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Sample records for stable autotrophic nitrogen

  1. Autotrophic nitrogen removal in one lab-scale vertical submerged biofilm reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhiwei; Chen, Yingxu; Li, Wenhong; Yang, Shangyuan; Du, Ping

    In this study, the process performance of a new vertical submerged biofilm reactor for complete autotrophic ammonia removal was investigated using synthetic wastewater. The main objectives of this study were to evaluate the flexibility of the reactor, achieve partial autotrophic nitrification with influent ammonium nitrogen ranging from 40 to 280 mg L -1, and achieve a stable half partial autotrophic nitrification by controlling hydraulic retention time (HRT) and alkalinity. A very low concentration of nitrate was observed in the effluent during nitrification. Then autotrophic denitrification revealed Anammox bacteria were present and active in the central anaerobic parts of the bioreactor which was inoculated with a mixed microbial consortium from activated sludge. The results of this study demonstrated that autotrophic denitrification processes can coexist with heterotrophic denitrifying processes in the same environment even if Anammox bacteria were less competitive than heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria.

  2. [Mechanism of ammonium removal in the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal in one reactor process].

    PubMed

    Yang, Guo-hong; Fang, Fang; Guo, Jin-song; Qin, Yu; Wei, Ying

    2009-01-01

    Different synthetic wastewaters were used in the batch tests to analyze the intermediate products and the nitrogen balance, and to study the mechanism of ammonium removal in the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal in one reactor process with the sludge cultured in the SBBR completely autotrophic nitrogen removal system. The results showed that 62% of ammonium was converted to such nitrogen compounds as NO2-, NO3-, NH2 OH, N2H4, NO, NO2, N2O and N2 without addition of organic carbon, and N2 took up 90.07%. The ammonium in the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal in one reactor system was removed in many ways. 4.5% of ammonium was removed in the physical-chemical way. 3.73% of ammonium was converted by the conventional nitrification-denitrification process. The quantity of ammonium removed by the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal in one reactor process was 53.77%, which is the largest, and the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal in one reactor process could be realized in two different metabolic pathways. But the effluent ammonium in the anoxic reactor, where enough NO2 present were present, was equal to the blank system, and no ammonium was converted to such nitrogen compounds as NO2- and N2 by Nitrosomonas eutropha using NO2 as electron acceptor, which maybe caused by lack of the function bacteria. PMID:19353865

  3. Effect of heterotrophic growth on autotrophic nitrogen removal in a granular sludge reactor.

    PubMed

    Mozumder, M Salatul Islam; Picioreanu, Cristian; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Volcke, Eveline I P

    2014-01-01

    This study deals with the influence of heterotrophic growth on autotrophic nitrogen removal from wastewater in a granular sludge reactor. A mathematical model was set-up including autotrophic and heterotrophic growth and decay in the granules from a partial nitritation-anammox process. A distinction between heterotrophic bacteria was made based on the electron acceptor (dissolved oxygen, nitrite or nitrate) on which they grow, while the nitrogen gas produced was 'labelled' to retrieve its origin, from anammox or heterotrophic bacteria. Taking into account heterotrophic growth resulted in a lower initial nitrogen removal, but in a higher steady state nitrogen removal compared with a model in which heterotrophic growth was neglected. The anammox activity is related with the fact that heterotrophs initially use nitrite as electron acceptor, but when they switch to nitrate the produced nitrite can be used by anammox bacteria. Increased anammox activity in the presence of heterotrophs, therefore, resulted in a marginally increased N2 production at steady state. Heterotrophic denitrification of nitrate to nitrite also explains why small amounts of organic substrate present in the influent positively affect the maximum nitrogen removal capacity. However, the process efficiency deteriorates once the amount of organic substrate in the influent exceeds a certain threshold. The bulk oxygen concentration and the granule size have a dual effect on the autotrophic nitrogen removal efficiency. Besides, the maximum nitrogen removal efficiency decreases and the corresponding optimal bulk oxygen concentration increases with increasing granule size. PMID:24645487

  4. Elemental sulfur formation and nitrogen removal from wastewaters by autotrophic denitrifiers and anammox bacteria.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunshuang; Zhao, Dongfeng; Yan, Laihong; Wang, Aijie; Gu, Yingying; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2015-09-01

    Elemental sulfur (S(0)) formation from and nitrogen removal on sulfide, nitrate and ammonium-laden wastewaters were achieved by denitrifying ammonium oxidation (DEAMOX) reactor with autotrophic denitrifiers and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria. The sulfide to nitrate ratio is a key process parameter for excess accumulation of S(0) and a ratio of 1.31:1 is a proposed optimum. The Alishewanella, Thauera and Candidatus Anammoximicrobium present respectively the autotrophic denitrifiers and anammox bacteria for the reactor. DEAMOX is demonstrated promising biological process for treating organics-deficient (S+N) wastewaters with excess S(0) production. PMID:26022701

  5. Detection of autotrophic verrucomicrobial methanotrophs in a geothermal environment using stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Christine E; Stott, Matthew B; Dunfield, Peter F

    2012-01-01

    Genomic analysis of the methanotrophic verrucomicrobium "Methylacidiphilum infernorum" strain V4 has shown that most pathways conferring its methanotrophic lifestyle are similar to those found in proteobacterial methanotrophs. However, due to the large sequence divergence of its methane monooxygenase-encoding genes (pmo), "universal" pmoA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers do not target these bacteria. Unlike proteobacterial methanotrophs, "Methylacidiphilum" fixes carbon autotrophically, and uses methane only for energy generation. As a result, techniques used to detect methanotrophs in the environment such as (13)CH(4)-stable isotope probing (SIP) and pmoA-targeted PCR do not detect verrucomicrobial methanotrophs, and they may have been overlooked in previous environmental studies. We developed a modified SIP technique to identify active methanotrophic Verrucomicrobia in the environment by labeling with (13)CO(2) and (13)CH(4), individually and in combination. Testing the protocol in "M. infernorum" strain V4 resulted in assimilation of (13)CO(2) but not (13)CH(4), verifying its autotrophic lifestyle. To specifically detect methanotrophs (as opposed to other autotrophs) via (13)CO(2)-SIP, a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay specific for verrucomicrobial-pmoA genes was developed and used in combination with SIP. Incubation of an acidic, high-temperature geothermal soil with (13)CH(4) + (12)CO(2) caused little shift in the density distribution of verrucomicrobial-pmoA genes relative to controls. However, labeling with (13)CO(2) in combination with (12)CH(4) or (13)CH(4) induced a strong shift in the distribution of verrucomicrobial-pmoA genes towards the heavy DNA fractions. The modified SIP technique demonstrated that the primary methanotrophs active in the soil were autotrophs and belonged to the Verrucomicrobia. This is the first demonstration of autotrophic, non-proteobacterial methanotrophy in situ, and provides a tool to detect verrucomicrobial methanotrophs

  6. Detection of autotrophic verrucomicrobial methanotrophs in a geothermal environment using stable isotope probing

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Christine E.; Stott, Matthew B.; Dunfield, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    Genomic analysis of the methanotrophic verrucomicrobium “Methylacidiphilum infernorum” strain V4 has shown that most pathways conferring its methanotrophic lifestyle are similar to those found in proteobacterial methanotrophs. However, due to the large sequence divergence of its methane monooxygenase-encoding genes (pmo), “universal” pmoA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers do not target these bacteria. Unlike proteobacterial methanotrophs, “Methylacidiphilum” fixes carbon autotrophically, and uses methane only for energy generation. As a result, techniques used to detect methanotrophs in the environment such as 13CH4-stable isotope probing (SIP) and pmoA-targeted PCR do not detect verrucomicrobial methanotrophs, and they may have been overlooked in previous environmental studies. We developed a modified SIP technique to identify active methanotrophic Verrucomicrobia in the environment by labeling with 13CO2 and 13CH4, individually and in combination. Testing the protocol in “M. infernorum” strain V4 resulted in assimilation of 13CO2 but not 13CH4, verifying its autotrophic lifestyle. To specifically detect methanotrophs (as opposed to other autotrophs) via 13CO2-SIP, a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay specific for verrucomicrobial-pmoA genes was developed and used in combination with SIP. Incubation of an acidic, high-temperature geothermal soil with 13CH4 + 12CO2 caused little shift in the density distribution of verrucomicrobial-pmoA genes relative to controls. However, labeling with 13CO2 in combination with 12CH4 or 13CH4 induced a strong shift in the distribution of verrucomicrobial-pmoA genes towards the heavy DNA fractions. The modified SIP technique demonstrated that the primary methanotrophs active in the soil were autotrophs and belonged to the Verrucomicrobia. This is the first demonstration of autotrophic, non-proteobacterial methanotrophy in situ, and provides a tool to detect verrucomicrobial methanotrophs in other ecosystems. PMID

  7. Biodegradation of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) in completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shen-Yi; Lu, Li-An; Lin, Jih-Gaw

    2016-06-01

    This study conducted a completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process in a continuous anoxic upflow bioreactor to treat synthetic wastewater with TMAH (tetramethylammonium hydroxide) ranging from 200 to 1000mg/L. The intermediates were analyzed for understanding the metabolic pathway of TMAH biodegradation in CANON process. In addition, (15)N-labeled TMAH was used as the substrate in a batch anoxic bioreactor to confirm that TMAH was converted to nitrogen gas in CANON process. The results indicated that TMAH was almost completely biodegraded in CANON system at different influent TMAH concentrations of 200, 500, and 1000mg/L. The average removal efficiencies of total nitrogen were higher than 90% during the experiments. Trimethylamine (TMA) and methylamine (MA) were found to be the main biodegradation intermediates of TMAH in CANON process. The production of nitrogen gas with (15)N-labeled during the batch anaerobic bioreactor indicated that CANON process successfully converted TMAH into nitrogen gas. PMID:26879202

  8. The feasibility of using a two-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal process to treat sewage.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bin; Zhang, Shujun; Zhang, Liang; Yi, Peng; Wang, Junmin; Wang, Shuying; Peng, Yongzhen

