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1

Settlement Prediction, Gas Modeling and Slope Stability Analysis  

E-print Network

Settlement Prediction, Gas Modeling and Slope Stability Analysis in Coll Cardús Landfill Li Yu using mechanical models Simulation of gas generation, transport and extraction in MSW landfill 1 models Simulation of gas generation, transport and extraction in MSW landfill 1) Analytical solution

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

2

Drosophila Circadian Rhythms: Stability Robustness Analysis and Model Reduction  

E-print Network

Drosophila Circadian Rhythms: Stability Robustness Analysis and Model Reduction Jorge M. Gonc investigates two models of circadian rhythms in Drosophila: one by Gonze et al. and a more generic model the control and regulation of circadian rhythms and other limit cycle behaviours. 1 Introduction Many aspects

Gonçalves, Jorge

3

A Coupled Aeroelastic Model for Launch Vehicle Stability Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A technique for incorporating distributed aerodynamic normal forces and aeroelastic coupling effects into a stability analysis model of a launch vehicle is presented. The formulation augments the linear state-space launch vehicle plant dynamics that are compactly derived as a system of coupled linear differential equations representing small angular and translational perturbations of the rigid body, nozzle, and sloshing propellant coupled with normal vibration of a set of orthogonal modes. The interaction of generalized forces due to aeroelastic coupling and thrust can be expressed as a set of augmenting non-diagonal stiffness and damping matrices in modal coordinates with no penalty on system order. While the eigenvalues of the structural response in the presence of thrust and aeroelastic forcing can be predicted at a given flight condition independent of the remaining degrees of freedom, the coupled model provides confidence in closed-loop stability in the presence of rigid-body, slosh, and actuator dynamics. Simulation results are presented that characterize the coupled dynamic response of the Ares I launch vehicle and the impact of aeroelasticity on control system stability margins.

Orr, Jeb S.

2010-01-01

4

Models and Stability Analysis of Boiling Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic stability of boiling water reactors (BWRs) using a model that includes: space-time modal neutron kinetics based on spatial w-modes; single- and two-phase flow in parallel boiling channels; fuel rod heat conduction dynamics; and a simple model of the recirculation loop. The BR model is represented by a set of time-dependent nonlinear ordinary differential equations, and is studied as a dynamical system using the modern bifurcation theory and nonlinear dynamical systems analysis. We first determine the stability boundary (SB) - or Hopf bifurcation set- in the most relevant parameter plane, the inlet-subcooling-number/external-pressure-drop plane, for a fixed control rod induced external reactivity equal to the 100% rod line value; then we transform the SB to the practical power-flow map used by BWR operating engineers and regulatory agencies. Using this SB, we show that the normal operating point at 100% power is very stable, that stability of points on the 100% rod line decreases as the flow rate is reduced, and that operating points in the low-flow/high-power region are least stable. We also determine the SB that results when the modal kinetics is replaced by simple point reactor kinetics, and we thereby show that the first harmonic mode does not have a significant effect on the SB. However, we later show that it nevertheless has a significant effect on stability because it affects the basin of attraction of stable operating points. Using numerical simulations we show that, in the important low-flow/high-power region, the Hopf bifurcation that occurs as the SB is crossed is subcritical; hence, growing oscillations can result following small finite perturbations of stable steady-states on the 100% rod line at points in the low-flow/high-power region. Numerical simulations are also performed to calculate the decay ratios (DRs) and frequencies of oscillations for various points on the 100% rod line. It is determined that the U.S. NRC requirement of DR is not rigorously satisfied in the low-flow/high-power region; hence, this region should be avoided during normal startup and shutdown operations. The frequency of oscillation is shown to decrease as the flow rate is reduced. Moreover, the simulation frequency of 0.5Hz determined in the low-flow/high-power region is consistent with those observed during actual instability incidents. Additional numerical simulations show that in the low-flow/high-power region, for the same initial conditions, the use of point kinetics leads to damped oscillations, whereas the model that includes the modal neutron kinetics equations results in growing nonlinear oscillations.

John Dorning

2002-04-15

5

Stability analysis of an implicitly defined labor market model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Until very recently, the pervasive existence of models exhibiting well-defined backward dynamics but ill-defined forward dynamics in economics and finance has apparently posed no serious obstacles to the analysis of their dynamics and stability, despite the problems that may arise from possible erroneous conclusions regarding theoretical considerations and policy prescriptions from such models. A large number of papers have dealt with this problem in the past by assuming the existence of symmetry between forward and backward dynamics, even in the case when the map cannot be invertible either forward or backwards. However, this procedure has been seriously questioned over the last few years in a series of papers dealing with implicit difference equations and inverse limit spaces. This paper explores the search and matching labor market model developed by Bhattacharya and Bunzel [J. Bhattacharya, H. Bunzel, Chaotic Planning Solution in the Textbook Model of Equilibrium Labor Market Search and Matching, Mimeo, Iowa State University, 2002; J. Bhattacharya, H. Bunzel, Economics Bulletin 5 (19) (2003) 1-10], with the following objectives in mind: (i) to show that chaotic dynamics may still be present in the model for acceptable parameter values, (ii) to clarify some open questions related with the admissible dynamics in the forward looking setting, by providing a rigorous proof of the existence of cyclic and chaotic dynamics through the application of tools from symbolic dynamics and inverse limit theory.

Mendes, Diana A.; Mendes, Vivaldo M.

2008-06-01

6

Linear Stability Analysis of Thermo-Lattice Boltzmann Models  

Microsoft Academic Search

The numerical stability of thermo-lattice Boltzmann (TLBE) models is presented.The TLBE algorithm is linearized and represented in matrix form. The spectral radius of the resulting matrix is obtained by the method of powers. In particular, the numerical stability of two 2-speed 13-bit TLBE modelsone based on the hexagonal lattice, and the other on a square latticeis examined. For these two

Pavol Pavlo; George Vahala; Linda Vahala; Min Soe

1998-01-01

7

Stability analysis of the Euler discretization for SIR epidemic model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we consider a discrete SIR epidemic model obtained by the Euler method. For that discrete model, existence of disease free equilibrium and endemic equilibrium is established. Sufficient conditions on the local asymptotical stability of both disease free equilibrium and endemic equilibrium are also derived. It is found that the local asymptotical stability of the existing equilibrium is achieved only for a small time step size h. If h is further increased and passes the critical value, then both equilibriums will lose their stability. Our numerical simulations show that a complex dynamical behavior such as bifurcation or chaos phenomenon will appear for relatively large h. Both analytical and numerical results show that the discrete SIR model has a richer dynamical behavior than its continuous counterpart.

Suryanto, Agus

2014-06-01

8

Verified Analysis of a Model for Stance Stabilization  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The stabilization of stance is a subject of continuing research in biology, biomechanics and robotics. It plays an important\\u000a role in many clinical applications as well as in forward dynamical gait simulation. In this paper, we propose a new model\\u000a relying on a two cylinder foot contact scheme. This contact model has the advantage of simple and smooth dynamic behavior

Ekaterina Auer; Haider Albassam; Andrs Kecskemthy; Wolfram Luther

9

Performance Evaluation 40 (2000) 2746 A novel approach to queue stability analysis of polling models  

E-print Network

in modeling many real-world systems. For example, token-passing LAN, polling scheme, and processor sharing on stability of the whole system. This system stability analysis, however, fails to model many real-world systems for which some queues may continue to operate under an unstable system. In this paper we address

Chang, Rocky Kow-Chuen

10

A Versatile System Model for the Dynamic Stability Analysis of Power Systems Including HVDC Links  

Microsoft Academic Search

A general and novel approach for the development of the linearized model for the dynamic stability analysis of multimachine power systems including HVDC links is presented in this paper. The modelling considers detailed representation of the generators and DC links with their associated controllers and nonlinear voltage dependent loads. The component models are formulated separately and are interconnected by the

K. R. Padiyar; M. A. Pal; C. Radhakrishna

1981-01-01

11

Floquet stability analysis of the longitudinal dynamics of two hovering model insects.  

PubMed

Because of the periodically varying aerodynamic and inertial forces of the flapping wings, a hovering or constant-speed flying insect is a cyclically forcing system, and, generally, the flight is not in a fixed-point equilibrium, but in a cyclic-motion equilibrium. Current stability theory of insect flight is based on the averaged model and treats the flight as a fixed-point equilibrium. In the present study, we treated the flight as a cyclic-motion equilibrium and used the Floquet theory to analyse the longitudinal stability of insect flight. Two hovering model insects were considered-a dronefly and a hawkmoth. The former had relatively high wingbeat frequency and small wing-mass to body-mass ratio, and hence very small amplitude of body oscillation; while the latter had relatively low wingbeat frequency and large wing-mass to body-mass ratio, and hence relatively large amplitude of body oscillation. For comparison, analysis using the averaged-model theory (fixed-point stability analysis) was also made. Results of both the cyclic-motion stability analysis and the fixed-point stability analysis were tested by numerical simulation using complete equations of motion coupled with the Navier-Stokes equations. The Floquet theory (cyclic-motion stability analysis) agreed well with the simulation for both the model dronefly and the model hawkmoth; but the averaged-model theory gave good results only for the dronefly. Thus, for an insect with relatively large body oscillation at wingbeat frequency, cyclic-motion stability analysis is required, and for their control analysis, the existing well-developed control theories for systems of fixed-point equilibrium are no longer applicable and new methods that take the cyclic variation of the flight dynamics into account are needed. PMID:22491980

Wu, Jiang Hao; Sun, Mao

2012-09-01

12

Floquet stability analysis of the longitudinal dynamics of two hovering model insects  

PubMed Central

Because of the periodically varying aerodynamic and inertial forces of the flapping wings, a hovering or constant-speed flying insect is a cyclically forcing system, and, generally, the flight is not in a fixed-point equilibrium, but in a cyclic-motion equilibrium. Current stability theory of insect flight is based on the averaged model and treats the flight as a fixed-point equilibrium. In the present study, we treated the flight as a cyclic-motion equilibrium and used the Floquet theory to analyse the longitudinal stability of insect flight. Two hovering model insects were considereda dronefly and a hawkmoth. The former had relatively high wingbeat frequency and small wing-mass to body-mass ratio, and hence very small amplitude of body oscillation; while the latter had relatively low wingbeat frequency and large wing-mass to body-mass ratio, and hence relatively large amplitude of body oscillation. For comparison, analysis using the averaged-model theory (fixed-point stability analysis) was also made. Results of both the cyclic-motion stability analysis and the fixed-point stability analysis were tested by numerical simulation using complete equations of motion coupled with the NavierStokes equations. The Floquet theory (cyclic-motion stability analysis) agreed well with the simulation for both the model dronefly and the model hawkmoth; but the averaged-model theory gave good results only for the dronefly. Thus, for an insect with relatively large body oscillation at wingbeat frequency, cyclic-motion stability analysis is required, and for their control analysis, the existing well-developed control theories for systems of fixed-point equilibrium are no longer applicable and new methods that take the cyclic variation of the flight dynamics into account are needed. PMID:22491980

Wu, Jiang Hao; Sun, Mao

2012-01-01

13

Stability analysis of dynamic collaboration model with control signals on two lanes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, the influence of control signals on the stability of two-lane traffic flow is mainly studied by applying control theory with lane changing behaviors. We present the two-lane dynamic collaboration model with lateral friction and the expressions of feedback control signals. What is more, utilizing the delayed feedback control theory to the two-lane dynamic collaboration model with control signals, we investigate the stability of traffic flow theoretically and the stability conditions for both lanes are derived with finding that the forward and lateral feedback signals can improve the stability of traffic flow while the backward feedback signals cannot achieve it. Besides, direct simulations are conducted to verify the results of theoretical analysis, which shows that the feedback signals have a significant effect on the running state of two vehicle groups, and the results are same with the theoretical analysis.

Li, Zhipeng; Zhang, Run; Xu, Shangzhi; Qian, Yeqing; Xu, Juan

2014-12-01

14

Stability analysis of interval type-2 fuzzy-model-based control systems.  

PubMed

This paper presents the stability analysis of interval type-2 fuzzy-model-based (FMB) control systems. To investigate the system stability, an interval type-2 Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy model, which can be regarded as a collection of a number of type-1 T-S fuzzy models, is proposed to represent the nonlinear plant subject to parameter uncertainties. With the lower and upper membership functions, the parameter uncertainties can be effectively captured. Based on the interval type-2 T-S fuzzy model, an interval type-2 fuzzy controller is proposed to close the feedback loop. To facilitate the stability analysis, the information of the footprint of uncertainty is used to develop some membership function conditions, which allow the introduction of slack matrices to handle the parameter uncertainties in the stability analysis. Stability conditions in terms of linear matrix inequalities are derived using a Lyapunov-based approach. Simulation examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed interval type-2 FMB control approach. PMID:18558528

Lam, H K; Seneviratne, Lakmal D

2008-06-01

15

Analysis of the stability of stationary boundary friction modes in the framework of a synergetic model  

E-print Network

A synergetic model describing the state of an ultrathin lubricant layer squeezed between two atomically smooth solid surfaces operating in the boundary friction mode has been developed further. To explain the presence of different operation modes of the system for various sets of its main parameters, the mathematical analysis of the synergetic model is carried out. The type of functioning a tribological system is described in accordance with the stability character of singular points, and the diagrams distinguishing various operation modes are obtained. Phase portraits corresponding to different stability types are plotted for all diagram areas. A stick-slip mode of motion that is often observed experimentally is described.

Iakov A. Lyashenko; Nataliia N. Manko

2014-01-17

16

Turbine-generator transient monitoring; Torsional stress analysis and stability model identification  

SciTech Connect

A hardware and software system has been developed under EPRI sponsorship to monitor turbine-generator transient events, perform shaft torsional stress analysis for each event, and derive the best fit stability model parameters for each event. As the acquisition hardware is built around commercial digital transient recorder equipment, standard fault recorder type analysis of event data is also possible. The off-line analysis workstation is an 80386 personal computer running 32 bit FORTRAN under the XENIX operating system. The EPRI project is currently underway with two turbine-generators being monitored and events analyzed. Typical analysis results are presented in this paper along with implementation details.

Wegner, C.A.; Bowler, C.E.J.; Rubino, J.C.P. (Laboratoires d'Electronique et de Physique Appliquee (LEP), 75 - Paris (France)); Edmonds, J.S. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States))

1991-01-01

17

Generation of optimal linear parametric models for LFT-based robust stability analysis and control design  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a general approach to generate a linear parametric state-space model, which approximates a nonlinear system with high accuracy. It is optimally suited for LFT-based robust stability analysis and control design. At the beginning a Jacobian-based linearization is applied to generate a set of linearized state-space systems describing the local behavior of the nonlinear plant about the corresponding equilibrium

Harald Pfifer; Simon Hecker

2008-01-01

18

Analysis and test evaluation of the dynamic response and stability of three advanced turboprop models  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of dynamic response and stability wind tunnel tests of three 62.2 cm (24.5 in) diameter models of the Prop-Fan, advanced turboprop, are presented. Measurements of dynamic response were made with the rotors mounted on an isolated nacelle, with varying tilt for nonuniform inflow. One model was also tested using a semi-span wing and fuselage configuration for response to realistic aircraft inflow. Stability tests were performed using tunnel turbulence or a nitrogen jet for excitation. Measurements are compared with predictions made using beam analysis methods for the model with straight blades, and finite element analysis methods for the models with swept blades. Correlations between measured and predicted rotating blade natural frequencies for all the models are very good. The IP dynamic response of the straight blade model is reasonably well predicted. The IP response of the swept blades is underpredicted and the wing induced response of the straight blade is overpredicted. Two models did not flutter, as predicted. One swept blade model encountered an instability at a higher RPM than predicted, showing predictions to be conservative.

Bansal, P. N.; Arseneaux, P. J.; Smith, A. F.; Turnberg, J. E.; Brooks, B. M.

1985-01-01

19

A comparative analysis of terrain stability models for predicting shallow landslides in colluvial soils  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most of the slopes of the hilly areas of the Apennines are composed of colluvial soils originating from the weathering of the bedrock and down slope transportation. Shallow slides affect this superficial cover, depend largely on the surface topography and are a recurrent problem. SINMAP and SHALSTAB are terrain stability models that combine steady state hydrology assumptions with the infinite slope stability model to quantify shallow slope stability. They have a similar physical basis but they use different indices to quantify instability. The purposes of this study are to test and compare the approaches of SINMAP and SHALSTAB models for slope stability analysis and to compare the results of these analyses with the locations of the shallow landslides that occurred on November 2002 in an area of the Oltrepo Pavese (Northern Apennines). The territory of S. Giuletta, characterized by clayey-silty colluvial soils, represents the test site. The Digital Elevation Model was constructed from a 1:5000 scale contour map and was used to estimate the slope of the terrain as well as the potential soil moisture conditions. In situ and laboratory tests provided the basis for measuring values for soil hydraulic and geotechnical parameters (moisture content, soil suction, Atterberg limits, methylene blue dye adsorption, hydraulic conductivity). Soil thickness was extracted from a soil database. An inventory of landslide from interpretation of aerial photographs and field surveys was used to document sites of instability (mostly soil slips) and to provide a test of model performance by comparing observed landslide locations with model predictions. The study discusses the practical advantages and limitations of the two models in connection with the geological characteristics of the studied area, which could be representative of similar geological contexts in the Apennines.

Meisina, C.; Scarabelli, S.

2007-06-01

20

Stability analysis and synthesis of nonlinear time-delay systems via linear Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy models  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper concerns with the stability analysis and synthesis of nonlinear retarded systems via linear TakagiSugeno (TS) fuzzy model approach. First, the TS fuzzy models with time-delay are present and the stability conditions are derived using LyapunovRazumikhin functional approach. Then a stabilization approach for nonlinear retarded systems through fuzzy state feedback and fuzzy observer-based controller is proposed. It shows that

Yong-yan Cao; P. M. Frank

2001-01-01

21

Stability analysis of the vertical position control loop in TCV using rigid and deformable plasma models  

Microsoft Academic Search

The stability of the vertical position control system in TCV is analysed using two different plasma models, a deformable plasma model (DPM) and a rigid plasma model (RPM). The open loop growth rates and closed loop stability are computed, as functions of various plasma parameters, for both models. It is found that the difference between the open loop growth rates

F. Hofmann; J.-M. Moret; D. J. Ward

1998-01-01

22

Stability analysis of an epidemic model with diffusion and stochastic perturbation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we investigate the stability of an epidemic model with diffusion and stochastic perturbation. We first show both the local and global stability of the endemic equilibrium of the deterministic epidemic model by analyzing corresponding characteristic equation and Lyapunov function. Second, for the corresponding reaction-diffusion epidemic model, we present the conditions of the globally asymptotical stability of the endemic equilibrium. And we carry out the analytical study for the stochastic model in details and find out the conditions for asymptotic stability of the endemic equilibrium in the mean sense. Furthermore, we perform a series of numerical simulations to illustrate our mathematical findings.

Rao, Feng; Wang, Weiming; Li, Zhibin

2012-06-01

23

Stability Analysis and Stability Chart for Unsaturated Residual Soil Slope  

Microsoft Academic Search

In tropical residual soils most hill slope failures are caused by rainfall. It is therefore important to consider dynamic hydrological conditions when attempting to analyze the stability of residual soil slopes. This paper describes a coupled hydrology\\/stability model that has been developed to overcome the limitations of the standard method of analysis used to investigate stability of tropical soil slopes.

Bujang B. K. Huat; Faisal Hj; R. S. K. Rajoo

2006-01-01

24

Slope Stability Analysis Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides information as well as a downloadable demo version of a slope stability and reinforced soil analysis and design software. The software includes an analysis option which analyzes strata profile and groundwater conditions, surcharge loads and earthquake forces, slip surfaces, and reinforced soil options. Data input and editing can also be performed as well as output from the program and graphics.

2008-07-17

25

Stability and Folding Behavior Analysis of Zinc-Finger Using Simple Models  

PubMed Central

Zinc-fingers play crucial roles in regulating gene expression and mediating protein-protein interactions. In this article, two different proteins (Sp1f2 and FSD-1) are investigated using the Gaussian network model and anisotropy elastic network model. By using these simple coarse-grained methods, we analyze the structural stabilization and establish the unfolding pathway of the two different proteins, in good agreement with related experimental and molecular dynamics simulation data. From the analysis, it is also found that the folding process of the zinc-finger motif is predominated by several factors. Both the zinc ion and C-terminal loop affect the folding pathway of the zinc-finger motif. Knowledge about the stability and folding behavior of zinc-fingers may help in understanding the folding mechanisms of the zinc-finger motif and in designing new zinc-fingers. Meanwhile, these simple coarse-grained analyses can be used as a general and quick method for mechanistic studies of metalloproteins. PMID:21152317

Chang, Shan; Jiao, Xiong; Hu, Jian-Ping; Chen, Yan; Tian, Xu-Hong

2010-01-01

26

A study of the compressibility behavior of peat stabilized by DMM: Lab model and FE analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Peats are considered as extremely soft, unconsolidated deposits. These soils are geotechnically problematic, due to their high compressibility and low shear strength. Cement is widely used for the stabilization of peat by deep mixing method (DMM). This paper presents the results of the model study of compressibility properties of fibrous, hemic and sapric peats, stabilized with columns formed by DMM.

B B K Huat; S Kazemian; A Prasad; M Barghchi

2011-01-01

27

Stability and bifurcation analysis of a preypredator model with age based predation  

E-print Network

naturally. In light of this, a mathematical model is proposed to study the stability and bifurcation of the predators in forest in higher age-groups are large in size so it becomes essential to consider age

Anderson, Douglas R.

28

The improvement of OPC accuracy and stability by the model parameters' analysis and optimization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The OPC model is very critical in the sub 45nm device because the Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) is so tight to meet the device performance and the process window latitude for the production level. The OPC model is generally composed of an optical model and a resist model. Each of them has physical terms to be calculated without any wafer data and empirical terms to be fitted with real wafer data to make the optical modeling and the resist modeling. Empirical terms are usually related to the OPC accuracy, but are likely to be overestimated with the wafer data and so those terms can deteriorate OPC stability in case of being overestimated by a small cost function. Several physical terms have been used with ideal value in the optical property and even weren't be considered because those parameters didn't give a critical impact on the OPC accuracy, but these parameters become necessary to be applied to the OPC modeling at the low k1 process. Currently, real optic parameter instead of ideal optical parameter like the laser bandwidth, source map, pupil polarization including the phase and intensity difference start to be measured and those real measured value are used for the OPC modeling. These measured values can improve the model accuracy and stability. In the other hand these parameters can make the OPC model to overcorrect the process proximity errors without careful handling. The laser bandwidth, source map, pupil polarization, and focus centering for the optical modeling are analyzed and the sample data weight scheme and resist model terms are investigated, too. The image blurring by actual laser bandwidth in the exposure system is modeled and the modeling result shows that the extraction of the 2D patterns is necessary to get a reasonable result due to the 2D patterns' measurement noise in the SEM. The source map data from the exposure machine shows lots of horizontal and vertical intensity difference and this phenomenon must come from the measurement noise because this huge intensity difference can't be caused by the scanner system with respect to the X-Y intensity difference specification in the scanner. Therefore this source map should be well organized for the OPC modeling and a manipulated source map improves the horizontal and vertical mask bias and even OPC convergence. The focus parameter which is critical for the process window OPC and ORC should be matched to the tilted Bossung plot which is caused by uncorrectable aberration to predict the CD change in the through focus with a new devised method. Pupil polarization data can be applied into the OPC modeling and this parameter is also used for the unpolarized source and the polarized source and specially this parameter helps Apodization loss to be 0 and is evaluated for the effect into the modeling. With the analysis and optimization about the model parameters the robust model is achieved in the sub 45nm device node.

Chung, No-Young; Choi, Woon-Hyuk; Lee, Sung-Ho; Kim, Sung-Il; Lee, Sun-Yong

2007-10-01

29

Modeling and Stability Analysis of a DFIG-Based Wind-Power Generator Interfaced With a Series-Compensated Line  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper deals with modeling and stability analysis of a doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG)-based wind-power unit that is interfaced with the grid via a series-compensated transmission line. A detailed mathematical model is developed in this paper that takes into account dynamics of the flux observer, phase-locked loop (PLL), controllers of the power-electronic converter, and wind turbine. Using the model and

Amir Ostadi; Amirnaser Yazdani; Rajiv K. Varma

2009-01-01

30

Analysis of the market weights under the Volatility-Stabilized Market models  

Microsoft Academic Search

We derive the joint density of market weights, at fixed times and suitable stopping times, of the Volatility-stabilized market models introduced by Fernholz and Karatzas in 2005. The argument rests on computing the exit density of a collection of independent Bessel-square processes of possibly different dimensions from the unit simplex. We show that the law of the market weights is

Soumik Pal

2009-01-01

31

Exponential stability analysis of large-scale time-delay nonlinear systems with hybrid models  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents one method to deal with the exponential stability problems for a kind of complex large-scale time-delay nonlinear systems with hybrid models. These hybrid large-scale time-delay systems are composed of considerable interconnected time-delay nonlinear subsystems, some of which are described by differential equations and others by Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy models. Novel techniques to cope with the nonlinear interconnection between

Degang Xu; Guiwei Hua; Zhifang Su

2008-01-01

32

An improved CAMRAD model for aeroelastic stability analysis of the XV-15 with advanced technology blades  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In pursuit of higher performance, the XV-15 Tiltrotor Research Aircraft was modified by the installation of new composite rotor blades. Initial flights with the Advanced Technology Blades (ATB's) revealed excessive rotor control loads that were traced to a dynamic mismatch between the blades and the aircraft control system. The analytical models of both the blades and the mechanical controls were extensively revised for use by the CAMRAD computer program to better predict aeroelastic stability and loads. This report documents the most important revisions and discusses their effects on aeroelastic stability predictions for airplane-mode flight. The ATB's may be flown in several different configurations for research, including changes in blade sweep and tip twist. The effects on stability of 1 deg and 0 deg sweep are illustrated, as are those of twisted and zero-twist tips. This report also discusses the effects of stiffening the rotor control system, which was done by locking out lateral cyclic swashplate motion with shims.

Acree, C. W., Jr.

1993-01-01

33

Stability Analysis of Ecomorphodynamic Equations  

E-print Network

Although riparian vegetation is present in or along many water courses of the world, its active role resulting from the interaction with flow and sediment processes has only recently become an active field of research. Especially, the role of vegetation in the process of river pattern formation has been explored and demonstrated mostly experimentally and numerically until now. In the present work, we shed light on this subject by performing a linear stability analysis on a simple model for riverbed vegetation dynamics coupled with the set of classical river morphodynamic equations. The vegetation model only accounts for logistic growth, local positive feedback through seeding and resprouting, and mortality by means of uprooting through flow shear stress. Due to the simplicity of the model, we can transform the set of equations into an eigenvalue problem and assess the stability of the linearized equations when slightly perturbated away from a spatially homogeneous solution. If we couple vegetation dynamics wi...

Brenbold, Fabian; Perona, Paolo

2014-01-01

34

Thermohaline circulation stability : a box model  

E-print Network

A thorough analysis of the stability of uncoupled and coupled versions of an inter-hemispheric 3-box model of Thermohaline Circulation (THC) is presented. The model consists of a northern high latitudes box, a tropical ...

Lucarini, Valerio

2003-01-01

35

Numerical Stability Analysis of Linear Wave Propagation in Extended MHD Modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Extended MHD (2-fluid) modeling of fusion plasmas using a split semi-implicit time-advance based on a particular high-order finite element with C^1 continuity has been shown to offer significant advantages in efficiency and accuracy[1,2]. However, the method requires the introduction of several viscosity and hyper-viscosity coefficients to provide robust numerical stability. As a code-validation exercise, we report on a systematic study of the simulation of wave propagation in the linear regime. We initialize the simulation in a stable linear eigenmode of the extended MHD equations and follow the evolution to measure the numerical dispersion relation for the 3 sets of MHD waves. We present results showing how the stability, dispersion and dissipation depend on grid size, time step, and the magnitude of the viscosity and hyper-viscosity coefficients. These linear perturbation tests act as useful benchmarks and guides for numerical stability for nonlinear simulations. [1] S. Jardin, J. Comput. Phys. 200 (2004) 133 [2] S. Jardin and J. Breslau, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056101 (2005)

Gan, Yu; Jardin, Stephen

2006-10-01

36

A simplified spatial model for BWR stability  

SciTech Connect

A spatial reduced order model for the study of BWR stability, based on the phenomenological model of March-Leuba et al., is presented. As one dimensional spatial dependence of the neutron flux, fuel temperature and void fraction is introduced, it is possible to describe both global and regional oscillations of the reactor power. Both linear stability analysis and numerical analysis were applied in order to describe the parameters which govern the model stability. The results were found qualitatively similar to past results. Doppler reactivity feedback was found essential for the explanation of the different regions of the flow-power stability map. (authors)

Berman, Y. [Dept. of Physics, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Nuclear Research Center-Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Lederer, Y. [Dept. of Physics, Nuclear Research Center-Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Meron, E. [Dept. of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, Dept. of Physics, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel)

2012-07-01

37

Stability and parameter dependency analysis of a facilitation tectal column (FTC) model.  

PubMed

Mathematical models and computer simulations have been widely used to study the spatio-temporal characteristics of the processing of information carried out by the central nervous system. When trying to show whether or not a neural model accounts for the phenomena under study, if the number of parameters whose values need to be calculated becomes large, then computer simulations alone become very inefficient to define such values. Here, we developed stability and parameter dependency analyses of the mathematical representation of a single facilitation tectal column (FTC) model, to show how by using techniques from non-linear systems theory we can define the ranges of parameter values under which the model would explain the required performance of the neural net model. The benefits of these analyses can be grouped in two parts: first, the advantage of using non-linear systems techniques to analyze, analytically, the dynamics of neural net models; and second, we get a deeper understanding of why the hypotheses embedded in the models yield the appropriate behaviors and what are the critical situations (parametric combinations) under which these behaviors are displayed. PMID:2277234

Cervantes-Prez, F; Arbib, M A

1990-01-01

38

Stability analysis of a degenerate hyperbolic system modelling a heat exchanger  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mathematical modelling of a heat exchanger in a carbon dioxide heat pump, an evap- orator, is considered. A reduced model, called the the zero Mach-number limit, is derived from the Euler equations of compressible fluid flow through elimination of time scales associated with sound waves. The well-posedness of the resulting partial differential- algebraic equation (PDAE) is investigated by analysis of

Michael Hanke; K. Henrik; A. Olsson; Magnus Strmgren

2007-01-01

39

Stability analysis of an HIV/AIDS epidemic model with treatment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An HIV/AIDS epidemic model with treatment is investigated. The model allows for some infected individuals to move from the symptomatic phase to the asymptomatic phase by all sorts of treatment methods. We first establish the ODE treatment model with two infective stages. Mathematical analyses establish that the global dynamics of the spread of the HIV infectious disease are completely determined by the basic reproduction number [real]0. If [real]0<=1, the disease-free equilibrium is globally stable, whereas the unique infected equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable if [real]0>1. Then, we introduce a discrete time delay to the model to describe the time from the start of treatment in the symptomatic stage until treatment effects become visible. The effect of the time delay on the stability of the endemically infected equilibrium is investigated. Moreover, the delay model exhibits Hopf bifurcations by using the delay as a bifurcation parameter. Finally, numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the results.

Cai, Liming; Li, Xuezhi; Ghosh, Mini; Guo, Baozhu

2009-07-01

40

Stochastic stability and instability of model ecosystems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this work, we initiate a stability study of multispecies communities in stochastic environment by using Ito's differential equations as community models. By applying the direct method of Liapunov, we obtain sufficient conditions for stability and instability in the mean of the equilibrium populations. The conditions are expressed in terms of the dominant diagonal property of community matrices, which is a suitable mechanism for resolving the central problem of 'complexity vs stability' in model ecosystems. As a by-product of this analysis we exhibit important structural properties of the stochastic density-dependent models, and establish tolerance of community stability to a broad class of nonlinear time-varying perturbations.

Ladde, G. S.; Siljak, D. D.

1975-01-01

41

Stability Analysis of the 19A Ore Pass at Brunswick Mine Using a Two-Stage Numerical Modeling Approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The longevity of ore pass systems is an important consideration in underground mines. This is controlled to a degree by the structural stability of an ore pass which can be compromised by changes in the stress regime and the degree of fracturing of the rock mass. A failure mechanism specific to ore pass systems is damage on the ore pass wall by impact load or wear by material flow. Structural, stress and material flow-induced failure mechanisms interact with severe repercussions, although in most cases one mechanism is more dominant. This paper aims to provide a better understanding of the interaction of ore pass failure mechanisms in an operating mine. This can provide an aid in the design of ore pass systems. A two-stage numerical approach was used for the back analysis of an ore pass at Brunswick mine in Canada. The first stage in the analysis relied on a 3D boundary element analysis to define the stress regime in the vicinity of the ore pass. The second stage used a synthetic rock mass (SRM) model, constructed from a discrete fracture network, generated from quantitative rock mass field data. The fracture network geometry was introduced into a bonded particle model, in a particle flow code (PFC). Subsequently, the ore pass was excavated within the SRM model. A stability analysis quantified the extent of rock mass failure around the ore pass due to the interaction of pre-existing fractures and the failure of the intact rock bridges between these fractures. The resulting asymmetric failure patterns along the length of the ore pass were controlled to a large degree by the in situ fractures. The influence of particle flow impact was integrated into the model by projecting a discrete rock fragment against the ore pass walls represented by the SRM model. The numerical results illustrated that material impact on ore pass walls resulted in localised damage and accelerated the stress-induced failure.

Esmaieli, Kamran; Hadjigeorgiou, John; Grenon, Martin

2013-11-01

42

Tailings dams stability analysis using numerical modelling of geotechnical and geophysical data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Methods for monitoring seepage and detecting internal erosion are essential for the safety evaluation of embankment dams. Internal erosion is one of the major reasons for embankment dam failures, and there are thousands of large tailings dams and waste-rock dumps in the world that may pe considered as hotspots for environmental impact. In this research the geophysical survey works were performed on Cetatuia 2 tailings dam. Electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) method was able to detect spatially anomalous zones inside the embankment dam. These anomalies are the results of internal erosion phenomena which may progressing inside the dam and is difficult to detect by conventional methods. Data aquired by geophysical survey together with their interpretations were used in the numerical model for slope stability assessment. The final results show us the structural weakness induced by the presence of internal erosion elements especially for seismic loading case. This research methodology may be also available for tailings dam monitoring purposes. Electrical Rezistivity Imaging (ERI) was performed on Cetatuia 2 dam at the Uranium Milling Plant Feldioara, in order to map areas with lateral and vertical changes in resistivity. The electrodes are connected to an automated computer operated switch box that selects the 4 electrodes to be used. A computer controls the switch box and the measuring device, and runs a program that selects the electrodes, makes the measurement, and stores the measurement. For inversion processing procedures was used Res2Din software. The measured resistivity were plotted by the pseudo section contouring method. There are five resistivity pseudosections obtained from the Cetatuia 2 tailings dam during the october 2007 measurements. Four transversal profiles trans1 to trans4 are perpendicular to the berms and the longitudinal one long1 is placed along dam's crest. The high resistivities near the berms surfaces corresponds to unsaturated fill materials and the low resistivities near the crest correspond to water saturated material. The resistivities values greater then 80 ohm.m may be explained by some error obtained for that inversion model. Profiles trans3 and trans4 were measured on perpendicular directions to berm alignment and show two distinct zones. The upward low resistivities zone correspond to water saturated materials especially from the compacted clay dam's core and the downward high resistivities zone belongs to unsaturated fill materials. The boundary between high and low resistivity at the depth of about 5 to 7 meters shows the groundwater level. The continuation of the high resistivity zones towards the end of the profile trans3, which is different from other profiles is probably due to the presence of dry coarse materials in shallow depth correspondingly to sandy clay. The sand fractions from the clay matrix may be affected by internal erosional phenomena, due to seepage currents that overpassed the material critical gradient. In this case the relative high resistivities values were considered as a presumptive erosional pattern. This profile was considered for the slope stability finite element modelling. The profile long1 which is placed along dam's crest is the longest profiles and extends up to nearly 420 m. The boundary between high and low resistivity at the depth of about 4 to 8 meters shows the groundwater across the dam core. The central part of the profile (about meter 200) shows the same relative high resistivities that occurred on transversal profile trans3. Resistivity data was used for building the 3D electrical resistivity model. The water saturated materials have locations very close to dam's crest (resistivity values usually lower then 10 ohm.m) and on both dam's arms. The groundwater levels were confirmed by the piezometric measurements. Electrical Rezistivity Imaging method had the possibility to show the most important disturbant elements that in certain conditions may weak the dam's state of safety. This study considered the SSR (Shear Strength Reduction) technique for sl

Mihai, S.; Zlagnean, M.; Oancea, I.; Petrescu, A.

2009-04-01

43

This document is a preprint of the final paper: Q. shafiee, T. Dragicevic, J. C. Vasquez, and J. M. Guerrero, "Modeling, Stability Analysis and Active Stabilization of Multiple  

E-print Network

between the MGs on stability of these systems. This model can be also used to synthesis and study dynamics type such as photovoltaic (PV) system, fuel cell, and energy storages (e.g., secondary battery to create dc MG clusters. Modeling of power electronic systems has been addressed in several research works

Vasquez, Juan Carlos

44

Linear stability analysis for an optimum Glauert rotor modelled by an actuator disc  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We approximate a wind turbine using the Actuator Disc methodology with loading for an optimum Glauert rotor, and vary blade length and tip speed ratio, to determine base flows for linear stability computations at a Reynolds number of 100. Results from such computations suggest that the least stable mode is axisymmetric and insensitive to changes in tip speed operation, suggesting that the stability properties in the farfield wake for an optimised rotor are independent of the chosen tip speed optimization point. Higher azimuthal modes promote greater variation in velocities and may be relevant to cases at higher Reynolds numbers.

Smith, D. M.; Blackburn, H. M.; Sheridan, J.

2014-06-01

45

Global stability analysis for cosmological models with nonminimally coupled scalar fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We explore dynamics of cosmological models with a nonminimally coupled scalar field evolving on a spatially flat Friedmann-Lematre-Robertson-Walker background. We consider cosmological models including the Hilbert-Einstein curvature term and the N degree monomial of the scalar field nonminimally coupled to gravity. The potential of the scalar field is the n degree monomial or polynomial. We describe several qualitatively different types of dynamics depending on values of power indices N and n. We identify that three main possible pictures correspond to n 2N cases. Some special features connected with the important cases of N=n (including the quadratic potential with quadratic coupling) and n =2N (which shares its asymptotics with the potential of the Higgs-driven inflation) are described separately. A global qualitative analysis allows us to cover the most interesting cases of small N and n by a limiting number of phase-space diagrams. The influence of the cosmological constant to the global features of dynamics is also studied.

Skugoreva, Maria A.; Toporensky, Alexey V.; Vernov, Sergey Yu.

2014-09-01

46

An analytical model for stability analysis of rock layers over a circular opening  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of the study presented is to provide an analytical solution for determining the stability of a flexible rock layer overlying a circular opening. This problem is of general interest to the mining community but is particularly relevant to the oil and gas industry where drilling of deep wellbores often results in sand production around the well and hence

Hans H. Vaziri; Javad S. Jalali; Rafiq Islam

2001-01-01

47

Energy function analysis for power system stability  

Microsoft Academic Search

Energy Function Analysis for Power System Stability presents the concept of energy function, which has found wide-spread applications for power systems in recent years. The most recent advances in five distinct areas are reviewed: Development of energy functions for structure preserving models, which can incorporate non-linear load models; energy functions which include a detailed model of the generating unit (i.e.

M. A. Pai

1989-01-01

48

DYNAMIC CHARACTERIZATION AND STABILITY OF A LARGE SIZE MULTIBODY TILTROTOR MODEL BY POD ANALYSIS  

Microsoft Academic Search

A great level of flexibility and accuracy can be gained by em- ploying a multibody approach as the modeling strategy for servo- aeroelastic analyses of rotating wing aircraft. However, the re- sulting models are often large, in terms of degrees of freedom, and fully nonlinear, making the dynamic characterization phase cumbersome and computationally demanding. Moreover, non- minimal set formulations such

Pierangelo Masarati; Giuseppe Quaranta; Massimiliano Lanz; Paolo Mantegazza

49

Dynamic stability analysis of torsional vibrations of a shaft system connected by a Hooke's joint through a continuous system model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stability of parametrically excited torsional vibrations of a shaft system composed of two torsionally elastic shafts interconnected through a Hooke's joint is studied. The shafts are considered to be continuous (distributed-parameter) systems and an approximate discrete model for the torsional vibrations of the shaft system is derived via a finite element scheme. The stability of the solutions of the linearized equations of motion, consisting of a set of Mathieu-Hill type equations, is examined by means of a monodromy matrix method and the results are presented in the form of a Strutt-Ince diagram visualizing the effects of the system parameters on the stability of the shaft system.

Bulut, Gkhan

2014-08-01

50

Global stability analysis of SEIR model with holling type II incidence function.  

PubMed

A deterministic model for the transmission dynamics of a communicable disease is developed and rigorously analysed. The model, consisting of five mutually exclusive compartments representing the human dynamics, has a globally asymptotically stable disease-free equilibrium (DFE) whenever a certain epidemiological threshold, known as the basic reproduction number (??), is less than unity; in such a case the endemic equilibrium does not exist. On the other hand, when the reproduction number is greater than unity, it is shown, using nonlinear Lyapunov function of Goh-Volterra type, in conjunction with the LaSalle's invariance principle, that the unique endemic equilibrium of the model is globally asymptotically stable under certain conditions. Furthermore, the disease is shown to be uniformly persistent whenever ?? > 1. PMID:23091562

Safi, Mohammad A; Garba, Salisu M

2012-01-01

51

Cosmological Models and Stability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Principles in the form of heuristic guidelines or generally accepted dogma play an important role in the development of physical theories. In particular, philosophical considerations and principles figure prominently in the work of Albert Einstein. As mentioned in the talk by Ji? Bi?k at this conference, Einstein formulated the equivalence principle, an essential step on the road to general relativity, during his time in Prague 1911-1912. In this talk, I would like to discuss some aspects of cosmological models. As cosmology is an area of physics where "principles" such as the "cosmological principle" or the "Copernican principle" play a prominent role in motivating the class of models which form part of the current standard model, I will start by comparing the role of the equivalence principle to that of the principles used in cosmology. I will then briefly describe the standard model of cosmology to give a perspective on some mathematical problems and conjectures on cosmological models, which are discussed in the later part of this paper.

Andersson, Lars

52

Cosmological models and stability  

E-print Network

Principles in the form of heuristic guidelines or generally accepted dogma play an important role in the development of physical theories. In particular, philosophical considerations and principles figure prominently in the work of Albert Einstein. As mentioned in the talk by Jiri Bicak at this conference Einstein formulated the equivalence principle, an essential step on the road to general relativity, during his time in Prague 1911-1912. In this talk, I would like to discuss some aspects of cosmological models. As cosmology is an area of physics where "principles" such as the "cosmological principle" or the "Copernican principle" play a prominent role in motivating the class of models which form part of the current standard model, I will start by comparing the role of the equivalence principle to that of the principles used in cosmology. I will then briefly describe the standard model of cosmology to give a perspective on some mathematical problems and conjectures on cosmological models, which are discussed in the later part of this paper.

Lars Andersson

2013-10-07

53

Modelling and Stability Analysis of Hybrid Multiple Access in the IEEE 802.15.4 Protocol  

E-print Network

.2 [Computer-Communication Networks]: Network Protocols General Terms: Performance, Standardization, Theory. INTRODUCTION The IEEE 802.15.4 communication standard is arguably becoming the most popular protocol for low framework for modelling the behavior of the hybrid MAC protocol of the IEEE 802.15.4 standard is proposed

Johansson, Karl Henrik

54

Stability, Bifurcation and Chaos Analysis of Vector-Borne Disease Model with Application to Rift Valley Fever  

PubMed Central

This paper investigates a RVF epidemic model by qualitative analysis and numerical simulations. Qualitative analysis have been used to explore the stability dynamics of the equilibrium points while visualization techniques such as bifurcation diagrams, Poincar maps, maxima return maps and largest Lyapunov exponents are numerically computed to confirm further complexity of these dynamics induced by the seasonal forcing on the mosquitoes oviposition rates. The obtained results show that ordinary differential equation models with external forcing can have rich dynamic behaviour, ranging from bifurcation to strange attractors which may explain the observed fluctuations found in RVF empiric outbreak data, as well as the non deterministic nature of RVF inter-epidemic activities. Furthermore, the coexistence of the endemic equilibrium is subjected to existence of certain number of infected Aedes mosquitoes, suggesting that Aedes have potential to initiate RVF epidemics through transovarial transmission and to sustain low levels of the disease during post epidemic periods. Therefore we argue that locations that may serve as RVF virus reservoirs should be eliminated or kept under control to prevent multi-periodic outbreaks and consequent chains of infections. The epidemiological significance of this study is: (1) low levels of birth rate (in both Aedes and Culex) can trigger unpredictable outbreaks; (2) Aedes mosquitoes are more likely capable of inducing unpredictable behaviour compared to the Culex; (3) higher oviposition rates on mosquitoes do not in general imply manifestation of irregular behaviour on the dynamics of the disease. Finally, our model with external seasonal forcing on vector oviposition rates is able to mimic the linear increase in livestock seroprevalence during inter-epidemic period showing a constant exposure and presence of active transmission foci. This suggests that RVF outbreaks partly build upon RVF inter-epidemic activities. Therefore, active RVF surveillance in livestock is recommended. PMID:25271641

Pedro, Sansao A.; Abelman, Shirley; Ndjomatchoua, Frank T.; Sang, Rosemary; Tonnang, Henri E. Z.

2014-01-01

55

Stability and Transient Analysis in the Modelling of Railway Disc Brake Squeal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper deals with friction induced vibrations and especially with railway disc brake squeal. The first part of the paper\\u000a is devoted to the strategy used to model the general problem of self-excited vibrations of a rotating disc in frictional contact\\u000a with two pads. Unilateral contact conditions with Coulomb friction and constant friction coefficient are considered. In order\\u000a to predict

X. Lorang; O. Chiello

56

Liapunov stability analysis of spinning flexible spacecraft.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The attitude stability of a class of spinning flexible spacecraft in a force-free environment is analyzed. The spacecraft is modeled as a rigid core having attached to it a flexible appendage idealized as a collection of elastically interconnected particles. Liapunov stability theorems are employed with the Hamiltonian of the system, constrained through the angular momentum integral so as to admit complete damping, used as a testing function. The Hamiltonian is written in terms of modal coordinates as interpreted by the hybrid coordinate formulation, thus allowing truncation to a level amenable to literal stability analysis. Testing functions are constructed for a spacecraft with an arbitrary (discretized) appendage, and closed form stability criteria are generated for the first mode of a restricted appendage model lying in a plane which contains the center of mass and is orthogonal to the spin axis. The criteria are (except for idealized cases on the stability boundary line in the parameter space) both necessary and sufficient for stability for any spacecraft characterized by the planar appendage model, such as a spacecraft containing solar panels and/or radial booms.

Barbera, F. J.; Likins, P.

1973-01-01

57

A biomechanical analysis of atlantoaxial stabilization methods using a bovine model. C1/C2 fixation analysis.  

PubMed

The reliability and initial postoperative stability of six widely used C1-C2 surgical constructs were evaluated by nondestructive biomechanical testing of ten fresh bovine upper cervical spine segments. The six fixation techniques were the simple midline sublaminar C1 wiring (SMW), the modified Gallie wiring (MGW), the Brook wedge arthrodesis (BWA), the bilateral lateral mass screw (LMS), and the Clark arthrodesis without (CWO) and with (CW) the adjunctive use of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement. Instability was produced by resection of the base of the dens. Intact, destabilized, and instrumented constructs were tested in unconstrained flexion, extension, torsion, anterior, and posterior shear forces. The LMS and CW techniques proved the most effective in achieving C1-C2 stability. Sublaminar C2 wiring methods tended to have greater torsional and shear stiffness. Less rigid fixation techniques frequently loosened. All non-PMMA-enhanced wired constructs failed to restore the ability to adequately resist the posterior translation of C1 on C2. Stabilization of an unstable atlantoaxial articulation is best accomplished by a lateral mass screw or sublaminar C1-C2 PMMA-enhanced technique. Other techniques provided less consistent and reliable surgical fixation. Because of the inadequacy of wired constructs to resist posterior shear in patients with this instability pattern, the usual treatment may need to be modified to include more prolonged or protective external immobilization or more rigid fixation techniques. Although less rigid, the SMW and the MGW techniques are safer because they require less-frequent passage of sublaminar wires, avoid potential problems with PMMA, and obviate the hazards of further lateral dissection and insertion of the transarticular screws. PMID:8472462

Smith, M D; Kotzar, G; Yoo, J; Bohlman, H

1993-05-01

58

Complete Stability Analysis of Multifunction MMIC Circuits  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a systematic methodology for complete stability analysis of nonlinear microwave multifunction circuits. The proposed strategy has two different stages: the stability analysis of a nominal steady-state solution and the use of continuation techniques to efficiently determine the unstable operation ranges. The stability analysis is demanding due to the multiple loops contained in the large multifunction circuit. The

Csar Barquinero; Almudena Surez; Amparo Herrera; Jos Luis Garca

2007-01-01

59

Catchment scale validation of SMOS and ASCAT soil moisture products using hydrological modeling and temporal stability analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since soil moisture is an important influencing factor of the hydrological cycle, knowledge of its spatio-temporal dynamics is crucial for climate and hydrological modeling. In recent years several soil moisture data products from satellite information have become available with global coverage and sub-monthly resolution. Since the remote sensing of soil moisture is an indirect measurement method and influenced by a large number of factors (e.g. atmospheric correction, vegetation, soil roughness, etc.), a comprehensive validation of the resulting soil moisture products is required. However, the coarse spatial resolution of these products hampers the comparison with point-scale in situ measurements. Therefore, upscaling of in situ to the scale of the satellite data is needed. We present the validation results of the soil moisture products of the years 2010-2012 retrieved from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) for the Rur and Erft catchments in western Germany. For the upscaling of in situ data obtained from three test sites of the Terrestrial Environmental Observatories (TERENO) initiative we used the hydrological model WaSiM ETH. Correlation of the SMOS product to modeled and upscaled soil moisture resulted in a mean correlation coefficient of 0.28 whereas for ASCAT a correlation coefficient of 0.50 was obtained. However, for specific regions the SMOS product showed similar correlation coefficients as the ASCAT product. While for ASCAT correlation was mainly dependent on topography and vegetation, SMOS was also influenced by radiofrequency interferences in our study area. Both products show dry biases as compared to the soil moisture reference. However, while SMOS showed relatively constant bias values, ASCAT bias is variable throughout the year. As an additional validation method we performed a temporal stability analysis of the retrieved spatio-temporal soil moisture data. Through investigation of mean relative differences of soil moisture for every pixel, their standard deviations and their rankings, we analyzed the temporal persistence of spatial patterns. Our results show high standard deviations for both SMOS and ASCAT soil moisture products as compared to modeled soil moisture, indicating a lower temporal persistence. The consistence of ranks of mean relative differences was low for SMOS and relative ASCAT soil moisture compared to modeled soil moisture, while ASCAT soil moisture, converted to absolute values, showed higher rank consistence.

