and geotechnical parameters (moisture content, soil suction, Atterberg limits, methylene blue dye adsorption, hydraulic conductivity). Soil thickness was extracted from a soil database. An inventory of landslide from interpretation of aerial photographs and field surveys was used to document sites of instability (mostly soil slips) and to provide a test of model performance by comparing observed landslide locations with model predictions. The study discusses the practical advantages and limitations of the two models in connection with the geological characteristics of the studied area, which could be representative of similar geological contexts in the Apennines.

  4. Stability analysis of a state dependent delayed, coupled two DOF model of drill-stringvibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandakumar, K.; Wiercigroch, Marian

    2013-05-01

    Stick-slip and bit-bounce are dangerous dynamic phenomena encountered during rotary drilling of oil-wells, but their exact origins and interplay are far from obvious. In this paper, we consider a fully coupled two degrees-of-freedom model, which assumes a state-dependent time delay and a viscous damping for both the axial and torsional motions. Without making any asymptotic assumptions, we have conducted a detailed linear stability analysis of the resultant mathematical model, which is composed of two coupled delay differential equations. The main significance of our work lies in providing practically useful results, which are in the form of stability charts in the plane of drilling rates and rotary speeds.

  5. Aeromechanical stability analysis of a multirotor vehicle model representing a hybrid heavy lift airship (HHLA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, C.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1984-01-01

    Hybrid Heavy Lift Airship (HHLA) is a proposed candidate vehicle aimed at providing heavy lift capability at low cost. This vehicle consists of a buoyant envelope attached to a supporting structure to which four rotor systems, taken from existing helicopters are attached. Nonlinear equations of motion capable of modelling the dynamics of this coupled multi-rotor/support frame/vehicle system have been developed. Using these equations of motion the aeroelastic and aeromechanical stability analysis is performed aimed at identifying potential instabilities which could occur for this type of vehicle. The coupling between various blade, supporting structure and rigid body modes is identified. Furthermore, the effects of changes in buoyancy ratio (Buoyant lift/total weight) on the dynamic characteristics of the vehicle are studied. The dynamic effects found are of considerable importance for the design of such vehicles. The analytical model developed is also useful for studying the aeromechanical stability of single rotor and tandem rotor coupled rotor/fuselage systems.

  6. Stability analysis of a thermocapillary spreading film with slip-model.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Naveen

    2014-11-01

    Thin liquid films spreading on a solid substrate due to thermocapillary stresses are susceptible to rivulet instability at the advancing solid-liquid-vapor contact line. The unstable front is related to the presence of a capillary ridge at the contact line. In this work, the dynamics and stability of thermocapillary-driven films are analyzed using a detailed slip-model to alleviate the stress singularity at the moving contact line. The slip-model is well suited to model partially wetting fluids due to the possibility of defining the contact angle explicitly. The effect of motion of the contact line on the dynamic contact angle and subsequently on the dynamics and stability of the film is explored. The apparent contact angle is a result of the static contact angle and motion of the contact line. It is shown that one can obtain exactly the same base profile with and without taking into account the effect of motion on the contact angle with suitable change of parameters but the linear stability of the two profiles is different. Further the transient growth is found to be somewhat different but small for both configurations. Analysis of the ε -pseudospectra indicates a highly non-normal system for the case of dynamic contact angle. PMID:25428784

  7. Perturbation and Stability Analysis of the Multi-Anticipative Intelligent Driver Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi-Qun; Xie, Wei-Jun; Shi, Jing; Shi, Qi-Xin

    This paper discusses three kinds of IDM car-following models that consider both the multi-anticipative behaviors and the reaction delays of drivers. Here, the multi-anticipation comes from two ways: (1) the driver is capable of evaluating the dynamics of several preceding vehicles, and (2) the autonomous vehicles can obtain the velocity and distance information of several preceding vehicles via inter-vehicle communications. In this paper, we study the stability of homogeneous traffic flow. The linear stability analysis indicates that the stable region will generally be enlarged by the multi-anticipative behaviors and reduced by the reaction delays. The temporal amplification and the spatial divergence of velocities for local perturbation are also studied, where the results further prove this conclusion. Simulation results also show that the multi-anticipative behaviors near the bottleneck will lead to a quicker backwards propagation of oscillations.

  8. Stability analysis of an e-SEIAR model with point-to-group worm propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fangwei; Zhang, Yunkai; Wang, Changguang; Ma, Jianfeng

    2015-03-01

    Internet worms have drawn significant attention due to their enormous threats to the Internet. The main goal of this paper is to explore the interaction dynamics between a malicious worm and an benign worm, using a mathematical model, namely e-SEIAR. The e-SEIAR model takes two important network environment factors into consideration: point-to-group worm propagation mode and benign worms. Furthermore, some related dynamics properties are studied, along with the analysis of how to combat the worm prevalence based on the stability of equilibria. Simulation results show that the performance of our proposed models is effective in combating such worms, in terms of decreasing the number of hosts infected by the malicious worm and reducing the malicious worm propagation speed. Based on our simulations, we believe there is great potential for an effective method to use benign worms to combat malicious worms in some point-to-group applications.

  9. Evaluating network analysis and agent based modeling for investigating the stability of commercial air carrier schedules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Sheila Ruth

    For a number of years, the United States Federal Government has been formulating the Next Generation Air Transportation System plans for National Airspace System improvement. These improvements attempt to address air transportation holistically, but often address individual improvements in one arena such as ground or in-flight equipment. In fact, air transportation system designers have had only limited success using traditional Operations Research and parametric modeling approaches in their analyses of innovative operations. They need a systemic methodology for modeling of safety-critical infrastructure that is comprehensive, objective, and sufficiently concrete, yet simple enough to be deployed with reasonable investment. The methodology must also be amenable to quantitative analysis so issues of system safety and stability can be rigorously addressed. The literature suggests that both agent-based models and network analysis techniques may be useful for complex system development and analysis. The purpose of this research is to evaluate these two techniques as applied to analysis of commercial air carrier schedule (route) stability in daily operations, an important component of air transportation. Airline-like routing strategies are used to educe essential elements of applying the method. Two main models are developed, one investigating the network properties of the route structure, the other an Agent-based approach. The two methods are used to predict system properties at a macro-level. These findings are compared to observed route network performance measured by adherence to a schedule to provide validation of the results. Those interested in complex system modeling are provided some indication as to when either or both of the techniques would be applicable. For aviation policy makers, the results point to a toolset capable of providing insight into the system behavior during the formative phases of development and transformation with relatively low investment

  10. Implementation of Bounding Surface Model into ABAQUS and Its Application to Wellbore Stability Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Al-Muntasheri, G.; Abousleiman, Y. N.

    2014-12-01

    The critical state concept based bounding surface model is one of the most widely used elastoplastic constitutive models for geomaterials, attributed mainly to its essential feature of allowing plastic deformation to occur for stress points within the bounding surface and thus the capability to represent the realistic non-recoverable behaviour of soils and rocks observed under the cyclic loading. This paper develops an implicit integration algorithm for the bounding surface model, using the standard return mapping approach (elastic predictor-plastic corrector), to obtain the updated stresses for the given strain increments. The formulation of the constitutive integration requires the derivation of a supplementary differential equation to describe the evolution of a key variable, i.e., the ratio between the image stress and the current stress quantities. It is essentially an extension of the integration scheme presented in an earlier work used for the simple bounding surface version of modified Cam Clay associated with a substantially simplified hardening rule. The integration algorithm for the bounding surface model is implemented into the finite element analysis commercial program, ABAQUS, through the material interface of UMAT (user defined material subroutine), and then used for the analysis of wellbore stability problem. The predictions from the ABAQUS simulations are generally in excellent agreement with the available analytical solutions, thus demonstrating the accuracy and robustness of the proposed integration scheme.

  11. Stability analysis, non-linear pulsations and mass loss of models for 55 Cygni (HD 198478)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Abhay Pratap; Glatzel, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    55 Cygni is a variable supergiant. Recent observational studies revealed that this star pulsates in pressure, gravity and strange modes. The pulsations seem to be associated with episodes of mass loss. In this paper we present a theoretical study of stellar models with parameters close to that of 55 Cygni. A linear non-adiabatic stability analysis with respect to radial perturbations is performed and the evolution of instabilities into the non-linear regime is followed by numerical simulation. Our study indicates that the mass of 55 Cygni lies below 28 M⊙. As the final consequence of the instabilities the non-linear simulations revealed finite amplitude pulsations with periods consistent with the observations. The non-linear results also indicate a connection between pulsations and mass loss and allow for an estimate of the mean mass-loss rate. It is consistent with the observed values.

  12. The Stability Analysis for an Extended Car Following Model Based on Control Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Hong-Xia; Meng, Xiang-Pei; Zhu, Ke-Qiang; Cheng, Rong-Jun

    2014-08-01

    A new method is proposed to study the stability of the car-following model considering traffic interruption probability. The stability condition for the extended car-following model is obtained by using the Lyapunov function and the condition for no traffic jam is also given based on the control theory. Numerical simulations are conducted to demonstrate and verify the analytical results. Moreover, numerical simulations show that the traffic interruption probability has an influence on driving behavior and confirm the effectiveness of the method on the stability of traffic flow.

  13. An Investment Model Analysis of Relationship Stability among Women Court-Mandated to Violence Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhatigan, Deborah L.; Moore, Todd M.; Stuart, Gregory L.

    2005-01-01

    This investigation examined relationship stability among 60 women court-mandated to violence interventions by applying a general model (i.e., Rusbult's 1980 Investment Model) to predict intentions to leave current relationships. As in past research, results showed that Investment Model predictions were supported such that court-mandated women who…

  14. Safe distance car-following model including backward-looking and its stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Da; Jin, Peter Jing; Pu, Yun; Ran, Bin

    2013-03-01

    The focus of this paper is the car-following behavior including backward-looking, simply called the bi-directional looking car-following behavior. This study is motivated by the potential changes of the physical properties of traffic flow caused by the fast developing intelligent transportation system (ITS), especially the new connected vehicle technology. Existing studies on this topic focused on general motors (GM) models and optimal velocity (OV) models. The safe distance car-following model, Gipps' model, which is more widely used in practice have not drawn too much attention in the bi-directional looking context. This paper explores the property of the bi-directional looking extension of Gipps' safe distance model. The stability condition of the proposed model is derived using the linear stability theory and is verified using numerical simulations. The impacts of the driver and vehicle characteristics appeared in the proposed model on the traffic flow stability are also investigated. It is found that taking into account the backward-looking effect in car-following has three types of effect on traffic flow: stabilizing, destabilizing and producing non-physical phenomenon. This conclusion is more sophisticated than the study results based on the OV bi-directional looking car-following models. Moreover, the drivers who have the smaller reaction time or the larger additional delay and think the other vehicles have larger maximum decelerations can stabilize traffic flow.

  15. Physical mechanisms of phonation onset: a linear stability analysis of an aeroelastic continuum model of phonation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoyan; Neubauer, Juergen; Berry, David A

    2007-10-01

    In an investigation of phonation onset, a linear stability analysis was performed on a two-dimensional, aeroelastic, continuum model of phonation. The model consisted of a vocal fold-shaped constriction situated in a rigid pipe coupled to a potential flow which separated at the superior edge of the vocal fold. The vocal fold constriction was modeled as a plane-strain linear elastic layer. The dominant eigenvalues and eigenmodes of the fluid-structure-interaction system were investigated as a function of glottal airflow. To investigate specific aerodynamic mechanisms of phonation onset, individual components of the glottal airflow (e.g., flow-induced stiffness, inertia, and damping) were systematically added to the driving force. The investigations suggested that flow-induced stiffness was the primary mechanism of phonation onset, involving the synchronization of two structural eigenmodes. Only under conditions of negligible structural damping and a restricted set of vocal fold geometries did flow-induced damping become the primary mechanism of phonation onset. However, for moderate to high structural damping and a more generalized set of vocal fold geometries, flow-induced stiffness remained the primary mechanism of phonation onset. PMID:17902864

  16. Linear stability analysis of self-excited vibrations in drilling using an infinite dimensional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarsnes, Ulf Jakob F.; Aamo, Ole Morten

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with predicting the occurrence of self-excited vibrations during drilling. Previous work postulates that these are due to the coupling between the distributed drill string system and the regenerative effect in the bit-rock interaction law. We use a previously developed distributed model and the linearized bit-rock interaction law to derive a graphical condition for stability based on the Nyquist stability criterion.

  17. General model of a cascade of reactions with time delays: Global stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, Marek

    2015-07-01

    The problem considered in this paper consists of a cascade of reactions with discrete as well as distributed delays, which arose in the context of Hes1 gene expression. For the abstract general model sufficient conditions for global stability are presented. Then the abstract result is applied to the Hes1 model.

  18. Stability Analysis of Attractor Neural Network Model of Inferior Temporal Cortex —Relationship between Attractor Stability and Learning Order—

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomoyuki Kimoto,; Tatsuya Uezu,; Masato Okada,

    2010-06-01

    Miyashita found that the long-term memory of visual stimuli is stored in the monkey’s inferior temporal cortex and that the temporal correlation in terms of the learning order of visual stimuli is converted into spatial correlation in terms of the firing rate patterns of the neuron group. To explain Miyashita’s findings, Griniasty et al. [Neural Comput. 5 (1993) 1] and Amit et al. [J. Neurosci. 14 (1994) 6435] proposed the attractor neural network model, and the Amit model has been examined only for the stable state acquired by storing memory patterns in a fixed sequence. In the real world, however, the learning order has statistical continuity but it also has randomness, and the stability of the state changes depending on the statistical properties of learning order when memory patterns are stored randomly. In addition, it is preferable for the stable state to become an appropriate attractor that reflects the relationship between memory patterns by the statistical properties of the learning order. In this study, we examined the dependence of the stable state on the statistical properties of the learning order without modifying the Amit model. The stable state was found to change from the correlated attractor to the Hopfield or Mp attractor, which is the mixed state with all memory patterns when the rate of random learning increases. Furthermore, we found that if the statistical properties of the learning order change, the stable state can change to an appropriate attractor reflecting the relationship between memory patterns.

  19. Tailings dams stability analysis using numerical modelling of geotechnical and geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihai, S.; Zlagnean, M.; Oancea, I.; Petrescu, A.

    2009-04-01

    dam's state of safety. This study considered the SSR (Shear Strength Reduction) technique for slope stability numerical modelling. In the SSR finite element technique, elasto-plastic strength is assumed for dam's materials and shear strengths are progressively reduced until collapse occurs. Numerical modelling was performed on the most critical profile choosed through analysis of geophysical and geotechnical informational volume achieved by insitu or in laboratory tests. Finite element analysis were considered in two situations: first, before geophysical investigations and second considering the whole informational of data achieved. Both situations were analysed in static and pseudo-static conditions. The factor of safety before geophysical investigations is high enough to describe a stable state of stability even for the seismic load. The total displacement distributions were modified by the presence of internal erosional element giving a high state of instability, especially for the pseudo-static case. These analysis using the finite element method prove the importance of structural disturbance elements that may occure inside the dam body produced by internal erosional processes.

  20. Linearized blade row compression component model. Stability and frequency response analysis of a J85-3 compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tesch, W. A.; Moszee, R. H.; Steenken, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    NASA developed stability and frequency response analysis techniques were applied to a dynamic blade row compression component stability model to provide a more economic approach to surge line and frequency response determination than that provided by time-dependent methods. This blade row model was linearized and the Jacobian matrix was formed. The clean-inlet-flow stability characteristics of the compressors of two J85-13 engines were predicted by applying the alternate Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion to the Jacobian matrix. The predicted surge line agreed with the clean-inlet-flow surge line predicted by the time-dependent method to a high degree except for one engine at 94% corrected speed. No satisfactory explanation of this discrepancy was found. The frequency response of the linearized system was determined by evaluating its Laplace transfer function. The results of the linearized-frequency-response analysis agree with the time-dependent results when the time-dependent inlet total-pressure and exit-flow function amplitude boundary conditions are less than 1 percent and 3 percent, respectively. The stability analysis technique was extended to a two-sector parallel compressor model with and without interstage crossflow and predictions were carried out for total-pressure distortion extents of 180 deg, 90 deg, 60 deg, and 30 deg.

  1. A distributed model for slope stability analysis using radar detected rainfall intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leoni, L.; Rossi, G.; Catani, F.

    2009-04-01

    The term shallow landslides is widely used in literature to describe a slope movement of limited size that mainly develops in soils up to a maximum of a few meters. Shallow landslides are usually triggered by heavy rainfall because, as the water starts to infiltrate in the soil, the pore-water pressure increases so that the shear strength of the soil is reduced leading to slope failure. We have developed a distributed hydrological-geotechnical model for the forecasting of the temporal and spatial distribution of shallow landslides to be used as a warning system for civil protection purpose. The model uses radar detected rainfall intensity as the input for the hydrological simulation of the infiltration. Using the rainfall pattern detected by the radar is in fact possible to dynamically control the redistribution of groundwater pressure associated with transient infiltration of rain so as to infer the slope stability of the studied area. The model deals with both saturated and unsaturated conditions taking into account the effect of soil suction when the soil is not completely saturated. Two pilot sites have been chosen to develop and test this model: the Armea basin (Liguria, Italy) and the Ischia Island (Campania, Italy). In recent years several severe rainstorms have occurred in both these areas. In at least two cases these have triggered numerous shallow landslides that have caused victims and damaged roads, buildings and agricultural activities. In its current stage, the basic basin-scale model applied for predicting the probable location of shallow landslides involves several stand-alone components. The solution suggested by Iverson for the Richards equation is used to estimate the transient groundwater pressure head distribution according to radar detected rainfall intensity. A soil depth prediction scheme and a limit-equilibrium infinite slope stability algorithm are used to calculate the distributed factor of safety (FS) at different depths and to record

  2. An improved CAMRAD model for aeroelastic stability analysis of the XV-15 with advanced technology blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    In pursuit of higher performance, the XV-15 Tiltrotor Research Aircraft was modified by the installation of new composite rotor blades. Initial flights with the Advanced Technology Blades (ATB's) revealed excessive rotor control loads that were traced to a dynamic mismatch between the blades and the aircraft control system. The analytical models of both the blades and the mechanical controls were extensively revised for use by the CAMRAD computer program to better predict aeroelastic stability and loads. This report documents the most important revisions and discusses their effects on aeroelastic stability predictions for airplane-mode flight. The ATB's may be flown in several different configurations for research, including changes in blade sweep and tip twist. The effects on stability of 1 deg and 0 deg sweep are illustrated, as are those of twisted and zero-twist tips. This report also discusses the effects of stiffening the rotor control system, which was done by locking out lateral cyclic swashplate motion with shims.

  3. Rock Cavern Stability Analysis Under Different Hydro-Geological Conditions Using the Coupled Hydro-Mechanical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. M.; Zhao, Z. Y.; Choo, L. Q.; Sun, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Rock cavern stability has a close relationship with the uncertain geological parameters, such as the in situ stress, the joint configurations, and the joint mechanical properties. Therefore, the stability of the rock cavern should be studied with variable geological conditions. In this paper, the coupled hydro-mechanical model, which is under the framework of the discontinuous deformation analysis, is developed to study the underground cavern stability when considering the hydraulic pressure after excavation. Variable geological conditions are taken into account to study their impacts on the seepage rate and the cavern stability, including the in situ stress ratio, joint spacing, and joint dip angle. In addition, the two cases with static hydraulic pressure and without hydraulic pressure are also considered for the comparison. The numerical simulations demonstrate that the coupled approach can capture the cavern behavior better than the other two approaches without the coupling effects.

  4. Stability analysis, modeling, simulation and experimental testing of an EMS Maglev system with structural flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasoge, Aravind M.

    Vehicle-guideway interaction studies of Magnetically Levitated (Maglev) vehicles indicate that structural flexibility can adversely affect the overall stability and performance of such systems. This is one of the reasons why guideways are generally made very rigid. This in turn leads to increased cost of the overall system since guideway construction forms a significant portion of the overall cost. In this dissertation, the influence of structural flexibility on the stability of Electromagnetic Suspension (EMS) Maglev systems is studied. It is shown how inherently unstable and flexible structure EMS Maglev systems can achieve guaranteed stability by using collocated actuators and sensors, along with de-centralized Proportional plus Derivative (PD) controllers. These results are valid even in the presence of Track/Guideway flexibility. A detailed dynamic model is developed for the EMS Maglev demonstration system (Test Bogie) currently under research and development at Old Dominion University (ODU). This model incorporates structural dynamics with flexible modes of vibration, non-linear electrodynamics, feedback controllers, discrete time implementation, noise filters and disturbance inputs. This model is validated via real time experimental testing. The model thus validated is used for simulation case studies involving levitation and lateral disturbance, lateral control, and centralized control.

  5. Stability analysis of simple models for immune cells interacting with normal pathogens and immune system retroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Reibnegger, G; Fuchs, D; Hausen, A; Werner, E R; Werner-Felmayer, G; Dierich, M P; Wachter, H

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical analysis is presented for several simple dynamical systems that might be considered as crude descriptions for the situation when an immune system retrovirus, immune cells, and normal autonomously replicating pathogens interact. By stability analysis of the steady-state solutions, the destabilizing effect of the immune system retrovirus is described. The qualitative behavior of the solutions depending on the system parameters is analyzed in terms of trajectories moving in a phase space in which the axes are defined by the population numbers of the interacting biological entities. PMID:2522657

  6. Variational formulation and stability analysis of a three dimensional superelastic model for shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessi, Roberto; Pham, Kim

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a variational framework for the three-dimensional macroscopic modelling of superelastic shape memory alloys in an isothermal setting. Phase transformation is accounted through a unique second order tensorial internal variable, acting as the transformation strain. Postulating the total strain energy density as the sum of a free energy and a dissipated energy, the model depends on two material scalar functions of the norm of the transformation strain and a material scalar constant. Appropriate calibration of these material functions allows to render a wide range of constitutive behaviours including stress-softening and stress-hardening. The quasi-static evolution problem of a domain is formulated in terms of two physical principles based on the total energy of the system: a stability criterion, which selects the local minima of the total energy, and an energy balance condition, which ensures the consistency of the evolution of the total energy with respect to the external loadings. The local phase transformation laws in terms of Kuhn-Tucker relations are deduced from the first-order stability condition and the energy balance condition. The response of the model is illustrated with a numerical traction-torsion test performed on a thin-walled cylinder. Evolutions of homogeneous states are given for proportional and non-proportional loadings. Influence of the stress-hardening/softening properties on the evolution of the transformation domain is emphasized. Finally, in view of an identification process, the issue of stability of homogeneous states in a multi-dimensional setting is answered based on the study of second-order derivative of the total energy. Explicit necessary and sufficient conditions of stability are provided.

  7. Stability analysis of ecomorphodynamic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bärenbold, F.; Crouzy, B.; Perona, P.

    2016-02-01

    In order to shed light on the influence of riverbed vegetation on river morphodynamics, we perform a linear stability analysis on a minimal model of vegetation dynamics coupled with classical one- and two-dimensional Saint-Venant-Exner equations of morphodynamics. Vegetation is modeled as a density field of rigid, nonsubmerged cylinders and affects flow via a roughness change. Furthermore, vegetation is assumed to develop following a logistic dependence and may be uprooted by flow. First, we perform the stability analysis of the reduced one-dimensional framework. As a result of the competitive interaction between vegetation growth and removal through uprooting, we find a domain in the parameter space where originally straight rivers are unstable toward periodic longitudinal patterns. For realistic values of the sediment transport parameter, the dominant longitudinal wavelength is determined by the parameters of the vegetation model. Bed topography is found to adjust to the spatial pattern fixed by vegetation. Subsequently, the stability analysis is repeated for the two-dimensional framework, where the system may evolve toward alternate or multiple bars. On a fixed bed, we find instability toward alternate bars due to flow-vegetation interaction, but no multiple bars. Both alternate and multiple bars are present on a movable, vegetated bed. Finally, we find that the addition of vegetation to a previously unvegetated riverbed favors instability toward alternate bars and thus the development of a single course rather than braiding.

  8. Stability analysis of a model gene network links aging, stress resistance, and negligible senescence

    PubMed Central

    Kogan, Valeria; Molodtsov, Ivan; Menshikov, Leonid I.; Reis, Robert J. Shmookler; Fedichev, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Several animal species are considered to exhibit what is called negligible senescence, i.e. they do not show signs of functional decline or any increase of mortality with age. Recent studies in naked mole rat and long-lived sea urchins showed that these species do not alter their gene-expression profiles with age as much as other organisms do. This is consistent with exceptional endurance of naked mole rat tissues to various genotoxic stresses. We conjectured, therefore, that the lifelong transcriptional stability of an organism may be a key determinant of longevity. We analyzed the stability of a simple genetic-network model and found that under most common circumstances, such a gene network is inherently unstable. Over a time it undergoes an exponential accumulation of gene-regulation deviations leading to death. However, should the repair systems be sufficiently effective, the gene network can stabilize so that gene damage remains constrained along with mortality of the organism. We investigate the relationship between stress-resistance and aging and suggest that the unstable regime may provide a mathematical basis for the Gompertz “law” of aging in many species. At the same time, this model accounts for the apparently age-independent mortality observed in some exceptionally long-lived animals. PMID:26316217

  9. Stability analysis of a model gene network links aging, stress resistance, and negligible senescence.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Valeria; Molodtsov, Ivan; Menshikov, Leonid I; Shmookler Reis, Robert J; Fedichev, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Several animal species are considered to exhibit what is called negligible senescence, i.e. they do not show signs of functional decline or any increase of mortality with age. Recent studies in naked mole rat and long-lived sea urchins showed that these species do not alter their gene-expression profiles with age as much as other organisms do. This is consistent with exceptional endurance of naked mole rat tissues to various genotoxic stresses. We conjectured, therefore, that the lifelong transcriptional stability of an organism may be a key determinant of longevity. We analyzed the stability of a simple genetic-network model and found that under most common circumstances, such a gene network is inherently unstable. Over a time it undergoes an exponential accumulation of gene-regulation deviations leading to death. However, should the repair systems be sufficiently effective, the gene network can stabilize so that gene damage remains constrained along with mortality of the organism. We investigate the relationship between stress-resistance and aging and suggest that the unstable regime may provide a mathematical basis for the Gompertz "law" of aging in many species. At the same time, this model accounts for the apparently age-independent mortality observed in some exceptionally long-lived animals. PMID:26316217

  10. A Generalized Stability Analysis of the AMOC in Earth System Models: Implication for Decadal Variability and Abrupt Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, Alexey V.; Fedorov, Alexey

    2015-01-14

    The central goal of this research project was to understand the mechanisms of decadal and multi-decadal variability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) as related to climate variability and abrupt climate change within a hierarchy of climate models ranging from realistic ocean models to comprehensive Earth system models. Generalized Stability Analysis, a method that quantifies the transient and asymptotic growth of perturbations in the system, is one of the main approaches used throughout this project. The topics we have explored range from physical mechanisms that control AMOC variability to the factors that determine AMOC predictability in the Earth system models, to the stability and variability of the AMOC in past climates.