    2011-09-01

    The feasibility of using a two-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal process to treat sewage was examined in this study. The obtained results showed that total nitrogen (TN) could be efficiently removed by 88.38% when influent TN and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were 45.87 and 44.40 mg/L, respectively. In the first stage, nitritation was instantly achieved by the bioaugmentation strategy, and can be maintained under limited oxygen condition (below 0.2mg/L). The ratio of nitrite to ammonium in the effluent of the nitritation reactor can be controlled at approximate 1.0 by adjusting aeration rate. In the second stage, anammox was realized in the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, where the total nitrogen removal rate was 0.40 kg Nm(-3)d(-1) under limited-substrate condition. Therefore, the organic matter in sewage can be firstly concentrated in biomass which could generate biogas (energy). Then, nitrogen in sewage could be removed in a two-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal process. PMID:21719278

  9. Performance of autotrophic nitrogen removal in the granular sludge bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan; Zheng, Ping; Chen, Tingting; Chen, Jianwei; Xing, Yajuan; Ji, Qixing; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Jiqiang

    2012-11-01

    The autotrophic nitrogen removal process in the granular sludge bed reactor (GSB-ANR process) is a new and promising biotechnology for nitrogen removal from wastewater, which requires single reactor, simple operation and inorganic carbon. The results showed that the GSB-ANR process could be successfully started up with nitrifying granular sludge as inoculum. The volumetric nitrogen loading rate and the volumetric nitrogen removal rate reached 5.44 and 2.57kgNm(-3)day(-1), respectively, which were significantly higher than the level reported for the autotrophic nitrogen removal processes in single reactor. The predominant functional microorganisms were from Planctomycetes and Nitrosomonas. The excellent performance of GSB-ANR process was ascribed to: (a) The high activities of aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) bacteria; (b) the good settlability of the granular sludge; (c) the suitable DO concentration that satisfied the oxygen requirement of AOB and prevented ANAMMOX bacteria from oxygen inhibition. PMID:22940302

  10. Effect of granule size on autotrophic nitrogen removal in a granular sludge reactor.

    PubMed

    Volcke, E I P; Picioreanu, C; De Baets, B; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2010-10-01

    Autotrophic nitrogen removal through sequential partial nitritation and anammox reactions can be achieved in biofilm reactors by controlling the oxygen concentration in the bulk liquid in such a way that nitrite oxidizers are outcompeted by anammox bacteria. In the case of granular sludge reactors, the granule size may influence the optimal range of oxygen concentration, as has been confirmed in the present study by means of numerical simulations. The range of oxygen concentrations for which combined partial nitritation and anammox conversion is established becomes broader for larger particles and with increasing influent ammonium concentrations. At the same time the likelihood of nitrite accumulation in the reactor effluent also increases. PMID:21046957

  11. Autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification for simultaneous removal of nitrogen, sulfur and organic matter.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Lorna; Aguirre, Juan P; Muñoz, Maria A; Barahona, Andrea; Huiliñir, Cesar; Montalvo, Silvio; Borja, Rafael

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this investigation was to assess the startup and operation of a laboratory-scale hybrid UASB-Anaerobic Filter Reactor (UASFB) of 1 L volume, kept at 30°C, in order to carry out a simultaneous autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification process. First, the heterotrophic and autotrophic populations were separately enriched, with specific cultures and subsequently the UASFB was inoculated with 2 g L(-1) of volatile suspended solids (VSS), with a ratio of 1.5:1 (autotrophs: heterotrophs). The influent or synthetic wastewater used was composed of: Na2S2O3·5H2O, CH3COOK, NaNO3, NaHCO3, K2HPO4, NH4Cl and saline solution. The concentrations varied depending on the organic loading rate (OLR), nitrogen loading rate (NLR) and sulfur loading rate (SLR) applied. In the UASFB reactor, two experimental conditions were tested and assessed: (i) COD/N ratio of 3.6 and SLR of 0.75 kg S m(-3) d(-1); and (ii) COD/N ratio of 5.8 and SLR of 0.25 kg S m(-3) d(-1). The results obtained demonstrated that an inoculum coming from an anaerobic reactor was able to carry out the process, obtaining a maximum nitrate removal of 85.3% in the first stage of operation and 99.5% in the second stage. The recovery of sulfur in form of sulfate in the effluent did not present a tendency to stabilize during the measured time, with a maximum thiosulfate removal of 32.5%, when the SLR was lowered to 0.25 kg S m(-3) d(-1). The maximum organic matter elimination, measured as COD, was 75.8%, which indicates the relatively good performance and behavior of the heterotrophic microorganisms. PMID:27093220

  12. Nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur isotopic change during heterotrophic (Pseudomonas aureofaciens) and autotrophic (Thiobacillus denitrificans) denitrification reactions.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Takahiro; Alvarez, Kelly; Lin, In-Tian; Shimada, Jun

    2015-12-01

    In batch culture experiments, we examined the isotopic change of nitrogen in nitrate (δ(15)NNO3), carbon in dissolved inorganic carbon (δ(13)CDIC), and sulfur in sulfate (δ(34)SSO4) during heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification of two bacterial strains (Pseudomonas aureofaciens and Thiobacillus denitrificans). Heterotrophic denitrification (HD) experiments were conducted with trisodium citrate as electron donor, and autotrophic denitrification (AD) experiments were carried out with iron disulfide (FeS2) as electron donor. For heterotrophic denitrification experiments, a complete nitrate reduction was accomplished, however bacterial denitrification with T. denitrificans is a slow process in which, after seventy days nitrate was reduced to 40% of the initial concentration by denitrification. In the HD experiment, systematic change of δ(13)CDIC (from -7.7‰ to -12.2‰) with increase of DIC was observed during denitrification (enrichment factor εN was -4.7‰), suggesting the contribution of C of trisodium citrate (δ(13)C=-12.4‰). No SO4(2-) and δ(34)SSO4 changes were observed. In the AD experiment, clear fractionation of δ(13)CDIC during DIC consumption (εC=-7.8‰) and δ(34)SSO4 during sulfur use of FeS2-S (around 2‰), were confirmed through denitrification (εN=-12.5‰). Different pattern in isotopic change between HD and AD obtained on laboratory-scale are useful to recognize the type of denitrification occurring in the field. PMID:26529303

  13. Nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur isotopic change during heterotrophic (Pseudomonas aureofaciens) and autotrophic (Thiobacillus denitrificans) denitrification reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, Takahiro; Alvarez, Kelly; Lin, In-Tian; Shimada, Jun

    2015-12-01

    In batch culture experiments, we examined the isotopic change of nitrogen in nitrate (δ15NNO3), carbon in dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC), and sulfur in sulfate (δ34SSO4) during heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification of two bacterial strains (Pseudomonas aureofaciens and Thiobacillus denitrificans). Heterotrophic denitrification (HD) experiments were conducted with trisodium citrate as electron donor, and autotrophic denitrification (AD) experiments were carried out with iron disulfide (FeS2) as electron donor. For heterotrophic denitrification experiments, a complete nitrate reduction was accomplished, however bacterial denitrification with T. denitrificans is a slow process in which, after seventy days nitrate was reduced to 40% of the initial concentration by denitrification. In the HD experiment, systematic change of δ13CDIC (from - 7.7‰ to - 12.2‰) with increase of DIC was observed during denitrification (enrichment factor εN was - 4.7‰), suggesting the contribution of C of trisodium citrate (δ13C = - 12.4‰). No SO42 - and δ34SSO4 changes were observed. In the AD experiment, clear fractionation of δ13CDIC during DIC consumption (εC = - 7.8‰) and δ34SSO4 during sulfur use of FeS2-S (around 2‰), were confirmed through denitrification (εN = - 12.5‰). Different pattern in isotopic change between HD and AD obtained on laboratory-scale are useful to recognize the type of denitrification occurring in the field.

  14. Startup and oxygen concentration effects in a continuous granular mixed flow autotrophic nitrogen removal reactor.

    PubMed

    Varas, Rodrigo; Guzmán-Fierro, Víctor; Giustinianovich, Elisa; Behar, Jack; Fernández, Katherina; Roeckel, Marlene

    2015-08-01

    The startup and performance of the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process was tested in a continuously fed granular bubble column reactor (BCR) with two different aeration strategies: controlling the oxygen volumetric flow and oxygen concentration. During the startup with the control of oxygen volumetric flow, the air volume was adjusted to 60mL/h and the CANON reactor had volumetric N loadings ranging from 7.35 to 100.90mgN/Ld with 36-71% total nitrogen removal and high instability. In the second stage, the reactor was operated at oxygen concentrations of 0.6, 0.4 and 0.2mg/L. The best condition was 0.2 mgO2/L with a total nitrogen removal of 75.36% with a CANON reactor activity of 0.1149gN/gVVSd and high stability. The feasibility and effectiveness of CANON processes with oxygen control was demonstrated, showing an alternative design tool for efficiently removing nitrogen species. PMID:25965951

  15. Effects of HRT and water temperature on nitrogen removal in autotrophic gravel filter.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing-hang; He, Sheng-bing; Wu, Su-qing; Huang, Jung-Chen; Zhou, Wei-li; Chen, Xue-chu

    2016-03-01

    Organic Carbon added to low ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C/N ratio) wastewater to enhance heterotrophic denitrification performance might lead to higher operating costs and secondary pollution. In this study, sodium thiosulfate (Na2S2O3) was applied as an electron donor for a gravel filter (one kind of constructed wetland) to investigate effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and water temperature on the nitrate removal efficiency. The results show that with an HRT of 12 h, the average total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiencies were 91% at 15-20 °C and 18% at 3-6 °C, respectively. When HRT increased to 24 h, the average TN removal increased accordingly to 41% at 3-6 °C, suggesting denitrification performance was improved by extended HRT at low water temperatures. Due to denitrification, 96% of added nitrate nitrogen (NO3(-)-N) was converted to nitrogen gas, with a mean flux of nitrous oxide (N2O) was 0.0268-0.1500 ug m(-2) h(-1), while 98.86% of thiosulfate was gradually converted to sulfate throughout the system. Thus, our results show that the sulfur driven autotrophic denitrification constructed wetland demonstrated an excellent removal efficiency of nitrate for wastewater treatment. The HRT and water temperature proved to be two influencing factors in this constructed wetland treatment system. PMID:26766357