Rtzer, K.; Montzka, C.; Bogena, H.; Wagner, W.; Kerr, Y. H.; Kidd, R.; Vereecken, H.

2014-11-01

60

Kinetic analysis of thermal stability of human low density lipoproteins: a model for LDL fusion in atherogenesis[S  

PubMed Central

Fusion of modified LDL in the arterial wall promotes atherogenesis. Earlier we showed that thermal denaturation mimics LDL remodeling and fusion, and revealed kinetic origin of LDL stability. Here we report the first quantitative analysis of LDL thermal stability. Turbidity data show sigmoidal kinetics of LDL heat denaturation, which is unique among lipoproteins, suggesting that fusion is preceded by other structural changes. High activation energy of denaturation, Ea = 100 8 kcal/mol, indicates disruption of extensive packing interactions in LDL. Size-exclusion chromatography, nondenaturing gel electrophoresis, and negative-stain electron microscopy suggest that LDL dimerization is an early step in thermally induced fusion. Monoclonal antibody binding suggests possible involvement of apoB N-terminal domain in early stages of LDL fusion. LDL fusion accelerates at pH < 7, which may contribute to LDL retention in acidic atherosclerotic lesions. Fusion also accelerates upon increasing LDL concentration in near-physiologic range, which likely contributes to atherogenesis. Thermal stability of LDL decreases with increasing particle size, indicating that the pro-atherogenic properties of small dense LDL do not result from their enhanced fusion. Our work provides the first kinetic approach to measuring LDL stability and suggests that lipid-lowering therapies that reduce LDL concentration but increase the particle size may have opposite effects on LDL fusion. PMID:22855737

Lu, Mengxiao; Gantz, Donald L.; Herscovitz, Haya; Gursky, Olga

2012-01-01

61

Stability analysis and future singularity of the $m^2 R \\Box^{-2} R$ model of non-local gravity  

E-print Network

We analyse the classical stability of the model proposed by Maggiore and Mancarella, where gravity is modified by a term $\\sim m^2 R \\Box^{-2} R$ to produce the late-time acceleration of the expansion of the universe. Our study takes into account all excitations of the metric that can potentially drive an instability. There are some subtleties in identifying these modes, as a non-local field theory contains dynamical fields which yet do not correspond to degrees of freedom. Since some of them are ghost-like, we clarify the impact of such modes on the stability of the solutions of interest that are the flat space-time and cosmological solutions. We then find that flat space-time is unstable under scalar perturbations, but the instability manifests itself only at cosmological scales, i.e. out of the region of validity of this solution. It is therefore the stability of the FLRW solution which is relevant there, in which case the scalar perturbations are known to be well-behaved by numerical studies. By finding the analytic solution for the late-time behaviour of the scale factor, which leads to a big rip singularity, we argue that the linear perturbations are bounded in the future because of the domination of Hubble friction. In particular, this effect damps the scalar ghost perturbations which were responsible for destabilizing Minkowski space-time. Thus, the model remains phenomenologically viable.

Yves Dirian; Ermis Mitsou

2014-08-21

62

Stability analysis and future singularity of the m2Rsquare-2R model of non-local gravity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We analyse the classical stability of the model proposed by Maggiore and Mancarella, where gravity is modified by a term ~ m2 R square-2 R to produce the late-time acceleration of the expansion of the universe. Our study takes into account all excitations of the metric that can potentially drive an instability. There are some subtleties in identifying these modes, as a non-local field theory contains dynamical fields which yet do not correspond to degrees of freedom. Since some of them are ghost-like, we clarify the impact of such modes on the stability of the solutions of interest that are the flat space-time and cosmological solutions. We then find that flat space-time is unstable under scalar perturbations, but the instability manifests itself only at cosmological scales, i.e. out of the region of validity of this solution. It is therefore the stability of the FLRW solution which is relevant there, in which case the scalar perturbations are known to be well-behaved by numerical studies. By finding the analytic solution for the late-time behaviour of the scale factor, which leads to a big rip singularity, we argue that the linear perturbations are bounded in the future because of the domination of Hubble friction. In particular, this effect damps the scalar ghost perturbations which were responsible for destabilizing Minkowski space-time. Thus, the model remains phenomenologically viable.

Dirian, Yves; Mitsou, Ermis

2014-10-01

63

Analysis of polytype stability in PVT grown silicon carbide single crystal using competitive lattice model Monte Carlo simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Polytype stability is very important for high quality SiC single crystal growth. However, the growth conditions for the 4H, 6H and 15R polytypes are similar, and the mechanism of polytype stability is not clear. The kinetics aspects, such as surface-step nucleation, are important. The kinetic Monte Carlo method is a common tool to study surface kinetics in crystal growth. However, the present lattice models for kinetic Monte Carlo simulations cannot solve the problem of the competitive growth of two or more lattice structures. In this study, a competitive lattice model was developed for kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of the competition growth of the 4H and 6H polytypes of SiC. The site positions are fixed at the perfect crystal lattice positions without any adjustment of the site positions. Surface steps on seeds and large ratios of diffusion/deposition have positive effects on the 4H polytype stability. The 3D polytype distribution in a physical vapor transport method grown SiC ingot showed that the facet preserved the 4H polytype even if the 6H polytype dominated the growth surface. The theoretical and experimental results of polytype growth in SiC suggest that retaining the step growth mode is an important factor to maintain a stable single 4H polytype during SiC growth.

Guo, Hui-Jun; Huang, Wei; Liu, Xi; Gao, Pan; Zhuo, Shi-Yi; Xin, Jun; Yan, Cheng-Feng; Zheng, Yan-Qing; Yang, Jian-Hua; Shi, Er-Wei

2014-09-01

64

Stability analysis and future singularity of the $m^2 R \\Box^{-2} R$ model of non-local gravity  

E-print Network

We analyse the classical stability of the model proposed by Maggiore and Mancarella, where gravity is modified by a term $\\sim m^2 R \\Box^{-2} R$ to produce the late-time acceleration of the expansion of the universe. Our study takes into account all excitations of the metric that can potentially drive an instability. There are some subtleties in identifying these modes, as a non-local field theory contains dynamical fields which yet do not correspond to degrees of freedom. Since some of them are ghost-like, we clarify the impact of such modes on the stability of the solutions of interest that are the flat space-time and cosmological solutions. We then find that flat space-time is unstable under scalar perturbations, but the instability manifests itself only at cosmological scales, i.e. out of the region of validity of this solution. It is therefore the stability of the FLRW solution which is relevant there, in which case the scalar perturbations are known to be well-behaved by numerical studies. By finding t...

Dirian, Yves

2014-01-01

65

The stability of colorectal cancer mathematical models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer. To better understand about the kinetics of cancer growth, mathematical models are used to provide insight into the progression of this natural process which enables physicians and oncologists to determine optimal radiation and chemotherapy schedules and develop a prognosis, both of which are indispensable for treating cancer. This thesis investigates the stability of colorectal cancer mathematical models. We found that continuous saturating feedback is the best available model of colorectal cancer growth. We also performed stability analysis. The result shows that cancer progress in sequence of genetic mutations or epigenetic which lead to a very large number of cells population until become unbounded. The cell population growth initiate and its saturating feedback is overcome when mutation changes causing the net per-capita growth rate of stem or transit cells exceed critical threshold.

Khairudin, Nur Izzati; Abdullah, Farah Aini

2013-04-01

66

Edge stability analysis of high bgrp plasmas  

Microsoft Academic Search

An MHD stability analysis of the edge plasma shows that in highly triangular plasmas, the increasing global bgrp has a stabilizing effect on the low-n instabilities that trigger edge localized modes (ELMs). The improved stability allows the access of higher edge pressure gradients before the ELM is triggered. At the same time, the edge plasma moves closer to the high-n

S. Saarelma; S. Gnter

2004-01-01

67

Mathematical model of the primary CD8 T cell immune response: stability analysis of a nonlinear age-structured system.  

PubMed

The primary CD8 T cell immune response, due to a first encounter with a pathogen, happens in two phases: an expansion phase, with a fast increase of T cell count, followed by a contraction phase. This contraction phase is followed by the generation of memory cells. These latter are specific of the antigen and will allow a faster and stronger response when encountering the antigen for the second time. We propose a nonlinear mathematical model describing the T CD8 immune response to a primary infection, based on three nonlinear ordinary differential equations and one nonlinear age-structured partial differential equation, describing the evolution of CD8 T cell count and pathogen amount. We discuss in particular the roles and relevance of feedback controls that regulate the response. First we reduce our system to a system with a nonlinear differential equation with a distributed delay. We study the existence of two steady states, and we analyze the asymptotic stability of these steady states. Second we study the system with a discrete delay, and analyze global asymptotic stability of steady states. Finally, we show some simulations that we can obtain from the model and confront them to experimental data. PMID:21842166

Terry, Emmanuelle; Marvel, Jacqueline; Arpin, Christophe; Gandrillon, Olivier; Crauste, Fabien

2012-08-01

68

Prediction of attitude stability of asymmetric dual-spin stabilized spacecraft using improved liquid slosh model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The rigid slug method for modelling sloshing liquid fuel aboard dual-spin stabilized spacecraft has been shown to be inadequate by recent flight data. This rigid slug model and a uniform gravity model put forth by Abramson is examined in detail. The Abramson model is incorporated into a computer simulation written specifically to predict spacecraft attitude. An analysis is performed with both the modified and unmodified versions of this simulation to determine the boundaries of stability for rotor and platform asymmetries. The results show that the improved model is better able to predict spacecraft attitude stability.

Szostak, Michael J.

1991-06-01

69

IMFIT Integrated Modeling Applications Supporting Experimental Analysis: Multiple Time-Slice Kinetic EFIT Reconstructions, MHD Stability Limits, and Energy and Momentum Flux Analyses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This presentation summarizes several useful applications provided by the IMFIT integrated modeling framework to support DIII-D and EAST research. IMFIT is based on Python and utilizes modular task-flow architecture with a central manager and extensive GUI support to coordinate tasks among component modules. The kinetic-EFIT application allows multiple time-slice reconstructions by fetching pressure profile data directly from MDS+ or from ONETWO or PTRANSP. The stability application analyzes a given reference equilibrium for stability limits by performing parameter perturbation studies with MHD codes such as DCON, GATO, ELITE, or PEST3. The transport task includes construction of experimental energy and momentum fluxes from profile analysis and comparison against theoretical models such as MMM95, GLF23, or TGLF.

Collier, A.; Lao, L. L.; Abla, G.; Chu, M. S.; Prater, R.; Smith, S. P.; St. John, H. E.; Guo, W.; Li, G.; Pan, C.; Ren, Q.; Park, J. M.; Bisai, N.; Srinivasan, R.; Sun, A. P.; Liu, Y.; Worrall, M.

2010-11-01

70

Performance and stability analysis of a photovoltaic power system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The performance and stability characteristics of a 10 kVA photovoltaic power system are studied using linear Bode analysis and a nonlinear analog simulation. Power conversion efficiencies, system stability, and system transient performance results are given for system operation at various levels of solar insolation. Additionally, system operation and the modeling of system components for the purpose of computer simulation are described.

Merrill, W. C.; Blaha, R. J.; Pickrell, R. L.

1978-01-01

71

Boiling water reactor stability analysis with RETRAN-03  

Microsoft Academic Search

An MOC option has been developed to eliminate the numerical diffusion associated with the time domain analysis of small perturbations. This model has been implemented as an option in RETRAN-03 and evaluated for BWR stability applications by comparing RETRAN analyses results with data from a series of stability tests from the Vermont Yankee reactor. The results indicate that the MOC

P. A. Bergeron; N. Fujita; M. P. Paulsen; J. H. McFadden; L. J. Agee

1994-01-01

72

A distributed slope stability model for steep forested basins  

Microsoft Academic Search

A distributed, physically based slope stability model (dSLAM), based on an infinite slope model, a kinematic wave groundwater model, and a continuous change vegetation root strength model, is presented. It is integrated with a contour line-based topographic analysis and a geographic information system (GIS) for spatial data extraction and display. The model can be run with either individual rainfall events

Weimin Wu; Roy C. Sidle

1995-01-01

73

Stability analysis and stabilization strategies for linear supply chains  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to delays in the adaptation of production or delivery rates, supply chains can be dynamically unstable with respect to perturbations in the consumption rate, which is known as bull-whip effect. Here, we study several conceivable production strategies to stabilize supply chains, which is expressed by different specifications of the management function controlling the production speed in dependence of the stock levels. In particular, we will investigate, whether the reaction to stock levels of other producers or suppliers has a stabilizing effect. We will also demonstrate that the anticipation of future stock levels can stabilize the supply system, given the forecast horizon ? is long enough. To show this, we derive linear stability conditions and carry out simulations for different control strategies. The results indicate that the linear stability analysis is a helpful tool for the judgement of the stabilization effect, although unexpected deviations can occur in the non-linear regime. There are also signs of phase transitions and chaotic behavior, but this remains to be investigated more thoroughly in the future.

Nagatani, Takashi; Helbing, Dirk

2004-04-01

74

Stability of stochastic switched SIRS models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stochastic stability problems of a stochastic switched SIRS model with or without distributed time delay are considered. By utilizing the Lyapunov methods, sufficient stability conditions of the disease-free equilibrium are established. Stability conditions about the subsystem of the stochastic switched SIRS systems are also obtained.

Meng, Xiaoying; Liu, Xinzhi; Deng, Feiqi

2011-11-01

75

Stability analysis of delayed cellular neural networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the problems of stability in a class of delayed cellular neural networks (DCNN) are studied; some new stability criteria are obtained by using the Lyapunov functional method and some analysis techniques. These criteria can be used to design globally stable networks and thus have important significance in both theory and application.

Jinde Cao; Dongming Zhou

1998-01-01

76

Advanced stability analysis for laminar flow control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five classes of problems are addressed: (1) the extension of the SALLY stability analysis code to the full eighth order compressible stability equations for three dimensional boundary layer; (2) a comparison of methods for prediction of transition using SALLY for incompressible flows; (3) a study of instability and transition in rotating disk flows in which the effects of Coriolis forces

S. A. Orszag

1981-01-01

77

On the stick-slip flow from slit and cylindrical dies of a Phan-Thien and Tanner fluid model. II. Linear stability analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During extrusion of viscoelastic fluids various flow instabilities may arise resulting in a distorted free surface. In order to investigate the factors generating these instabilities we performed a linear stability analysis at zero Reynolds number around the steady solution of the cylindrical or planar stick-slip flow for a viscoelastic fluid following the affine exponential Phan-Thien Tanner (PTT) model. Stick-slip flow is an important special case of the extrudate swell problem, since the latter reduces to it in the limit of infinite surface tension but avoids the complications of a free-boundary flow. The linear stability analysis is performed for various values of the rheological parameters of the PTT model in order to determine the effects of all material properties. It is found that the flow becomes unstable as the Weissenberg number increases above a critical value, due to a Hopf bifurcation suggesting that the flow will become periodic in time. Both the critical value of the Weissenberg number and the frequency of the instability depend strongly on the rheological parameters of the viscoelastic model. The corresponding eigenvectors indicate that the perturbed flow field has a spatially periodic structure, initiated at the rim of the die, extending for up to 5-7 die gaps downstream, but confined close to the surface of the extrudate, in qualitative agreement with existing experiments. This suggests that instability is generated by the combination of the singularity in the velocity and stress fields at the die lip and the strong extension that the extruded polymer undergoes near its surface. The elasticity alone can be responsible for the appearance of instabilities in the extrusion process of viscoelastic fluids and the often used assumptions of wall slip or compressibility, although they might be present, are not required. Finally, the mechanisms that produce these instabilities are examined through energy analysis of the disturbance flow.

Karapetsas, George; Tsamopoulos, John

2013-09-01

78

Developments in Cylindrical Shell Stability Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Today high-performance computing systems and new analytical and numerical techniques enable engineers to explore the use of advanced materials for shell design. This paper reviews some of the historical developments of shell buckling analysis and design. The paper concludes by identifying key research directions for reliable and robust methods development in shell stability analysis and design.

Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

1998-01-01

79

The finite volume flic method and its stability analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, a general finite volume Fluid-in-cell method (FVFLIC) for solving the NavierStokes equations is introduced. The stability of the numerical method is then analysed by directly using two-dimensional Euler equations instead of a linear model equation. This direct approach to the analysis of non-linear stability is based on the Taylor expansion of the discretized Euler equations and some