  11. The stability of the extended model of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis examined by stoichiometric network analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, V. M.; Čupić, Ž.; Ivanović, A.; Kolar-Anić, Lj.

    2011-12-01

    Stoichiometric network analysis (SNA) represents a powerful mathematical tool for stability analysis of complex stoichiometric networks. Recently, the important improvement of the method has been made, according to which instability relations can be entirely expressed via reaction rates, instead of thus far used, in general case undefined, current rates. Such an improved SNA methodology was applied to the determination of exact instability conditions of the extended model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, a neuroendocrinological system, whose hormone concentrations exert complex oscillatory evolution. For emergence of oscillations, the Hopf bifurcation condition was utilized. Instability relations predicted by SNA showed good correlation with numerical simulation data of the HPA axis model.

  12. Stability Analysis of SIR Model with Distributed Delay on Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuangxia; Cao, Jie; Wen, Fenghua; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, by taking full consideration of distributed delay, demographics and contact heterogeneity of the individuals, we present a detailed analytical study of the Susceptible-Infected-Removed (SIR) epidemic model on complex population networks. The basic reproduction number [Formula: see text] of the model is dominated by the topology of the underlying network, the properties of individuals which include birth rate, death rate, removed rate and infected rate, and continuously distributed time delay. By constructing suitable Lyapunov functional and employing Kirchhoff's matrix tree theorem, we investigate the globally asymptotical stability of the disease-free and endemic equilibrium points. Specifically, the system shows threshold behaviors: if [Formula: see text], then the disease-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable, otherwise the endemic equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable. Furthermore, the obtained results show that SIR models with different types of delays have different converge time in the process of contagion: if [Formula: see text], then the system with distributed time delay stabilizes fastest; while [Formula: see text], the system with distributed time delay converges most slowly. The validness and effectiveness of these results are demonstrated through numerical simulations. PMID:27490363

  13. Stability Analysis of SIR Model with Distributed Delay on Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chuangxia; Cao, Jie; Wen, Fenghua; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, by taking full consideration of distributed delay, demographics and contact heterogeneity of the individuals, we present a detailed analytical study of the Susceptible-Infected-Removed (SIR) epidemic model on complex population networks. The basic reproduction number R0 of the model is dominated by the topology of the underlying network, the properties of individuals which include birth rate, death rate, removed rate and infected rate, and continuously distributed time delay. By constructing suitable Lyapunov functional and employing Kirchhoff’s matrix tree theorem, we investigate the globally asymptotical stability of the disease-free and endemic equilibrium points. Specifically, the system shows threshold behaviors: if R0≤1, then the disease-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable, otherwise the endemic equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable. Furthermore, the obtained results show that SIR models with different types of delays have different converge time in the process of contagion: if R0>1, then the system with distributed time delay stabilizes fastest; while R0≤1, the system with distributed time delay converges most slowly. The validness and effectiveness of these results are demonstrated through numerical simulations. PMID:27490363

  14. A simplified spatial model for BWR stability

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Y.; Lederer, Y.; Meron, E.

    2012-07-01

    A spatial reduced order model for the study of BWR stability, based on the phenomenological model of March-Leuba et al., is presented. As one dimensional spatial dependence of the neutron flux, fuel temperature and void fraction is introduced, it is possible to describe both global and regional oscillations of the reactor power. Both linear stability analysis and numerical analysis were applied in order to describe the parameters which govern the model stability. The results were found qualitatively similar to past results. Doppler reactivity feedback was found essential for the explanation of the different regions of the flow-power stability map. (authors)

  15. PrimeSupplier Cross-Program Impact Analysis and Supplier Stability Indicator Simulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calluzzi, Michael

    2009-01-01

    PrimeSupplier, a supplier cross-program and element-impact simulation model, with supplier solvency indicator (SSI), has been developed so that the shuttle program can see early indicators of supplier and product line stability, while identifying the various elements and/or programs that have a particular supplier or product designed into the system. The model calculates two categories of benchmarks to determine the SSI, with one category focusing on agency programmatic data and the other focusing on a supplier's financial liquidity. PrimeSupplier was developed to help NASA smoothly transition design, manufacturing, and repair operations from the Shuttle program to the Constellation program, without disruption in the industrial supply base.

  16. Stability analysis of an HIV/AIDS epidemic model with treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Liming; Li, Xuezhi; Ghosh, Mini; Guo, Baozhu

    2009-07-01

    An HIV/AIDS epidemic model with treatment is investigated. The model allows for some infected individuals to move from the symptomatic phase to the asymptomatic phase by all sorts of treatment methods. We first establish the ODE treatment model with two infective stages. Mathematical analyses establish that the global dynamics of the spread of the HIV infectious disease are completely determined by the basic reproduction number [real]0. If [real]0<=1, the disease-free equilibrium is globally stable, whereas the unique infected equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable if [real]0>1. Then, we introduce a discrete time delay to the model to describe the time from the start of treatment in the symptomatic stage until treatment effects become visible. The effect of the time delay on the stability of the endemically infected equilibrium is investigated. Moreover, the delay model exhibits Hopf bifurcations by using the delay as a bifurcation parameter. Finally, numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the results.

  17. Implementation of a Single-Stage-To-Orbit (SSTO) model for stability and control analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingalls, Stephen A.

    1995-01-01

    Three NASA centers: Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Langley Research Center (LaRC), and Johnson Space Center (JSC) are currently involved in studying a family of single-stage- and two-stage-to-orbit (SSTO/TSTO) vehicles to serve as the next generation space transportation system (STS). A rocketed winged-body is the current focus. The configuration (WB001) is a vertically-launched, horizontally-landing system with circular cross-section. Preliminary aerodynamic data was generated by LaRC and is a combination of wind-tunnel data, empirical methods, and Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System-(APAS) generated values. JSC's efforts involve descent trajectory design, stability analysis, and flight control system synthesis. Analysis of WB001's static stability indicates instability in 'tuck' (C(sub mu) less than 0: Mach = 0.30, alpha greater than 3.25 deg; Mach = 0.60, alpha greater than 8.04), an unstable dihedral effects (C(sub l(beta)) greater than 0: Mach = 30,alpha less than 12 deg.; Mach = 0.60, alpha less than 10.00 deg.), and, most significantly, an unstable weathercock stability derivative, C(sub n(beta)), at all angles of attack and subsonic Mach numbers. Longitudinal trim solutions for Mach = 0.30 and 0.60 indicate flight path angle possibilities ranging from around 12 (M = 0.30) to slightly over 20 degrees at Mach = 0.60. Trim angles of attack increase from 6.24 at Mach 0.60 and 10,000 feet to 17.7 deg. at Mach 0.30, sea-level. Lateral trim was attempted for a design cross-wind of 25.0 knots. The current vehicle aerodynamic and geometric characteristics will only yield a lateral trim solution at impractical tip-fin deflections (approximately equal to 43 deg.) and bank angles (21 deg.). A study of the lateral control surfaces, tip-fin controllers for WB001, indicate increased surface area would help address these instabilities, particularly the deficiency in C(sub n(beta)), but obviously at the expense of increased vehicle weight. Growth factors of

  18. Stability of the human respiratory control system. I. Analysis of a two-dimensional delay state-space model.

    PubMed

    Batzel, J J; Tran, H T

    2000-07-01

    A number of mathematical models of the human respiratory control system have been developed since 1940 to study a wide range of features of this complex system. Among them, periodic breathing (including Cheyne-Stokes respiration and apneustic breathing) is a collection of regular but involuntary breathing patterns that have important medical implications. The hypothesis that periodic breathing is the result of delay in the feedback signals to the respiratory control system has been studied since the work of Grodins et al. in the early 1950's [12]. The purpose of this paper is to study the stability characteristics of a feedback control system of five differential equations with delays in both the state and control variables presented by Khoo et al. [17] in 1991 for modeling human respiration. The paper is divided in two parts. Part I studies a simplified mathematical model of two nonlinear state equations modeling arterial partial pressures of O2 and CO2 and a peripheral controller. Analysis was done on this model to illuminate the effect of delay on the stability. It shows that delay dependent stability is affected by the controller gain, compartmental volumes and the manner in which changes in the ventilation rate is produced (i.e., by deeper breathing or faster breathing). In addition, numerical simulations were performed to validate analytical results. Part II extends the model in Part I to include both peripheral and central controllers. This, however, necessitates the introduction of a third state equation modeling CO2 levels in the brain. In addition to analytical studies on delay dependent stability, it shows that the decreased cardiac output (and hence increased delay) resulting from the congestive heart condition can induce instability at certain control gain levels. These analytical results were also confirmed by numerical simulations. PMID:10958415

  19. Stability of the human respiratory control system. II. Analysis of a three-dimensional delay state-space model.

    PubMed

    Batzel, J J; Tran, H T

    2000-07-01

    A number of mathematical models of the human respiratory control system have been developed since 1940 to study a wide range of features of this complex system. Among them, periodic breathing (including Cheyne-Stokes respiration and apneustic breathing) is a collection of regular but involuntary breathing patterns that have important medical implications. The hypothesis that periodic breathing is the result of delay in the feedback signals to the respiratory control system has been studied since the work of Grodins et al. in the early 1950's [1]. The purpose of this paper is to study the stability characteristics of a feedback control system of five differential equations with delays in both the state and control variables presented by Khoo et al. [4] in 1991 for modeling human respiration. The paper is divided in two parts. Part I studies a simplified mathematical model of two nonlinear state equations modeling arterial partial pressures of O2 and CO2 and a peripheral controller. Analysis was done on this model to illuminate the effect of delay on the stability. It shows that delay dependent stability is affected by the controller gain, compartmental volumes and the manner in which changes in the ventilation rate is produced (i.e., by deeper breathing or faster breathing). In addition, numerical simulations were performed to validate analytical results. Part II extends the model in Part I to include both peripheral and central controllers. This, however, necessitates the introduction of a third state equation modeling CO2 levels in the brain. In addition to analytical studies on delay dependent stability, it shows that the decreased cardiac output (and hence increased delay) resulting from the congestive heart condition can induce instability at certain control gain levels. These analytical results were also confirmed by numerical simulations. PMID:10958416

  20. Modeling and stability analysis for the upper atmosphere research satellite auxiliary array switch component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfgang, R.; Natarajan, T.; Day, J.

    1987-01-01

    A feedback control system, called an auxiliary array switch, was designed to connect or disconnect auxiliary solar panel segments from a spacecraft electrical bus to meet fluctuating demand for power. A simulation of the control system was used to carry out a number of design and analysis tasks that could not economically be performed with a breadboard of the hardware. These tasks included: (1) the diagnosis of a stability problem, (2) identification of parameters to which the performance of the control system was particularly sensitive, (3) verification that the response of the control system to anticipated fluctuations in the electrical load of the spacecraft was satisfactory, and (4) specification of limitations on the frequency and amplitude of the load fluctuations.

  1. Stability analysis of operator splitting for large-scale ocean modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Higdon, R.L.; Bennett, A.F.

    1996-02-01

    The ocean plays a crucial role in the earth`s climate system, and an improved understanding of that role will be aided greatly by high-resolution simulations of global ocean circulation over periods of many years. For such simulations the computational requirements are extremely demanding and maximum efficiency is essential. However, the governing equations typically used for ocean modeling admit wave velocities having widely varying magnitudes, and this situation can create serious problems with the efficiency of numerical algorithms. One common approach to resolving these problems is to split the fast and slow dynamics into separate sub-problems. The fast motions are nearly independent of depth, and it is natural to try to model these motions with a two-dimensional system of equations. These fast equations could be solved with an implicit time discretization or with an explicit method with short time steps. The slow motions would then be modeled with a three-dimensional system that is solved explicitly with long time steps that are determined by the slow wave speeds. However, if the splitting is inexact, then the equations that model the slow motions might actually contain some fast components, so the stability of explicit algorithms for the slow equations could come into doubt. In this paper we discuss some general features of the operator splitting problem, and we then describe an example of such a splitting and show that instability can arise in that case. 21 refs., 7 figs.

  2. MAP stability, design, and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson-Jackson, A. J.; Andrews, S. F.; O'Donnell, J. R., Jr.; Markley, F. L.

    1998-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) is a follow-on to the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft. The design and analysis of the MAP attitude control system (ACS) have been refined since work previously reported. The full spacecraft and instrument flexible model was developed in NASTRAN, and the resulting flexible modes were plotted and reduced with the Modal Significance Analysis Package (MSAP). The reduced-order model was used to perform the linear stability analysis for each control mode, the results of which are presented in this paper. Although MAP is going to a relatively disturbance-free Lissajous orbit around the Earth-Sun L(2) Lagrange point, a detailed disturbance-torque analysis is required because there are only a small number of opportunities for momentum unloading each year. Environmental torques, including solar pressure at L(2), aerodynamic and gravity gradient during phasing-loop orbits, were calculated and simulated. Thruster plume impingement torques that could affect the performance of the thruster modes were estimated and simulated, and a simple model of fuel slosh was derived to model its effect on the motion of the spacecraft. In addition, a thruster mode linear impulse controller was developed to meet the accuracy requirements of the phasing loop burns. A dynamic attitude error limiter was added to improve the performance of the ACS during large attitude slews. The result of this analysis is a stable ACS subsystem that meets all of the mission's requirements.

  3. Stability analysis and optimal control of an epidemic model with awareness programs by media.

    PubMed

    Misra, A K; Sharma, Anupama; Shukla, J B

    2015-12-01

    The impact of awareness campaigns and behavioral responses on epidemic outbreaks has been reported at times. However, to what extent does the provision of awareness and behavioral changes affect the epidemic trajectory is unknown, but important from the public health standpoint. To address this question, we formulate a mathematical model to study the effect of awareness campaigns by media on the outbreak of an epidemic. The awareness campaigns are treated as an intervention for the emergent disease. These awareness campaigns divide the whole populations into two subpopulation; aware and unaware, by inducing behavioral changes amongst them. The awareness campaigns are included explicitly as a separate dynamic variable in the modeling process. The model is analyzed qualitatively using stability theory of differential equations. We have also identified an optimal implementation rate of awareness campaigns so that disease can be controlled with minimal possible expenditure on awareness campaigns, using optimal control theory. The control setting is investigated analytically using optimal control theory, and the numerical solutions illustrating the optimal regimens under various assumptions are also shown. PMID:26551557

  4. Stochastic stability and instability of model ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladde, G. S.; Siljak, D. D.

    1975-01-01

    In this work, we initiate a stability study of multispecies communities in stochastic environment by using Ito's differential equations as community models. By applying the direct method of Liapunov, we obtain sufficient conditions for stability and instability in the mean of the equilibrium populations. The conditions are expressed in terms of the dominant diagonal property of community matrices, which is a suitable mechanism for resolving the central problem of 'complexity vs stability' in model ecosystems. As a by-product of this analysis we exhibit important structural properties of the stochastic density-dependent models, and establish tolerance of community stability to a broad class of nonlinear time-varying perturbations.

  5. Stability Analysis for Cellinoid Shape Model in Inverse Process from Lightcurves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiao-Ping; Ip, Wing-Huen; Song, Yun-Lin; Zhao, Hai-Bin

    2016-04-01

    the cellinoid shape model. Then the regularization tools and constraints could be added in the inverse algorithm to limit the parameter space for saving the computational cost and enhancing the stability of the algorithm. References: [1] Lu X.-P. et al.(2014) Earth,Moon and Planet. 112, 73-87 [2] Lu X.-P. et al.(2015) Planetary and Space Science. 108, 31-40 [3] Lu X.-P. et al.(2016) Icarus. 267, 24-33

  6. Stochastic modeling of high-stability ground clocks in GPS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kan; Rothacher, Markus

    2013-05-01

    In current global positioning system (GPS) applications, receiver clocks are typically estimated epoch-wise in the data analyses even for clocks with high performance like Hydrogen-masers (H-maser). Applying an appropriate clock model for high-stability receiver clocks should, in view of the strong correlation between the station height and the clock parameters, significantly improve the positioning results. Recent experiments have shown that modeling the deterministic behavior of high-quality receiver clocks can improve the kinematic precise point positioning considerably. In this paper, well-behaving ground clocks are studied in detail applying constraints between subsequent and near-subsequent clock parameters. The influence of different weights for these relative clock constraints on the positioning quality, especially on the height, is investigated. For excellent clocks, an improvement of up to a factor of 3 can be obtained for the repeatability of the kinematic height estimates. This may be essential to detect small but sudden changes in the vertical component (e.g., caused by earthquakes). Troposphere zenith path delays (ZPD) are also heavily correlated with the receiver clock estimates and station heights. All these parameters are usually estimated simultaneously. We show that the use of relative clock constraints allows for a higher time resolution of the ZPD estimates (smaller than 2 h) without compromising the quality of the kinematic height estimates.

  7. Stability analysis of multi-group deterministic and stochastic epidemic models with vaccination rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Gao, Rui-Mei; Fan, Xiao-Ming; Han, Qi-Xing

    2014-09-01

    We discuss in this paper a deterministic multi-group MSIR epidemic model with a vaccination rate, the basic reproduction number ℛ0, a key parameter in epidemiology, is a threshold which determines the persistence or extinction of the disease. By using Lyapunov function techniques, we show if ℛ0 is greater than 1 and the deterministic model obeys some conditions, then the disease will prevail, the infective persists and the endemic state is asymptotically stable in a feasible region. If ℛ0 is less than or equal to 1, then the infective disappear so the disease dies out. In addition, stochastic noises around the endemic equilibrium will be added to the deterministic MSIR model in order that the deterministic model is extended to a system of stochastic ordinary differential equations. In the stochastic version, we carry out a detailed analysis on the asymptotic behavior of the stochastic model. In addition, regarding the value of ℛ0, when the stochastic system obeys some conditions and ℛ0 is greater than 1, we deduce the stochastic system is stochastically asymptotically stable. Finally, the deterministic and stochastic model dynamics are illustrated through computer simulations.

  8. Stability analysis for the flow of granular materials down an inclined plane using kinetic model. Quarterly report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopal, K.R.

    1993-07-01

    In the previous report the linearized stability equations for the flow of granular materials down an inclined plane, modeled by the kinetic constitutive theory [cf Richman & Marciniec (1990)] were derived. Here, we use the approximate solution of Richman & Marciniec (1990) as the base solution for the linearized stability analysis. The governing equations obtained are solved numerically to obtain the marginal stability curves which are presented in this report.

  9. Empirical evidence and stability analysis of the linear car-following model with gamma-distributed memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Xin; Pan, Yan; Wang, Haixin; Wong, S. C.; Choi, Keechoo

    2016-05-01

    Car-following models, which describe the reactions of the driver of a following car to the changes of the leading car, are essential for the development of traffic flow theory. A car-following model with a stochastic memory effect is considered to be more realistic in modeling drivers' behavior. Because a gamma-distributed memory function has been shown to outperform other forms according to empirical data, in this study, we thus focus on a car-following model with a gamma-distributed memory effect; analytical and numerical studies are then conducted for stability analysis. Accordingly, the general expression of undamped and stability points is achieved by analytical study. The numerical results show great agreement with the analytical results: introducing the effect of the driver's memory causes the stable regions to weaken slightly, but the metastable region is obviously enlarged. In addition, a numerical study is performed to further analyze the variation of the stable and unstable regions with respect to the different profiles of gamma distribution.

  10. Analysis and test evaluation of the dynamic stability of three advanced turboprop models at zero forward speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Arthur F.

    1985-01-01

    Results of static stability wind tunnel tests of three 62.2 cm (24.5 in) diameter models of the Prop-Fan are presented. Measurements of blade stresses were made with the Prop-Fans mounted on an isolated nacelle in an open 5.5 m (18 ft) wind tunnel test section with no tunnel flow. The tests were conducted in the United Technology Research Center Large Subsonic Wind Tunnel. Stall flutter was determined by regions of high stress, which were compared with predictions of boundaries of zero total viscous damping. The structural analysis used beam methods for the model with straight blades and finite element methods for the models with swept blades. Increasing blade sweep tends to suppress stall flutter. Comparisons with similar test data acquired at NASA/Lewis are good. Correlations between measured and predicted critical speeds for all the models are good. The trend of increased stability with increased blade sweep is well predicted. Calculated flutter boundaries generaly coincide with tested boundaries. Stall flutter is predicted to occur in the third (torsion) mode. The straight blade test shows third mode response, while the swept blades respond in other modes.

  11. Stability analysis of free piston Stirling engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bégot, Sylvie; Layes, Guillaume; Lanzetta, François; Nika, Philippe

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a stability analysis of a free piston Stirling engine. The model and the detailed calculation of pressures losses are exposed. Stability of the machine is studied by the observation of the eigenvalues of the model matrix. Model validation based on the comparison with NASA experimental results is described. The influence of operational and construction parameters on performance and stability issues is exposed. The results show that most parameters that are beneficial for machine power seem to induce irregular mechanical characteristics with load, suggesting that self-sustained oscillations could be difficult to maintain and control.

  12. Stability analysis of the ODE model representation of amyloidogenic processing in Alzheimer's disease in the presence of SORLA.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, Jan Harold M; Lao, Angelyn R; Ruivivar, Leonor A

    2016-04-26

    The proteolytic breakdown of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by secretases is a complex cellular process that results in the formation of neurotoxic Aβ peptides, causative of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Processing involves monomeric and dimeric forms of APP that are transported through distinct cellular compartments where the various secretases reside. Amyloidogenic processing is also influenced by modifiers such as sorting receptor-related protein (SORLA), an inhibitor of APP breakdown and a major AD risk factor. This paper analyzed the temporal behavior of a mathematical model describing APP processing under the influence of SORLA, by performing a stability analysis of the mathematical model. We found one biochemically meaningful equilibrium point ξ. By means of linearization, Hartman-Grobman theorem, and Routh-Hurwitz test, it was shown that ξ is a locally asymptotically stable equilibrium point. The region of attraction of ξ was approximated by using the fluctuation lemma. An immediate consequence of the stability analysis of the reduced system to the temporal behavior of the solutions of the original system was also obtained. The biological implications of these results for the dynamic behavior of the activity of APP and secretases under SORLA's influence were established. PMID:26980455

  13. Evaluation of Reinforcement and Analysis of Stability of a High-Arch Dam Based on Geomechanical Model Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Liu, Y. R.; Yang, Q.

    2015-03-01

    Reinforcement measures are often used in high-arch dams with complicated geological foundations. The geomechanical model test is an effective method to study the global stability of arch dams and to evaluate the reinforcement effects of foundation treatments. The block masonry technique was developed to simulate the jointed rock mass, tectonic discontinuities, and reinforcement measures. A tailor-made low-strength binder and small blocks were developed to simulate the strength and deformation of the jointed rock mass and discontinuities, respectively. We applied this technique to geomechanical model tests of the Dagangshan arch dam with and without foundation reinforcements. A rupture test was conducted, and the stress and displacement distribution of the dam and abutments were recorded; the failure mechanisms and processes were explored. The reinforcement effects of the foundation treatment were evaluated by comparing the test results of the models with and without foundation reinforcements. Our analysis indicates that foundation reinforcements can improve the stress distribution, decrease deformation, prevent slides, reduce fault movement, and improve the global stability of high-arch dams.

  14. Linear stability analysis for an optimum Glauert rotor modelled by an actuator disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. M.; Blackburn, H. M.; Sheridan, J.

    2014-06-01

    We approximate a wind turbine using the Actuator Disc methodology with loading for an optimum Glauert rotor, and vary blade length and tip speed ratio, to determine base flows for linear stability computations at a Reynolds number of 100. Results from such computations suggest that the least stable mode is axisymmetric and insensitive to changes in tip speed operation, suggesting that the stability properties in the farfield wake for an optimised rotor are independent of the chosen tip speed optimization point. Higher azimuthal modes promote greater variation in velocities and may be relevant to cases at higher Reynolds numbers.

  15. Lateral stability analysis for X-29A drop model using system identification methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, David L.; Batterson, James G.

    1989-01-01

    A 22-percent dynamically scaled replica of the X-29A forward-swept-wing airplane has been flown in radio-controlled drop tests at the NASA Langley Research Center. A system identification study of the recorded data was undertaken to examine the stability and control derivatives that influence the lateral behavior of this vehicle with particular emphasis on an observed wing rock phenomenon. All major lateral stability derivatives and the damping-in-roll derivative were identified for angles of attack from 5 to 80 degrees by using a data-partitioning methodology and a modified stepwise regression algorithm.

  16. Stability analysis of Western flank of Cumbre Vieja volcano (La Palma) using numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bru, Guadalupe; Gonzalez, Pablo J.; Fernandez-Merodo, Jose A.; Fernandez, Jose

    2016-04-01

    La Palma volcanic island is one of the youngest of the Canary archipelago, being a composite volcano formed by three overlapping volcanic centers. There are clear onshore and offshore evidences of past giant landslides that have occurred during its evolution. Currently, the active Cumbre Vieja volcano is in an early development state (Carracedo et al., 2001). The study of flank instability processes aim to assess, among other hazards, catastrophic collapse and potential tsunami generation. Early studies of the potential instability of Cumbre Vieja volcano western flank have focused on the use of sparse geodetic networks (Moss et al. 1999), surface geological mapping techniques (Day et al. 1999) and offshore bathymetry (Urgeles et al. 1999). Recently, a dense GNSS network and satellite radar interferometry results indicate ground motion consistent with deep-seated creeping processes (Prieto et al. 2009, Gonzalez et al. 2010). In this work, we present a geomechanical advanced numerical model that captures the ongoing deformation processes at Cumbre Vieja. We choose the Finite Elements Method (FEM) which is based in continuum mechanics and is the most used for geotechnical applications. FEM has the ability of using arbitrary geometry, heterogeneities, irregular boundaries and different constitutive models representative of the geotechnical units involved. Our main contribution is the introduction of an inverse approach to constrain the geomechanical parameters using satellite radar interferometry displacements. This is the first application of such approach on a large volcano flank study. We suggest that the use of surface displacements and inverse methods to rigorously constrain the geomechanical model parameter space is a powerful tool to understand volcano flank instability. A particular important result of the studied case is the estimation of displaced rock volume, which is a parameter of critical importance for simulations of Cumbre Vieja tsunamigenic hazard

  17. Dynamic performance modeling and stability analysis of a segmented reflector telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryaciotaki-Boussalis, Helen A.; Briggs, Hugh C.; Ih, Che-Hang CH.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of vibration suppression in segmented reflector telescopes is considered. The decomposition of the structure into smaller components is discussed, and control laws for vibration suppression and conditions for stability at the local and global levels are presented. The states of the reflector segments are mapped into ray displacements on the detector plane.