  16. Autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite in a sponge-bed trickling filter.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Guillén, J A; Jayawardana, L K M C B; Lopez Vazquez, C M; de Oliveira Cruz, L M; Brdjanovic, D; van Lier, J B

    2015-01-01

    Partial nitritation in sponge-bed trickling filters (STF) under natural air circulation was studied in two reactors: STF-1 and STF-2 operated at 30°C with sponge thickness of 0.75 and 1.50cm, respectively. The coexistence of nitrifiers and Anammox bacteria was obtained and attributed to the favorable environment created by the reactors' design and operational regimes. After 114days of operation, the STF-1 had an average NH4(+)-N removal of 69.3% (1.17kgN/m(3)sponged) and a total nitrogen removal of 52.2% (0.88kgN/m(3)sponged) at a Nitrogen Loading Rate (NLR) of 1.68kgN/m(3)sponged and Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT) of 1.71h. The STF-2 showed an average NH4(+)-N removal of 81.6 % (0.77kgN/m(3)sponged) and a total nitrogen removal of 54% (0.51kgN/m(3)sponged), at an NLR of 0.95kgN/m(3)sponged and HRT of 2.96h. The findings suggest that autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite in STF systems is a feasible alternative. PMID:25863209

  17. Sequentially aerated membrane biofilm reactors for autotrophic nitrogen removal: microbial community composition and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pellicer-Nàcher, Carles; Franck, Stéphanie; Gülay, Arda; Ruscalleda, Maël; Terada, Akihiko; Al-Soud, Waleed Abu; Hansen, Martin Asser; Sørensen, Søren J; Smets, Barth F

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-aerated biofilm reactors performing autotrophic nitrogen removal can be successfully applied to treat concentrated nitrogen streams. However, their process performance is seriously hampered by the growth of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). In this work we document how sequential aeration can bring the rapid and long-term suppression of NOB and the onset of the activity of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses confirmed that such shift in performance was mirrored by a change in population densities, with a very drastic reduction of the NOB Nitrospira and Nitrobacter and a 10-fold increase in AnAOB numbers. The study of biofilm sections with relevant 16S rRNA fluorescent probes revealed strongly stratified biofilm structures fostering aerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in biofilm areas close to the membrane surface (rich in oxygen) and AnAOB in regions neighbouring the liquid phase. Both communities were separated by a transition region potentially populated by denitrifying heterotrophic bacteria. AOB and AnAOB bacterial groups were more abundant and diverse than NOB, and dominated by the r-strategists Nitrosomonas europaea and Ca. Brocadia anammoxidans, respectively. Taken together, the present work presents tools to better engineer, monitor and control the microbial communities that support robust, sustainable and efficient nitrogen removal. PMID:24112350

  18. Sequentially aerated membrane biofilm reactors for autotrophic nitrogen removal: microbial community composition and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pellicer-Nàcher, Carles; Franck, Stéphanie; Gülay, Arda; Ruscalleda, Maël; Terada, Akihiko; Al-Soud, Waleed Abu; Hansen, Martin Asser; Sørensen, Søren J; Smets, Barth F

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-aerated biofilm reactors performing autotrophic nitrogen removal can be successfully applied to treat concentrated nitrogen streams. However, their process performance is seriously hampered by the growth of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). In this work we document how sequential aeration can bring the rapid and long-term suppression of NOB and the onset of the activity of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses confirmed that such shift in performance was mirrored by a change in population densities, with a very drastic reduction of the NOB Nitrospira and Nitrobacter and a 10-fold increase in AnAOB numbers. The study of biofilm sections with relevant 16S rRNA fluorescent probes revealed strongly stratified biofilm structures fostering aerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in biofilm areas close to the membrane surface (rich in oxygen) and AnAOB in regions neighbouring the liquid phase. Both communities were separated by a transition region potentially populated by denitrifying heterotrophic bacteria. AOB and AnAOB bacterial groups were more abundant and diverse than NOB, and dominated by the r-strategists Nitrosomonas europaea and Ca. Brocadia anammoxidans, respectively. Taken together, the present work presents tools to better engineer, monitor and control the microbial communities that support robust, sustainable and efficient nitrogen removal. PMID:24112350

  19. Completely autotrophic nitrogen-removal over nitrite in lab-scale constructed wetlands: evidence from a mass balance study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guangzhi; Austin, David

    2007-06-01

    A mass-balance study was carried out to investigate the transformation of nitrogenous pollutants in vertical flow wetlands. Landfill leachate containing low BOD, but a high concentration of ammonia, was treated in four wetland columns under predominately aerobic conditions. Influent total nitrogen in the leachate consisted mainly of ammonia with less than 1% nitrate and nitrite, and negligible organic nitrogen. There was a substantial loss of total nitrogen (52%) in one column, whereas other columns exhibited zero to minor losses (<12%). Net nitrogen loss under study conditions was unexpected. Correlations between pH, nitrite and nitrate concentrations indicated the removal of nitrogen under study conditions did not follow the conventional, simplistic, chemistry of autotrophic nitrification. Through mass-balance analysis, it was found that CANON (Completely Autotrophic Nitrogen-removal Over Nitrite) was responsible for the transformation of nitrogen into gaseous form, thereby causing the loss of nitrogen mass. The results show that CANON can be native to aerobic engineered wetland systems treating wastewater that contains high ammonia and low BOD. PMID:17349669

  20. Separating Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Contributions to Soil Respiration in Maize-Based Agroecosystems Using Stable Carbon Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amos, B.; Walters, D. T.; Madhavan, S.; Arkebauer, T. J.; Scoby, D. L.

    2005-12-01

    Any effort to establish a carbon budget for a growing crop by means of a thorough accounting of all C sources and sinks will require the ability to discriminate between autotrophic and heterotrophic contributions to soil surface CO2 flux. Autotrophic soil respiration (Ra) is defined as combined root respiration and the respiration of soil microorganisms residing in the rhizosphere and using root-derived carbohydrates as an energy source, while heterotrophic respiration (Rh) is defined as the respiration of soil microorganisms and macroorganisms not directly under the influence of the live root system and using SOM as an energy source. We partition soil surface CO2 flux into its autotrophic and heterotrophic components by combining root exclusion with stable carbon isotope techniques in production scale (~65 ha) maize-based agroecosystems. After flux measurements, small chambers are placed on collars in both root excluded shields and in non-root excluded soil, ambient headspace CO2 is removed using a soda lime trap, and soil-respired C is allowed to collect in the chambers. Soil respiration samples are then collected in 12mL evacuated exetainers and analyzed for δ13C by means of a Finnigan Delta-S isotope ratio mass spectrometer interfaced with a Thermo Finnigan GasBench II and a cryogenic trap to increase CO2 concentration. These δ13C measurements were made throughout the 2005 growing season in maize fields representing three agroecosystems: irrigated continuous maize, irrigated maize-soybean rotation, and rainfed maize soybean rotation. Estimates of autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration along with other results of this study will be presented.

  1. Autotrophic nitrogen removal from ammonium at low applied voltage in a single-compartment microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Guoqiang; Zhang, Lixia; Li, Daping; Su, Wentao; Tao, Yong; Qian, Junwei

    2012-07-01

    A new approach was developed to achieve autotrophic nitrogen removal from ammonium at low applied voltage in a single-compartment 3-dimensional microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). The MEC consisted of anodic and cathodic electrodes, on which nitrifying and denitrifying biofilms, respectively, were attached. Nitrogen removal can be enhanced at an applied voltage in the MEC. Besides, the nitrogen removal efficiency gradually increased from 70.3% to 92.6% with the increase of applied voltage from 0.2 to 0.4V, as well as the maximum current was varied from 4.4 to 14 mA. The corresponding coulombic efficiency also increased from 82% to 94.4%, indicating that the increasing applied voltage could enhance electron extraction from ammonium during its oxidative removal. The DO was found to be a critical factor which affected the nitrogen removal in this MEC system. These results demonstrated that the MEC process was applicable to achieve autotrophic nitrogen removal from wastewater containing ammonium. PMID:22572551

  2. The CANON system (Completely Autotrophic Nitrogen-removal Over Nitrite) under ammonium limitation: interaction and competition between three groups of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Third, K A; Sliekers, A O; Kuenen, J G; Jetten, M S

    2001-12-01

    The CANON system (Completely Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal Over Nitrite) can potentially remove ammonium from wastewater in a single, oxygen-limited treatment step. The usefulness of CANON as an industrial process will be determined by the ability of the system to recover from major disturbances in feed composition. The CANON process relies on the stable interaction between only two bacterial populations: Nitrosomonas-like aerobic and Planctomycete-like anaerobic ammonium oxidising bacteria. The effect of extended periods of ammonium limitation was investigated at the laboratory scale in two different reactor types (sequencing batch reactor and chemostat). The lower limit of effective and stable nitrogen removal to dinitrogen gas in the CANON system was 0.1 kg N m(-3) day(-1). At this loading rate, 92% of the total nitrogen was removed. After prolonged exposure (> 1 month) to influxes lower than this critical NH4+-influx, a third population of bacteria developed in the system and affected the CANON reaction stoichiometry, resulting in a temporary decrease in nitrogen removal from 92% to 57%. The third group of bacteria were identified by activity tests and qualititative FISH (Fluorescence In Situ Hybridisation) analysis to be nitrite-oxidising Nitrobacter and Nitrospira species. The changes caused by the NH4+-limitation were completely reversible, and the system re-established itself as soon as the ammonium limitation was removed. This study showed that CANON is a robust system for ammonium removal, enduring periods of up to one month of ammonium limitation without irreversible damage. PMID:11876366

  3. Missing aerobic-phase nitrogen: The potential for heterotrophic reduction of autotrophically generated nitrous oxide in a sequencing batch reactor wastewater treatment system.