Y Mao; D. E Winterbone

1995-01-01

80

Convective instability in sedimentation: Linear stability analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ABSTRACTConvective sedimentation in a stably stratified saltwater is studied using the linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. Convective sedimentation is known to occur due to the double-diffusive mechanism and the settling-driven mechanism. In this study, a semi-empirical closure of sediment diffusivity based on the long-range hydrodynamics effect is adopted. The sediment phase can act as either the slow- or fast-diffusing agent in the double-diffusive system for the given salt diffusivity. Moreover, the settling-driven effect is proportional to the square of the sediment diameter via Stoke settling law. We consider sediment concentration (grain size) in the upper freshwater layer to be in the range of 0.1 to 39.4 g/l (2 to 60 m), which is on top of a saltwater layer with salinity 35 ppt. Linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> allows us to identify the dominant mechanism that triggers the instability, the growth rate, and the resulting characteristic finger width. <span class="hlt">Model</span> results suggest that for fine sediment with grain diameter smaller than 10 m (settling velocity 0.09 mm/s), double-diffusive mechanism controls the instability and the resulting sediment finger size is of millimeter scale. For the given threshold of growth rate of O(0.01) s-1, the minimum sediment concentration is about 8-15 g/l. For grain size greater than or around 10 m, the settling-driven mechanism dominates and instabilities occur at sediment concentration as low as O(0.1) g/l with centimeter-scale fingers. Our findings may contribute to a better understanding on the observed rapid sediment removal in the plume of small mountainous rivers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yu, Xiao; Hsu, Tian-Jian; Balachandar, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" 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id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">81</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.5683P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geotechnical vs. Geophysical <span class="hlt">models</span> for slope <span class="hlt">stability</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Current approaches to landslide forecasting are based either on empirical <span class="hlt">models</span>, which search for correlations between rainfall data and landslide occurrences, or on physically based <span class="hlt">models</span>, which combine hydrological <span class="hlt">models</span> with slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> analyses for the computation of the Factor of Safety. Traditionally, the calculation of the Factor of Safety is based on accurate geotechnical measurements, which provide information on the internal structure and the mechanical properties of the investigated soils through the <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of samples of very reduced size. Hence, both empirical and physically based traditional approaches are based on point information, which refer to very small rainwater collecting areas of rain gauges and very small soil volumes around porous probes. To overcome the limit of point-sampled information, we propose a semi-empirical approach based on the use of a geophysical Factor of Safety introduced in terms of local resistivities and slope angles. Starting from two resistivity tomography surveys performed on a test area on Sarno Mountains (Southern Italy) during the autumnal and spring seasons, we present an application of the proposed geophysical approach and compared the results with those coming from the infinite slope <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. Advantages and disadvantages of geotechnical and geophysical approaches are shown.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Piegari, E.; Di Maio, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">82</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1756166"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Dark Energy Star and <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have proposed a new <span class="hlt">model</span> of dark energy star consisting of three zones namely, an inhomogeneous interior region with anisotropic pressures, thin shell and the exterior vacuum region of Schwarzschild spacetime. We have discussed various physical properties. The <span class="hlt">model</span> satisfies all the physical requirements. The <span class="hlt">stability</span> condition under small linear perturbation has also been discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bhar, Piyali</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">83</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1409.4394v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Dark Energy Star and <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have proposed a new <span class="hlt">model</span> of dark energy star consisting of three zones namely, an inhomogeneous interior region with anisotropic pressures, thin shell and the exterior vacuum region of Schwarzschild spacetime. We have discussed various physical properties. The <span class="hlt">model</span> satisfies all the physical requirements. The <span class="hlt">stability</span> condition under small linear perturbation has also been discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Piyali Bhar; Farook Rahaman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">84</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21762909"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of fuzzy parametric uncertain systems.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, the determination of <span class="hlt">stability</span> margin, gain and phase margin aspects of fuzzy parametric uncertain systems are dealt. The <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of uncertain linear systems with coefficients described by fuzzy functions is studied. A complexity reduced technique for determining the <span class="hlt">stability</span> margin for FPUS is proposed. The method suggested is dependent on the order of the characteristic polynomial. In order to find the <span class="hlt">stability</span> margin of interval polynomials of order less than 5, it is not always necessary to determine and check all four Kharitonov's polynomials. It has been shown that, for determining <span class="hlt">stability</span> margin of FPUS of order five, four, and three we require only 3, 2, and 1 Kharitonov's polynomials respectively. Only for sixth and higher order polynomials, a complete set of Kharitonov's polynomials are needed to determine the <span class="hlt">stability</span> margin. Thus for lower order systems, the calculations are reduced to a large extent. This idea has been extended to determine the <span class="hlt">stability</span> margin of fuzzy interval polynomials. It is also shown that the gain and phase margin of FPUS can be determined analytically without using graphical techniques. PMID:21762909</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bhiwani, R J; Patre, B M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">85</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810008861&hterms=chi+energy&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dchi%2Benergy"> <span id="translatedtitle">Advanced <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for laminar flow control</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Five classes of problems are addressed: (1) the extension of the SALLY <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> code to the full eighth order compressible <span class="hlt">stability</span> equations for three dimensional boundary layer; (2) a comparison of methods for prediction of transition using SALLY for incompressible flows; (3) a study of instability and transition in rotating disk flows in which the effects of Coriolis forces and streamline curvature are included; (4) a new linear three dimensional instability mechanism that predicts Reynolds numbers for transition to turbulence in planar shear flows in good agreement with experiment; and (5) a study of the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of finite amplitude disturbances in axisymmetric pipe flow showing the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of this flow to all nonlinear axisymmetric disturbances.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Orszag, S. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">86</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981chi..reptQ....O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Advanced <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for laminar flow control</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Five classes of problems are addressed: (1) the extension of the SALLY <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> code to the full eighth order compressible <span class="hlt">stability</span> equations for three dimensional boundary layer; (2) a comparison of methods for prediction of transition using SALLY for incompressible flows; (3) a study of instability and transition in rotating disk flows in which the effects of Coriolis forces and streamline curvature are included; (4) a new linear three dimensional instability mechanism that predicts Reynolds numbers for transition to turbulence in planar shear flows in good agreement with experiment; and (5) a study of the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of finite amplitude disturbances in axisymmetric pipe flow showing the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of this flow to all nonlinear axisymmetric disturbances.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Orszag, S. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">87</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18926678"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cosmology of brane <span class="hlt">models</span> with radion <span class="hlt">stabilization</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyze the cosmology of the Randall-Sundrum <span class="hlt">model</span> and that of compact brane <span class="hlt">models</span> in general in the presence of a radius <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> mechanism. We find that the expansion of our Universe is generically in agreement with the expected effective four dimensional description. The constraint (which is responsible for the appearance of nonconventional cosmologies in these <span class="hlt">models</span>) that must be</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Csaba Cski; Michael Graesser; Lisa Randall; John Terning</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">88</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12613351"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cosmology of Brane <span class="hlt">Models</span> with Radion <span class="hlt">Stabilization</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyze the cosmology of the Randall-Sundrum <span class="hlt">model</span> and that of compact brane <span class="hlt">models</span> in general in the presence of a radius <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> mechanism. We find that the expansion of our universe is generically in agreement with the expected effective four dimensional description. The constraint (which is responsible for the appearance of non-conventional cosmologies in these <span class="hlt">models</span>) that must be</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Csaba Csaki; Michael Graesser; Lisa Randall; John Terninge</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">89</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1228877"> <span id="translatedtitle">Performance and <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of a Shrouded-Fan UAV</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper deals with the estimation of the performance and <span class="hlt">stability</span> for a shrouded-fan unmanned rotorcraft whose mission profile also prescribes the flight in ground effect. The not so simple estimation of the aerodynamic coefficients and of the thrust in the various situations makes the performance calculation and the <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> difficult tasks. This is due to the strong interaction between the fan flow and shroud that causes quite different flow structures about the airframe depending on flight conditions. A further difficulty is related to the ground effect which produces substantial modifications in the rotor thrust and aerodynamic coefficients. To evaluate performance and <span class="hlt">stability</span>, two <span class="hlt">models</span> have been developed. One determines the aerodynamic coefficients of the shroud, whereas the other one calculates thrust and moment of the rotors system. Both <span class="hlt">models</span> take into account the mutual interference between fan flow and fuselage and ground effect. Performance and <span class="hlt">stability</span> are then discussed with ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">de Divitiis, Nicola</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">90</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/24046706"> <span id="translatedtitle">A linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for miscible displacements</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> has been performed for a miscible displacement in a semi-infinite system of finite thickness and unbounded width. A more general description of dispersion has been adopted than those used by previous workers. It is shown that, when there is a step change in concentration and the mobility ratio is unfavorable, the displacement can be unstable at</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shih-Hsien Chang; John C. Slattery</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">91</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53833985"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aeroelastic <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of a Darrieus wind turbine</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An aeroelastic <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> was developed for predicting flutter instabilities on vertical axis wind turbines. The analytical <span class="hlt">model</span> and mathematical formulation of the problem are described as well as the physical mechanism that creates flutter in Darrieus turbines. Theoretical results are compared with measured experimental data from flutter tests of the Sandia 2 Meter turbine. Based on this comparison, the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. Popelka</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">92</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/46954356"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Machining <span class="hlt">Stability</span> for a Parallel Machine Tool</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Machine tool chatter is a self-excited vibration generated by chip thickness variation. It severely degrades the quality of the machined surface. The incidence of chatter is greatly affected by the dynamic characteristics of machine tool structure. This article extends chatter <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> to a machine tool equipped with a parallel mechanism. The vibration <span class="hlt">model</span> of a parallel machine tool is</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. Hong; S. Kim; W. C. Choi; J.-B. Song</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">93</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27013904"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">stability</span> theory for <span class="hlt">model</span> systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Purpose The purpose of this paper is to carry out a theoretical study of the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the mathematical <span class="hlt">models</span> defined in a class of systems. Furthermore, it will be supposed that the <span class="hlt">models</span> have been obtained from experimental data and by means of the application of a methodology. The studies carried out in this paper are, on one</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Y. Villacampa; F. Verd; A. Prez</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">94</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.princeton.edu/mae/people/faculty/holmes/Publishings/simply%20stabilized%20running.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Simply <span class="hlt">Stabilized</span> Running <span class="hlt">Model</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The spring-loaded inverted pendulum (SLIP), or monopedal hopper, is an archetypal <span class="hlt">model</span> for running in numerous animal species. Although locomotion is generally considered a complex taskrequiring sophisticated control strategies to account for coordination and sta- bility, we show that stable gaits can be found in the SLIP with both linear and \\</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. M. Ghigliazza; R. Altendorfer; P. Holmes</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">95</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMOS53A1950B"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of ENSO over multi-decadal time-scales in a 1000-yr coupled general cirlculation <span class="hlt">model</span> simulation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Bjerknes (BJ) <span class="hlt">stability</span> index is an approximate formula that may be used to analyse the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the coupled El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) mode. The BJ <span class="hlt">stability</span> index depends on the basic mean state, the atmosphere's sensitivity to sea surface temperature and the ocean's sensitivity to wind forcing. A positive BJ <span class="hlt">stability</span> index indicates a growth of ENSO <span class="hlt">stability</span> while a negative BJ <span class="hlt">stability</span> index signifies the rate of decay with negative contributions coming from damping by mean advection and air-sea heat fluxes while positive contributions from the zonal advective, Ekman pumping and thermocline feedback. Here we employ the BJ <span class="hlt">stability</span> index to investigate ENSO variability over multi-decadal time scales in the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Mark version 3.0L (CSIRO Mk3L) coupled general circulation <span class="hlt">model</span> and assess the sensitivity of ENSO to changes in tropical climate conditions. <span class="hlt">Model</span> simulations are forced with atmospheric concentrations fixed at pre-industrial levels and integrated over 1000-years to allow a variety of ENSO events to be simulated. The BJ index points to a simulated ENSO that is damped with the negative contribution from thermal damping by air-sea heat fluxes dominating over the feedback processes. There also exists a significant positive correlation between the ENSO amplitude and ENSO <span class="hlt">stability</span> such that the BJ index becomes less damped with increasing ENSO variability. We find that significant variations in the ENSO amplitude exist on decadal and centennial time scales. These variations are mainly governed by variations in the strength of the thermocline feedback, which is in turn a function of the coherence between fluctuations of the atmosphere and the ocean in the equatorial Pacific, reflecting the response of winds to temperature gradients and the response of the thermocline to winds. Surprisingly, such decadal and centennial variations are only weakly control by the mean state differences. The implications for interpreting observed ENSO variability will be discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Borlace, S.; Cai, W.; Santoso, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">96</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820005844&hterms=automobile&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dautomobile"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of automobile driver steering control</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In steering an automobile, the driver must basically control the direction of the car's trajectory (heading angle) and the lateral deviation of the car relative to a delineated pathway. A previously published linear control <span class="hlt">model</span> of driver steering behavior which is analyzed from a <span class="hlt">stability</span> point of view is considered. A simple approximate expression for a <span class="hlt">stability</span> parameter, phase margin, is derived in terms of various driver and vehicle control parameters, and boundaries for <span class="hlt">stability</span> are discussed. A field test study is reviewed that includes the measurement of driver steering control parameters. Phase margins derived for a range of vehicle characteristics are found to be generally consistent with known adaptive properties of the human operator. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of driver adaptive behavior.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Allen, R. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">97</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JPhCS.401a2023T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hamiltonian structure and <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of a reduced four-field <span class="hlt">model</span> for plasmas in the presence of a strong guide field</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyze the collisionless and inviscid limit of a reduced fluid <span class="hlt">model</span> for tokamak plasma dynamics. We show that the <span class="hlt">model</span> under consideration possesses a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure with four infinite families of Casimir invariants. Sufficient conditions for energy <span class="hlt">stability</span> are derived and formulated in terms of requirements on the current, electron pressure, and parallel ion velocity gradients, as well as on the ion temperature. In particular, the <span class="hlt">stability</span> condition requires a gradient of the parallel flow in the presence of ion temperature and a negative upper bound on the current gradient, in the presence of pressure gradients and/or parallel velocity gradients. Examples of stable configurations are derived.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tassi, E.; Ratiu, T. S.; Lazzaro, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">98</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25196012"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for a multi-camera photogrammetric system.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Consumer-grade digital cameras suffer from geometrical instability that may cause problems when used in photogrammetric applications. This paper provides a comprehensive review of this issue of interior orientation parameter variation over time, it explains the common ways used for coping with the issue, and describes the existing methods for performing <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for a single camera. The paper then points out the lack of coverage of <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for multi-camera systems, suggests a modification of the collinearity <span class="hlt">model</span> to be used for the calibration of an entire photogrammetric system, and proposes three methods for system <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. The proposed methods explore the impact of the changes in interior orientation and relative orientation/mounting parameters on the reconstruction process. Rather than relying on ground truth in real datasets to check the system calibration <span class="hlt">stability</span>, the proposed methods are simulation-based. Experiment results are shown, where a multi-camera photogrammetric system was calibrated three times, and <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> was performed on the system calibration parameters from the three sessions. The proposed simulation-based methods provided results that were compatible with a real-data based approach for evaluating the impact of changes in the system calibration parameters on the three-dimensional reconstruction. PMID:25196012</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Habib, Ayman; Detchev, Ivan; Kwak, Eunju</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">99</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4178982"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> for a Multi-Camera Photogrammetric System</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Consumer-grade digital cameras suffer from geometrical instability that may cause problems when used in photogrammetric applications. This paper provides a comprehensive review of this issue of interior orientation parameter variation over time, it explains the common ways used for coping with the issue, and describes the existing methods for performing <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for a single camera. The paper then points out the lack of coverage of <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for multi-camera systems, suggests a modification of the collinearity <span class="hlt">model</span> to be used for the calibration of an entire photogrammetric system, and proposes three methods for system <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. The proposed methods explore the impact of the changes in interior orientation and relative orientation/mounting parameters on the reconstruction process. Rather than relying on ground truth in real datasets to check the system calibration <span class="hlt">stability</span>, the proposed methods are simulation-based. Experiment results are shown, where a multi-camera photogrammetric system was calibrated three times, and <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> was performed on the system calibration parameters from the three sessions. The proposed simulation-based methods provided results that were compatible with a real-data based approach for evaluating the impact of changes in the system calibration parameters on the three-dimensional reconstruction. PMID:25196012</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Habib, Ayman; Detchev, Ivan; Kwak, Eunju</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">100</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AIPC.1190...13N"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of <span class="hlt">Stabilization</span> Mechanisms in Lifted Flames</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Flame <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> and the mechanisms that govern the dynamics at the flame base have been subject to numerous studies in recent years. Recent results using a combined Large Eddy Simulation-Conditional Moment Closure (LES-CMC) approach to <span class="hlt">model</span> the turbulent flow field and the turbulence-chemistry interactions has been successful in predicting flame ignition and <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> by auto-ignition, but LES-CMCs capability of the accurate <span class="hlt">modelling</span> of the competition between turbulent quenching and laminar and turbulent flame propagation at the anchor point has not been resolved. This paper will consolidate LES-CMC results by analysing a wide range of lifted flame geometries with different prevailing <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> mechanisms. The simulations allow a clear distinction of the prevailing <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> mechanisms for the different flames, LES-CMC accurately predicts the competition between turbulence and chemistry during the auto-ignition process, however, the dynamics of the extinction process and turbulent flame propagation are not well captured. The averaging process inherent in the CMC methods does not allow for an instant response of the transported conditionally averaged reactive species to the changes in the flow conditions and any response of the scalars will therefore be delayed. Stationary or quasi-stationary conditions, however, can be well predicted for all flame configurations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Navarro-Martinez, S.; Kronenburg, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return 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showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">101</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26242743"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> of an elastic cytoskeletal tensegrity <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An elastic cytoskeletal tensegrity structure composed by six inextensible elastic struts and 24 elastic cables is considered. The <span class="hlt">model</span> is studied, adopting delay convention for <span class="hlt">stability</span>. Critical conditions for simple and compound instabilities are defined. Post-critical behavior is also described. Equilibrium states with buckling of the struts are also considered. It is revealed that critical Euler buckling load of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. A. Lazopoulos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">102</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992iece....5R...5F"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of free piston Stirling engine power generation system</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents a <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the free-piston Stirling engine and linear alternator power generation system. Such a system operates under sustained mechanical oscillators, <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the system is important for proper operation, and as a criterion in selecting the tuning capacitor. The <span class="hlt">stability</span> criterion of the system is that the rate of change in power dissipation and electric power output is always faster than the rate of the power generated by the engine. The dynamic equations and <span class="hlt">model</span> of the system are developed in this paper. Frequency domain <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and Bode plot techniques are utilized in the study. The stable operating frequency region corresponding to different levels of power output are then determined.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fu, Z. X.; Nasar, S. A.; Rosswurm, Mark</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">103</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6375664"> <span id="translatedtitle">Xenon <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> using the generalized nyquist criterion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Xenon-induced spatial power oscillations caused by control rod movement may cause control problems in nuclear power plant operation. Many studies have been performed to assess the xenon <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> using the time-domain technique or the frequency-domain technique for the single-input/single-output (SISO) system. However, those methods are too complicated and thus too time consuming, or too simple to provide results according to control rod movement in a certain position. This study analyzes xenon axial <span class="hlt">stability</span> using the modal expansion technique in the frequency domain with the generalized Nyquist criterion, which is suitable for a multi-input/multi-output (MIMO) system. To examine this <span class="hlt">model</span>, an axial <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> has been performed for the pressurized water reactor core of YGN-1 in Korea. The studied design parameters are power level, control rod position, and core average burnup.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Choi, Yoocho; Park, Gooncherl; Chung, Changhyun (Seoul National Univ. (Korea)); Park, Jongkyun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">104</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/566792"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of White Oak Dam</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">White Oak Dam is located in the White Oak Creek watershed which provides the primary surface drainage for Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> was made on the dam by Syed Ahmed in January 1994 which included an evaluation of the liquefaction potential of the embankment and foundation. This report evaluates the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the dam and includes comments on the report prepared by Ahmed. Slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> analyses were performed on the dam and included cases for sudden drawdown, steady seepage, partial pool and earthquake. Results of the <span class="hlt">stability</span> analyses indicate that the dam is stable and failure of the structure would not occur for the cases considered. The report prepared by Ahmed leads to the same conclusions as stated above. Review of the report finds that it is complete, well documented and conservative in its selection of soil parameters. The evaluation of the liquefaction potential is also complete and this report is in agreement with the findings that the dam and foundation are not susceptible to liquefaction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-04-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">105</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26649561"> <span id="translatedtitle">Flexural-torsional bifurcations of a cantilever beam under potential and circulatory forces I: Non-linear <span class="hlt">model</span> and <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a cantilever elastic beam with rectangular cross-section under the action of a follower tangential force and a bending conservative couple at the free end is analyzed. The beam is herein <span class="hlt">modeled</span> as a non-linear Cosserat rod <span class="hlt">model</span>. Non-linear, partial integro-differential equations of motion are derived expanded up to cubic terms in the transversal displacement and torsional angle</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Achille Paolone; Marcello Vasta; Angelo Luongo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">106</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApJ...788..160J"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Consistent Orbital <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> for the GJ 581 System</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We apply a combination of N-body <span class="hlt">modeling</span> techniques and automated data fitting with Monte Carlo Markov Chain uncertainty <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of Keplerian orbital <span class="hlt">models</span> to RV data to determine long-term <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the planetary system GJ 581. We find that while there are <span class="hlt">stability</span> concerns with the four-planet <span class="hlt">model</span> as published by Forveille et al., when uncertainties in the system are accounted for, particularly stellar jitter, the hypothesis that the four-planet <span class="hlt">model</span> is gravitationally unstable is not statistically significant. Additionally, the system including proposed planet g by Vogt et al. also shows some <span class="hlt">stability</span> concerns when eccentricities are allowed to float in the orbital fit, yet when uncertainties are included in the <span class="hlt">analysis</span>, the system including planet g also cannot be proven to be unstable. We present revised reduced ?2 values for Keplerian astrocentric orbital fits assuming four-planet and five-planet <span class="hlt">models</span> for GJ 581 under the condition that best fits must be stable, and we find no distinguishable difference by including planet g in the <span class="hlt">model</span>. Additionally, we present revised orbital element estimates for each, assuming uncertainties due to stellar jitter under the constraint of the system being gravitationally stable.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Joiner, David A.; Sul, Cesar; Dragomir, Diana; Kane, Stephen R.; Kress, Monika E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">107</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005JCoPh.207..309D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous solution algorithms for Eulerian Eulerian gas solid flow <span class="hlt">models</span>: <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and convergence behaviour of a point and a plane solver</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Simultaneous solution algorithms for Eulerian-Eulerian gas-solid flow <span class="hlt">models</span> are presented and their <span class="hlt">stability</span> analyzed. The integration algorithms are based on dual-time stepping with fourth-order Runge-Kutta in pseudo-time. The domain is solved point or plane wise. The discretization of the inviscid terms is based on a low-Mach limit of the multi-phase preconditioned advection upstream splitting method (MP-AUSMP). The numerical <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the simultaneous solution algorithms is analyzed in 2D with the Fourier method. <span class="hlt">Stability</span> results are compared with the convergence behaviour of 3D riser simulations. The impact of the grid aspect ratio, preconditioning, artificial dissipation, and the treatment of the source terms is investigated. A particular advantage of the simultaneous solution algorithms is that they allow a fully implicit treatment of the source terms which are of crucial importance for the Eulerian-Eulerian gas-solid flow <span class="hlt">models</span> and their solution. The numerical <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the optimal simultaneous solution algorithm is analyzed for different solids volume fractions and gas-solid slip velocities. Furthermore, the effect of the grid resolution on the convergence behaviour and the simulation results is investigated. Finally, simulations of the bottom zone of a pilot-scale riser with a side solids inlet are experimentally validated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">De Wilde, Juray; Vierendeels, Jan; Heynderickx, Geraldine J.; Marin, Guy B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">108</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54027965"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for laminar flow control, part 2</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Topics covered include: (1) optimization of the numerics of the SALLY <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> code; (2) relation between temporal and spatial <span class="hlt">stability</span> theory; (3) compressible flow <span class="hlt">stability</span> calculations; (4) spectral methods for the boundary layer equations; and (5) numerical study of nonlinear, nonparallel <span class="hlt">stability</span> of incompressible flows. Bibtex entry for this abstract Preferred format for this abstract (see Preferences) Find Similar</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. A. Orszag</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">109</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AcMSn..27..823Z"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stabilization</span> control of a hovering <span class="hlt">model</span> insect: lateral motion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Our previous study shows that the lateral disturbance motion of a <span class="hlt">model</span> drone fly does not have inherent <span class="hlt">stability</span> (passive <span class="hlt">stability</span>), because of the existence of an unstable divergence mode. But drone flies are observed to fly stably. Constantly active control must be applied to <span class="hlt">stabilize</span> the flight. In this study, we investigate the lateral <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> control of the <span class="hlt">model</span> drone fly. The method of computational fluid dynamics is used to compute the lateral control derivatives and the techniques of eigenvalue and eigenvector <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and modal decomposition are used for solving the equations of motion. Controllability <span class="hlt">analysis</span> shows that although inherently unstable, the lateral disturbance motion is controllable. By feeding back the state variables (i.e. lateral translation velocity, yaw rate, roll rate and roll angle, which can be measured by the sensory system of the insect) to produce anti-symmetrical changes in stroke amplitude and/or in angle of attack between the left and right wings, the motion can be <span class="hlt">stabilized</span>, explaining why the drone flies can fly stably even if the flight is passively unstable.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Yan-Lai; Sun, Mao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">110</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21421147"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> of the Einstein static universe in open cosmological <span class="hlt">models</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">stability</span> properties of the Einstein static solution of general relativity are altered when corrective terms arising from modification of the underlying gravitational theory appear in the cosmological equations. In this paper the existence and <span class="hlt">stability</span> of static solutions are considered in the framework of two recently proposed quantum gravity <span class="hlt">models</span>. The previously known <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the Einstein static solutions in the semiclassical regime of loop quantum cosmology with modifications to the gravitational sector is extended to open cosmological <span class="hlt">models</span> where a static neutrally stable solution is found. A similar <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is also performed in the framework of Horava-Lifshitz gravity under detailed balance and projectability conditions. In the case of open cosmological <span class="hlt">models</span> the two solutions found can be either unstable or neutrally stable according to the admitted values of the parameters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Canonico, Rosangela; Parisi, Luca [Dipartimento di Fisica 'E. R. Caianiello', Universita di Salerno, Via Ponte Don Melillo, I-84081 Baronissi (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Napoli, GC di Salerno, Via Ponte Don Melillo, I-84081 Baronissi (Italy)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">111</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27010965"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aeroelastic <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of turbomachinery : Part II <span class="hlt">stability</span> computations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Part II of the two-part paper describes an aeroelastic <span class="hlt">analysis</span> program and its application for <span class="hlt">stability</span> computations of turbomachinery blade rows. Unsteady Euler or Navier-Stokes equations are solved on dynamically deforming, body fitted, and grid to obtain the aeroelastic characteristics. Blade structural response is <span class="hlt">modeled</span> using a modal representation of the blade and the work-per-cycle method is used to evaluate</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Srivastava; M. A. Bakhle; T. G. Keith Jr; D. Hoyniak</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">112</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/59995"> <span id="translatedtitle">Adaptive rational spectral methods for the linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of nonlinear fourth-order problems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents the application of adaptive rational spectral methods to the linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of nonlinear fourth-order problems. Our <span class="hlt">model</span> equation is a phase-field <span class="hlt">model</span> of infiltration, but the proposed ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Juanes, Ruben</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">113</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950016557&hterms=SAMM&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DSAMM"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shapes and <span class="hlt">stability</span> of algebraic nuclear <span class="hlt">models</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A generalization of the procedure to study shapes and <span class="hlt">stability</span> of algebraic nuclear <span class="hlt">models</span> introduced by Gilmore is presented. One calculates the expectation value of the Hamiltonian with respect to the coherent states of the algebraic structure of the system. Then equilibrium configurations of the resulting energy surface, which depends in general on state variables and a set of parameters, are classified through the Catastrophe theory. For one- and two-body interactions in the Hamiltonian of the interacting Boson <span class="hlt">model</span>-1, the critical points are organized through the Cusp catastrophe. As an example, we apply this Separatrix to describe the energy surfaces associated to the Rutenium and Samarium isotopes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lopez-Moreno, Enrique; Castanos, Octavio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">114</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16055383"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Modelling</span> molecular <span class="hlt">stability</span> in the RNA world.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">RNA secondary structure, <span class="hlt">stability</span> and melting curves are calculated for a <span class="hlt">model</span> of a possible ribozyme corresponding to the RNA directed RNA polymerase (ribopolymerase) required in the RNA world. From these calculations, rates of folding and hybridisation are estimated and used in a stochastic simulation of the dynamics of a population of ribopolymerase molecules. Two <span class="hlt">models</span> are considered: one synthesising a conventional antiparallel reverse complementary transcript and one synthesising a parallel complementary transcript. It was found that the latter system can operate much more effective in the higher temperatures thought to prevail during the RNA world. PMID:16055383</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Taylor, William R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">115</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780004420&hterms=tap+chi&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dtap%2Bchi"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for laminar flow control, part 1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The basic equations for the <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of flow over three dimensional swept wings are developed and numerical methods for their solution are surveyed. The equations for nonlinear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of three dimensional disturbances in compressible, three dimensional, nonparallel flows are given. Efficient and accurate numerical methods for the solution of the equations of <span class="hlt">stability</span> theory were surveyed and analyzed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Benney, D. J.; Orszag, S. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">116</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21443223"> <span id="translatedtitle">Can an electron-shell closing <span class="hlt">model</span> explain the structure and <span class="hlt">stability</span> of ligand-<span class="hlt">stabilized</span> metal clusters?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigated the structure and <span class="hlt">stability</span> of several aluminum hydride complexes to understand the essence of "superatom chemistry" and to gain a right perspective on the ligand (L)-<span class="hlt">stabilized</span> metal (M) clusters. We successfully interpret the structure and <span class="hlt">stability</span> using molecular orbital <span class="hlt">analysis</span>, which clearly shows the failure of an electron-shell closing <span class="hlt">model</span> (or a superatom <span class="hlt">model</span>) to explain it. The structure and <span class="hlt">stability</span> of Al(m)H(n) are closely associated with the molecular orbital <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> owing to the effective orbital overlap between Al(m) (M(m)) and nH (nL). The importance of retaining the electronic structural integrity of M(m) in M(m)L(n)-within an electron-shell closing <span class="hlt">model</span>-has been underestimated or even disregarded, and this has created the current controversies in the scientific community. PMID:21443223</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Hyemi; Han, Young-Kyu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">117</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.buffalostate.edu/geography/documents/frothingham%202008.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of <span class="hlt">stability</span> threshold <span class="hlt">analysis</span> as a cursory method of screening potential streambank <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> techniques</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A water quality issue that is of particular concern in human-modified streams is sediment pollution. In-stream areas of sediment production have been targeted and managed using stream channelization and, more recently, biotechnical streambank <span class="hlt">stabilization</span>. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of <span class="hlt">stability</span> threshold <span class="hlt">analysis</span> as a cursory method to develop a range of potential streambank <span class="hlt">stabilization</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kelly M. Frothingham</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">118</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.inria.fr/docs/00/17/75/66/PDF/ICEEDT07.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">-<span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of a class of nonlinear fractional differential equations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lp -<span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of a class of nonlinear fractional differential equations Samir Ladaci investigates the Lp -<span class="hlt">stability</span> properties of fractional nonlinear differential equations. Systems defined The fractional calculus and fractional order differential equations attracted a great attention these last</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boyer, Edmond</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">119</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20090019073&hterms=approximate+schur+complement&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dapproximate%2Bschur%2Bcomplement"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bounded Linear <span class="hlt">Stability</span> Margin <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Nonlinear Hybrid Adaptive Control</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents a bounded linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for a hybrid adaptive control that blends both direct and indirect adaptive control. <span class="hlt">Stability</span> and convergence of nonlinear adaptive control are analyzed using an approximate linear equivalent system. A <span class="hlt">stability</span> margin <span class="hlt">analysis</span> shows that a large adaptive gain can lead to a reduced phase margin. This method can enable metrics-driven adaptive control whereby the adaptive gain is adjusted to meet <span class="hlt">stability</span> margin requirements.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nguyen, Nhan T.; Boskovic, Jovan D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">120</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24483388"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> of earthquake clustering <span class="hlt">models</span>: criticality and branching ratios.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the <span class="hlt">stability</span> conditions of a class of branching processes prominent in the <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and <span class="hlt">modeling</span> of seismicity. This class includes the epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) <span class="hlt">model</span> as a special case, but more generally comprises <span class="hlt">models</span> in which the magnitude distribution of direct offspring depends on the magnitude of the progenitor, such as the branching aftershock sequence (BASS) <span class="hlt">model</span> and another recently proposed branching <span class="hlt">model</span> based on a dynamic scaling hypothesis. These <span class="hlt">stability</span> conditions are closely related to the concepts of the criticality parameter and the branching ratio. The criticality parameter summarizes the asymptotic behavior of the population after sufficiently many generations, determined by the maximum eigenvalue of the transition equations. The branching ratio is defined by the proportion of triggered events in all the events. Based on the results for the generalized case, we show that the branching ratio of the ETAS <span class="hlt">model</span> is identical to its criticality parameter because its magnitude density is separable from the full intensity. More generally, however, these two values differ and thus place separate conditions on <span class="hlt">model</span> <span class="hlt">stability</span>. As an illustration of the difference and of the importance of the <span class="hlt">stability</span> conditions, we employ a version of the BASS <span class="hlt">model</span>, reformulated to ensure the possibility of stationarity. In addition, we analyze the magnitude distributions of successive generations of the BASS <span class="hlt">model</span> via analytical and numerical methods, and find that the compound density differs substantially from a Gutenberg-Richter distribution, unless the process is essentially subcritical (branching ratio less than 1) or the magnitude dependence between the parent event and the direct offspring is weak. PMID:24483388</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhuang, Jiancang; Werner, Maximilian J; Harte, David S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">121</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1016004"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of dynamical neural networks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, we use the matrix measure technique to study the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of dynamical neural networks. Testable conditions for global exponential <span class="hlt">stability</span> of nonlinear dynamical systems and dynamical neural networks are given. It shows how a few well-known results can be unified and generalized in a straightforward way. Local exponential <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a class of dynamical neural networks is</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Y. Fang; T. G. Kincaid</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">122</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50489443"> <span id="translatedtitle">Systematic <span class="hlt">stability-analysis</span> method for analog circuits</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Analyzing the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of an analog circuit is an important part of the circuit design. Several commercial simulators are equipped with special <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> techniques. Problems arise when your design kit does not support such simulator. Another issue is when the designer wants to get insight into the sources of the instability to propose a <span class="hlt">stabilization</span>. This can be done</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gerd Vandersteen; Stephane Bronckers; Petr Dobrovolny; Y. Rolain</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">123</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24486234"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic flight <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a hovering <span class="hlt">model</span> dragonfly.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The longitudinal dynamic flight <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a <span class="hlt">model</span> dragonfly at hovering flight is studied, using the method of computational fluid dynamics to compute the <span class="hlt">stability</span> derivatives and the techniques of eigenvalue and eigenvector <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for solving the equations of motion. Three natural modes of motion are identified for the hovering flight: one unstable oscillatory mode, one stable fast subsidence mode and one stable slow subsidence mode. The flight is dynamically unstable owing to the unstable oscillatory mode. The instability is caused by a pitch-moment derivative with respect to horizontal velocity. The damping force and moment derivatives (with respect to horizontal and vertical velocities and pitch-rotational velocity, respectively) weaken the instability considerably. The aerodynamic interaction between the forewing and the hindwing does not have significant effect on the <span class="hlt">stability</span> properties. The dragonfly has similar <span class="hlt">stability</span> derivatives, hence <span class="hlt">stability</span> properties, to that of a one-wing-pair insect at normal hovering, but there are differences in how the derivatives are produced because of the highly inclined stroke plane of the dragonfly. PMID:24486234</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liang, Bin; Sun, Mao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">124</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21086426"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of polyolefin <span class="hlt">stabilizers</span> and their degradation products.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Polymeric materials are complex samples, as they contain various groups of additives, compounding ingredients, and fillers. An important group of additives are <span class="hlt">stabilizers</span>. Efficient <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> is essential especially for polypropylene, as it is sensitive to oxidation and radical attack due to the numerous tertiary carbon atoms in its structure. How long a polymer will be sufficiently <span class="hlt">stabilized</span> can be deduced from the contained amount of intact <span class="hlt">stabilizer</span>. Different approaches for the <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of <span class="hlt">stabilizers</span> in polyolefins are available, which include sample preparation with subsequent chromatographic separation as well as direct <span class="hlt">analysis</span> techniques. In round-robin tests, <span class="hlt">stabilizer</span> concentrations obtained varied strongly. This shows the demand for reliable and robust methods. <span class="hlt">Stabilizers</span> get consumed while protecting the polymer and are then present as degradation products. They were observed while quantifying intact <span class="hlt">stabilizers</span>, in migration studies, and - if volatile - in emission studies of polymers. Furthermore, e.g. interactions with other polymer ingredients or irradiation degraded <span class="hlt">stabilizers</span>. The identification of degradation products provides a better insight into the reactions associated with <span class="hlt">stabilization</span>. Their quantitation makes it possible to deduce the original level of <span class="hlt">stabilization</span>. Furthermore, polymer ingredients degrading <span class="hlt">stabilizers</span> can be identified. Knowledge on these interactions contributes significantly to improved polymer <span class="hlt">stabilization</span>. PMID:21086426</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reingruber, Eva; Buchberger, Wolfgang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">125</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/58989270"> <span id="translatedtitle">Steady State <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of AC-DC Power Systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This thesis presents a comprehensive approach for the steady state <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of AC-DC power systems. A new method is presented for the evaluation of the system state matrix which is then used to determine system <span class="hlt">stability</span> and develop new algorithms for the <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and control of large power systems.\\u000aThe method exploits the powerful features of the Component</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Farooq Ahmad Qureshy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">126</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1558683"> <span id="translatedtitle">Admittance space <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of power electronic systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Power electronics based power distribution systems (PEDSs) are becoming increasingly common, particularly in marine and aerospace applications. <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of this class of systems is crucial due to the potential for negative impedance instability. Existing techniques of <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> introduce artificial conservativeness, are sensitive to component grouping, and at the same time do not explicitly address uncertainties and variations in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. D. Sudhoff; S. F. Glover; P. T. Lamm; D. H. Schmucker; D. E. Delisle; S. P. Karatsinides</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">127</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://geophysics.mines.edu/cgem/pdf%20files/Kass%202005.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">SLOPE <span class="hlt">STABILITY</span> <span class="hlt">ANALYSIS</span> OF THE ILIAMNA VOLCANO, ALASKA, USING ASTER TIR, SRTM DEM, AND AEROMAGNETIC DATA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">SLOPE <span class="hlt">STABILITY</span> <span class="hlt">ANALYSIS</span> OF THE ILIAMNA VOLCANO, ALASKA, USING ASTER TIR, SRTM DEM and digital elevation <span class="hlt">models</span> to create a hazard index that characterizes slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> on active volcanoes. Introduction Volcano monitoring in the Aleutians is of great importance due to the heavy amount of airplane</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">128</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1469370"> <span id="translatedtitle">Direct <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of electric power systems using energy functions: theory, applications, and perspective</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> programs are a primary tool used by power system planning and operating engineers to predict the response of the system to various disturbances. Important conclusions and decisions are made based on the results of <span class="hlt">stability</span> studies. This paper presents a theoretical foundation of direct methods for both network-reduction and network-preserving power system <span class="hlt">models</span>. In addition to an overview,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">HSIAO-DONG CHIANG; Chia-Chi Chu; GERRY CAULEY</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">129</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860005824&hterms=quasi-experimental+procedures&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dquasi-experimental%2Bprocedures"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of various unsteady aerodynamic <span class="hlt">models</span> on the aeromechanical <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a helicopter in ground resonance</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aeromechanical <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a helicopter in ground resonance was analyzed, by incorporating five different aerodynamic <span class="hlt">models</span> in the coupled rotor/fuselage <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. The sensitivity of the results to changes in aerodynamic <span class="hlt">modelling</span> was carefully examined. The theoretical results were compared with experimental data and useful conclusions are drawn regarding the role of aerodynamic <span class="hlt">modeling</span> on this aeromechanical <span class="hlt">stability</span> problem. The aerodynamic <span class="hlt">model</span> which provided the best all around correlation with the experimental data was identified.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Friedmann, P. P.; Venkatesan, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">130</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1011.5672v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Perturbative <span class="hlt">stability</span> of SFT-based cosmological <span class="hlt">models</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We review the appearance of multiple scalar fields in linearized SFT based cosmological <span class="hlt">models</span> with a single non-local scalar field. Some of these local fields are canonical real scalar fields and some are complex fields with unusual coupling. These systems only admit numerical or approximate <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. We introduce a modified potential for multiple scalar fields that makes the system exactly solvable in the cosmological context of Friedmann equations and at the same time preserves the asymptotic behavior expected from SFT. The main part of the paper consists of the <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of inhomogeneous cosmological perturbations in this system. We show numerically that perturbations corresponding to the new type of complex fields always vanish. As an example of application of this <span class="hlt">model</span> we consider an explicit construction of the phantom divide crossing and prove the perturbative <span class="hlt">stability</span> of this process at the linear order. The issue of ghosts and ways to resolve it are briefly discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Federico Galli; Alexey S. Koshelev</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-11-25</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">131</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1310113"> <span id="translatedtitle">Perturbative <span class="hlt">stability</span> of SFT-based cosmological <span class="hlt">models</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We review the appearance of multiple scalar fields in linearized SFT based cosmological <span class="hlt">models</span> with a single non-local scalar field. Some of these local fields are canonical real scalar fields and some are complex fields with unusual coupling. These systems only admit numerical or approximate <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. We introduce a modified potential for multiple scalar fields that makes the system exactly solvable in the cosmological context of Friedmann equations and at the same time preserves the asymptotic behavior expected from SFT. The main part of the paper consists of the <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of inhomogeneous cosmological perturbations in this system. We demonstrate numerically that perturbations corresponding to the new type of complex fields always vanish. As an example of application of this <span class="hlt">model</span> we consider an explicit construction of the phantom divide crossing and prove the perturbative <span class="hlt">stability</span> of this process.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Galli, Federico</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">132</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JCAP...05..012G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Perturbative <span class="hlt">stability</span> of SFT-based cosmological <span class="hlt">models</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We review the appearance of multiple scalar fields in linearized SFT based cosmological <span class="hlt">models</span> with a single non-local scalar field. Some of these local fields are canonical real scalar fields and some are complex fields with unusual coupling. These systems only admit numerical or approximate <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. We introduce a modified potential for multiple scalar fields that makes the system exactly solvable in the cosmological context of Friedmann equations and at the same time preserves the asymptotic behavior expected from SFT. The main part of the paper consists of the <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of inhomogeneous cosmological perturbations in this system. We show numerically that perturbations corresponding to the new type of complex fields always vanish. As an example of application of this <span class="hlt">model</span> we consider an explicit construction of the phantom divide crossing and prove the perturbative <span class="hlt">stability</span> of this process at the linear order. The issue of ghosts and ways to resolve it are briefly discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Galli, Federico; Koshelev, Alexey S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">133</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20110011791&hterms=unix&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dunix"> <span id="translatedtitle">CFD Based Computations of Flexible Helicopter Blades for <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">As a collaborative effort among government aerospace research laboratories an advanced version of a widely used computational fluid dynamics code, OVERFLOW, was recently released. This latest version includes additions to <span class="hlt">model</span> flexible rotating multiple blades. In this paper, the OVERFLOW code is applied to improve the accuracy of airload computations from the linear lifting line theory that uses displacements from beam <span class="hlt">model</span>. Data transfers required at every revolution are managed through a Unix based script that runs jobs on large super-cluster computers. Results are demonstrated for the 4-bladed UH-60A helicopter. Deviations of computed data from flight data are evaluated. Fourier <span class="hlt">analysis</span> post-processing that is suitable for aeroelastic <span class="hlt">stability</span> computations are performed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Guruswamy, Guru P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">134</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19730030471&hterms=riccati&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Driccati"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of Riccati covariance equations of Kalman filter.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The present paper takes the basic mathematical approach to analyze the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of Riccati equations. First, a simple <span class="hlt">stability</span> criterion like that of the linear constant coefficient system is sought for the nonlinear constant Riccati Equation. Then, a complete <span class="hlt">analysis</span> on the limiting covariance P follows. The <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is focussed on the main theorem. Finally, the computational aspects of the Riccati equations are analyzed with examples. The application of this <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is to provide a simple <span class="hlt">stability</span> criterion for the Kalman filter computation to test and predict filter convergence and thus modify filter parameters accordingly.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Teng, L.; Schmidt, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">135</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/838308"> <span id="translatedtitle">DETERMINATION OF ELECTROCHEMICAL PERFORMANCE, AND THERMO-MECHANICALCHEMICAL <span class="hlt">STABILITY</span> OF SOFCS FROM DEFECT <span class="hlt">MODELING</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The objectives of this project were to: provide fundamental relationships between SOFC performance and operating conditions and transient (time dependent) transport properties; extend <span class="hlt">models</span> to thermo-mechanical <span class="hlt">stability</span>, thermo-chemical <span class="hlt">stability</span>, and multilayer structures; incorporate microstructural effects such as grain boundaries and grain-size distribution; experimentally verify <span class="hlt">models</span> and devise strategies to obtain relevant material constants; and assemble software package for integration into SECA failure <span class="hlt">analysis</span> <span class="hlt">models</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wachsman, E.D.; Duncan, K.L.; Ebrahimi, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">136</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820044822&hterms=Modern+technique&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3D%2528Modern%2Btechnique%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Application of modern time series <span class="hlt">analysis</span> to high <span class="hlt">stability</span> oscillators</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Techniques of modern time series <span class="hlt">analysis</span> useful for investigating the characteristics of high-<span class="hlt">stability</span> oscillators and identifying systematic perturbations are discussed with reference to an experiment in which the frequencies of superconducting cavity-<span class="hlt">stabilized</span> oscillators and hydrogen masers were compared. The techniques examined include transformation to stationarity, autocorrelation and cross-correlation, superresolution, and transfer function determination.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Farrell, B. F.; Mattison, W. M.; Vessot, R. F. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">137</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26290639"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonlinear aerostatic <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of Jiang Yin suspension bridge</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A nonlinear aerostatic <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the Jiang Yin suspension bridge over the Yangtse River in China is carried out in this paper. We propose a new nonlinear method to analyze aerostatic <span class="hlt">stability</span> of suspension bridges, based on both the three components of wind loads and geometric nonlinearity. A computer program NASAB, based on the proposed method, has been developed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jin Cheng; Jian-Jing Jiang; Ru-Cheng Xiao; Hai-Fan Xiang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">138</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26953139"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of PWM feedback control systems with PID regulators</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is of great significance in those feedback control systems in which the power amplifier is operated as a pulse-modulator device, since under these circumstances the whole control system is highly non-linear. <span class="hlt">Stability</span> in PWM feedback control systems with a proportional type regulator has been amply described in the literature. Only recently, however, have such studies been extended to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. LA CAVA; G. PALETTA; C. PICARDI</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">139</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://digital.csic.es/bitstream/10261/3441/3/4366.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of sonic horizons in Bose-Einstein condensates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examine the linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> of various configurations in Bose-Einstein condensates with steplike sonic horizons. These configurations are chosen in analogy with gravitational systems with a black hole horizon, a white hole horizon, and a combination of both. We discuss the role of different boundary conditions in this <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span>, paying special attention to their meaning in gravitational terms. We</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Barcel; A. Cano; L. J. Garay; G. Jannes</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">140</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/2166803"> <span id="translatedtitle">Systematic <span class="hlt">stability-analysis</span> method for analog circuits</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Analyzing the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of an analog circuit is an impor- tant part of the circuit design. Several commercial simula- tors are equipped with special <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> techniques. Problems arise when your design kit does not support such simulator. Another issue is when the designer wants to get insight into the sources of the instability to propose a stabi- lization. This</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gerd Vandersteen; Stephane Bronckers; Petr Dobrovoln; Yves Rolain</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">141</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/543659"> <span id="translatedtitle">White Oak Dam <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. Volume I</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A parametric study was conducted to evaluate the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the White Oak Dam (WOD) embankment and foundation. Slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> analyses were performed for the upper and lower bound soil properties at three sections of the dam using the PCSTABL4 computer program. Minimum safety factors were calculated for the applicable seismic and static loading conditions. Liquefaction potential of the dam embankment and foundation solid during the seismic event was assessed by using simplified procedures. The WOD is classified as a low hazard facility and the Evaluation Basis Earthquake (EBE) is defined as an earthquake with a magnitude of m{sub b} = 5.6 and a Peak Ground Accelerator (PGA) of 0.13 g. This event is approximately equivalent to a Modified Mercalli Intensity of VI-VIII. The EBE is used to perform the seismic evaluation for slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> and liquefaction potential. Results of the <span class="hlt">stability</span> analyses and the liquefaction assessment lead to the conclusion that the White Oak Dam is safe and stable for the static and the seismic events defined in this study. Ogden Environmental, at the request of MMES, has checked and verified the calculations for the critical loading conditions and performed a peer review of this report. Ogden has determined that the WOD is stable under the defined static and seismic loading conditions and the embankment materials are in general not susceptible to liquefaction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ahmed, S.B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">142</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.igpm.rwth-aachen.de/Download/reports/reusken/ARpaper48.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of two-dimensional pool-boiling systems M. Speetjens</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of two-dimensional pool-boiling systems M. Speetjens , A. Reusken , S. Maier In this paper we consider a <span class="hlt">model</span> for pool-boiling systems known from the liter- ature. This <span class="hlt">model</span> involves only the temperature distribution within the heater and <span class="hlt">models</span> the heat exchange with the boiling medium via</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">143</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/14548921"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for a class of TakagiSugeno fuzzy control systems with PID controllers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> method for a class of fuzzy control systems based on TakagiSugeno <span class="hlt">models</span> and PID controllers is proposed in this paper. It has shown that the traditional TakagiSugeno fuzzy state <span class="hlt">models</span> with certain matrix structures are equivalent to fuzzy transfer function <span class="hlt">models</span>, which have two consequents in each rule. Then, when the PID controllers utilising the overall</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Le Hung Lan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">144</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.infomine.com/publications/docs/Martin2002b.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Some considerations in the <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of upstream tailings dams</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Upstream constructed tailings dams represent a significant challenge to the geotechnical engineer in terms of <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of their <span class="hlt">stability</span>, in large part because the shear strength of the loose sands and fine grained or \\</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. E. Martin; E. C. McRoberts</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">145</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2499"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long term voltage <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for small disturbances</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This dissertation attempts to establish an analytical and comprehensive framework to deal with two critical challenges associated with voltage <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span>: 1. To study the new competitive environment appropriately and give more incentive...