  18. Modeling and Analysis for Tearing Mode Stability in DIII-D Hybrid Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyungjin; Park, J. M.; Murakami, M.; La Haye, R. J.; Na, Yong-Su; DIII-D Team

    2014-10-01

    Plasma rotation in DIII-D hybrid scenario plasmas is found to change the stability of tearing modes (TMs) in a profound manner. It is important to understand the onset threshold and the evolution of TMs for developing a high-performance steady-state fusion reactor. The modified Rutherford equation (MRE) estimates the growth rate of an island and is used to analyze the TM stability. The change in TM stability was investigated in hybrid plasmas with various conditions including rotation, normalized beta, q profile, and so on. The measured island width is larger in low q95 cases and increased as plasma rotation was reduced. The island width calculated by MRE with TM stability index Δ' assumed from its poloidal mode number, -m/r, showed a good agreement during high rotation, but could not be matched to the experimental island width at lower rotation. Simulations of TMs using resistive MHD codes such as NIMROD and PEST3 will also be presented and compared with experiments to determine the possibility for predicting TM onset by Δ' calculation. Work supported in part by the US DOE under DE-AC05-00OR22725 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  19. An Ex Vivo Model in Human Femoral Heads for Histopathological Study and Resonance Frequency Analysis of Dental Implant Primary Stability

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Cortés, Pedro; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Catena, Andrés; Ortega-Oller, Inmaculada; Salas-Pérez, José; Gómez-Sánchez, Rafael; Aguilar, Mariano; Aguilar, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective. This study was designed to explore relationships of resonance frequency analysis (RFA)—assessed implant stability (ISQ values) with bone morphometric parameters and bone quality in an ex vivo model of dental implants placed in human femoral heads and to evaluate the usefulness of this model for dental implant studies. Material and Methods. This ex vivo study included femoral heads from 17 patients undergoing surgery for femoral neck fracture due to osteoporosis (OP) (n = 7) or for total prosthesis joint replacement due to severe hip osteoarthrosis (OA) (n = 10). Sixty 4.5 × 13 mm Dentsply Astra implants were placed, followed by RFA. CD44 immunohistochemical analysis for osteocytes was also carried out. Results. As expected, the analysis yielded significant effects of femoral head type (OA versus OA) (P < 0.001), but not of the implants (P = 0.455) or of the interaction of the two factors (P = 0.848). Bonferroni post hoc comparisons showed a lower mean ISQ for implants in decalcified (50.33 ± 2.92) heads than in fresh (66.93 ± 1.10) or fixated (70.77 ± 1.32) heads (both P < 0.001). The ISQ score (fresh) was significantly higher for those in OA (73.52 ± 1.92) versus OP (67.13 ± 1.09) heads. However, mixed linear analysis showed no significant association between ISQ scores and morphologic or histomorphometric results (P > 0.5 in all cases), and no significant differences in ISQ values were found as a function of the length or area of the cortical layer (both P > 0.08). Conclusion. Although RFA-determined ISQ values are not correlated with morphometric parameters, they can discriminate bone quality (OP versus OA). This ex vivo model is useful for dental implant studies. PMID:24995307

  20. Cosmological Models and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Lars

    Principles in the form of heuristic guidelines or generally accepted dogma play an important role in the development of physical theories. In particular, philosophical considerations and principles figure prominently in the work of Albert Einstein. As mentioned in the talk by Jiří Bičák at this conference, Einstein formulated the equivalence principle, an essential step on the road to general relativity, during his time in Prague 1911-1912. In this talk, I would like to discuss some aspects of cosmological models. As cosmology is an area of physics where "principles" such as the "cosmological principle" or the "Copernican principle" play a prominent role in motivating the class of models which form part of the current standard model, I will start by comparing the role of the equivalence principle to that of the principles used in cosmology. I will then briefly describe the standard model of cosmology to give a perspective on some mathematical problems and conjectures on cosmological models, which are discussed in the later part of this paper.

  1. Stability analysis of the Biot/squirt models for wave propagation in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiawei; Yong, Wen-An

    2016-01-01

    This work is concerned with the Biot/squirt (BISQ) models for wave propagation in saturated porous media. We show that the models allow exponentially exploding solutions, as time goes to infinity, when the characteristic squirt-flow coefficient is negative or has a non-zero imaginary part. We also show that the squirt-flow coefficient does have non-zero imaginary parts for some experimental parameters or for low angular frequencies. Because the models are linear, the existence of such exploding solutions indicates instability of the BISQ models. This result, for the first time, provides a theoretical explanation of the well-known empirical observation that BISQ model is not reliable (not consistent with Gassmann's formula) at low frequencies. It calls on a reconsideration of the widely used BISQ theory. On the other hand, we demonstrate that the 3-D isotropic BISQ model is stable when the squirt-flow coefficient is positive. In particular, the original Biot model is unconditionally stable where the squirt-flow coefficient is 1.

  2. Dynamic stability analysis of torsional vibrations of a shaft system connected by a Hooke's joint through a continuous system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulut, Gökhan

    2014-08-01

    Stability of parametrically excited torsional vibrations of a shaft system composed of two torsionally elastic shafts interconnected through a Hooke's joint is studied. The shafts are considered to be continuous (distributed-parameter) systems and an approximate discrete model for the torsional vibrations of the shaft system is derived via a finite element scheme. The stability of the solutions of the linearized equations of motion, consisting of a set of Mathieu-Hill type equations, is examined by means of a monodromy matrix method and the results are presented in the form of a Strutt-Ince diagram visualizing the effects of the system parameters on the stability of the shaft system.

  3. The Existence and Stability Analysis of the Equilibria in Dengue Disease Infection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggriani, N.; Supriatna, A. K.; Soewono, E.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we formulate an SIR (Susceptible - Infective - Recovered) model of Dengue fever transmission with constant recruitment. We found a threshold parameter K0, known as the Basic Reproduction Number (BRN). This model has two equilibria, disease-free equilibrium and endemic equilibrium. By constructing suitable Lyapunov function, we show that the disease- free equilibrium is globally asymptotic stable whenever BRN is less than one and when it is greater than one, the endemic equilibrium is globally asymptotic stable. Numerical result shows the dynamic of each compartment together with effect of multiple bio-agent intervention as a control to the dengue transmission.

  4. Stability analysis of a simplified model of a fluidized bed combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Trevino, C. ); Herrera, C. ); Garcia-Ybarra, P. )

    1990-06-01

    The transient behavior of a simplified two-phase model of a fluidized bed combustor is analyzed in this article. The chemical reaction assumed was only the heterogeneous reaction C + 1/2 O{sub 2} {r arrow} CO, which is also assumed to be controlled by diffusion. A set of nonlinear perturbation equations, around the steady-state solution, have been obtained. The corresponding set of linearized equations are then solved, obtaining the stable and unstable regions in the parametric space. The system proves to be always stable for the possible parametric set of the present model.

  5. Stability analysis of pine wilt disease model by periodic use of insecticides.

    PubMed

    Awan, Aziz Ullah; Ozair, Muhammad; Din, Qamar; Hussain, Takasar

    2016-12-01

    This work is related to qualitative behaviour of an epidemic model of pine wilt disease. More precisely, we proved that the reproductive number has sharp threshold properties. It has been shown that how vector population can be reduced by the periodic use of insecticides. Numerical simulations show that epidemic level of infected vectors becomes independent of saturation level by including the transmission through mating. PMID:27584035

  6. CFD analysis of baffle flame stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Farmer, Richard C.

    1991-06-01

    A computational fluid dynamics analysis of ignition and combustion in baffle flame stabilized combustors was developed in order to increase the understanding of combustion efficiency and stability. The objectives of this investigation were to develop and verify a computational model of the ignition and combustion of typical augmenter configurations and to generalize the model for application to the combustion occurring in a generic gas turbine engine with augmenters, upstream vitiation, and a downstream chocked nozzle. Triangular bar and cone stabilized flames were simulated. Quasi-global propane and methane kinetics models were employed in the computation. A more detailed methane-air kinetics model was also used. An ignition procedure was devised by initially providing a 1200 K hot spot near the base to start the flame. The recirculation zone lengths of cold and hot flows were well predicted. Time averaged flow quantities were used for data comparisons since the predicted recirculating zones of the reacting flows were unsteady.

  7. Stability, Bifurcation and Chaos Analysis of Vector-Borne Disease Model with Application to Rift Valley Fever

    PubMed Central

    Pedro, Sansao A.; Abelman, Shirley; Ndjomatchoua, Frank T.; Sang, Rosemary; Tonnang, Henri E. Z.

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates a RVF epidemic model by qualitative analysis and numerical simulations. Qualitative analysis have been used to explore the stability dynamics of the equilibrium points while visualization techniques such as bifurcation diagrams, Poincaré maps, maxima return maps and largest Lyapunov exponents are numerically computed to confirm further complexity of these dynamics induced by the seasonal forcing on the mosquitoes oviposition rates. The obtained results show that ordinary differential equation models with external forcing can have rich dynamic behaviour, ranging from bifurcation to strange attractors which may explain the observed fluctuations found in RVF empiric outbreak data, as well as the non deterministic nature of RVF inter-epidemic activities. Furthermore, the coexistence of the endemic equilibrium is subjected to existence of certain number of infected Aedes mosquitoes, suggesting that Aedes have potential to initiate RVF epidemics through transovarial transmission and to sustain low levels of the disease during post epidemic periods. Therefore we argue that locations that may serve as RVF virus reservoirs should be eliminated or kept under control to prevent multi-periodic outbreaks and consequent chains of infections. The epidemiological significance of this study is: (1) low levels of birth rate (in both Aedes and Culex) can trigger unpredictable outbreaks; (2) Aedes mosquitoes are more likely capable of inducing unpredictable behaviour compared to the Culex; (3) higher oviposition rates on mosquitoes do not in general imply manifestation of irregular behaviour on the dynamics of the disease. Finally, our model with external seasonal forcing on vector oviposition rates is able to mimic the linear increase in livestock seroprevalence during inter-epidemic period showing a constant exposure and presence of active transmission foci. This suggests that RVF outbreaks partly build upon RVF inter-epidemic activities. Therefore, active

  8. Enhanced rotor modeling tailored for rub dynamic stability analysis and simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. R.

    1989-01-01

    New methods are presented that allow straightforward application of complex nonlinearities to finite element based rotor dynamic analyses. The key features are: (1) the methods can be implemented with existing finite element or dynamic simulation programs, (2) formulation is general for simple application to a wide range of problems, and (3) implementation is simplified because nonlinear aspects are separated from the linear part of the model. The new techniques are illustrated with examples of inertial nonlinearity and torquewhirl which can be important in rubbing turbomachinery. The sample analyses provide new understanding of these nonlinearities which are discussed.

  9. Jacobi stability analysis of the Lorenz system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Ho, Chor Yin; Leung, Chun Sing; Yip, Stan

    2015-06-01

    We perform the study of the stability of the Lorenz system by using the Jacobi stability analysis, or the Kosambi-Cartan-Chern (KCC) theory. The Lorenz model plays an important role for understanding hydrodynamic instabilities and the nature of the turbulence, also representing a nontrivial testing object for studying nonlinear effects. The KCC theory represents a powerful mathematical method for the analysis of dynamical systems. In this approach, we describe the evolution of the Lorenz system in geometric terms, by considering it as a geodesic in a Finsler space. By associating a nonlinear connection and a Berwald type connection, five geometrical invariants are obtained, with the second invariant giving the Jacobi stability of the system. The Jacobi (in)stability is a natural generalization of the (in)stability of the geodesic flow on a differentiable manifold endowed with a metric (Riemannian or Finslerian) to the non-metric setting. In order to apply the KCC theory, we reformulate the Lorenz system as a set of two second-order nonlinear differential equations. The geometric invariants associated to this system (nonlinear and Berwald connections), and the deviation curvature tensor, as well as its eigenvalues, are explicitly obtained. The Jacobi stability of the equilibrium points of the Lorenz system is studied, and the condition of the stability of the equilibrium points is obtained. Finally, we consider the time evolution of the components of the deviation vector near the equilibrium points.

  10. Stability analysis and optimal control of plant fungal epidemic: An explicit model with curative factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggriani, N.; Putri, L. Nurul; Supriatna, A. K.

    2015-03-01

    Many plants could not escape from diseases caused by fungi. The use of fungicide can help to reduce the spread of the fungi but if it used continuously with the same dosage, the fungi would be invulnerable to fungicide eventually. Hence, it is critical to know the appropriate level of fungicide application and its impact on the dynamics of the plants. In this paper we use an explicit model of fungal outbreaks of plant by taking into account a curative factor including the dynamic of fungicides itself. Granting of fungicide on crops is useful to control the infected plants as well as protecting the vulnerable plants. Optimal control is used to find out how many doses of the appropriate fungicide should be used to cure infected plants. Optimal control is obtained by applying Pontryagin's Minimum Principle. We found that the presence of appropriate level of fungicide speeds up the reduction of infected plants as well as accelerates the growth of healthy plants.

  11. Input to state stability in reservoir models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Markus; Sierra, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Models in ecology and biogeochemistry, in particular models of the global carbon cycle, can be generalized as systems of non-autonomous ordinary differential equations (ODEs). For many applications, it is important to determine the stability properties for this type of systems, but most methods available for autonomous systems are not necessarily applicable for the non-autonomous case. We discuss here stability notions for non-autonomous nonlinear models represented by systems of ODEs explicitly dependent on time and a time-varying input signal. We propose Input to State Stability (ISS) as candidate for the necessary generalization of the established analysis with respect to equilibria or invariant sets for autonomous systems, and show its usefulness by applying it to reservoir models typical for element cycling in ecosystem, e.g. in soil organic matter decomposition. We also show how ISS generalizes existent concepts formerly only available for Linear Time Invariant (LTI) and Linear Time Variant (LTV) systems to the nonlinear case.

  12. The application of the model of coordinate S-transformation for stability analysis of datum points in high-precision GPS deformation monitoring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiming; Zhou, Mingduan; Wang, Chao; Mei, Lianhui

    2012-11-01

    Based on the model of coordinate S-transformation, a novel method of stability analysis of datum points in high-precision GPS deformation monitoring networks is proposed. The model of coordinate S-transformation is used to calculate seven transformation parameters in adjacent two measurement stages, in order to confirm the stability of stations by coordinate differences. To judge the stability of stations, in comparison to the traditional method by a fixed the same datum point, the "threshold approach" and "statistical test approach" have been developed and applied to evaluate the stability of datum points of a first-order GPS deformation monitoring network of a hydropower station located in the West Region of China.

  13. A Combined Remote Sensing-Numerical Modelling Approach to the Stability Analysis of Delabole Slate Quarry, Cornwall, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havaej, Mohsen; Coggan, John; Stead, Doug; Elmo, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Rock slope geometry and discontinuity properties are among the most important factors in realistic rock slope analysis yet they are often oversimplified in numerical simulations. This is primarily due to the difficulties in obtaining accurate structural and geometrical data as well as the stochastic representation of discontinuities. Recent improvements in both digital data acquisition and incorporation of discrete fracture network data into numerical modelling software have provided better tools to capture rock mass characteristics, slope geometries and digital terrain models allowing more effective modelling of rock slopes. Advantages of using improved data acquisition technology include safer and faster data collection, greater areal coverage, and accurate data geo-referencing far exceed limitations due to orientation bias and occlusion. A key benefit of a detailed point cloud dataset is the ability to measure and evaluate discontinuity characteristics such as orientation, spacing/intensity and persistence. This data can be used to develop a discrete fracture network which can be imported into the numerical simulations to study the influence of the stochastic nature of the discontinuities on the failure mechanism. We demonstrate the application of digital terrestrial photogrammetry in discontinuity characterization and distinct element simulations within a slate quarry. An accurately geo-referenced photogrammetry model is used to derive the slope geometry and to characterize geological structures. We first show how a discontinuity dataset, obtained from a photogrammetry model can be used to characterize discontinuities and to develop discrete fracture networks. A deterministic three-dimensional distinct element model is then used to investigate the effect of some key input parameters (friction angle, spacing and persistence) on the stability of the quarry slope model. Finally, adopting a stochastic approach, discrete fracture networks are used as input for 3D

  14. Liapunov stability analysis of spinning flexible spacecraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbera, F. J.; Likins, P.

    1973-01-01

    The attitude stability of a class of spinning flexible spacecraft in a force-free environment is analyzed. The spacecraft is modeled as a rigid core having attached to it a flexible appendage idealized as a collection of elastically interconnected particles. Liapunov stability theorems are employed with the Hamiltonian of the system, constrained through the angular momentum integral so as to admit complete damping, used as a testing function. The Hamiltonian is written in terms of modal coordinates as interpreted by the hybrid coordinate formulation, thus allowing truncation to a level amenable to literal stability analysis. Testing functions are constructed for a spacecraft with an arbitrary (discretized) appendage, and closed form stability criteria are generated for the first mode of a restricted appendage model lying in a plane which contains the center of mass and is orthogonal to the spin axis. The criteria are (except for idealized cases on the stability boundary line in the parameter space) both necessary and sufficient for stability for any spacecraft characterized by the planar appendage model, such as a spacecraft containing solar panels and/or radial booms.

  15. Analysis of the Stability of Teacher-Level Growth Scores from the Student Growth Percentile Model. REL 2016-104

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lash, Andrea; Makkonen, Reino; Tran, Loan; Huang, Min

    2016-01-01

    This study, undertaken at the request of the Nevada Department of Education, examined the stability over years of teacher-level growth scores from the Student Growth Percentile (SGP) model, which many states and districts have selected as a measure of effectiveness in their teacher evaluation systems. The authors conducted a generalizability study…

  16. Euler Technology Assessment - SPLITFLOW Code Applications for Stability and Control Analysis on an Advanced Fighter Model Employing Innovative Control Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Keith J.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents results from the NASA-Langley sponsored Euler Technology Assessment Study conducted by Lockheed-Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems (LMTAS). The purpose of the study was to evaluate the ability of the SPLITFLOW code using viscous and inviscid flow models to predict aerodynamic stability and control of an advanced fighter model. The inviscid flow model was found to perform well at incidence angles below approximately 15 deg, but not as well at higher angles of attack. The results using a turbulent, viscous flow model matched the trends of the wind tunnel data, but did not show significant improvement over the Euler solutions. Overall, the predictions were found to be useful for stability and control design purposes.

  17. Liquid rocket spray combustion stability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1992-01-01

    A computational approach to the analysis of spray combustion stability in liquid rocket combustors is proposed which is based on the unsteady quasi-two-dimensional Euler equations with interphase source terms derived from a Lagrangian treatment of the combusting spray. Based on a preliminary evaluation, the computational methodology presented here is a promising research tool and a potential design/development aid for investigating the stability characteristics of liquid rocket engines. The method is characterized by low numerical noise; the Lagrangian treatment of the spray offers improved flexibility for the direct modeling of spray combustion.

  18. Sensitivity of free bar morphology in rivers to secondary flow modeling: Linear stability analysis and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Toshiki; Shimizu, Yasuyuki; Kimura, Ichiro

    2016-06-01

    A number of numerical models have been proposed to understand and simulate fluvial river morphodynamics; however, it is somewhat unclear whether all the models are able to consistently simulate flow-bed instability phenomena. This study investigates the sensitivity of free bar morphology in rivers to secondary flow models used in depth-averaged models using linear stability analyses and numerical simulations. Both the linear analyses and numerical simulations suggest that under certain hydraulic conditions, an equilibrium-type secondary flow model, which has been widely used in river morphodynamic models, fails to generate a finite wavelength and bar mode, allowing the inception of bars of infinitely short scale and infinitely high mode. Using a nonequilibrium-type secondary flow model avoids the unphysical formation of these incipient free bars, and gives better solutions regarding finite amplitude bars. Since free bars are essential, intrinsic river morphological features, the findings of this study can be applied to a wide range of river morphodynamic calculations.

  19. Stability of Quark Star Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M., Azam; S. A., Mardan; M. A., Rehman

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the stability of quark stars with four different types of inner matter configurations; isotropic, charged isotropic, anisotropic and charged anisotropic by using the concept of cracking. For this purpose, we have applied local density perturbations technique to the hydrostatic equilibrium equation as well as on physical parameters involved in the model. We conclude that quark stars become potentially unstable when inner matter configuration is changed and electromagnetic field is applied.

  20. Analysis and testing of aeroelastic model stability augmentation systems. [for supersonic transport aircraft wing and B-52 aircraft control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevart, F. D.; Patel, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    Testing and evaluation of a stability augmentation system for aircraft flight control were performed. The flutter suppression system and synthesis conducted on a scale model of a supersonic wing for a transport aircraft are discussed. Mechanization and testing of the leading and trailing edge surface actuation systems are described. The ride control system analyses for a 375,000 pound gross weight B-52E aircraft are presented. Analyses of the B-52E aircraft maneuver load control system are included.

  1. Kinetic analysis of thermal stability of human low density lipoproteins: a model for LDL fusion in atherogenesis[S

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Mengxiao; Gantz, Donald L.; Herscovitz, Haya; Gursky, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Fusion of modified LDL in the arterial wall promotes atherogenesis. Earlier we showed that thermal denaturation mimics LDL remodeling and fusion, and revealed kinetic origin of LDL stability. Here we report the first quantitative analysis of LDL thermal stability. Turbidity data show sigmoidal kinetics of LDL heat denaturation, which is unique among lipoproteins, suggesting that fusion is preceded by other structural changes. High activation energy of denaturation, Ea = 100 ± 8 kcal/mol, indicates disruption of extensive packing interactions in LDL. Size-exclusion chromatography, nondenaturing gel electrophoresis, and negative-stain electron microscopy suggest that LDL dimerization is an early step in thermally induced fusion. Monoclonal antibody binding suggests possible involvement of apoB N-terminal domain in early stages of LDL fusion. LDL fusion accelerates at pH < 7, which may contribute to LDL retention in acidic atherosclerotic lesions. Fusion also accelerates upon increasing LDL concentration in near-physiologic range, which likely contributes to atherogenesis. Thermal stability of LDL decreases with increasing particle size, indicating that the pro-atherogenic properties of small dense LDL do not result from their enhanced fusion. Our work provides the first kinetic approach to measuring LDL stability and suggests that lipid-lowering therapies that reduce LDL concentration but increase the particle size may have opposite effects on LDL fusion. PMID:22855737

  2. Numerical Stability and Control Analysis Towards Falling-Leaf Prediction Capabilities of Splitflow for Two Generic High-Performance Aircraft Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlton, Eric F.

    1998-01-01

    Aerodynamic analysis are performed using the Lockheed-Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems (LMTAS) Splitflow computational fluid dynamics code to investigate the computational prediction capabilities for vortex-dominated flow fields of two different tailless aircraft models at large angles of attack and sideslip. These computations are performed with the goal of providing useful stability and control data to designers of high performance aircraft. Appropriate metrics for accuracy, time, and ease of use are determined in consultations with both the LMTAS Advanced Design and Stability and Control groups. Results are obtained and compared to wind-tunnel data for all six components of forces and moments. Moment data is combined to form a "falling leaf" stability analysis. Finally, a handful of viscous simulations were also performed to further investigate nonlinearities and possible viscous effects in the differences between the accumulated inviscid computational and experimental data.

  3. Stability Analysis of Tachocline Latitudinal Differential Rotation and Coexisting Toroidal Band Using a Shallow-Water Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikpati, Mausumi; Gilman, Peter A.; Rempel, Matthias

    2003-10-01

    Recently global, quasi-two-dimensional instabilities of tachocline latitudinal differential rotation have been studied using a so-called shallow-water model. While purely hydrodynamic shallow-water type disturbances were found to destabilize only the overshoot tachocline, the MHD analysis showed that in the presence of a broad toroidal field, both the radiative and overshoot parts of the tachocline can be unstable. We explore here instability in the shallow-water solar tachocline with concentrated toroidal bands placed at a wide range of latitudes, emulating different phases of the solar cycle. In equilibrium, the poleward magnetic curvature stress of the band is balanced either by an equatorward hydrostatic pressure gradient or by the Coriolis force from a prograde jet inside the band. We find that toroidal bands placed almost at all latitudes make the system unstable to shallow-water disturbances. For bands without prograde jets, the instability persists well above 100 kG peak field, while a jet stabilizes the band at a field of ~40 kG. The jet imparts gyroscopic inertia to the toroidal band inhibiting it from unstably ``tipping'' its axis away from rotation axis. Like previously studied HD and MHD shallow-water instabilities in the tachocline, unstable shallow-water modes found here produce kinetic helicity and hence a tachocline α-effect these narrow kinetic helicity profiles should generate narrowly confined poloidal fields, which will help formation of the narrow toroidal field. Toroidal bands poleward of 15° latitude suppress midlatitude hydrodynamic α-effects. However, even strong toroidal bands equatorward of 15° allow this hydrodynamic α-effect. Such bands should occur during the late declining phase of a solar cycle and, thus, could help the onset of a new cycle by switching on the mid latitude α-effect.

  4. Analysis of longwall pillar stability

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, C.

    1987-01-01

    This dissertation proposes a new method for longwall pillar design, developed primarily from underground measurements. This dissertation addresses three areas of direct relevance to longwall pillar design: (1) The magnitude, time-of-arrival, and distribution of the abutment loads applied to longwall pillars; (2) The strength and behavior of coal pillars; (3) The relationship between pillar sizing and entry stability, and other factors affecting the roof/pillar/floor interaction during longwall mining. The research focused on two field studies performed in adjacent longwall panels at a West Virginia coal mine. In each study, measurements of pillar stress, pillar deformation, and entry stability were obtained during and after the approach of the longwall face. Other research included detailed reanalyses of field data from other studies, an in-depth comparative study of available longwall pillar design methods, numerical modeling to determine post-development longwall pillar loads, and an evaluation of two index tests used to determine coal strength. The proposed longwall pillar design method incorporates a new approach to estimating abutment loads hat was developed from the research. The method also employs existing empirical pillar strength formulas that were shown to be applicable to longwall pillars. The proposed design method represents an improvement over the existing methods, because it can be used with designs employing combinations of differently sized pillars, and because it can calculate stability factors for the several different service functions of pillars around a longwall.