    PubMed

    Shiskowskii, D M; Mavinic, D S

    2005-08-01

    Several biochemical pathways can induce nitrogen loss from aerated, aerobic wastewater treatment bioreactors. These pathways include "traditional" simultaneous nitrification-denitrification (SND) (i.e. autotrophic nitrification - heterotrophic denitrification), autotrophic denitrification, and anaerobic ammonia oxidation. An oxygen limitation, often expressed in terms of low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration, is a common element of these pathways. The presented research investigated the effect of mixed liquor DO concentration and biomass slowly degradable carbon (SDC) utilization rate on the heterotrophic nitrous oxide (N2O) reduction rate, for biomass cultured in an anoxic/aerobic wastewater treatment bioreactor. Biomass oxygen and SDC availability-limitation, expressed in terms of DO concentration and SDC ultilization rate, respectively, were found to significantly impact the observed heterotrophic N2O reduction rate. The findings support the hypothesis that nitrogen lost from the mixed liquor of an aerobic bioreactor could result from simultaneous autotrophic N2O generation (i.e. autotrophic denitrification) and heterotrophic N2O reduction. The results also support the idea that autotrophic N2O generation could be occurring in a bioreactor, although N2O may not be measurable in the reactor off-gas. Therefore, this autotrophic N2O generation - heterotrophic N2O reduction mechanism provides an alternative explanation to nitrogen loss, when compared to "conventional" SND, where heterotrophic organisms are assumed to reduce autotrophically generated nitrite and nitrate to dinitrogen (N2). In addition, nitrogen loss speculatively attributed to N2 formation via anaerobic ammonia oxidation in oxygen-limited environments, again because of the absence of measurable N2O, may in fact be due to the autotrophic N2O generation - heterotrophic N2O reduction mechanism. PMID:16128383

  4. Effects of dissolved oxygen on microbial community of single-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal system treating simulating mature landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xin; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Jiale; Qing, Xiaoxia; He, Qiang

    2016-10-01

    The performance of four identical sequencing biofilm batch reactors (SBBR) for autotrophic nitrogen removal was investigated with 2000mg/L ammonia-containing mature landfill leachate at 30°C. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of dissolved oxygen (DO) on the performance and microbial community of single-stage nitrogen removal using anammox and partial nitritation (SNAP) system. At an applied load of 0.5kgNm(-3)d(-1), average total nitrogen removal efficiency (TNRE) above 90% was long-term achieved with an optimal DO concentration of 2.7mg/L. The microelectrode-measured profiles showed the microenvironments inside the biofilms. 16S ribosomal Ribonucleic Acid (rRNA) amplicon pyrosequencing and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) were used to analyze the microbial variations of different DO concentrations and different positions inside one reactor. PMID:27450126

  5. Implementing a Nitrogen-Based Model for Autotrophic Respiration Using Satellite and Field Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, Bhaskar J.; Houser, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The rate of carbon accumulation by terrestrial plant communities in a process-level, mechanistic modeling is the difference of the rate of gross photosynthesis by a canopy (A(sub g)) and autotrophic respiration (R) of the stand. Observations for different biomes often show that R to be a large and variable fraction of A(sub g), ca. 35% to 75%, although other studies suggest the ratio of R and A(sub g) to be less variable. Here, R has been calculated according to the two compartment model as being the sum of maintenance and growth components. The maintenance respiration of foliage and living fine roots for different biomes has been determined objectively from observed nitrogen content of these organs. The sapwood maintenance respiration is based on pipe theory, and checked against an independently derived equation considering sapwood biomass and its maintenance coefficient. The growth respiration has been calculated from the difference of A(sub g) and maintenance respiration. The A(sub g) is obtained as the product of biome-specific radiation use efficiency for gross photosynthesis under unstressed conditions and intercepted photosynthetically active radiation, and adjusted for stress. Calculations have been done using satellite and ground observations for 36 consecutive months (1987-1989) over large contiguous areas (ca. 10(exp 5) sq km) of boreal forests, crop land, temperate deciduous forest, temperate grassland, tropical deciduous forest, tropical evergreen forest, tropical savanna, and tundra. The ratio of annual respiration and gross photosynthesis, (R/A(sub g)), is found to be 0.5-0.6 for temperate and cold adopted biome areas, but somewhat higher for tropical biome areas (0.6-0.7). Interannual variation of the fluxes is found to be generally less than 15%. Calculated fluxes are compared with observations and several previous estimates. Results of sensitivity analysis are presented for uncertainties in parameterization and input data. It is found that

  6. 454-Pyrosequencing Analysis of Bacterial Communities from Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal Bioreactors Utilizing Universal Primers: Effect of Annealing Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Martinez, Alejandro; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Alejandro; Rodelas, Belén; Abbas, Ben A.; Martinez-Toledo, Maria Victoria; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.; Osorio, F.; Gonzalez-Lopez, Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Identification of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria by molecular tools aimed at the evaluation of bacterial diversity in autotrophic nitrogen removal systems is limited by the difficulty to design universal primers for the Bacteria domain able to amplify the anammox 16S rRNA genes. A metagenomic analysis (pyrosequencing) of total bacterial diversity including anammox population in five autotrophic nitrogen removal technologies, two bench-scale models (MBR and Low Temperature CANON) and three full-scale bioreactors (anammox, CANON, and DEMON), was successfully carried out by optimization of primer selection and PCR conditions (annealing temperature). The universal primer 530F was identified as the best candidate for total bacteria and anammox bacteria diversity coverage. Salt-adjusted optimum annealing temperature of primer 530F was calculated (47°C) and hence a range of annealing temperatures of 44–49°C was tested. Pyrosequencing data showed that annealing temperature of 45°C yielded the best results in terms of species richness and diversity for all bioreactors analyzed. PMID:26421306

  7. Effect of inorganic carbon on the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process in a sequencing batch biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Chen, You-Peng; Li, Shan; Fang, Fang; Guo, Jin-Song; Zhang, Qiang; Gao, Xu

    2012-12-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB) are autotrophic microorganisms. Inorganic carbon (IC) is their main carbon source. The effects of IC limitation on AOB and AnAOB in the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process in a sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) were examined. The optimal IC concentration in the influent was investigated. The start-up time of the CANON process from the activated sludge in the SBBR was 80 d under controlled free ammonia (FA) conditions and sufficient IC source. The AOB and AnAOB activities were limited by an IC concentration of 50 mg-C-L(-1) in the influent, whilst the nitrogen loading rate (NLR) was 200 mg-N x L(-1) x d(-1). The experiment on recovering the influent IC showed that AOB and AnAOB activities were affected by the IC limitation, and not by the pH or FA, at 200mg-N x L(-1) x d(-1) NLR and 50mg-C x L(-1) IC in the CANON process. The activities were recovered by increasing the IC concentration in the influent. From an economic point of view, the optimal IC concentration in the influent was 250mg-C x L(-1) at 200mg-N x L(-1) x d(-1) NLR in this CANON system. PMID:23437661

  8. [Single-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal reactor with self-generated granular sludge for treating sludge dewatering effluent].

    PubMed

    Cao, Jian-ping; Du, Bing; Liu, Yin; Qin, Yong-sheng

    2009-10-15

    Single-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal (SANR) has been observed in a long-term operated nitrosation air-lift reactor for treating digested sludge dewatering effluent from sewage wastewater treatment plant. A kind of so called self-generated granular sludge which undertake the SANR reaction has oriented formed. The performance of SANR reactor cultivated above sludge for treating sludge dewatering effluent has been tested and better results have been reached. When the influent total nitrogen (TN) was kept about 350 mg/L (mainly ammonium nitrogen), the average TN removal efficiency and nitrogen removal load were 74.8% (maximum 86.92%) and 0.68 kg x (m3 x d)(-1) [maximum 0.9 kg x (m3 x d)(-1)] respectively. The operation stability and nitrogen removal efficiency have been enforced after adding a certain quantity powered activated carbon. The influent ammonium concentration, nitrogen load and aeration rate have a great effect on SANR reactor as well as the influent organic compound, pH, alkalinity have a relatively low effect. The parameters such as the ratios of aeration rate/deltaTN, aeration rate/deltaNH4+ -N, deltaALK/deltaTN can be used for better controlling the reaction. PMID:19968119

  9. Nitrate-dependent anaerobic ferrous oxidation (NAFO) by denitrifying bacteria: a perspective autotrophic nitrogen pollution control technology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Zheng, Ping; Wang, Ru; Li, Wei; Lu, Huifeng; Zhang, Jiqiang

    2014-12-01

    The nitrate-dependent anaerobic ferrous oxidation (NAFO) is an important discovery in the fields of microbiology and geology, which is a valuable biological reaction since it can convert nitrate into nitrogen gas, removing nitrogen from wastewater. The research on NAFO can promote the development of novel autotrophic biotechnologies for nitrogen pollution control and get a deep insight into the biogeochemical cycles. In this work, batch experiments were conducted with denitrifying bacteria as biocatalyst to investigate the performance of nitrogen removal by NAFO. The results showed that the denitrifying bacteria were capable of chemolithotrophic denitrification with ferrous salt as electron donor, namely NAFO. And the maximum nitrate conversion rates (qmax) reached 57.89 mg (g VSS d)−1, which was the rate-limiting step in NAFO. Fe/N ratio, temperature and initial pH had significant influences on nitrogen removal by NAFO process, and their optimal values were 2.0 °C, 30.15 °C and 8.0 °C, respectively. PMID:25461924

  10. Start-up of the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal process using low activity anammox inoculum to treat low strength UASB effluent.