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Men, Kun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">146</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/38748075"> <span id="translatedtitle">Technological Forecasting---<span class="hlt">Model</span> Selection, <span class="hlt">Model</span> <span class="hlt">Stability</span>, and Combining <span class="hlt">Models</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The paper identifies 29 <span class="hlt">models</span> that the literature suggests are appropriate for technological forecasting. These <span class="hlt">models</span> are divided into three classes according to the timing of the point of inflexion in the innovation or substitution process. Faced with a given data set and such a choice, the issue of <span class="hlt">model</span> selection needs to be addressed. Evidence used to aid <span class="hlt">model</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nigel Meade; Towhidul Islam</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">147</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.math.miami.edu/~ruan/MyPapers/RuanHe-siap98.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">GLOBAL <span class="hlt">STABILITY</span> IN CHEMOSTAT-TYPE COMPETITION <span class="hlt">MODELS</span> WITH NUTRIENT RECYCLING</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">GLOBAL <span class="hlt">STABILITY</span> IN CHEMOSTAT-TYPE COMPETITION <span class="hlt">MODELS</span> WITH NUTRIENT RECYCLING SHIGUI RUAN AND XUE- type competition <span class="hlt">models</span> with nutrient recycling. In the first <span class="hlt">model</span> the recycling is instantaneous, whereas in the second, the recycling is delayed. They carried out the equilibrium <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and obtained</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ruan, Shigui</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">148</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50690165"> <span id="translatedtitle">DQ-transformation approach for <span class="hlt">modelling</span> and <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of AC-DC power system with controlled PWM rectifier and constant power loads</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper a technique for analysing aircraft frequency wild power systems with constant power loads is developed and demonstrated. Power electronic based loads often behave as constant power loads, especially when feeding machine or actuator drives under current and speed control. The constant power (CP) loads can affect the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the power system. The problem is a particular</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K.-N. Areerak; S. V. Bozhko; G. M. Asher; D. W. P. Thomas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">149</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PUSP...37..109K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Soap Bubble Elasticity: <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> and Correlation with Foam <span class="hlt">Stability</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A correlation between the elastic modulus of soap bubble and the foam <span class="hlt">stability</span> was found. A <span class="hlt">model</span> system was chosen: a soap bubble <span class="hlt">stabilized</span> by simple nonionic surfactant tetraethylene glycol octyl ether (C8E4) and 10^-5 M NaCl. The Elastic moduli were determined by periodical expansion and shrinking of foam bubbles with frequency of 0.1 Hz and volumetric amplitude of 2 mm 3. The film tension was monitored via commercial profile <span class="hlt">analysis</span> tensiometer (Sinterface Technologies, GmbH). The elastic moduli of foam bubbles versus surfactant concentration in the range of 2x10^-3 - 10^-2 M were obtained. In addition, the theory of Lucassen and van den Tempel for the elastic modulus of single liquid/air interface at given frequency was exploited as well. The bulk diffusion coefficient of the surfactant molecules is unknown parameter through the adsorption frequency in this theory. Hence, a fitting procedure (with one free parameter) was conducted matching experimental and theoretical data. The value of the bulk diffusion coefficient of C8E4 obtained was 5.1x10^-11 m^2/s, which is an order of magnitude lower value than what is expected for. The foam was generated by shaking method and left to decay. A correlation between the elastic modulus and foam life time upon surfactant concentration was found.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Karakashev, S. I.; Tsekov, R.; Manev, E. D.; Nguyen, A. V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">150</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www2.coe.pku.edu.cn/tpic/2012931321278.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lateral <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Hypersonic Vehicle under Pressure Fluctuation by Solving Mathieu Differential Equation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lateral <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Hypersonic Vehicle under Pressure Fluctuation by Solving Mathieu's Republic of China Two recent test failures of Hypersonic Technology Vehicle 2 impose a strike in dynamic <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of hypersonic vehicles. To demonstrate the idea, a hypersonic <span class="hlt">model</span> is imagined</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huang, Xun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">151</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50083698"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span>-constrained <span class="hlt">model</span> predictive control with state estimation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This article presents an extension to <span class="hlt">stability</span>-constrained <span class="hlt">model</span> predictive control (SCMPC) incorporating state estimation. It is proved that asymptotic <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the closed loop system is guaranteed for SCMPC when a stable state estimator is used rather than direct measurement of the full state variables. The results are illustrated with experimental results from a real-time implementation of SCMPC with state</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xu Cheng; Bruce H. Krogh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">152</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AIPC.1400..206A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Structural <span class="hlt">Stability</span> of Mathematical <span class="hlt">Models</span> of National Economy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the paper we test robustness of particular dynamic systems in a compact regions of a plane and a weak structural <span class="hlt">stability</span> of one dynamic system of high order in a compact region of its phase space. The test was carried out based on the fundamental theory of dynamical systems on a plane and based on the conditions for weak structural <span class="hlt">stability</span> of high order dynamic systems. A numerical algorithm for testing the weak structural <span class="hlt">stability</span> of high order dynamic systems has been proposed. Based on this algorithm we assess the weak structural <span class="hlt">stability</span> of one computable general equilibrium <span class="hlt">model</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ashimov, Abdykappar A.; Sultanov, Bahyt T.; Borovskiy, Yuriy V.; Adilov, Zheksenbek M.; Ashimov, Askar A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">153</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhDT.......345S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of offshore wind farm and marine current farm</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Renewable energy has been playing an important role to meet power demand and 'Green Energy' market is getting bigger platform all over the world in the last few years. Due to massive increase in the prices of fossil fuels along with global warming issues, energy harvesting from renewable energy sources has received considerable interest, nowadays, where extensive researches are going on to ensure optimum use of renewable sources. In order to meet the increasing demand of electricity and power, integration of renewable energy is getting highest priorities around the world. Wind is one of the most top growing renewable energy resources and wind power market penetration is expected to reach 3.35 percent by 2013 from its present market of about 240 GW. A wind energy system is the most environmental friendly, cost effective and safe among all renewable energy resources available. Another promising form of renewable energy is ocean energy which covers 70 % of the earth. Ocean energy can be tapped from waves, tides and thermal elements. Offshore Wind farm (OWF) has already become very popular for large scale wind power integration with the onshore grid. Recently, marine current farm (MCF) is also showing good potential to become mainstream energy sources and already successfully commissioned in United Kingdom. However, squirrel cage induction generator (SCIG) has the <span class="hlt">stability</span> problem similar to synchronous generator especially during fault location to restore the electromagnetic torque. Series dynamic braking resistor (SDBR) has been known as a useful mean to <span class="hlt">stabilize</span> fixed speed wind generator system. On the other hand, doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) has the capability of coupling the control of active and reactive power and to provide necessary reactive power demand during grid fault conditions. Series dynamic braking resistor (SDBR) can also be employed with DFIG to limit the rotor over current. An integration of wind and tidal energy represents a new-trend for large electric energy production using offshore wind generators and marine current generators, respectively. Thus DFIG based offshore wind farm can be an economic solution to <span class="hlt">stabilize</span> squirrel cage induction generator based marine current farm without installing any addition FACTS devices. This thesis first focuses on the <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> of fixed speed IG based marine current farm using SDBR. Also <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> of DFIG based variable speed wind farm utilizing SDBR is studied in this work. Finally a co-operative control strategy is proposed where DFIG is controlled in such a way that it can even provide necessary reactive power demand of induction generator, so that additional cost of FACTS devices can be avoided. In that way, the DFIGs of the offshore wind farm (OWF) will actively compensate the reactive power demand of adjacent IGs of the marine current farm (MCF) during grid fault. Detailed <span class="hlt">modeling</span> and control scheme for the proposed system are demonstrated considering some realistic scenarios. The power system small signal <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is also carried out by eigenvalue <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for marine current generator topology, wind turbine generator topology and integrated topology. The relation between the modes and state variables are discussed in light of modal and sensitivity analyses. The results of theoretical analyses are verified by MATLAB/SIMULINK and laboratory standard power system simulator PSCAD/EMTDC.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shawon, Mohammad Hasanuzzaman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">154</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ChPhL..28i0501G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Theoretical <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of a Modified Continuum <span class="hlt">Model</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Based on the optimal velocity (OV) <span class="hlt">model</span>, a new car-following <span class="hlt">model</span> for traffic flow with the consideration of the driver's forecast effect (DFE) was proposed by Tang et al., which can be used to describe some complex traffic phenomena better. Using an asymptotic approximation between the headway and density, we obtain a new macro continuum version of the car-following <span class="hlt">model</span> with the DFE. The linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> theory is applied to derive the neutral <span class="hlt">stability</span> condition. The Kortewegde Vries equation near the neutral <span class="hlt">stability</span> line is given by nonlinear <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and the corresponding solution for the traffic density wave is derived.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ge, Hong-Xia; Wu, Shu-Zhen; Cheng, Rong-Jun; Lo, Siu-ming</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">155</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1953988"> <span id="translatedtitle">Energy-Casimir <span class="hlt">stability</span> of hybrid Vlasov-MHD <span class="hlt">models</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Different variants of hybrid kinetic-fluid <span class="hlt">models</span> are considered for describing the interaction of a bulk fluid plasma obeying MHD and an energetic component obeying a kinetic theory. Upon using the Vlasov kinetic theory for energetic particles, two planar Vlasov-MHD <span class="hlt">models</span> are compared in terms of their <span class="hlt">stability</span> properties. This is made possible by the Hamiltonian structures underlying the considered hybrid systems, whose infinite number of invariants makes the energy-Casimir method effective for determining <span class="hlt">stability</span>. Equilibrium equations for the <span class="hlt">models</span> are obtained from a variational principle and in particular a generalized hybrid Grad-Shafranov equation follows for one of the considered <span class="hlt">models</span>. The <span class="hlt">stability</span> conditions are then derived and discussed with particular emphasis on kinetic particle effects on classical MHD <span class="hlt">stability</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tronci, Cesare; Morrison, Philip J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">156</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1410.1793v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Energy-Casimir <span class="hlt">stability</span> of hybrid Vlasov-MHD <span class="hlt">models</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Different variants of hybrid kinetic-fluid <span class="hlt">models</span> are considered for describing the interaction of a bulk fluid plasma obeying MHD and an energetic component obeying a kinetic theory. Upon using the Vlasov kinetic theory for energetic particles, two planar Vlasov-MHD <span class="hlt">models</span> are compared in terms of their <span class="hlt">stability</span> properties. This is made possible by the Hamiltonian structures underlying the considered hybrid systems, whose infinite number of invariants makes the energy-Casimir method effective for determining <span class="hlt">stability</span>. Equilibrium equations for the <span class="hlt">models</span> are obtained from a variational principle and in particular a generalized hybrid Grad-Shafranov equation follows for one of the considered <span class="hlt">models</span>. The <span class="hlt">stability</span> conditions are then derived and discussed with particular emphasis on kinetic particle effects on classical MHD <span class="hlt">stability</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cesare Tronci; Emanuele Tassi; Philip J. Morrison</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">157</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012APS..MARA51009A"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of emulsion <span class="hlt">stability</span> in acrylic dispersions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Emulsions either micro or nano permit transport or solubilization of hydrophobic substances within a water-based phase. Different methods have been introduced at laboratory and industrial scales: mechanical stirring, high-pressure homogenization, or ultrasonics. In digital imaging, toners may be formed by aggregating a colorant with a latex polymer formed by batch or semi-continuous emulsion polymerization. Latex emulsions are prepared by making a monomer emulsion with monomer like Beta-carboxy ethyl acrylate (?-CEA) and stirring at high speed with an anionic surfactant like branched sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonates , aqueous solution until an emulsion is formed. Initiator for emulsion polymerization is 2-2'- azobis isobutyramide dehydrate with chain transfer agent are used to make the latex. If the latex emulsion is unstable, the resulting latexes produce a toner with larger particle size, broader particle size distribution with relatively higher latex sedimentation, and broader molecular weight distribution. Oswald ripening and coalescence cause droplet size to increase and can result in destabilization of emulsions. Shear thinning and elasticity of emulsions are applied to determine emulsion <span class="hlt">stability</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ahuja, Suresh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">158</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AIPC.1602..100A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kinematic <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of rope skipper's <span class="hlt">stability</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">There are various kinds of jumping that can be done while performing rope skipping activity. This activity was always associated with injury. But, if the rope skipper can perform the activity in a right way, it is believed that the injury might be reduced. The main purpose of this paper is to observe the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of rope skipper from a biomechanics perspective, which are the centre of mass, angle at the ankle, knee and hip joints and also the trajectory for the ipsilateral leg between the two types of skip which is one leg and two legs. Six healthy, physically active subject, two males and four females (age: 8.001.25 years, weight: 17.906.85 kg and height: 1.220.08 m) participated in this study. Kinematic data of repeated five cycles of rope skipping activity was captured by using Vicon Nexus system. Based on the data collected, skipping with two legs shows more stable behavior during preparation, flight and landing phases. It is concluded that landing on the balls of the feet, lowering the trajectory positions of the feet from the ground as well as flexion of each joint which would reduce the injury while landing.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ab Ghani, Nor Atikah; Rambely, Azmin Sham</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">159</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.optimization-online.org/DB_FILE/2005/02/1068.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of a Belgian Chocolate <span class="hlt">Stabilization</span> Problem</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Feb 20, 2005 ... by itself, but because the solution of a challenging <span class="hlt">model</span> problem by new techniques suggests that the .... rank-one matrix uv?. , where u and ... This led to numerical difficulties since constructing a companion matrix requires.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-02-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">160</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50370327"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stochastic <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and control of networked control systems with randomly varying long time-delays</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper mainly studies <span class="hlt">stability</span> and optimal control for networked control systems with the real-time setup of time-driven sensor, event-driven controller and actuator, and with the assumption that network-induced delay is no longer than certain known times of sampling period. The <span class="hlt">modeling</span> of this class of networked control systems is given. Then, preliminary stochastic <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of it is presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yuequan Yang; De Xu; Min Tan; Xianzhong Dai</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a 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showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">161</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1202.4097v1"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> of Ghost Dark Energy in CBD <span class="hlt">Model</span> of Gravity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the ghost dark energy <span class="hlt">model</span> versus perturbation. Since this kind of dark energy is instable in Einsteinian general relativity theory, then we study a new type of Brans-Dicke theory which has non-minimal coupling with matter which is called chameleon Brans-Dicke (CBD) <span class="hlt">model</span> of gravity. Due to this coupling the equation of conservation energy is modified. For considering the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the <span class="hlt">model</span> we use the adiabatic squared sound speed, $c_s^2$, whose sign of it determines the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the <span class="hlt">model</span> in which for $c_s^2 >0 $ the <span class="hlt">model</span> is stable and for $c_s^2 <0 $ the <span class="hlt">model</span> is instable. However, we study the interacting and non-interacting version of chameleon Brans-Dicke ghost dark energy (CBDGDE) with cold dark matter in non flat FLRW metric. We show that in all cases of investigation the <span class="hlt">model</span> is stable with a suitable choice of parameters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Khaled Saaidi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">162</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1425584"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> of Ghost Dark Energy in CBD <span class="hlt">Model</span> of Gravity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the ghost dark energy <span class="hlt">model</span> versus perturbation. Since this kind of dark energy is instable in Einsteinian general relativity theory, then we study a new type of Brans-Dicke theory which has non-minimal coupling with matter which is called chameleon Brans-Dicke (CBD) <span class="hlt">model</span> of gravity. Due to this coupling the equation of conservation energy is modified. For considering the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the <span class="hlt">model</span> we use the adiabatic squared sound speed, $c_s^2$, whose sign of it determines the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the <span class="hlt">model</span> in which for $c_s^2 >0 $ the <span class="hlt">model</span> is stable and for $c_s^2 <0 $ the <span class="hlt">model</span> is instable. However, we study the interacting and non-interacting version of chameleon Brans-Dicke ghost dark energy (CBDGDE) with cold dark matter in non flat FLRW metric. We show that in all cases of investigation the <span class="hlt">model</span> is stable with a suitable choice of parameters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saaidi, Khaled</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">163</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820024466&hterms=vibration+analysis+rotating+cantilever+blade&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dvibration%2Banalysis%2Brotating%2Bcantilever%2Bblade"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aeroelastic <span class="hlt">Stability</span> of Rotor Blades Using Finite Element <span class="hlt">Analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The flutter <span class="hlt">stability</span> of flap bending, lead-lag bending, and torsion of helicopter rotor blades in hover is investigated using a finite element formulation based on Hamilton's principle. The blade is divided into a number of finite elements. Quasi-steady strip theory is used to evaluate the aerodynamic loads. The nonlinear equations of motion are solved for steady-state blade deflections through an iterative procedure. The equations of motion are linearized assuming blade motion to be a small perturbation about the steady deflected shape. The normal mode method based on the coupled rotating natural modes is used to reduce the number of equations in the flutter <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. First the formulation is applied to single-load-path blades (articulated and hingeless blades). Numerical results show very good agreement with existing results obtained using the modal approach. The second part of the application concerns multiple-load-path blades, i.e. bearingless blades. Numerical results are presented for several analytical <span class="hlt">models</span> of the bearingless blade. Results are also obtained using an equivalent beam approach wherein a bearingless blade is <span class="hlt">modelled</span> as a single beam with equivalent properties. Results show the equivalent beam <span class="hlt">model</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chopra, I.; Sivaneri, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">164</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910045498&hterms=decentralized+system&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Ddecentralized%2Bsystem"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Modeling</span> and <span class="hlt">stability</span> of segmented reflector telescopes - A decentralized approach</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The decentralization of a segmented reflector telescope based on a finite-element <span class="hlt">model</span> of its structure is considered. The decentralization of the system at the panel level is considered. Each panel is originally treated as an isolated subsystem so that the controller design is performed independently at the local level, and then applied to the composite system for <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. The panel-level control laws were designed by means of pole placement using local output feedback. Simulation results show a better 1000:1 vibration attenuation in panel position when compared to the open-loop system. It is shown that the overall closed-loop system is exponentially stable provided that certain conditions are met. The advantage to the decentralized approach is that the design is performed in terms of the low-dimensionality subsystems, thus drastically reducing the design computational complexities.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ryaciotaki-Boussalis, Helen A.; Ih, Che-Hang Charles</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">165</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49459581"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of frames with flexible connections by transfer matrices</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">stability</span> of flexibly connected unbraced frames is studied using a transfer matrix formulation which incorporates modified girder stiffness to account for both rotational connection deformation and the finite width of columns. In the case of linear <span class="hlt">modelling</span> of connection flexibility, a direct iterative method yields the critical load. Empirical <span class="hlt">models</span> for moment-rotation relations, developed from experimental data, are incorporated</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. S. Kameshki; S. Syngellakis</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">166</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/24288786"> <span id="translatedtitle">MULTIPLICITY AND <span class="hlt">STABILITY</span> <span class="hlt">ANALYSIS</span> OF AGGLOMERATION CONTROLLED PRECIPITATION</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The possibility of multiplicity in continuous isothermal MSMPR precipitators has been explored for agglomeration controlled conditions and general criteria, independent of nucleation kinetics, are developed for <span class="hlt">stability</span> and multiplicity of the steady states. For the Volmer <span class="hlt">model</span> of primary nucleation and the magma dependent power law <span class="hlt">model</span> of secondary nucleation, parameter regions are determined in which multiple steady states exist,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. K. PADIA; S. K. BHATIA</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">167</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012TRACE..23..377F"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Absorption Chiller-Heaters by Applying Transfer Function</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A transfer function approach is found to be a practical method for ensuring stable operation of absorption chiller-heaters. The transfer function <span class="hlt">model</span> is based on a solution-circuit of the machine, which dominates the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the operation. This <span class="hlt">model</span> includes a solution pump, a generator with an overflow weir, and a float valve. We found that the solution-circuit system is designed with the cascade control, which makes the system stable. In this construction, the float valve actuates a primary control loop, and the overflow weir actuates a secondary loop. The effects of the characteristic of the solution pump and the overflow weir are estimated by the degree of the <span class="hlt">stabilities</span>, which are the gain margin and the phase margin. We found that the characteristic of the solution pump strongly effects the <span class="hlt">stability</span> by enhancing the effect of the cascade control and improving the <span class="hlt">stability</span>. So it is essential for a better <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> <span class="hlt">model</span>. According to these results, the established <span class="hlt">model</span> is useful for quantitatively predicting the <span class="hlt">stabilities</span> of a chiller-heater in operation, and simultaneously reducing its size and improving the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of operation. We conclude that the methodology based on transfer function can provide compact and reliable absorption chiller-heaters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fujii, Tatsuo; Miyake, Satoshi; Oka, Masahiro; Mori, Kiyoyuki</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">168</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1351614"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> of Hahnfeldt Angiogenesis <span class="hlt">Models</span> with Time Lags</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mathematical <span class="hlt">models</span> of angiogenesis, pioneered by P. Hahnfeldt, are under study. To enrich the dynamics of three <span class="hlt">models</span>, we introduced biologically motivated time-varying delays. All <span class="hlt">models</span> under study belong to a special class of nonlinear nonautonomous systems with delays. Explicit conditions for the existence of positive global solutions and the equilibria solutions were obtained. Based on a notion of an M-matrix, new results are presented for the global <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the system and were used to prove local <span class="hlt">stability</span> of one <span class="hlt">model</span>. For a local <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a second <span class="hlt">model</span>, the recent result for a Lienard-type second-order differential equation with delays was used. It was shown that <span class="hlt">models</span> with delays produce a complex and nontrivial dynamics. Some open problems are presented for further studies.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Amster, P; Idels, L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">169</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2011/Volume31/EB-11-V31-I1-P8.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The necessary condition for <span class="hlt">stability</span> in Tobin's Walras-Keynes-Phillips <span class="hlt">model</span>: A note</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In a 1975 paper entitled 'Keynesian <span class="hlt">Models</span> of Recession and Depression' James Tobin sought to formalize in a dynamic <span class="hlt">model</span> Keynes' argument that unemployment could persist in an economy with flexible wages and prices. In the course of his <span class="hlt">analysis</span> Tobin presented, without proof, a 'critical necessary condition for <span class="hlt">stability</span>' of the full employment equilibrium which is violated when expenditure</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Subrata Guha</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">170</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21428573"> <span id="translatedtitle">Advances in Computational <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Composite Aerospace Structures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">European aircraft industry demands for reduced development and operating costs. Structural weight reduction by exploitation of structural reserves in composite aerospace structures contributes to this aim, however, it requires accurate and experimentally validated <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of real structures under realistic loading conditions. This paper presents different advances from the area of computational <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of composite aerospace structures which contribute to that field. For stringer stiffened panels main results of the finished EU project COCOMAT are given. It investigated the exploitation of reserves in primary fibre composite fuselage structures through an accurate and reliable simulation of postbuckling and collapse. For unstiffened cylindrical composite shells a proposal for a new design method is presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Degenhardt, R. [DLR, Inst. Composite Structures and Adaptive Systems, Lilienthalplatz 7, 38108 Braunschweig (Germany); PFH, Private University of Applied Sciences Goettingen, Composite Engineering Campus Stade (Germany); Araujo, F. C. de [Dept Civil Eng, UFOP, 35400-000 Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">171</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PrAeS..58...36F"> <span id="translatedtitle">RANS <span class="hlt">modeling</span> of high-speed aerodynamic flow transition with consideration of <span class="hlt">stability</span> theory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">One of the effective approaches to simulate laminar-turbulent transition flows is based on Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. In this review article, the development of such approach is introduced in three categories: the low-Reynolds number turbulence <span class="hlt">models</span>, the correlation-based transition <span class="hlt">models</span>, and the recently proposed <span class="hlt">models</span> based on local variables. A summary is then presented of physical insights gained from both experiments and <span class="hlt">stability</span> analyses for high-speed transitional flows. Finally, the role of <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> in RANS environment, including the early attempts and new <span class="hlt">models</span> accommodating the flow instability modes, is discussed in detail.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fu, Song; Wang, Liang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">172</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21232739"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stabilizing</span> <span class="hlt">model</span> predictive control for constrained nonlinear distributed delay systems.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, a <span class="hlt">model</span> predictive control scheme with guaranteed closed-loop asymptotic <span class="hlt">stability</span> is proposed for a class of constrained nonlinear time-delay systems with discrete and distributed delays. A suitable terminal cost functional and also an appropriate terminal region are utilized to achieve asymptotic <span class="hlt">stability</span>. To determine the terminal cost, a locally asymptotically <span class="hlt">stabilizing</span> controller is designed and an appropriate Lyapunov-Krasoskii functional of the locally <span class="hlt">stabilized</span> system is employed as the terminal cost. Furthermore, an invariant set for locally <span class="hlt">stabilized</span> system which is established by using the Razumikhin Theorem is used as the terminal region. Simple conditions are derived to obtain terminal cost and terminal region in terms of Bilinear Matrix Inequalities. The method is illustrated by a numerical example. PMID:21232739</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mahboobi Esfanjani, R; Nikravesh, S K Y</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">173</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=45267"> <span id="translatedtitle">RELATION OF URBAN <span class="hlt">MODEL</span> PERFORMANCE TO <span class="hlt">STABILITY</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The RAM <span class="hlt">model</span> performance in estimating SO2 concentrations in St. Louis, MO for 1976 has been discussed in several previous papers by the authors. In these studies the <span class="hlt">model</span> estimates were compared to the observed concentrations of SO2 at 13 sites in the St. Louis metropolitan ar...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">174</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010APS..DFD.EL003H"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the pulmonary liquid bilayer.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The lung consists of liquid-lined compliant airways that convey air to and from the alveoli where gas exchange takes place. Because the airways are coated with a bilayer consisting of a mucus layer on top of a periciliary fluid layer, a surface tension instability can generate flows within the bilayer and induce the formation of liquid plugs that block the passage of air. This is a problem for example with premature neonates whose lungs do not produce sufficient quantities of surfactant and suffer from respiratory distress syndrome. To study this instability a system of coupled nonlinear evolution equations are derived using lubrication theory for the thicknesses of the two liquid layers which are assumed to be Newtonian. A normal mode <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is used to investigate the initial growth of the disturbances, and reveals how the grow rate is affected by the ratio of viscosities ?, film thicknesses ? and surface tensions ? of the two layers which can change by disease. Numerical solutions of the evolution equations show that there is a critical bilayer thickness ?c above which closure occurs, and that a more viscous and thicker layer compared to the periciliary layer closes more slowly. However, ?cis weakly dependent on ?, ? and ?. We also examine the potential impact of wall shear stress and normal stress on cell damage. This work is funded by NIH HL85156.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Halpern, David; Grotberg, James</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">175</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19840013097&hterms=sundstrom&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dsundstrom"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> of finite difference <span class="hlt">models</span> containing two boundaries or interfaces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">stability</span> of finite difference <span class="hlt">models</span> of hyperbolic initial boundary value problems is connected with the propagation and reflection of parasitic waves. Wave propagation ideas are applied to <span class="hlt">models</span> containing two boundaires or interfaces, where repeated reflection of trapped wave packets is a potential new source of instability. Various known instability phenomena are accounted for in a unified way. Results show: (1) dissipativity does not ensure <span class="hlt">stability</span> when three or more formulas are concatenated at a boundary or internal interface; (2) algebraic GKS instabilities can be converted by a second boundary to exponential instabilities only when an infinite numerical reflection coefficient is present; and (3) GKS-<span class="hlt">stability</span> and P-<span class="hlt">stability</span> can be established in certain problems by showing that all numerical reflection coefficients have modulus less than 1.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Trefethen, L. N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">176</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930018247&hterms=till&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dtill"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> investigations of airfoil flow by global <span class="hlt">analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">As the result of global, non-parallel flow <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> the single value of the disturbance growth-rate and respective frequency is obtained. This complex value characterizes the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the whole flow configuration and is not referred to any particular flow pattern. The global <span class="hlt">analysis</span> assures that all the flow elements (wake, boundary and shear layer) are taken into account. The physical phenomena connected with the wake instability are properly reproduced by the global <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. This enhances the investigations of instability of any 2-D flows, including ones in which the boundary layer instability effects are known to be of dominating importance. Assuming fully 2-D disturbance form, the global linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> problem is formulated. The system of partial differential equations is solved for the eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The equations, written in the pure stream function formulation, are discretized via FDM using a curvilinear coordinate system. The complex eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors are evaluated by an iterative method. The investigations performed for various Reynolds numbers emphasize that the wake instability develops into the Karman vortex street. This phenomenon is shown to be connected with the first mode obtained from the non-parallel flow <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. The higher modes are reflecting different physical phenomena as for example Tollmien-Schlichting waves, originating in the boundary layer and having the tendency to emerge as instabilities for the growing Reynolds number. The investigations are carried out for a circular cylinder, oblong ellipsis and airfoil. It is shown that the onset of the wake instability, the waves in the boundary layer, the shear layer instability are different solutions of the same eigenvalue problem, formulated using the non-parallel theory. The <span class="hlt">analysis</span> offers large potential possibilities as the generalization of methods used till now for the <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Morzynski, Marek; Thiele, Frank</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">177</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pti.psu.edu/Annual%20Reports/Annual%20Report%2003-04/Publications/AnstromIMECE2003-43188.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">MODEL</span> DEVELOPMENT FOR INTEGRATED HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE DYNAMIC <span class="hlt">STABILITY</span> SYSTEMS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study expanded an existing full car dynamic <span class="hlt">model</span> (HVOSM.VD2) to enable simulation of electric, hybrid electric, and fuel cell vehicles with integrated vehicle <span class="hlt">stability</span> systems. A prototype range extending series hybrid vehicle was constructed with independent front wheel drives. A hybrid vehicle <span class="hlt">stability</span> assist (VSA) algorithm was developed to perform proportional control of yaw rate through left\\/right distribution of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Joel R. Anstrom</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">178</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.math.umn.edu/~scheel/preprints/optics_ps.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of stationary light transmission in nonlinear photonic structures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of stationary light transmission in nonlinear photonic structures Dmitry E transmission is generally intensity-dependent in nonlinear photonic gratings, such that transmission of light.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA February 24, 2003 Abstract We study optical bistability of stationary light</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Scheel, Arnd</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">179</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.tlc-networks.polito.it/carla/papers/techreport.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Techical Report <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Route <span class="hlt">Stability</span> in MANETs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Techical Report <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Route <span class="hlt">Stability</span> in MANETs G. Carofiglio, C. Chiasserini, M. Garetto, E A fundamental issue arising in mobile ad-hoc networks (MANETs) is the selection of the optimal path between any they offer. In particular, mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) enable users to maintain connectivity to the fixed</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">180</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://faculty.kfupm.edu.sa/math/kwee/fkdv2.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Weakly dispersive hydraulic flows in a contraction --Nonlinear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Weakly dispersive hydraulic flows in a contraction -- Nonlinear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> Bernard K. Ee hydraulic solutions of the forced Korteweg de-Vries equation is investigated here. For numerical convenience is destabilized by a hydraulic instability in which superexponential growth occurs prior to satura- tion</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ee, Bernard Kuowei</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return 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showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">181</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=37566"> <span id="translatedtitle">GEOTECHNICAL <span class="hlt">ANALYSIS</span> FOR REVIEW OF DIKE <span class="hlt">STABILITY</span> (GARDS). TECHNICAL MANUAL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The structure and capabilities of a user-friendly, interactive computer program developed for the <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of dikes (GARDS) are described. The program was developed under the sponsorship of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and therefore emphasizes Hazardous Wast...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">182</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.eng.tau.ac.il/~michaelm/survey.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Survey Paper <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Switched Systems using Variational</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Survey Paper <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Switched Systems using Variational Principles: an Introduction Michael Margaliot a a School of Electrical Engineering­Systems, Tel Aviv University, Israel. Abstract Many- namical behavior in each mode. Our car changes its dy- namic behavior every time we change gears. Our</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Margaliot, Michael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">183</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18888057"> <span id="translatedtitle">MHD <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of type II ELMs in ASDEX Upgrade</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigated the differences between type I and type II edge localized modes (ELMs) in ASDEX Upgrade using the MHD <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. When plasma conditions are changed from typical type I ELMy conditions to type II ELMy conditions, the character of the edge instabilities change. With increased triangularity and edge safety factor, the low-n peelingballooning mode becomes more stable and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Saarelma; S. Gnter; L. D. Horton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">184</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55431192"> <span id="translatedtitle">MHD <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of type II ELMs in ASDEX Upgrade</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigated the differences between type I and type II edge localized modes (ELMs) in ASDEX Upgrade using the MHD <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. When plasma conditions are changed from typical type I ELMy conditions to type II ELMy conditions, the character of the edge instabilities change. With increased triangularity and edge safety factor, the low-n peeling ballooning mode becomes more stable</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Saarelma; S. Gnter; L. D. Horton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">185</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1990-THESIS-C496"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of buried flexible pipes: a biaxial buckling equation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">STABILITY</span> <span class="hlt">ANALYSIS</span> OF BURIED FLEXIBLE PIPES: A BIAXIAL BUCKLING EQUATION A Thesis by MELISSA TUYET-MAI CHAU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Civil Engineering STABLILITY <span class="hlt">ANALYSIS</span> OF BURIED FLEXIBLE PIPES: A BIAXIAL BUCKLING EQUATION A Thesis by MELISSA TUYET-MAI CHAU Approved as to style and content by: r. obert L. Lytt n (Chair of Committee...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chau, Melissa Tuyet-Mai</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">186</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.rnr.lsu.edu/keim/pubs/Keim&Skaugset_HP03.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Modelling</span> effects of forest canopies on slope <span class="hlt">stability</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigated the potential effects of rainfall intensity smoothing by forest canopies on slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> by <span class="hlt">modelling</span> soil responses to measured rainfall and throughfall during high-intensity rain. Field measurements showed that maximum intensities of precipitation were generally reduced under forest canopies at two sites in the Pacific Northwest, USA. <span class="hlt">Modelling</span> soil water pore- pressure responses of a hypothetical hillslope to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Richard F. Keim; Arne E. Skaugset</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">187</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51861682"> <span id="translatedtitle">The solid sphere <span class="hlt">model</span> in studies of crystal <span class="hlt">stability</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The possibility of employing the hard sphere <span class="hlt">model</span> in studies of real, stable, inert-gas crystals is considered. On the basis of the firmly established phase transition criterion for a <span class="hlt">model</span> system the <span class="hlt">stability</span> curve of a real crystal is found, with attractive forces considered by first-order perturbation theory. The result obtained is compared with experiment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">. A. Arinshtein; Ya. B. Gorelik</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">188</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://math.uci.edu/~genciso/Papers/Testosterone.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the <span class="hlt">Stability</span> of a <span class="hlt">Model</span> of Testosterone German Enciso</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On the <span class="hlt">Stability</span> of a <span class="hlt">Model</span> of Testosterone Dynamics German Enciso Eduardo D. Sontag Department of a well-known delayed negative- feedback <span class="hlt">model</span> of testosterone dynamics, which has been proposed in the presence of delays of arbitrary length. Keywords: testosterone dynamics, monotone systems, negative</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Enciso, Germán</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">189</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4723030"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> study of the TCP-RED system using detrended fluctuation <span class="hlt">analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">It has been observed that the TCP-RED system may exhibit instability and oscillatory behavior. Control methods proposed in the past have been based on the analytical <span class="hlt">models</span> that rely on statistical measurements of network parameters. In this paper, we apply the detrended fluctuation <span class="hlt">analysis</span> (DFA) method to analyze <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the TCP-RED system. The DFA has been used for detecting</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xi Chen; Siu-Chung Wong; Chi Kong Tse; Ljiljana Trajkovic</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">190</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://inside.mines.edu/~vgriffit/pubs/slope_paper.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> by nite elements D. V. GRIFFITHS and P. A. LANE{</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> by ®nite elements D. V. GRIFFITHS? and P. A. LANE{ The majority of slope to all engineers. The ®nite element method represents a powerful alternative ap- proach for slope, regarding the failure mechanism. Slope failure in the ®nite element <span class="hlt">model</span> occurs `naturally' through</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">191</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0504576v2"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> properties of some perfect fluid cosmological <span class="hlt">models</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Flat FRW perfect fluid cosmologies can be reproduced as particular solutions of suitable field theoretical <span class="hlt">models</span>. Here we investigate the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of perfect fluid <span class="hlt">model</span> trajectories with respect to sets of trajectories of the corresponding field <span class="hlt">models</span> having generic initial conditions. It is shown that the trajectories of barotropic perfect fluid <span class="hlt">models</span> and those of the Chaplygin gas <span class="hlt">model</span> are stable. The total probability to reach the Chaplygin gas regime early enough to achieve a matter dominated stage having a realistic duration is calculated for a scalar field <span class="hlt">model</span> assuming a natural measure in the space of initial conditions taken near a cosmological singularity. An example is presented of a two-fluid cosmological <span class="hlt">model</span> where the <span class="hlt">stability</span> is partially absent.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vittorio Gorini; Alexander Kamenshchik; Ugo Moschella; Vincent Pasquier; Alexei Starobinsky</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-04-26</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">192</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27046196"> <span id="translatedtitle">Galvanic vestibular stimulation for <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of postural adaptation and <span class="hlt">stability</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Human postural dynamics was investigated in 12 normal subjects by means of a force platform recording body sway, induced by bipolar transmastoid galvanic stimulation of the vestibular nerve and labyrinth. The <span class="hlt">model</span> adopted was that of an inverted segmented pendulum, the dynamics of postural control being assumed to be reflected in the <span class="hlt">stabilizing</span> forces actuated by the feet as a</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rolf Johansson; Miins Magnusson; Per A. Fransson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">193</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pserc.wisc.edu/documents/publications/papers/2000_general_publications/market_PWRS.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">STABILITY</span> <span class="hlt">ANALYSIS</span> OF INTERCONNECTED POWER SYSTEMS COUPLED WITH MARKET DYNAMICS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">through numeric tests using various mar- ket update <span class="hlt">models</span>, with detailed generator, and the pressure for greater reliance on mar- ket mechanism has grown stronger [7]. However, these same conditions, considering of the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the coupled system incorporating both market operation and electromechan- ical</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">194</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.eie.polyu.edu.hk/~cktse/pdf-paper/ISCAS2004-Dranga.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">STABILITY</span> <span class="hlt">ANALYSIS</span> OF POWER CIRCUIT COMPRISING VIRTUAL , H. Funato*</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">of the eigenvalues of the Jacobian matrix of the Poincaré map, evaluated at its fixed point. Bifurcation behaviour-linear, nonlinear system is <span class="hlt">modeled</span> by its Poincaré map. The <span class="hlt">stability</span> criterion employs the position- frequency slow-scale bifurcation behaviour. More complete information can be achieved by sampled</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tse, Chi K. "Michael"</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">195</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19960015896&hterms=sausages&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dsausages"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fluid Dynamic and <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of a Thin Liquid Sheet</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Interest in thin sheet flows has recently been renewed due to their potential application in space radiators. Theoretical and experimental studies of the fluid dynamics and <span class="hlt">stability</span> of thin liquid sheet flows have been carried out in this thesis. A computer program was developed to determine the cross-sectional shape of the edge cylinder given the cross-sectional area of the edge cylinder. A <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> was performed on a non-planer liquid sheet. A study was conducted to determine the effects of air resistance on the sheet.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McMaster, Matthew S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">196</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFM.V43B1427B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Limitations of Deterministic <span class="hlt">Modelling</span> of Slope <span class="hlt">Stability</span> on Volcanic Edifices</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The conditions leading to the 18 May 1980 sector collapse of Mount St Helens have been the subject of a number of detailed investigations. Preservation of the initial failure plane(s) allowed Voight et al. (1983) and Donnadieu et al. (2001) to undertake back analyses and determine a range of possible failure conditions. While the <span class="hlt">models</span> proposed offer major insights into potential failure mechanisms, we will demonstrate that deterministic analyses are of limited usefulness because many of the <span class="hlt">model</span> parameters, such as cohesion, internal friction and pore pressure, are very poorly constrained. This creates problems of non-uniqueness in the solution. An alternative approach involves a series of Monte Carlo simulations to identify potential combinations of parameters that will produce the observed failure plane. Initial input ranges are specified for each parameter and the predetermined <span class="hlt">model</span> is run repeatedly, with the parameter values for each <span class="hlt">model</span> selected at random from within the input ranges. The interaction between parameters can be examined in detail, providing a better understanding of the potential failure conditions. This approach, which has been tested initially on a theoretical slope with predetermined failure conditions, highlights the fact that it is impossible to generate a unique <span class="hlt">model</span> that fits the data when the slope has poorly defined strength parameters. This has clear implications for the validity of commonly used deterministic approaches. This probabilistic back <span class="hlt">analysis</span> approach has been used to reanalyse the conditions that led to the May 18 collapse on Mount St Helens. Donnadieu, F., Merle, O., and Besson, J.C., 2001, Volcanic edifice <span class="hlt">stability</span> during cryptodome intrusion, Bulletin of Volcanology, vol 63, p61-72. Voight, B., Janda, R.J., Glicken, H., and Douglass, P.M., 1983, Nature and Mechanics of the Mount St-Helens Rockslide-Avalanche of 18 May 1980, Geotechnique, vol 33, p243-273.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Burrell, R. V.; Pinkerton, H.; Binley, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">197</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=newtonian&pg=2&id=EJ903747"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stabilizing</span> a Bicycle: A <span class="hlt">Modeling</span> Project</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This article is a project that takes students through the process of forming a mathematical <span class="hlt">model</span> of bicycle dynamics. Beginning with basic ideas from Newtonian mechanics (forces and torques), students use techniques from calculus and differential equations to develop the equations of rotational motion for a bicycle-rider system as it tips from</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pennings, Timothy J.; Williams, Blair R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">198</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JSV...333.5464B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental bifurcation <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of an impact oscillator-Determining <span class="hlt">stability</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We propose and investigate three different methods for assessing <span class="hlt">stability</span> of dynamical equilibrium states during experimental bifurcation <span class="hlt">analysis</span>, using a control-based continuation method. The idea is to modify or turn off the control at an equilibrium state and study the resulting behavior. As a proof of concept the three methods are successfully implemented and tested for a harmonically forced impact oscillator with a hardening spring nonlinearity, and controlled by electromagnetic actuators. We show that under certain conditions it is possible to quantify the instability in terms of finite-time Lyapunov exponents. As a special case we study an isolated branch in the bifurcation diagram brought into existence by a 1:3 subharmonic resonance. On this isola it is only possible to determine <span class="hlt">stability</span> using one of the three methods, which is due to the fact that only this method guarantees that the equilibrium state can be restored after measuring <span class="hlt">stability</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bureau, Emil; Schilder, Frank; Elmegrd, Michael; Santos, Ilmar F.; Thomsen, Jon J.; Starke, Jens</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">199</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20090009917&hterms=air+flow+control&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dair%2Bflow%2Bcontrol"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> and Control <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of the F-15B Quiet Spike Aircraft</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The primary objective of the Quiet Spike flight research program was the aerodynamic and structural proof-of-concept of a telescoping, 24 ft, sonic-boom suppressing nose boom on a F-15B aircraft. The program goal was to collect flight data for <span class="hlt">model</span> validation up to 1.8 Mach. In the area of <span class="hlt">stability</span> and controls the primary concern was to assess the effect of the spike on the <span class="hlt">stability</span>, controllability and handling qualities of the aircraft. The primary goal of this test philosophy was maintaining safety of flight. Two main issues are discussed in this paper: the <span class="hlt">stability</span> and controls approach and <span class="hlt">analysis</span> in the presence of uncertain spike influenced aerodynamics on the F-15B aircraft flight dynamics; and the <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of F-15B flight dynamics implications due to spike induced air flow in the vicinity of air data and angle-of-attack sensors. Also addressed are flight test implications based on the <span class="hlt">analysis</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McWherter, Shaun; Moua,Cheng; Gera, Joseph; Cox, Timothy H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">200</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://polar.ncep.noaa.gov/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Marine <span class="hlt">Modeling</span> and <span class="hlt">Analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Marine <span class="hlt">Modeling</span> and <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> Branch (MMAB) of the Environmental <span class="hlt">Modeling</span> Center is responsible for the development of improved numerical weather and marine prediction <span class="hlt">modeling</span> systems. These <span class="hlt">models</span> provide <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and real-time forecast guidance on marine meteorological, oceanographic, and cryospheric parameters over the global oceans and coastal areas of the US. This site provides access to MMAB <span class="hlt">modeling</span> tools for ocean waves (including an interactive presentation,) sea ice, marine meteorology, sea surface temperature and more. The site also features a mailing list, bibliography of publications, and information about <span class="hlt">modeling</span> products still in the experimental and development phases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">National Centers For Environmental Prediction, National O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" 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showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">201</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17946632"> <span id="translatedtitle">Plantar pressure parameters for dynamic gait <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dynamic <span class="hlt">stability</span> measurement is necessary to evaluate human performance over a variety of locomotor environments. In this paper, the suitability of parameters extracted from plantar-pressure measurements as input into a dynamic <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">model</span> was investigated. FScan in-shoe pressure data were collected from 15 subjects as they completed four successively more unstable walking tasks. Six parameters met the criteria of being reliably calculated from plantar pressure data, increasing as the task became more unstable, and relating to past measures from the literature: anterior/posterior centre of force (CoF) position, medio-lateral CoF position, double support time, stance time, cell triggering frequency, and maximum lateral CoF position. These parameters could be combined to create an index of dynamic gait <span class="hlt">stability</span>. PMID:17946632</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lemaire, Edward D; Biswas, Ajoy; Kofman, Jonathan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12779590"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> of active systems with a spatially periodic activity: <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of a simple <span class="hlt">model</span> and application to the boiling crisis problem.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate theoretically the possibility to control the transition between two metastable states in reactive systems by imposing a spatial modulation. In particular, we consider the technologically very important case of the transition between the low temperature (nucleate boiling) and the high temperature (film boiling) phases of boiling of a liquid over a heat generating element, also known as the boiling crisis. With the help of a simplified <span class="hlt">model</span>, we demonstrate that the dangerous regime where the high temperature phase invades the whole system requires a larger heat power in a periodically spatially modulated system, than in a uniform system. The possibility that a local perturbation, such as a small gas bubble, may induce locally a transition to the film boiling state is also considered. We show that the transition to the film boiling regime is hindered in a spatially periodic system. (c) 2002 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779590</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pumir, Alain; Barelko, Viktor V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19980017945&hterms=NHL&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DNHL"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Stability</span> of Radiatively Cooling Jets I. Linear <span class="hlt">Analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The results of a spatial <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of a two-dimensional slab jet, in which optically thin radiative cooling is dynamically important, are presented. We study both magnetized and unmagnetized jets at external Mach numbers of 5 and 20. We <span class="hlt">model</span> the cooling rate by using two different cooling curves: one appropriate to interstellar gas, and the other to photoionized gas of reduced metallicity. Thus, our results will be applicable to both protostellar (Herbig-Haro) jets and optical jets from active galactic nuclei. We present analytical solutions to the dispersion relations in useful limits and solve the dispersion relations numerically over a broad range of perturbation frequencies. We find that the growth rates and wavelengths of the unstable Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) modes are significantly different from the adiabatic limit, and that the form of the cooling function strongly affects the results. In particular, if the cooling curve is a steep function of temperature in the neighborhood of the equilibrium state, then the growth of K-H modes is reduced relative to the adiabatic jet. On the other hand, if the cooling curve is a shallow function of temperature, then the growth of K-H modes can be enhanced relative to the adiabatic jet by the increase in cooling relative to heating in overdense regions. Inclusion of a dynamically important magnetic field does not strongly modify the important differences between an adiabatic jet and a cooling jet, provided the jet is highly supermagnetosonic and not magnetic pressure-dominated. In the latter case, the unstable modes behave more like the transmagnetosonic magnetic pressure-dominated adiabatic limit. We also plot fluid displacement surfaces associated with the various waves in a cooling jet in order to predict the structures that might arise in the nonlinear regime. This <span class="hlt">analysis</span> predicts that low-frequency surface waves and the lowest order body modes will be the most effective at producing observable features in the jet.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hardee, Philip E.; Stone, James M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20100038437&hterms=equation+delay&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dequation%2Bdelay"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bounded Linear <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> - A Time Delay Margin Estimation Approach for Adaptive Control</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents a method for estimating time delay margin for <span class="hlt">model</span>-reference adaptive control of systems with almost linear structured uncertainty. The bounded linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> method seeks to represent the conventional <span class="hlt">model</span>-reference adaptive law by a locally bounded linear approximation within a small time window using the comparison lemma. The locally bounded linear approximation of the combined adaptive system is cast in a form of an input-time-delay differential equation over a small time window. The time delay margin of this system represents a local <span class="hlt">stability</span> measure and is computed analytically by a matrix measure method, which provides a simple analytical technique for estimating an upper bound of time delay margin. Based on simulation results for a scalar <span class="hlt">model</span>-reference adaptive control system, both the bounded linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> method and the matrix measure method are seen to provide a reasonably accurate and yet not too conservative time delay margin estimation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nguyen, Nhan T.; Ishihara, Abraham K.; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje Srinlvas; Bakhtiari-Nejad, Maryam</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1615579G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Integrating plant-microbe interactions to understand soil C <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> with the MIcrobial-MIneral Carbon <span class="hlt">Stabilization</span> <span class="hlt">model</span> (MIMICS)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">If soil organic matter is predominantly microbial biomass, plant inputs that build biomass should also increase SOM. This seems obvious, but the implications fundamentally change how we think about the relationships between plants, microbes and SOM. Plant residues that build microbial biomass are typically characterized by low C/N ratios and high lignin contents. However, plants with high lignin contents and high C/N ratios are believed to increase SOM, an entrenched idea that still strongly motivates agricultural soil management practices. Here we use a combination of meta-<span class="hlt">analysis</span> with a new microbial-explicit soil biogeochemistry <span class="hlt">model</span> to explore the relationships between plant litter chemistry, microbial communities, and SOM <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> in different soil types. We use the MIcrobial-MIneral Carbon <span class="hlt">Stabilization</span> (MIMICS) <span class="hlt">model</span>, newly built upon the Community Land <span class="hlt">Model</span> (CLM) platform, to enhance our understanding of biology in earth system processes. The turnover of litter and SOM in MIMICS are governed by the activity of r- and k-selected microbial groups and temperature sensitive Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Plant and microbial residues are <span class="hlt">stabilized</span> short-term by chemical recalcitrance or long-term by physical protection. Fast-turnover litter inputs increase SOM by >10% depending on temperature in clay soils, and it's only in sandy soils devoid of physical protection mechanisms that recalcitrant inputs build SOM. These results challenge centuries of lay knowledge as well as conventional ideas of SOM formation, but are they realistic? To test this, we conducted a meta-<span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the relationships between the chemistry of plant liter inputs and SOM concentrations. We find globally that the highest SOM concentrations are associated with plant inputs containing low C/N ratios. These results are confirmed by individual tracer studies pointing to greater <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> of low C/N ratio inputs, particularly in clay soils. Our <span class="hlt">model</span> and meta-<span class="hlt">analysis</span> results suggest that current ideas about plant-microbe-SOM relationships are unraveling. If so, our reconsideration of the mechanisms <span class="hlt">stabilizing</span> SOM will also challenge long-held views about how to optimize plant community management to increase SOM.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Grandy, Stuart; Wieder, Will; Kallenbach, Cynthia; Tiemann, Lisa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10185866"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preliminary hazards <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of thermal scrap <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> system. Revision 1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This preliminary <span class="hlt">analysis</span> examined the HA-21I glovebox and its supporting systems for potential process hazards. Upon further <span class="hlt">analysis</span>, the thermal <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> system has been installed in gloveboxes HC-21A and HC-21C. The use of HC-21C and HC-21A simplified the initial safety <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. In addition, these gloveboxes were cleaner and required less modification for operation than glovebox HA-21I. While this document refers to glovebox HA-21I for the hazards <span class="hlt">analysis</span> performed, glovebox HC-21C is sufficiently similar that the following <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is also valid for HC-21C. This hazards <span class="hlt">analysis</span> document is being re-released as revision 1 to include the updated flowsheet document (Appendix C) and the updated design basis (Appendix D). The revised Process Flow Schematic has also been included (Appendix E). This Current revision incorporates the recommendations provided from the original hazards <span class="hlt">analysis</span> as well. The System Design Description (SDD) has also been appended (Appendix H) to document the bases for Safety Classification of thermal <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> equipment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lewis, W.S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-08-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.eng.yale.edu/aflab/pdf/stability.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fast and Robust Algorithm for Compositional <span class="hlt">Modeling</span>: Part I--<span class="hlt">Stability</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fast and Robust Algorithm for Compositional <span class="hlt">Modeling</span>: Part I--<span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> Testing Abbas feature of the transformation is that the TPD surface becomes smooth and has one minimum. The combination of a single minimum and the surface smoothness contributes to a re- markable robustness in calculations</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Firoozabadi, Abbas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/795316"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermohaline circulation <span class="hlt">stability</span>: a box <span class="hlt">model</span> study - Part II: coupled atmosphere-ocean <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A thorough <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a coupled version of an inter-hemispheric 3-box <span class="hlt">model</span> of Thermohaline Circulation (THC) is presented. This study follows a similarly structured <span class="hlt">analysis</span> on an uncoupled version of the same <span class="hlt">model</span> presented in Part I. We study how the strength of THC changes when the system undergoes forcings representing global warming conditions. Each perturbation to the initial equilibrium is characterized by the total radiative forcing realized, by the rate of increase, and by the North-South asymmetry. The choice of suitably defined metrics allows us to determine the boundary dividing the set of radiative forcing scenarios that lead the system to equilibria characterized by a THC pattern similar to the present one, from those that drive the system to equilibria where the THC is reversed. We also consider different choices for the atmospheric transport parameterizations and for the ratio between the high latitude to tropical radiative forcing. We generally find that fast forcings are ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lucarini, V; Lucarini, Valerio; Stone, Peter H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27116103"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coupled three-dimensional aeroelastic <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of bladed disks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the present work an algorithm for the coupled aeromechanical computation of three-dimensional compressor cascades vibrating in a traveling-wave mode is presented and applied to the determination of aeroelastic <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a transonic fan rotor. The initial vibratory modes are computed using a finite-element structural <span class="hlt">analysis</span> code. The unsteady flow field response to blade vibration is estimated by numerical integration</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. A. Gerolymos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.iag.uni-stuttgart.de/people/michael.dumbser/files/carbuncle.