  5. Analysis of polytype stability in PVT grown silicon carbide single crystal using competitive lattice model Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hui-Jun; Huang, Wei; Liu, Xi; Gao, Pan; Zhuo, Shi-Yi; Xin, Jun; Yan, Cheng-Feng; Zheng, Yan-Qing; Yang, Jian-Hua; Shi, Er-Wei

    2014-09-01

    Polytype stability is very important for high quality SiC single crystal growth. However, the growth conditions for the 4H, 6H and 15R polytypes are similar, and the mechanism of polytype stability is not clear. The kinetics aspects, such as surface-step nucleation, are important. The kinetic Monte Carlo method is a common tool to study surface kinetics in crystal growth. However, the present lattice models for kinetic Monte Carlo simulations cannot solve the problem of the competitive growth of two or more lattice structures. In this study, a competitive lattice model was developed for kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of the competition growth of the 4H and 6H polytypes of SiC. The site positions are fixed at the perfect crystal lattice positions without any adjustment of the site positions. Surface steps on seeds and large ratios of diffusion/deposition have positive effects on the 4H polytype stability. The 3D polytype distribution in a physical vapor transport method grown SiC ingot showed that the facet preserved the 4H polytype even if the 6H polytype dominated the growth surface. The theoretical and experimental results of polytype growth in SiC suggest that retaining the step growth mode is an important factor to maintain a stable single 4H polytype during SiC growth.

  6. The stability of colorectal cancer mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairudin, Nur Izzati; Abdullah, Farah Aini

    2013-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer. To better understand about the kinetics of cancer growth, mathematical models are used to provide insight into the progression of this natural process which enables physicians and oncologists to determine optimal radiation and chemotherapy schedules and develop a prognosis, both of which are indispensable for treating cancer. This thesis investigates the stability of colorectal cancer mathematical models. We found that continuous saturating feedback is the best available model of colorectal cancer growth. We also performed stability analysis. The result shows that cancer progress in sequence of genetic mutations or epigenetic which lead to a very large number of cells population until become unbounded. The cell population growth initiate and its saturating feedback is overcome when mutation changes causing the net per-capita growth rate of stem or transit cells exceed critical threshold.

  7. Stability analysis of a polymer coating process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallel, A.; Hachem, E.; Demay, Y.; Agassant, J. F.

    2015-05-01

    A new coating process involving a short stretching distance (1 mm) and a high draw ratio (around 200) is considered. The resulting thin molten polymer film (around 10 micrometers) is set down on a solid primary film and then covered by another solid secondary film. In experimental studies, periodical fluctuation in the thickness of the coated layer may be observed. The processing conditions markedly influence the onset and the development of these defects and modeling will help our understanding of their origins. The membrane approach which has been commonly used for cast film modeling is no longer valid and two dimensional time dependent models (within the thickness) are developed in the whole domain (upstream die and stretching path). A boundary-value problem with a free surface for the Stokes equations is considered and stability of the free surface is assessed using two different numerical strategies: a tracking strategy combined with linear stability analysis involving computation of leading eigenvalues, and a Level Set capturing strategy coupled with transient stability analysis.

  8. Phononic band structures and stability analysis using radial basis function method with consideration of different interface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhi-zhong; Wei, Chun-qiu; Zheng, Hui; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a meshless radial basis function (RBF) collocation method is developed to calculate the phononic band structures taking account of different interface models. The present method is validated by using the analytical results in the case of perfect interfaces. The stability is fully discussed based on the types of RBFs, the shape parameters and the node numbers. And the advantages of the proposed RBF method compared to the finite element method (FEM) are also illustrated. In addition, the influences of the spring-interface model and the three-phase model on the wave band gaps are investigated by comparing with the perfect interfaces. For different interface models, the effects of various interface conditions, length ratios and density ratios on the band gap width are analyzed. The comparison results of the two models show that the weakly bonded interface has a significant effect on the properties of phononic crystals. Besides, the band structures of the spring-interface model have certain similarities and differences with those of the three-phase model.

  9. The stability analysis of a general viral infection model with distributed delays and multi-staged infected progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinliang; Liu, Shengqiang

    2015-01-01

    We investigate an in-host model with general incidence and removal rate, as well as distributed delays in virus infections and in productions. By employing Lyapunov functionals and LaSalle's invariance principle, we define and prove the basic reproductive number R0 as a threshold quantity for stability of equilibria. It is shown that if R0 > 1 , then the infected equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable, while if R0 ⩽ 1 , then the infection free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable under some reasonable assumptions. Moreover, n + 1 distributed delays describe (i) the time between viral entry and the transcription of viral RNA, (ii) the n - 1 -stage time needed for activated infected cells between viral RNA transcription and viral release, and (iii) the time necessary for the newly produced viruses to be infectious (maturation), respectively. The model can describe the viral infection dynamics of many viruses such as HIV-1, HCV and HBV.

  10. Stability analysis for the flow of granular materials down an inclined plane using kinetic model. Quarterly report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopal, K.R.

    1992-12-31

    The flow of granular materials down an inclined plane is modeled by the Richman & Marciniec (1990) in which, they consider a kinetic constitutive theory that includes the effects of particle transport and collisions. Richman & Marciniec (1990) obtained closed form solution for the granular temperature profile, by replacing the volume fraction by its depth-averaged value in the balance equation`s, and thereby from constitutive relations for the normal and shear stresses they obtained the volume fraction and velocity profiles. Here, we use the model proposed by Richman & marciniec (1990) to study the linearized stability for the flow of granular materials down an inclined plane. The governing equations are obtained from the conservation of mass, balance of linear momentum and balance of energy. The basic flow equations and the order of {epsilon} equations are derived, but we intend to use the approximate solution of Richman & Marciniec (1990) as the base solution for the linearized stability analysis.

  11. IMFIT Integrated Modeling Applications Supporting Experimental Analysis: Multiple Time-Slice Kinetic EFIT Reconstructions, MHD Stability Limits, and Energy and Momentum Flux Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, A.; Lao, L. L.; Abla, G.; Chu, M. S.; Prater, R.; Smith, S. P.; St. John, H. E.; Guo, W.; Li, G.; Pan, C.; Ren, Q.; Park, J. M.; Bisai, N.; Srinivasan, R.; Sun, A. P.; Liu, Y.; Worrall, M.

    2010-11-01

    This presentation summarizes several useful applications provided by the IMFIT integrated modeling framework to support DIII-D and EAST research. IMFIT is based on Python and utilizes modular task-flow architecture with a central manager and extensive GUI support to coordinate tasks among component modules. The kinetic-EFIT application allows multiple time-slice reconstructions by fetching pressure profile data directly from MDS+ or from ONETWO or PTRANSP. The stability application analyzes a given reference equilibrium for stability limits by performing parameter perturbation studies with MHD codes such as DCON, GATO, ELITE, or PEST3. The transport task includes construction of experimental energy and momentum fluxes from profile analysis and comparison against theoretical models such as MMM95, GLF23, or TGLF.

  12. Stability Analysis of ISS Medications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, V. E.

    2014-01-01

    the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) to measure the amount of intact active ingredient, identify degradation products and measure their amounts. Some analyses were conducted by an independent analytical laboratory, but certain (Schedule) medications could not be shipped to their facility and were analyzed at JSC. RESULTS Nine medications were analyzed with respect to active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and degradant amounts. Results were compared to the USP requirements for API and degradants/impurities content for every FDA-approved medication. One medication met USP requirements at 5 months after its expiration date. Four of the nine (44% of those tested) medications tested met USP requirements up to 8 months post-expiration. Another 3 medications (33% of those tested) met USP guidelines 2-3 months before expiration. One medication, a compound classed by the FDA as a dietary supplement and sometimes used as a sleep aid, failed to meet USP requirements at 11 months post-expiration. CONCLUSION Analysis of each medication at a single time point provides limited information on the stability of a medication stored in particular conditions; it is not possible to predict how long a medication may be safe and effective from these data. Notwithstanding, five of the nine medications tested (56%) met USP requirements for API and degradants/impurities at least 5 months past expiration dates. The single compound that failed to meet USP requirements is not regulated as strictly as prescription medications are during manufacture; it is unknown if this medication would have met the requirements prior to flight. Notably, it was the furthest beyond its expiration date. Only more comprehensive analysis of flight-aged samples compared to appropriate ground controls will permit determination of spaceflight effects on medication stability.

  13. Analysis and test evaluation of the dynamic response and stability of three advanced turboprop models at low forward speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Arthur F.

    1985-01-01

    Results of wind tunnel tests at low forward speed for blade dynamic response and stability of three 62.2 cm (24.5 in) diameter models of the Prop-Fan, advanced turboprop, are presented. Measurements of dynamic response were made with the rotors mounted on an isolated nacelle, with varying tilt for nonuniform inflow. Low speed stall flutter tests were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.0 to 0.35. Measurements are compared to Eigen-solution flutter boundaries. Calculated 1P stress response agrees favorably with experiment. Predicted stall flutter boundaries correlate well with measured high stress regions. Stall flutter is significantly reduced by increased blade sweep. Susceptibility to stall flutter decreases rapidly with forward speed.

  14. Stability of stochastic switched SIRS models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaoying; Liu, Xinzhi; Deng, Feiqi

    2011-11-01

    Stochastic stability problems of a stochastic switched SIRS model with or without distributed time delay are considered. By utilizing the Lyapunov methods, sufficient stability conditions of the disease-free equilibrium are established. Stability conditions about the subsystem of the stochastic switched SIRS systems are also obtained.

  15. Transition prediction using three dimensional stability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    Several methods of transition prediction by linear stability analysis are compared. The spectral stability analysis code SALLY is used to analyze flows over laminar flow control wings. It is shown that transition by the envelope method and a new modified wave packet method are comparable in reliability but that the envelope method is more efficient computationally.

  16. Analysis of cavern and well stability at the West Hackberry SPR site using a full-dome model.

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolik, Steven R.

    2015-08-01

    This report presents computational analyses that simulate the structural response of caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) West Hackberry site. The cavern field comprises 22 caverns. Five caverns (6, 7, 8, 9, 11) were acquired from industry and have unusual shapes and a history dating back to 1946. The other 17 caverns (101-117) were leached according to SPR standards in the mid-1980s and have tall cylindrical shapes. The history of the caverns and their shapes are simulated in a three-dimensional geomechanics model of the site that predicts deformations, strains, and stresses. Future leaching scenarios corresponding to oil drawdowns using fresh water are also simulated by increasing the volume of the caverns. Cavern pressures are varied in the model to capture operational practices in the field. The results of the finite element model are interpreted to provide information on the current and future status of subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The most significant results in this report are relevant to Cavern 6. The cavern is shaped like a bowl with a large ceiling span and is in close proximity to Cavern 9. The analyses predict tensile stresses at the edge of the ceiling during repressurization of Cavern 6 following workover conditions. During a workover the cavern is at low pressure to service a well. The wellhead pressures are atmospheric. When the workover is complete, the cavern is repressurized. The resulting elastic stresses are sufficient to cause tension around the edge of the large ceiling span. With time, these stresses relax to a compressive state because of salt creep. However, the potential for salt fracture and propagation exists, particularly towards Cavern 9. With only 200 feet of salt between the caverns, the operational consequences must be examined if the two caverns become connected. A critical time may be during a workover of Cavern 9 in part because of the operational vulnerabilities, but also because dilatant damage

  17. Aerobic stabilization of biological sludge characterized by an extremely low decay rate: modeling, identifiability analysis and parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, C G; Olguín, M T; Fall, C

    2014-08-01

    Aerobic digestion batch tests were run on a sludge model that contained only two fractions, the heterotrophic biomass (XH) and its endogenous residue (XP). The objective was to describe the stabilization of the sludge and estimate the endogenous decay parameters. Modeling was performed with Aquasim, based on long-term data of volatile suspended solids and chemical oxygen demand (VSS, COD). Sensitivity analyses were carried out to determine the conditions for unique identifiability of the parameters. Importantly, it was found that the COD/VSS ratio of the endogenous residues (1.06) was significantly lower than for the active biomass fraction (1.48). The decay rate constant of the studied sludge (low bH, 0.025 d(-1)) was one-tenth that usually observed (0.2d(-1)), which has two main practical significances. Digestion time required is much more long; also the oxygen uptake rate might be <1.5 mg O₂/gTSSh (biosolids standards), without there being significant decline in the biomass. PMID:24907570

  18. Performance and stability analysis of a photovoltaic power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.; Blaha, R. J.; Pickrell, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The performance and stability characteristics of a 10 kVA photovoltaic power system are studied using linear Bode analysis and a nonlinear analog simulation. Power conversion efficiencies, system stability, and system transient performance results are given for system operation at various levels of solar insolation. Additionally, system operation and the modeling of system components for the purpose of computer simulation are described.

  19. Power System Transient Stability Analysis through a Homotopy Analysis Method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaobu; Du, Pengwei; Zhou, Ning

    2014-04-01

    As an important function of energy management systems (EMSs), online contingency analysis plays an important role in providing power system security warnings of instability. At present, N-1 contingency analysis still relies on time-consuming numerical integration. To save computational cost, the paper proposes a quasi-analytical method to evaluate transient stability through time domain periodic solutions’ frequency sensitivities against initial values. First, dynamic systems described in classical models are modified into damping free systems whose solutions are either periodic or expanded (non-convergent). Second, because the sensitivities experience sharp changes when periodic solutions vanish and turn into expanded solutions, transient stability is assessed using the sensitivity. Third, homotopy analysis is introduced to extract frequency information and evaluate the sensitivities only from initial values so that time consuming numerical integration is avoided. Finally, a simple case is presented to demonstrate application of the proposed method, and simulation results show that the proposed method is promising.

  20. Slope stability analysis of Valles Marineris, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittorio De Blasio, Fabio; Battista Crosta, Giovanni; Castellanza, Riccardo; Utili, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Valles Marineris (VM) in the equatorial area of Mars exhibits several gravitational failures which resulted in a series of large landslides up to several hundred cubic kilometers in volume. Questions arise as to forces at play and rock strength in the stability of the walls of VM. In this work we address the stability analysis of the walls of VM by considering the strength of the materials of the chasma walls and the causes of landslides. Using finite element calculations and the limit analysis upper bound method, we explore the range of cohesion and friction angle values associated to realistic failure geometries, and compare predictions with the classical Culmann's wedge model. Our analysis is based both on synthetic, simplified slope profiles and also on the real shape of the walls of VM taken from the MOLA topographic data. Validation of the calibrated cohesion and friction angle values is performed by comparing the computed unstable cross sectional areas with the observed pre- and post-failure profiles and estimated failure surface geometry. This offers a link between rock mass properties, slope geometry and volume of the observed failure. Pseudo-static seismic analyses generated another set of dimensionless charts. Our pseudo-static analyses show that low seismicity events induced by meteoroids impacts compatible with the size of craters could be a cause for some of the observed landslides if poor rock properties for VM is assumed.

  1. High beta and second stability region transport and stability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, M.H.; Phillps, M.W.; Todd, A.M.M.; Krishnaswami, J.; Hartley, R.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes ideal and resistive studies of high-beta plasmas and of the second stability region. Emphasis is focused on supershot'' plasmas in TFIR where MHD instabilities are frequently observed and which spoil their confinement properties. Substantial results are described from the analysis of these high beta poloidal plasmas. During these studies, initial pressure and safety factor profiles were obtained from the TRANSP code, which is used extensively to analyze experimental data. Resistive MBD stability studies of supershot equilibria show that finite pressure stabilization of tearing modes is very strong in these high {beta}p plasmas. This has prompted a detailed re-examination of linear tearing mode theory in which we participated in collaboration with Columbia University and General Atomics. This finite pressure effect is shown to be highly sensitive to small scale details of the pressure profile. Even when an ad hoc method of removing this stabilizing mechanism is implemented, however, it is shown that there is only superficial agreement between resistive MBD stability computation and the experimental data. While the mode structures observed experimentally can be found computationally, there is no convincing correlation with the experimental observations when the computed results are compared with a large set of supershot data. We also describe both the ideal and resistive stability properties of TFIR equilibria near the transition to the second region. It is shown that the highest {beta} plasmas, although stable to infinite-n ideal ballooning modes, can be unstable to the so called infernal'' modes associated with small shear. The sensitivity of these results to the assumed pressure and current density profiles is discussed. Finally, we describe results from two collaborative studies with PPPL. The first involves exploratory studies of the role of the 1/1 mode in tokamaks and, secondly, a study of sawtooth stabilization using ICRF.

  2. Application of small-signal modeling and measurement techniques to the stability analysis of an integrated switching-mode power system. [onboard Dynamics Explorer Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, R. C.; Owen, H. A., Jr.; Wilson, T. G.; Rodriguez, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    Small-signal modeling techniques are used in a system stability analysis of a breadboard version of a complete functional electrical power system. The system consists of a regulated switching dc-to-dc converter, a solar-cell-array simulator, a solar-array EMI filter, battery chargers and linear shunt regulators. Loss mechanisms in the converter power stage, including switching-time effects in the semiconductor elements, are incorporated into the modeling procedure to provide an accurate representation of the system without requiring frequency-domain measurements to determine the damping factor. The small-signal system model is validated by the use of special measurement techniques which are adapted to the poor signal-to-noise ratio encountered in switching-mode systems. The complete electrical power system with the solar-array EMI filter is shown to be stable over the intended range of operation.

  3. Stability analysis of dynamic thin shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Crawford, Paulo

    2005-11-01

    We analyse the stability of generic spherically symmetric thin shells to linearized perturbations around static solutions. We include the momentum flux term in the conservation identity, deduced from the 'ADM' constraint and the Lanczos equations. Following the Ishak Lake analysis, we deduce a master equation which dictates the stable equilibrium configurations. Considering the transparency condition, we study the stability of thin shells around black holes, showing that our analysis is in agreement with previous results. Applying the analysis to traversable wormhole geometries, by considering specific choices for the form function, we deduce stability regions and find that the latter may be significantly increased by considering appropriate choices for the redshift function.

  4. Nodal analysis for reactor kinetics and stability. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.K.; Becker, M.; Park, G.C.

    1983-07-01

    General space kinetics models have been developed for more accurate stability analysis utilizing nodal analysis, a commonly used technique for analyzing power distributions in large power reactors. Kinetics parameters for use in these kinetics models have been properly derived by utilizing self-consistent nodal data and power distributions. The procedure employed in the nodal code SIMULATE has been utilized for power distribution, since that methodology is general and includes various commonly used nodal methods as special cases. Cross sections are correlated as functions of void fraction and exposure. A computer program investigating thermo-hydrodynamic stability, NUFREQ has been modified to accommodate general spatial kinetics models with an improved thermal-hydraulics model. Stability analyses have been performed for density wave oscillations for a representative operating BWR system. Spatial coupling effects on the stability margins were found to be significant.

  5. Least-Squares Regression and Spectral Residual Augmented Classical Least-Squares Chemometric Models for Stability-Indicating Analysis of Agomelatine and Its Degradation Products: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Naguib, Ibrahim A; Abdelrahman, Maha M; El Ghobashy, Mohamed R; Ali, Nesma A

    2016-01-01

    Two accurate, sensitive, and selective stability-indicating methods are developed and validated for simultaneous quantitative determination of agomelatine (AGM) and its forced degradation products (Deg I and Deg II), whether in pure forms or in pharmaceutical formulations. Partial least-squares regression (PLSR) and spectral residual augmented classical least-squares (SRACLS) are two chemometric models that are being subjected to a comparative study through handling UV spectral data in range (215-350 nm). For proper analysis, a three-factor, four-level experimental design was established, resulting in a training set consisting of 16 mixtures containing different ratios of interfering species. An independent test set consisting of eight mixtures was used to validate the prediction ability of the suggested models. The results presented indicate the ability of mentioned multivariate calibration models to analyze AGM, Deg I, and Deg II with high selectivity and accuracy. The analysis results of the pharmaceutical formulations were statistically compared to the reference HPLC method, with no significant differences observed regarding accuracy and precision. The SRACLS model gives comparable results to the PLSR model; however, it keeps the qualitative spectral information of the classical least-squares algorithm for analyzed components. PMID:26987554

  6. Analysis and modelling of the temporal stability of throughfall and near-surface soil moisture at the plot scale in the Italian pre-Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuecco, Giulia; van Meerveld, Ilja; Penna, Daniele; Hopp, Luisa; Borga, Marco

    2016-04-01

    event and the start of the soil moisture measurements. The temporal stability of soil moisture was larger than the temporal stability of throughfall and they were also not significantly correlated. The patterns of temporal stability were also not related to canopy openness or LAI, suggesting that the spatial variability in throughfall is probably linked to small scale characteristics of the canopy. A soil moisture model was used to test which combination of soil properties and vegetation characteristics leads to uncorrelated patterns of temporal stability of throughfall and soil moisture. The application of the model revealed that a large spatial variability in saturated hydraulic conductivity that is correlated with the spatial variability in LAI and root fraction tends to strongly weaken the correlation between throughfall and soil moisture patterns. The analysis of field data combined with the model application suggests that in this specific forested hillslope the spatial organization of soil moisture is dominated by a combination of soil properties and vegetation characteristics, rather than by the throughfall spatial patterns. Keywords: throughfall; near-surface soil moisture; temporal stability; plot scale; spatial variability; forested hillslope.

  7. Solar Dynamic Power System Stability Analysis and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momoh, James A.; Wang, Yanchun

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to conduct dynamic analysis, control design, and control performance test of solar power system. Solar power system consists of generation system and distribution network system. A bench mark system is used in this research, which includes a generator with excitation system and governor, an ac/dc converter, six DDCU's and forty-eight loads. A detailed model is used for modeling generator. Excitation system is represented by a third order model. DDCU is represented by a seventh order system. The load is modeled by the combination of constant power and constant impedance. Eigen-analysis and eigen-sensitivity analysis are used for system dynamic analysis. The effects of excitation system, governor, ac/dc converter control, and the type of load on system stability are discussed. In order to improve system transient stability, nonlinear ac/dc converter control is introduced. The direct linearization method is used for control design. The dynamic analysis results show that these controls affect system stability in different ways. The parameter coordination of controllers are recommended based on the dynamic analysis. It is concluded from the present studies that system stability is improved by the coordination of control parameters and the nonlinear ac/dc converter control stabilize system oscillation caused by the load change and system fault efficiently.

  8. Moduli stabilization in stringy ISS models

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Yu; Nakayama, Yu; Yamazaki, Masahito; Yanagida, T.T.

    2007-09-28

    We present a stringy realization of the ISS metastable SUSY breaking model with moduli stabilization. The mass moduli of the ISS model is stabilized by gauging of a U(1) symmetry and its D-term potential. The SUSY is broken both by F-terms and D-terms. It is possible to obtain de Sitter vacua with a vanishingly small cosmological constant by an appropriate fine-tuning of flux parameters.

  9. Stability analysis of zigzag boron nitride nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Hari Mohan Late, Ravikiran; Saxena, Shailendra K.; Kumar, Rajesh; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Jaiswal, Neeraj K.; Srivastava, Pankaj

    2015-05-15

    We have explored the structural stability of bare and hydrogenated zigzag boron nitride nanoribbons (ZBNNRs). In order to investigate the structural stability, we calculate the cohesive energy for bare, one-edge and both edges H-terminated ZBNNRs with different widths. It is found that the ZBNNRs with width Nz=8 are energetically more favorable than the lower-width counterparts (Nz<8). Bare ZBNNRs have been found energetically most stable as compared to the edge terminated ribbons. Our analysis reveals that the structural stability is a function of ribbon-width and it is not affected significantly by the type of edge-passivation (one-edge or both-edges)

  10. The nu Andromedae System: Models and Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, Tomasz F.; Malhotra, Renu; Black, David C.

    2000-01-01

    Radial velocity observations of the F8 V star nu Andromedae taken at Lick and at Whipple Observatories have revealed evidence of three periodicities in the line-of-sight velocity of the star. These periodicities have been interpreted as evidence for at least three low-mass companions (LMCs) revolving around nu Andromedae. The mass and orbital parameters inferred for these companions raise questions about the dynamical stability of the system. We report here results from our independent analysis of the published radial velocity data, as well as new unpublished data taken at Lick Observatory. Our results confirm the finding of three periods in the data. Our best fits to the data, on the assumption that these periods arise from the gravitational perturbations of companions in Keplerian orbits, are also generally in agreement but with some differences from the earlier findings. We find that the available data do not constrain well the orbital eccentricity of the middle companion in a three-companion model of the data. We also find that in order for our best-fit model to the Lick data to be dynamically stable over the lifetime of the star (approximately 2 billion years), the system must have a mean inclination to the plane of the sky greater than 13 deg. The corresponding minimum inclination for the best fit to the Whipple data set is 19 deg. These values imply that the maximum mass for the outer companion can be no greater than about 20 Jupiter masses. Our analysis of the stability of the putative systems also places constraints on the relative inclinations of the orbital planes of the companions. We comment on global versus local (i.e., method of steepest descent) means of finding best-fit orbits from radial velocity data sets.

  11. Developments in Cylindrical Shell Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Today high-performance computing systems and new analytical and numerical techniques enable engineers to explore the use of advanced materials for shell design. This paper reviews some of the historical developments of shell buckling analysis and design. The paper concludes by identifying key research directions for reliable and robust methods development in shell stability analysis and design.

  12. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P.

    1993-08-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts, is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  13. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P. )

    1993-11-08

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  14. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Verdon, C. P.

    1993-11-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code orchid.

  15. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Verdon, C. P.