    PubMed

    Malamis, S; Katsou, E; Frison, N; Di Fabio, S; Noutsopoulos, C; Fatone, F

    2013-11-01

    The start-up of the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal process was examined in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) using low activity anoxic ammonium oxidation (anammox) inoculum. The SBR received effluent from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) that treated low strength wastewater. The volumetric nitrogen loading rate (vNLR) was first 0.24 ± 0.11 kg Nm(-3)d(-1) and then reduced to 0.10 ± 0.02 kg Nm(-3)d(-1). The average specific anammox activity was 2.27 ± 1.31 mg N (gVSS h)(-1), at 30°C representing an increase of 161% compared to the inoculum. The decrease in vNLR did not significantly affect anammox activity, but resulted in a decrease of denitrifying heterotrophic activity to very low levels after the first 30 days owing to the decrease of organic loading rate (OLR). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis confirmed the stable presence of anammox bacteria in biomass. Numerous filamentous microorganisms were present, several of which were in a state of endogenous respiration. PMID:24077156

  11. Sewage treatment by an UAFB-EGSB biosystem with energy recovery and autotrophic nitrogen removal under different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Gao, Da-Wen; Huang, Xiao-Li; Tao, Yu; Cong, Yan; Wang, Xiao-Long

    2015-04-01

    A system combined an upflow anaerobic fixed bed (UAFB) and an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) was designed and verified as a success for treating real sewage with simultaneous energy recovery and autotrophic nitrogen removal. The impact of temperature (stepwise decreased from 30 °C to 20 °C and 10 °C) was a primary focus, aiming to reveal the response of the anaerobic digestion (AD) and anammox efficiency to the temperature variation. As the temperature decreases, the soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD) removal rate was 90.6%, 90.0% and 84.7%, respectively; total nitrogen (TN) removal was 69.4%, 48.8%, 38.4%, respectively; NH4(+)-N removal was 91.3%, 74.9%, 65.1%, respectively. Methanogenic activity of UAFB was significantly influenced by low temperatures, while the unavoidable growth of heterotrophic organisms in EGSB also contributed to the sCOD removal, even at 10 °C. Lower working temperature (10/20 °C) limited the growth and activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anaerobic ammonia oxidation bacteria (AnAOB), but improved the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) activity. PMID:25625463

  12. Cultivation-independent detection of autotrophic hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria by DNA stable-isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Pumphrey, Graham M; Ranchou-Peyruse, Anthony; Spain, Jim C

    2011-07-01

    Knallgas bacteria are a physiologically defined group that is primarily studied using cultivation-dependent techniques. Given that current cultivation techniques fail to grow most bacteria, cultivation-independent techniques that selectively detect and identify knallgas bacteria will improve our ability to study their diversity and distribution. We used stable-isotope probing (SIP) to identify knallgas bacteria in rhizosphere soil of legumes and in a microbial mat from Obsidian Pool in Yellowstone National Park. When samples were incubated in the dark, incorporation of (13)CO(2) was H(2) dependent. SIP enabled the detection of knallgas bacteria that were not detected by cultivation, and the majority of bacteria identified in the rhizosphere soils were betaproteobacteria predominantly related to genera previously known to oxidize hydrogen. Bacteria in soil grew on hydrogen at concentrations as low as 100 ppm. A hydB homolog encoding a putative high-affinity NiFe hydrogenase was amplified from (13)C-labeled DNA from both vetch and clover rhizosphere soil. The results indicate that knallgas bacteria can be detected by SIP and populations that respond to different H(2) concentrations can be distinguished. The methods described here should be applicable to a variety of ecosystems and will enable the discovery of additional knallgas bacteria that are resistant to cultivation. PMID:21622787

  13. Performance of one-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal in a biofilm reactor with low C/N ratio.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Fang, Fang; Guo, Jinsong; Chen, Youpeng; Yang, Jixiang; Wei, Honghuai

    2015-01-01

    Wastewater with C/N ratios ranging from 1.00 to 0.33 caused by a gradual increase in influent NH4+-N concentration was used to evaluate the performance of the one-stage nitrogen removal process in a biofilm reactor. The system was operated for 197 days under chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration of 250 mg L(-1) and influent NH4+-N concentrations ranging from 250 to 750 mg L(-1). The effects of the C/N ratio and dissolved oxygen (DO) on nitrogen removal were evaluated at different influent C/N ratios and DO concentrations, respectively. The microbial composition of the system was examined by scanning electron microscopy and polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and the relative contribution of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) to nitrogen removal was assessed by calculating the average rates of ANAMMOX and denitrification in batch experiments. Results showed that the removal efficiencies of total nitrogen (TN), NH4+-N and COD were 74-97%, 75-99% and 64-97%, respectively. The C/N ratio had a significant influence on nitrogen removal efficiency when it was decreased from 1.00 to 0.70, but no significant change was observed when it was reduced from 0.70 to 0.33. DO also correlated with the NH4+-N concentration in the influent, and 3.0 mg L(-1) was found to be a suitable concentration for the influent NH4+-N concentration of 450±5 mg L(-1). Analysis of microbial composition of the system revealed that biofilm and activated sludge were mainly composed of aerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria, anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB) and denitrifying bacteria. Activity tests suggested that AnAOB played an important role in the one-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal process, contributing to about 52.7% of total TN removal via ANAMMOX. PMID:25650251

  14. Extraction and characterization of extracellular polymeric substances in biofilm and sludge via completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite system.

    PubMed

    Chen, You-Peng; Li, Chun; Guo, Jin-Song; Fang, Fang; Gao, Xu; Zhang, Peng; Li, Shan

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were extracted from sludge and biofilm via the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) system. Tightly bound (TB)-EPS were extracted using four physical methods, namely, cationic exchange resin (CER), sonication, heating, and steaming. CER was the most effective and most suitable method for extraction among the four methods. Moreover, the ultraviolet-vis spectra of TB-EPS indicated that few cells were destroyed by the CER method. The major component contents of total EPS, proteins, carbohydrates, humic substances, and DNA in sludge were 60.77, 49.84, 21.63, and 9.01 mg/g volatile suspended solids (VSS) and 90.03, 29.01, 15.96, and 10.04 mg/g VSS in biofilm, respectively. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra results indicated differences in the EPS functional groups between biofilm and sludge. The results of the batch experiments showed that the biofilm activity was significantly higher than that of the sludge in the CANON system. Furthermore, biomass activity was probably influenced by the EPS composition and distribution in the sludge and biofilm. PMID:23239415

  15. Application of nitrogen metabolism in autotrophic bacteria to chemosynthetic bioregeneration in space missions, supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wixom, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The chemolithotroph, Hydrogenomonas eutropha, was considered as a life support, bioregenerative system. This project focuses on several metabolic functions that are related to the proposed nitrogen cycle between man and this microbe. Specifically this organism has the capability to utilize as the sole nitrogen source such urine components as urea and fifteen individual amino acids, but not nine other amino acids. The effectiveness of utilization was high for many amino acids. Several specific growth inhibitions were also observed. The enzyme that catalyzes the incorporation of ammonia in the medium into amino acids was identified as a NADP-specific, L-glutamate dehydrogenase. This enzyme has a constitutive nature. This organism can synthesize all of its amino acids from carbon dioxide and ammonia. Therefore with the background literature of multiple pathways of individual amino acid biosyntheses, our evidence to date is consistent with the Hydrogeneomonas group having the same pathway of valine-isoleucine formation as the classical E. coli.

  16. Autotrophic nitrogen removal from black water: calcium addition as a requirement for settleability.

    PubMed

    de Graaff, M S; Temmink, H; Zeeman, G; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Buisman, C J N

    2011-01-01

    Black (toilet) water contains half of the organic load in the domestic wastewater, as well as the major fraction of the nutrients nitrogen and phosphorus. When collected with vacuum toilets, the black water is 25 times more concentrated than the total domestic wastewater stream, i.e. including grey water produced by laundry, showers etc. A two-stage nitritation-anammox process was successfully employed and removed 85%-89% of total nitrogen in anaerobically treated black water. The (free) calcium concentration in black water was too low (42 mg/L) to obtain sufficient granulation of anammox biomass. The granulation and retention of the biomass was improved considerably by the addition of 39 mg/L of extra calcium. This resulted in a volumetric nitrogen removal rate of 0.5 gN/L/d, irrespective of the two temperatures of 35 °C and 25 °C at which the anammox reactors were operated. Nitrous oxide, a very strong global warming gas, was produced in situations of an incomplete anammox conversion accompanied by elevated levels of nitrite. PMID:20822793

  17. N2O and NO emissions during autotrophic nitrogen removal in a granular sludge reactor--a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle, S W H; Callens, J; Mampaey, K E; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Volcke, E I P

    2012-01-01

    This contribution deals with NO and N2O emissions during autotrophic nitrogen removal in a granular sludge reactor. Two possible model scenarios describing this emission by ammonium- oxidizing biomass have been compared in a simulation study of a granular sludge reactor for one-stage partial nitritation--Anammox. No significant difference between these two scenarios was noticed. The influence of the bulk oxygen concentration, granule size, reactor temperature and ammonium load on the NO and N2O emissions has been assessed. The simulation results indicate that emission maxima of NO and N2O coincide with the region for optimal Anammox conversion. Also, most of the NO and N2O are present in the off-gas, owing to the limited solubility of both gases. The size of granules needs to be large enough not to limit optimal Anammox activity, but not too large as this implies an elevated production of N2O. Temperature has a significant influence on N2O emission, as a higher temperature results in a better N-removal efficiency and a lowered N2O production. Statistical analysis of the results showed that there is a strong correlation between nitrite accumulation and N2O production. Further, three regions of operation can be distinguished: a region with high N2O, NO and nitrite concentration; a region with high N2 concentrations and, as such, high removal percentages; and a region with high oxygen and nitrate concentrations. There is some overlap between the first two regions, which is in line with the fact that maximum emission of NO and N2O coincides with the region for optimal Anammox conversion. PMID:23393969

  18. Autotrophic nitrogen assimilation and carbon capture for microbial protein production by a novel enrichment of hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Matassa, Silvio; Verstraete, Willy; Pikaar, Ilje; Boon, Nico

    2016-09-15

    Domestic used water treatment systems are currently predominantly based on conventional resource inefficient treatment processes. While resource recovery is gaining momentum it lacks high value end-products which can be efficiently marketed. Microbial protein production offers a valid and promising alternative by upgrading low value recovered resources into high quality feed and also food. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria to upgrade ammonium and carbon dioxide under autotrophic growth conditions. The enrichment of a generic microbial community and the implementation of different culture conditions (sequenced batch resp. continuous reactor) revealed surprising features. At low selection pressure (i.e. under sequenced batch culture at high solid retention time), a very diverse microbiome with an important presence of predatory Bdellovibrio spp. was observed. The microbial culture which evolved under high rate selection pressure (i.e. dilution rate D = 0.1 h(-1)) under continuous reactor conditions was dominated by Sulfuricurvum spp. and a highly stable and efficient process in terms of N and C uptake, biomass yield and volumetric productivity was attained. Under continuous culture conditions the maximum yield obtained was 0.29 g cell dry weight per gram chemical oxygen demand equivalent of hydrogen, whereas the maximum volumetric loading rate peaked 0.41 g cell dry weight per litre per hour at a protein content of 71%. Finally, the microbial protein produced was of high nutritive quality in terms of essential amino acids content and can be a suitable substitute for conventional feed sources such as fishmeal or soybean meal. PMID:27262118

  19. [Abundance and Community Composition of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea in Two Completely Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal over Nitrite Systems].