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Matrix <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of the Carbuncle Phenomenon</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The carbuncle phenomenon is a shock instability mechanism which ruins all ef- forts to compute grid-aligned shock waves using low-dissipative upwind schemes. The present study develops a <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for two-dimensional steady shocks on structured meshes based on the matrix method. The numerical resolution of the corresponding eigenvalue problem confirms the typical odd-even form of the unstable mode and displays</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Michael Dumbser; Jean-Marc Moschetta; Jeremie Gressier</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/gr-qc/0201042v1"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> of Sigma-<span class="hlt">Model</span> Strings and Textures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In flat space-time, sigma-<span class="hlt">model</span> strings and textures are both unstable to collapse and subsequent decay. With sufficient cosmological expansion, however, they are stable in a generalized sense: a small perturbation will cause them to change their shape, but they do not decay. The current rate of expansion is sufficient to <span class="hlt">stabilize</span> strings, but not textures.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. S. Ward</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39363260"> <span id="translatedtitle">A dynamic mathematical <span class="hlt">model</span> for wastewater <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> ponds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A dynamic mathematical <span class="hlt">model</span> was developed to predict the effluent quality of facultative wastewater <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> ponds. For a sound representation of sedimentwater column, water columnatmosphere interactions and stratification due to variations in dissolved oxygen concentrations, a two-dimensional hydraulic <span class="hlt">model</span> was employed considering dispersed flow and diffusion in horizontal and vertical directions, respectively. Resulting partial differential equation system was solved using</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bora Beran; Fikret Kargi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4226630"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Predictive Performance and <span class="hlt">Stability</span> of Six Species Distribution <span class="hlt">Models</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Predicting species potential geographical range by species distribution <span class="hlt">models</span> (SDMs) is central to understand their ecological requirements. However, the effects of using different <span class="hlt">modeling</span> techniques need further investigation. In order to improve the prediction effect, we need to assess the predictive performance and <span class="hlt">stability</span> of different SDMs. Methodology We collected the distribution data of five common tree species (Pinus massoniana, Betula platyphylla, Quercus wutaishanica, Quercus mongolica and Quercus variabilis) and simulated their potential distribution area using 13 environmental variables and six widely used SDMs: BIOCLIM, DOMAIN, MAHAL, RF, MAXENT, and SVM. Each <span class="hlt">model</span> run was repeated 100 times (trials). We compared the predictive performance by testing the consistency between observations and simulated distributions and assessed the <span class="hlt">stability</span> by the standard deviation, coefficient of variation, and the 99% confidence interval of Kappa and AUC values. Results The mean values of AUC and Kappa from MAHAL, RF, MAXENT, and SVM trials were similar and significantly higher than those from BIOCLIM and DOMAIN trials (p<0.05), while the associated standard deviations and coefficients of variation were larger for BIOCLIM and DOMAIN trials (p<0.05), and the 99% confidence intervals for AUC and Kappa values were narrower for MAHAL, RF, MAXENT, and SVM. Compared to BIOCLIM and DOMAIN, other SDMs (MAHAL, RF, MAXENT, and SVM) had higher prediction accuracy, smaller confidence intervals, and were more stable and less affected by the random variable (randomly selected pseudo-absence points). Conclusions According to the prediction performance and <span class="hlt">stability</span> of SDMs, we can divide these six SDMs into two categories: a high performance and <span class="hlt">stability</span> group including MAHAL, RF, MAXENT, and SVM, and a low performance and <span class="hlt">stability</span> group consisting of BIOCLIM, and DOMAIN. We highlight that choosing appropriate SDMs to address a specific problem is an important part of the <span class="hlt">modeling</span> process. PMID:25383906</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huang, Min-Yi; Fan, Wei-Yi; Wang, Zhi-Gao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992juvs.rept.....H"> <span id="translatedtitle">JT-60 Upgrade vertical <span class="hlt">stability</span> experiments and <span class="hlt">analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The JT-60 Upgrade tokamak (JT-60U), can produce plasmas with vertical elongation (kappa approximately = 1.6), and thus allows investigation of vertical instability phenomena. The present work describes investigation of the vertical <span class="hlt">stability</span> characteristics of JT-60U plasmas through experimental results and simulation. Experiments described include feedback turnoff cases and high beta(sub p) unstable plasma cases. For purposes of simulation, the plasma is <span class="hlt">modeled</span> as a rigid assembly of current-carrying axisymmetric loops. A nominal conductor <span class="hlt">model</span> based on design geometry was modified to reproduce the results of a series of coil excitation experiments using a reduced order system identification approach. A two-coil <span class="hlt">model</span> was used to fit the experimental coil excitation behavior, and the full order conductor <span class="hlt">model</span> was modified to allow the dominant modes to reflect the low order dynamic response. The resulting plasma-conductor <span class="hlt">model</span> is shown to reproduce the vertical <span class="hlt">stability</span> behavior of JT-60U fairly well. Theoretical predictions of limits on the value of Shafranov (Lambda) achievable in JT-60U are made.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Humphreys, D. A.; Yoshino, Ryuji</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21537562"> <span id="translatedtitle">Anisotropic stress and <span class="hlt">stability</span> in modified gravity <span class="hlt">models</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The existence of anisotropic stress of a purely geometrical origin seems to be a characteristic of higher order gravity <span class="hlt">models</span>, and has been suggested as a probe to test these <span class="hlt">models</span> observationally, for example, in weak lensing experiments. In this paper, we seek to find a class of higher order gravity <span class="hlt">models</span> of f(R,G) type that would give us a zero anisotropic stress and study the consequences for the viability of the actual <span class="hlt">model</span>. For the special case of a de Sitter background, we identify a subclass of <span class="hlt">models</span> with the desired property. We also find a direct link between anisotropic stress and the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the <span class="hlt">model</span> as well as the presence of extra degrees of freedom, which seems to be a general feature of higher order gravity <span class="hlt">models</span>. Particularly, setting the anisotropic stress equal to zero for a de Sitter background leads to a singularity that makes it impossible to reach the de Sitter evolution.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saltas, Ippocratis D. [Astronomy Centre, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Kunz, Martin [Departement de Physique Theorique, Universite de Geneve, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-03-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1238148"> <span id="translatedtitle">Symbolic <span class="hlt">models</span> for nonlinear control systems without <span class="hlt">stability</span> assumptions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Finite-state <span class="hlt">models</span> of control systems were proposed by several researchers as a convenient mechanism to synthesize controllers enforcing complex specifications. Existing techniques for the construction of such symbolic <span class="hlt">models</span> have so far relied on certain <span class="hlt">stability</span> or stabilizability assumptions. In this paper, we show that these assumptions can be relaxed and prove that large classes of unstable systems admit symbolic <span class="hlt">models</span>. The effectiveness of the proposed results is illustrated by synthesizing a controller for an inverted pendulum subject to a schedulability constraint.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zamani, Majid; Mazo, Manuel; Tabuada, Paulo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/795315"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermohaline circulation <span class="hlt">stability</span>: a box <span class="hlt">model</span> study - Part I: uncoupled <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A thorough <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the uncoupled Rooth interhemispheric 3-box <span class="hlt">model</span> of thermohaline circulation (THC) is presented. The <span class="hlt">model</span> consists of a northern high latitudes box, a tropical box, and a southern high latitudes box, which respectively correspond to the northern, tropical and southern Atlantic ocean. We adopt restoring boundary conditions for the temperature variables and flux boundary conditions for the salinity variables. We study how the strength of THC changes when the system undergoes forcings that are analogous to those of global warming conditions by applying to the equilibrium state perturbations to the moisture and heat fluxes into the three boxes. In each class of experiments, we determine, using suitably de- fined metrics, the boundary dividing the set of forcing scenarios that lead the system to equilibria characterized by a THC pattern similar to the present one, from those that drive the system to equilibria with a reversed THC. Fast increases in the moisture flux into th...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lucarini, V; Lucarini, Valerio; Stone, Peter H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JDE...257.3102C"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> of spiky solution of Keller-Segel's minimal chemotaxis <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A huge volume of research has been done for the simplest chemotaxis <span class="hlt">model</span> (Keller-Segel's minimal <span class="hlt">model</span>) and its variants, yet, some of the basic issues remain unresolved until now. For example, it is known that the minimal <span class="hlt">model</span> has spiky steady states that can be used to <span class="hlt">model</span> the important cell aggregation phenomenon, but the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of monotone spiky steady states was not shown. In this paper, we derive, first formally and then rigorously, the asymptotic expansion of these monotone steady states, and then we use this fine information on the spike to prove its local asymptotic <span class="hlt">stability</span>. Moreover, we obtain the uniqueness of such steady states. We expect that the new ideas and techniques for rigorous asymptotic expansion and spectrum <span class="hlt">analysis</span> presented in this paper will be useful in attacking and hence stimulating research on other more sophisticated chemotaxis <span class="hlt">models</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chen, Xinfu; Hao, Jianghao; Wang, Xuefeng; Wu, Yaping; Zhang, Yajing</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5331604"> <span id="translatedtitle">Two-fluid <span class="hlt">modeling</span> in analyzing the interfacial <span class="hlt">stability</span> of liquid film flows</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The area-averaged two-fluid <span class="hlt">model</span> formulation of a separated two-phase flow system is used to investigate interfacial <span class="hlt">stability</span> of liquid film flows. The <span class="hlt">analysis</span> takes into account the effects of phase change at the interface as well as the dynamic effects of the adjacent vapor flow on the interfacial <span class="hlt">stability</span>. Wave formation and instability criteria are established in terms of the generalized fluid and flow parameters. The criteria are applied to investigate the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of laminar liquid film flow with interfacial shear and phase change. The influence of various dimensionless parameters characterizing film thickness, gravity, phase change and interfacial shear are studied with respect to the neutral <span class="hlt">stability</span>, temporal growth factor and the wave propagation velocity. The results of the present study indicate that the interfacial <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> developed within the frame of the two-fluid <span class="hlt">model</span> formulation proves to be quite accurate as judged by comparing its results with the available experimental data and with the results of much longer and more complex analytical investigations which are valid only for the liquid film free of interfacial shear.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kocamustafaogullari, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20030064141&hterms=Modeling+carrying+capacity&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DModeling%2Bcarrying%2Bcapacity"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Modeling</span> and Simulation of a Helicopter Slung Load <span class="hlt">Stabilization</span> Device</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper addresses the problem of simulation and <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> of the yaw motions of a cargo container slung load. The study configuration is a UH-60 helicopter carrying a 6ft x 6 ft x 8 ft CONEX container. This load is limited to 60 KIAS in operations and flight testing indicates that it starts spinning in hover and that spin rate increases with airspeed. The simulation reproduced the load yaw motions seen in the flight data after augmenting the load <span class="hlt">model</span> with terms representing unsteady load yaw moment effects acting to reinforce load oscillations, and augmenting the hook <span class="hlt">model</span> to include yaw resistance at the hook. The use of a vertical fin to <span class="hlt">stabilize</span> the load is considered. Results indicate that the CONEX airspeed can be extended to 110 kts using a 3x5 ft fin.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cicolani, Luigi S.; Ehlers, George E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' 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showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15322294"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of multimeric proteins by effective DeltaG and effective m-values.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Analyzing the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a multimeric protein is challenging because of the intrinsic difficulty in handling the mathematical <span class="hlt">model</span> for the folded multimer-unfolded monomer equilibrium. To circumvent this problem, we introduce the concept of effective <span class="hlt">stability</span>, DeltaGeff (= -RTlnKeff), where Keff is the equilibrium constant expressed in monomer units. <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of the denaturant effect on DeltaGeff gives new insight into the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of multimeric proteins. When a multimeric protein is mostly folded, the dependence of effective <span class="hlt">stability</span> on denaturant concentration (effective m-value) is simply the m-value of its monomeric unit. However, when the protein is mostly unfolded, its <span class="hlt">stability</span> depends on denaturant concentration with the m-value of its multimeric form. We also find that the effective m-value at the Cm is a good approximation of the apparent m-value determined by fitting the equilibrium unfolding data from multimeric proteins with a two-state monomer <span class="hlt">model</span>. Moreover, when the m-value of a monomeric unit is estimated from its size, the effective <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a multimeric protein can be determined simply from Cm and this estimated m-value. These simple and intuitive approaches will allow a facile <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of multimeric proteins. These analyses are also applicable for high-throughput <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of protein <span class="hlt">stability</span> on a proteomic scale. PMID:15322294</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Park, Chiwook; Marqusee, Susan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary;jsessionid=71523136365F4F02BA4B0F01CB246AC1?doi=10.1.1.130.7232&rank=4"> <span id="translatedtitle">Vehicle Dynamics and <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> with Matlab and Adams Car</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The automotive active dynamics and <span class="hlt">stability</span> control is nowadays available from many manufacturers which offer different hardware and software solutions. To compare the performance obtainable considering different active systems, a mathematical <span class="hlt">model</span> of a new car was implemented through Adams Car. The <span class="hlt">model</span> was completed with a powertrain specifically conceived in Matlab environment to overcome problems due to an Adams Car <span class="hlt">modelling</span> not suitable to describe every operating condition (e.g. standing start, gearshift). A strategy to overcome the problems introduced by the dependence of nominal yaw rate value on the instantaneously available tire-terrain adhesion coefficient was considered. The most important results obtained adopting the described strategy are presented through animations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N. Arborio; P. Munaretto; M. Velardocchia; N. Riva; E. Suraci</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23586672"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and controller design in microbial continuous culture with discrete time delay.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and controller design in microbial continuous culture with discrete time delay are studied. The dissimilation process of glycerol to 1,3-propanediol cannot avoid the disturbances caused by time delay. Time delay can limit and degrade the achievable performance of controlled systems, and even induce instability. Based on the biodynamic <span class="hlt">model</span>, some properties of its solutions are discussed. In addition, we investigate how the time-delay affects the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the system. A linear matrix inequalities method is applied to find a feedback controller to ensure the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the closed-loop system. The simulation results indicate that this controller might be feasible for continuous bioprocess control. PMID:23586672</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhu, Xi; Gao, Jinggui; Feng, Enmin; Xiu, Zhilong; Jin, Sheng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20000063376&hterms=fuzzy&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dfuzzy"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fuzzy Current-Mode Control and <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper a current-mode control (CMC) methodology is developed for a buck converter by using a fuzzy logic controller. Conventional CMC methodologies are based on lead-lag compensation with voltage and inductor current feedback. In this paper the converter lead-lag compensation will be substituted with a fuzzy controller. A small-signal <span class="hlt">model</span> of the fuzzy controller will also be developed in order to examine the <span class="hlt">stability</span> properties of this buck converter control system. The paper develops an analytical approach, introducing fuzzy control into the area of CMC.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kopasakis, George</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AIPC.1479.1383G"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for spatial attrition with n forces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Close combat between two forces can be <span class="hlt">modelled</span> through a set of two coupled partial differential equations, of second order in space and first order in time. That problem has been studied and shows a way to find stable solutions by means of a careful selection of the discretization both in time and space and through the use of a simple transformation. The results are generalized here for more interacting forces. It is found that the eigenvalues of the matrix that represent the system dynamics together with the time step size shape up the <span class="hlt">stability</span> coefficients.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gonzlez, Eduardo; Villena, Marcelo J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20997136"> <span id="translatedtitle">Validation of IVA Computer Code for Flow Boiling <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">IVA is a computer code for <span class="hlt">modeling</span> of transient multiphase, multi-component, non-equilibrium flows in arbitrary geometry including flow boiling in 3D nuclear reactors. This work presents part of the verification procedure of the code. We analyze the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of flow boiling in natural circulation loop. Experimental results collected on the AREVA/FANP KATHY loop regarding frequencies, mass flows and decay ratio of the oscillations are used for comparison. The comparison demonstrates the capability of the code to successfully simulate such class of processes. (author)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ivanov Kolev, Nikolay [Framatome-ANP, PO Box 3220, D-91058, Erlangen (Germany)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5408358"> <span id="translatedtitle">Predicting waste <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> pond performance using an ecological simulation <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Waste <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> ponds (lagoons) are often favored in small communities because of their low cost and ease of operation. Most <span class="hlt">models</span> currently used to predict performance are empirical or fail to address the primary lagoon cell. Empirical methods for predicting lagoon performance have been found to be off as much as 248 percent when used on a system other than the one they were developed for. Also, the present <span class="hlt">models</span> developed for the primary cell lack the ability to predict parameters other than biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and nitrogen. Oxygen consumption is usually estimated from BOD utilization. LAGOON is a fortran program which <span class="hlt">models</span> the biogeochemical processes characteristic of the primary cell of facultative lagoons. <span class="hlt">Model</span> parameters can be measured from lagoons in the vicinity of a proposed lagoon or estimated from laboratory studies. The <span class="hlt">model</span> was calibrated utilizing a subset of the Corinne Utah lagoon data then validated utilizing a subset of the Corinne Utah data.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">New, G.R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4083295"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ant Colony Optimization <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> on Overall <span class="hlt">Stability</span> of High Arch Dam Basis of Field Monitoring</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A dam ant colony optimization (D-ACO) <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the overall <span class="hlt">stability</span> of high arch dams on complicated foundations is presented in this paper. A modified ant colony optimization (ACO) <span class="hlt">model</span> is proposed for obtaining dam concrete and rock mechanical parameters. A typical dam parameter feedback problem is proposed for nonlinear back-<span class="hlt">analysis</span> numerical <span class="hlt">model</span> based on field monitoring deformation and ACO. The basic principle of the proposed <span class="hlt">model</span> is the establishment of the objective function of optimizing real concrete and rock mechanical parameter. The feedback <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is then implemented with a modified ant colony algorithm. The algorithm performance is satisfactory, and the accuracy is verified. The m groups of feedback parameters, used to run a nonlinear FEM code, and the displacement and stress distribution are discussed. A feedback <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the deformation of the Lijiaxia arch dam and based on the modified ant colony optimization method is also conducted. By considering various material parameters obtained using different <span class="hlt">analysis</span> methods, comparative analyses were conducted on dam displacements, stress distribution characteristics, and overall dam <span class="hlt">stability</span>. The comparison results show that the proposal <span class="hlt">model</span> can effectively solve for feedback multiple parameters of dam concrete and rock material and basically satisfy assessment requirements for geotechnical structural engineering discipline. PMID:25025089</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu, Xiaoli; Chen, Hong-Xin; Kim, Jinxie</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AcAau..93..162N"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the <span class="hlt">stability</span> and bifurcation <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of dual-spin spacecraft</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The dynamics of dual-spin spacecraft under effects of energy dissipation are considered in this paper, where the damper masses in the platform (P) and the rotor (R) cause energy loss in the system. The Floquet theory is employed to obtain <span class="hlt">stability</span> charts for different relative spin rates of the subsystem R with respect to the subsystem P. Based on the general <span class="hlt">model</span> for the system with nutation dampers on both P and R, <span class="hlt">models</span> are presented for a system whose nutation damper exists only in P as well as a system without nutation damper. The results obtained from the Floquet theory agree with the energy sink <span class="hlt">analysis</span> in the literature. The bifurcation <span class="hlt">analysis</span> based on the movement of loci of the Floquet multipliers as the system passes through the flutter <span class="hlt">stability</span> boundary indicates that the system experiences the secondary Hopf (Neimark-Sacker) bifurcation. The investigations show that for spacecraft whose nutation damper exists only in one of the subsystems, there is no need to apply Floquet theory, and the Routh-Hurwitz criteria provides necessary and sufficient conditions for <span class="hlt">stability</span>. Furthermore, for the case that only P has damping, the Lyapunov <span class="hlt">stability</span> criteria agree with Routh-Hurwitz criteria.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nazari, Morad; Butcher, Eric A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820053658&hterms=mixed+methods+research&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dmixed%2Bmethods%2Bresearch%2524"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> of mixed time integration schemes for transient thermal <span class="hlt">analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A current research topic in coupled-field problems is the development of effective transient algorithms that permit different time integration methods with different time steps to be used simultaneously in various regions of the problems. The implicit-explicit approach seems to be very successful in structural, fluid, and fluid-structure problems. This paper summarizes this research direction. A family of mixed time integration schemes, with the capabilities mentioned above, is also introduced for transient thermal <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. A <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and the computer implementation of this technique are also presented. In particular, it is shown that the mixed time implicit-explicit methods provide a natural framework for the further development of efficient, clean, modularized computer codes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu, W. K.; Lin, J. I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20090034255&hterms=omb+control&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Domb%2Bcontrol%2B%2523"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> and Control <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of the F-15B Quiet SpikeTM Aircraft</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The primary purpose of the Quiet Spike(TradeMark) flight research program was to analyze the aerodynamic, structural, and mechanical proof-of-concept of a large multi-stage telescoping nose spike installed on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) F-15B airplane. This report describes the preflight <span class="hlt">stability</span> and control <span class="hlt">analysis</span> performed to assess the effect of the spike on the <span class="hlt">stability</span>, controllability, and handling qualities of the airplane; and to develop an envelope expansion approach to maintain safety of flight. The overall flight test objective was to collect flight data to validate the spike structural dynamics and loads <span class="hlt">model</span> up to Mach 1.8. Other objectives included validating the mechanical feasibility of a morphing fuselage at operational conditions and determining the near-field shock wave characterization. The two main issues relevant to the <span class="hlt">stability</span> and control objectives were the effects of the spike-influenced aerodynamics on the F-15B airplane flight dynamics, and the air data and angle-of-attack sensors. The <span class="hlt">analysis</span> covered the sensitivity of the <span class="hlt">stability</span> margins, and the handling qualities due to aerodynamic variation and the maneuvering limitations of the F-15B Quiet Spike configuration. The results of the <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and the implications for the flight test program are also presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McWherter, Shaun C.; Moua, Cheng M.; Gera, Joseph; Cox, Timothy H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4043158"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonlinear flight dynamics and <span class="hlt">stability</span> of hovering <span class="hlt">model</span> insects</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Current analyses on insect dynamic flight <span class="hlt">stability</span> are based on linear theory and limited to small disturbance motions. However, insects' aerial environment is filled with swirling eddies and wind gusts, and large disturbances are common. Here, we numerically solve the equations of motion coupled with the NavierStokes equations to simulate the large disturbance motions and analyse the nonlinear flight dynamics of hovering <span class="hlt">model</span> insects. We consider two representative <span class="hlt">model</span> insects, a <span class="hlt">model</span> hawkmoth (large size, low wingbeat frequency) and a <span class="hlt">model</span> dronefly (small size, high wingbeat frequency). For small and large initial disturbances, the disturbance motion grows with time, and the insects tumble and never return to the equilibrium state; the hovering flight is inherently (passively) unstable. The instability is caused by a pitch moment produced by forward/backward motion and/or a roll moment produced by side motion of the insect. PMID:23697714</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liang, Bin; Sun, Mao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6955050"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic pressure approach to <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of reactor fuel plate <span class="hlt">stability</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The dynamic pressure <span class="hlt">model</span> can conveniently be used to evaluate the critical stress regions as a function of flow velocity. For some of the preliminary advanced neutron source reactor plate designs this could be very significant since the flow velocity could be limited by peak stresses in the plates more than by deflection or <span class="hlt">stability</span>. The dynamic pressure results predicts the differential pressure across a plate as a function of flow velocity. The pressure differential can then be used to find the deflection and/or stress of the plate using traditional plate analyses. Instability would occur when plates are touching at mid-channel such that rapid oscillations of pressure can occur. The technique is conservative and gives a design limit for the plate. This <span class="hlt">model</span> is one of several methods being used in the design of the ANS fuel elements. 10 refs., 4 figs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Swinson, W.F.; Yahr, G.T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004JChPh.12111183D"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> of smectic phases in the Gay-Berne <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a detailed computer simulation study of the phase behavior of the Gay-Berne liquid crystal <span class="hlt">model</span> with molecular anisotropy parameter ?=4.4. According to previous investigations: (i) this <span class="hlt">model</span> exhibits isotropic (I), smectic-A (Sm-A), and smectic-B (Sm-B) phases at low pressures, with an additional nematic (N) phase between the I and Sm-A phases at sufficiently high pressures; (ii) the range of <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the Sm-A phase turns out to be essentially constant when varying the pressure, whereas other investigations seem to suggest a pressure-dependent Sm-A range; and (iii) the range of <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the Sm-B phase remains unknown, as its <span class="hlt">stability</span> with respect to the crystal phase has not been previously considered. The results reported here do show that the Sm-A phase is stable over a limited pressure range, and so it does not extend to arbitrarily low or high pressures. This is in keeping with previous investigations of the effect of molecular elongation on the phase behavior of Gay-Berne <span class="hlt">models</span>. A detailed study of the melting transition at various pressures shows that the low-temperature crystalline phase melts into an isotropic liquid at very low pressures, and into a nematic liquid at very high pressures. At intermediate pressures, the crystal melts into a Sm-A liquid and no intermediate Sm-B phase is observed. On the basis of this and previous investigations, the reported Sm-B phase for Gay-Berne <span class="hlt">models</span> appears to be a molecular solid rather than a smectic liquid phase.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">de Miguel, Enrique; Martn del Ro, Elvira; Blas, Felipe J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.compadre.org/Repository/document/ServeFile.cfm?ID=12308&DocID=3050"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quantum Magnetism <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> <span class="hlt">Model</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Quantum Magnetism <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> <span class="hlt">Model</span> was created to help students as well as researchers who are studying magnetism. It provides a very simple interface for defining (theoretical) quantum spin <span class="hlt">models</span>; sliders are automatically created to vary the parameters in the <span class="hlt">models</span>; and several plots are automatically created to visualize the results. Within the program, several measured (experimental) data sets are included for a variety of real molecules. These provide the opportunity to experience the <span class="hlt">modeling</span> process by varying the parameters in the <span class="hlt">model</span> and exploring how the simulated results compare to the measured data. The interactions between neighboring quantum magnetic moments ("spins") are <span class="hlt">modeled</span> using the Heisenberg <span class="hlt">model</span>; calculations are carried out by numerically diagonalizing the matrix representation of the Heisenberg Hamiltonian; and plots display the energy spectrum, magnetization, and magnetic susceptibility as a function of temperature and magnetic field. This simulation is a "Fully Integrated Tool for Magnetic <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> in Research & Teaching," so we also refer to it with the acronym "FIT-MART". FIT-MART was developed using the Easy Java Simulations (EJS) <span class="hlt">modeling</span> tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking ejs_fitmart.jar file will run the package if Java is installed. In future versions of this simulation, curricular materials will be included to help students to learn about magnetism, and automated fitting routines will be included to help researchers quickly and easily <span class="hlt">model</span> experimental data. FIT-MART was developed using the Easy Java Simulations (EJS) <span class="hlt">modeling</span> tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking ejs_fitmart.jar file will run the package if Java is installed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Engelhardt, Larry; Garland, Chad; Rainey, Cameron; Freeman, Austin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMNH13D..04S"> <span id="translatedtitle">SOSlope 3D: implementing root reinforcement and preferential flow in slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">modeling</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The quantification of root reinforcement represents a key issue in different area of engineering (slope <span class="hlt">stability</span>, soil protection, silviculture/tree <span class="hlt">stability</span>, hydraulic). Between all the effects of plants (direct and indirect) on the physical and chemical soil processes, the mechanical effect of roots is considered particularly important for slope <span class="hlt">stability</span>. The study of root reinforcement is faced with the high complexity of interactions of processes and factors at different spatio-temporal scales. In particular, the hierarchical spatial heterogeneity of vegetation and its effects on soil processes represent a big challenge for quantitative up-scaling methods. The objective of this contribution is to contextualize the complexity of the root-soil interactions in view of slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> problems, to review the recent scientific contributions in the quantification of root reinforcement, and to discuss the practical meaning of recent research results. In the presentation of an up-scaling framework for the implementation of root reinforcement and preferential flow in slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span>, the following arguments will be discussed: tensile force and pullout force of single roots, apparent elasticity of single roots, strain loading approach for the characterization of root bundle mechanics, meaning of root diameter distribution on root reinforcement, spatial heterogeneity of root distribution, hydro-mechanical and rheological properties of rooted soil under tension and compression, and triggering mechanism of shallow landslides. The above-mentioned factors and processes build up the modules implemented in a numerical <span class="hlt">model</span> for slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> calculations, the SOSlope <span class="hlt">model</span>. The SOSlope <span class="hlt">model</span> is characterized by the use of a spring-block framework (with 1x1 m cell grid), a strain step loading approach for the redistribution of forces, and the implementation of a spatial distribution of root at the hill slope scale. The results of simulations performed with the SOSlope <span class="hlt">model</span> serve as background for the discussion on the role of root reinforcement for protection forests management and bioengineering applications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schwarz, M.; Cohen, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3337434"> <span id="translatedtitle">Genome-wide <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of long noncoding RNA <span class="hlt">stability</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Transcriptomic analyses have identified tens of thousands of intergenic, intronic, and cis-antisense long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) that are expressed from mammalian genomes. Despite progress in functional characterization, little is known about the post-transcriptional regulation of lncRNAs and their half-lives. Although many are easily detectable by a variety of techniques, it has been assumed that lncRNAs are generally unstable, but this has not been examined genome-wide. Utilizing a custom noncoding RNA array, we determined the half-lives of ?800 lncRNAs and ?12,000 mRNAs in the mouse Neuro-2a cell line. We find only a minority of lncRNAs are unstable. LncRNA half-lives vary over a wide range, comparable to, although on average less than, that of mRNAs, suggestive of complex metabolism and widespread functionality. Combining half-lives with comprehensive lncRNA annotations identified hundreds of unstable (half-life < 2 h) intergenic, cis-antisense, and intronic lncRNAs, as well as lncRNAs showing extreme <span class="hlt">stability</span> (half-life > 16 h). <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of lncRNA features revealed that intergenic and cis-antisense RNAs are more stable than those derived from introns, as are spliced lncRNAs compared to unspliced (single exon) transcripts. Subcellular localization of lncRNAs indicated widespread trafficking to different cellular locations, with nuclear-localized lncRNAs more likely to be unstable. Surprisingly, one of the least stable lncRNAs is the well-characterized paraspeckle RNA Neat1, suggesting Neat1 instability contributes to the dynamic nature of this subnuclear domain. We have created an online interactive resource (http://<span class="hlt">stability</span>.matticklab.com) that allows easy navigation of lncRNA and mRNA <span class="hlt">stability</span> profiles and provides a comprehensive annotation of ?7200 mouse lncRNAs. PMID:22406755</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Clark, Michael B.; Johnston, Rebecca L.; Inostroza-Ponta, Mario; Fox, Archa H.; Fortini, Ellen; Moscato, Pablo; Dinger, Marcel E.; Mattick, John S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011SPIE.8125E..0IK"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tool for bonded optical element thermal <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An analytical tool is presented which supports the opto-mechanical design of bonded optical elements. Given the mounting requirements from the optical engineer, the alignment <span class="hlt">stability</span> and optical stresses in bonded optics can be optimized for the adhesive and housing material properties. While a perfectly athermalized mount is desirable, it is not realistic. The tool permits evaluation of element <span class="hlt">stability</span> and stress over the expected thermal range at nominal, or worst case, achievable assembly and manufacturing tolerances. Selection of the most appropriate mount configuration and materials, which maintain the optical engineer's design, is then possible. The tool is based on a stress-strain <span class="hlt">analysis</span> using Hooke's Law in the worst case plane through the optic centerline. The optimal bond line is determined for the selected adhesive, housing and given optic materials using the basic athermalization equation. Since a mounting solution is expected to be driven close to an athermalized design, the stress variations are considered linearly related to strain. A review of the equation set, the tool input and output capabilities and formats and an example will be discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Klotz, Gregory L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhyD..239.2011Q"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> and bifurcation <span class="hlt">analysis</span> in hematopoietic stem cell dynamics with multiple delays</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper is devoted to the <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of a maturity structured system of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) populations in the bone marrow. The <span class="hlt">model</span> is a system of differential equations with several time delays. We discuss the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of equilibria and perform the <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of Hopf bifurcation. More precisely, we first obtain a set of improved sufficient conditions ensuring the global asymptotical <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the zero solution using the Lyapunov method and the embedding technique of asymptotically autonomous semiflows. Then we prove that there exists at least one positive periodic solution for the n-dimensional system as a time delay varies in some region. This result is established by combining Hopf bifurcation theory, the global Hopf bifurcation theorem due to Wu [J. Wu, Symmetric functional differential equations and neural networks with memory, Trans. Amer. Math. Soc. 350 (1998) 4799-4838], and a continuation theorem of coincidence degree theory. Some numerical simulations are also presented to illustrate the analytic results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Qu, Ying; Wei, Junjie; Ruan, Shigui</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21736312"> <span id="translatedtitle">Foamability and foam <span class="hlt">stability</span> of molecular reconstituted <span class="hlt">model</span> sparkling wines.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The present work aims at identifying the contribution of the different wine components to the foaming properties of wines. Twelve fractions were isolated from wine, and foam aptitude of each fraction was measured individually at the concentration at which it was recovered, using wine <span class="hlt">model</span> solutions. For these concentrations, the maximum foam height (HM) was 8.4-11.7 cm, foam height on <span class="hlt">stability</span> was 6.9-7.5 cm, and foam <span class="hlt">stability</span> (TS) was 3.0-6.5 s. Moreover, foam measurements were also performed using 2-, 5-, and 10-fold concentrations of these compounds in wine. The HM increased linearly with the concentration of mannoproteins having low content of protein (MP1), and TS increased exponentially. The fractions that individually showed higher foaming properties were mixed in binary and ternary combinations, demonstrating that MP1 when mixed with low molecular weight hydrophobic compounds strengthens the air/water interface of these solutions, a characteristic that is on the basis of sparkling wines' foamability and foam <span class="hlt">stability</span>. PMID:21736312</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Coelho, Elisabete; Rocha, Slvia M; Coimbra, Manuel A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-08-24</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23004000"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hydrodynamic-driven <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of morphological patterns on stalactites and implications for cave paleoflow reconstructions.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A novel hydrodynamic-driven <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is presented for surface patterns on speleothems, i.e., secondary sedimentary cave deposits, by coupling fluid dynamics to the geochemistry of calcite precipitation or dissolution. Falling film theory provides the solution for the flow-field and depth perturbations, the latter being crucial to triggering patterns known as crenulations. In a wide range of Reynolds numbers, the <span class="hlt">model</span> provides the dominant wavelengths and pattern celerities, in fair agreement with field data. The <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the phase velocity of ridges on speleothems has a potential as a proxy of past film flow rates, thus suggesting a new support for paleoclimate analyses. PMID:23004000</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Camporeale, Carlo; Ridolfi, Luca</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvD..86h4041L"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the Witten black hole (cigar soliton) under world-sheet renormalization group flow</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyze the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the Euclidean Witten black hole (the cigar soliton in mathematics literature) under first-order renormalization group (Ricci) flow of the world-sheet sigma <span class="hlt">model</span>. This <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is from the target space point of view. We find that the Witten black hole has no unstable normalizable perturbative modes in a linearized mode <span class="hlt">analysis</span> in which we consider circularly symmetric perturbations. Finally, we discuss a result from mathematics that implies the existence of a nonnormalizable mode of the Witten black hole under which the geometry flows to the sausage solution studied by Fateev, Onofri and Zamolodchikov.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lambert, Carolyn; Suneeta, Vardarajan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JIEI...10...71D"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of equilibrium for a reformulated foreign trade <span class="hlt">model</span> of three countries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, we study the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of equilibrium for a foreign trade <span class="hlt">model</span> consisting of three countries. As the gravity equation has been proven an excellent tool of <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and adequately stable over time and space all over the world, we further enhance the problem to three masses. We use the basic Structure of Heckscher-Ohlin-Samuelson <span class="hlt">model</span>. The national income equals consumption outlays plus investment plus exports minus imports. The proposed reformulation of the problem focus on two basic concepts: (1) the delay inherited in our economic variables and (2) the interaction effect along the three economies involved. <span class="hlt">Stability</span> and stabilizability conditions are investigated while numerical examples provide further insight and better understanding. Finally, a generalization of the gravity equation is somehow obtained for the <span class="hlt">model</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dassios, Ioannis K.; Kalogeropoulos, Grigoris</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.met.reading.ac.uk/~sv901069/LucariniandStone2005b.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermohaline Circulation <span class="hlt">Stability</span>: A Box <span class="hlt">Model</span> Study. Part II: Coupled AtmosphereOcean <span class="hlt">Model</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thermohaline Circulation <span class="hlt">Stability</span>: A Box <span class="hlt">Model</span> Study. Part II: Coupled Atmosphere­Ocean <span class="hlt">Model</span> of an interhemispheric three-box <span class="hlt">model</span> of thermohaline circulation (THC) is presented. This study follows a similarly for a brief presentation of the concept of thermohaline circulation (THC) and for a discussion of the relevant</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lucarini, Valerio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24808552"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of Markovian jump stochastic BAM neural networks with impulse control and mixed time delays.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper discusses the issue of <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for a class of impulsive stochastic bidirectional associative memory neural networks with both Markovian jump parameters and mixed time delays. The jumping parameters are <span class="hlt">modeled</span> as a continuous-time discrete-state Markov chain. Based on a novel Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional, the generalized Ito?'s formula, mathematical induction, and stochastic <span class="hlt">analysis</span> theory, a linear matrix inequality approach is developed to derive some novel sufficient conditions that guarantee the exponential <span class="hlt">stability</span> in the mean square of the equilibrium point. At the same time, we also investigate the robustly exponential <span class="hlt">stability</span> in the mean square of the corresponding system with unknown parameters. It should be mentioned that our <span class="hlt">stability</span> results are delay-dependent, which depend on not only the upper bounds of time delays but also their lower bounds. Moreover, the derivatives of time delays are not necessarily zero or smaller than one since several free matrices are introduced in our results. Consequently, the results obtained in this paper are not only less conservative but also generalize and improve many earlier results. Finally, two numerical examples and their simulations are provided to show the effectiveness of the theoretical results. PMID:24808552</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhu, Quanxin; Cao, Jinde</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pscc-central.org/uploads/tx_ethpublications/s14p03.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">ANALYSIS</span> AND DESIGN OF POWER SYSTEM <span class="hlt">STABILIZERS</span> AND FACTS BASED <span class="hlt">STABILIZERS</span> USING GENETIC ALGORITHMS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Power system <span class="hlt">stability</span> enhancement via a power system <span class="hlt">stabilizer</span> (PSS) and FACTS-based <span class="hlt">stabilizers</span> is thoroughly investigated in this paper. The design problem of PSS and different FACTS controllers is formulated as an optimization problem. An eigenvalue-based objective function to increase the system damping and improve the system re- sponse is proposed. Then, a real-coded genetic algo- rithm (RCGA) is employed</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. A. Abido; Y. L. Abdel-Magid</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012Nonli..25.2625S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for travelling waves of second order in time PDE's</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study travelling waves ?c of second order in time PDE's u_{tt}+{ L} u+N(u)=0 . The linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for these <span class="hlt">models</span> is reduced to the question of the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of quadratic pencils in the form \\lambda^2Id+2c\\lambda \\partial_x+{ H}_c , where { H}_c=c^2 \\partial_{xx}+{ L}+N'(\\varphi_c) . If { H}_c is a self-adjoint operator, with a simple negative eigenvalue and a simple eigenvalue at zero, then we completely characterize the linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> of ?c. More precisely, we introduce an explicitly computable index \\omega^*({ H}_c)\\in (0, \\infty] , so that the wave ?c is stable if and only if |c|\\geq \\omega^*({ H}_c) . The results are applicable both in the periodic case and in the whole line case. The method of proof involves a delicate <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of a function { G} , associated with { H} , whose positive zeros are exactly the positive (unstable) eigenvalues of the pencil \\lambda^2Id+2c\\lambda \\partial_x+{ H} . We would like to emphasize that the function { G} is not the Evans function for the problem, but rather a new object that we define herein, which fits the situation rather well. As an application, we consider three classical <span class="hlt">models</span>the good Boussinesq equation, the Klein-Gordon-Zakharov (KGZ) system and the fourth order beam equation. In the whole line case, for the Boussinesq case and the KGZ system (and as a direct application of the main results), we compute explicitly the set of speeds which give rise to linearly stable travelling waves (and for all powers of p in the case of Boussinesq). This result is new for the KGZ system, while it generalizes the results of Alexander et al (2012, personal communication) and Alexander and Sachs (1995 Nonlinear World 2 471-507), which apply to the case p = 2. For the beam equation, we provide an implicit formula (depending only on the function \\|\\varphi_c'\\|_{L^2}) , which works for all p and for both the periodic and the whole line cases. Our results complement (and exactly match, whenever they exist) the results of a long line of investigation regarding the related notion of orbital <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the same waves. Informally, we have found that in all the examples that we have looked at, our theory applies, whenever the Grillakis-Shatah-Strauss (GSS) theory applies. We believe that the results in this paper (or a variation thereof) will enable the linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> as well as asymptotic <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for most <span class="hlt">models</span> in the form u_{tt}+{ L} u+N(u)=0 .</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stanislavova, Milena; Stefanov, Atanas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1407.3401v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">A new approach on the <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> in ELKO cosmology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this work it has been developed a new approach to study the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a system composed by an ELKO field interacting with dark matter, which could give some contribution in order to alleviate the cosmic coincidence problem. It is assumed that the potential that characterizes the ELKO field is not specified, but it is related to a constant parameter $\\delta$. The strength of the interaction between the matter and the ELKO field is characterized by a constant parameter $\\beta$ and it is also assumed that both the ELKO field as the matter energy density are related to their pressures by equations of state parameters $\\omega_\\phi$ and $\\omega_m$, respectively. The system of equations is analysed by a dynamical system approach. It was found out the conditions of <span class="hlt">stability</span> between the parameters $\\delta$ and $\\beta$ in order to have stable fixed points for the system for different values of the equation of state parameters $\\omega_\\phi$ and $\\omega_m$, and the results are presented in form of tables. The possibility of decay of Elko field into dark matter or vice verse can be read directly from the tables, since the parameters $\\delta$ and $\\beta$ satisfy some inequalities. This opens the possibility to constrain the potential in order to have a stable system for different interactions terms between the Elko field and dark matter. The cosmic coincidence problem can be alleviated for some specific relations between the parameters of the <span class="hlt">model</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Pinho S. S.; S. H. Pereira; J. F. Jesus</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15745440"> <span id="translatedtitle">Personality <span class="hlt">stability</span> in late adulthood: a behavioral genetic <span class="hlt">analysis</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A sample of 833 twins from the Minnesota Twin Study of Adult Development and Aging completed the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ; Tellegen, 1982) twice, averaging 59.4 (sd=9.7) years of age at first and 64.4 (sd=10.2) years of age at second testing (average retest interval 5.0 years, sd=2.36, range 1.0-10.4 years). Both means and standard deviations of scale scores were extremely stable from first to second testing. In addition, sample participants tended to retain their rank order on the scales (average r=.76 across scales). Bivariate biometric analyses showed that the genetic influences on most of the scale scores were almost perfectly correlated across the two waves (range .95 to 1.00). The nonshared environmental influences were also highly correlated across the two waves (range .53 to .73). <span class="hlt">Models</span> specifying identical variance components at the two time points and fixing the genetic correlation to 1.00 provided improved fit. The results suggest that the high <span class="hlt">stability</span> of personality in later adulthood has a strong genetic foundation, supplemented by <span class="hlt">stability</span> of environmental effects. PMID:15745440</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Johnson, Wendy; McGue, Matt; Krueger, Robert F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/956682"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of implicit time discretizations for the Compton-scattering Fokker-Planck equation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Fokker-Planck equation is a widely used approximation for <span class="hlt">modeling</span> the Compton scattering of photons in high energy density applications. In this paper, we perform a <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of three implicit time discretizations for the Compton-Scattering Fokker-Planck equation. Specifically, we examine (i) a Semi-Implicit (SI) scheme that employs backward-Euler differencing but evaluates temperature-dependent coefficients at their beginning-of-time-step values, (ii) a Fully Implicit (FI) discretization that instead evaluates temperature-dependent coefficients at their end-of-time-step values, and (iii) a Linearized Implicit (LI) scheme, which is developed by linearizing the temperature dependence of the FI discretization within each time step. Our <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> shows that the FI and LI schemes are unconditionally stable and cannot generate oscillatory solutions regardless of time-step size, whereas the SI discretization can suffer from instabilities and nonphysical oscillations for sufficiently large time steps. With the results of this <span class="hlt">analysis</span>, we present time-step limits for the SI scheme that prevent undesirable behavior. We test the validity of our <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and time-step limits with a set of numerical examples.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Densmore, Jeffery D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Warsa, James S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lowrie, Robert B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morel, Jim E [TEXAS A& M UNIV</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21308108"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of implicit time discretizations for the Compton-scattering Fokker-Planck equation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Fokker-Planck equation is a widely used approximation for <span class="hlt">modeling</span> the Compton scattering of photons in high energy density applications. In this paper, we perform a <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of three implicit time discretizations for the Compton-Scattering Fokker-Planck equation. Specifically, we examine (i) a Semi-Implicit (SI) scheme that employs backward-Euler differencing but evaluates temperature-dependent coefficients at their beginning-of-time-step values, (ii) a Fully Implicit (FI) discretization that instead evaluates temperature-dependent coefficients at their end-of-time-step values, and (iii) a Linearized Implicit (LI) scheme, which is developed by linearizing the temperature dependence of the FI discretization within each time step. Our <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> shows that the FI and LI schemes are unconditionally stable and cannot generate oscillatory solutions regardless of time-step size, whereas the SI discretization can suffer from instabilities and nonphysical oscillations for sufficiently large time steps. With the results of this <span class="hlt">analysis</span>, we present time-step limits for the SI scheme that prevent undesirable behavior. We test the validity of our <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and time-step limits with a set of numerical examples.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Densmore, Jeffery D. [Computational Physics and Methods Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS D409, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)], E-mail: jdd@lanl.gov; Warsa, James S. [Computational Physics and Methods Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS D409, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)], E-mail: warsa@lanl.gov; Lowrie, Robert B. [Computational Physics and Methods Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS D409, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)], E-mail: lowrie@lanl.gov; Morel, Jim E. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, 3133 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)], E-mail: morel@tamu.edu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011APS..DPPTP9029S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Resistive Wall Mode in Rotating High-beta Plasmas in DIII-D</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> of resistive wall modes (RWM) in rotating high beta DIII-D discharges is analyzed using the MARS-F code. The modes are calculated in axisymmetric toroidal equilibrium using the MHD plasma <span class="hlt">model</span> with kinetic damping effects. RWM are analyzed for different spacing between the resistive wall and the plasma boundary and for different toroidal rotation profiles. Sensitivity study of the mode's <span class="hlt">stability</span> on the plasma edge q-profile is made by varying both the edge current profile and the proximity of the plasma boundary to the real X-point geometry. The importance of the edge <span class="hlt">modeling</span> on accurate RWM <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is revisited. Scans of the mode's growth rate and frequency are made in these settings, and the mode's structure is explored. Quasilinear toroidal torque driven by jxB force due to current and magnetic field perturbations in the RWM is estimated and compared with the experimental estimate of the total toroidal torque on plasma. The dependencies of the RWM growth rate and frequency on the <span class="hlt">stability</span> and torque parameters are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Svidzinski, V. A.; in, Y.; Kim, J. S.; Chu, M. S.; Liu, Y. Q.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004APS..DPPNP1017Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Progress in the Integration of Physics-Based MHD <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Models</span> into the ONETWO Transport Code</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Self-consistent integration of MHD <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">models</span> in transport <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is essential for simulation and development of AT scenarios for DIII-D and ITER. High accuracy equilibrium calculations are required for <span class="hlt">stability</span> studies. To facilitate the coupling of the <span class="hlt">stability</span> results with transport calculations, the TOQ inverse Grad-Shafranov equilibrium solver has been integrated into ONETWO. The running results of a sample simulation using TOQ and other equilibrium solvers inside ONETWO are generally in agreement. To <span class="hlt">model</span> the effects of resonant magnetic drag due to error magnetic field on the plasma rotation, a simple inductive motor <span class="hlt">model</span> has been implemented into ONETWO. Simulation of a DIII-D RWM discharge indicates that the observed plasma slowing down cannot be fully explained by the resonant magnetic damping due to the error magnetic field alone. Non-resonant magnetic damping likely plays a role. Other planned developments include integration of ONETWO with the ELITE edge peeling- ballooning <span class="hlt">stability</span> code to study ELM dynamics. Details of the development and recent results will be presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhou, D.; St John, H. E.; Lao, L. L.; Chu, M. S.; Snyder, P. B.; Brennan, D. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20822175"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> Monitoring Tests Using a Nuclear-Coupled Boiling Channel <span class="hlt">Model</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new test platform for <span class="hlt">stability</span> studies is presented that can be used to generate a power time series, which in turn may be used to validate the capability of boiling water reactor <span class="hlt">stability</span>-monitoring algorithms. The thermal hydraulics for boiling channels are <span class="hlt">modeled</span> and coupled with neutron kinetics to analyze the nonlinear dynamics of the closed-loop system. The <span class="hlt">model</span> uses point kinetics to study core-wide oscillations, and it couples two time-domain calculations, for the fundamental and first harmonic modes, to study out-of-phase oscillations. The channel coolant flow dynamics is dominant in the power fluctuations observed by in-core nuclear instrumentation, and additive white noise is added to the solution for the channel flow in the thermal-hydraulic <span class="hlt">model</span> to generate a noisy power time series. Autoregressive <span class="hlt">analysis</span> performed with the computer-generated series agrees with the <span class="hlt">stability</span> properties of the boiling channel. The operating conditions of the channel can be modified to accommodate a wide range of <span class="hlt">stability</span> conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cecenas-Falcon, Miguel; Edwards, Robert M. [Pennsylvania State University (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-07-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780023101&hterms=Charles&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3D%2528Charles%2BV%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of <span class="hlt">stability</span> contributions of high dihedral V-tails</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An investigation was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of four analytical methods (empirical, modified empirical, vortex-lattice, and an inviscid, three dimensional, potential flow, wing body program) to estimate the lateral and longitudinal static <span class="hlt">stability</span> characteristics of an isolated V-tail wind tunnel <span class="hlt">model</span>. The experimental tests were conducted in the V/STOL tunnel at a Mach number of 0.18. Angle-of-attack data were obtained from -12 deg to 8 deg at 0 deg sideslip. Sideslip sweeps from -5 deg to 10 deg were made at angles of attack of 4 deg, 0 deg and -4 deg. The V-tail dihedral angles were 45 deg, 50 deg, 55 deg, and 60 deg.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Freeman, C. E.; Yeager, W. T., Jr.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ee.technion.ac.il/~adam/GRADUATES/048962/DaiPapers/dai95b.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">STABILITY</span> OF OPEN MULTICLASS NETWORKS VIA FLUID <span class="hlt">MODELS</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">models</span>, scheduling, performance <span class="hlt">analysis</span>, Harris recurrence, heavy traffic, Brownian <span class="hlt">models</span>. 1 seems bounded. Figure 2 plots the queue length processes at stations 1 and 2 for system (M) in the first 10, 000 units of simulation time. The plot again suggests that the total queue length cycles</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shwartz, Adam</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010APS..DFD.HU002K"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Superhydrophobic Friction Reduction Polymeric Microchannels</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Superhydrophobic surfaces are surfaces where fluid contact angle is larger than 150^o. Superhydrophobic states which allow water droplets to fall off at low sliding angles are termed as Cassie state. It is widely known that drag/friction reduction is closely related to liquid under Cassie state, and studies have been widely performed to achieve such effects. Our research goal is to develop superhydrophobic microfluidic channels with trenches on the side walls and observe the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the air pockets formed within these trenches. We have prepared PDMS(poly-dimethylsiloxane) substrates with different trench aspect ratio of 1:1, 1:2, 1:500 and 1:3000. As the aspect ratio of the trench decreases, the pressure in the air pockets tends to resist wetting. However, once penetration of the water into the air pocket occurred, the shallow trenches were wetted in a rapid fashion while the deep trenches were wetted at a slower rate. A compression <span class="hlt">model</span> of the air pockets as a function of pressure difference and volume change of the air pockets was also developed. In the theoretical <span class="hlt">model</span>, the air in the pockets is assumed to be an ideal gas. This <span class="hlt">model</span> was compared and validated against the experimental results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Tae Jin; Hidrovo, Carlos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.G54A..01P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Accuracy of SLR Observations and <span class="hlt">Stability</span> of its <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> Products</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is currently the only space technique that determines the origin of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) and contributing in equal parts with VLBI, to the definition of its scale. The ITRS requires the origin of its realization, the ITRF, to coincide with the center of mass of the Earth system --the geocenter. Earth orbiting satellites describe orbits centered at the geocenter, so all satellite techniques would in principle sense its location and provide access to it. What singles out SLR is the fact that it is an absolute and very accurate technique compared to those using RF technologies (at present). Despite these theoretical attributes, SLR in practice is far from perfect. There are <span class="hlt">modeling</span> issues that affect its precision and accuracy, and practical issues (primarily the current tracking network) that are the main cause of its long-term <span class="hlt">stability</span>. Until we have deployed the next generation tracking networks that will support the goals set forth by the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS), we will have to cope with these facts and understand the limitations that they impose and how they affect the various ITRS realizations. We will discuss the current system limitations and the ways that the SLR community is addressing these at present. This will include improved <span class="hlt">modeling</span> of the measurements, the dynamics of the target satellites, the geophysical <span class="hlt">models</span> describing the station position at measurement times and the role of the limited SLR ground and space segments deployed today.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pavlis, E. C.; Kuzmicz-Cieslak, M.; Wolford, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21432319"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a soft-wall <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate the <span class="hlt">stability</span> and fluctuations of a soft-wall <span class="hlt">model</span> that has an asymptotically anti-de Sitter metric and a scalar field that has an asymptotically power-law dependence in the conformal coordinate. By imposing UV boundary conditions, the soft-wall mass scale can be fixed to be near the TeV scale and causes the radion to no longer be massless. A hierarchy between the weak scale and the Planck scale can be generated for various particle spectrum behavior, although natural values only occur for a gravitational sector containing scalar fields that act like unparticles. In addition, if bulk standard <span class="hlt">model</span> fields have nonstandard couplings to the gravitational sector, then a discrete particle spectrum can be realized in the nongravitational sector. This allows for the possibility of an unparticle solution to the hierarchy problem.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gherghetta, T.; Setzer, N. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria, 3010 (Australia)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFM.H42B..02G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coupling a Soil Moisture <span class="hlt">Model</span> and a Slope <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Model</span> to Predict Landslides in the Himalayas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Landsliding of the hillslope regolith is an important source of sediment to the fluvial network in the unglaciated portions of the Himalayas of Nepal. These landslides can produce abrupt increases of up to 3 orders of magnitude in the fluvial sediment load in less than a day. An <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of 3 yr of daily sediment load and daily rainfall data defines a relationship between monsoonal rainfall and the triggering of landslides in the Annapurna region of Nepal. Two distinct rainfall thresholds, a seasonal accumulation and a daily total, must be overcome before landslides are initiated. To explore the geomorphological controls on these thresholds, we develop a slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">model</span>, driven by daily rainfall data, which accounts for changes in regolith moisture. The pattern of rainfall thresholds predicted by the <span class="hlt">model</span> is similar to the field data, including the decrease in the daily rainfall threshold as the seasonal rainfall accumulation increases. Results from the <span class="hlt">model</span> suggest that, for a given hillslope, regolith thickness determines the seasonal rainfall necessary for failure, whereas slope angle controls the daily rainfall required for failure. The magnitude and frequency of predicted landslides are compared to data from other regions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gabet, E. J.; Burbank, D. W.; Putkonen, J. K.; Pratt-Sitaula, B. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://globalchange.mit.edu/./files/document/MITJPSPGC_Reprint05-2.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermohaline Circulation <span class="hlt">Stability</span>: A Box <span class="hlt">Model</span> Study. Part I: Uncoupled <span class="hlt">Model</span> VALERIO LUCARINI* AND PETER H. STONE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thermohaline Circulation <span class="hlt">Stability</span>: A Box <span class="hlt">Model</span> Study. Part I: Uncoupled <span class="hlt">Model</span> VALERIO LUCARINI and essentially affects the surface waters, and the thermohaline circulation (THC), which is characterized</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25068534"> <span id="translatedtitle">Towards understanding the <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> process in vermicomposting using PARAFAC <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of fluorescence spectra.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this study, fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) combined with parallel factor <span class="hlt">analysis</span> (PARAFAC) was employed to trace the behavior of water extractable organic matter and assess the <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> process during vermicomposting of sewage sludge and cattle dung. Experiments using different mixing ratios of sewage sludge and cattle dung were conducted using Eisenia fetida. The results showed that vermicomposting reduced the DOC, DOC/DON ratio and ammonia, while increased the nitrate content. A three-component <span class="hlt">model</span> containing two humic-like materials (components 1 and 2) and a protein-like material (component 3) was successfully developed using PARAFAC <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. Moreover, the initial waste composition had a significant effect on the distribution of each component and the addition of cattle dung improved the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of sewage sludge in vermicomposting. The PARAFAC results also indicated that protein-like materials were degraded and humic acid-like compounds were evolved during vermicomposting. Pearson correlation <span class="hlt">analysis</span> showed that components 2 and 3 are more suitable to assess vermicompost maturity than component 1. In all, EEM-PARAFAC can be used to track organic transformation and assess biological <span class="hlt">stability</span> during the vermicomposting process. PMID:25068534</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lv, Baoyi; Xing, Meiyan; Zhao, Chunhui; Yang, Jian; Xiang, Liang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14617860"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Octanhydroxamate of iron: synthesis, <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and investigation of <span class="hlt">stability</span>].