    1993-08-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  16. Voltage stability analysis in the new deregulated environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tong

    Nowadays, a significant portion of the power industry is under deregulation. Under this new circumstance, network security analysis is more critical and more difficult. One of the most important issues in network security analysis is voltage stability analysis. Due to the expected higher utilization of equipment induced by competition in a power market that covers bigger power systems, this issue is increasingly acute after deregulation. In this dissertation, some selected topics of voltage stability analysis are covered. In the first part, after a brief review of general concepts of continuation power flow (CPF), investigations on various matrix analysis techniques to improve the speed of CPF calculation for large systems are reported. Based on these improvements, a new CPF algorithm is proposed. This new method is then tested by an inter-area transaction in a large inter-connected power system. In the second part, the Arnoldi algorithm, the best method to find a few minimum singular values for a large sparse matrix, is introduced into the modal analysis for the first time. This new modal analysis is applied to the estimation of the point of voltage collapse and contingency evaluation in voltage security assessment. Simulations show that the new method is very efficient. In the third part, after transient voltage stability component models are investigated systematically, a novel system model for transient voltage stability analysis, which is a logical-algebraic-differential-difference equation (LADDE), is offered. As an example, TCSC (Thyristor controlled series capacitors) is addressed as a transient voltage stabilizing controller. After a TCSC transient voltage stability model is outlined, a new TCSC controller is proposed to enhance both fault related and load increasing related transient voltage stability. Its ability is proven by the simulation.

  17. The role of context on alpha-helix stabilization: host-guest analysis in a mixed background peptide model.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J.; Spek, E. J.; Gong, Y.; Zhou, H.; Kallenbach, N. R.

    1997-01-01

    The helix content of a series of peptides containing single substitutions of the 20 natural amino acids in a new designed host sequence, succinyl-YSEEEEKAKKAXAEEAEKKKK-NH2, has been determined using CD spectroscopy. This host is related to one previously studied, in which triple amino acid substitutions were introduced into a background of Glu-Lys blocks completely lacking alanine. The resulting free energies show that only Ala and Glu- prove to be helix stabilizing, while all other side chains are neutral or destabilizing. This agrees with results from studies of alanine-rich peptide modela, but not the previous Glu-Lys block oligomers in which Leu and Met also stabilize helix. The helix propensity scale derived from the previous block oligomers correlated well with the frequencies of occurrence of different side chains in helical sequences of proteins, whereas the values from the present series do not. The role of context in determining scales of helix propensity values is discussed, and the ability of algorithms designed to predict helix structure from sequence is compared. PMID:9194186

  18. Electrostatic Analysis of The Nucleosome Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenley, Andrew; Adams, David; Onufriev, Alexey

    2007-03-01

    The wrapping and unwrapping of the DNA around the histone octomer of a nucleosome core particle (NCP) plays a vital role in many cellular processes, such as transcription, replication, and cell differentiation. The exact mechanisms underlying the associated transitions in the NCP are still not well understood. We present a simple, two-state electrostatic model of the NCP that agrees with a number of experiments and suggests mechanisms that could initiate DNA unwrapping in vivo. We present and discuss a 2D phase diagram of the system as a function of ambient salt concentration and the net charge of the histone octomer. The model also predicts the free energy of a NCP at physiological conditions. The stability of the system is strongly dependent on the charge of the histone octomer, hinting at possible modes of control in in vivo (acetylation and/or pH changes). The model permits analytical solutions in the low and high salt limits. The analysis of these solutions suggests simple physical mechanisms behind the observed folding and unfolding behavior at environmental solvent conditions.

  19. Terrestrial Photogrammetry and Numerical Modelling for the Stability Analysis of Rock Slopes in High Mountain Areas: Aiguilles Marbrées case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtaz, M.; Ferrero, A. M.; Roncella, R.; Segalini, A.; Umili, G.

    2014-03-01

    Several high-altitude slope instability phenomena, involving rock blocks of different volumes, have been observed in recent years. The increase in these phenomena could be correlated to climatic variations and to a general increase in temperature that has induced both ice melting with consequent water seepage and glacial lowering, with a consequent loss of support of the rock face. The degradation of the high-altitude thermal layer, which is known as "permafrost", can determine the formation of highly fractured rock slopes where instabilities can concentrate. The present research has developed a methodology to improve the understanding and assessment of rock slope stability conditions in high mountain environments where access is difficult. The observed instabilities are controlled by the presence of discontinuities that can determine block detachments. Consequently, a detailed survey of the rock faces is necessary, both in terms of topography and geological structure, and in order to locate the discontinuities on the slope to obtain a better geometric reconstruction and subsequent stability analysis of the blocky rock mass. Photogrammetric surveys performed at different times allow the geostructure of the rock mass to be determined and the rock block volumes and detachment mechanisms to be estimated, in order to assess the stability conditions and potential triggering mechanisms. Photogrammetric surveys facilitate both the characterisation of the rock mass and the monitoring of slope instabilities over time. The methodology has been applied in a case study pertaining to the North Face of Aiguilles Marbrées in the Mont Blanc massif, which suffers from frequent instability phenomena. A slope failure that occurred in 2007 has been back-analysed using both the limit equilibrium method (LEM) and 3D distinct element modelling (DEM). The method has been supported and validated with traditional in situ surveys and measurements of the discontinuity orientation and other

  20. Magnetization stability analysis of the Stoner-Wohlfarth model under a spin-polarized current with a tilted polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiyuan; Sun, Z. Z.

    2014-02-14

    The stationary-state solutions of magnetization dynamics under a spin-polarized current that was polarized in an arbitrary direction were investigated by solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Slonczewski equation for a single-domain magnet. Taking into consideration the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy, the equilibrium directions of the magnetization vectors were analytically obtained by solving an algebraic cubic equation. It was found that one to three pairs of magnetization equilibrium states existed, depending on the current intensity and the direction of the spin polarization. By numerically analyzing the stabilities of these equilibrium states, the threshold switching current for the reversing the magnetic vector was obtained under different current polarization configurations, which may be useful for use in future spintronics devices.

  1. Advanced stability analysis for laminar flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orszag, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    Five classes of problems are addressed: (1) the extension of the SALLY stability analysis code to the full eighth order compressible stability equations for three dimensional boundary layer; (2) a comparison of methods for prediction of transition using SALLY for incompressible flows; (3) a study of instability and transition in rotating disk flows in which the effects of Coriolis forces and streamline curvature are included; (4) a new linear three dimensional instability mechanism that predicts Reynolds numbers for transition to turbulence in planar shear flows in good agreement with experiment; and (5) a study of the stability of finite amplitude disturbances in axisymmetric pipe flow showing the stability of this flow to all nonlinear axisymmetric disturbances.

  2. Stability analysis of spacecraft power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpin, S. M.; Grigsby, L. L.; Sheble, G. B.; Nelms, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    The problems in applying standard electric utility models, analyses, and algorithms to the study of the stability of spacecraft power conditioning and distribution systems are discussed. Both single-phase and three-phase systems are considered. Of particular concern are the load and generator models that are used in terrestrial power system studies, as well as the standard assumptions of load and topological balance that lead to the use of the positive sequence network. The standard assumptions regarding relative speeds of subsystem dynamic responses that are made in the classical transient stability algorithm, which forms the backbone of utility-based studies, are examined. The applicability of these assumptions to a spacecraft power system stability study is discussed in detail. In addition to the classical indirect method, the applicability of Liapunov's direct methods to the stability determination of spacecraft power systems is discussed. It is pointed out that while the proposed method uses a solution process similar to the classical algorithm, the models used for the sources, loads, and networks are, in general, more accurate. Some preliminary results are given for a linear-graph, state-variable-based modeling approach to the study of the stability of space-based power distribution networks.

  3. Simple Analysis of Prolate-Spin Attitude Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, Sei-Ichiro

    How can a prolate satellite spinning about its axis of minimum moment of inertia be attitude-stabilized using dual spin? To this question, we find a simple, clear answer. We replace the satellite with an equivalent frame model and describe its attitude motion as small deviations from its nominal attitude. We show that a friction-like torque applied to the spin axis reduces its nutation motion, and that a similar torque is generated by a nutation damper on a de-spun platform. Thus, we derive a simple attitude-stability theory using minimal mathematical analysis. This theory is applicable to the spin stabilization of geosynchronous communication satellite.

  4. Global stability analysis of electrified jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivero-Rodriguez, Javier; Pérez-Saborid, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    Electrospinning is a common process used to produce micro and nano polymeric fibers. In this technique, the whipping mode of a very thin electrified jet generated in an electrospray device is nhanced in order to increase its elongation. In this work, we use a theoretical Eulerian model that describes the kinematics and dynamics of the midline of the jet, its radius and convective velocity. The model equations result from balances of mass, linear and angular momentum applied to any differential slice of the jet together with constitutive laws for viscous forces and moments, as well as appropriate expressions for capillary and electrical forces. As a first step towards computing the complete nonlinear, transient dynamics of the electrified jet, we have performed a global stability analysis of the forementioned equations and compared the results with experimental data obtained by Guillaume et al. [2011] and Guerrero-Millán et al. [2014]. The support of the Ministry of Science and Innovation of Spain (Project DPI 2010-20450-C03-02) is acknowledged.

  5. Temperature dependent stability model for graphene nanoribbon interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanu, Waikhom Mona; Das, Debaprasad

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a temperature dependent equivalent circuit model for graphene nanoribbon (GNR) interconnects is proposed. The stability analysis of GNR interconnects is performed using this proposed model and its performance is compared with respect to that of the copper based interconnects. The analysis is performed for different interconnect systems for 16nm ITRS technology node. With increase in the length of interconnects, the relative stability increases. GNR interconnect shows less increase of resistance with the increase in temperature as compared to Cu interconnects.

  6. Stability analysis in tachyonic potential chameleon cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Farajollahi, H.; Salehi, A.; Tayebi, F.; Ravanpak, A. E-mail: a.salehi@guilan.ac.ir E-mail: aravanpak@guilan.ac.ir

    2011-05-01

    We study general properties of attractors for tachyonic potential chameleon scalar-field model which possess cosmological scaling solutions. An analytic formulation is given to obtain fixed points with a discussion on their stability. The model predicts a dynamical equation of state parameter with phantom crossing behavior for an accelerating universe. We constrain the parameters of the model by best fitting with the recent data-sets from supernovae and simulated data points for redshift drift experiment generated by Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Stock market stability: Diffusion entropy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shouwei; Zhuang, Yangyang; He, Jianmin

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we propose a method to analyze the stock market stability based on diffusion entropy, and conduct an empirical analysis of Dow Jones Industrial Average. Empirical results show that this method can reflect the volatility and extreme cases of the stock market.

  8. Stability Analysis of the Impoundment of Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slávik, Ivan

    2013-03-01

    An impoundment is an engineering construction used for the safe deposition of unexploitable waste from industrial and mining facilities. In terms of the legislative requirements of the Slovak Republic, a "Measurements Project" must be developed for each impoundment. In this document the prerequisites for the safe operation of an impoundment, the limit and critical values of the monitored phenomena and the facts influencing the safety of the impoundment and the area endangered by such a site are also defined. The safety and stability of an impoundment are verified according to a "Measurements Project" by considering stability at regular time intervals. This contribution presents, in the form of a parametric study, a stability analysis of an ash impoundment. The stability analysis provides an example of the utilization of an information database of the results of the regular monitoring of the geotechnical properties of the materials forming the impoundment's body and the surrounding rock mass. The stability of the impoundment is expressed for a recent state - without a continuous water level in its body and, at the same time, for a hypothetical limit and critical water level according to the valid "Handling Regulations".

  9. Master stability analysis in transient spatiotemporal chaos.

    PubMed

    Wackerbauer, Renate

    2007-11-01

    The asymptotic stability of spatiotemporal chaos is difficult to determine, since transient spatiotemporal chaos may be extremely long lived. A master stability analysis reveals that the asymptotic state of transient spatiotemporal chaos in the Gray-Scott system and in the Bär-Eiswirth system is characterized by negative transverse Lyapunov exponents on the attractor of the invariant synchronization manifold. The average lifetime of transient spatiotemporal chaos depends on the number of transverse directions that are unstable along a typical excitation cycle. PMID:18233739

  10. ASTROP2 users manual: A program for aeroelastic stability analysis of propfans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, G. V.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1991-01-01

    A user's manual is presented for the aeroelastic stability and response of propulsion systems computer program called ASTROP2. The ASTROP2 code preforms aeroelastic stability analysis of rotating propfan blades. This analysis uses a two-dimensional, unsteady cascade aerodynamics model and a three-dimensional, normal-mode structural model. Analytical stability results from this code are compared with published experimental results of a rotating composite advanced turboprop model and of nonrotating metallic wing model.

  11. Stability Analysis in a Model of 1,2-dichloroethane Biodegradation by Klebsiella Oxytoca va 8391Immobilized on Granulated Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, M.; Dimitrova, N.

    2011-11-01

    We consider an ecological model for biodegradation of toxic substances in aquatic and atmospheric biotic systems. The model, which is described by a nonlinear system of four ordinary differential equations, is known to be experimentally validated. We compute the equilibrium points of the model and study their asymptotic stability. The Maple package BifTools is used to calculate one- and two-parameter bifurcations of the equilibrium points.

  12. Stability Analysis of a Uniformly Heated Channel with Supercritical Water

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega Gomez, T.; Class, A.; Schulenberg, T.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    2006-07-01

    The thermal-hydraulic stability of a uniformly heated channel at supercritical water pressure has been investigated to help understand the system instability phenomena which may occur in Supercritical Water Nuclear Reactors (SCWR). We have extended the modeling approach often used for Boiling Water Nuclear Reactor (BWR) stability analysis to supercritical pressure operation conditions. We have shown that Ledinegg excursive instabilities and pressure-drop oscillations (PDO) will not occur in supercritical water systems. The linear stability characteristics of a typical uniformly heated channel were computed by evaluating the eigenvalues of the model. An analysis of non-linear instability phenomena was also performed in the time domain and the dynamic bifurcations were evaluated. (authors)

  13. Stability analysis of the spatiotemporal Lugiato-Lefever model for Kerr optical frequency combs in the anomalous and normal dispersion regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godey, Cyril; Balakireva, Irina V.; Coillet, Aurélien; Chembo, Yanne K.

    2014-06-01

    We propose a detailed stability analysis of the Lugiato-Lefever model for Kerr optical frequency combs in whispering-gallery-mode resonators when they are pumped in either the anomalous- or normal-dispersion regime. We analyze the spatial bifurcation structure of the stationary states depending on two parameters that are experimentally tunable; namely, the pump power and the cavity detuning. Our study demonstrates that, in both the anomalous- and normal-dispersion cases, nontrivial equilibria play an important role in this bifurcation map because their associated eigenvalues undergo critical bifurcations that are actually foreshadowing the existence of localized and extended spatial dissipative structures. The corresponding bifurcation maps are evidence of a considerable richness from a dynamical standpoint. The case of anomalous dispersion is indeed the most interesting from the theoretical point of view because of the considerable variety of dynamical behavior that can be observed. For this case we study the emergence of super- and subcritical Turing patterns (or primary combs) in the system via modulational instability. We determine the areas where bright isolated cavity solitons emerge, and we show that soliton molecules can emerge as well. Very complex temporal patterns can actually be observed in the system, where solitons (or soliton complexes) coexist with or without mutual interactions. Our investigations also unveil the mechanism leading to the phenomenon of breathing solitons. Two routes to chaos in the system are identified; namely, a route via the destabilization of a primary comb, and another via the destabilization of solitons. For the case of normal dispersion, we unveil the mechanism leading to the emergence of weakly stable Turing patterns. We demonstrate that this weak stability is justified by the distribution of stable and unstable fixed points in the parameter space (flat states). We show that dark cavity solitons can emerge in the system, and

  14. Stability analysis of automobile driver steering control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    In steering an automobile, the driver must basically control the direction of the car's trajectory (heading angle) and the lateral deviation of the car relative to a delineated pathway. A previously published linear control model of driver steering behavior which is analyzed from a stability point of view is considered. A simple approximate expression for a stability parameter, phase margin, is derived in terms of various driver and vehicle control parameters, and boundaries for stability are discussed. A field test study is reviewed that includes the measurement of driver steering control parameters. Phase margins derived for a range of vehicle characteristics are found to be generally consistent with known adaptive properties of the human operator. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of driver adaptive behavior.

  15. Thermodynamic modeling of natural zeolite stability

    SciTech Connect

    Chipera, S.J.; Bish, D.L.

    1997-06-01

    Zeolites occur in a variety of geologic environments and are used in numerous agricultural, commercial, and environmental applications. It is desirable to understand their stability both to predict future stability and to evaluate the geochemical conditions resulting in their formation. The use of estimated thermodynamic data for measured zeolite compositions allows thermodynamic modeling of stability relationships among zeolites in different geologic environments (diagenetic, saline and alkaline lakes, acid rock hydrothermal, basic rock, deep sea sediments). This modeling shows that the relative cation abundances in both the aqueous and solid phases, the aqueous silica activity, and temperature are important factors in determining the stable zeolite species. Siliceous zeolites (e.g., clinoptilolite, mordenite, erionite) present in saline and alkaline lakes or diagenetic deposits formed at elevated silica activities. Aluminous zeolites (e.g., natrolite, mesolite/scolecite, thomsonite) formed in basic rocks in association with reduced silica activities. Likewise, phillipsite formation is favored by reduced aqueous silica activities. The presence of erionite, chabazite, and phillipsite are indicative of environments with elevated potassium concentrations. Elevated temperature, calcic water conditions, and reduced silica activity help to enhance the laumontite and wairakite stability fields. Analcime stability increases with increased temperature and aqueous Na concentration, and/or with decreased silica activity.

  16. DYNAMIC LANDSCAPES, STABILITY AND ECOLOGICAL MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The image of a ball rolling along a series of hills and valleys is an effective heuristic by which to communicate stability concepts in ecology. However, the dynamics of this landscape model have little to do with ecological systems. Other landscape representations, however, are ...

  17. Stability of Ensemble Models Predicts Productivity of Enzymatic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Theisen, Matthew K.; Lafontaine Rivera, Jimmy G.; Liao, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Stability in a metabolic system may not be obtained if incorrect amounts of enzymes are used. Without stability, some metabolites may accumulate or deplete leading to the irreversible loss of the desired operating point. Even if initial enzyme amounts achieve a stable steady state, changes in enzyme amount due to stochastic variations or environmental changes may move the system to the unstable region and lose the steady-state or quasi-steady-state flux. This situation is distinct from the phenomenon characterized by typical sensitivity analysis, which focuses on the smooth change before loss of stability. Here we show that metabolic networks differ significantly in their intrinsic ability to attain stability due to the network structure and kinetic forms, and that after achieving stability, some enzymes are prone to cause instability upon changes in enzyme amounts. We use Ensemble Modelling for Robustness Analysis (EMRA) to analyze stability in four cell-free enzymatic systems when enzyme amounts are changed. Loss of stability in continuous systems can lead to lower production even when the system is tested experimentally in batch experiments. The predictions of instability by EMRA are supported by the lower productivity in batch experimental tests. The EMRA method incorporates properties of network structure, including stoichiometry and kinetic form, but does not require specific parameter values of the enzymes. PMID:26963521

  18. Stability of Ensemble Models Predicts Productivity of Enzymatic Systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Theisen, Matthew K.; Lafontaine Rivera, Jimmy G.; Liao, James C.

    2016-03-10

    Stability in a metabolic system may not be obtained if incorrect amounts of enzymes are used. Without stability, some metabolites may accumulate or deplete leading to the irreversible loss of the desired operating point. Even if initial enzyme amounts achieve a stable steady state, changes in enzyme amount due to stochastic variations or environmental changes may move the system to the unstable region and lose the steady-state or quasi-steady-state flux. This situation is distinct from the phenomenon characterized by typical sensitivity analysis, which focuses on the smooth change before loss of stability. Here we show that metabolic networks differ significantlymore » in their intrinsic ability to attain stability due to the network structure and kinetic forms, and that after achieving stability, some enzymes are prone to cause instability upon changes in enzyme amounts. We use Ensemble Modelling for Robustness Analysis (EMRA) to analyze stability in four cell-free enzymatic systems when enzyme amounts are changed. Loss of stability in continuous systems can lead to lower production even when the system is tested experimentally in batch experiments. The predictions of instability by EMRA are supported by the lower productivity in batch experimental tests. Finally, the EMRA method incorporates properties of network structure, including stoichiometry and kinetic form, but does not require specific parameter values of the enzymes.« less

  19. Analysis of Stabilization Mechanisms in Lifted Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Martinez, S.; Kronenburg, A.

    2009-12-01

    Flame stabilization and the mechanisms that govern the dynamics at the flame base have been subject to numerous studies in recent years. Recent results using a combined Large Eddy Simulation-Conditional Moment Closure (LES-CMC) approach to model the turbulent flow field and the turbulence-chemistry interactions has been successful in predicting flame ignition and stabilization by auto-ignition, but LES-CMCs capability of the accurate modelling of the competition between turbulent quenching and laminar and turbulent flame propagation at the anchor point has not been resolved. This paper will consolidate LES-CMC results by analysing a wide range of lifted flame geometries with different prevailing stabilization mechanisms. The simulations allow a clear distinction of the prevailing stabilization mechanisms for the different flames, LES-CMC accurately predicts the competition between turbulence and chemistry during the auto-ignition process, however, the dynamics of the extinction process and turbulent flame propagation are not well captured. The averaging process inherent in the CMC methods does not allow for an instant response of the transported conditionally averaged reactive species to the changes in the flow conditions and any response of the scalars will therefore be delayed. Stationary or quasi-stationary conditions, however, can be well predicted for all flame configurations.

  20. Aeroelastic stability analysis of a Darrieus wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Popelka, D.

    1982-02-01

    An aeroelastic stability analysis has been developed for predicting flutter instabilities on vertical axis wind turbines. The analytical model and mathematical formulation of the problem are described as well as the physical mechanism that creates flutter in Darrieus turbines. Theoretical results are compared with measured experimental data from flutter tests of the Sandia 2 Meter turbine. Based on this comparison, the analysis appears to be an adequate design evaluation tool.

  1. Aggregation in ecosystem models and model stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giricheva, Evgeniya

    2015-05-01

    Using a multimodal approach to research ecosystems improves usage of available information on an object. This study presents several models of the Bering Sea ecosystem. The ecosystem is considered as a closed object, that is, the influence of the environment is not provided. We then add the links with the external medium in the models. The models differ in terms of the degree and method of grouping components. Our method is based on the differences in habitat and food source of groups, which allows us to determine the grouping of species with a greater effect on system dynamics. In particular, we determine whether benthic fish aggregation or pelagic fish aggregation can change the consumption structure of some groups of species, and consequently, the behavior of the entire model system.

  2. Stability Analysis for a Multi-Camera Photogrammetric System

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Ayman; Detchev, Ivan; Kwak, Eunju

    2014-01-01

    Consumer-grade digital cameras suffer from geometrical instability that may cause problems when used in photogrammetric applications. This paper provides a comprehensive review of this issue of interior orientation parameter variation over time, it explains the common ways used for coping with the issue, and describes the existing methods for performing stability analysis for a single camera. The paper then points out the lack of coverage of stability analysis for multi-camera systems, suggests a modification of the collinearity model to be used for the calibration of an entire photogrammetric system, and proposes three methods for system stability analysis. The proposed methods explore the impact of the changes in interior orientation and relative orientation/mounting parameters on the reconstruction process. Rather than relying on ground truth in real datasets to check the system calibration stability, the proposed methods are simulation-based. Experiment results are shown, where a multi-camera photogrammetric system was calibrated three times, and stability analysis was performed on the system calibration parameters from the three sessions. The proposed simulation-based methods provided results that were compatible with a real-data based approach for evaluating the impact of changes in the system calibration parameters on the three-dimensional reconstruction. PMID:25196012

  3. A Renormalisation Group Method. IV. Stability Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brydges, David C.; Slade, Gordon

    2015-05-01

    This paper is the fourth in a series devoted to the development of a rigorous renormalisation group method for lattice field theories involving boson fields, fermion fields, or both. The third paper in the series presents a perturbative analysis of a supersymmetric field theory which represents the continuous-time weakly self-avoiding walk on . We now present an analysis of the relevant interaction functional of the supersymmetric field theory, which permits a nonperturbative analysis to be carried out in the critical dimension . The results in this paper include: proof of stability of the interaction, estimates which enable control of Gaussian expectations involving both boson and fermion fields, estimates which bound the errors in the perturbative analysis, and a crucial contraction estimate to handle irrelevant directions in the flow of the renormalisation group. These results are essential for the analysis of the general renormalisation group step in the fifth paper in the series.

  4. Stability Analysis for HIFiRE Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; White, Jeffery A.; Kimmel, Roger; Adamczak, David; Borg, Matthew; Stanfield, Scott; Smith, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    The HIFiRE-1 flight experiment provided a valuable database pertaining to boundary layer transition over a 7-degree half-angle, circular cone model from supersonic to hypersonic Mach numbers, and a range of Reynolds numbers and angles of attack. This paper reports selected findings from the ongoing computational analysis of the measured in-flight transition behavior. Transition during the ascent phase at nearly zero degree angle of attack is dominated by second mode instabilities except in the vicinity of the cone meridian where a roughness element was placed midway along the length of the cone. The growth of first mode instabilities is found to be weak at all trajectory points analyzed from the ascent phase. For times less than approximately 18.5 seconds into the flight, the peak amplification ratio for second mode disturbances is sufficiently small because of the lower Mach numbers at earlier times, so that the transition behavior inferred from the measurements is attributed to an unknown physical mechanism, potentially related to step discontinuities in surface height near the locations of a change in the surface material. Based on the time histories of temperature and/or heat flux at transducer locations within the aft portion of the cone, the onset of transition correlated with a linear N-factor, based on parabolized stability equations, of approximately 13.5. Due to the large angles of attack during the re-entry phase, crossflow instability may play a significant role in transition. Computations also indicate the presence of pronounced crossflow separation over a significant portion of the trajectory segment that is relevant to transition analysis. The transition behavior during this re-entry segment of HIFiRE-1 flight shares some common features with the predicted transition front along the elliptic cone shaped HIFiRE-5 flight article, which was designed to provide hypersonic transition data for a fully 3D geometric configuration. To compare and contrast the

  5. Stabilization control of a hovering model insect: lateral motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Lai; Sun, Mao

    2011-10-01

    Our previous study shows that the lateral disturbance motion of a model drone fly does not have inherent stability (passive stability), because of the existence of an unstable divergence mode. But drone flies are observed to fly stably. Constantly active control must be applied to stabilize the flight. In this study, we investigate the lateral stabilization control of the model drone fly. The method of computational fluid dynamics is used to compute the lateral control derivatives and the techniques of eigenvalue and eigenvector analysis and modal decomposition are used for solving the equations of motion. Controllability analysis shows that although inherently unstable, the lateral disturbance motion is controllable. By feeding back the state variables (i.e. lateral translation velocity, yaw rate, roll rate and roll angle, which can be measured by the sensory system of the insect) to produce anti-symmetrical changes in stroke amplitude and/or in angle of attack between the left and right wings, the motion can be stabilized, explaining why the drone flies can fly stably even if the flight is passively unstable.