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing-feng; Li, Ting; Zhang, Shu-jun; Fan, Xiao-yan; Pan, Kai-ling; Ma, Qian; Yuan, Ya-lin

    2015-08-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification, which was thought to be only performed by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In recent years, ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) was also confirmed to take part in ammonia oxidation. The diversity and abundance of AOA have been investigated in various environments, however, little is known regarding the AOA in the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) wastewater treatment process. In this study, the abundance and diversity of AOA were investigated in the biofilm and flocculent activated sludge collected in a lab-scale (L) CANON system and a pilot-scale (P) CANON systems, respectively. The quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) was applied to investigate the abundance of AOA and the diversity of AOA was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cloning and sequencing. The qPCR results showed that the average abundance of AOA amoA gene of L and P was 2.42 x 10(6) copies x g(-1) dry sludge and 6.51 x 10(6) copies x g(-1) dry sludge, respectively. The abundance of AOA in biofilm was 10.1-14.1 times higher than that in flocculent activated sludge. For P system, the abundance of AOA in flocculent activated sludge was 1.8 times higher than that in biofilm. The results indicated that the abundance of AOA might be affected by different sludge morphology. The diversity of AOA in P system was extremely limited, only one OTU was observed, which was classified into Nitrosopumilus subcluster 5.2. The diversity of AOA in L system was higher, eight OTUs were observed, which were classified into five genera: Nitrososphaera subcluster 9, subcluster 8.1, subcluster 4.1, subcluster 1.1 and Nitrosopumilus subcluster 5.2. The diversity and abundance of AOA were different in CANON systems with different sludge morphology. AOA may play an important role in ammonia oxidation in CANON system. PMID:26592025

  20. Characterization of an Autotrophic Nitrogen-Removing Biofilm from a Highly Loaded Lab-Scale Rotating Biological Contactor

    PubMed Central

    Pynaert, Kris; Smets, Barth F.; Wyffels, Stijn; Beheydt, Daan; Siciliano, Steven D.; Verstraete, Willy

    2003-01-01

    In this study, a lab-scale rotating biological contactor (RBC) treating a synthetic NH4+ wastewater devoid of organic carbon and showing high N losses was examined for several important physiological and microbial characteristics. The RBC biofilm removed 89% ± 5% of the influent N at the highest surface load of approximately 8.3 g of N m−2 day−1, with N2 as the main end product. In batch tests, the RBC biomass showed good aerobic and anoxic ammonium oxidation (147.8 ± 7.6 and 76.5 ± 6.4 mg of NH4+-N g of volatile suspended solids [VSS]−1 day−1, respectively) and almost no nitrite oxidation (< 1 mg of N g of VSS−1 day−1). The diversity of aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AAOB) and planctomycetes in the biofilm was characterized by cloning and sequencing of PCR-amplified partial 16S rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis of the clones revealed that the AAOB community was fairly homogeneous and was dominated by Nitrosomonas-like species. Close relatives of the known anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacterium (AnAOB) Kuenenia stuttgartiensis dominated the planctomycete community and were most probably responsible for anoxic ammonium oxidation in the RBC. Use of a less specific planctomycete primer set, not amplifying the AnAOB, showed a high diversity among other planctomycetes, with representatives of all known groups present in the biofilm. The spatial organization of the biofilm was characterized using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). The latter showed that AAOB occurred side by side with putative AnAOB (cells hybridizing with probe PLA46 and AMX820/KST1275) throughout the biofilm, while other planctomycetes hybridizing with probe PLA886 (not detecting the known AnAOB) were present as very conspicuous spherical structures. This study reveals that long-term operation of a lab-scale RBC on a synthetic NH4+ wastewater devoid of organic carbon yields a stable biofilm in which two bacterial groups, thought

  1. An operational protocol for facilitating start-up of single-stage autotrophic nitrogen-removing reactors based on process stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, A G; Vangsgaard, A K; Sin, G; Smets, B F

    2013-01-01

    Start-up and operation of single-stage nitritation-anammox sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) for completely autotrophic nitrogen removal can be challenging and far from trivial. In this study, a step-wise procedure is developed based on stoichiometric analysis of the process performance from nitrogen species measurements to systematically guide start-up and normal operation efforts (instead of trial and error). The procedure is successfully applied to laboratory-scale SBRs for start-up and maintained operation over an 8-month period. This analysis can serve as a strong decision-making tool to take appropriate actions with respect to reactor operation to accelerate start-up or ensure high-rate N removal via the nitritation-anammox pathway. PMID:23925177

  2. The demonstration of a novel sulfur cycle-based wastewater treatment process: sulfate reduction, autotrophic denitrification, and nitrification integrated (SANI®) biological nitrogen removal process.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Wu, Di; Jiang, Feng; Ekama, George A; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2012-11-01

    Saline water supply has been successfully practiced for toilet flushing in Hong Kong since 1950s, which saves 22% of freshwater in Hong Kong. In order to extend the benefits of saline water supply into saline sewage management, we have recently developed a novel biological organics and nitrogen removal process: the Sulfate reduction, Autotrophic denitrification, and Nitrification Integrated (SANI®) process. The key features of this novel process include elimination of oxygen demand in organic matter removal and production of minimal sludge. Following the success of a 500-day lab-scale trial, this study reports a pilot scale evaluation of this novel process treating 10 m(3) /day of 6-mm screened saline sewage in Hong Kong. The SANI® pilot plant consisted of a sulfate reduction up-flow sludge bed (SRUSB) reactor, an anoxic bioreactor for autotrophic denitrification and an aerobic bioreactor for nitrification. The plant was operated at a steady state for 225 days, during which the average removal efficiencies of both chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total suspended solids (TSS) at 87% and no excess sludge was purposefully withdrawn. Furthermore, a tracer test revealed 5% short circuit flow and a 34.6% dead zone in the SRUSB, indicating a good possibility to further optimize the treatment capacity of the process for full-scale application. Compared with conventional biological nitrogen removal processes, the SANI® process reduces 90% of waste sludge, which saves 35% of the energy and reduces 36% of fossil CO(2) emission. The SANI® process not only eliminates the major odor sources originating from primary treatment and subsequent sludge treatment and disposal during secondary saline sewage treatment, but also promotes saline water supply as an economic and sustainable solution for water scarcity and sewage treatment in water-scarce coastal areas. PMID:22549429

  3. Stable nitrogen isotopes in coastal macroalgae: geographic and anthropogenic variability.

    PubMed

    Viana, Inés G; Bode, Antonio

    2013-01-15

    Growing human population adds to the natural nitrogen loads to coastal waters. Both anthropogenic and natural nitrogen is readily incorporated in new biomass, and these different nitrogen sources may be traced by the measurement of the ratio of stable nitrogen isotopes (δ(15)N). In this study δ(15)N was determined in two species of macroalgae (Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus), and in nitrate and ammonium to determine the relative importance of anthropogenic versus natural sources of nitrogen along the coast of NW Spain. Both algal species and nitrogen sources showed similar isotopic enrichment for a given site, but algal δ(15)N was not related to either inorganic nitrogen concentrations or δ(15)N in the water samples. The latter suggests that inorganic nitrogen inputs are variable and do not always leave an isotopic trace in macroalgae. However, a significant linear decrease in macroalgal δ(15)N along the coast is consistent with the differential effect of upwelling. Besides this geographic variability, the influence of anthropogenic nitrogen sources is evidenced by higher δ(15)N in macroalgae from rias and estuaries compared to those from open coastal areas and in areas with more than 15×10(3) inhabitants in the watershed. These results indicate that, in contrast with other studies, macroalgal δ(15)N is not simply related to either inorganic nitrogen concentrations or human population size but depends on other factors as the upwelling or the efficiency of local waste treatment systems. PMID:23247291

  4. Qualitative Distinction of Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Processes at the Leaf Level by Means of Triple Stable Isotope (C–O–H) Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kimak, Adam; Kern, Zoltan; Leuenberger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Foliar samples were harvested from two oaks, a beech, and a yew at the same site in order to trace the development of the leaves over an entire vegetation season. Cellulose yield and stable isotopic compositions (δ13C, δ18O, and δD) were analyzed on leaf cellulose. All parameters unequivocally define a juvenile and a mature period in the foliar expansion of each species. The accompanying shifts of the δ13C-values are in agreement with the transition from remobilized carbohydrates (juvenile period), to current photosynthates (mature phase). While the opponent seasonal trends of δ18O of blade and vein cellulose are in perfect agreement with the state-of-art mechanistic understanding, the lack of this discrepancy for δD, documented for the first time, is unexpected. For example, the offset range of 18 permil (oak veins) to 57 permil (oak blades) in δD may represent a process driven shift from autotrophic to heterotrophic processes. The shared pattern between blade and vein found for both oak and beech suggests an overwhelming metabolic isotope effect on δD that might be accompanied by proton transfer linked to the Calvin-cycle. These results provide strong evidence that hydrogen and oxygen are under different biochemical controls even at the leaf level. PMID:26635835

  5. Qualitative Distinction of Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Processes at the Leaf Level by Means of Triple Stable Isotope (C-O-H) Patterns.