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hydroxamic acids are found as chelates in plants, as metabolites of bacteria and funges. Some aerobic microorganisms synthesize hydroxamic acids, which transmit iron from environment to the cells of the plants. Fourteen hydroxamic acids were synthesized and their interaction with iron (II and III) was investigated. The purpose of this investigation was synthesis of hydroxamic acids, creation of stable iron chelate with one of these acids, preparation of the methods of <span class="hlt">analysis</span>, investigation of the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of chelate and application for prophylaxis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. We used octanhydroxamic acid for creation of chelate with iron. The synthesis of this acid was the cheapest and compound with iron appeared stable. Iron chelates after acid hydrolysis were analyzed by quantity of iron (9.8-12.3%). We used complexometric titration method with dinatrium salt of ethylendiamintetraacetic acid without indication for quantitative <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. Iron (II) chelate is less stable, therefore, we used Fe (III) octanhydroxamate for further investigations. Preliminary trials with rabbits confirm rapid assimilation of iron (III) chelate from gastrointestinal tract and activation of erythropoiesis. PMID:14617860</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Palma, Palma; Sapragoniene, Marija; Stankevicius, Antanas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012RCD....17..385K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonlinear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of a regular vortex pentagon outside a circle</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A nonlinear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the stationary rotation of a system of five identical point vortices lying uniformly on a circle of radius R 0 outside a circular domain of radius R is performed. The problem is reduced to the problem of <span class="hlt">stability</span> of an equilibrium position of a Hamiltonian system with a cyclic variable. The <span class="hlt">stability</span> of stationary motion is interpreted as Routh <span class="hlt">stability</span>. Conditions for <span class="hlt">stability</span>, formal <span class="hlt">stability</span> and instability are obtained depending on the values of the parameter q = R 2/ R {0/2}.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kurakin, Leonid G.; Ostrovskaya, Irina V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4177640"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">Stability</span> Indicating Capillary Electrophoresis Method for <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Buserelin</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A simple and rapid <span class="hlt">stability</span> indicating method based on capillary zone electrophoresis has been developed and validated for the <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of buserelin (BUS). The best separations were achieved by using a bare fused silica capillary (75 ?m i.d.; 65.5 cm total, 57.0 cm effective length), phosphate buffer (pH = 3.00; 26.4 mM), at 35 C. The sample was hydrodynamically injected at 50 mbar for 5 seconds; the applied voltage was 30 kV and detection was carried out by UV-absorbance at 200 nm. Method validation resulted in the following figures of merit : the method was linear in the concentration range between 0.781 and 500 ?g/mL (linear regression coefficient 0.9996), accuracy was between 99.3% and 100.9%, intra assay precision was between 0.3% and 1.0% and intermediate precision was between 1.0% and 2.1%. Evaluation of the specificity of the method showed no interference between excipients or products of force degradation and BUS. Under the selected conditions, separation of BUS and its degradation products was completed in less than 10 min, and BUS could be quantified after different stress conditions without any interference. The results enabled the conclusion that under thermal stress upon exposure to 90 C BUS is degraded by first order kinetics. It was demonstrated that the method can be applied as a rapid and easy to use method for quantification and <span class="hlt">stability</span> testing of BUS in biopharmaceutical formulations in quality control laboratories.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tamizi, Elnaz; Kenndler, Ernst; Jouyban, Abolghasem</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21607968"> <span id="translatedtitle">Proton <span class="hlt">stability</span> and light Z' inspired by string derived <span class="hlt">models</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Proton <span class="hlt">stability</span> is one of the most perplexing puzzles in particle physics. While the renormalizable standard <span class="hlt">model</span> forbids proton decay mediating operators due to accidental global symmetries, many of its extensions introduce such dimension four, five and six operators. Furthermore, it is, in general, expected that quantum gravity only respects local gauge, or discreet, symmetries. String theory provides the arena to study particle physics in a consistent framework of perturbative quantum gravity. An appealing proposition, in this context, is that the dangerous operators are suppressed by an Abelian gauge symmetry, which is broken near the TeV scale. A viable U(1) symmetry should also be anomaly free, be family universal, and allow the generation of fermion masses via the Higgs mechanism. We discuss such U(1) symmetries that arise in quasirealistic free fermionic heterotic-string derived <span class="hlt">models</span>. Ensuring that the U(1) symmetry is anomaly free at the low scale requires that the standard <span class="hlt">model</span> spectrum is augmented by additional states that are compatible with the charge assignments in the string <span class="hlt">models</span>. We construct such string-inspired <span class="hlt">models</span> and discuss some of their phenomenological implications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Faraggi, Alon E.; Mehta, Viraf M. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 7ZL (United Kingdom)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AIPC.1168..953M"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Note on Local <span class="hlt">Stability</span> Conditions for Two Types of Monetary <span class="hlt">Models</span> with Recursive Utility</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This note explores local <span class="hlt">stability</span> conditions for money-in-utility-function (MIUF) and transaction-costs (TC) <span class="hlt">models</span> with recursive utility. Although Chen et al. [Chen, B.-L., M. Hsu, and C.-H. Lin, 2008, Inflation and growth: impatience and a qualitative equivalent, Journal of Money, Credit, and Banking, Vol. 40, No. 6, 1310-1323] investigated the relationship between inflation and growth in MIUF and TC <span class="hlt">models</span> with recursive utility, they conducted only a comparative static <span class="hlt">analysis</span> in a steady state. By establishing sufficient conditions for local <span class="hlt">stability</span>, this note proves that impatience should be increasing in consumption and real balances. Increasing impatience, although less plausible from an empirical point of view, receives more support from a theoretical viewpoint.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Miyazaki, Kenji; Utsunomiya, Hitoshi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/460454"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analytical mass leaching <span class="hlt">model</span> for contaminated soil and soil <span class="hlt">stabilized</span> waste</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An analytical <span class="hlt">model</span> for evaluating mass leaching from contaminated soil or soil <span class="hlt">stabilized</span> waste is presented. The <span class="hlt">model</span> is based on mass transport due to advection, dispersion, and retardation and can be used to evaluate the suitability and/or efficiency of soil washing solutions based on the results of column leaching studies. The <span class="hlt">model</span> differs from more traditional <span class="hlt">models</span> for column leaching studies in that the <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is based on the cumulative mass of leachate instead of leachate concentration. A cumulative mass basis for leaching eliminates the requirement for determination of instantaneous effluent concentrations in the more traditional column leaching approach thereby allowing for the collection of relatively large effluent volumes. The cumulative masses of three heavy metals -- Cd, Pb, and Zn -- leached from two specimens of soil mixed with fly ash are analyzed with the mass leaching <span class="hlt">model</span> to illustrate application and limitation of the <span class="hlt">model</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shackelford, C.D. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Glade, M.J. [Parsons Engineering Science, Inc., Denver, CO (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/959096"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of cavern <span class="hlt">stability</span> at the West Hackberry SPR site.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report presents computational analyses that simulate the structural response of caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) West Hackberry site. The cavern field comprises 22 caverns. Five caverns (6, 7, 8, 9, 11) were acquired from industry and have unusual shapes and a history dating back to 1946. The other 17 caverns (101-117) were leached according to SPR standards in the mid-1980s and have tall cylindrical shapes. The history of the caverns and their shapes are simulated in a three-dimensional geomechanics <span class="hlt">model</span> of the site that predicts deformations, strains, and stresses. Future leaching scenarios corresponding to oil drawdowns using fresh water are also simulated by increasing the volume of the caverns. Cavern pressures are varied in the <span class="hlt">model</span> to capture operational practices in the field. The results of the finite element <span class="hlt">model</span> are interpreted to provide information on the current and future status of subsidence, well integrity, and cavern <span class="hlt">stability</span>. The most significant results in this report are relevant to Cavern 6. The cavern is shaped like a bowl with a large ceiling span and is in close proximity to Cavern 9. The analyses predict tensile stresses at the edge of the ceiling during repressuization of Cavern 6 following workover conditions. During a workover the cavern is at low pressure to service a well. The wellhead pressures are atmospheric. When the workover is complete, the cavern is repressurized. The resulting elastic stresses are sufficient to cause tension around the edge of the large ceiling span. With time, these stresses relax to a compressive state because of salt creep. However, the potential for salt fracture and propagation exists, particularly towards Cavern 9. With only 200 ft of salt between the caverns, the operational consequences must be examined if the two caverns become connected. A critical time may be during a workover of Cavern 9 in part because of the operational vulnerabilities, but also because dilatant damage is predicted under the ledge that forms the lower lobe in the cavern. The remaining caverns have no significant issues regarding cavern <span class="hlt">stability</span> and may be safely enlarged during subsequent oil drawdowns. Predicted well strains and subsidence are significant and consequently future remedial actions may be necessary. These predicted well strains certainly suggest appropriate monitoring through a well-logging program. Subsidence is currently being monitored.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ehgartner, Brian L.; Sobolik, Steven Ronald</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JNS....23.1073R"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> Switches in a Host-Pathogen <span class="hlt">Model</span> as the Length of a Time Delay Increases</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The destabilising effects of a time delay in mathematical <span class="hlt">models</span> are well known. However, delays are not necessarily destabilising. In this paper, we explore an example of a biological system where a time delay can be both stabilising and destabilising. This example is a host-pathogen <span class="hlt">model</span>, incorporating density-dependent prophylaxis (DDP). DDP describes when individual hosts invest more in immunity when population densities are high, due to the increased risk of infection in crowded conditions. In this system, as the delay length increases, there are a finite number of switches between stable and unstable behaviour. These <span class="hlt">stability</span> switches are demonstrated and characterised using a combination of numerical methods and <span class="hlt">analysis</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reynolds, Jennifer J. H.; Sherratt, Jonathan A.; White, Andrew</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22060177"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> of haematological parameters and its relevance on the athlete's biological passport <span class="hlt">model</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">stability</span> of haematological parameters is crucial to guarantee accurate and reliable data for implementing and interpreting the athlete's biological passport (ABP). In this <span class="hlt">model</span>, the values of haemoglobin, reticulocytes and out-of-doping period (OFF)-score (Hb-60?Ret) are used to monitor the possible variations of those parameters, and also to compare the thresholds developed by the statistical <span class="hlt">model</span> for the single athlete on the basis of its personal values and the variance of parameters in the modal group. Nevertheless, a critical review of the current scientific literature dealing with the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the haematological parameters included in the ABP programme, and which are used for evaluating the probability of anomalies in the athlete's profile, is currently lacking. In addition, we collected information from published studies, in order to supply a useful, practical and updated review to sports physicians and haematologists. There are some parameters that are highly stable, such as haemoglobin and erythrocytes (red blood cells [RBCs]), whereas others, (e.g. reticulocytes, mean RBC volume and haematocrit) appear less stable. Regardless of the methodology, the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of haematological parameters is improved by sample refrigeration. The <span class="hlt">stability</span> of all parameters is highly affected from high storage temperatures, whereas the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of RBCs and haematocrit is affected by initial freezing followed by refrigeration. Transport and rotation of tubes do not substantially influence any haematological parameter except for reticulocytes. In all the studies we reviewed that used Sysmex instrumentation, which is recommended for ABP measurements, <span class="hlt">stability</span> was shown for 72 hours at 4 C for haemoglobin, RBCs and mean curpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC); up to 48 hours for reticulocytes; and up to 24 hours for haematocrit. In one study, Sysmex instrumentation shows <span class="hlt">stability</span> extended up to 72 hours at 4 C for all the parameters. There are significant differences among methods and instruments: Siemens Advia shows lower <span class="hlt">stability</span> than Sysmex as regards to reticulocytes. However, the limit of 36 hours from blood collection to <span class="hlt">analysis</span> as recommended by ABP scientists is reasonable to guarantee analytical quality, when samples are transported at 4 C and are accompanied by a certified steadiness of this temperature. There are some parameters that are highly stable, such as haemoglobin and RBCs; whereas others, such as reticulocytes, mean cell volume and haematocrit are more unstable. The <span class="hlt">stability</span> of haematological parameters might be improved independently from the analytical methodology, by refrigeration of the specimens. PMID:22060177</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lombardi, Giovanni; Lanteri, Patrizia; Colombini, Alessandra; Lippi, Giuseppe; Banfi, Giuseppe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ChPhB..22i8401Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamical investigation and parameter <span class="hlt">stability</span> region <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of a flywheel energy storage system in charging mode</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, the dynamic behavior <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the electromechanical coupling characteristics of a flywheel energy storage system (FESS) with a permanent magnet (PM) brushless direct-current (DC) motor (BLDCM) is studied. The Hopf bifurcation theory and nonlinear methods are used to investigate the generation process and mechanism of the coupled dynamic behavior for the average current controlled FESS in the charging mode. First, the universal nonlinear dynamic <span class="hlt">model</span> of the FESS based on the BLDCM is derived. Then, for a 0.01 kWh/1.6 kW FESS platform in the Key Laboratory of the Smart Grid at Tianjin University, the phase trajectory of the FESS from a stable state towards chaos is presented using numerical and stroboscopic methods, and all dynamic behaviors of the system in this process are captured. The characteristics of the low-frequency oscillation and the mechanism of the Hopf bifurcation are investigated based on the Routh <span class="hlt">stability</span> criterion and nonlinear dynamic theory. It is shown that the Hopf bifurcation is directly due to the loss of control over the inductor current, which is caused by the system control parameters exceeding certain ranges. This coupling nonlinear process of the FESS affects the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the motor running and the efficiency of energy transfer. In this paper, we investigate into the effects of control parameter change on the <span class="hlt">stability</span> and the <span class="hlt">stability</span> regions of these parameters based on the averaged-<span class="hlt">model</span> approach. Furthermore, the effect of the quantization error in the digital control system is considered to modify the <span class="hlt">stability</span> regions of the control parameters. Finally, these theoretical results are verified through platform experiments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Wei-Ya; Li, Yong-Li; Chang, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Nan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1014152"> <span id="translatedtitle">SDI CFD <span class="hlt">MODELING</span> <span class="hlt">ANALYSIS</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Organization requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) develop a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method to mix and blend the miscible contents of the blend tanks to ensure the contents are properly blended before they are transferred from the blend tank; such as, Tank 50H, to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) feed tank. The work described here consists of two <span class="hlt">modeling</span> areas. They are the mixing <span class="hlt">modeling</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> during miscible liquid blending operation, and the flow pattern <span class="hlt">analysis</span> during transfer operation of the blended liquid. The transient CFD governing equations consisting of three momentum equations, one mass balance, two turbulence transport equations for kinetic energy and dissipation rate, and one species transport were solved by an iterative technique until the species concentrations of tank fluid were in equilibrium. The steady-state flow solutions for the entire tank fluid were used for flow pattern <span class="hlt">analysis</span>, for velocity scaling <span class="hlt">analysis</span>, and the initial conditions for transient blending calculations. A series of the <span class="hlt">modeling</span> calculations were performed to estimate the blending times for various jet flow conditions, and to investigate the impact of the cooling coils on the blending time of the tank contents. The <span class="hlt">modeling</span> results were benchmarked against the pilot scale test results. All of the flow and mixing <span class="hlt">models</span> were performed with the nozzles installed at the mid-elevation, and parallel to the tank wall. From the CFD <span class="hlt">modeling</span> calculations, the main results are summarized as follows: (1) The benchmark analyses for the CFD flow velocity and blending <span class="hlt">models</span> demonstrate their consistency with Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL) and literature test results in terms of local velocity measurements and experimental observations. Thus, an application of the established criterion to SRS full scale tank will provide a better, physically-based estimate of the required mixing time, and elevation of transfer pump for minimum sludge disturbance. (2) An empirical equation for a tank with no cooling coils agrees reasonably with the current <span class="hlt">modeling</span> results for the dual jet. (3) From the sensitivity study of the cooling coils, it was found that the tank mixing time for the coiled tank was about two times longer than that of the tank fluid with no coils under the 1/10th scale, while the coiled tank required only 50% longer than the one without coils under the full scale Tank 50H. In addition, the time difference is reduced when the pumping U{sub o}d{sub o} value is increased for a given tank. (4) The blending time for T-shape dual jet pump is about 20% longer than that of 15{sup o} upward V-shape pump under the 1/10th pilot-scale tank, while the time difference between the two pumps is about 12% for the full-scale Tank 50H. These results are consistent with the literature information. (5) A transfer pump with a solid-plate suction screen operating at 130 gpm can be located 9.5 inches above settled sludge for 2 in screen height in a 85 ft waste tank without disturbing any sludge. Detailed results are summarized in Table 13. Final pump performance calculations were made by using the established CW pump design, and operating conditions to satisfy the two requirements of minimum sludge disturbance, and adequate blending of tank contents. The final calculation results show that the blending times for the coiled and uncoiled tanks coupled with the CW pump design are 159 and 83 minutes, respectively. All the results are provided in Table 16.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-05-05</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1404.0681v2"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stabilizing</span> Electroweak Vacuum in a Vector-like Fermion <span class="hlt">Model</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To avoid possible electroweak vacuum instability in the vector-like fermion <span class="hlt">model</span>, we introduce a new singlet scalar to the <span class="hlt">model</span>, which couples to the vector-like fermion, and also mixes with the Higgs boson after spontaneous symmetry breaking. We investigate the vector-like fermion predominantly coupled to the third generation quarks, and its mass is generated from the vacuum expectation value of the new scalar field in the <span class="hlt">model</span>. In this setup, as running towards high energies, the new scalar provides positive contribution to the running of the higgs quartic coupling, and the matching on the scale of the scalar mass gives rise to a threshod effect that lifts up the higgs quartic coupling strength. The two effects help <span class="hlt">stabilize</span> the electroweak vacuum of the Higgs potential. Therefore, this setup could evade possible vacuum instability in the vector-like fermion <span class="hlt">model</span>. We show that a large range of parameter space is allowed to have both stable Higgs vacuum and perturbativity of all the running couplings, up to the Planck scale. We also examine the experimental constraints from the electroweak precision observables such as oblique corrections S, T and non-oblique corrections to the Zbb coupling, the Higgs coupling precision measurements, and the current LHC direct searches.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ming-Lei Xiao; Jiang-Hao Yu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1982JCoPh..48..200B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Numerical Boundary Conditions and Implicit Difference Approximations for Hyperbolic Equations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Implicit noniterative finite-difference schemes have recently been developed by several authors for multidimensional systems of nonlinear hyperbolic partial differential equations. When applied to linear <span class="hlt">model</span> equations with periodic boundary conditions those schemes are unconditionally stable (A-stable). As applied in practice the algorithms often face a severe time-step restriction. A major source of the difficulty is the treatment of the numerical boundary conditions. One conjecture has been that unconditional <span class="hlt">stability</span> requires implicit numerical boundary conditions. An apparent counterexample was the space-time extrapolation considered by Gustafsson, Kreiss, and Sundstrom. In this paper we examine space (implicit) and space-time (explicit) extrapolation using normal mode <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for a finite and infinite number of spatial mesh intervals. The results indicate that for unconditional <span class="hlt">stability</span> with a finite number of spatial mesh intervals the numerical boundary conditions must be implicit.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Beam, R. M.; Warming, R. F.; Yee, H. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/43131578"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> of nonrotating stellar systems. I - Oblate shell-orbit <span class="hlt">models</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">stability</span> of perhaps the simplest family of nonspherical stellar system <span class="hlt">models</span> with realistic density profiles, the oblate 'shell-orbit' <span class="hlt">models</span> first described by Bishop (1987), is investigated. The axisymmetric <span class="hlt">stability</span> of these <span class="hlt">models</span> is considered first by presenting an approximate criterion for short-wavelength <span class="hlt">stability</span> and then by N-body integration. It is found that <span class="hlt">models</span> flatter than about E6 are axisymmetrically</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">David Merritt; Massimo Stiavelli</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.columbia.edu/cu/lweb/eresources/archives/rbml/urban/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Joseph Urban Stage Design <span class="hlt">Models</span> & Documents <span class="hlt">Stabilization</span> & Access Project</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Born in Vienna in 1872, Joseph Urban came to the United States in 1912 with thousands of other immigrants. One of the distinguishing elements of Urban's life was that he would go on to design over 500 stage sets for more than 168 productions. By the time of his death in 1933, he had served as the art director of the Boston Opera, stage designer for the Metropolitan Opera, and had been in the employ of Florenz Ziegfeld, working on his famed Follies. This lovely online collection created by the Columbia University Libraries' Preservation Division brings together many items that document his work for a number of these organizations. Within the collection, visitors will find images of 61 three-dimensional stage <span class="hlt">models</span>, watercolor renderings, libretti, and other such materials. The site also contains a very lengthy and erudite series of essays on Urban's works, along with detailed information about how the collection was preserved and <span class="hlt">stabilized</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5350672"> <span id="translatedtitle">Boiling water reactor <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> in the time domain</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Boiling water nuclear reactors may experience density wave instabilities. These instabilities cause the density, and consequently the mass flow rate, to oscillate in the shrouded fuel bundles. This effect causes the nuclear power generation to oscillate due to the tight coupling of flow to power, especially under gravity-driven circulation. In order to predict the amplitude of the power oscillation, a time domain transient <span class="hlt">analysis</span> tool may be employed. The <span class="hlt">modeling</span> tool must have sufficient hydrodynamic detail to <span class="hlt">model</span> natural circulation in two-phase flow as well as the coupled nuclear feedback. TRAC/BF1 is a <span class="hlt">modeling</span> code with such capabilities. A dynamic system <span class="hlt">model</span> has been developed for a typical boiling water reactor. Using this tool it has been demonstrated that density waxes may be <span class="hlt">modeled</span> in this fashion and that their resultant hydrodynamic and nuclear behavior correspond well to simple theory. Several cases have been analyzed using this <span class="hlt">model</span>, the goal being to determine the coupling between the channel hydrodynamics and the nuclear power. From that study it has been concluded that two-phase friction controls the extent of the oscillation and that the existing conventional methodologies of implementing two-phase friction into <span class="hlt">analysis</span> codes of this type can lead to significant deviation in results from case to case. It has also been determined that higher dimensional nuclear feedback <span class="hlt">models</span> reduce the extent of the oscillation. It has also been confirmed from a nonlinear dynamic standpoint that the birth of this oscillation may be described as a Hopf Bifurcation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Borkowski, J.A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/489297"> <span id="translatedtitle">Crack <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of low alloy steel primary coolant pipe</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">At present, cast duplex stainless steel has been used for the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan and joints of dissimilar material have been applied for welding to reactor vessels and steam generators. For the primary coolant piping of the next APWR plants, application of low alloy steel that results in designing main loops with the same material is being studied. It means that there is no need to weld low alloy steel with stainless steel and that makes it possible to reduce the welding length. Attenuation of Ultra Sonic Wave Intensity is lower for low alloy steel than for stainless steel and they have advantageous inspection characteristics. In addition to that, the thermal expansion rate is smaller for low alloy steel than for stainless steel. In consideration of the above features of low alloy steel, the overall reliability of primary coolant piping is expected to be improved. Therefore, for the evaluation of crack <span class="hlt">stability</span> of low alloy steel piping to be applied for primary loops, elastic-plastic future mechanics <span class="hlt">analysis</span> was performed by means of a three-dimensioned FEM. The evaluation results for the low alloy steel pipings show that cracks will not grow into unstable fractures under maximum design load conditions, even when such a circumferential crack is assumed to be 6 times the size of the wall thickness.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tanaka, T.; Kameyama, M. [Kansai Electric Power Company, Osaka (Japan); Urabe, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago (Japan)] [and others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25147838"> <span id="translatedtitle">Slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> using limit equilibrium method in nonlinear criterion.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span>, the limit equilibrium method is usually used to calculate the safety factor of slope based on Mohr-Coulomb criterion. However, Mohr-Coulomb criterion is restricted to the description of rock mass. To overcome its shortcomings, this paper combined Hoek-Brown criterion and limit equilibrium method and proposed an equation for calculating the safety factor of slope with limit equilibrium method in Hoek-Brown criterion through equivalent cohesive strength and the friction angle. Moreover, this paper investigates the impact of Hoek-Brown parameters on the safety factor of slope, which reveals that there is linear relation between equivalent cohesive strength and weakening factor D. However, there are nonlinear relations between equivalent cohesive strength and Geological Strength Index (GSI), the uniaxial compressive strength of intact rock ? ci , and the parameter of intact rock m i . There is nonlinear relation between the friction angle and all Hoek-Brown parameters. With the increase of D, the safety factor of slope F decreases linearly; with the increase of GSI, F increases nonlinearly; when ? ci is relatively small, the relation between F and ? ci is nonlinear, but when ? ci is relatively large, the relation is linear; with the increase of m i , F decreases first and then increases. PMID:25147838</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lin, Hang; Zhong, Wenwen; Xiong, Wei; Tang, Wenyu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930005608&hterms=geodesic+ellipse&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dgeodesic%2Bellipse"> <span id="translatedtitle">BLSTA: A boundary layer code for <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A computer program is developed to solve the compressible, laminar boundary-layer equations for two-dimensional flow, axisymmetric flow, and quasi-three-dimensional flows including the flow along the plane of symmetry, flow along the leading-edge attachment line, and swept-wing flows with a conical flow approximation. The finite-difference numerical procedure used to solve the governing equations is second-order accurate. The flow over a wide range of speed, from subsonic to hypersonic speed with perfect gas assumption, can be calculated. Various wall boundary conditions, such as wall suction or blowing and hot or cold walls, can be applied. The results indicate that this boundary-layer code gives velocity and temperature profiles which are accurate, smooth, and continuous through the first and second normal derivatives. The code presented herein can be coupled with a <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> code and used to predict the onset of the boundary-layer transition which enables the assessment of the laminar flow control techniques. A user's manual is also included.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wie, Yong-Sun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1310.4202v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Probability of Vacuum <span class="hlt">Stability</span> in Type IIB Multi-Khler Moduli <span class="hlt">Models</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the probability that all eigenvalues of the moduli mass matrix at extremal points are positive in concrete multi-K\\"ahler moduli <span class="hlt">models</span> of type IIB string theory compactifications in the large volume regime. Our <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is motivated by the open question if vacua which are uplifted to de Sitter remain stable. We derive a simple analytical condition for the mass matrix to be positive definite, and estimate the corresponding probability in a supersymmetric moduli <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> <span class="hlt">model</span> along the lines of KKLT and a non-supersymmetric Large Volume Scenario type of <span class="hlt">model</span>, given a reasonable range of compactification parameters. Under identical conditions, the probability for the supersymmetric <span class="hlt">model</span> is moderately higher than that of the Large Volume Scenario type <span class="hlt">model</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Markus Rummel; Yoske Sumitomo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JHEP...12..003S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Probability of vacuum <span class="hlt">stability</span> in type IIB multi-Khler moduli <span class="hlt">models</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the probability that all eigenvalues of the moduli mass matrix at extremal points are positive in concrete multi-Khler moduli <span class="hlt">models</span> of type IIB string theory compactifications in the large volume regime. Our <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is motivated by the open question if vacua which are uplifted to de Sitter remain stable. We derive a simple analytical condition for the mass matrix to be positive definite, and estimate the corresponding probability in a supersymmetric moduli <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> <span class="hlt">model</span> along the lines of KKLT and a non-supersymmetric Large Volume Scenario type of <span class="hlt">model</span>, given a reasonable range of compactification parameters. Under identical conditions, the probability for the supersymmetric <span class="hlt">model</span> is moderately higher than that of the Large Volume Scenario type <span class="hlt">model</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sumitomo, Yoske; Rummel, Markus</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011SPIE.7752E..0HW"> <span id="translatedtitle">The study of landscape <span class="hlt">stability</span> in Yuli County by principal component <span class="hlt">analysis</span> method based on RS and GIS technology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In order to evaluate quantitatively the landscape <span class="hlt">stability</span> of arid areas, a study area was selected in Yuli county of the middle and lower reaches of Tarim river. Remote sensing image data are the main data sources, the image data are processed by the support of RS and GIS technology. The study extracted 11 indices of landscape <span class="hlt">stability</span> by FRAGSTATS software, and the standard matrix of these indices data are got using Z-Score method, then the comprehensive evaluation <span class="hlt">model</span> of landscape <span class="hlt">stability</span> is constructed by principal component <span class="hlt">analysis</span> method. The study results showed that the range of comprehensive evaluation scores of Yuli's ecological landscape <span class="hlt">stability</span> is 1.736, which indicated there is a great variation in ecological landscape <span class="hlt">stability</span> of study area. The <span class="hlt">stability</span> declines as the following order: forest land - water area- grass land- cultivated land - buildup land -unused land. The landscape <span class="hlt">stability</span> is always the key scientific issues which should be solved urgently, the study on landscape <span class="hlt">stability</span> has important theoretical and practical significance.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, Qianfeng; Zhou, Kefa; Sun, Li; Chen, Limou; Ou, Yang; Li, Guangyu; Qin, Yanfang; Wang, Jinlin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001Prama..56..797N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Phase <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> in cinnarizine complexes using X-ray profile <span class="hlt">analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Characterization of cobalt(II), cadmium(II), copper(II) and tin(II) cinnarizine complexes have been carried out using conductivity, electronic spectra, infrared, nmr, thermogravimetric and X-ray analyses to establish the nature of phase <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> in these materials. Also, the intrinsic strain components present in these materials during the formation have been computed using wide-angle X-ray scattering <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. The variation of the crystallite shape ellipsoid in these materials has been discussed on the basis of Hosemann's paracrystalline <span class="hlt">model</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nagendrappa, G.; Urs, S. Subramanya Raj; Madhava, M. S.; Somashekar, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27460192"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of a Rectifier-Inverter Induction Motor Drive</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">stability</span> study of a rectifier-inverter induction motor drive system is performed by neglecting the harmonic content of the stator voltages and applying Nyquist <span class="hlt">stability</span> criterion to the small- displacement equations obtained by linearization about an operating point. This investigation reveals that system instability can occur over a wide speed range if the system parameters are improperly selected. It appears</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thomas Lipo; Paul Krause</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1969-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3804285"> <span id="translatedtitle">Genome-Wide <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Human MicroRNA <span class="hlt">Stability</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Increasing studies have shown that microRNA (miRNA) <span class="hlt">stability</span> plays important roles in physiology. However, the global picture of miRNA <span class="hlt">stability</span> remains largely unknown. Here, we had analyzed genome-wide miRNA <span class="hlt">stability</span> across 10 diverse cell types using miRNA arrays. We found that miRNA <span class="hlt">stability</span> shows high dynamics and diversity both within individual cells and across cell types. Strikingly, we observed a negative correlation between miRNA <span class="hlt">stability</span> and miRNA expression level, which is different from current findings on other biological molecules such as proteins and mRNAs that show positive and not negative correlations between <span class="hlt">stability</span> and expression level. This finding indicates that miRNA has a distinct action mode, which we called rapid production, rapid turnover; slow production, slow turnover. This mode further suggests that high expression miRNAs normally degrade fast and may endow the cell with special properties that facilitate cellular status-transition. Moreover, we revealed that the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of miRNAs is affected by cohorts of factors that include miRNA targets, transcription factors, nucleotide content, evolution, associated disease, and environmental factors. Together, our results provided an extensive description of the global landscape, dynamics, and distinct mode of human miRNA <span class="hlt">stability</span>, which provide help in investigating their functions in physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:24187663</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Yang; Li, Zhixin; Zhou, Shixin; Wen, Jinhua; Geng, Bin; Yang, Jichun; Cui, Qinghua</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50571587"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Discrete Time Delay Control for Nonlinear Systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents a solution to the long standing problem of the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of time delay control (TDC) for nonlinear systems. Ever since it was first introduced, TDC has rapidly drawn attentions owing to its unusually robust performance and yet its extraordinarily compact form. The existing <span class="hlt">stability</span> analyses have been made based on the assumption that the TDC is continuous</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Je Hyung Jung; Pyung-Hun Chang; Sang Hoon Kang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/14103"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Large-Scale Incompressible Flow Calculations on Massively Parallel Computers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A set of linear and nonlinear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> tools have been developed to analyze steady state incompressible flows in 3D geometries. The algorithms have been implemented to be scalable to hundreds of parallel processors. The linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> of steady state flows are determined by calculating the rightmost eigenvalues of the associated generalize eigenvalue problem. Nonlinear <span class="hlt">stability</span> is studied by bifurcation <span class="hlt">analysis</span> techniques. The boundaries between desirable and undesirable operating conditions are determined for buoyant flow in the rotating disk CVD reactor.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">LEHOUCQ,RICHARD B.; ROMERO,LOUIS; SALINGER,ANDREW G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-10-25</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2896709"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> of Ranked Gene Lists in Large Microarray <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> Studies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents an empirical study that aims to explain the relationship between the number of samples and <span class="hlt">stability</span> of different gene selection techniques for microarray datasets. Unlike other similar studies where number of genes in a ranked gene list is variable, this study uses an alternative approach where <span class="hlt">stability</span> is observed at different number of samples that are used for gene selection. Three different metrics of <span class="hlt">stability</span>, including a novel metric in bioinformatics, were used to estimate the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the ranked gene lists. Results of this study demonstrate that the univariate selection methods produce significantly more stable ranked gene lists than the multivariate selection methods used in this study. More specifically, thousands of samples are needed for these multivariate selection methods to achieve the same level of <span class="hlt">stability</span> any given univariate selection method can achieve with only hundreds. PMID:20625502</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stiglic, Gregor; Kokol, Peter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006APS..DPPBP1104G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Linear <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Free Surface Liquid Metal Flow</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the flow of a liquid metal on a planar surface in the presence of an external magnetic field. The objective is to account for the behavior encountered in a free surface MHD experiment at Princeton, but the <span class="hlt">model</span> has a range of astrophysical and industrial applications (see companion poster). This class of free surface flow exhibits two mechanisms of linear instability. In the so-called `soft' instability, a downstream propagating surface wave of large wavelength becomes mildly unstable. The second, `hard', instability is of the critical layer type and takes place at shorter wavelengths. Solving the eigenvalue problem posed by the coupled Orr-Sommerfeld and induction equations via a spectral method, we find that in the regime of relevance to the Princeton experiment (Reynolds number, magnetic Reynolds number and Hartmann number up to 10 ^ 5 , 10 ^ - 1 , and 10 ^ 3 , respectively) MHD effects suppress both types of instability. The soft instability is efficiently suppressed via resistive dissipation if the background magnetic field is normal to the basic flow. In contrast, the hard instability is strongly suppressed irrespective of the details of the background magnetic field configuration, even at moderate Hartmann numbers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Giannakis, D.; Rosner, R.; Fischer, P.; Ji, H.; Burin, M.; McMurtry, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4223625"> <span id="translatedtitle">Primary posterior <span class="hlt">stabilized</span> total knee arthroplasty: <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of different instrumentation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Intercondylar femoral bone removal during posterior <span class="hlt">stabilized</span> (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) makes many cruciate substituting implant designs less appealing than cruciate retaining implants. Bone stock conservation is considered fundamental in the prevision of future revision surgeries. The purpose of this study was to compare the quantity of intercondylar bone removable during PS housing preparation using three contemporary PS TKA instrumentations. Method We compared different box cutting jigs which were utilized for the PS housing of three popular PS knee prostheses. The bone removal area from every PS box cutting jig was three-dimensionally measured. Results Independently from the implant size, the cutting jig for a specific PS TKA always resected significantly less bone than the others: this difference was statistically significant, especially for small- to medium-sized total knee femoral components. Conclusion This study does not establish a clinical relevance of removing more or less bone at primary TKA, but suggests that if a PS design is indicated, it is preferable to select a <span class="hlt">model</span> which possibly resects less distal femoral bone. PMID:25037275</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60768840"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hazards <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Polycube <span class="hlt">Stabilization</span> Process</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A hazards <span class="hlt">analysis</span> was performed to identify and evaluate hazards associated with the <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> of plutonium-bearing polystyrene cubes and fragments (''polycubes''). This document describes the methodology and presents the results of the hazard <span class="hlt">analysis</span> performed. The Hazards and Operability Study (HazOp) technique was used to identify the hazards associated with the polycube <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> process.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/97/37/00/PDF/2013-192_hal.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">MULTI-SCALE <span class="hlt">ANALYSIS</span> OF WATER ALTERATION ON THE ROCKSLOPE <span class="hlt">STABILITY</span> FRAMEWORK</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">on the rock slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. The aim of this paper is the multi scale <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the chemical impact and will be presented. KEY WORDS: Water, chemical degradation, rock discontinuity, <span class="hlt">stability</span>. 1 INTRODUCTION Roads-Polish Colloquium of Soil and Rock Mechanics, Montpellier : France (2013)" #12;2 In addition of chemical reactions</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1440475"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lateral <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Hypersonic Vehicle under Pressure Fluctuation by Solving Mathieu Differential Equation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two recent test failures of Hypersonic Technology Vehicle 2 impose a strike to the increasingly growing enthusiasm, not only on the United States side. It is important to find out the exact failure reason, otherwise a solution is impossible. In this Note, we propose a potential failure reason from the perspective of lateral <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. We argue that the time variant pressure fluctuations, which are normally omitted in classical aircraft dynamics <span class="hlt">analysis</span>, could not be neglected in dynamic <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of hypersonic vehicles. To demonstrate the idea, a hypersonic <span class="hlt">model</span> is imagined in this work and its aerodynamic parameters are estimated using fundamental fluid principles. Pressure fluctuations are thereafter estimated by an empirical formula. A lateral dynamic equation is set up, taking those time variant fluctuations into account. The resulted equation is a Mathieu differential equation. Numerical solutions of this equation show that the inclusion of fluctuation terms generates more complicated dynamics ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wei, Qingkai</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014FlDyR..46f1401C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Vortex <span class="hlt">stability</span> in a multi-layer quasi-geostrophic <span class="hlt">model</span>: application to Mediterranean Water eddies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">stability</span> of circular vortices to normal mode perturbations is studied in a multi-layer quasi-geostrophic <span class="hlt">model</span>. The stratification is fitted on the Gulf of Cadiz where many Mediterranean Water (MW) eddies are generated. Observations of MW eddies are used to determine the parameters of the reference experiment; sensitivity tests are conducted around this basic case. The objective of the study is two-fold: (a) determine the growth rates and nonlinear evolutions of unstable perturbations for different three-dimensional (3D) velocity structures of the vortices, (b) check if the different structure of our idealized vortices, mimicking MW cyclones and anticyclones, can induce different <span class="hlt">stability</span> properties in a <span class="hlt">model</span> that conserves parity symmetry, and apply these results to observed MW eddies. The linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> reveals that, among many 3D distributions of velocity, the observed eddies are close to maximal <span class="hlt">stability</span>, with instability time scales longer than 100 days (these time scales would be less than 10 days for vertically more sheared eddies). The elliptical deformation is most unstable for realistic eddies (the antisymmetric one dominates for small eddies and the triangular one for large eddies); the antisymmetric mode is stronger for cyclones than for anticyclones. Nonlinear evolutions of eddies with radii of about 30 km, and elliptically perturbed, lead to their re-organization into 3D tripoles; smaller eddies are stable and larger eddies break into 3D dipoles. Horizontally more sheared eddies are more unstable and sustain more asymmetric instabilities. In summary, few differences were found between cyclone and anticyclone <span class="hlt">stability</span>, except for strong horizontal velocity shears.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Carton, Xavier; Sokolovskiy, Mikhail; Mnesguen, Claire; Aguiar, Ana; Meunier, Thomas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JHEP...08..098D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Higgs mass and vacuum <span class="hlt">stability</span> in the Standard <span class="hlt">Model</span> at NNLO</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the first complete next-to-next-to-leading order <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the Standard <span class="hlt">Model</span> Higgs potential. We computed the two-loop QCD and Yukawa corrections to the relation between the Higgs quartic coupling ( ?) and the Higgs mass ( M h ), reducing the theoretical uncertainty in the determination of the critical value of M h for vacuum <span class="hlt">stability</span> to 1 GeV. While ? at the Planck scale is remarkably close to zero, absolute <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the Higgs potential is excluded at 98 % C.L. for M h < 126 GeV. Possible consequences of the near vanishing of ? at the Planck scale, including speculations about the role of the Higgs field during inflation, are discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Degrassi, Giuseppe; Di Vita, Stefano; Elias-Mir, Joan; Espinosa, Jos R.; Giudice, Gian F.; Isidori, Gino; Strumia, Alessandro</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20050229353&hterms=operations+maintenance&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Doperations%2Bmaintenance"> <span id="translatedtitle">Operations and <span class="hlt">Modeling</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Reliability and Maintainability <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> Tool (RMAT) provides NASA the capability to estimate reliability and maintainability (R&M) parameters and operational support requirements for proposed space vehicles based upon relationships established from both aircraft and Shuttle R&M data. RMAT has matured both in its underlying database and in its level of sophistication in extrapolating this historical data to satisfy proposed mission requirements, maintenance concepts and policies, and type of vehicle (i.e. ranging from aircraft like to shuttle like). However, a companion analyses tool, the Logistics Cost <span class="hlt">Model</span> (LCM) has not reached the same level of maturity as RMAT due, in large part, to nonexistent or outdated cost estimating relationships and underlying cost databases, and it's almost exclusive dependence on Shuttle operations and logistics cost input parameters. As a result, the full capability of the RMAT/LCM suite of <span class="hlt">analysis</span> tools to take a conceptual vehicle and derive its operations and support requirements along with the resulting operating and support costs has not been realized.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ebeling, Charles</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999JPhD...32.2763J"> <span id="translatedtitle">Water-vortex <span class="hlt">stabilized</span> electric arc: I. Numerical <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A numerical <span class="hlt">model</span> for an electric arc <span class="hlt">stabilized</span> by a water vortex has been proposed. The two-dimensional axisymmetric <span class="hlt">model</span> includes the discharge area between the cathode and the orifice of the arc chamber. The production of water plasma, i.e. the rate of evaporation of a water wall, is taken either from experiments or is determined numerically by fitting of the outlet plasma parameters to the experimental ones. The computer results concern thermal, fluid dynamic and electrical characteristics of such arcs for the currents 300, 400, 500 and 600 A. It is found, for example, that the role of thermal diffusion within the discharge increases with current. The power losses from the arc due to radial conduction and radiation represent around 50% of the input power. Rotation of the plasma column due to the induced tangential velocity component has negligible effect on the overall arc performance. The calculated velocities, pressure drops and electrical potentials are in good agreement with experiments carried out on the water plasma torch PAL-160 operating at our Institute.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jenista, Jir</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1008.0669v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Jacobian deformation ellipsoid and Lyapunov <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> revisited</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> introduced by Lyapunov and extended by Oseledec is an excellent tool to describe the character of nonlinear n-dimensional flows by n global exponents if these flows are stable in time. However, there are two main shortcomings: (a) The local exponents fail to indicate the origin of instability where trajectories start to diverge. Instead, their time evolution contains a much stronger chaos than the trajectories, which is only eliminated by integrating over a long time. Therefore, shorter time intervals cannot be characterized correctly, which would be essential to analyse changes of chaotic character as in transients. (b) Moreover, although Oseledec uses an n dimensional sphere around a point x to be transformed into an n dimensional ellipse in first order, this local ellipse has yet not been evaluated. The aim of this contribution is to eliminate these two shortcomings. Problem (a) disappears if the Oseledec method is replaced by a frame with a 'constraint' as performed by Rateitschak and Klages (RK) [Phys. Rev. E 65 036209 (2002)]. The reasons why this method is better will be illustrated by comparing different systems. In order to analyze shorter time intervals, integrals between consecutive Poincare points will be evaluated. The local problems (b) will be solved analytically by introducing the symmetric 'Jacobian deformation ellipsoid' and its orthogonal submatrix, which enable to search in the full phase space for extreme local separation exponents. These are close to the RK exponents but need no time integration of the RK frame. Finally, four sets of local exponents are compared: Oseledec frame, RK frame, Jacobian deformation ellipsoid and its orthogonal submatrix.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Franz Waldner; Rainer Klages</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-08-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> 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showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920032934&hterms=nonlinear+factor+analysis&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dnonlinear%2Bfactor%2Banalysis"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of bridged cracks in brittle matrix composites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The bridging of matrix cracks by fibers is an important toughening mechanism in fiber reinforced brittle matrix composites. This paper presents the results of a nonlinear finite element <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the Mode-I propagation of a bridged matrix crack in a finite size specimen. The composite is <span class="hlt">modeled</span> as an orthotropic continuum and the bridging due to the fibers is <span class="hlt">modeled</span> as a distribution of tractions which resist crack opening. A critical stress intensity factor criterion is employed for matrix crack propagation while a critical crack opening condition is used for fiber failure. The structural response of the specimen (load-deflection curves) as well as the stress intensity factor of the propagating crack are calculated for various constituent properties and specimen configurations for both tensile and bending loading. By controlling the length of the bridged crack results are obtained which highlight the transition from stable to unstable behavior of the propagating crack.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ballarini, Roberto; Muju, Sandeep</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=31087"> <span id="translatedtitle">APPLICATIONS <span class="hlt">ANALYSIS</span> REPORT: CHEMFIX TECHNOLOGIES, INC., SOLIDIFICATION/<span class="hlt">STABILIZATION</span> PROCESS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Chemfix Solidification/<span class="hlt">Stabilization</span> treatment process was evaluated under EPA's SITE program. he process reduced leaching levels of lead and copper. hysical testing results were acceptable. ppropriate applications and process limitations are discussed in this report....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/420360"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of a variable-speed wind turbine</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper examines the elastomechanical <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a four-bladed wind turbine over a specific rotor speed range. <span class="hlt">Stability</span> modes, frequencies, and dampings are extracted using a specialized modal processor developed at NREL that post-processes the response data generated by the ADAMS simulation code. The processor can analyze a turbine with an arbitrary number of rotor blades and offers a novel capability of isolating <span class="hlt">stability</span> modes that become locked at a single frequency. Results indicate that over a certain rotor speed range, the tower lateral mode and the rotor regressive in-plane mode coalesce, resulting in a self-excited instability. Additional results show the effect of tower and nacelle parameters on the <span class="hlt">stability</span> boundaries.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bir, G.S.; Wright, A.D.; Butterfield, C.P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=126617"> <span id="translatedtitle">APPLICATIONS <span class="hlt">ANALYSIS</span> REPORT: CHEMFIX TECHNOLOGIES, INC. - SOLIDIFICATION/<span class="hlt">STABILIZATION</span> PROCESS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In support of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, this report evaluates the Chemfix Technologies, Inc. (Chemfix), solidification/<span class="hlt">stabilization</span> technology for on-site treatment of hazardous waste. The Chemfix ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/3128"> <span id="translatedtitle">AC system <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and assessment for Shipboard Power Systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">due to reconfiguration might cause voltage instability, such as progressive voltage decreases or voltage oscillations. SPS <span class="hlt">stability</span> thus should be assessed to ensure the stable operation of a system during reconfiguration. In this dissertation, time...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Qi, Li</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-04-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19730023223&hterms=fashion+trends&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3D%2528fashion%2Btrends%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and trend study of a balloon tethered in a wind, with experimental comparisons</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and trend study for a balloon tethered in a steady wind are presented. The linearized, <span class="hlt">stability</span>-derivative type <span class="hlt">analysis</span> includes balloon aerodynamics, buoyancy, mass (including apparent mass), and static forces resulting from the tether cable. The <span class="hlt">analysis</span> has been applied to a balloon 7.64 m in length, and the results are compared with those from tow tests of this balloon. This comparison shows that the <span class="hlt">analysis</span> gives reasonable predictions for the damping, frequencies, modes of motion, and <span class="hlt">stability</span> boundaries exhibited by the balloon. A trend study for the 7.64-m balloon was made to illustrate how the <span class="hlt">stability</span> boundaries are affected by changes in individual <span class="hlt">stability</span> parameters. The trends indicated in this study may also be applicable to many other tethered-balloon systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Redd, L. T.; Bland, S. R.; Bennett, R. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22163089"> <span id="translatedtitle">Energy approach to <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the locked and rotating resistive wall modes in tokamaks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A method is proposed for <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the locked and rotating resistive wall modes (RWMs) in tokamaks. The method is based on the relations describing the balance of energy permeating through the vessel wall. This is a natural extension of the traditional energy approach to the plasma <span class="hlt">stability</span> tasks which allows incorporation of the energy outflow (absent in the classical energy principle) and its dissipation in the wall. The proposed method covers the locked and rotating modes with a complex growth rate. Its efficiency is proved by derivation of a general dispersion relation for such modes with further reduction to particular consequences for slow and fast RWMs. It is shown that in the latter case, when the skin depth becomes smaller than the wall thickness, the mode rotation essentially amplifies its damping, weakening and even suppressing the instability. This effect was earlier found in the frame of the slab <span class="hlt">model</span> [V. D. Pustovitov, Phys. Plasmas 19, 062503 (2012)]. Here, it is confirmed with equations valid for toroidal geometry, which are obtained as a supplement to the standard energy principle. The presented results predict strong rotational <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> of the fast RWMs, which occurs at the mode rotation frequency above a critical level. The estimates are given to allow comparison of these predictions with experimental results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pustovitov, V. D. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Institute of Tokamak Physics (Russian Federation)] [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Institute of Tokamak Physics (Russian Federation)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3878265"> <span id="translatedtitle">Detecting cellular reprogramming determinants by differential <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of gene regulatory networks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Cellular differentiation and reprogramming are processes that are carefully orchestrated by the activation and repression of specific sets of genes. An increasing amount of experimental results show that despite the large number of genes participating in transcriptional programs of cellular phenotypes, only few key genes, which are coined here as reprogramming determinants, are required to be directly perturbed in order to induce cellular reprogramming. However, identification of reprogramming determinants still remains a combinatorial problem, and the state-of-art methods addressing this issue rests on exhaustive experimentation or prior knowledge to narrow down the list of candidates. Results Here we present a computational method, without any preliminary selection of candidate genes, to identify reduced subsets of genes, which when perturbed can induce transitions between cellular phenotypes. The method relies on the expression profiles of two stable cellular phenotypes along with a topological <span class="hlt">analysis</span> <span class="hlt">stability</span> elements in the gene regulatory network that are necessary to cause this multi-<span class="hlt">stability</span>. Since stable cellular phenotypes can be considered as attractors of gene regulatory networks, cell fate and cellular reprogramming involves transition between these attractors, and therefore current method searches for combinations of genes that are able to destabilize a specific initial attractor and <span class="hlt">stabilize</span> the final one in response to the appropriate perturbations. Conclusions The method presented here represents a useful framework to assist researchers in the field of cellular reprogramming to design experimental strategies with potential applications in the regenerative medicine and disease <span class="hlt">modelling</span>. PMID:24350678</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4016541"> <span id="translatedtitle">GraTeLPy: graph-theoretic linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background A biochemical mechanism with mass action kinetics can be represented as a directed bipartite graph (bipartite digraph), and <span class="hlt">modeled</span> by a system of differential equations. If the differential equations (DE) <span class="hlt">model</span> can give rise to some instability such as multistability or Turing instability, then the bipartite digraph contains a structure referred to as a critical fragment. In some cases the existence of a critical fragment indicates that the DE <span class="hlt">model</span> can display oscillations for some parameter values. We have implemented a graph-theoretic method that identifies the critical fragments of the bipartite digraph of a biochemical mechanism. Results GraTeLPy lists all critical fragments of the bipartite digraph of a given biochemical mechanism, thus enabling a preliminary <span class="hlt">analysis</span> on the potential of a biochemical mechanism for some instability based on its topological structure. The correctness of the implementation is supported by multiple examples. The code is implemented in Python, relies on open software, and is available under the GNU General Public License. Conclusions GraTeLPy can be used by researchers to test large biochemical mechanisms with mass action kinetics for their capacity for multistability, oscillations and Turing instability. PMID:24572152</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21546956"> <span id="translatedtitle">A new matching method for linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of MHD modes close to the ideal MHD marginal <span class="hlt">stability</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new matching method has been invented for linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) modes for plasmas marginally stable against ideal MHD. An inner region with a finite width is utilized as in our previous study [M. Furukawa, S. Tokuda, and L.-J. Zheng, Phys. Plasmas 17, 052502 (2010)]. An ordering scheme for the outer region has been newly developed, thereby it succeeds to include effects of small plasma inertia and resistivity perturbatively in the outer region. The corresponding boundary condition requires direct, not asymptotic, matching of the outer and inner solutions, which assumes nothing special for the behavior of parallel electric field across the matching points. The union of the ordering scheme and the boundary condition enables us to apply our matching method even for plasmas marginally stable against ideal MHD. Because our matching method is not asymptotic, it is easy to implement numerically. The <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of resistive MHD modes, such as internal kink and tearing modes, is satisfactory.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Furukawa, M. [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Tokuda, S. [Research Organization for Information Science and Technology, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 140-0001 (Japan)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-06-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012IJART...1b...5E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Strength <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Coconut Fiber <span class="hlt">Stabilized</span> Earth for Farm Structures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Investigation of the strength characteristic of soil from alluvial deposit of River Benue in makurdi <span class="hlt">stabilized</span> with coconut fiber as a <span class="hlt">stabilizer</span> was carried as local building material for farm structure. Processed coconut fibers were mixed with the soil at four different mix ratios of 1% fiber, 2% fiber, 3% fiber and 4% fiber by percentage weight with 0% fiber as control. Compaction test and compressive strength were carried out on the various <span class="hlt">stabilizing</span> ratio. From the compaction test, the correlation between the maximum dry density and optimum moisture content is a second order polynomial with a coefficient of 63% obtained at1.91kg/m3and 20.0% respectively while the compressive strength test shows an optimum failure load of 8.62N/mm2 at 2%fibre:100% soil mix ratio at 2.16 maximum dry density.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Enokela, O. S.; P. O, Alada</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ntfs.conf...19B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonlinear <span class="hlt">Stability</span> of a SIRS Epidemic <span class="hlt">Model</span> with Convex Incidence Rate</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study an epidemic <span class="hlt">model</span> for infections with non permanent acquired immunity (SIRS). The incidence rate is assumed to be convex respect to the infective class. By using a peculiar Lyapunov function, we obtain necessary and sufficient conditions for the local nonlinear <span class="hlt">stability</span> of equilibria. Conditions ensuring the global <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the endemic equilibrium are also obtained. Our procedure allows to enlarge the class of incidence rates ensuring the Lyapunov nonlinear <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the endemic equilibrium for SIRS <span class="hlt">models</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Buonomo, B.; Rionero, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860005835&hterms=ethnology&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dethnology"> <span id="translatedtitle">F-111 natural laminar flow glove flight test data <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and boundary layer <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of 34 selected flight test data cases from a NASA flight program incorporating a natural laminar flow airfoil into partial wing gloves on the F-111 TACT airplane is given. This <span class="hlt">analysis</span> determined the measured location of transition from laminar to turbulent flow. The report also contains the results of a boundary layer <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of 25 of the selected cases in which the crossflow (C-F) and Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) disturbance amplification factors are correlated with the measured transition location. The chord Reynolds numbers for these cases ranges from about 23 million to 29 million, the Mach numbers ranged from 0.80 to 0.85, and the glove leading-edge sweep angles ranged from 9 deg to 25 deg. Results indicate that the maximum extent of laminar flow varies from 56% chord to 9-deg sweep on the upper surface, and from 51% chord at 16-deg sweep to 6% chord at 25-deg sweep on the lower. The results of the boundary layer <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> indicate that when both C-F and T-S disturbances are amplified, an interaction takes place which reduces the maximum amplification factor of either type of disturbance that can be tolerated without causing transition.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Runyan, L. J.; Navran, B. H.; Rozendaal, R. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PhRvD..76i5019C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Implications of vacuum <span class="hlt">stability</span> constraints on the nonminimal supersymmetric standard <span class="hlt">model</span> with lepton number violation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We carry out a detailed <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the scalar sector of the nonminimal supersymmetric standard <span class="hlt">model</span> with lepton number violation, and study the constraints imposed on it by the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the electroweak symmetry breaking vacuum. The <span class="hlt">model</span> contains a trilinear lepton number violating term in the superpotential together with the associated supersymmetry breaking interactions which can give rise to neutrino masses. We evaluate the mass matrices for the various boson and fermion modes and then discuss the effect that the lepton number violating interactions have on the mass spectra using a phenomenological prescription to implement the experimental constraints on the light neutrinos mass matrix. We also discuss qualitatively the conditions on the lepton number violating parameters set by the unbounded from below directions, and from the absence of the charge and color breaking minima in this <span class="hlt">model</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chemtob, M.; Pandita, P. N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4106079"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Maximal Sodium and Potassium Conductance on the <span class="hlt">Stability</span> of Hodgkin-Huxley <span class="hlt">Model</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) equation is the first cell computing <span class="hlt">model</span> in the world and pioneered the use of <span class="hlt">model</span> to study electrophysiological problems. The <span class="hlt">model</span> consists of four differential equations which are based on the experimental data of ion channels. Maximal conductance is an important characteristic of different channels. In this study, mathematical method is used to investigate the importance of maximal sodium conductance g-Na and maximal potassium conductance g-K. Applying <span class="hlt">stability</span> theory, and taking g-Na and g-K as variables, we analyze the <span class="hlt">stability</span> and bifurcations of the <span class="hlt">model</span>. Bifurcations are found when the variables change, and bifurcation points and boundary are also calculated. There is only one bifurcation point when g-Na is the variable, while there are two points when g-K is variable. The (g-Na,??g-K) plane is partitioned into two regions and the upper bifurcation boundary is similar to a line when both g-Na and g-K are variables. Numerical simulations illustrate the validity of the <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. The results obtained could be helpful in studying relevant diseases caused by maximal conductance anomaly. PMID:25104970</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, Kuanquan; Yuan, Yongfeng; Zhang, Henggui</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ima.umn.edu/preprints/feb2003/1910.