  6. A consistent orbital stability analysis for the GJ 581 system

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, David A.; Sul, Cesar; Kress, Monika E.; Dragomir, Diana; Kane, Stephen R.

    2014-06-20

    We apply a combination of N-body modeling techniques and automated data fitting with Monte Carlo Markov Chain uncertainty analysis of Keplerian orbital models to RV data to determine long-term stability of the planetary system GJ 581. We find that while there are stability concerns with the four-planet model as published by Forveille et al., when uncertainties in the system are accounted for, particularly stellar jitter, the hypothesis that the four-planet model is gravitationally unstable is not statistically significant. Additionally, the system including proposed planet g by Vogt et al. also shows some stability concerns when eccentricities are allowed to float in the orbital fit, yet when uncertainties are included in the analysis, the system including planet g also cannot be proven to be unstable. We present revised reduced χ{sup 2} values for Keplerian astrocentric orbital fits assuming four-planet and five-planet models for GJ 581 under the condition that best fits must be stable, and we find no distinguishable difference by including planet g in the model. Additionally, we present revised orbital element estimates for each, assuming uncertainties due to stellar jitter under the constraint of the system being gravitationally stable.

  7. Chromosomal model for analysis of a long CTG/CAG tract stability in wild-type Escherichia coli and its nucleotide excision repair mutants.

    PubMed

    Szwarocka, Sylwia T; Staczek, Paweł; Parniewski, Paweł

    2007-07-01

    Many human hereditary neurological diseases, including fragile X syndrome, myotonic dystrophy, and Friedreich's ataxia, are associated with expansions of the triplet repeat sequences (TRS) (CGG/CCG, CTG/CAG, and GAA/TTC) within or near specific genes. Mechanisms that mediate mutations of TRS include DNA replication, repair, and gene conversion and (or) recombination. The involvement of the repair systems in TRS instability was investigated in Escherichia coli on plasmid models, and the results showed that the deficiency of some nucleotide excision repair (NER) functions dramatically affects the stability of long CTG inserts. In such models in which there are tens or hundreds of plasmid molecules in each bacterial cell, repetitive sequences may interact between themselves and according to a recombination hypothesis, which may lead to expansions and deletions within such repeated tracts. Since one cannot control interaction between plasmids, it is also sometimes difficult to give precise interpretation of the results. Therefore, using modified lambda phage (lambdaInCh), we have constructed a chromosomal model to study the instability of trinucleotide repeat sequences in E. coli. We have shown that the stability of (CTG/CAG)68 tracts in the bacterial chromosome is influenced by mutations in NER genes in E. coli. The absence of the uvrC or uvrD gene products greatly enhances the instability of the TRS in the chromosome, whereas the lack of the functional UvrA or UvrB proteins causes substantial stabilization of (CTG/CAG) tracts. PMID:17898841

  8. Shapes and stability of algebraic nuclear models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez-Moreno, Enrique; Castanos, Octavio

    1995-01-01

    A generalization of the procedure to study shapes and stability of algebraic nuclear models introduced by Gilmore is presented. One calculates the expectation value of the Hamiltonian with respect to the coherent states of the algebraic structure of the system. Then equilibrium configurations of the resulting energy surface, which depends in general on state variables and a set of parameters, are classified through the Catastrophe theory. For one- and two-body interactions in the Hamiltonian of the interacting Boson model-1, the critical points are organized through the Cusp catastrophe. As an example, we apply this Separatrix to describe the energy surfaces associated to the Rutenium and Samarium isotopes.

  9. Stability analysis of an inline peptide-based conjugate for metal delivery: nickel(II)-claMP Tag epidermal growth factor as a model system.

    PubMed

    Mills, Brittney J; Laurence, Jennifer S

    2015-02-01

    Metals are a key component of many diagnostic imaging and biotechnology applications, and the majority of cancer patients receive a platinum-based drug as part of their treatment. Significant effort has been devoted to developing tight binding synthetic chelators to enable effective targeted delivery of metal-based conjugates, with most successes involving lanthanides rather than transition metals for diagnostic imaging. Chemical conjugation modifies the protein's properties and generates a heterogeneous mixture of products. Chelator attachment is typically carried out by converting the amino group on lysines to an amide, which can impact the stability and solubility of the targeting protein and these properties vary among the set of individual conjugate species. Site-specific attachment is sought to reduce complexity and control stability. Here, the metal abstraction peptide technology was applied to create the claMP Tag, an inline platform for generating site-specific conjugates involving transition metals. The claMP Tag was genetically encoded into epidermal growth factor (EGF) and loaded with nickel(II) as a model system to demonstrate that the tag within the homogeneous inline conjugate presents sufficient solution stability to enable biotechnology applications. The structure and disulfide network of the protein and chemical stability of the claMP Tag and EGF components were characterized. PMID:25212829

  10. Stability analysis of lattice Boltzmann methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, J.D.; Chen, Shiyi

    1996-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann equation describes the evolution of the velocity distribution function on a lattice in a manner that macroscopic fluid dynamical behavior is recovered. Although the equation is a derivative of lattice gas automata, it may be interpreted as a Lagrangian finite-difference method for the numerical simulation of the discrete-velocity Boltzmann equation that makes use of a BGK collision operator. As a result, it is not surprising that numericaI instability of lattice Boltzmann methods have been frequently encountered by researchers. We present an analysis of the stability of perturbations of the particle populations linearized about equilibrium values corresponding to a constant-density uniform mean flow. The linear stability depends on the following parameters: the distribution of the mass at a site between the different discrete speeds, the BGK relaxation time, the mean velocity, and the wave-number of the perturbations. This parameter space is too large to compute the complete stability characteristics. We report some stability results for a subset of the parameter space for a 7-velocity hexagonal lattice, a 9-velocity square lattice, and a 15-velocity cubic lattice. Results common to all three lattices are (1) the BGK relaxation time {tau} must be greater than 1/2 corresponding to positive shear viscosity, (2) there exists a maximum stable mean velocity for fixed values of theother parameters, and (3) as {tau} is increased from 1/2 the maximum stable velocity increases monotonically until some fixed velocity is reached which does not change for larger {tau}.

  11. Theory and modelling of nanocarbon phase stability.

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The transformation of nanodiamonds into carbon-onions (and vice versa) has been observed experimentally and has been modeled computationally at various levels of sophistication. Also, several analytical theories have been derived to describe the size, temperature and pressure dependence of this phase transition. However, in most cases a pure carbon-onion or nanodiamond is not the final product. More often than not an intermediary is formed, known as a bucky-diamond, with a diamond-like core encased in an onion-like shell. This has prompted a number of studies investigating the relative stability of nanodiamonds, bucky-diamonds, carbon-onions and fullerenes, in various size regimes. Presented here is a review outlining results of numerous theoretical studies examining the phase diagrams and phase stability of carbon nanoparticles, to clarify the complicated relationship between fullerenic and diamond structures at the nanoscale.

  12. Stability analysis and future singularity of the m{sup 2} R □{sup -2} R model of non-local gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dirian, Yves; Mitsou, Ermis E-mail: ermis.mitsou@unige.ch

    2014-10-01

    We analyse the classical stability of the model proposed by Maggiore and Mancarella, where gravity is modified by a term ∼ m{sup 2} R □{sup -2} R to produce the late-time acceleration of the expansion of the universe. Our study takes into account all excitations of the metric that can potentially drive an instability. There are some subtleties in identifying these modes, as a non-local field theory contains dynamical fields which yet do not correspond to degrees of freedom. Since some of them are ghost-like, we clarify the impact of such modes on the stability of the solutions of interest that are the flat space-time and cosmological solutions. We then find that flat space-time is unstable under scalar perturbations, but the instability manifests itself only at cosmological scales, i.e. out of the region of validity of this solution. It is therefore the stability of the FLRW solution which is relevant there, in which case the scalar perturbations are known to be well-behaved by numerical studies. By finding the analytic solution for the late-time behaviour of the scale factor, which leads to a big rip singularity, we argue that the linear perturbations are bounded in the future because of the domination of Hubble friction. In particular, this effect damps the scalar ghost perturbations which were responsible for destabilizing Minkowski space-time. Thus, the model remains phenomenologically viable.

  13. Simple Analysis of Prolate-Spin Attitude Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, Sei-Ichiro

    How can a prolate spacecraft spinning about its axis of minimum moment of inertia be attitude-stabilized by using dual spin? To this question, we find a simple, clear answer. We replace the spacecraft with an equivalent point-mass model and describe its attitude motion as small deviations from its nominal attitude. We show that a friction-like torque applied to the spin axis would reduce wobble motions, and that a similar torque is generated by a wobble damper on a de-spun platform. Thus, we derive a simple attitude-stability theory using minimal mathematical analysis, and this theory is applicable to the spin stabilization of geosynchronous communication spacecraft.

  14. Kahler stabilized, modular invariant heterotic string models

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillard, Mary K.; Gaillard, Mary K.; Nelson, Brent D.

    2007-03-19

    We review the theory and phenomenology of effective supergravity theories based on orbifold compactifications of the weakly-coupled heterotic string. In particular, we consider theories in which the four-dimensional theory displays target space modular invariance and where the dilatonic mode undergoes Kahler stabilization. A self-contained exposition of effective Lagrangian approaches to gaugino condensation and heterotic string theory is presented, leading to the development of the models of Binétruy, Gaillard and Wu. Various aspects of the phenomenology of this class of models are considered. These include issues of supersymmetry breaking and superpartner spectra, the role of anomalous U(1) factors, issues of flavor and R-parity conservation, collider signatures, axion physics, and early universe cosmology. For the vast majority of phenomenological considerations the theories reviewed here compare quite favorably to other string-derived models in the literature. Theoretical objections to the framework and directions for further research are identified and discussed.

  15. Stability analysis for laminar flow control, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benney, D. J.; Orszag, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    The basic equations for the stability analysis of flow over three dimensional swept wings are developed and numerical methods for their solution are surveyed. The equations for nonlinear stability analysis of three dimensional disturbances in compressible, three dimensional, nonparallel flows are given. Efficient and accurate numerical methods for the solution of the equations of stability theory were surveyed and analyzed.

  16. Truck Roll Stability Data Collection and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, SS

    2001-07-02

    The principal objective of this project was to collect and analyze vehicle and highway data that are relevant to the problem of truck rollover crashes, and in particular to the subset of rollover crashes that are caused by the driver error of entering a curve at a speed too great to allow safe completion of the turn. The data are of two sorts--vehicle dynamic performance data, and highway geometry data as revealed by vehicle behavior in normal driving. Vehicle dynamic performance data are relevant because the roll stability of a tractor trailer depends both on inherent physical characteristics of the vehicle and on the weight and distribution of the particular cargo that is being carried. Highway geometric data are relevant because the set of crashes of primary interest to this study are caused by lateral acceleration demand in a curve that exceeds the instantaneous roll stability of the vehicle. An analysis of data quality requires an evaluation of the equipment used to collect the data because the reliability and accuracy of both the equipment and the data could profoundly affect the safety of the driver and other highway users. Therefore, a concomitant objective was an evaluation of the performance of the set of data-collection equipment on the truck and trailer. The objective concerning evaluation of the equipment was accomplished, but the results were not entirely positive. Significant engineering apparently remains to be done before a reliable system can be fielded. Problems were identified with the trailer to tractor fiber optic connector used for this test. In an over-the-road environment, the communication between the trailer instrumentation and the tractor must be dependable. In addition, the computer in the truck must be able to withstand the rigors of the road. The major objective--data collection and analysis--was also accomplished. Using data collected by instruments on the truck, a ''bad-curve'' database can be generated. Using this database

  17. Stability of earthquake clustering models: Criticality and branching ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Jiancang; Werner, Maximilian J.; Harte, David S.

    2013-12-01

    We study the stability conditions of a class of branching processes prominent in the analysis and modeling of seismicity. This class includes the epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model as a special case, but more generally comprises models in which the magnitude distribution of direct offspring depends on the magnitude of the progenitor, such as the branching aftershock sequence (BASS) model and another recently proposed branching model based on a dynamic scaling hypothesis. These stability conditions are closely related to the concepts of the criticality parameter and the branching ratio. The criticality parameter summarizes the asymptotic behavior of the population after sufficiently many generations, determined by the maximum eigenvalue of the transition equations. The branching ratio is defined by the proportion of triggered events in all the events. Based on the results for the generalized case, we show that the branching ratio of the ETAS model is identical to its criticality parameter because its magnitude density is separable from the full intensity. More generally, however, these two values differ and thus place separate conditions on model stability. As an illustration of the difference and of the importance of the stability conditions, we employ a version of the BASS model, reformulated to ensure the possibility of stationarity. In addition, we analyze the magnitude distributions of successive generations of the BASS model via analytical and numerical methods, and find that the compound density differs substantially from a Gutenberg-Richter distribution, unless the process is essentially subcritical (branching ratio less than 1) or the magnitude dependence between the parent event and the direct offspring is weak.

  18. Modelling Hydrodynamic Stability in Electrochemical Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontes, J.; Mangiavacchi, N.; Rabello dos Anjos, G.; Barcia, O. E.; Mattos, O. R.; Tribollet, B.

    2008-10-01

    We review the key points concerning the linear stability of the classical von Kármán's solution of rotating disk flow, modified by the coupling, through the fluid viscosity, with concentration field of a chemical species. The results were recently published by Mangiavacchi et al. (Phys. Fluids, 19: 114109, 2007) and refer to electrochemical cells employing iron rotating disk electrodes, which dissolve in the 1 M H2SO4 solution of the electrolyte. Polarization curves obtained in such cells present a current instability at the beginning of the region where the current is controlled by the the hydrodynamics. The onset of the instability occurs in a range of potentials applied to the cell and disappear above and below this range. Dissolution of the iron electrode gives rise to a thin concentration boundary layer, with thickness of about 4% of the thickness of the hydrodynamic boundary layer. The concentration boundary layer increases the interfacial fluid viscosity, diminishes the diffusion coefficient and couples both fields, with a net result of affecting the hydrodynamic of the problem. Since the current is proportional to the interfacial concentration gradient of the chemical species responsible by the ions transport, the instability of the coupled fields can lead to the current instability observed in the experimental setups. This work presents the results of the linear stability analysis of the coupled fields and the first results concerning the Direct Numerical Simulation, currently undertaken in our group. The results show that small increases of the interfacial viscosity result in a significant reduction of the stability of modes existing in similar configurations, but with constant viscosity fluids. Upon increasing the interfacial viscosity, a new unstable region emerges, in a range of Reynolds numbers much smaller than the lower limit of the unstable region previously known. Though the growth rate of modes in the previously known region is larger than the

  19. Bounded Linear Stability Margin Analysis of Nonlinear Hybrid Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Boskovic, Jovan D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a bounded linear stability analysis for a hybrid adaptive control that blends both direct and indirect adaptive control. Stability and convergence of nonlinear adaptive control are analyzed using an approximate linear equivalent system. A stability margin analysis shows that a large adaptive gain can lead to a reduced phase margin. This method can enable metrics-driven adaptive control whereby the adaptive gain is adjusted to meet stability margin requirements.

  20. High beta and second stability region transport and stability analysis. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, M.H.; Phillps, M.W.; Tood, A.M.M.

    1993-12-01

    This report describes both ideal and resistive MHD stability studies of supershot plasmas in TFTR. The MHD equilibrium and stability modeling of TFTR plasmas has concentrated on those experiments where the safety factor, q, profile was inferred from motional Stark effect measurements (MSE). These are conveniently divided into two groups, first where q is less than unity over some fraction of the plasma radius and, secondly, where q everywhere exceed unity. In the first case, the experimental result that qanalysis pose a major challenge to the validity of ideal MHD theory since these plasmas are usually observed to be free of any coherent 1/1 instability. In the second case where q>l we revisit the resistive stability properties of low {beta}, high q{sub edge} supershots again using MSE q-profiles as a starting point. We find that 2/1 and 3/2 tearing modes can be excited in some circumstances and that the MSE profiles are typically near marginal stability to each of these modes.

  1. Robustness for slope stability modelling under deep uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Susana; Holcombe, Liz; Pianosi, Francesca; Wagener, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    Landslides can have large negative societal and economic impacts, such as loss of life and damage to infrastructure. However, the ability of slope stability assessment to guide management is limited by high levels of uncertainty in model predictions. Many of these uncertainties cannot be easily quantified, such as those linked to climate change and other future socio-economic conditions, restricting the usefulness of traditional decision analysis tools. Deep uncertainty can be managed more effectively by developing robust, but not necessarily optimal, policies that are expected to perform adequately under a wide range of future conditions. Robust strategies are particularly valuable when the consequences of taking a wrong decision are high as is often the case of when managing natural hazard risks such as landslides. In our work a physically based numerical model of hydrologically induced slope instability (the Combined Hydrology and Stability Model - CHASM) is applied together with robust decision making to evaluate the most important uncertainties (storm events, groundwater conditions, surface cover, slope geometry, material strata and geotechnical properties) affecting slope stability. Specifically, impacts of climate change on long-term slope stability are incorporated, accounting for the deep uncertainty in future climate projections. Our findings highlight the potential of robust decision making to aid decision support for landslide hazard reduction and risk management under conditions of deep uncertainty.

  2. Soliton stability in some knot soliton models

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, C.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2007-02-15

    We study the issue of stability of static solitonlike solutions in some nonlinear field theories which allow for knotted field configurations. Concretely, we investigate the Aratyn-Ferreira-Zimerman model [Phys. Lett. B 456, 162 (1999); Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1723 (1999)], based on a Lagrangian quartic in first derivatives with infinitely many conserved currents, for which infinitely many soliton solutions are known analytically. For this model we find that sectors with different (integer) topological charges (Hopf index) are not separated by an infinite energy barrier. Further, if variations which change the topological charge are allowed, then the static solutions are not even critical points of the energy functional. We also explain why soliton solutions can exist at all, in spite of these facts. In addition, we briefly discuss the Nicole model [J. Phys. G 4, 1363 (1978)], which is based on a sigma-model-type Lagrangian. For the Nicole model we find that different topological sectors are separated by an infinite energy barrier.

  3. Stability and modal analysis of shock/boundary layer interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Joseph W.; Larsson, Johan; Bernardini, Matteo; Pirozzoli, Sergio

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of oblique shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions is analyzed by mining a large-eddy simulation (LES) database for various strengths of the incoming shock. The flow dynamics is first analyzed by means of dynamic mode decomposition (DMD), which highlights the simultaneous occurrence of two types of flow modes, namely a low-frequency type associated with breathing motion of the separation bubble, accompanied by flapping motion of the reflected shock, and a high-frequency type associated with the propagation of instability waves past the interaction zone. Global linear stability analysis performed on the mean LES flow fields yields a single unstable zero-frequency mode, plus a variety of marginally stable low-frequency modes whose stability margin decreases with the strength of the interaction. The least stable linear modes are grouped into two classes, one of which bears striking resemblance to the breathing mode recovered from DMD and another class associated with revolving motion within the separation bubble. The results of the modal and linear stability analysis support the notion that low-frequency dynamics is intrinsic to the interaction zone, but some continuous forcing from the upstream boundary layer may be required to keep the system near a limit cycle. This can be modeled as a weakly damped oscillator with forcing, as in the early empirical model by Plotkin (AIAA J 13:1036-1040, 1975).

  4. Analysis of Brace Stiffness Influence on Stability of the Truss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajewski, M.; Iwicki, P.

    2015-02-01

    The paper is devoted to the numerical and experimental research of stability of a truss with side elastic supports at the top chord. The structure is a model of a real roof truss scaled by factor 1/4. The linear buckling analysis and non-linear static analysis were carried out. The buckling length factor for the compressed top chord was calculated and the limit load for the imperfect truss shell model with respect to brace stiffness was obtained. The relation between brace normal force and loading of the truss is presented. The threshold stiffness of braces necessary to obtain the maximum buckling load was found. The truss load bearing capacity obtained from numerical analysis was compared with Eurocode 3 requirements.

  5. Physics-based stability analysis of MOS transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrara, A.; Steeneken, P. G.; Boksteen, B. K.; Heringa, A.; Scholten, A. J.; Schmitz, J.; Hueting, R. J. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a physics-based model is derived based on a linearization procedure for investigating the electrical, thermal and electro-thermal instability of power metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) transistors. The proposed model can be easily interfaced with a circuit or device simulator to perform a failure analysis, making it particularly useful for power transistors. Furthermore, it allows mapping the failure points on a three-dimensional (3D) space defined by the gate-width normalized drain current, drain voltage and junction temperature. This leads to the definition of the Safe Operating Volume (SOV), a powerful frame work for making failure predictions and determining the main root of instability (electrical, thermal or electro-thermal) in different bias and operating conditions. A comparison between the modeled and the measured SOV of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) LDMOS transistors is reported to support the validity of the proposed stability analysis.

  6. Fully Parallel MHD Stability Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinski, Vladimir; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo; Liu, Yueqiang

    2014-10-01

    Progress on full parallelization of the plasma stability code MARS will be reported. MARS calculates eigenmodes in 2D axisymmetric toroidal equilibria in MHD-kinetic plasma models. It is a powerful tool for studying MHD and MHD-kinetic instabilities and it is widely used by fusion community. Parallel version of MARS is intended for simulations on local parallel clusters. It will be an efficient tool for simulation of MHD instabilities with low, intermediate and high toroidal mode numbers within both fluid and kinetic plasma models, already implemented in MARS. Parallelization of the code includes parallelization of the construction of the matrix for the eigenvalue problem and parallelization of the inverse iterations algorithm, implemented in MARS for the solution of the formulated eigenvalue problem. Construction of the matrix is parallelized by distributing the load among processors assigned to different magnetic surfaces. Parallelization of the solution of the eigenvalue problem is made by repeating steps of the present MARS algorithm using parallel libraries and procedures. Initial results of the code parallelization will be reported. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  7. Fully Parallel MHD Stability Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinski, Vladimir; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo; Liu, Yueqiang

    2013-10-01

    Progress on full parallelization of the plasma stability code MARS will be reported. MARS calculates eigenmodes in 2D axisymmetric toroidal equilibria in MHD-kinetic plasma models. It is a powerful tool for studying MHD and MHD-kinetic instabilities and it is widely used by fusion community. Parallel version of MARS is intended for simulations on local parallel clusters. It will be an efficient tool for simulation of MHD instabilities with low, intermediate and high toroidal mode numbers within both fluid and kinetic plasma models, already implemented in MARS. Parallelization of the code includes parallelization of the construction of the matrix for the eigenvalue problem and parallelization of the inverse iterations algorithm, implemented in MARS for the solution of the formulated eigenvalue problem. Construction of the matrix is parallelized by distributing the load among processors assigned to different magnetic surfaces. Parallelization of the solution of the eigenvalue problem is made by repeating steps of the present MARS algorithm using parallel libraries and procedures. Preliminary results of the code parallelization will be reported. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  8. Fully Parallel MHD Stability Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinski, Vladimir; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo; Liu, Yueqiang

    2015-11-01

    Progress on full parallelization of the plasma stability code MARS will be reported. MARS calculates eigenmodes in 2D axisymmetric toroidal equilibria in MHD-kinetic plasma models. It is a powerful tool for studying MHD and MHD-kinetic instabilities and it is widely used by fusion community. Parallel version of MARS is intended for simulations on local parallel clusters. It will be an efficient tool for simulation of MHD instabilities with low, intermediate and high toroidal mode numbers within both fluid and kinetic plasma models, already implemented in MARS. Parallelization of the code includes parallelization of the construction of the matrix for the eigenvalue problem and parallelization of the inverse iterations algorithm, implemented in MARS for the solution of the formulated eigenvalue problem. Construction of the matrix is parallelized by distributing the load among processors assigned to different magnetic surfaces. Parallelization of the solution of the eigenvalue problem is made by repeating steps of the present MARS algorithm using parallel libraries and procedures. Results of MARS parallelization and of the development of a new fix boundary equilibrium code adapted for MARS input will be reported. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  9. Decentralized, cooperative control of multivehicle systems: Design and stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitz, Lesley Anne

    2009-12-01

    This dissertation addresses the design and stability analysis of decentralized, cooperative control laws for multivehicle systems. Advances in communication, navigation, and surveillance systems have enabled greater autonomy in multivehicle systems, and there is a shift toward decentralized, cooperative systems for computational efficiency and robustness. In a decentralized control scheme, control inputs are determined onboard each vehicle; therefore, decentralized controllers are more efficient for large numbers of vehicles, and the system is more robust to communication failures and reconfiguration. The design of decentralized, cooperative control laws is explored for a nonlinear vehicle model that can be represented in a double-integrator form. Cooperative controllers are functions of spacing errors with respect to other vehicles in the system, where the communication structure defines the information that is available to each vehicle. Control inputs are selected to achieve internal stability, or zero steady-state spacing errors, between vehicles in the system. Closed-loop equations of motion for the cooperative system can be written in a structural form, where damping and stiffness matrices contain control gains acting on the velocity and positions of the vehicles, respectively. The form of the stiffness matrix is determined by the communication structure, where different communication structures yield different control forms. Communication structures are compared using two structural analysis tools: modal cost and frequency-response functions, which evaluate the response of the multivehicle systems to disturbances. The frequency-response information is shown to reveal the string stability of different cooperative control forms. The effects of time delays in the feedback states of the cooperative control laws on system stability are also investigated. Closed-loop equations of motion are modeled as delay differential equations, and two stability notions are

  10. Flight stability analysis under changes in insect morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noest, Robert; Wang, Z. Jane

    2015-11-01

    Insect have an amazing ability to control their flight, being able to perform both fast aerial maneuvers and stable hovering. The insect's neural system has developed various mechanism by which it can control these flying feats, but we expect that insect morphology is equally important in facilitating the aerial control. We perform a computational study using a quasi-steady instantaneous flapping flight model which allows us to freely adapt the insect's morphological parameters. We picked a fruit fly as the basis for the body shape and wing motion, and study the effect of changes to the morphology for a range of wing stroke amplitudes. In each case we determine the periodic flight mode, with the period equal to a single wing beat, and do a Floquet stability analysis of the flight. To interpret our results we will compare the changed morphology to related insects. We discuss the implications of the insects location on the stability diagram.