    PubMed

    Kimak, Adam; Kern, Zoltan; Leuenberger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Foliar samples were harvested from two oaks, a beech, and a yew at the same site in order to trace the development of the leaves over an entire vegetation season. Cellulose yield and stable isotopic compositions (δ(13)C, δ(18)O, and δD) were analyzed on leaf cellulose. All parameters unequivocally define a juvenile and a mature period in the foliar expansion of each species. The accompanying shifts of the δ(13)C-values are in agreement with the transition from remobilized carbohydrates (juvenile period), to current photosynthates (mature phase). While the opponent seasonal trends of δ(18)O of blade and vein cellulose are in perfect agreement with the state-of-art mechanistic understanding, the lack of this discrepancy for δD, documented for the first time, is unexpected. For example, the offset range of 18 permil (oak veins) to 57 permil (oak blades) in δD may represent a process driven shift from autotrophic to heterotrophic processes. The shared pattern between blade and vein found for both oak and beech suggests an overwhelming metabolic isotope effect on δD that might be accompanied by proton transfer linked to the Calvin-cycle. These results provide strong evidence that hydrogen and oxygen are under different biochemical controls even at the leaf level. PMID:26635835

  6. Remediation of nitrate-nitrogen contaminated groundwater using a pilot-scale two-layer heterotrophic-autotrophic denitrification permeable reactive barrier with spongy iron/pine bark.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guoxin; Huang, Yuanying; Hu, Hongyan; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Ying; Deng, Renwei

    2015-07-01

    A novel two-layer heterotrophic-autotrophic denitrification (HAD) permeable reactive barrier (PRB) was proposed for remediating nitrate-nitrogen contaminated groundwater in an oxygen rich environment, which has a packing structure of an upstream pine bark layer and a downstream spongy iron and river sand mixture layer. The HAD PRB involves biological deoxygenation, heterotrophic denitrification, hydrogenotrophic denitrification, and anaerobic Fe corrosion. Column and batch experiments were performed to: (1) investigate the NO3(-)-N removal and inorganic geochemistry; (2) explore the nitrogen transformation and removal mechanisms; (3) identify the hydrogenotrophic denitrification capacity; and (4) evaluate the HAD performance by comparison with other approaches. The results showed that the HAD PRB could maintain constant high NO3(-)-N removal efficiency (>91%) before 38 pore volumes (PVs) of operation (corresponding to 504d), form little or even negative NO2(-)-N during the 45 PVs, and produce low NH4(+)-N after 10 PVs. Aerobic heterotrophic bacteria played a dominant role in oxygen depletion via aerobic respiration, providing more CO2 for hydrogenotrophic denitrification. The HAD PRB significantly relied on heterotrophic denitrification. Hydrogenotrophic denitrification removed 10-20% of the initial NO3(-)-N. Effluent total organic carbon decreased from 403.44mgL(-1) at PV 1 to 9.34mgL(-1) at PV 45. Packing structure had a noticeable effect on its denitrification. PMID:25747301

  7. Cultivation-Independent Detection of Autotrophic Hydrogen-Oxidizing Bacteria by DNA Stable-Isotope Probing ▿

    PubMed Central

    Pumphrey, Graham M.; Ranchou-Peyruse, Anthony; Spain, Jim C.

    2011-01-01

    Knallgas bacteria are a physiologically defined group that is primarily studied using cultivation-dependent techniques. Given that current cultivation techniques fail to grow most bacteria, cultivation-independent techniques that selectively detect and identify knallgas bacteria will improve our ability to study their diversity and distribution. We used stable-isotope probing (SIP) to identify knallgas bacteria in rhizosphere soil of legumes and in a microbial mat from Obsidian Pool in Yellowstone National Park. When samples were incubated in the dark, incorporation of 13CO2 was H2 dependent. SIP enabled the detection of knallgas bacteria that were not detected by cultivation, and the majority of bacteria identified in the rhizosphere soils were betaproteobacteria predominantly related to genera previously known to oxidize hydrogen. Bacteria in soil grew on hydrogen at concentrations as low as 100 ppm. A hydB homolog encoding a putative high-affinity NiFe hydrogenase was amplified from 13C-labeled DNA from both vetch and clover rhizosphere soil. The results indicate that knallgas bacteria can be detected by SIP and populations that respond to different H2 concentrations can be distinguished. The methods described here should be applicable to a variety of ecosystems and will enable the discovery of additional knallgas bacteria that are resistant to cultivation. PMID:21622787

  8. Microbial community and population dynamics of single-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal for dilute wastewater at the benchmark oxygen rate supply.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Tzu; Chen, Shiou-Shiou; Lee, Po-Heng; Bae, Jaeho

    2013-11-01

    Microbial communities and their kinetic performance in a single-stage autotrophic nitrogen-removal filter at an optimal oxygen supply were examined to determine the presence and activity of denitrifiers, anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing (anammox), ammonia-oxidizing, and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. To this end, different molecular biology techniques such as real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and biomarkers such as 16S rRNA revealed a diverse microbial community along the filter. It was important to survey the specific species of anammox bacteria using a newly designed Candidatus Brocadiafulgida (BF) specific primer, as well as Candidatus Brocadia anammoxidans (BA) and Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis (KS) specific primers. An unexpected finding was that the predominant anammox species switched from KS in concentrated wastewater to BA in dilute wastewaters. The Eckenfelder model of the NH3-N transformation along the filter was Se=S0 exp(-0.192D/L(2.3217)). These results provide a foundational understanding of the microbial structure and reaction kinetics in such systems. PMID:24011603

  9. Diversity and succession of autotrophic microbial community in high-elevation soils along deglaciation chronosequence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinbo; Kong, Weidong; Zhang, Guoshuai; Khan, Ajmal; Guo, Guangxia; Zhu, Chunmao; Wei, Xiaojie; Kang, Shichang; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M

    2016-10-01

    Global warming has resulted in substantial glacier retreats in high-elevation areas, exposing deglaciated soils to harsh environmental conditions. Autotrophic microbes are pioneering colonizers in the deglaciated soils and provide nutrients to the extreme ecosystem devoid of vegetation. However, autotrophic communities remain less studied in deglaciated soils. We explored the diversity and succession of the cbbL gene encoding the large subunit of form I RubisCO, a key CO2-fixing enzyme, using molecular methods in deglaciated soils along a 10-year deglaciation chronosequence on the Tibetan Plateau. Our results demonstrated that the abundance of all types of form I cbbL (IA/B, IC and ID) rapidly increased in young soils (0-2.5 years old) and kept stable in old soils. Soil total organic carbon (TOC) and total nitrogen (TN) gradually increased along the chronosequence and both demonstrated positive correlations with the abundance of bacteria and autotrophs, indicating that soil TOC and TN originated from autotrophs. Form IA/B autotrophs, affiliated with cyanobacteria, exhibited a substantially higher abundance than IC and ID. Cyanobacterial diversity and evenness increased in young soils (<6 years old) and then remained stable. Our findings suggest that cyabobacteria play an important role in accumulating TOC and TN in the deglaciated soils. PMID:27465079

  10. Stable Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotope Analysis of Nitrate using Denitrifying Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edenburn, L.; Michalski, G. M.

    2009-12-01

    The total isotopic composition of nitrate is used for identifying the origin and fate of nitrate in atmospheric, terrestrial and aquatic systems. The analysis of δ 18O, δ15N, and Δ17O values each give important and unique information about the sources and sinks of nitrate in these systems. Currently, there is no published method that allows for the simultaneous determination of δ18O, δ15N, and Δ17O of nitrate. Cascotti designed a novel method for measurement of δ18O and δ15N in nitrate but not Δ17O. This denitrifier method is based on the isotope ratio analysis of nitrous oxide generated by reduction of nitrate by cultured denitrifying bacteria. Kaiser then altered Cascotti's denitrifier method by converting N2O into O2 followed by the quantitative measurement δ18O and Δ17O, however δ15N was not measured. Here we present preliminary data on δ15N, δ18O, Δ17O values of N2 and O2 generated by the disproportionation of bacterial produced N2O. During the process of denitrification, nitrates are converted to nitrogen gas via a series of intermediate gaseous nitrogen oxide products. This is possible due to the presence of heterotrophic bacteria or autotrophic denitrifiers in select bacteria. Thus, we have chosen three distinct bacteria for the investigation of nitrate reduction for this study: Pseudomonas aureofaciens, Bacillus halodenitrificans, and Achromobacter cycloclastes. They each contain the copper-containing nitrite reductase necessary for the catalyzation of nitrate in order to complete the nitrogen cycle by returning N2 to the atmosphere. Bacillus halodenitrificans has the advantage of being an anaerobic halotolerant (salt-tolerant) denitrifier. Many of our samples have a high saline content; also, pre-concentration techniques using anion resin require elution using high ionic strength solutions. Further, high saline growth solutions limit contamination from other bacteria or organisms. Our efforts also focus on the conversion of N2O over a gold

  11. Effects of plant biomass on nitrogen transformation in subsurface-batch constructed wetlands: a stable isotope and mass balance assessment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Wen, Yue; Zhou, Qi; Vymazal, Jan

    2014-10-15

    Nitrate is commonly found in the influent of subsurface-batch constructed wetlands (SSB CWs) used for tertiary wastewater treatments. To understand the effects of plants and the litter on nitrate removal, as well as on nitrogen transformation in SSB CWs, six laboratory-scale SSB CW microcosms were set up in duplicate and were operated as batch systems with hydraulic residence time (HRT) of 5d. The presence of Typha latifolia enhanced nitrate removal in SSB CWs, and the N removed by plant uptake was mainly stored in aboveground biomass. Typha litter addition greatly improved nitrate removal in SSB CWs through continuous input of labile organic carbon, and calculated enrichment factors (ε) were between -12.1‰--13.9‰ from the nitrogen stable isotope analysis, suggesting that denitrification plays a dominant role in the N removal. Most significantly, simultaneous sulfur-based autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification was observed in CWs. Finally, mass balance showed that denitrification, sedimentation burial and plant uptake respectively contributed 54%-94%, 1%-46% and 7.5%-14.3% to the N removal in CWs. PMID:25000198

  12. Temporal variation of nitrogen balance within constructed wetlands treating slightly polluted water using a stable nitrogen isotope experiment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wanguang; Lei, Qiongye; Li, Zhengkui; Han, Huayang

    2016-02-01

    Slightly polluted water has become one of the main sources of nitrogen contaminants in recent years, for which constructed wetlands (CW) is a typical and efficient treatment. However, the knowledge about contribution of individual nitrogen removal pathways and nitrogen balance in constructed wetlands is still limited. In this study, a stable-isotope-addition experiment was performed in laboratory-scale constructed wetlands treating slightly polluted water to determine quantitative contribution of different pathways and temporal variation of nitrogen balance using Na(15)NO3 as tracer. Microbial conversion and substrate retention were found to be the dominant pathways in nitrogen removal contributing 24.4-79.9 and 8.9-70.7 %, respectively, while plant contributed only 4.6-11.1 % through direct assimilation but promoted the efficiency of other pathways. In addition, microbial conversion became the major way to remove N whereas nitrogen retained in substrate at first was gradually released to be utilized by microbes and plants over time. The findings indicated that N2 emission representing microbial conversion was not only the major but also permanent nitrogen removal process, thus keeping a high efficiency of microbial conversion is important for stable and efficient nitrogen removal in constructed wetlands. PMID:26438366

  13. STABLE ISOTOPIC EVIDENCE OF CARBON AND NITROGEN USE IN CULTURED ECTOMYCORRHIZAL AND SAPROTROPHIC FUNGI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotopes in sporocarps have proven useful for inferring ectomycorrhizal or saprotrophic status and understanding carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) utilization. However, greater understanding of processes producing isotopic concentrations is needed. We measured natural abundanc...