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nominal <span class="hlt">Stability</span> of the Real-Time Iteration Scheme for Nonlinear <span class="hlt">Model</span> Predictive Control</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">, the feedback delay due to the computation time is short compared to the timescale of the system, and classicalNominal <span class="hlt">Stability</span> of the Real-Time Iteration Scheme for Nonlinear <span class="hlt">Model</span> Predictive Control Moritz and optimizer dynamics, however, <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the closed-loop system is not implied by standard nonlinear <span class="hlt">model</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ima.umn.edu/preprints/feb2003/1910.ps"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nominal <span class="hlt">Stability</span> of the RealTime Iteration Scheme for Nonlinear <span class="hlt">Model</span> Predictive Control</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">, the feedback delay due to the computation time is short compared to the timescale of the system, and classicalNominal <span class="hlt">Stability</span> of the Real­Time Iteration Scheme for Nonlinear <span class="hlt">Model</span> Predictive Control Moritz and optimizer dynamics, however, <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the closed­loop system is not implied by standard nonlinear <span class="hlt">model</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0705.3626v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mode <span class="hlt">stability</span> in delta Scuti stars: linear <span class="hlt">analysis</span> versus observations in open clusters</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A comparison between linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and observations of pulsation modes in five delta Scuti stars, belonging to the same cluster, is presented. The study is based on the work by Michel et al. (1999), in which such a comparison was performed for a representative set of <span class="hlt">model</span> solutions obtained independently for each individual star considered. In this paper we revisit the work by Michel et al. (1999) following, however, a new approach which consists in the search for a single, complete, and coherent solution for all the selected stars, in order to constrain and test the assumed physics describing these objects. To do so, refined descriptions for the effects of rotation on the determination of the global stellar parameters and on the adiabatic oscillation frequency computations are used. In addition, a crude attempt is made to study the role of rotation on the prediction of mode instabilities.The present results are found to be comparable with those reported by Michel et al. (1999). Within the temperature range log T_eff = 3.87-3.88 agreement between observations and <span class="hlt">model</span> computations of unstable modes is restricted to values for the mixing-length parameter alpha_nl less or equal to 1.50. This indicates that for these stars a smaller value for alpha_nl is required than suggested from a calibrated solar <span class="hlt">model</span>. We stress the point that the linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> used in this work still assumes stellar <span class="hlt">models</span> without rotation and that further developments are required for a proper description of the interaction between rotation and pulsation dynamics.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. C. Suarez; E. Michel; G. Houdek; F. Perez Hernandez; Y. Lebreton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-05-24</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850021648&hterms=SSI&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DSSI"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonlinear global <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of compressor stall phenomena</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Compressor stall phenomena are analyzed from the point of view of nonlinear control theory, based on bifurcation-catastrophe techniques. This new approach appears promising and offers insight into such well-known compressor instability problems as surge and rotating stall and suggests strategies for recovery. Three interlocking dynamic nonlinear state space <span class="hlt">models</span> are developed. It is shown that the problem of rotating stall can be viewed as an induced bifurcation of solution of the unstalled <span class="hlt">model</span>. Hysteresis effects are shown to exist in the stall/recovery process. Surge cycles are observed for some critical parameter values. The oscillatory behavior is seen to be due to development of limit cycles, generated by Hopf bifurcation of solutions. More specifically, it is observed that at certain critical values of parameters, a family of stable limit cycles with growning and then diminishing amplitudes is generated, then giving rise to an unstable family of limit cycles. This unstable family in turn bifurcates into other unstable families. To further illustrate the utility of the methodology, some partial computation of domains is carried out, and parameter sensitivity <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is performed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Razavi, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.inma.ucl.ac.be/~bastin/paperECC2014.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of switching hyperbolic systems: the example of SMB chromatography</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of switching hyperbolic systems: the example of SMB chromatography Georges with switching boundary conditions. Our contribution is to show, through the specific example of SMB the specific example of SMB chromatography [16] and to show how exponential <span class="hlt">stability</span> (in L2-norm) can</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bastin, Georges</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span 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</span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.inma.ucl.ac.be/~bastin/paperCDC2013.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of switching hyperbolic systems: the example of SMB chromatography</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of switching hyperbolic systems: the example of SMB chromatography Georges with switching boundary conditions. Our contribution is to show, through the specific example of SMB through the specific example of SMB chromatography [16] and to show how exponential <span class="hlt">stability</span> (in L2-norm</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bastin, Georges</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://robot.kut.ac.kr/papers/eurohaptics_2010.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Mobile Robot Teleoperation with Variable Force Feedback Gain</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Mobile Robot Teleoperation with Variable Force Feedback Gain Ildar University of Technology and Education, School of Mechanical Engineering, Cheonan, R. of Korea jhryu@kut.ac.kr http://robot.kut.ac.kr Abstract. We analyze the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of previously proposed mobile robot tele</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ryu, Jee-Hwan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=order+AND+classification&pg=3&id=EJ961320"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> and Change in Work Values: A Meta-<span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Longitudinal Studies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A meta-<span class="hlt">analysis</span> of longitudinal studies was conducted to investigate <span class="hlt">stability</span> and change in work values across the life span. Both rank-order <span class="hlt">stability</span> and mean-level change were investigated using an integrative classification for intrinsic, extrinsic, social and status work values (Ross, Schwartz, & Surkis, 1999). Results of rank-order</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jin, Jing; Rounds, James</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.fusion.ucla.edu/abdou/abdou%20publications/2011/FST-v60-VetchaStability_TOFE-19(Aug2011).pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">STABILITY</span> <span class="hlt">ANALYSIS</span> FOR BUOYANCY-OPPOSED FLOWS IN POLOIDAL DUCTS OF THE DCLL BLANKET</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">STABILITY</span> <span class="hlt">ANALYSIS</span> FOR BUOYANCY-OPPOSED FLOWS IN POLOIDAL DUCTS OF THE DCLL BLANKET N. Vetcha, S of the buoyancy assisted flow in DCLL blanket based on the solution of the Orr- Sommefeld equation for MHD flows is used here to address the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the buoyancy-opposed (downward) flows in the DCLL blanket</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Abdou, Mohamed</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.eng.clemson.edu/~lonny/pubs/journal/cas03.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">On optimal <span class="hlt">stabilized</span> MITC4 plate bending elements for accurate frequency response <span class="hlt">analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On optimal <span class="hlt">stabilized</span> MITC4 plate bending elements for accurate frequency response <span class="hlt">analysis</span> Lonny L The mixed interpolation technique of the well-established MITC4 quadrilateral plate finite element. ? 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: <span class="hlt">Stabilized</span> finite element methods</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thompson, Lonny L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cohabitation+AND+marriage&pg=4&id=EJ870017"> <span id="translatedtitle">Does Premarital Cohabitation Predict Subsequent Marital <span class="hlt">Stability</span> and Marital Quality? A Meta-<span class="hlt">Analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cohabitation with a romantic partner has become common in recent decades. This meta-<span class="hlt">analysis</span> examined the link between premarital cohabitation and marital <span class="hlt">stability</span> (k = 16) and marital quality (k = 12). Cohabitation had a significant negative association with both marital <span class="hlt">stability</span> and marital quality. The negative predictive effect on marital</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jose, Anita; O'Leary, K. Daniel; Moyer, Anne</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/543660"> <span id="translatedtitle">White Oak Dam <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. Appendix. Volume II</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A parametric study was conducted to evaluate the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the White Oak Dam (WOD) embankment and foundation. Slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> analyses were performed for the upper and lower bound soil properties at three sections of the dam using the PCSTABL4 computer program. Minimum safety factors were calculated for the applicable seismic and static loading conditions. Liquefaction potential of the dam embankment and foundation solid during the seismic event was assessed by using simplified procedures. The WOD is classified as a low hazard facility and the Evaluation Basis Earthquake (EBE) is defined as an earthquake with a magnitude of m{sub b} = 5.6 and a Peak Ground Accelerator (PGA) of 0.13 g. This event is approximately equivalent to a Modified Mercalli Intensity of VI-VIII. The EBE is used to perform the seismic evaluation for slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> and liquefaction potential. Results of the <span class="hlt">stability</span> analyses and the liquefaction assessment lead to the conclusion that the White Oak Dam is safe and stable for the static and the seismic events defined in this study. Ogden Environmental, at the request of MMES, has checked and verified the calculations for the critical loading conditions and performed a peer review of this report. Ogden has determined that the WOD is stable under the defined static and seismic loading conditions and the embankment materials are in general not susceptible to liquefaction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ahmed, S.B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50529184"> <span id="translatedtitle">Voltage <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Wind Farm Integration into Transmission Network</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In some regional grids in China, wind power penetration will increase rapidly because of the abundant wind resources in those areas and the government policy impetus. However, the power system security and <span class="hlt">stability</span> may be affected due to the higher wind power penetration. Because majority of the wind farms with higher installed capacity intends to be connected into the transmission</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yongning Chi; Yanhua Liu; Weisheng Wang; Huizhu Dai</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/43146933"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of the Planetary System Orbiting upsilo Andromedae</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present numerical orbital integrations designed to test the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the three planets detected in orbit around upsilo Andromedae and possible smaller bodies orbiting in the system which have not yet been discovered. We find that some configurations are stable for at least 109 yr, whereas in other configurations planets can be ejected into interstellar space or crash into</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eugenio J. Rivera; Jack J. Lissauer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/5303678"> <span id="translatedtitle">The application of dynamic programming to slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The applicability of the dynamic programming method to two-dimensional slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> analyses is studied. The critical slip surface is defined as the slip surface that yields the minimum value of an optimal function. The only assumption regarding the shape of the critical slip surface is that the surface is an assemblage of linear segments. Stresses acting along the critical slip</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ha T. V. Pham; Delwyn G. Fredlund</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21443424"> <span id="translatedtitle">Longitudinal structure of MHD perturbations at the boundary of convective <span class="hlt">stability</span> in the Kruskal-Oberman <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is shown that, in contrast to the MHD <span class="hlt">model</span>, a perturbation at the boundary of convective <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a finite-pressure plasma in confinement systems without an averaged minB in the Kruskal-Oberman <span class="hlt">model</span> is not generally a purely flute one. The reasons for this discrepancy are clarified. The <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is carried out for axisymmetric configurations formed by a poloidal magnetic field.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Arsenin, V. V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/808391"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Modeling</span> of Neoclassical Tearing Mode <span class="hlt">Stability</span> for Generalized Toroidal Geometry</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) can lead to disruption and loss of confinement. Previous <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of these modes used large aspect ratio, low beta (plasma pressure/magnetic pressure) approximations to determine the effect of NTMs on tokamak plasmas. A more accurate tool is needed to predict the onset of these instabilities. As a follow-up to recent theoretical work, a code has been written which computes the tearing mode island growth rate for arbitrary tokamak geometry. It calls PEST-3 [A. Pletzer et al., J. Comput. Phys. 115, 530 (1994)] to compute delta prime, the resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) matching parameter. The code also calls the FLUXGRID routines in NIMROD [A.H. Glasser et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 41, A747 (1999)] for Dnc, DI and DR [C.C. Hegna, Phys. Plasmas 6, 3980 (1999); A.H. Glasser et al., Phys. Fluids 18, 875 (1975)], which are the bootstrap current driven term and the ideal and resistive interchange mode criterion, respectively. In addition to these components, the NIMROD routines calculate alphas-H, a new correction to the Pfirsch-Schlter term. Finite parallel transport effects were added and a National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] equilibrium was analyzed. Another program takes the output of PEST-3 and allows the user to specify the rational surface, island width, and amount of detail near the perturbed surface to visualize the total helical flux. The results of this work will determine the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of NTMs in an spherical torus (ST) [Y.-K.M. Peng et al., Nucl. Fusion 26, 769 (1986)] plasma with greater accuracy than previously achieved.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A.L. Rosenberg; D.A. Gates; A. Pletzer; J.E. Menard; S.E. Kruger; C.C. Hegna; F. Paoletti; S. Sabbagh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-08-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ChPhB..20c0501D"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Stochastic <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a Logistic <span class="hlt">model</span> with Poisson white noise</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The stochastic <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a logistic <span class="hlt">model</span> subjected to the effect of a random natural environment, <span class="hlt">modeled</span> as Poisson white noise process, is investigated. The properties of the stochastic response are discussed for calculating the Lyapunov exponent, which had proven to be the most useful diagnostic tool for the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of dynamical systems. The generalised It differentiation formula is used to analyse the stochastic <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the response. The results indicate that the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the response is related to the intensity and amplitude distribution of the environment noise and the growth rate of the species. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 10872165 and 10932009).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Duan, Dong-Hai; Xu, Wei; Su, Jun; Zhou, Bing-Chang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://matwbn.icm.edu.pl/ksiazki/cc/cc32/cc3235.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">On <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> in shape optimisation : critical shapes for Neumann problem1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">stability</span> issue of critical shapes for shape op- timization problems with the state function given by a solution to the Neumann problem for the Laplace equation is considered. To this end, the properties of the shape Hessian evaluated at critical shapes are analysed. First, it is proved that the <span class="hlt">stability</span> cannot be expected for the <span class="hlt">model</span> problem. Then, the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Dambrine; J. Soko</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/54880"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> and robustness <span class="hlt">analysis</span> tools for marine robot localization and mapping applications</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aim of this <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is to explore the fundamental <span class="hlt">stability</span> issues of a robotic vehicle carrying out localization, mapping, and feedback control in a perturbation-filled environment. Motivated by the application of ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Englot, Brendan J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=129529"> <span id="translatedtitle">APPLICATIONS <span class="hlt">ANALYSIS</span> REPORT: SITE PROGRAM DEMONSTRATION TEST SOLIDITECH, INC. SOLIDIFICATION/ <span class="hlt">STABILIZATION</span> PROCESS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This Applications <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> Report evaluates the Soliditech, Inc., solidification/ <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> process for the on-site treatment of waste materials. The Soliditech process mixes and chemically treats waste material with Urrichem (a proprietary reagent), additives, pozzolanic mat...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=126849"> <span id="translatedtitle">SILICATE TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION'S SOLIDIFICATION/ <span class="hlt">STABILIZATION</span> TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC AND INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SOILS - APPLICATIONS <span class="hlt">ANALYSIS</span> REPORT</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This Applications <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> Report evaluates the solidification/<span class="hlt">stabilization</span> treatment process of Silicate Technology Corporation (STC) for the on-site treatment of hazardous waste. The STC immobilization technology utilizes a proprietary product (FMS Silicate) to chemically stab...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2000-THESIS-A75"> <span id="translatedtitle">Borehole <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> at the Coporo-1 well, Colombia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">year of drilling operations. The <span class="hlt">stability</span> problems included hole-cleaning problems, frequent stuck-pipe incidents and poor cementing jobs. Furthermore, hole rugosity at Coporo-1 made running casing, logging, and tripping problematic. Fig. 1. 1... instability problems was hole cleaning that caused frequent pack-off incidents, stuck pipe, and one sidetrack aller the core barrel got stuck at 17, 305 ft in the Los Cuervos formation. Furthermore, severe borehole rugosity caused by sand/shale sequences...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Arias, Henry</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/24283417"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Three UV-Filters Using HPLC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">UV-absorbing substances are widely used in sunscreens to filter out ultraviolet radiation in sunlight. These substances need to be stable in sunscreens in order to obtain the expected protection during the shelf-life of the products.A conveniant HPLC method for the separation and quantification of three common UV-filters in a sunscreen emulsion is presented. Using this method the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of benzophenone-3,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Meijer; M. Lodn</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26955206"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> of feedback systems with sensor or actuator failures: <span class="hlt">analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper studies the linear, time-invariant, multi-input multi-output unity-feedback system with possible failures in the sensor or actuator-connections. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the system with failures in k of the sensor-connections or with failures in m of the actuator-connections and develop conditions for <span class="hlt">stability</span>, It is shown that if the system is stable for all possible</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. NAZLI GUNDES</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000PhLA..269..112G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Numerical <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of laser mode competition and <span class="hlt">stability</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The competition between simultaneously oscillating modes in a laser oscillator is discussed. We analyze numerically the mode completion in a laser with two or three modes that are oscillating over their threshold, starting from the <span class="hlt">stability</span> conditions in different situations of coupling between modes. For the two-mode oscillating case, our results represented in the intensity-time plane lead to the same conclusions as those from the published literature represented in the intensity-intensity plane.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gearba, Alina; Cone, Gabriela</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cs.ucdavis.edu/~peisert/research/2007-4-SADFE-2007-Talk.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Toward <span class="hlt">Models</span> for Forensic <span class="hlt">Analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">is Forensic <span class="hlt">Analysis</span>? Forensic <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is the process of answering the questions: How did an event take place Approaches Solutions Intended for Non-Forensic Purposes Syslog Process Accounting IDS Alerts Ad Hoc SolutionsToward <span class="hlt">Models</span> for Forensic <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> Sean Peisert (UC San Diego) Matt Bishop (UC Davis) Sid Karin</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peisert, Sean</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1982-THESIS-B171"> <span id="translatedtitle">Parallel processing techniques applied to transient <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of power systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">PARALLEL PROCESSING TECHNIQUES APPLIED TO TRANSIENT <span class="hlt">STABILITY</span> <span class="hlt">ANALYSIS</span> OF POWER SYSTEMS A Thesis CHANDRAKUMAR JOHN BALACHANDRA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A@I University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 19gg Major Subject: Elect-. ical Engineer ng PARALLEL PROCESSING TECHNIQUES APPLIED TO TRANSIENT <span class="hlt">STABILITY</span> <span class="hlt">ANALYSIS</span> OF POWER SYSTEMS A Thesis by CHANDRAKUMAR JOHN BALACHANDRA Approved as to style and content by...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Balachandra, Chandrakumar John</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008cls..conf..290G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Constraint <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Bumblebee <span class="hlt">Models</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dirac's Harailtonian constraint <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is used to study vector theories with spontaneous Lorentz violation known as bumblebee <span class="hlt">models</span>. In certain of these <span class="hlt">models</span>, the Nambu-Goldstone sector has properties similar to those of photons in classical electromagnetism. An <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the different types of constraints and resulting number of degrees of freedom is presented here for <span class="hlt">models</span> with different kinetic and potential terms, and the results are compared with electromagnetism.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gagne, N.; Vrublevskis, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://fitelson.org/woodward/cricky_1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">ACTUAL CAUSATION: <span class="hlt">ANALYSIS</span>, <span class="hlt">MODELING</span> &</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Bastard Child They have sought a single causal relation that is fully objective, like causal structure his rock through the window) #12;Causal <span class="hlt">Models</span> Modifiable Structural Equation <span class="hlt">Models</span> Graphical and equations represent is the causal structure of this scenario The judgment that Suzy's throw caused</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fitelson, Branden</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16605640"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of dynamical regimes in nonlinear systems with discrete symmetries.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a theorem that allows one to simplify the linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of periodic and quasiperiodic nonlinear regimes in N-particle mechanical systems with different kinds of discrete symmetry. This theorem suggests a decomposition of the linearized system arising in the standard <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> into a number of subsystems whose dimensions can be considerably less than the dimension of the full system. As an example of such a simplification, we discuss the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of bushes of modes (invariant manifolds) for the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chains and prove another theorem about the maximal dimension of the above-mentioned subsystems. PMID:16605640</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chechin, G M; Zhukov, K G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014CNSNS..19.3753W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Global <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a multiple infected compartments <span class="hlt">model</span> for waterborne diseases</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, mathematical <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is carried out for a multiple infected compartments <span class="hlt">model</span> for waterborne diseases, such as cholera, giardia, and rotavirus. The <span class="hlt">model</span> accounts for both person-to-person and water-to-person transmission routes. Global <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the equilibria is studied. In terms of the basic reproduction number R0, we prove that, if R0?1, then the disease-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable and the infection always disappears; whereas if R0>1, there exists a unique endemic equilibrium which is globally asymptotically stable for the corresponding fast-slow system. Numerical simulations verify our theoretical results and present that the decay rate of waterborne pathogens has a significant impact on the epidemic growth rate. Also, we observe numerically that the unique endemic equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable for the whole system. This statement indicates that the present method need to be improved by other techniques.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, Yi; Cao, Jinde</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.inma.ucl.ac.be/~bastin/paper79.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of a Vision-Based Control Design for an Autonomous Mobile Robot</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">1 <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of a Vision-Based Control Design for an Autonomous Mobile Robot J.B. Coulaud a mobile robot equipped with a camera to track a line on the ground. The control algorithm as well <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. Index Terms-- mobile robot, control design <span class="hlt">analysis</span>, visual- servoing, path tracking I</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bastin, Georges</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060006673&hterms=fault+tree+analysis&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dfault%2Btree%2Banalysis"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Model</span>-Based Safety <span class="hlt">Analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">System safety <span class="hlt">analysis</span> techniques are well established and are used extensively during the design of safety-critical systems. Despite this, most of the techniques are highly subjective and dependent on the skill of the practitioner. Since these analyses are usually based on an informal system <span class="hlt">model</span>, it is unlikely that they will be complete, consistent, and error free. In fact, the lack of precise <span class="hlt">models</span> of the system architecture and its failure modes often forces the safety analysts to devote much of their effort to gathering architectural details about the system behavior from several sources and embedding this information in the safety artifacts such as the fault trees. This report describes <span class="hlt">Model</span>-Based Safety <span class="hlt">Analysis</span>, an approach in which the system and safety engineers share a common system <span class="hlt">model</span> created using a <span class="hlt">model</span>-based development process. By extending the system <span class="hlt">model</span> with a fault <span class="hlt">model</span> as well as relevant portions of the physical system to be controlled, automated support can be provided for much of the safety <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. We believe that by using a common <span class="hlt">model</span> for both system and safety engineering and automating parts of the safety <span class="hlt">analysis</span>, we can both reduce the cost and improve the quality of the safety <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. Here we present our vision of <span class="hlt">model</span>-based safety <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and discuss the advantages and challenges in making this approach practical.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Joshi, Anjali; Heimdahl, Mats P. E.; Miller, Steven P.; Whalen, Mike W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/13271740"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of grasped object by soft-fingers with 3-dimensional deformation based on moment <span class="hlt">stability</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper analyze <span class="hlt">stability</span> of an object grasped by soft-fingers in 3-dimensional space based on moment <span class="hlt">stability</span>. We firstly define the moment <span class="hlt">stability</span> as a criterion for <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a grasped object when the object is perturbed for the orientation. In detail, the moment <span class="hlt">stability</span> means that the grasping force can be the restoring force when the object is perturbed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Akira Nakashima; Yoshikazu Hayakawa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23627973"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preoperative <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of fit of a patient-specific surgical guide.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Although the use of patient-specific surgical guides has gained popularity over the past decade, little research has been done to examine in an objective and qualitative way the fit of such instruments. In this study, we have developed a <span class="hlt">model</span> to predict the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a guide designed to fit on a supporting bone surface, thereby providing feedback on the translational and rotational <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the device. The method was validated by comparing different guide designs with respect to their <span class="hlt">stability</span> on the contact surface and comparing these results to those measured with a set of experiments. This validation experiment indicates that our <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">model</span> can be used to predict the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the fit of a surgical guide during the preoperative design process. PMID:23627973</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Van den Broeck, Joyce; Wirix-Speetjens, Roel; Vander Sloten, Jos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/5224155"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hierarchical <span class="hlt">modeling</span> of population <span class="hlt">stability</span> and species group attributes from survey data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many ecological studies require <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of collections of estimates. For example, population change is routinely estimated for many species from surveys such as the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS), and the species are grouped and used in comparative analyses. We developed a hierarchical <span class="hlt">model</span> for estimation of group attributes from a collection of estimates of population trend. The <span class="hlt">model</span> uses information from predefined groups of species to provide a context and to supplement data for individual species; summaries of group attributes are improved by statistical methods that simultaneously analyze collections of trend estimates. The <span class="hlt">model</span> is Bayesian; trends are treated as random variables rather than fixed parameters. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods to fit the <span class="hlt">model</span>. Standard assessments of population <span class="hlt">stability</span> cannot distinguish magnitude of trend and statistical significance of trend estimates, but the hierarchical <span class="hlt">model</span> allows us to legitimately describe the probability that a trend is within given bounds. Thus we define population <span class="hlt">stability</span> in terms of the probability that the magnitude of population change for a species is less than or equal to a predefined threshold. We applied the <span class="hlt">model</span> to estimates of trend for 399 species from the BBS to estimate the proportion of species with increasing populations and to identify species with unstable populations. Analyses are presented for the collection of all species and for 12 species groups commonly used in BBS summaries. Overall, we estimated that 49% of species in the BBS have positive trends and 33 species have unstable populations. However, the proportion of species with increasing trends differs among habitat groups, with grassland birds having only 19% of species with positive trend estimates and wetland birds having 68% of species with positive trend estimates.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sauer, J.R.; Link, W.A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12809516"> <span id="translatedtitle">Testing hypotheses about determinants of protein structure with high-precision, high-throughput <span class="hlt">stability</span> measurements and statistical <span class="hlt">modeling</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Statistical <span class="hlt">modeling</span> provides the mathematics to use data from large numbers of mutant proteins to generate information about hypotheses concerning protein structure not easily obtained from anecdotal studies on small numbers of mutants. Here we use the unfolding free energies of 303 unique eglin c mutant proteins obtained from high-precision, high-throughput chemical denaturation measurements to assess <span class="hlt">models</span> concerning helix <span class="hlt">stability</span>. A <span class="hlt">model</span> with helix propensity as the sole determinant of <span class="hlt">stability</span> accounts for 83% of the mutant-to-mutant variation in <span class="hlt">stability</span> for 99% of the mutant proteins (three outliers). When position effects and side chain-side chain interactions are added to the <span class="hlt">model</span>, the fraction of variation explained increases to 92%. The propensity parameters in this <span class="hlt">model</span> are identical to helix propensity values derived from other approaches. Measurement error accounts for another 1% of the mutant-to-mutant variation in <span class="hlt">stability</span>. While the data support terms for several of the expected <span class="hlt">stabilizing</span>/destabilizing effects, it does not support terms for several others, including i, i + 3 effects in the center of the helix and helix-dipole effects. In addition, the <span class="hlt">model</span> does better with terms for several <span class="hlt">stabilizing</span>/destabilizing effects for which we cannot identify the physical basis. The precision of our unfolding <span class="hlt">stability</span> measurements (+/-0.087 kcal/mol) allows us to conclude that the 7% of variation in <span class="hlt">stabilities</span> of the mutant proteins not accounted for by the <span class="hlt">model</span> or by measurement variation is both real and large with respect to the nonpropensity terms in the <span class="hlt">model</span>. The <span class="hlt">analysis</span> also shows that the common practice of using C(m)m(av) instead of C(m)m(mut) to calculate DeltaG(HOH,N-D) values for each mutant protein results in a loss of information. We see no correlation between the residuals derived from the full <span class="hlt">model</span> and m(mut) - m(wt), and hence it is unlikely our m(mut) values reflect mutant-to-mutant differences in the denatured state. PMID:12809516</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yi, Fang; Sims, Dorothy A; Pielak, Gary J; Edgell, Marshall Hall</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-06-24</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1208.0157v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Flavor <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of dense supernova neutrinos with flavor-dependent angular distributions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Numerical simulations of the supernova (SN) neutrino self-induced flavor conversions, associated with the neutrino-neutrino interactions in the deepest stellar regions, have been typically carried out assuming the "bulb-<span class="hlt">model</span>". In this approximation, neutrinos are taken to be emitted half-isotropically by a common neutrinosphere. In the recent Ref. \\cite{Mirizzi:2011tu} we have removed this assumption by introducing flavor-dependent angular distributions for SN neutrinos, as suggested by core-collapse simulations. We have found that in this case a novel multi-angle instability in the self-induced flavor transitions can arise. In this work we perform an extensive study of this effect, carrying out a linearized flavor <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for different SN neutrino energy fluxes and angular distributions, in both normal and inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We confirm that spectra of different nu species which cross in angular space (where F_{\</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alessandro Mirizzi; Pasquale Dario Serpico</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890024300&hterms=simple+harmonic+oscillator+systems&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dsimple%2Bharmonic%2Boscillator%2Bsystems"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of large space structure control systems with delayed input</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Large space structural systems, due to their inherent flexibility and low mass to area ratio, are represented by large dimensional mathematical <span class="hlt">models</span>. For implementation of the control laws for such systems a finite amount of time is required to evaluate the control signals; and this time delay may cause instability in the closed loop control system that was previously designed without taking the input delay into consideration. The <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of a simple harmonic oscillator representing the equation of a single mode as a function of delay time is analyzed analytically and verified numerically. The effect of inherent damping on the delay is also analyzed. The control problem with delayed input is also formulated in the discrete time domain.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reddy, A. S. S. R.; Bainum, P. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890004095&hterms=simple+harmonic+oscillator+systems&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dsimple%2Bharmonic%2Boscillator%2Bsystems"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of large space structure control systems with delayed input</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Large space structural systems, due to their inherent flexibility and low mass to area ratio, are represented by large dimensional mathematical <span class="hlt">models</span>. For implementation of the control laws for such systems a finite amount of time is required to evaluate the control signals; and this time delay may cause instability in the closed loop control system that was previously designed without taking the input delay into consideration. The <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of a simple harmonic oscillator representing the equation of a single mode as a function of delay time is treated analytically and verified numerically. The effect of inherent damping on the delay is also analyzed. The control problem with delayed input is also formulated in the discrete time domain.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reddy, A. S. S. R.; Bainum, Peter M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23220347"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lateral dynamic flight <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a <span class="hlt">model</span> bumblebee in hovering and forward flight.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The lateral dynamic flight <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a <span class="hlt">model</span> bumblebee in hovering and forward flight is studied, using the method of computational fluid dynamics to compute the <span class="hlt">stability</span> derivatives and the techniques of eigenvalue and eigenvector <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for solving the equations of motion. The lateral motion of the <span class="hlt">model</span> bumblebee is unstable at hovering and low flight speed (advance ratio J=0, 0.13), and becomes neutral or weakly stable at medium and high flight speeds (J=0.31-0.57). The instability at hovering and low speed is mainly caused by a positive roll-moment derivative with respect to the side-slip velocity, which is due to the effect of changing the axial velocity of the leading-edge-vortex (LEV) (i.e. the 'lateral wind' due to the side motion of the insect increases the axial velocity of the LEV on one wing and decreases that on the other wing). As flight speed increases, because the mean position of the wings moves more and more backward, the effect of 'changing-LEV-axial-velocity' becomes weaker and weaker and the roll-moment derivative decreases first and then changes its sign to become negative, resulting in the neutrally or weakly stable motion at medium and high flight speeds. PMID:23220347</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xu, Na; Sun, Mao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/459866"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cascade <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the debris catalog under a two-component flux <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> is analyzed with a two component <span class="hlt">model</span>. The critical densities derived are in agreement with other estimates in the appropriate limits. The current catalog is stable for nominal decay parameters, although further growth or cascade coefficients higher than nominal could be causes for concern. Sources reduce <span class="hlt">stability</span>, which is more of a problem at high altitudes than low.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Canavan, G.H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cs.ele.tue.nl/MLazar/nmpc05paper.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the <span class="hlt">Stability</span> and Robustness of Non-Smooth Nonlinear <span class="hlt">Model</span> Predictive Control</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper considers discrete-time nonlinear, possibly discontinuous, systems in closed-loop with <span class="hlt">Model</span> Predictive Controllers (MPC). The aim of the paper is to provide a priori sufficient conditions for asymptotic <span class="hlt">stability</span> in the Lyapunov sense and robust <span class="hlt">stability</span>, while allowing for both the system dynamics and the value function of the MPC cost (the usual candidate Lyapunov function in MPC) to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mircea Lazar; Maurice Heemels; Alberto Bemporad; Siep Weiland</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/2144091"> <span id="translatedtitle">Oscillator <span class="hlt">Models</span> and Collective Motion: Splay State <span class="hlt">Stabilization</span> of Self-Propelled Particles</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents a Lyapunov design for the <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> of collective motion in a planar kinematic <span class="hlt">model</span> of N particles moving at constant speed. We derive a control law that achieves asymptotic <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the splay state formation, characterized by uniform rotation of N evenly spaced particles on a circle. In designing the control law, the particle headings are treated</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Derek A. Paley; Naomi Ehrich Leonard; Rodolphe Sepulchre</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a 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href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://immunogenomics.hms.harvard.edu/PDFs/1997%20-%20limit.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">modeling</span> in physiology <span class="hlt">Stabilized</span> bubbles in the body: pressure-radius</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">modeling</span> in physiology <span class="hlt">Stabilized</span> bubbles in the body: pressure-radius relationships and the limits bubbles in the body: pressure-radius relationships and the limits to <span class="hlt">stabilization</span>. J. Appl. Physiol. 82 bubbles, such as the microbubbles being put forward as ultrasound contrast agents. Our present goals</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Raychaudhuri, Soumya</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://almaak.usc.edu/~rsacker/pubs/Mosq_Proc.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Global Asymptotic <span class="hlt">Stability</span> in the Jia Li <span class="hlt">Model</span> for Genetically Altered mosquitoes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Global Asymptotic <span class="hlt">Stability</span> in the Jia Li <span class="hlt">Model</span> for Genetically Altered mosquitoes Robert J. Sacker@csupomona.edu Keywords: Difference equation, global <span class="hlt">stability</span>, genetically altered mosquitoes AMS 2000 Subject and filariasis continue to have an impact on populations worldwide. The Anopheles strains of mosquitoes</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sacker, Robert J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ai.stanford.edu/~latombe/papers/h-bond-stability/ICMLC2011.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Modelling</span> Hydrogen Bond <span class="hlt">Stability</span> by Regression Trees Igor Chikalov, Mikhail Moshkov</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Modelling</span> Hydrogen Bond <span class="hlt">Stability</span> by Regression Trees Igor Chikalov, Mikhail Moshkov Mathematical-mail: peggyyao@stanford.edu Hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) play a key role in both the formation and <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> A hydrogen bond (H-bond) corresponds to the attractive electrostatic interaction between a covalent pair D</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pratt, Vaughan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012APS..DPPBP8150N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Two-fluid edge plasma <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> in divertor tokamak geometry</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Plasma in the edge region of tokamaks sets a boundary condition for the core plasma and interacts with plasma facing components. Edge Localized Modes, which occur in some high-confinement mode plasmas, can restrict the pedestal height and send large heat loads to the divertor. This work applies 2DX, a code capable of solving eigenvalue problems of any fluid <span class="hlt">model</span> [1], to the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluid <span class="hlt">models</span> associated with the edge region. Currently, this code has been successfully benchmarked against linear ideal MHD codes such as ELITE [2] for simple shifted circle geometry and ballooning dominated cases of peeling-ballooning (P-B) modes [3]. We extend this simple geometry study to peeling dominated cases before studying P-B modes in the more general case of strongly shaped two-fluid plasmas. Moreover, this code can be used to extend <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of P-B modes across the separatrix to assess the effect of the scrape off layer <span class="hlt">model</span> on <span class="hlt">stability</span>. Ultimately, this code can also be benchmarked against non-ideal MHD <span class="hlt">models</span>.[4pt] [1] D.A. Baver et al., Comp. Phys. Comm. 182, 1610 (2011).[0pt] [2] H.R. Wilson et al., Phys. Plasma 9, 1277 (2002).[0pt] [3] P.B. Snyder et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056115 (2005).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Neiser, Tom; Baver, Derek; Carter, Troy; Myra, James; Snyder, Philip; Umansky, Maxim</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1102.2695v2"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of an autonomous system in loop quantum cosmology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We discuss the <span class="hlt">stability</span> properties of an autonomous system in loop quantum cosmology. The system is described by a self-interacting scalar field $\\phi$ with positive potential $V$, coupled with a barotropic fluid in the Universe. With $\\Gamma=VV"/V'^2$ considered as a function of $\\lambda=V'/V$, the autonomous system is extended from three dimensions to four dimensions. We find that the dynamic behaviors of a subset, not all, of the fixed points are independent of the form of the potential. Considering the higher-order derivatives of the potential, we get an infinite-dimensional autonomous system which can describe the dynamical behavior of the scalar field with more general potential. We find that there is just one scalar-field-dominated scaling solution in the loop quantum cosmology scenario.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kui Xiao; Jian-Yang Zhu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20120013662&hterms=fee&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dfee"> <span id="translatedtitle">Flexible Launch Vehicle <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> Using Steady and Unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Launch vehicles frequently experience a reduced <span class="hlt">stability</span> margin through the transonic Mach number range. This reduced <span class="hlt">stability</span> margin can be caused by the aerodynamic undamping one of the lower-frequency flexible or rigid body modes. <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of the behavior of a flexible vehicle is routinely performed with quasi-steady aerodynamic line loads derived from steady rigid aerodynamics. However, a quasi-steady aeroelastic <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> can be unconservative at the critical Mach numbers, where experiment or unsteady computational aeroelastic <span class="hlt">analysis</span> show a reduced or even negative aerodynamic damping.Amethod of enhancing the quasi-steady aeroelastic <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of a launch vehicle with unsteady aerodynamics is developed that uses unsteady computational fluid dynamics to compute the response of selected lower-frequency modes. The response is contained in a time history of the vehicle line loads. A proper orthogonal decomposition of the unsteady aerodynamic line-load response is used to reduce the scale of data volume and system identification is used to derive the aerodynamic stiffness, damping, and mass matrices. The results are compared with the damping and frequency computed from unsteady computational aeroelasticity and from a quasi-steady <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. The results show that incorporating unsteady aerodynamics in this way brings the enhanced quasi-steady aeroelastic <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> into close agreement with the unsteady computational aeroelastic results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bartels, Robert E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41763897"> <span id="translatedtitle">Formal uncertainty <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of a Lagrangian photochemical air pollution <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study applied Monte Carlo <span class="hlt">analysis</span> with Latin hypercube sampling to evaluate the effects of uncertainty in air parcel trajectory paths, emissions, rate constants, deposition affinities, mixing heights, and atmospheric <span class="hlt">stability</span> on predictions from a vertically resolved photochemical trajectory <span class="hlt">model</span>. Uncertainties in concentrations of ozone and other secondary compounds and in predicted changes due to 25% reductions in motor vehicle</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Michelle S. Bergin; K. Petrini; J. R. Dhieux; J. B. Milford; G. S. Noblet; Robert A. Harley</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AIPC.1493..559K"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of a time-periodic 2-dof MEMS structure</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are becoming important for all kinds of industrial applications. Among them are filters in communication devices, due to the growing demand for efficient and accurate filtering of signals. In recent developments single degree of freedom (1-dof) oscillators, that are operated at a parametric resonances, are employed for such tasks. Typically vibration damping is low in such MEM systems. While parametric excitation (PE) is used so far to take advantage of a parametric resonance, this contribution suggests to also exploit parametric anti-resonances in order to improve the damping behavior of such systems. <span class="hlt">Modeling</span> aspects of a 2-dof MEM system and first results of the <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the non-linear and the linearized system are the focus of this paper. In principle the investigated system is an oscillating mechanical system with two degrees of freedom x = [x1x2]T that can be described by Mx+Cx+K1x+K3(x2)x+Fes(x,V(t)) = 0. The system is inherently non-linear because of the cubic mechanical stiffness K3 of the structure, but also because of electrostatic forces (1+cos(?t))Fes(x) that act on the system. Electrostatic forces are generated by comb drives and are proportional to the applied time-periodic voltage V(t). These drives also provide the means to introduce time-periodic coefficients, i.e. parametric excitation (1+cos(?t)) with frequency ?. For a realistic MEM system the coefficients of the non-linear set of differential equations need to be scaled for efficient numerical treatment. The final mathematical <span class="hlt">model</span> is a set of four non-linear time-periodic homogeneous differential equations of first order. Numerical results are obtained from two different methods. The linearized time-periodic (LTP) system is studied by calculating the Monodromy matrix of the system. The eigenvalues of this matrix decide on the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the LTP-system. To study the unabridged non-linear system, the bifurcation software ManLab is employed. Continuation <span class="hlt">analysis</span> including <span class="hlt">stability</span> evaluations are executed and show the frequency ranges for which the 2-dof system becomes unstable due to parametric resonances. Moreover, the existence of frequency intervals are shown where enhanced damping for the system is observed for this MEMS. The results from the <span class="hlt">stability</span> studies are confirmed by simulation results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kniffka, Till Jochen; Welte, Johannes; Ecker, Horst</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780005094&hterms=PISTON+AIRCRAFT+1938&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DPISTON%2BAIRCRAFT%2B1938"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aeroelastic <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the AD-1 manned oblique-wing aircraft</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The AD-1 manned flight test program was conducted to evaluate the <span class="hlt">stability</span>, control and handling characteristics of oblique wing aircraft. The results of the aeroelastic <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> are presented for both the wing alone and the wing with ailerons. A comparison was made between the results obtained using the traditional k-method of flutter <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and the results using the PK or British method of flutter <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. Studies were performed using the latest version of the NASTRAN computer code as well as the PASS/FLUT program.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rutkowski, M. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12762850"> <span id="translatedtitle">Parametric <span class="hlt">stability</span> evaluation in computer experiments on the mathematical <span class="hlt">model</span> of Drosophila control gene subnetwork.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using the method of generalized threshold <span class="hlt">models</span>, the problem is formulated and solved to evaluate the parametric <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the <span class="hlt">model</span> of a gene subnetwork controlling the early ontogenesis of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Computer experiments have been performed to test the parametric <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the <span class="hlt">model</span>. Quantitative evaluations have been obtained for parametric <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the Drosophila gene subnetwork in nuclei along the embryo's anterior-posterior axis. The results of computer experiments have been compared with the previous research data on "sensitivity" of functioning regimes to random changes of the parameters in the <span class="hlt">models</span> of prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems, namely the system controlling the lambda-phage development and the subsystem controlling the flower morphogenesis of Arabidopsis thaliana. The obtained results confirm high parametric <span class="hlt">stability</span> of gene networks that control the development of organisms. PMID:12762850</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tchuraev, Rustem N; Galimzyanov, Alexander V</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6632363"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Modelling</span> of dual <span class="hlt">stability</span> in a cable-in-conduit conductor</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A zero dimensional <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">model</span> has been developed for cable-in-conduit superconductors. The <span class="hlt">model</span> is effective in simulating the multi-valued <span class="hlt">stability</span> behaviour in the vicinity of the limiting current. This has been by modifying the helium heat transfer coefficient to account for inertial and fractional terms which affect the induced helium flow. Although this effect is treated qualitatively on a pseudo-one-dimensional basis, the <span class="hlt">model</span> can reproduce with remarkable accuracy the multi-valued <span class="hlt">stability</span> behaviour shown in earlier measurements performed by Lue, et al. The influence of the steady state mass flow is discussed, and a first order approximation of its effect is introduced in the <span class="hlt">model</span> showing how an increase of the steady flow tends to wash-away'' the multiple <span class="hlt">stability</span> region as observed in the experiment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bottura, L. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany, F.R.). NET Design Team); Minervini, J.V. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/d1788w70thl23228.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> in compressible, flat-plate boundary-layers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">stability</span> problem of two-dimensional compressible flat-plate boundary layers is handled using the linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> theory.\\u000a The <span class="hlt">stability</span> equations obtained from three-dimensional compressible NavierStokes equations are solved simultaneously with\\u000a two-dimensional mean flow equations, using an efficient shoot-search technique for adiabatic wall condition. In the <span class="hlt">analysis</span>,\\u000a a wide range of Mach numbers extending well into the hypersonic range are considered for</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Serkan zgen; Senem Atalayer K?rcal?</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ZaMP...65..905Z"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of an interactive system of wave equation and heat equation with memory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper is devoted to the <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of an interaction system comprised of a wave equation and a heat equation with memory, where the hereditary heat conduction is due to Gurtin-Pipkin law or Coleman-Gurtin law. First, we show the strong asymptotic <span class="hlt">stability</span> of solutions to this system. Then, the exponential <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the interaction system is obtained when the hereditary heat conduction is of Gurtin-Pipkin type. Further, we show the lack of uniform decay of the interaction system when the heat conduction law is of Coleman-Gurtin type.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Qiong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/22622891"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Analysis</span> and time <span class="hlt">stability</span> of activable hydrospheric tracers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of EDTA or DTPA complexed In, Dy, Sm and La hydrospheric tracers at ng\\/l level in sea water as well as fresh\\u000a water, employing coprecipitation and neutron activation <span class="hlt">analysis</span> has been evaluated. Laboratory experiments were performed\\u000a for one month to examine the effect of (i) sediments plus suspended particulates, (ii) suspended particulates and (iii) pure\\u000a water on the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">I. Drabaek</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50145426"> <span id="translatedtitle">Self-testing and self-tuning of power system <span class="hlt">stabilizers</span> using Prony <span class="hlt">analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents a new method for self-testing and self-tuning of power system <span class="hlt">stabilizers</span> (PSSs) using Prony <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. Prony <span class="hlt">analysis</span> detects oscillation frequency, damping, phase and amplitude in measured waveforms. By applying this technique to signals of generator speed, output power, and generator internal induced voltage, weak damping oscillations are detected and the PSS parameters can be modified to damp</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Amono; M. Watanabe; M. Banjo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/808406"> <span id="translatedtitle">Design <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> Report for 244-AR Interim <span class="hlt">Stabilization</span> Exhaust Ventilation Ducting</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report documents the design <span class="hlt">analysis</span> performed for the exhaust ducting associated with the 244-AR Interim <span class="hlt">Stabilization</span> Project. The exhaust ducting connects portable exhausters PORO5 and PORO6 to the existing east dog house of the 291-AR filter vault and the vessel ventilation system. This <span class="hlt">analysis</span> examines loads on the ductwork and ductwork supports.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">RUTHERFORD, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-11-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://web1.pas.rochester.edu/~bearclaw/paper_library/MiuraPritchett82.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonlocal <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the MHD Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a compressible plasma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A general <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is performed for the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in sheared magnetohydrodynamic flow of finite thickness in a compressible plasma. The <span class="hlt">analysis</span> allows for arbitrary orientation of the magnetic field B, velocity flow v, and wave vector k in the plane perpendicular to the velocity gradient, and no restrictions are imposed on the sound or Alfven Mach numbers. The</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Miura; P. L. Pritchett</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pearlx.snu.ac.kr/publication/iecec_bhs.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Large Signal <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of the Solar Array Power System Using the Controlled Load Characteristic</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A large signal <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the solar array regulator system is performed to facilitate the design and <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of a Low-Earth-Orbit satellite power system. The effective load characteristics of every controllable method in the solar array regulator system, such as the constant power load, variable power load, constant voltage load, constant current load, and constant resistive load, are classified</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hyunsu Bae; Jaeho Lee; Bohyung Cho</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1407.2566v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Decompositions of Hilbert Spaces, <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> and Convergence Probabilities for Discrete-Time Quantum Dynamical Semigroups</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate convergence properties of discrete-time semigroup quantum dynamics, including asymptotic <span class="hlt">stability</span>, probability and speed of convergence to target pure states and subspaces. These are of interest in the <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of uncontrolled evolutions as well as in the engineering of dynamics for quantum information processing. Two Hilbert space decompositions that allow to check <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the target and estimation of the speed of convergence are constructed. When the target is not attractive, a formula for computing its asymptotic probability is provided.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Giuseppe Ilario Cirillo; Francesco Ticozzi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950026510&hterms=Prediction+Propane-Air+Turbulent+Flame&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3DPrediction%2BPropane-Air%2BTurbulent%2BFlame"> <span id="translatedtitle">Combustion-acoustic <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> for premixed gas turbine combustors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lean, prevaporized, premixed combustors are susceptible to combustion-acoustic instabilities. A <span class="hlt">model</span> was developed to predict eigenvalues of axial modes for combustion-acoustic interactions in a premixed combustor. This work extends previous work by including variable area and detailed chemical kinetics mechanisms, using the code LSENS. Thus the acoustic equations could be integrated through the flame zone. Linear perturbations were made of the continuity, momentum, energy, chemical species, and state equations. The qualitative accuracy of our approach was checked by examining its predictions for various unsteady heat release rate <span class="hlt">models</span>. Perturbations in fuel flow rate are currently being added to the <span class="hlt">model</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Darling, Douglas; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Oyediran, Ayo; Cowan, Lizabeth</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> 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showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014RMRE...47.2239L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comprehensive <span class="hlt">Stability</span> Evaluation of Rock Slope Using the Cloud <span class="hlt">Model</span>-Based Approach</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This article presents the cloud <span class="hlt">model</span>-based approach for comprehensive <span class="hlt">stability</span> evaluation of complicated rock slopes of hydroelectric stations in mountainous area. This approach is based on membership cloud <span class="hlt">models</span> which can account for randomness and fuzziness in slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> evaluation. The slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> is affected by various factors and each of which is ranked into five grades. The ranking factors are sorted into four categories. The ranking system of slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> is introduced and then the membership cloud <span class="hlt">models</span> are applied to analyze each ranking factor for generating cloud memberships. Afterwards, the obtained cloud memberships are synthesized with the factor weights given by experts for comprehensive <span class="hlt">stability</span> evaluation of rock slopes. The proposed approach is used for the <span class="hlt">stability</span> evaluation of the left abutment slope in Jinping 1 Hydropower Station. It is shown that the cloud <span class="hlt">model</span>-based strategy can well consider the effects of each ranking factor and therefore is feasible and reliable for comprehensive <span class="hlt">stability</span> evaluation of rock slopes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu, Zaobao; Shao, Jianfu; Xu, Weiya; Xu, Fei</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20483879"> <span id="translatedtitle">A simplified approach for slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of uncontrolled waste dumps.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of municipal solid waste has always been problematic because of the heterogeneous nature of the waste materials. The requirement for large testing equipment in order to obtain representative samples has identified the need for simplified approaches to obtain the unit weight and shear strength parameters of the waste. In the present study, two of the most recently published approaches for determining the unit weight and shear strength parameters of the waste have been incorporated into a slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> using the Bishop method to prepare slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> charts. The slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> charts were prepared for uncontrolled waste dumps having no liner and leachate collection systems with pore pressure ratios of 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5, considering the most critical slip surface passing through the toe of the slope. As the proposed slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> charts were prepared by considering the change in unit weight as a function of height, they reflect field conditions better than accepting a constant unit weight approach in the <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. They also streamline the selection of slope or height as a function of the desired factor of safety. PMID:20483879</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Turer, Dilek; Turer, Ahmet</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012Cryo...52..739K"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of thermal <span class="hlt">stability</span> of conduction-cooled LTS magnet</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The temperature <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the conduction-cooled or cryogen-free magnet is governed by the heat balance between the heat generation rate and the cooling rate by the cryocooler through the thermal links. The dynamic thermal profile of a conduction-cooled NbTi magnet during charging and discharging process has been analyzed in terms of theoretically evaluated dynamic heat loss profile. The NbTi coil was energized up to 90 A with 2 A/min, 4 A/min, and 6 A/min sweep rates and the corresponding hysteretic AC loss and resistive heat loss have been estimated with all three sweep rates. The equilibrium temperatures of the magnet are 3.23 K and 3.82 K at zero and 90 A current respectively. At the beginning of the charging process, the AC loss has dominant role in the thermal profile of magnet but resistive heat loss takes over the dominant role towards the end of charging process. The thermal profile of the magnet during continuous charging has been compared with discharging of the magnet and step-wise charging.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kar, S.; Konduru, P.; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Rajesh; Sharma, R. G.; Roy, A.; Datta, T. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/945515"> <span id="translatedtitle">Contrast <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and <span class="hlt">stability</span> on the ExAO testbed</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High-contrast adaptive optics systems, such as those needed to image extrasolar planets, are known to require excellent wavefront control and diffraction suppression. The Laboratory for Adaptive Optics at UC Santa Cruz is investigating limits to high-contrast imaging in support of the Gemini Planet Imager. Previous contrast measurements were made with a simple single-opening prolate spheroid shaped pupil that produced a limited region of high-contrast, particularly when wavefront errors were corrected with the 1024-actuator Boston Micromachines MEMS deformable mirror currently in use on the testbed. A more sophisticated shaped pupil is now being used that has a much larger region of interest facilitating a better understanding of high-contrast measurements. In particular we examine the effect of heat sources in the testbed on PSF <span class="hlt">stability</span>. We find that rms image motion scales as 0.02 {lambda}/D per watt when the heat source is near the pupil plane. As a result heat sources of greater than 5 watts should be avoided near pupil planes for GPI. The safest place to introduce heat is near a focal plane. Heat also can effect the standard deviation of the high-contrast region but in the final instrument other sources of error should be more significant.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Evans, J; Thomas, S; Gavel, D; Dillon, D; Macintosh, B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-06-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.3119M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Integration of complex <span class="hlt">models</span> for slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> and landslide runout with GIS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are common tools for landslide susceptibility and hazard <span class="hlt">analysis</span> on various spatial scales, from global to local. Complex multivariate statistical methods are successfully used in combination with GIS for studies of landslide susceptibility at the regional scale. In contrast, relatively simple deterministic or semi-deterministic methods are often employed for detailed studies at the local scale (for example infinite slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">models</span> or two-parameter friction <span class="hlt">models</span> for runout). These methods, however, are inappropriate in many cases, and more complex approaches would be required instead. The main reasons for the scarcity of more advanced GIS-based deterministic <span class="hlt">modelling</span> tools are that (a) in contrast to many statistical methods, which, though mathematically complex, rely on the simple overlay of maps, deterministic <span class="hlt">models</span> for slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> or landslide motion are often geometrically complex, and (b) that many deterministic <span class="hlt">models</span> are expressed in non-rectangular coordinate systems. Whilst these, chosen by engineers, physicians, or mathematicians, are adequate for the problems to be solved, they seem to discourage geoinformation scientists. The work presented here is understood as an attempt to overcome these problems by involving geoinformation scientists, engineers, and mathematicians in a common project. The following two gaps were attacked: (1) A GIS-based <span class="hlt">model</span> for rotational slope failures. Infinite slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">models</span>, which are frequently used in combination with GIS, are suitable for the identification of shallow translational slope failures. Theoretically, they are only valid for cohesionless soil and a constant inclination of the slope. They fail for deep-seated rotational failures. Being more complex from a geometrical point of view, rotational failures are usually <span class="hlt">modelled</span> based on a pre-defined longitudinal section, assuming a circular or elliptical slip surface. The most critical slip surface is often approached with a Monte Carlo simulation. Only few attempts have been made to develop GIS-based, three-dimensional software including such <span class="hlt">models</span>, though this would be essential for allowing realistic simulations of landslides in complex terrain. (2) A fully deterministic GIS-based <span class="hlt">model</span> for the runout of debris flows and related phenomena, based on the Savage-Hutter theory. The motion of so-called granular flows is a highly complex phenomenon. Semi-deterministic approaches (e.g. two-parameter friction <span class="hlt">models</span>) are frequently applied in combination with GIS, but fully deterministic <span class="hlt">models</span> are required for detailed studies of travel distance, velocity, and energy of granular flows. The most advanced concept for understanding and <span class="hlt">modelling</span> such flows is the Savage-Hutter theory, a system of differential equations based on the conservation of mass and momentum. The equations have been solved for a number of idealized topographies, but not yet satisfactorily for arbitrary terrain, and no attempts to use them directly with GIS were known up to now. Both <span class="hlt">models</span> were integrated with the Open Source GIS software GRASS GIS as raster-based modules. Tests with study areas in Italy and Argentina were promising, but also highlighted a strong need for further research.