  11. Equilibrium and Stability Analysis of PEGASUS Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sontag, Aaron

    2001-10-01

    Magnetic equilibrium analyses of low-A discharges in the PEGASUS Toroidal Experiment have been performed using EFIT and a locally developed code which incorporates a nonlinear least-squares fitting routine coupled to a Grad-Shafranov solver. Induced currents in the continuous, resistive vessel wall are estimated using a time-evolving current filament model and are constrained during the reconstruction by wall-mounted flux loops and B-dot coils. With I_wall/Ip up to 2, the poloidal field due to the walls often dominates early in the discharge. A recent upgrade of the internal magnetics set to include 20 poloidal flux loops, a poloidal array of 20 B-dot coils, and a diamagnetic loop has increased the accuracy of equilibrium reconstructions. Plasmas with A < 1.3, Ip on the order of 0.15 MA, 0.2 < li < 0.8, and betat < 25% have been analyzed. The presence of a broad q ~ 2 region inside the plasma corresponds to the growth of a large 2/1 internal mode. Ideal stability analyses have been performed using DCON.

  12. Wellbore stability analysis during the production of a carbonate reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, J.-L.; Coehlo, L.; Baud, P.; Guevara Junior, N.

    2009-04-01

    Carbonate reservoirs represent a major part of the world oil and gas reserves. During production, the extraction of hydrocarbons reduces pore pressure and thus causes an increase in the effective stress and mechanical compaction in the reservoir. The compactive deformation and failure may be spatially extensive or localized to the vicinity of the wellbore, but in either case the consequences can be economically severe involving surface subsidence, well failure and various production problems. The analysis of wellbore stability and more generally of deformation and failure in carbonate environments hinges upon a relevant constitutive modeling of carbonate rocks over a wide range of porosities. In this study, we performed a wellbore stability analysis for a lateral wellbore junction in three dimensions. The complex geometry for the wellbore junction was modeled with tetrahedral finite elements considering a rate independent elastic-plastic isotropic material that presented linear behavior during elastic strain and associated flow rule. A finite element model simulating drilling and production phases were done for field conditions from a deep water reservoir in Campos basin, offshore Brazil. In this context, several scenarios were studied considering true 3D orientation for both in situ stresses and geometry of the wellbore junction itself. We discussed the impact of constitutive modeling on the wellbore stability, based on new experimental data on two micritic porous carbonates. Series of conventional triaxial experiments were performed at room temperature in dry and wet conditions on samples of Comiso and Tavel limestones of respective porosity 17 and 16%. The wet samples were deformed in drained conditions with 10 MPa pore pressure. The initial yield stresses were identified as the critical stresses at the onset of shear-enhanced compaction, subsequent yield stresses were considered to depend on hardening given by the plastic volumetric strain. For both limestones

  13. Linear stability analysis for hydrothermal alteration of kimberlitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Andrey; Belyaeva, Ekaterina

    2016-06-01

    The influx of groundwater into hot kimberlite deposits results in the reaction of water with olivine-rich rocks. The products of the reaction are serpentine and release of latent heat. The rise of temperature due to the heat release increases the rate of the reaction. Under certain conditions, this self-speeding up of the reaction can result in instabilities associated with a significantly higher final serpentinization in slightly warmer regions of the kimberlite deposit. We conduct linear stability analysis of serpentinization in an isolated volume of porous kimberlitic rocks saturated with water and an inert gas. There is a counteracting interplay between the heat release tending to destabilize the uniform distribution of parameters and the heat conduction tending to stabilize it by smoothing out temperature perturbations. We determine the critical spatial scale separating the parameters where one phenomenon dominates over another. The perturbations of longer-than-critical length grow, whereas the perturbations of shorter-than-critical length fade. The analytical results of the linear stability analysis are supported by direct numerical simulations using a full nonlinear model.

  14. Influence of various unsteady aerodynamic models on the aeromechanical stability of a helicopter in ground resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, P. P.; Venkatesan, C.

    1985-01-01

    The aeromechanical stability of a helicopter in ground resonance was analyzed, by incorporating five different aerodynamic models in the coupled rotor/fuselage analysis. The sensitivity of the results to changes in aerodynamic modelling was carefully examined. The theoretical results were compared with experimental data and useful conclusions are drawn regarding the role of aerodynamic modeling on this aeromechanical stability problem. The aerodynamic model which provided the best all around correlation with the experimental data was identified.

  15. Bifurcation and stability of an improved time-delayed fluid flow model in internet congestion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Liang; Zhu, Jie; Luo, Xiao-Shu

    2009-09-01

    Based on the fluid flow time-delayed model proposed by Misra et al in internet congestion control, one modified time-delayed model is presented, where the influence of the communication delay on the router queue length is investigated in detail. The main advantage of the new model is that its stability domain is larger even without an extra controller. By linear stability analysis and numerical simulation, the effectiveness and feasibility of the novel model in internet congestion control are verified.

  16. Landslide stability analysis on basis of LIDAR data extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hui; Fernandez-Steeger, Tomas M.; Dong, Mei; Azzam, Rafig

    2010-05-01

    Currently, existing contradictory between remediation and acquisition from natural resource induces a series of divergences. With regard to open pit mining, legal regulation requires human to fill back the open pit area with water or recreate new landscape by other materials; on the other hand, human can not help excavating the mining area due to the shortage of power resource. However, to engineering geologists, one coincident problem which takes place not only in filling but also in mining operation should be paid more attention to, i.e. the slope stability analysis within these areas. There are a number of construction activities during remediation or mining process which can directly or indirectly cause slope failure. Lives can be endangered since local failure either while or after remediation; for mining process, slope failure in a bench, which carries a main haul road or is adjacent to human activity area, would be significant catastrophe to the whole mining program. The stability of an individual bench or slope is controlled by several factors, which are geological condition, morphology, climate, excavation techniques and transportation approach. The task which takes the longest time is to collect the morphological data. Consequently, it is one of the most dangerous tasks due to the time consuming in mining field. LIDAR scanning for morphological data collecting can help to skip this obstacle since advantages of LIDAR techniques as follows: • Dynamic range available on the market: from 3 m to beyond 1 km, • Ruggedly designed for demanding field applications, • Compact, easily hand-carried and deployed by a single operator. In 2009, scanning campaigns for 2 open pit quarry have been carried out. The aim for these LIDAR detections is to construct a detailed 3D quarry model and analyze the bench stability to support the filling planning. The 3D quarry surface was built up by using PolyWorks 10.1 on basis of LIDAR data. LIDAR data refining takes an

  17. Stability analysis of large electric power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Elwood, D.M.

    1993-01-01

    Modern electric power systems are large and complicated, and, in many regions of the world, the generation and transmission systems are operating near their limits. Ensuring the reliable operation of the power system requires engineers to study the response of the system to various disturbances. The responses to large disturbances are examined by numerically solving the nonlinear differential-algebraic equations describing the power system. The response to small disturbances is typically studied via eigenanalysis. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) recently developed the Extended Transient/Mid-term Stability Program (ETMSP) to study large disturbance stability and the Small Signal Stability Program Package (SSSP) to study small signal stability. The primary objectives of the work described in this report were to (1) explore ways of speeding up ETMSP, especially on mid-term voltage stability problems, (2) explore ways of speeding up the Multi-Area Small-Signal Stability program (MASS), one of the codes in SSSP, and (3) explore ways of increasing the size of problem that can be solved by the Cray version of MASS.

  18. Research on Stability Analysis of International Prototype Kilogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaoping; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Jian; Ren, Qingxiong; Ren, Qingmao

    Today, the kilogram is the last of the seven base units of the International System of Units (SI) which is based on a physical artifact. The demands of modern mass metrology have led to an increasing focus on the surface stability and analysis of mass standard. Methods for evaluating the correlation between the measured mass values of the prototypes of the kilogram includes: collection of historical calibration data for kilogram prototypes, setting up a model for deterministic and random changes in the mass of a kilogram prototype (relative to the IPK), adjustment of parameters in a model using historical calibration data, and prediction of future mass values of a kilogram prototype using model and adjusted parameters.

  19. Perturbative stability of SFT-based cosmological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Federico; Koshelev, Alexey S.

    2011-05-01

    We review the appearance of multiple scalar fields in linearized SFT based cosmological models with a single non-local scalar field. Some of these local fields are canonical real scalar fields and some are complex fields with unusual coupling. These systems only admit numerical or approximate analysis. We introduce a modified potential for multiple scalar fields that makes the system exactly solvable in the cosmological context of Friedmann equations and at the same time preserves the asymptotic behavior expected from SFT. The main part of the paper consists of the analysis of inhomogeneous cosmological perturbations in this system. We show numerically that perturbations corresponding to the new type of complex fields always vanish. As an example of application of this model we consider an explicit construction of the phantom divide crossing and prove the perturbative stability of this process at the linear order. The issue of ghosts and ways to resolve it are briefly discussed.

  20. Theoretical foundations for finite-time transient stability and sensitivity analysis of power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Sambarta

    Transient stability and sensitivity analysis of power systems are problems of enormous academic and practical interest. These classical problems have received renewed interest, because of the advancement in sensor technology in the form of phasor measurement units (PMUs). The advancement in sensor technology has provided unique opportunity for the development of real-time stability monitoring and sensitivity analysis tools. Transient stability problem in power system is inherently a problem of stability analysis of the non-equilibrium dynamics, because for a short time period following a fault or disturbance the system trajectory moves away from the equilibrium point. The real-time stability decision has to be made over this short time period. However, the existing stability definitions and hence analysis tools for transient stability are asymptotic in nature. In this thesis, we discover theoretical foundations for the short-term transient stability analysis of power systems, based on the theory of normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds and finite time Lyapunov exponents, adopted from geometric theory of dynamical systems. The theory of normally hyperbolic surfaces allows us to characterize the rate of expansion and contraction of co-dimension one material surfaces in the phase space. The expansion and contraction rates of these material surfaces can be computed in finite time. We prove that the expansion and contraction rates can be used as finite time transient stability certificates. Furthermore, material surfaces with maximum expansion and contraction rate are identified with the stability boundaries. These stability boundaries are used for computation of stability margin. We have used the theoretical framework for the development of model-based and model-free real-time stability monitoring methods. Both the model-based and model-free approaches rely on the availability of high resolution time series data from the PMUs for stability prediction. The problem of

  1. Study report on guidelines and test procedures for investigating stability of nonlinear cardiovascular control system models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzjerrell, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    A general study of the stability of nonlinear as compared to linear control systems is presented. The analysis is general and, therefore, applies to other types of nonlinear biological control systems as well as the cardiovascular control system models. Both inherent and numerical stability are discussed for corresponding analytical and graphic methods and numerical methods.

  2. Linear stability analysis for hydrothermal alteration of kimberlitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Andrey; Belyaeva, Ekaterina

    2016-04-01

    The influx of groundwater into hot kimberlite deposits results in the reaction of water with olivine-rich rocks. The products of the reaction are serpentine and release of latent heat. The rise of temperature due to the heat release increases the rate of the reaction. Under certain conditions, this self-speeding up of the reaction can result in instabilities associated with a significantly higher final serpentinisation in slightly warmer regions of the kimberlite deposit. We conduct linear stability analysis of serpentinisation in an isolated volume of porous kimberlitic rocks saturated with water and an inert gas. There is a counteracting interplay between the heat release tending to destabilise the uniform distribution of parameters and the heat conduction tending to stabilise it by smoothing out temperature perturbations. We determine the critical spatial scale separating the parameters where one phenomenon dominates over another. The perturbations of longer-than-critical length grow, whereas the perturbations of shorter-than-critical length fade. The analytical results of the linear stability analysis are supported by direct numerical simulations using a full nonlinear model. Keywords: Hydrothermal systems, volcaniclastic deposits, phase transitions, instability analysis, numerical solutions

  3. Visual optimality and stability analysis of 3DCT scan positions.

    PubMed

    Amirkhanov, Artem; Heinzl, Christoph; Reiter, Michael; Gröller, Eduard

    2010-01-01

    Industrial cone-beam X-Ray computed tomography (CT) systems often face problems due to artifacts caused by a bad placement of the specimen on the rotary plate. This paper presents a visual-analysis tool for CT systems, which provides a simulation-based preview and estimates artifacts and deviations of a specimen's placement using the corresponding 3D geometrical surface model as input. The presented tool identifies potentially good or bad placements of a specimen and regions of a specimen, which cause the major portion of artefacts. The tool can be used for a preliminary analysis of the specimen before CT scanning, in order to determine the optimal way of placing the object. The analysis includes: penetration lengths, placement stability and an investigation in Radon space. Novel visualization techniques are applied to the simulation data. A stability widget is presented for determining the placement parameters' robustness. The performance and the comparison of results provided by the tool compared with real world data is demonstrated using two specimens. PMID:20975189

  4. DETERMINATION OF ELECTROCHEMICAL PERFORMANCE, AND THERMO-MECHANICALCHEMICAL STABILITY OF SOFCS FROM DEFECT MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Wachsman, E.D.; Duncan, K.L.; Ebrahimi, F.

    2005-01-27

    The objectives of this project were to: provide fundamental relationships between SOFC performance and operating conditions and transient (time dependent) transport properties; extend models to thermo-mechanical stability, thermo-chemical stability, and multilayer structures; incorporate microstructural effects such as grain boundaries and grain-size distribution; experimentally verify models and devise strategies to obtain relevant material constants; and assemble software package for integration into SECA failure analysis models.

  5. Methods of stability analysis in nonlinear mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Warnock, R.L.; Ruth, R.D.; Gabella, W.; Ecklund, K.

    1989-01-01

    We review our recent work on methods to study stability in nonlinear mechanics, especially for the problems of particle accelerators, and compare our ideals to those of other authors. We emphasize methods that (1) show promise as practical design tools, (2) are effective when the nonlinearity is large, and (3) have a strong theoretical basis. 24 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. White Oak Dam stability analysis. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, S.B.

    1994-01-01

    A parametric study was conducted to evaluate the stability of the White Oak Dam (WOD) embankment and foundation. Slope stability analyses were performed for the upper and lower bound soil properties at three sections of the dam using the PCSTABL4 computer program. Minimum safety factors were calculated for the applicable seismic and static loading conditions. Liquefaction potential of the dam embankment and foundation solid during the seismic event was assessed by using simplified procedures. The WOD is classified as a low hazard facility and the Evaluation Basis Earthquake (EBE) is defined as an earthquake with a magnitude of m{sub b} = 5.6 and a Peak Ground Accelerator (PGA) of 0.13 g. This event is approximately equivalent to a Modified Mercalli Intensity of VI-VIII. The EBE is used to perform the seismic evaluation for slope stability and liquefaction potential. Results of the stability analyses and the liquefaction assessment lead to the conclusion that the White Oak Dam is safe and stable for the static and the seismic events defined in this study. Ogden Environmental, at the request of MMES, has checked and verified the calculations for the critical loading conditions and performed a peer review of this report. Ogden has determined that the WOD is stable under the defined static and seismic loading conditions and the embankment materials are in general not susceptible to liquefaction.

  7. CFD Based Computations of Flexible Helicopter Blades for Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.

    2011-01-01

    As a collaborative effort among government aerospace research laboratories an advanced version of a widely used computational fluid dynamics code, OVERFLOW, was recently released. This latest version includes additions to model flexible rotating multiple blades. In this paper, the OVERFLOW code is applied to improve the accuracy of airload computations from the linear lifting line theory that uses displacements from beam model. Data transfers required at every revolution are managed through a Unix based script that runs jobs on large super-cluster computers. Results are demonstrated for the 4-bladed UH-60A helicopter. Deviations of computed data from flight data are evaluated. Fourier analysis post-processing that is suitable for aeroelastic stability computations are performed.

  8. GE simplified boiling water reactor stability analysis in time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shanlai

    1997-12-01

    General Electric Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) was designed as a next generation light water reactor. It uses natural circulation to remove the heat from the reactor core. Because of this unique in-vessel circulation feature, SBWR is expected to exhibit different stability behaviors. The main emphasis of this thesis is to study the SBWR stability behavior in the time domain. The best-estimate BWR accident/transient analysis computer code, TRAC-BF1, is employed to analyze the SBWR stability behavior. A detailed TRAC-BF1 SBWR model has been developed, which has the capability to model the in-vessel natural circulation and the reactor core kinetics. The model is used to simulate three slow depressurization processes. The simulation results show that the reactor is stable under low pressure and nominal downcomer water level conditions. However, when the downcomer water level is raised to about 19.2 m above the bottom of the reactor vessel, an unstable power oscillation is observed. The identified power oscillation is further analyzed using TRAC-BF1 1-D kinetics and the new TRAC-BF1 3-D kinetics code developed in this thesis. The effects of different time step sizes and vessel model nodalizations are examined. It is found that the power oscillation is in-phase and has a frequency of 0.3 HZ. In order to further explore the physical instabilty initiation mechanisms, a simplified dynamic model consisting of six simple differential equations is developed. The simplified model is able to predict the dominant physical phenomenon identified by the TRAC-BF1 analysis. The results indicate that the system instability is possibly caused by the steam separator hydro-static head oscillation under the high water level condition. In order to explore the higher order spacial effect of power oscillation, a 3-D reactor core kinetics code is coupled with the TRAC-BF1 computer code in the PVM parallel processing environment. A new coupling scheme and a multiple time step marching

  9. On the boundary conditions in slope stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugh, Ashok K.

    2003-09-01

    Boundary conditions can affect computed factor of safety results in two- and three-dimensional stability analyses of slopes. Commonly used boundary conditions in two- and three-dimensional slope stability analyses via limit-equilibrium and continuum-mechanics based solution procedures are described. A sample problem is included to illustrate the importance of boundary conditions in slope stability analyses. The sample problem is solved using two- and three-dimensional numerical models commonly used in engineering practice.

  10. Large-signal stability analysis of PWM converters

    SciTech Connect

    Huynh, P.T.; Cho, B.H.

    1995-12-31

    Investigation of the effects of existing nonlinearities on the stability of PWM converters is performed. The bilinear structure, the duty cycle saturation, and the opamp saturation are the principal nonlinearities in PWM converters. These nonlinearities are incorporated in the large-signal analytical models of PWM converters, and the basic input-output stability theory is applied to analyze their stability. Design and optimization of the small-signal loop gains to counteract the undesirable nonlinear effects are also discussed.

  11. Wellbore stability analysis in carbonate reservoir considering anisotropic behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, José; Guevara, Nestor; Coelho, Lucia; Baud, Patrick

    2010-05-01

    Carbonate reservoirs represent a major part of the world oil and gas reserves. In particular, recent discoveries in the pre-salt offshore Brazil place big challenges to exploration and production under high temperatures and pressures (HTHP). During production, the extraction of hydrocarbons reduces pore pressure and thus causes an increase in the effective stress and mechanical compaction in the reservoir. The compactive deformation and failure may be spatially extensive or localized to the vicinity of the wellbore, but in either case the consequences can be economically severe involving surface subsidence, well failure and various production problems. The analysis of wellbore stability and more generally of deformation and failure in carbonate environments hinges upon a relevant constitutive modeling of carbonate rocks over a wide range of porosities, in particular, observed microstructure of samples suggests anisotropic behaviour. In this study, we performed a wellbore stability analysis for a lateral wellbore junction in three dimensions. The complex geometry for the wellbore junction was modeled with tetrahedral finite elements considering a rate independent elastic-plastic isotropic material that presented linear behavior during elastic strain and associated flow rule. A finite element model simulating drilling and production phases were done for field conditions from a deep water reservoir in Campos basin, offshore Brazil. In this context, several scenarios were studied considering true 3D orientation for both in situ stresses and geometry of the wellbore junction itself. We discussed the impact of constitutive modeling, considering anisotropic ductile damage and pressure sensitiveness on the wellbore stability. Parameter values for the analysis were based based on experimental data on two micritic porous carbonates. Series of conventional triaxial experiments were performed at room temperature in dry and wet conditions on samples of Comiso and Tavel

  12. Neuromechanical models for insect locomotion: Stability, maneuverability, and proprioceptive feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukillaya, R.; Proctor, J.; Holmes, P.

    2009-06-01

    We describe a hierarchy of models for legged locomotion, emphasizing relationships among feedforward (preflexive) stability, maneuverability, and reflexive feedback. We focus on a hexapedal geometry representative of insect locomotion in the ground plane that includes a neural central pattern generator circuit, nonlinear muscles, and a representative proprioceptive sensory pathway. Although these components of the model are rather complex, neglect of leg mass yields a neuromechanical system with only three degrees of freedom, and numerical simulations coupled with a Poincaré map analysis shows that the feedforward dynamics is strongly stable, apart from one relatively slow mode and a neutral mode in body yaw angle. These modes moderate high frequency perturbations, producing slow heading changes that can be corrected by a stride-to-stride steering strategy. We show that the model's response to a lateral impulsive perturbation closely matches that of a cockroach subject to a similar impulse. We also describe preliminary studies of proprioceptive leg force feedback, showing how a reflexive pathway can reinforce the preflexive stability inherent in the system.

  13. Space Shuttle Main Engine real time stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, F. Y.

    1993-06-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is a reusable, high performance, liquid rocket engine with variable thrust. The engine control system continuously monitors the engine parameters and issues propellant valve control signals in accordance with the thrust and mixture ratio commands. A real time engine simulation lab was installed at MSFC to verify flight software and to perform engine dynamic analysis. A real time engine model was developed on the AD100 computer system. This model provides sufficient fidelity on the dynamics of major engine components and yet simplified enough to be executed in real time. The hardware-in-the-loop type simulation and analysis becomes necessary as NASA is continuously improving the SSME technology, some with significant changes in the dynamics of the engine. The many issues of interfaces between new components and the engine can be better understood and be resolved prior to the firing of the engine. In this paper, the SSME real time simulation Lab at the MSFC, the SSME real time model, SSME engine and control system stability analysis, both in real time and non-real time is presented.

  14. Electroweak absolute, meta-, and thermal stability in neutrino mass models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Manfred; Patel, Hiren H.; Radovčić, Branimir

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the stability of the electroweak vacuum in neutrino mass models containing right-handed neutrinos or fermionic isotriplets. In addition to considering absolute stability, we place limits on the Yukawa couplings of new fermions based on metastability and thermal stability in the early Universe. Our results reveal that the upper limits on the neutrino Yukawa couplings can change significantly when the top quark mass is allowed to vary within the experimental range of uncertainty in its determination.

  15. Rotor stability estimation with competing tilting pad bearing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloud, C. Hunter; Maslen, Eric H.; Barrett, Lloyd E.

    2012-05-01

    When predicting the stability of rotors supported by tilting pad journal bearings, it is currently debated whether or not the bearings should be represented with frequency dependent dynamics. Using an experimental apparatus, measurements of pad temperatures, unbalance response and stability are compared with modeling predictions for two tilting pad bearing designs. Predictions based on frequency dependent tilting pad bearing dynamics exhibited significantly better correlation with the stability measurements than those assuming frequency independent dynamics.

  16. Stability analysis through bifurcation theory, 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guicheteau, P.

    1993-06-01

    This communication follows a previous communication which was presented in the same Agard Lecture Series (LS 191). In the previous communication, some theoretical foundations of Bifurcation Theory were recalled and a methodology aiming at a systematic prediction of the behavior of non-linear differential equations was presented. This communication mentions some problems which are connected with the introduction of control laws in order to stabilize an unstable dynamic system and presents a brief state of the art related to the determination of the attracting region of a stable equilibrium point.

  17. Sensitivity analysis of hydrodynamic stability operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Peter J.; Henningson, Dan S.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Malik, Mujeeb R.

    1992-01-01

    The eigenvalue sensitivity for hydrodynamic stability operators is investigated. Classical matrix perturbation techniques as well as the concept of epsilon-pseudoeigenvalues are applied to show that parts of the spectrum are highly sensitive to small perturbations. Applications are drawn from incompressible plane Couette, trailing line vortex flow and compressible Blasius boundary layer flow. Parametric studies indicate a monotonically increasing effect of the Reynolds number on the sensitivity. The phenomenon of eigenvalue sensitivity is due to the non-normality of the operators and their discrete matrix analogs and may be associated with large transient growth of the corresponding initial value problem.

  18. A numerical model for stability considerations in HTS magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtonen, Jorma; Mikkonen, Risto; Paasi, Jaakko

    2000-03-01

    We propose that in an HTS application, stability is lost more likely because of a global increase in temperature caused by heat generation distributed over the whole coil than because of a local normal zone which starts to propagate. For consideration of stability in HTS magnets, we present a computational model based on the heat conduction equation coupled with Maxwell's equations, whereby analysis can be performed by using commercial software packages for computational electromagnetics and thermodynamics. For temperature distribution inside the magnet, we derive the magnetic field dependent effective values of thermal conductivity, specific heat, and heat generated by electromagnetic phenomena for the composite structure of the magnet, while cooling conditions and external heat sources are described as boundary conditions. Our model enables the magnet designer to estimate a safe level of the operation current before a thermal runaway. Finally, as examples, we present some calculations of the HTS magnet with ac to review the effects of slanted electric field-current density E (J ) characteristics and high critical temperature of HTS materials.

  19. The stability of the three transmembrane and the four transmembrane human vitamin K epoxide reductase models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sangwook

    2016-04-01

    The three transmembrane and the four transmembrane helix models are suggested for human vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR). In this study, we investigate the stability of the human three transmembrane/four transmembrane VKOR models by employing a coarse-grained normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulation. Based on the analysis of the mobility of each transmembrane domain, we suggest that the three transmembrane human VKOR model is more stable than the four transmembrane human VKOR model.

  20. Structural Stability of Mathematical Models of National Economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashimov, Abdykappar A.; Sultanov, Bahyt T.; Borovskiy, Yuriy V.; Adilov, Zheksenbek M.; Ashimov, Askar A.

    2011-12-01

    In the paper we test robustness of particular dynamic systems in a compact regions of a plane and a weak structural stability of one dynamic system of high order in a compact region of its phase space. The test was carried out based on the fundamental theory of dynamical systems on a plane and based on the conditions for weak structural stability of high order dynamic systems. A numerical algorithm for testing the weak structural stability of high order dynamic systems has been proposed. Based on this algorithm we assess the weak structural stability of one computable general equilibrium model.

  1. Galvanic vestibular stimulation for analysis of postural adaptation and stability.

    PubMed

    Johansson, R; Magnusson, M; Fransson, P A

    1995-03-01

    Human postural dynamics was investigated in 12 normal subjects by means of a force platform recording body sway, induced by bipolar transmastoid galvanic stimulation of the vestibular nerve and labyrinth. The model adopted was that of an inverted segmented pendulum, the dynamics of postural control being assumed to be reflected in the stabilizing forces actuated by the feet as a result of complex muscular activity subject to state feedback of body sway and position. Time-series analysis demonstrates that a transfer function from stimulus to sway-force response with specific parameters can be identified. In addition, adaptation to the vestibular stimulus is demonstrated to exist, and we describe this phenomenon using quantification in terms of a postural adaptation time constant in the range of 40-50 s. The results suggest means to evaluate adaptive behavior and postural control in the erect human being which may be useful in the rehabilitation of individuals striving to regain upright stance. PMID:7698784

  2. Shear-ballooning stability analysis of low-. beta. plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1981-11-01

    A model of magnetic configurations that has both shear and variation of the field curvature along the magnetic field is constructed. The stability analysis of this system is performed by expanding the perturbation functions to phi/sub 0/ which is constant along the field and phi/sub 1/ which is sinusoidally varied along the field line. The shear term is retained in the form of differntial operations in zeta, the coordinate parallel to the pressure gradient. After several simplifications, the equation reduces itself to the fourth order differential equation. The eigenvalue of this equation is numerically obtained. The calculated critical ..beta.. plotted versus the well depth parameter, h, makes a smooth transition between h < 0 (maximum average B) and h > 0 (minimum average B). Using the same technique, the nondivergent solution to the localized shear mode (Suydam mode) is also obtained by retaining the inertia term.

  3. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of hydrodynamic stability in cyclonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman Inigo, Juan; Juniper, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Cyclonic separators are used in a variety of industries to efficiently separate mixtures of fluid and solid phases by means of centrifugal forces and gravity. In certain circumstances, the vortex core of cyclonic flows is known to precess due to the instability of the flow, which leads to performance reductions. We aim to characterize the unsteadiness using linear stability analysis of the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations in a global framework. The system of equations, including the turbulence model, is linearised to obtain an eigenvalue problem. Unstable modes corresponding to the dynamics of the large structures of the turbulent flow are extracted. The analysis shows that the most unstable mode is a helical motion which develops around the axis of the flow. This result is in good agreement with LES and experimental analysis, suggesting the validity of the approach. Finally, an adjoint-based sensitivity analysis is performed to determine the regions of the flow that, when altered, have most influence on the frequency and growth-rate of the unstable eigenvalues.

  4. Soap Bubble Elasticity: Analysis and Correlation with Foam Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakashev, S. I.; Tsekov, R.; Manev, E. D.; Nguyen, A. V.

    2010-05-01

    A correlation between the elastic modulus of soap bubble and the foam stability was found. A model system was chosen: a soap bubble stabilized by simple nonionic surfactant tetraethylene glycol octyl ether (C8E4) and 10^-5 M NaCl. The Elastic moduli were determined by periodical expansion and shrinking of foam bubbles with frequency of 0.1 Hz and volumetric amplitude of 2 mm 3. The film tension was monitored via commercial profile analysis tensiometer (Sinterface Technologies, GmbH). The elastic moduli of foam bubbles versus surfactant concentration in the range of 2x10^-3 - 10^-2 M were obtained. In addition, the theory of Lucassen and van den Tempel for the elastic modulus of single liquid/air interface at given frequency was exploited as well. The bulk diffusion coefficient of the surfactant molecules is unknown parameter through the adsorption frequency in this theory. Hence, a fitting procedure (with one free parameter) was conducted matching experimental and theoretical data. The value of the bulk diffusion coefficient of C8E4 obtained was 5.1x10^-11 m^2/s, which is an order of magnitude lower value than what is expected for. The foam was generated by shaking method and left to decay. A correlation between the elastic modulus and foam life time upon surfactant concentration was found.

  5. Nonlinear stability analysis, energy exchange and solitons on vortex cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftekhari, Kamran

    1999-10-01

    The subject of this dissertation is to develop reliable analytical and numerical methods for the study of the nonlinear stability of a class of slender, incompressible axisymmetric swirling flows. We desire to understanding early nonlinear evolution and possibly gain insight into phenomena such as solitary waves observed on vortex filaments and strongly nonlinear phenomena like vortex breakdown. We use an extension of the method used by Leibovich & Ma [1982] for the development of the equations, which differs in some significant aspects from the formulation of the aforementioned authors. We find, in agreement with Leibovich & Ma [1982], that the complex envelope amplitude of weakly nonlinear asymmetric waves is governed by the cubically nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLS), however our form for coefficients differs from those of Leibovich & Ma [1982]. Most significantly, our formulation includes an axisymmetric disturbance component at second order (a full order lower than Leibovich & Ma) and thus permits energy exchange between asymmetric and axisymmetric disturbance components. The resulting equations also explicitly demonstrate the possibility of singular points where the group (not phase) velocity of linear disturbance equals the local axial flow velocity (group-velocity critical layer in our terminology) and where the NLS coefficients blow up, thus providing a wavenumber selection mechanism for the weakly nonlinear evolution. After implementation of numerical algorithm, our goal is to investigate the effects of weak nonlinearities on the stability of axisymmetric columnar flows. The analysis is applied to several model vortical flows, namely the Q-vortex and the Batchelor [1964] trailing line vortex.

  6. Stability of weighted spectral distribution in a pseudo tree-like network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Jiao; Yuan-ping, Nie; Cheng-dong, Huang; Jing, Du; Rong-hua, Guo; Fei, Huang; Jian-mai, Shi

    2016-05-01

    The comparison of networks with different orders strongly depends on the stability analysis of graph features in evolving systems. In this paper, we rigorously investigate the stability of the weighted spectral distribution (i.e., a spectral graph feature) as the network order increases. First, we use deterministic scale-free networks generated by a pseudo tree-like model to derive the precise formula of the spectral feature, and then analyze the stability of the spectral feature based on the precise formula. Except for the scale-free feature, the pseudo tree-like model exhibits the hierarchical and small-world structures of complex networks. The stability analysis is useful for the classification of networks with different orders and the similarity analysis of networks that may belong to the same evolving system. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61402485, 61303061, and 71201169).

  7. Dilaton stabilization in three-generation heterotic string model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beye, Florian; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Kuwakino, Shogo

    2016-09-01

    We study dilaton stabilization in heterotic string models. By utilizing the asymmetric orbifold construction, we construct an explicit three-generation model whose matter content in the visible sector is the supersymmetric standard model with additional vectorlike matter. This model does not contain any geometric moduli fields except the dilaton field. Model building at a symmetry enhancement point in moduli space enlarges the rank of the hidden gauge group. By analyzing multiple hidden gauge sectors, the dilaton field is stabilized by the racetrack mechanism. We also discuss a supersymmetry breaking scenario and F-term uplifting.

  8. Modeling and stability of segmented reflector telescopes - A decentralized approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryaciotaki-Boussalis, Helen A.; Ih, Che-Hang Charles

    1990-01-01

    The decentralization of a segmented reflector telescope based on a finite-element model of its structure is considered. The decentralization of the system at the panel level is considered. Each panel is originally treated as an isolated subsystem so that the controller design is performed independently at the local level, and then applied to the composite system for stability analysis. The panel-level control laws were designed by means of pole placement using local output feedback. Simulation results show a better 1000:1 vibration attenuation in panel position when compared to the open-loop system. It is shown that the overall closed-loop system is exponentially stable provided that certain conditions are met. The advantage to the decentralized approach is that the design is performed in terms of the low-dimensionality subsystems, thus drastically reducing the design computational complexities.

  9. Linear Stability Analysis of an Acoustically Vaporized Droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Junaid; Qamar, Adnan; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is a phase transition phenomena of a superheat liquid (Dodecafluoropentane, C5F12) droplet to a gaseous bubble, instigated by a high-intensity acoustic pulse. This approach was first studied in imaging applications, and applicable in several therapeutic areas such as gas embolotherapy, thrombus dissolution, and drug delivery. High-speed imaging and theoretical modeling of ADV has elucidated several physical aspects, ranging from bubble nucleation to its subsequent growth. Surface instabilities are known to exist and considered responsible for evolving bubble shapes (non-spherical growth, bubble splitting and bubble droplet encapsulation). We present a linear stability analysis of the dynamically evolving interfaces of an acoustically vaporized micro-droplet (liquid A) in an infinite pool of a second liquid (liquid B). We propose a thermal ADV model for the base state. The linear analysis utilizes spherical harmonics (Ynm, of degree m and order n) and under various physical assumptions results in a time-dependent ODE of the perturbed interface amplitudes (one at the vapor/liquid A interface and the other at the liquid A/liquid B interface). The perturbation amplitudes are found to grow exponentially and do not depend on m. Supported by KAUST Baseline Research Funds.

  10. Stability over time: Is behavior analysis a trait psychology?

    PubMed Central

    Vyse, Stuart

    2004-01-01

    Historically, behavior analysis and trait psychology have had little in common; however, recent developments in behavior analysis bring it closer to one of the core assumptions of the trait approach: the stability of behavior over time and, to a lesser extent, environments. The introduction of the concept of behavioral momentum and, in particular, the development of molar theories have produced some common features and concerns. Behavior-analytic theories of stability provide improved explanations of many everyday phenomena and make possible the expansion of behavior analysis into areas that have been inadequately addressed. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:22478416

  11. Kinematic analysis of rope skipper's stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ab Ghani, Nor Atikah; Rambely, Azmin Sham

    2014-06-01

    There are various kinds of jumping that can be done while performing rope skipping activity. This activity was always associated with injury. But, if the rope skipper can perform the activity in a right way, it is believed that the injury might be reduced. The main purpose of this paper is to observe the stability of rope skipper from a biomechanics perspective, which are the centre of mass, angle at the ankle, knee and hip joints and also the trajectory for the ipsilateral leg between the two types of skip which is one leg and two legs. Six healthy, physically active subject, two males and four females (age: 8.00±1.25 years, weight: 17.90±6.85 kg and height: 1.22±0.08 m) participated in this study. Kinematic data of repeated five cycles of rope skipping activity was captured by using Vicon Nexus system. Based on the data collected, skipping with two legs shows more stable behavior during preparation, flight and landing phases. It is concluded that landing on the balls of the feet, lowering the trajectory positions of the feet from the ground as well as flexion of each joint which would reduce the injury while landing.

  12. Analysis of emulsion stability in acrylic dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2012-02-01

    Emulsions either micro or nano permit transport or solubilization of hydrophobic substances within a water-based phase. Different methods have been introduced at laboratory and industrial scales: mechanical stirring, high-pressure homogenization, or ultrasonics. In digital imaging, toners may be formed by aggregating a colorant with a latex polymer formed by batch or semi-continuous emulsion polymerization. Latex emulsions are prepared by making a monomer emulsion with monomer like Beta-carboxy ethyl acrylate (β-CEA) and stirring at high speed with an anionic surfactant like branched sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonates , aqueous solution until an emulsion is formed. Initiator for emulsion polymerization is 2-2'- azobis isobutyramide dehydrate with chain transfer agent are used to make the latex. If the latex emulsion is unstable, the resulting latexes produce a toner with larger particle size, broader particle size distribution with relatively higher latex sedimentation, and broader molecular weight distribution. Oswald ripening and coalescence cause droplet size to increase and can result in destabilization of emulsions. Shear thinning and elasticity of emulsions are applied to determine emulsion stability.

  13. Stability analysis of offshore wind farm and marine current farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawon, Mohammad Hasanuzzaman

    -trend for large electric energy production using offshore wind generators and marine current generators, respectively. Thus DFIG based offshore wind farm can be an economic solution to stabilize squirrel cage induction generator based marine current farm without installing any addition FACTS devices. This thesis first focuses on the stabilization of fixed speed IG based marine current farm using SDBR. Also stabilization of DFIG based variable speed wind farm utilizing SDBR is studied in this work. Finally a co-operative control strategy is proposed where DFIG is controlled in such a way that it can even provide necessary reactive power demand of induction generator, so that additional cost of FACTS devices can be avoided. In that way, the DFIGs of the offshore wind farm (OWF) will actively compensate the reactive power demand of adjacent IGs of the marine current farm (MCF) during grid fault. Detailed modeling and control scheme for the proposed system are demonstrated considering some realistic scenarios. The power system small signal stability analysis is also carried out by eigenvalue analysis for marine current generator topology, wind turbine generator topology and integrated topology. The relation between the modes and state variables are discussed in light of modal and sensitivity analyses. The results of theoretical analyses are verified by MATLAB/SIMULINK and laboratory standard power system simulator PSCAD/EMTDC.

  14. Stability analysis of a bilayer contained within a cylindrical tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yuanyuan

    Airways in the lung are coated with a liquid bilayer consisting of a serous layer adjacent to a more viscous mucus layer which is contiguous with the air core. An instability due to surface tension at the interfaces may lead to the formation of a liquid plug that blocks the passage of air. This is known as airway closure. A stability analysis is carried out for the case when a Newtonian and immiscible liquid bilayer coats a compliant tube in the presence of an insoluble surfactant monolayer at the mucus-gas interface. A surface active material such as surfactant lowers the surface tension and also generates a surface stress at the interface, both of which are stabilizing, while the wall compliance may accelerate the formation of the liquid bridge. A system of nonlinear coupled equations for the deflections of the interfaces and the surfactant concentration is derived by using an extended lubrication theory analysis. A linear stability study using normal modes is conducted by linearizing the nonlinear evolution equations. A linear eigenvalue problem for the perturbation amplitudes is obtained. Non-trivial solutions are obtained provided the determinant of a linear system is singular. A fourth order polynomial for the growth rate of the disturbances is derived, whose coefficients depend on the wavenumber of the perturbation, the wall characteristics, the Marangoni number, the thickness of the bilayer, the aspect thickness ratio, the viscosity ratio of two liquid layers, and the surface tension ratio. Both stabilizing and destabilizing effects of various system parameters are investigated. A classical lubrication theory model is also derived for cases where a bilayer coats a rigid tube with insoluble surfactant along the liquid-gas interface, and a bilayer coating in a compliant tube with a clean liquid-gas interface. Results serve as a validation of the extended lubrication theory model. The accuracy of the extended lubrication theory model as the bilayer thickness

  15. Aeroelastic Stability of Rotor Blades Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, I.; Sivaneri, N.

    1982-01-01

    The flutter stability of flap bending, lead-lag bending, and torsion of helicopter rotor blades in hover is investigated using a finite element formulation based on Hamilton's principle. The blade is divided into a number of finite elements. Quasi-steady strip theory is used to evaluate the aerodynamic loads. The nonlinear equations of motion are solved for steady-state blade deflections through an iterative procedure. The equations of motion are linearized assuming blade motion to be a small perturbation about the steady deflected shape. The normal mode method based on the coupled rotating natural modes is used to reduce the number of equations in the flutter analysis. First the formulation is applied to single-load-path blades (articulated and hingeless blades). Numerical results show very good agreement with existing results obtained using the modal approach. The second part of the application concerns multiple-load-path blades, i.e. bearingless blades. Numerical results are presented for several analytical models of the bearingless blade. Results are also obtained using an equivalent beam approach wherein a bearingless blade is modelled as a single beam with equivalent properties. Results show the equivalent beam model.

  16. An Alternative Interpretation of Three Stability Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Rand R.

    1979-01-01

    Wilcox has described three probability models which characterize a single test item in terms of a population of examinees (ED 156 718). This note indicates indicates that similar models can be derived which characterize a single examinee in terms of an item domain. A numerical illustration is given. (Author/JKS)

  17. Kinematic Analysis of a Posterior-stabilized Knee Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhi-Xin; Wen, Liang; Qu, Tie-Bing; Hou, Li-Li; Xiang, Dong; Bin, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Background: The goal of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is to restore knee kinematics. Knee prosthesis design plays a very important role in successful restoration. Here, kinematics models of normal and prosthetic knees were created and validated using previously published data. Methods: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of a healthy, anticorrosive female cadaver were used to establish a model of the entire lower limbs, including the femur, tibia, patella, fibula, distal femur cartilage, and medial and lateral menisci, as well as the anterior cruciate, posterior cruciate, medial collateral, and lateral collateral ligaments. The data from the three-dimensional models of the normal knee joint and a posterior-stabilized (PS) knee prosthesis were imported into finite element analysis software to create the final kinematic model of the TKA prosthesis, which was then validated by comparison with a previous study. The displacement of the medial/lateral femur and the internal rotation angle of the tibia were analyzed during 0–135° flexion. Results: Both the output data trends and the measured values derived from the normal knee's kinematics model were very close to the results reported in a previous in vivo study, suggesting that this model can be used for further analyses. The PS knee prosthesis underwent an abnormal forward displacement compared with the normal knee and has insufficient, or insufficiently aggressive, “rollback” compared with the lateral femur of the normal knee. In addition, a certain degree of reverse rotation occurs during flexion of the PS knee prosthesis. Conclusions: There were still several differences between the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis and a normal knee, suggesting room for improving the design of the PS knee prosthesis. The abnormal kinematics during early flexion shows that the design of the articular surface played a vital role in improving the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis. PMID:25591565

  18. Decomposition-aggregation stability analysis of the spinning Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuk, S. M.; Siljak, D. D.

    1974-01-01

    Stability of an 11-th order linear model of the spinning Skylab is determined by the decomposition-aggregation method based upon the comparison principle and vector Liapunov functions. To reduce the inherent conservativeness of the method an optimization problem is formulated and resolved producing the optimum comparison system. The system provides the best estimate of the stability region of the important structural parameter - asymmetry in the boom settings.

  19. Ballooning mode stability in the Hall-magnetohydrodynamics model

    SciTech Connect

    Torasso, R.; Hameiri, Eliezer

    2005-03-01

    The governing equations of the ballooning modes are derived within the Hall-magneto-hydrodynamics (HMHD) model and given a standard Hamiltonian form, which is then used to derive sufficient conditions for stability. In most cases, ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) stability implies HMHD stability, as is the case for tokamak configurations if the pressure is a monotone increasing function of density and the entropy is monotone decreasing. The same result holds for general MHD plasmas with constant entropy and for incompressible plasmas. However, in the case of (compressible) closed-line systems such as the field-reversed configuration, or in a typical magnetospheric magnetic field, MHD ballooning stability does not guarantee HMHD stability. For the explicitly solvable configuration of the Z pinch it is in fact shown that the plasma can be MHD stable but HMHD unstable.

  20. Remarks on the stability analysis of reactive flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheurer, B.

    1987-01-01

    A simple model of compressible reacting flow is studied. First, a dispersion relation is derived for the linearized problem making a distinction between frozen and equilibrium sound speed. Second, the stability of the Von Neumann-Richtmyer scheme applied to this model is studied. A natural generalization of the C.F.L. condition is found.

  1. Bifurcation analysis of axial flow compressor stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccaughan, F. E.

    1990-01-01

    With a one-mode truncation it is possible to reduce the Moore-Greitzer model for compressor instability to a set of three ordinary differential equations. These are approached from the point of view of bifurcation theory. Most of the bifurcations emerge from a degenerate Takens-Bogdanov bifurcation point. The bifurcation sets are completed using the numerical branch tracking scheme AUTO. Despite the severity of the truncation, the agreement with experimental results is excellent.

  2. Pyrosequencing Based Microbial Community Analysis of Stabilized Mine Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. E.; Lee, B. T.; Son, A.

    2015-12-01

    Heavy metals leached from exhausted mines have been causing severe environmental problems in nearby soils and groundwater. Environmental mitigation was performed based on the heavy metal stabilization using Calcite and steel slag in Korea. Since the soil stabilization only temporarily immobilizes the contaminants to soil matrix, the potential risk of re-leaching heavy metal still exists. Therefore the follow-up management of stabilized soils and the corresponding evaluation methods are required to avoid the consequent contamination from the stabilized soils. In this study, microbial community analysis using pyrosequencing was performed for assessing the potential leaching of the stabilized soils. As a result of rarefaction curve and Chao1 and Shannon indices, the stabilized soil has shown lower richness and diversity as compared to non-contaminated negative control. At the phyla level, as the degree of contamination increases, most of phyla decreased with only exception of increased proteobacteria. Among proteobacteria, gamma-proteobacteria increased against the heavy metal contamination. At the species level, Methylobacter tundripaludum of gamma-proteobacteria showed the highest relative portion of microbial community, indicating that methanotrophs may play an important role in either solubilization or immobilization of heavy metals in stabilized soils.

  3. Analysis of Human Body Bipedal Stability for Neuromotor Disabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baritz, Mihaela; Cristea, Luciana; Rogozea, Liliana; Cotoros, Diana; Repanovici, Angela

    2009-04-01

    The analysis of different biomechanical aspects of balance and equilibrium is presented in the first part of the paper. We analyzed the posture, balance and stability of human body for a normal person and for a person with loco-motor or neuro-motor disabilities (in the second part). In the third part of the paper we presented the methodology and the experimental setup used to record the human body behavior in postural stability for persons with neuro-motors disabilities. The results and the conclusions are presented in the final part of the paper and also in the future work meant to establish the computer analysis for rehabilitation neuromotor disabilities.

  4. Advances in Computational Stability Analysis of Composite Aerospace Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Degenhardt, R.; Araujo, F. C. de

    2010-09-30

    European aircraft industry demands for reduced development and operating costs. Structural weight reduction by exploitation of structural reserves in composite aerospace structures contributes to this aim, however, it requires accurate and experimentally validated stability analysis of real structures under realistic loading conditions. This paper presents different advances from the area of computational stability analysis of composite aerospace structures which contribute to that field. For stringer stiffened panels main results of the finished EU project COCOMAT are given. It investigated the exploitation of reserves in primary fibre composite fuselage structures through an accurate and reliable simulation of postbuckling and collapse. For unstiffened cylindrical composite shells a proposal for a new design method is presented.

  5. Stability Analysis of Absorption Chiller-Heaters by Applying Transfer Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Tatsuo; Miyake, Satoshi; Oka, Masahiro; Mori, Kiyoyuki

    A transfer function approach is found to be a practical method for ensuring stable operation of absorption chiller-heaters. The transfer function model is based on a solution-circuit of the machine, which dominates the stability of the operation. This model includes a solution pump, a generator with an overflow weir, and a float valve. We found that the solution-circuit system is designed with the cascade control, which makes the system stable. In this construction, the float valve actuates a primary control loop, and the overflow weir actuates a secondary loop. The effects of the characteristic of the solution pump and the overflow weir are estimated by the degree of the stabilities, which are the gain margin and the phase margin. We found that the characteristic of the solution pump strongly effects the stability by enhancing the effect of the cascade control and improving the stability. So it is essential for a better stability analysis model. According to these results, the established model is useful for quantitatively predicting the stabilities of a chiller-heater in operation, and simultaneously reducing its size and improving the stability of operation. We conclude that the methodology based on transfer function can provide compact and reliable absorption chiller-heaters.

  6. High beta and second stability region transport and stability analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, M.H.; Phillps, M.W.; Todd, A.M.M.; Krishnaswami, J.; Hartley, R.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes ideal and resistive studies of high-beta plasmas and of the second stability region. Emphasis is focused on ``supershot`` plasmas in TFIR where MHD instabilities are frequently observed and which spoil their confinement properties. Substantial results are described from the analysis of these high beta poloidal plasmas. During these studies, initial pressure and safety factor profiles were obtained from the TRANSP code, which is used extensively to analyze experimental data. Resistive MBD stability studies of supershot equilibria show that finite pressure stabilization of tearing modes is very strong in these high {beta}p plasmas. This has prompted a detailed re-examination of linear tearing mode theory in which we participated in collaboration with Columbia University and General Atomics. This finite pressure effect is shown to be highly sensitive to small scale details of the pressure profile. Even when an ad hoc method of removing this stabilizing mechanism is implemented, however, it is shown that there is only superficial agreement between resistive MBD stability computation and the experimental data. While the mode structures observed experimentally can be found computationally, there is no convincing correlation with the experimental observations when the computed results are compared with a large set of supershot data. We also describe both the ideal and resistive stability properties of TFIR equilibria near the transition to the second region. It is shown that the highest {beta} plasmas, although stable to infinite-n ideal ballooning modes, can be unstable to the so called ``infernal`` modes associated with small shear. The sensitivity of these results to the assumed pressure and current density profiles is discussed. Finally, we describe results from two collaborative studies with PPPL. The first involves exploratory studies of the role of the 1/1 mode in tokamaks and, secondly, a study of sawtooth stabilization using ICRF.

  7. A CANDU figure-of-eight flow stability model

    SciTech Connect

    Gulshani, P.; Spinks, N.J.

    1984-11-01

    A stability model of flow oscillations observed in two-phase flow tests in a CANDU-like experimental rig is developed. The model is derived by linearizing and solving one-dimensional, homogeneous two-phase flow conservation equations. The flow oscillations are explained in terms of the response of the pressure in the two-phase region to a change in the single-phase flow. A simple instability criterion valid for high-pressure thermosyphoning is given. The observed and predicted periods and damping ratios are generally found to be in good agreement. Combined with a simple, analytic, steady-state model to give approximate loop operating conditions, the stability model is used to generate stability maps for thermosyphoning conditions.

  8. Modeling For Stabilization Of Segmented Telescope Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ih, Che-Hang C.; Boussalis, Helen A.

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses mathematical modeling of vibrations and active control to suppress vibrations of large, segmented telescope reflector. Vibrating structure treated as collection of substructures, each initially treated separately. Vibrations suppressed considerably, in comparison with open-loop vibration-attenuation mechanism.

  9. Stabilizing a Bicycle: A Modeling Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennings, Timothy J.; Williams, Blair R.

    2010-01-01

    This article is a project that takes students through the process of forming a mathematical model of bicycle dynamics. Beginning with basic ideas from Newtonian mechanics (forces and torques), students use techniques from calculus and differential equations to develop the equations of rotational motion for a bicycle-rider system as it tips from…

  10. A Robustly Stabilizing Model Predictive Control Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackmece, A. Behcet; Carson, John M., III

    2007-01-01

    A model predictive control (MPC) algorithm that differs from prior MPC algorithms has been developed for controlling an uncertain nonlinear system. This algorithm guarantees the resolvability of an associated finite-horizon optimal-control problem in a receding-horizon implementation.