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mergili, M.; Schratz, K.; Ostermann, A.; Fellin, W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/27864"> <span id="translatedtitle">Probabilistic <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of compression system <span class="hlt">stability</span> using importance sampling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The probability of instability is computed via a new approach based on Importance Sampling and a dynamic compression system <span class="hlt">model</span>. In contrast to ordinary Monte Carlo methods Importance Sampling offers reduced confidence ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kambouchev, Nayden Dimitrov, 1980-</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/970258"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Model</span> building techniques for <span class="hlt">analysis</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The practice of mechanical engineering for product development has evolved into a complex activity that requires a team of specialists for success. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has product engineers, mechanical designers, design engineers, manufacturing engineers, mechanical analysts and experimentalists, qualification engineers, and others that contribute through product realization teams to develop new mechanical hardware. The goal of SNL's Design Group is to change product development by enabling design teams to collaborate within a virtual <span class="hlt">model</span>-based environment whereby <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is used to guide design decisions. Computer-aided design (CAD) <span class="hlt">models</span> using PTC's Pro/ENGINEER software tools are heavily relied upon in the product definition stage of parts and assemblies at SNL. The three-dimensional CAD solid <span class="hlt">model</span> acts as the design solid <span class="hlt">model</span> that is filled with all of the detailed design definition needed to manufacture the parts. <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> is an important part of the product development process. The CAD design solid <span class="hlt">model</span> (DSM) is the foundation for the creation of the <span class="hlt">analysis</span> solid <span class="hlt">model</span> (ASM). Creating an ASM from the DSM currently is a time-consuming effort; the turnaround time for results of a design needs to be decreased to have an impact on the overall product development. This effort can be decreased immensely through simple Pro/ENGINEER <span class="hlt">modeling</span> techniques that summarize to the method features are created in a part <span class="hlt">model</span>. This document contains recommended <span class="hlt">modeling</span> techniques that increase the efficiency of the creation of the ASM from the DSM.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Walther, Howard P.; McDaniel, Karen Lynn; Keener, Donald; Cordova, Theresa Elena; Henry, Ronald C.; Brooks, Sean; Martin, Wilbur D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/215685"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> of hypersonic reacting stagnation flow of a detonatable gas mixture by dynamical systems <span class="hlt">analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">stability</span> characteristics of the reacting hypersonic flow of the fuel/oxidizer mixture in the stagnation region of a blunt body are studied. The conditions for oscillations of the combustion front are assumed to be determined mainly by the flow conditions at the stagnation region. The density at the stagnation region is assumed to be constant at hypersonic flow conditions. By assuming a simplified flow <span class="hlt">model</span>, the time dependent flow equations, including the heat addition due to the chemical reactions, are reduced to a second-order nonlinear differential equation for the instantaneous temperature. The solutions are analyzed assuming a one-step chemical reaction with zero-order and first-order processes using dynamical systems methods. These methods are used to determine the <span class="hlt">stability</span> boundaries in terms of the flow and chemical reaction parameters. It is shown that the zero-order reaction has nonperiodic solutions that may lead to explosion whereas the first-order and higher-order reactions may have periodic solutions indicating oscillations. The zero-order <span class="hlt">analysis</span> also reaffirms the requirements for a minimum size blunt body for the establishment of a detonation (in agreement with classical detonation theory) and the first-order <span class="hlt">analysis</span> indicates a minimum body size for establishment of oscillations. The oscillation frequencies are calculated using the small perturbation approximation for the temperature oscillations. These frequencies are compared with results from published data on spheres and hemisphere cylindrical bodies fired into hydrogen-oxygen and acetylene oxygen mixtures. Very good agreement is found between the measured and calculated results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tivanov, G.; Rom, J. [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel)] [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EPJD...68...88T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of collisionless reconnection in the presence of an equilibrium flow aligned with the guide field</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The influence of a velocity jet, directed along a magnetic guide field, on the linear evolution of collisionless reconnection is investigated both analytically and numerically. The <span class="hlt">analysis</span> covers both the small and large ?' regimes, with ?' indicating the standard tearing <span class="hlt">stability</span> parameter, and is carried out, in slab geometry, by means of a reduced four-field <span class="hlt">model</span> for magnetic reconnection accounting for two-fluid effects. Analytical dispersion relations are derived in both regimes and their predictions on the growth rates are tested against numerical simulations. In both regimes the presence of the flow is shown to have a <span class="hlt">stabilizing</span> effect, with growth rates decreasing when increasing the amplitude of the equilibrium flow. The analytical results predict that a decrease in the growth rate could be obtained also by reducing the characteristic width of the equilibrium flow profile. Such <span class="hlt">stabilizing</span> effects appear to be stronger in the small ?' regime. A very good quantitative agreement is found between the analytical predictions and the numerical results. As a complement to the <span class="hlt">analysis</span>, we also consider, in the small ?' regime, the dispersion relation in the absence of equilibrium flow, which extends a previously derived dispersion relation by including a corrective term due to plasma parallel compressibility. It is shown that such correction can have a <span class="hlt">stabilizing</span> effect and yields a better agreement with the numerical results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tassi, Emanuele; Grasso, Daniela; Comisso, Luca</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/3684477"> <span id="translatedtitle">Restoring Macroeconomic <span class="hlt">Stability</span> through Fiscal Adjustment: a RealFinancial CGE <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> for India</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">AbstractDeveloping-country attempts to regain macroeconomic <span class="hlt">stability</span> through fiscal adjustment are often unsuccessful in reducing inflation and balance-of-payments (BoP) disequilibrium. This paper examines why this may be so in the light of India's experience with <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> in response to the BoP crisis in 1991. It does so using a novel realfinancial computable general-equilibrium <span class="hlt">model</span>. Focusing on credit rather than money, the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. W. M. Naastepad</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/893934"> <span id="translatedtitle">Computaional <span class="hlt">Modeling</span> of the <span class="hlt">Stability</span> of Crevice Corrosion of Wetted SS316L</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">stability</span> of localized corrosion sites on SS 316L exposed to atmospheric conditions was studied computationally. The localized corrosion system was decoupled computationally by considering the wetted cathode and the crevice anode separately and linking them via a constant potential boundary condition at the mouth of the crevice. The potential of interest for <span class="hlt">stability</span> was the repassivation potential. The limitations on the ability of the cathode that are inherent due to the restricted geometry were assessed in terms of the dependence on physical and electrochemical parameters. Physical parameters studied include temperature, electrolyte layer thickness, solution conductivity, and the size of the cathode, as well as the crevice gap for the anode. The current demand of the crevice was determined considering a constant crevice solution composition that simulates the critical crevice solution as described in the literature. An <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of variance showed that the solution conductivity and the length of the cathode were the most important parameters in determining the total cathodic current capacity of the external surface. A semi-analytical equation was derived for the total current from a restricted geometry held at a constant potential at one end. The equation was able to reproduce all the <span class="hlt">model</span> computation results both for the wetted external cathode and the crevice and give good explanation on the effects of physicochemical and kinetic parameters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">F. Cui; F.J. Presuel-Moreno; R.G. Kelly</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-04-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25162627"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lateral dynamic flight <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a <span class="hlt">model</span> hoverfly in normal and inclined stroke-plane hovering.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many insects hover with their wings beating in a horizontal plane ('normal hovering'), while some insects, e.g., hoverflies and dragonflies, hover with inclined stroke-planes. Here, we investigate the lateral dynamic flight <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a hovering <span class="hlt">model</span> hoverfly. The aerodynamic derivatives are computed using the method of computational fluid dynamics, and the equations of motion are solved by the techniques of eigenvalue and eigenvector <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. The following is shown: The flight of the insect is unstable at normal hovering (stroke-plane angle equals 0) and the instability becomes weaker as the stroke-plane angle increases; the flight becomes stable at a relatively large stroke-plane angle (larger than about 24). As previously shown, the instability at normal hovering is due to a positive roll-moment/side-velocity derivative produced by the 'changing-LEV-axial-velocity' effect. When the stroke-plane angle increases, the wings bend toward the back of the body, and the 'changing-LEV-axial-velocity' effect decreases; in addition, another effect, called the 'changing-relative-velocity' effect (the 'lateral wind', which is due to the side motion of the insect, changes the relative velocity of its wings), becomes increasingly stronger. This causes the roll-moment/side-velocity derivative to first decrease and then become negative, resulting in the above change in <span class="hlt">stability</span> as a function of the stroke-plane angle. PMID:25162627</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xu, Na; Sun, Mao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://fluid.ippt.gov.pl/ictam04/text/sessions/docs/SM13/12531/SM13_12531_new.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">THERMOMECHANICAL <span class="hlt">STABILITY</span> AND VIBRATION <span class="hlt">ANALYSIS</span> OF COMPOSITE SHELLS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The postbuckling and postbuckled vibration <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of curved panels subjected to thermo-mechanical loading is presented here. The formulation is based on the modified Sanders' theory incorporating the geometric nonlinearities. The multi-term Galerkin's technique is used to obtain the true postbuckled shape of curved panels, postbuckled frequencies and associated mode shapes. The buckling and postbuckling behavior of laminated curved panels (spherical</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Girish; L. S. Ramachandra</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=hypothesis+AND+testing&pg=6&id=EJ890287"> <span id="translatedtitle">Factor Loading Estimation Error and <span class="hlt">Stability</span> Using Exploratory Factor <span class="hlt">Analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Exploratory factor <span class="hlt">analysis</span> (EFA) is commonly employed to evaluate the factor structure of measures with dichotomously scored items. Generally, only the estimated factor loadings are provided with no reference to significance tests, confidence intervals, and/or estimated factor loading standard errors. This simulation study assessed factor loading</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sass, Daniel A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50876859"> <span id="translatedtitle">Economic <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of the <span class="hlt">Stability</span> in the Wind Turbine Selection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Selection of wind turbine is one of the main factors which affect the economics of wind power projects. The current domestic economic <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of wind turbine selection are relatively backward and the evaluation indexes are imperfect- -major concerned indicators are theoretic indicators such as characteristics of wind turbine and rated generating capacity, lacking of the assessment of actual wind turbine</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zeng Ming; A. Sikaer; Geng Weiting; Li Chen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.math.ruh.ac.lk/staff/janak/research/Somathilake-JRW-SOJRPaper-1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the <span class="hlt">Stability</span> and Growth Forms of a Mathematical <span class="hlt">Model</span> for growth of Coral Reefs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On the <span class="hlt">Stability</span> and Growth Forms of a Mathematical <span class="hlt">Model</span> for growth of Coral Reefs L. W carbonate) which takes place only on the outer surface of the coral reef itself. Then we proceed to study-Diffusion-Convection type mathematical <span class="hlt">model</span> for formation of corals is proposed based on a <span class="hlt">model</span> previously proposed in [1</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wedagedera, Janak R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50889750"> <span id="translatedtitle">A combined dynamics <span class="hlt">model</span> for active roll <span class="hlt">stability</span> control of ground vehicles</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents a combined dynamics <span class="hlt">modeling</span> methodology which can be used to establish a complex 4-DOF (degree of freedom) vehicle dynamics <span class="hlt">model</span> for active roll <span class="hlt">stability</span> control of ground vehicles. The methodology is based on setting up three coordinate systems centered on the ground, the vehicle roll center and CG (center of gravity) respectively. The complex vehicle dynamics <span class="hlt">model</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Duan-Feng Chu; Gang-Yan Li; Xiao-Yun Lu; J. Karl Hedrick</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40852929"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Modeling</span> nitrogen removal in water hyacinth ponds receiving effluent from waste <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> ponds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We developed a dynamic <span class="hlt">model</span> to predict nitrogen removal in water hyacinth ponds (WHPs) receiving effluent from waste <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> ponds (WSPs). The <span class="hlt">model</span> is based on the biofilm reaction on the root surface of plant and pond walls. The <span class="hlt">model</span> consists of mass balances of six main substrates including: particulate organic nitrogen (PON), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), ammonium (NH4+), nitrite</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Qitao Yi; Chinhyu Hur; Youngchul Kim</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://math.univ-lyon1.fr/~crauste/preprint06_1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Modelling</span> and Asymptotic <span class="hlt">Stability</span> of a Growth Factor-Dependent Stem Cells</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Modelling</span> and Asymptotic <span class="hlt">Stability</span> of a Growth Factor-Dependent Stem Cells Dynamics <span class="hlt">Model</span>) Abstract Under the action of growth factors, proliferating and nonproliferating hematopoietic stem cells population. We propose a mathe- matical <span class="hlt">model</span> describing the evolution of a hematopoietic stem cell</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Crauste, Fabien</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.upmc.fr/docs/00/56/14/14/PDF/R11003.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reduced resistive MHD with general density I: <span class="hlt">Model</span> and <span class="hlt">stability</span> results</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Reduced resistive MHD with general density I: <span class="hlt">Model</span> and <span class="hlt">stability</span> results B. Despr´es and R. Sart]. Reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) <span class="hlt">models</span> have been proposed [5] to investigate a special type. In this work we focus on mathematical aspects of reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) <span class="hlt">models</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' 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showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27090340"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Modeling</span> of Wind Turbines Based on Doubly-Fed Induction Generators for Power System <span class="hlt">Stability</span> Studies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper deals with <span class="hlt">modeling</span> of the doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) and the corresponding converter for <span class="hlt">stability</span> studies. To enable efficient computation, a reduced-order DFIG <span class="hlt">model</span> is developed that restricts the calculation to the fundamental frequency component. However, the <span class="hlt">model</span> enhancement introduced in this paper allows the consideration of the alternating components of the rotor current as well, which is</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Istvan Erlich; Jrg Kretschmann; Jens Fortmann; Stephan Mueller-Engelhardt; Holger Wrede</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25106008"> <span id="translatedtitle">Longitudinal implant <span class="hlt">stability</span> measurements based on resonance frequency <span class="hlt">analysis</span> after placement in healed or regenerated bone.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Primary <span class="hlt">stability</span> is an indicator of subsequent osseointegration of dental implants. However, few studies have compared the implant <span class="hlt">stability</span> among anatomical regions and bone types; thus, not enough data exist regarding the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of implants placed in regenerated bone (RB). The present study evaluated primary and long-term <span class="hlt">stability</span> of implants placed in RB and non-regenerated healed bone (HB). A total of 216 screw cylinder implants were placed in 216 patients (98 in HB and 118 in RB, 6 [RB6, N = 68] or 12 [RB12, N = 50] months after tooth extraction). Implant <span class="hlt">stability</span> was evaluated using resonance frequency <span class="hlt">analysis</span> (RFA) measured at the time of implant placement (E1), at the time of loading (4 months after placement, E2), and 4 months after loading (E3). Various clinically relevant measurements were obtained, such as implant diameter, length, and location, as well as bone quality. At E1, implant location, bone quality, and experimental group significantly affected implant <span class="hlt">stability</span> (all at P < .05). At E2, implant location, diameter, length, and experimental group significantly affected implant <span class="hlt">stability</span> (all at P < .05). At E3, bone quality, implant diameter, length, and experimental group significantly affected implant <span class="hlt">stability</span> (all at P < .01). <span class="hlt">Stability</span> for the RB12 group was significantly higher than all other corresponding values; further, the values did not change significantly over time. For the HB and RB6 groups, <span class="hlt">stability</span> was significantly higher at E2 than at E1 (P < .001) and was no different between E2 and E3. Implant location, length, and experimental group were associated with these differences (all at P < .05). Compared with HB and RB6, higher implant <span class="hlt">stability</span> may be achieved in regenerated bone 12 months post-extraction (RB12). This <span class="hlt">stability</span> was achieved at E1 and maintained for at least 8 months. Variables such as implant length, diameter, and bone quality affected the <span class="hlt">stability</span> differently over time. Implant <span class="hlt">stability</span> varied in different anatomic regions and with regard to different healing processes in the bone. PMID:25106008</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Deli, Giorgio; Petrone, Vincenzo; De Risi, Valeria; Tadic, Drazen; Zafiropoulos, Gregory-George</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4111957"> <span id="translatedtitle">Survival <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and regression <span class="hlt">models</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Time-to-event outcomes are common in medical research as they offer more information than simply whether or not an event occurred. To handle these outcomes, as well as censored observations where the event was not observed during follow-up, survival <span class="hlt">analysis</span> methods should be used. Kaplan-Meier estimation can be used to create graphs of the observed survival curves, while the log-rank test can be used to compare curves from different groups. If it is desired to test continuous predictors or to test multiple covariates at once, survival regression <span class="hlt">models</span> such as the Cox <span class="hlt">model</span> or the accelerated failure time <span class="hlt">model</span> (AFT) should be used. The choice of <span class="hlt">model</span> should depend on whether or not the assumption of the <span class="hlt">model</span> (proportional hazards for the Cox <span class="hlt">model</span>, a parametric distribution of the event times for the AFT <span class="hlt">model</span>) is met. The goal of this paper is to review basic concepts of survival <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. Discussions relating the Cox <span class="hlt">model</span> and the AFT <span class="hlt">model</span> will be provided. The use and interpretation of the survival methods <span class="hlt">model</span> are illustrated using an artificially simulated dataset. PMID:24810431</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">George, Brandon; Seals, Samantha; Aban, Inmaculada</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21149020"> <span id="translatedtitle">Slope <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> In Seismic Areas Of The Northern Apennines (Italy)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Several research works have been published on the slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> in the northern Tuscany (central Italy) and particularly in the seismic areas of Garfagnana and Lunigiana (Lucca and Massa-Carrara districts), aimed at analysing the slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> under static and dynamic conditions and mapping the landslide hazard. In addition, in situ and laboratory investigations are available for the study area, thanks to the activities undertaken by the Tuscany Seismic Survey. Based on such a huge information the co-seismic <span class="hlt">stability</span> of few ideal slope profiles have been analysed by means of Limit equilibrium method LEM - (pseudo-static) and Newmark sliding block <span class="hlt">analysis</span> (pseudo-dynamic). The <span class="hlt">analysis</span>--results gave indications about the most appropriate seismic coefficient to be used in pseudo-static <span class="hlt">analysis</span> after establishing allowable permanent displacement. Such indications are commented in the light of the Italian and European prescriptions for seismic <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> with pseudo-static approach. The <span class="hlt">stability</span> conditions, obtained from the previous analyses, could be used to define microzonation criteria for the study area.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lo Presti, D. [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Pisa, via Diotisalvi 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Fontana, T. [Cittafutura Ltd, V. S. Chiara no 9 Lucca (Italy); Marchetti, D. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Pisa, via S. Maria 53, 56126 Pisa (Italy)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-07-08</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.sftw.umac.mo/~yangmin/conferencepdf/C04-11-Li-Liu-Ans.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hybrid Kinematics and <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> for the Mobile Modular Manipulator</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper addresses the following issues: how to b uild the hybrid kinematics <span class="hlt">model</span> for the mobile mod ular manipulator, how to decompose a given task into mot ions to be carried out by the manipulator or the mo bile platform, and what conditions to meet to avoid the mobile modular manipulator from tip-over. In this paper, the post ure</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yangmin Li; Yugang Liu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/97/62/14/PDF/2009-088_hal.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Numerical <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of smoke layer <span class="hlt">stability</span> 6 Truchot(1)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">, France (2> Egis Tunnel, France (3) LMFA Lyon University, France ABSTRACT The EGSISTES project is a global the tunnel. In such a case, it must be ensure that smoke stay stratified even in the case of an aerodynamic CFD codes, FDS and Phoenics, based on two différent approaches for turbulence <span class="hlt">modelling</span>, are used</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMNH13A1589L"> <span id="translatedtitle">A New Method for System Reliability <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of Tailings Dam <span class="hlt">Stability</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">For the purpose of <span class="hlt">stability</span> evaluation, a tailings dam can be considered as an artificial slope made of special soil materials which mainly come from mine tailings. As a particular engineering project, a tailings dam generally has experienced multi-loop hydraulic sediments as well as a long-term consolidation in the process of construction. The characteristics of sediment and consolidation result in a unique distribution of the soil layers with significant uncertainties, which come from both nature development and various human activities, and thus cause the discrete and the variability of the physical-mechanical properties dramatically greater than the natural geo-materials. Therefore, the location of critical slip surface (CSS) of the dam usually presents a notable drift. So, it means that the reliability evaluation task for a tailings dam is a system reliability problem indeed. Unfortunately, the previous research of reliability of tailings dam was mainly confined to the limit equilibrium method (LEM), which has three obvious drawbacks. First, it just focused on the variability along the slip surface rather than the whole space of the dam. Second, a fixed CSS, instead of variable one, was concerned in most cases. Third, the shape of the CSS was usually simplified to a circular. The present paper tried to construct a new reliability <span class="hlt">analysis</span> <span class="hlt">model</span> combined with several advanced techniques involving finite difference method (FDM), Monte Carlo simulation (MCS), support vector machine (SVM) and particle swarm optimization (PSO). The new framework was consisted of four modules. The first one is the limit equilibrium finite difference mode, which employed the FLAC3D code to generate stress fields and then used PSO algorithm to search the location of CSS and corresponding minimum factor of safety (FOS). The most value of this module was that each realization of stress field would lead to a particular CSS and its FOS. In other words, the consideration of the drift of CSS was significant to system reliability <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. Besides, the CSS was described with non-circular shape, which was much more superior to the circular one. Moreover, compare with the LEM, the numerical method has the ability to reflect the variability in a whole space of the dam. The second one is the orthogonal design modules aimed to generate high-quality training samples according to the variability of soil layers. The third one is the response surface <span class="hlt">model</span> based on SVM, which was designed to obtain the explicit performance function through the well-prepared training samples. The fourth one is the MCS <span class="hlt">model</span>, which can perform steady and effective reliability <span class="hlt">analysis</span> through the explicit performance function. As a result, a new approach for reliability <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of tailings dam <span class="hlt">stability</span> was presented. As a case study, the Yong-ping Copper Mine Tailings Dam in Jiangxi Province of China was analyzed in detail by this new method. It was shown that the effectiveness of the new method is considerable. In sum, this research is geared towards providing new ideas and available examples for future reliability assessment of tailings dam <span class="hlt">stability</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu, X.; Tang, H.; Xiong, C.; Ni, W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1056492"> <span id="translatedtitle">Design and <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of the ITER Vertical <span class="hlt">Stability</span> Coils</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The ITER vertical <span class="hlt">stability</span> (VS) coils have been developed through the preliminary design phase by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Final design, prototyping and construction will be carried out by the Chinese Participant Team contributing lab, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ASIPP). The VS coils are a part of the in-vessel coil systems which include edge localized mode (ELM) coils as well as the VS coils. An overview of the ELM coils is provided in another paper at this conference. 15 The VS design employs four turns of stainless steel jacketed mineral insulated copper (SSMIC) conductors The mineral insulation is Magnesium Oxide (MgO). Joule and nuclear heat is removed by water flowing at 3 m/s through the hollow copper conductor. A key element in the design is that slightly elevated temperatures in the conductor and its support spine during operation impose compressive stresses that mitigate fatigue damage. Away from joints, and break-outs, conductor thermal stresses are low because of the axisymmetry of the winding (there are no corner bends as in the ELM coils).The 120 degree segment joint, and break-out or terminal regions are designed with similar but imperfect constraint compared with the ring coil portion of the VS. The support for the break-out region is made from a high strength copper alloy, CuCrZr. This is needed to conduct nuclear heat to the actively cooled conductor and to the vessel wall. The support "spine" for the ring coil portion of the VS is 316 stainless steel, held to the vessel with preloaded 718 bolts. Lorentz loads resulting from normal operating loads, disruption loads and loads from disruption currents in the support spine shared with vessel, are applied to the VS coil. The transmission of the Lorentz and thermal expansion loads from the "spine" to the vessel rails is via friction augmented with a restraining "lip" to ensure the coil frictional slip is minimal and acceptable. Stresses in the coil, joints, and break-outs are presented. These are compared with static and fatigue allowables. Design for fatigue is much less demanding than for the ELM coils. A total of 30,000 cycles is required for VS design. Loads on the vessel due to the thermal expansion of the coil and spine are significant. Efforts to reduce these by reducing the cross section of the spine have been made but the vessel still must support loads resulting from restraint of thermal expansion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peter H. Titus, et. al.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-06</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19830010579&hterms=nano+fiber&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dnano%2Bfiber"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Modelling</span> of dimensional <span class="hlt">stability</span> of fiber reinforced composite materials</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Various methods of predicting the expansion and diffusion properties of composite laminates are reviewed. The prediction equations for continuous fiber composites can be applied to SMC composites as the effective fiber aspect ratio in the latter is large enough. The effect of hygrothermal expansion on the dimensional <span class="hlt">stability</span> of composite laminates was demonstrated through the warping of unsymmetric graphite/epoxy laminates. The warping is very sensitive to the size of the panel, and to the moisture content which is in turn sensitive to the relative humidity in the environment. Thus, any long term creep test must be carried out in a humidity-controlled environment. Environmental effects in SMC composites and bulk polyester were studied under seven different environments. The SMC composites chosen are SMC-R25, SMC-R40, and SMC-R65.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hahn, H. T.; Hosangadi, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19830024405&hterms=cycle+financial&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dcycle%2Bfinancial"> <span id="translatedtitle">Classical linear-control <span class="hlt">analysis</span> applied to business-cycle dynamics and <span class="hlt">stability</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Linear control <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is applied as an aid in understanding the fluctuations of business cycles in the past, and to examine monetary policies that might improve <span class="hlt">stabilization</span>. The <span class="hlt">analysis</span> shows how different policies change the frequency and damping of the economic system dynamics, and how they modify the amplitude of the fluctuations that are caused by random disturbances. Examples are used to show how policy feedbacks and policy lags can be incorporated, and how different monetary strategies for <span class="hlt">stabilization</span> can be analytically compared. Representative numerical results are used to illustrate the main points.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wingrove, R. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26649035"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of a CALM floating offshore structure</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">It has been shown that there exists the necessary and sufficient condition for the existence of stable periodic response for a type of catenary anchor leg mooring system, (CALM). The mathematical <span class="hlt">model</span> shows that the governing equation of motion for the system is a non-linear parametric second-order ordinary differential equation. The above-mentioned conditions have been obtained using the Schauder's fixed-point</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ebrahim Esmailzadeh; Avesta Goodarzi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21688653"> <span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of sevoflurane <span class="hlt">stability</span> during low flow anesthesia].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using the mass spectrometric method we studied the interaction of volatile anesthetic sevoflurane with a CO2 absorber during low flow anesthesia (0.5 l/min fresh gas mixture). The results of measurements of sevoflurane and one of the most toxic breakdown products of sevoflurane CF = C(CF3)-O-CH2F (substance A) throughout the anesthesia in the mode of inhalation-exhalation. The highest recorded concentration of substance A was 65 ppm. Biochemical <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of blood before and after anesthesia did not show connection with nephropathy and function of liver toxicity. PMID:21688653</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Elizarov, A Iu; Ershov, T D; Levshankov, A I</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10189073"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nuclear reactor dynamic <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> using hybrid symbolic-numeric methods</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The evaluation of system <span class="hlt">stability</span> is an integral part of reactor design. This work focuses on a reduced sodium void worth, metal fueled, liquid metal cooled, fast reactor with a single feedback path associated with the reactor outlet coolant temperature under low reactor power, low reactor coolant flow conditions such as might be found after a loss of flow without scram in some passively safe reactor designs. <span class="hlt">Stability</span> characterization is performed as system parameters, such as temperature coefficient of reactivity, reactor coolant flow, and natural circulation flow, vary. The system <span class="hlt">model</span> represents the reactor, the detailed thermal hydraulic reactivity feedback path associated with reactor outlet temperature, and decay heat. The computational procedure consists of a main numeric task which takes input functions generated by auxiliary symbolic preprocessing. In the symbolic stage, transcendental transfer functions are rationalized and introduced in a complex-variable root-locus form of the characteristic equation to yield real polynomial functions. In the MATLAB handled numeric stage, <span class="hlt">stability</span> is assessed through Routh`s algebraic <span class="hlt">stability</span> criterion. The procedure is applied to reactor cores of different shape and the influence of core geometrical changes on <span class="hlt">stability</span> regions, <span class="hlt">stability</span> boundary, <span class="hlt">stability</span> margin and frequency of oscillation is discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Depiante, E.V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/288566"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Simplest Walking <span class="hlt">Model</span>: <span class="hlt">Stability</span>, Complexity, and Scaling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We demonstrate that an irreducibly simple, uncontrolled, 2D, two-link <span class="hlt">model</span>, vaguely resembling human legs, can walk down a shallow slope, powered only by gravity. This <span class="hlt">model</span> is the simplest special case of the passive-dynamic <span class="hlt">models</span> pioneered by McGeer (1990a). It has two rigid massless legs hinged at the hip, a point-mass at the hip, and infinitesimal point-masses at the feet.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mariano Garcia; Anindya Chatterjee; Andy Ruina; Michael Coleman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2823222"> <span id="translatedtitle">Finite element <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the effect of cementing concepts on implant <span class="hlt">stability</span> and cement fatigue failure</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background and purpose Two contradictory cementing techniques (using an undersized stem versus a canal-filling stem) can both lead to excellent survival rates, a phenomenon known as the French paradox. Furthermore, previous studies have indicated that the type of bone supporting the cement mantle may affect implant survival. To further evaluate the mechanical consequences of variations in cementing technique, we studied the effect of implant size and type of bone supporting the cement mantle on the mechanical performance of cemented total hip arthroplasty, using finite element <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. Methods In a generic 2-dimensional plane-strain finite element <span class="hlt">model</span> of a transverse section of a cemented total hip arthroplasty with a Charnley-Kerboull stem, we varied implant size and type of bone supporting the cement mantle. The <span class="hlt">models</span> were subjected to 2 106 cycles of an alternating loading pattern of torque and a transverse load. During this loading history, we simulated cement fatigue crack formation and tracked rotational <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the implant. Results Canal-filling stems produced fewer cement cracks and less rotation than undersized stems. Cement mantles surrounded by trabecular bone produced more cement cracks and implant rotation than cement mantles surrounded by cortical bone. Interpretation Our investigation provides a possible explanation for the good clinical results obtained with canal-filling Charnley-Kerboull implants. Our findings also indicate that inferior mechanical properties are obtained with these implants if the cement is supported by trabecular bone, which may be minimized by an optimal cementing technique. PMID:19421913</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">van Aken, Jantien; Scheerlinck, Thierry; Verdonschot, Nico</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3486731"> <span id="translatedtitle">Life sciences domain <span class="hlt">analysis</span> <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objective Meaningful exchange of information is a fundamental challenge in collaborative biomedical research. To help address this, the authors developed the Life Sciences Domain <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> <span class="hlt">Model</span> (LS DAM), an information <span class="hlt">model</span> that provides a framework for communication among domain experts and technical teams developing information systems to support biomedical research. The LS DAM is harmonized with the Biomedical Research Integrated Domain Group (BRIDG) <span class="hlt">model</span> of protocol-driven clinical research. Together, these <span class="hlt">models</span> can facilitate data exchange for translational research. Materials and methods The content of the LS DAM was driven by <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of life sciences and translational research scenarios and the concepts in the <span class="hlt">model</span> are derived from existing information <span class="hlt">models</span>, reference <span class="hlt">models</span> and data exchange formats. The <span class="hlt">model</span> is represented in the Unified <span class="hlt">Modeling</span> Language and uses ISO 21090 data types. Results The LS DAM v2.2.1 is comprised of 130 classes and covers several core areas including Experiment, Molecular Biology, Molecular Databases and Specimen. Nearly half of these classes originate from the BRIDG <span class="hlt">model</span>, emphasizing the semantic harmonization between these <span class="hlt">models</span>. Validation of the LS DAM against independently derived information <span class="hlt">models</span>, research scenarios and reference databases supports its general applicability to represent life sciences research. Discussion The LS DAM provides unambiguous definitions for concepts required to describe life sciences research. The processes established to achieve consensus among domain experts will be applied in future iterations and may be broadly applicable to other standardization efforts. Conclusions The LS DAM provides common semantics for life sciences research. Through harmonization with BRIDG, it promotes interoperability in translational science. PMID:22744959</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Freimuth, Robert R; Freund, Elaine T; Schick, Lisa; Sharma, Mukesh K; Stafford, Grace A; Suzek, Baris E; Hernandez, Joyce; Hipp, Jason; Kelley, Jenny M; Rokicki, Konrad; Pan, Sue; Buckler, Andrew; Stokes, Todd H; Fernandez, Anna; Fore, Ian; Buetow, Kenneth H</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">417</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940014843&hterms=aeroservoelastic&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Daeroservoelastic"> <span id="translatedtitle">ISAC: A tool for aeroservoelastic <span class="hlt">modeling</span> and <span class="hlt">analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The capabilities of the Interaction of Structures, Aerodynamics, and Controls (ISAC) system of program modules is discussed. The major <span class="hlt">modeling</span>, <span class="hlt">analysis</span>, and data management components of ISAC are identified. Equations of motion are displayed for a Laplace-domain representation of the unsteady aerodynamic forces. Options for approximating a frequency-domain representation of unsteady aerodynamic forces with rational functions of the Laplace variable are shown. Linear time invariant state-space equations of motion that result are discussed. <span class="hlt">Model</span> generation and analyses of <span class="hlt">stability</span> and dynamic response characteristics are shown for an aeroelastic vehicle which illustrates some of the capabilities of ISAC as a <span class="hlt">modeling</span> and <span class="hlt">analysis</span> tool for aeroelastic applications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adams, William M., Jr.; Hoadley, Sherwood Tiffany</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">418</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JPhCS.364a2032Z"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of a Turbocharger Rotor System Supported on Floating Ring Bearings</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">stability</span> of a turbocharger rotor is governed by the coupling of rotor dynamics and fluid dynamics because the high speed rotor system is supported on a pair of hydrodynamic floating ring bearings which comprise of inner and outer fluid films in series. In order to investigate the <span class="hlt">stability</span>, this paper has developed a finite element <span class="hlt">model</span> of the rotor system with consideration of such exciting forces as rotor imbalance, hydrodynamic fluid forces, lubricant feed pressure and dead weight. The dimensionless analytical expression of nonlinear oil film forces in floating ring bearings have been derived on the basis of short bearing theory. Based on numerical simulation, the effects of rotor imbalance, lubricant viscosity, lubricant feed pressure and bearing clearances on the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of turbocharger rotor system have been studied. The disciplines of the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of two films and dynamic performances of rotor system have been provided.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, H.; Shi, Z. Q.; Zhen, D.; Gu, F. S.; Ball, A. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">419</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1648161"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of power system <span class="hlt">stabilizers</span> application for controlling poorly damped oscillations in the Alcan\\/BC hybrid power systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The study requirements to determine the effect of power system <span class="hlt">stabilizers</span> in controlling the undamped system oscillations in interconnected power systems are described. This <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is performed for the planning of excitation systems for new generators at Kemano, BC, Canada as well as excitation upgrade for the existing Kemano units. Available small signal <span class="hlt">stability</span> and transient <span class="hlt">stability</span> simulation techniques are</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K.-C. Lee</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">420</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25119008"> <span id="translatedtitle">Study of nano-hydroxyapatite/zirconia <span class="hlt">stabilized</span> with yttria in bone healing: histopathological study in rabbit <span class="hlt">model</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Acceleration of bone healing has always been a major challenge in orthopedic surgery, the aim of this study was an evaluation of the biological effects of zirconia-<span class="hlt">stabilized</span> yttria on bone healing, using an in vivo <span class="hlt">model</span>. Nano-hydroxyapatite powder with zirconia-<span class="hlt">stabilized</span> yttria were inserted in rabbit tibia and then histologically analyzed and compared with non-treated controls so thirty six. New Zealand white male rabbits randomly divided into two groups of 18 rabbits each. A cortical hole of 4 mm diameter and 8 mm depth in each tibia was drilled. In group I, the defect was left empty, whereas in group II, the bone defect was packed with nano-hydroxyapatite/5% zirconia <span class="hlt">stabilized</span> with yttria. Histological evaluations were performed at two, four and six weeks after the implantation. Microscopic changes on two groups along with the time course were scored and statistical <span class="hlt">analysis</span> showed that the average scores in group II were significantly higher than the other groups (p < 0.05). Histological <span class="hlt">analysis</span> was shown to be significantly improved by the nano-hydroxyapatite/5% zirconia <span class="hlt">stabilized</span> with yttria compared with the control group, suggesting that this biomaterial promote the healing of cortical bone, presumably by acting as an osteoconductive. PMID:25119008</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Abedi, Gholamreza; Jahanshahi, Amirali; Fathi, Mohamad Hosein; Haghdost, Iraj Sohrabi; Veshkini, Abas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' 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showDiv("page_23");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">421</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21607905"> <span id="translatedtitle">Time evolution of the radial perturbations and linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> of solitons and black holes in a generalized Skyrme <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the time evolution of the radial perturbation for self-gravitating soliton and black-hole solutions in a generalized Skyrme <span class="hlt">model</span> in which a dilaton is present. The background solutions were obtained recently by some of the authors. For both the solitons and the black holes two branches of solutions exist which merge at some critical value of the corresponding parameter. The results show that, similar to the case without a scalar field, one of the branches is stable against radial perturbations and the other is unstable. The conclusions for the linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the black holes in the generalized Skyrme <span class="hlt">model</span> are also in agreement with the results from the thermodynamical <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> based on the turning point method.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Doneva, Daniela D. [Department of Astronomy, Faculty of Physics, St. Kliment Ohridski University of Sofia, 5, James Bourchier Boulevard, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Theoretical Astrophysics, Eberhard-Karls University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen 72076 (Germany); Kokkotas, Kostas D. [Theoretical Astrophysics, Eberhard-Karls University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen 72076 (Germany); Stefanov, Ivan Zh. [Department of Applied Physics, Technical University of Sofia, 8, Kliment Ohridski Boulevard, 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria); Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, St. Kliment Ohridski University of Sofia, 5, James Bourchier Boulevard, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">422</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvD..84h4021D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Time evolution of the radial perturbations and linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> of solitons and black holes in a generalized Skyrme <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the time evolution of the radial perturbation for self-gravitating soliton and black-hole solutions in a generalized Skyrme <span class="hlt">model</span> in which a dilaton is present. The background solutions were obtained recently by some of the authors. For both the solitons and the black holes two branches of solutions exist which merge at some critical value of the corresponding parameter. The results show that, similar to the case without a scalar field, one of the branches is stable against radial perturbations and the other is unstable. The conclusions for the linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the black holes in the generalized Skyrme <span class="hlt">model</span> are also in agreement with the results from the thermodynamical <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> based on the turning point method.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Doneva, Daniela D.; Kokkotas, Kostas D.; Stefanov, Ivan Zh.; Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">423</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.H23E1025L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radar Detected Rainfall Intensity As An Input For Shallow Landslides Slope <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Model</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The term "shallow landslides" is widely used in literature to describe a slope movement of limited size that mainly develops in soils up to a maximum of a few meters. Shallow landslides are usually triggered by heavy rainfall because, as the water starts to infiltrate in the soil, the pore-water pressure increases so that the shear strength of the soil is reduced leading to slope failure. For this work we have developed a distributed hydrological-geotechnical <span class="hlt">model</span> for the forecasting of the temporal and spatial distribution of shallow landslide to be used as a warning system for civil protection purpose. The main goal of this work is the use of radar detected rainfall intensity as the input for the hydrological simulation of the infiltration. Using the rainfall pattern detected by the radar is in fact possible to dynamically control the redistribution of groundwater pressure associated with transient infiltration of rain so as to infer the slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the studied area. The <span class="hlt">model</span> deals with both saturated and unsaturated conditions. Two pilot sites have been chosen to develop and test this <span class="hlt">model</span>: the Armea basin (Liguria, Italy) and the Ischia Island (Campania, Italy). In recent years several severe rainstorms have occurred in both these areas. In at least two cases these have triggered numerous shallow landslides that have caused victims and damaged roads, buildings and agricultural activities. In its current stage the basic basin-scale <span class="hlt">model</span> applied for predicting the probable location of shallow landslides involves several stand-alone components. A module for estimating the groundwater pressure head distribution according to radar detected rainfall intensity, a soil depth prediction scheme and a limit-equilibrium infinite slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> algorithm which produces a factor of safety (FS). The additional ancillary data required have been collected during the field work. The single components are seamlessly integrated into a system that automatically publishes constantly updated FS values to a WebGIS in near-real- time so that local administrators responsible for public safety can access and download the data from the internet. This system has been running for a few months and is now being validated. Several types of problems hinder a correct validation of the system. One major obstacle was overcome when major storms triggered several tens of soil slips in December 2006 for the Armea basin and in April 2006 for Ischia. This events provided both the necessary rainfall data for the soil saturation component, which until then for previous occurred landslides was lacking, and a new landslide inventory for comparison with the FS produced by the slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">model</span> for the same event. The inventory was derived from a newly acquired VHR satellite image. Another important aspect of the research being performed regards the assessment of the relative importance of the different parameters involved in the limit-equilibrium infinite slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">model</span>. This statistical sensitivity <span class="hlt">analysis</span> has the aim of determining which errors in the input variables slope gradient, soil depth, soil saturation, cohesion and angle of internal friction produce the largest errors in the output FS values. Preliminary results indicate the importance of topographic attributes and of soil depth.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leoni, L.; Rossi, G.; Catani, F.; Righini, G.; Rudari, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">424</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/wg24628638003185.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of cages in high-speed oil-lubricated angular contact ball bearings</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">To investigate the cage <span class="hlt">stability</span> of high-speed oil-lubricated angular contact ball bearings, a dynamic <span class="hlt">model</span> of cages is\\u000a developed on the basis of Guptas and Meeks work. The <span class="hlt">model</span> can simulate the cage motion under oil lubrication with all six\\u000a degrees of freedom. Particularly, the <span class="hlt">model</span> introduces oil-film damping and hysteresis damping, and deals with the collision\\u000a contact as imperfect</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xiuhai Liu; Sier Deng; Hongfei Teng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">425</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50200202"> <span id="translatedtitle">UPFC <span class="hlt">model</span> for <span class="hlt">stability</span> calculations with decoupled watt-VAr control system</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">model</span> of a unified power flow controller-UPFC-for <span class="hlt">stability</span> calculations with the decoupled watt-VAr control system is described in the paper. In the UPFC single line diagram voltage source converters are represented by two phasor equivalent voltage sources which are mutually dependent. For transient <span class="hlt">stability</span> studies, with the exception of electrical circuits of synchronous machines and controllers, the electrical network</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">I. Papic</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">426</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.5025W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Linear <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of a Collisionless Distribution Function for the Force-Free Harris Sheet</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A discussion is presented of the first linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the collisionless distribution function recently found by Harrison and Neukirch for the force-free Harris sheet (Physical Review Letters 102, 135003, 2009). Macroscopic instabilities are considered, and the perturbations are assumed to be two-dimensional only. The <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is based on the technique of integration over unperturbed orbits. Similarly to the Harris sheet case (Nuovo Cimento, 23:115, 1962), this is only possible by using approximations to the exact orbits, which are unknown. Furthermore, the approximations for the Harris sheet case cannot be used for the force-free Harris sheet, and so new techniques have to be developed in order to make analytical progress. In addition to the full problem, the long wavelength limit is considered, and the results of the two cases are compared. The dependence of the <span class="hlt">stability</span> on various equilibrium parameters is investigated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wilson, Fiona; Neukirch, Thomas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">427</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMSH51A2214N"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Linear <span class="hlt">Stability</span> <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of a Collisionless Distribution Function for the Force-Free Harris Sheet</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A discussion is presented of the first linear <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the collisionless distribution function recently found by Harrison and Neukirch for the force-free Harris sheet (Physical Review Letters 102, 135003, 2009). Macroscopic instabilities are considered, and the perturbations are assumed to be two-dimensional only. The <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is based on the technique of integration over unperturbed orbits by using approximations to the exact orbits, for which analytical expressions are not available.Ffor the force-free Harris sheet, different approximations have to be used compared to the Harris sheet case. Only the long wavelength limit is considered and the dependence of the <span class="hlt">stability</span> on various equilibrium parameters is investigated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Neukirch, T.; Wilson, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">428</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AcGeo..62.1025D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multi-scale <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of water alteration on the rockslope <span class="hlt">stability</span> framework</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Water is an important weathering factor on rock discontinuities and in rock mass mechanical behaviour because of its chemical features such as temperature, pH or salinity which make it a "good" candidate to rock degradation. Furthermore the increase of rainfall frequency or intensity highlights some problems on the rock slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span>. This study aims to evaluate the effect of water flow on the rock slope <span class="hlt">stability</span> and it is performed at two space scales: in situ scale and laboratory (micro scale and macro scale). It shows how water induces degradation at multi-scale (surface roughness and matrix) and thus may decrease the <span class="hlt">stability</span> of the discontinuous rock mass. It has two main components: the effect of water-solid chemical mechanisms and the <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of the mechanical response of the discontinuity modified by the water alteration.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dochez, Sandra; Laouafa, Farid; Franck, Christian; Guedon, Sylvine; Martineau, Franois; D'Amato, Julie; Saintenoy, Albane</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">429</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006NucFu..46..403P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Theory-based <span class="hlt">model</span> for the pedestal, edge <span class="hlt">stability</span> and ELMs in tokamaks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An improved <span class="hlt">model</span> for triggering edge localized mode (ELM) crashes is developed for use within integrated <span class="hlt">modelling</span> simulations of the pedestal and ELM cycles at the edge of H-mode tokamak plasmas. The new <span class="hlt">model</span> is developed by using the BALOO, DCON and ELITE ideal MHD <span class="hlt">stability</span> codes to derive parametric expressions for the ELM triggering threshold. The whole toroidal mode number spectrum is studied with these codes. The DCON code applies to low mode numbers, while the BALOO code applies to only high mode numbers and the ELITE code applies to intermediate and high mode numbers. The variables used in the parametric <span class="hlt">stability</span> expressions are the normalized pressure gradient and the parallel current density, which drive ballooning and peeling modes. Two equilibria motivated by DIII-D geometry with different plasma triangularities are studied. It is found that the stable region in the high triangularity discharge covers a much larger region of parameter space than the corresponding <span class="hlt">stability</span> region in the low triangularity discharge. The new ELM trigger <span class="hlt">model</span> is used together with a previously developed <span class="hlt">model</span> for pedestal formation and ELM crashes in the ASTRA integrated <span class="hlt">modelling</span> code to follow the time evolution of the temperature profiles during ELM cycles. The ELM frequencies obtained in the simulations of low and high triangularity discharges are observed to increase with increasing heating power. There is a transition from second <span class="hlt">stability</span> to first ballooning mode <span class="hlt">stability</span> as the heating power is increased in the high triangularity simulations. The results from the ideal MHD <span class="hlt">stability</span> codes are compared with results from the resistive MHD <span class="hlt">stability</span> code NIMROD.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pankin, A. Y.; Bateman, G.; Brennan, D. P.; Schnack, D. D.; Snyder, P. B.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Kritz, A. H.; Janeschitz, G.; Kruger, S.; Onjun, T.; Pacher, G. W.; Pacher, H. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">430</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EPJST.222..757M"> <span id="translatedtitle">An automated algorithm for <span class="hlt">stability</span> <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of hybrid dynamical systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">There are many hybrid dynamical systems encountered in nature and in engineering, that have a large number of subsystems and a large number of switching conditions for transitions between subsystems. Bifurcation <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of such systems poses a problem, because the detection of periodic orbits and the computation of their Floquet multipliers become difficult in such systems. In this paper we propose an algorithm to solve this problem. It is based on the computation of the fundamental solution matrix over a complete period-where the orbit may contain transitions through a large number of subsystems. The fundamental solution matrix is composed of the exponential matrices for evolution through the subsystems (considered linear time invariant in this paper) and the saltation matrices for the transitions through switching conditions. This matrix is then used to compose a Newton-Raphson search algorithm to converge on the periodic orbit. The algorithm-which has no restriction of the complexity of the system-locates the periodic orbit (stable or unstable), and at the same time computes its Floquet multipliers. The program is written in a sufficiently general way, so that it can be applied to any hybrid dynamical system.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mandal, K.; Chakraborty, C.; Abusorrah, A.; Al-Hindawi, M. M.; Al-Turki, Y.; Banerjee, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">431</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.math.cuhk.edu.hk/~wei/foodchainsingle37.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">STABILITY</span> OF CLUSTER SOLUTIONS IN A COOPERATIVE CONSUMER CHAIN <span class="hlt">MODEL</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Models</span> involving a chain of components play an important role in biology, chemistry, social sciences but are more general and consumption of different commodities are also taken into account such as water, energy, raw materials, technology and informatio</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wei, Jun-cheng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">432</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60565997"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> Affects of Artificial Viscosity in Detonation <span class="hlt">Modeling</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Accurate multi-dimensional <span class="hlt">modeling</span> of detonation waves in solid HE materials is a difficult task. To treat applied problems which contain detonation waves one must consider reacting flow with a wide range of length-scales, non-linear equations of state (EOS), and material interfaces at which the detonation wave interacts with other materials. To be useful numerical <span class="hlt">models</span> of detonation waves must be</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P Vitello; P C Souers</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">433</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://escholarship.org/uc/item/0zb2h4v7?query=forensic+AND+processes"> <span id="translatedtitle">Toward <span class="hlt">Models</span> for Forensic <span class="hlt">Analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">1893) Forensic <span class="hlt">analysis</span> is the process of understanding, re-forensic <span class="hlt">model</span> to its conclusion are not yet known, but in the next section, we outline the processforensic analysts determine the appropriate trade-o?s. Conversely, a reversal of the translation process</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peisert, Sean; Bishop, Matt; Karin, Sidney; Marzullo, Keith</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">434</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.energy.ca.gov/2012publications/CEC-500-2012-FS/CEC-500-2012-FS-026.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Climate <span class="hlt">Analysis</span>, Monitoring, and <span class="hlt">Modeling</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Climate <span class="hlt">Analysis</span>, Monitoring, and <span class="hlt">Modeling</span> Environmental Research Area PIER Environmental Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/ environmental August 2012 The Issue Climate change is a daunting challenge and climate on wind energy resources by developing a new climate downscaling technique to estimate changes</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">435</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=aggregate+AND+demand&pg=5&id=ED073646"> <span id="translatedtitle">Economic <span class="hlt">Analysis</span>. Computer Simulation <span class="hlt">Models</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A multimedia course in economic <span class="hlt">analysis</span> was developed and used in conjunction with the United States Naval Academy. (See ED 043 790 and ED 043 791 for final reports of the project evaluation and development <span class="hlt">model</span>.) This volume of the text discusses the simulation of behavioral relationships among variable elements in an economy and presents</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sterling Inst., Washington, DC. Educational Technology Center.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">436</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15004023"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Stability</span> Affects of Artificial Viscosity in Detonation <span class="hlt">Modeling</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Accurate multi-dimensional <span class="hlt">modeling</span> of detonation waves in solid HE materials is a difficult task. To treat applied problems which contain detonation waves one must consider reacting flow with a wide range of length-scales, non-linear equations of state (EOS), and material interfaces at which the detonation wave interacts with other materials. To be useful numerical <span class="hlt">models</span> of detonation waves must be accurate, stable, and insensitive to details of the <span class="hlt">modeling</span> such as the mesh spacing, and mesh aspect ratio for multi-dimensional simulations. Studies we have performed show that numerical simulations of detonation waves can be very sensitive to the form of the artificial viscosity term used. The artificial viscosity term is included in our ALE hydrocode to treat shock discontinuities. We show that a monotonic, second order artificial viscosity <span class="hlt">model</span> derived from an approximate Riemann solver scheme can strongly damp unphysical oscillations in the detonation wave reaction zone, improving the detonation wave boundary wall interaction. These issues are demonstrated in 2D <span class="hlt">model</span> simulations presented of the 'Bigplate' test. Results using LX-I 7 explosives are compared with numerical simulation results to demonstrate the affects of the artificial viscosity <span class="hlt">model</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vitello, P; Souers, P C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-06-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">437</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3259975"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Models</span> in palaeontological functional <span class="hlt">analysis</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Models</span> are a principal tool of modern science. By definition, and in practice, <span class="hlt">models</span> are not literal representations of reality but provide simplifications or substitutes of the events, scenarios or behaviours that are being studied or predicted. All <span class="hlt">models</span> make assumptions, and palaeontological <span class="hlt">models</span> in particular require additional assumptions to study unobservable events in deep time. In the case of functional <span class="hlt">analysis</span>, the degree of missing data associated with reconstructing musculoskeletal anatomy and neuronal control in extinct organisms has, in the eyes of some scientists, rendered detailed functional <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of fossils intractable. Such a prognosis may indeed be realized if palaeontologists attempt to recreate elaborate biomechanical <span class="hlt">models</span> based on missing data and loosely justified assumptions. Yet multiple enabling methodologies and techniques now exist: tools for bracketing boundaries of reality; more rigorous consideration of soft tissues and missing data and methods drawing on physical principles that all organisms must adhere to. As with many aspects of science, the utility of such biomechanical <span class="hlt">models</span> depends on the questions they seek to address, and the accuracy and validity of the <span class="hlt">models</span> themselves. PMID:21865242</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anderson, Philip S. L.; Bright, Jen A.; Gill, Pamela G.; Palmer, Colin; Rayfield, Emily J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">438</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21865242"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Models</span> in palaeontological functional <span class="hlt">analysis</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Models</span> are a principal tool of modern science. By definition, and in practice, <span class="hlt">models</span> are not literal representations of reality but provide simplifications or substitutes of the events, scenarios or behaviours that are being studied or predicted. All <span class="hlt">models</span> make assumptions, and palaeontological <span class="hlt">models</span> in particular require additional assumptions to study unobservable events in deep time. In the case of functional <span class="hlt">analysis</span>, the degree of missing data associated with reconstructing musculoskeletal anatomy and neuronal control in extinct organisms has, in the eyes of some scientists, rendered detailed functional <span class="hlt">analysis</span> of fossils intractable. Such a prognosis may indeed be realized if palaeontologists attempt to recreate elaborate biomechanical <span class="hlt">models</span> based on missing data and loosely justified assumptions. Yet multiple enabling methodologies and techniques now exist: tools for bracketing boundaries of reality; more rigorous consideration of soft tissues and missing data and methods drawing on physical principles that all organisms must adhere to. As with many aspects of science, the utility of such biomechanical <span class="hlt">models</span> depends on the questions they seek to address, and the accuracy and validity of the <span class="hlt">models</span> themselves. PMID:21865242</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anderson, Philip S L; Bright, Jen A; Gill, Pamela G; Palmer, Colin; Rayfield, Emily J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">439</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4109965"> <span id="translatedtitle">Statistical Cluster <span class="hlt">Analysis</span> of the British Thoracic Society Severe Refractory Asthma Registry: Clinical Outcomes and Phenotype <span class="hlt">Stability</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Severe refractory asthma is a heterogeneous disease. We sought to determine statistical clusters from the British Thoracic Society Severe refractory Asthma Registry and to examine cluster-specific outcomes and <span class="hlt">stability</span>. Methods Factor <span class="hlt">analysis</span> and statistical cluster <span class="hlt">modelling</span> was undertaken to determine the number of clusters and their membership (N?=?349). Cluster-specific outcomes were assessed after a median follow-up of 3 years. A classifier was programmed to determine cluster <span class="hlt">stability</span> and was validated in an independent cohort of new patients recruited to the registry (n?=?245). Findings Five clusters were identified. Cluster 1 (34%) were atopic with early onset disease, cluster 2 (21%) were obese with late onset disease, cluster 3 (15%) had the least severe disease, cluster 4 (15%) were the eosinophilic with late onset disease and cluster 5 (15%) had significant fixed airflow obstruction. At follow-up, the proportion of subjects treated with oral corticosteroids increased in all groups with an increase in body mass index. Exacerbation frequency decreased significantly in clusters 1, 2 and 4 and was associated with a significant fall in the peripheral blood eosinophil count in clusters 2 and 4. <span class="hlt">Stability</span> of cluster membership at follow-up was 52% for the whole group with <span class="hlt">stability</span> being best in cluster 2 (71%) and worst in cluster 4 (25%). In an independent validation cohort, the classifier identified the same 5 clusters with similar patient distribution and characteristics. Interpretation Statistical cluster <span class="hlt">analysis</span> can identify distinct phenotypes with specific outcomes. Cluster membership can be determined using a classifier, but when treatment is optimised, cluster <span class="hlt">stability</span> is poor. PMID:25058007</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Newby, Chris; Heaney, Liam G.; Menzies-Gow, Andrew; Niven, Rob M.; Mansur, Adel; Bucknall, Christine; Chaudhuri, Rekha; Thompson, John; Burton, Paul; Brightling, Chris</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">440</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1648513"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nuclear plant <span class="hlt">models</span> for medium- to long-term power system <span class="hlt">stability</span> studies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">CRIEPI and EPRI have jointly developed PWR and BWR nuclear power plant <span class="hlt">models</span> for medium-to long-term power system dynamic simulation studies, which are being implemented for EPRI's and CRIEPI's long-term <span class="hlt">stability</span> programs respectively, The <span class="hlt">models</span> are extended versions of CRIEPI's previous <span class="hlt">model</span> for short-term simulation. The <span class="hlt">models</span> are useful in simulating the plant dynamics taking into account responses of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. Inoue; T. Ichikawa; P. Kundur; P. Hirsch</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div>