  14. VARYING STABLE NITROGEN ISOTOPIC RATIOS OF DIFFERENT COASTAL MARSH PLANTS AND THEIR RELATIONSHIPS WITH WASTEWATER NITROGEN AND LAND USE IN NEW ENGLAND, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable nitrogen isotopic ratios of coastal biota have been used as indicators of sources of anthropogenic nitrogen. In this study the relationships of the stable nitrogen isotopic ratios of salt marsh plants, Iva frutescens (L.), Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin ex Steud, Spar...

  15. Nitrogen Stable Isotope Composition of Various Fossil-fuel Combustion Nitrogen Oxide Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, W.; Michalski, G. M.; Fang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) are important trace gases that impact atmospheric chemistry, air quality, and climate. In order to help constrain NOx source contributions, the nitrogen (N) stable isotope composition of NOx (δ15N-NOx) may be a useful indicator for NOx source partitioning. However, despite anthropogenic emissions being the most prevalent source of NOx, there is still large uncertainty in the δ15N-NOx values for anthropogenic sources. To this end, this study provides a detailed analysis of several fossil-fuel combustion NOx sources and their δ15N-NOx values. To accomplish this, exhaust or flue samples from several fossil-fuel combustion sources were sampled and analyzed for their δ15N-NOx that included airplanes, gasoline-powered vehicles not equipped with a catalytic converter, gasoline-powered lawn tools and utility vehicles, diesel-electric buses, diesel semi-trucks, and natural gas-burning home furnace and power plant. A relatively large range of δ15N-NOx values were measured from -28.1 to 0.3‰ for individual exhaust/flue samples with cold started diesel-electric buses contributing on average the lowest δ15N-NOx values at -20.9‰, and warm-started diesel-electric buses contributing on average the highest values of -1.7‰. The NOx sources analyzed in this study primarily originated from the "thermal production" of NOx and generally emitted negative δ15N-NOx values, likely due to the kinetic isotope effect associated with its production. It was found that there is a negative correlation between NOx concentrations and δ15N-NOx for fossil-fuel combustion sources equipped with catalytic NOx reduction technology, suggesting that the catalytic reduction of NOx may have an influence on δ15N-NOx values. Based on the δ15N-NOx values reported in this study and in previous studies, a δ15N-NOx regional and seasonal isoscape was constructed for the contiguous United States. The constructed isoscape demonstrates the seasonal importance of various

  16. Stable Isotope Identification of Nitrogen Sources for United States (U.S.) Pacific Coast Estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used natural abundance stable isotope data to evaluate nitrogen sources to U.S. west coast estuaries. We collected δ15N of macroalgae data and supplemented this with available data from the literature for estuaries from Mexico to Alaska. Stable isotope ratios of green m...

  17. Novel Tool for Simultaneous Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope Analyses in Aqueous Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federherr, E.; Schmidt, T. C.; Cerli, C.; Kalbitz, K.; Kupka, H. J.; Lange, L.; Dunsbach, R.; Panetta, R. J.; Kasson, A.

    2014-12-01

    Investigation of transformation and transport processes of carbon and nitrogen in ecosystems plays an important role to understand and predict their dynamics and role in biogeochemistry. Consequently, suitable and accurate methods for concentration as well as stable isotopic composition analysis of carbon and nitrogen in waters and aqueous solutions play a significant role. Traditionally dissolved carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis (SIA) is performed using either offline sample preparation followed by elemental analysis isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA/IRMS) or modified wet chemical oxidation based device coupled to IRMS. Recently we presented a high temperature combustion system (HTC), which significantly improves upon these methods for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) SIA. The analysis of δ15N of dissolved nitrogen still has large limitations. Its low concentration makes EA/IRMS laborious, time and sample consuming. Systems based on wet chemical oxidation-IRMS bare the risk of sensitivity loss as well as of fractionation due to incomplete mineralization. In addition, the high solubility of molecular nitrogen in water remains a technical challenge, as it requires additional separation steps to distinguish between physically dissolved nitrogen and bound nitrogen. Further development of our HTC system lead to the implementation of the δ15N determination which now coupled, into a novel total organic carbon (TOC) analyzing system, especially designed for SIA of both, carbon and nitrogen. Integrated, innovative purge and trap technique (peak focusing) for nitrogen with aluminosilicate adsorber and peltier element based cooling system, in combination with high injection volume (up to 3 mL) as well as favorable carrier gas flow significantly improves sensitivity. Down to 1ppm and less total nitrogen can be measured with precision of ≤ 0.5‰. To lower the background caused by physically dissolved nitrogen new, membrane-vacuum based, degasser was designed

  18. Kinetic fractionation of stable nitrogen isotopes during amino acid transamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macko, Stephen A.; Estep, Marilyn L. Fogel; Engel, Michael H.; Hare, P. E.

    1986-10-01

    This study evaluates a kinetic isotope effect involving 15N, during the transamination reactions catalyzed by glutamic oxalacetic transaminase. During the transfer of amino nitrogen from glutamic acid to oxaloacetate to form aspartic acid, 14NH 2 reacted 1.0083 times faster than 14NH 2. In the reverse reaction transferring NH 2 from aspartic acid to α-ketoglutarate, 14NH 2 was incorporated 1.0017 times faster than 15NH 2. Knowledge of the magnitude and sign of these isotope effects will be useful in the interpretation of the distribution of 15N in biological and geochemical systems.

  19. NITROGEN STABLE ISOTOPE RATIOS IN SPOROCARPS OF ECTOMYCORRHIZAL FUNGI: INFLUENCE OF PHYLOGENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been suggested that nitrogen stable isotope ratios (expressed as delta 15-N) of fungus sporocarps, in conjunction with delta 15-N data from other ecosystem compartments, can be used to elucidate key processes in forest N-cycling. Although results of previous studies genera...

  20. PHYLOGENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES ON NITROGEN STABLE ISOTOPE RATIOS IN SPOROCARPS OF ECTOMYCORRHIZAL FUNGI

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been suggested that nitrogen stable isotope ratios (expressed as d15N) of fungus sporocarps, in conjunction with d15N data from other ecosystem compartments, can be used to elucidate key processes in forest N-cycling. Although results of previous studies generally support ...

  1. STABLE NITROGEN ISOTOPES AS INDICATORS OF ANTHOPOGENIC ACTIVITIES IN SMALL FRESHWATER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable nitrogen isotope ratios ( 15N) were measured in fish, mussel, and sediment samples taken from 17 small freshwater sites to examine food chain length and trophic position across sites affected by differing levels of anthropogenic activity. Both shoreline development and fis...

  2. Denitrification of groundwater using a sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrifying anaerobic fluidized-bed MBR: performance and bacterial community structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Chengzhi; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-03-01

    This paper investigates a novel sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrifying anaerobic fluidized bed membrane bioreactor (AnFB-MBR) that has the potential to overcome the limitations of conventional sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification systems. The AnFB-MBR produced consistent high-quality product water when fed by a synthetic groundwater with NO3 (-)-N ranging 25-80 mg/L and operated at hydraulic retention times of 0.5-5.0 h. A nitrate removal rate of up to 4.0 g NO3 (-)-N/Lreactord was attained by the bioreactor, which exceeded any reported removal capacity. The flux of AnFB-MBR was maintained in the range of 1.5-15 L m(-2) h(-1). Successful membrane cleaning was practiced with cleaning cycles of 35-81 days, which had no obvious effect on the AnFB-MBR performance. The (15) N-tracer analyses elucidated that nitrogen was converted into (15) N2-N and (15) N-biomass accounting for 88.1-93.1 % and 6.4-11.6 % of the total nitrogen produced, respectively. Only 0.3-0.5 % of removed nitrogen was in form of (15)N2O-N in sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification process, reducing potential risks of a significant amount of N2O emissions. The sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrifying bacterial consortium was composed mainly of bacteria from Proteobacteria, Chlorobi, and Chloroflexi phyla, with genera Thiobacillus, Sulfurimonas, and Ignavibacteriales dominating the consortium. The pyrosequencing assays also suggested that the stable microbial communities corresponded to the elevated performance of the AnFB-MBR. Overall, this research described relatively high nitrate removal, acceptable flux, indicating future potential for the technology in practice. PMID:25343972

  3. [Effects of lipid extraction on stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses of Ommastrephes bartramii muscle].

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi; Chen, Xin-Jun; Gao, Chun-Xia; Li, Yun-Kai

    2014-11-01

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA) has become an important tool to investigate diet shift, habitat use and trophic structure of animal population. Muscle is considered to be the most common tissue for SIA, however, lipid content in muscle causes a considerable bias to the interpretation of isotopic ratios of animals. Neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) is an important economic cephalopod of Chinese distant water fishery, and plays a major role in marine ecosystems. In this study, the effects of lipid extraction on stable isotope ratios of the muscles of 53 neon flying squids were investigated and the interference mechanism of lipid in SIA was clarified with the aim of contrasting the suitability of different lipid correction models of stable carbon isotope. Results showed that the stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic values of non-lipid extracted samples significantly increased after lipid extractions by 0.71 per thousand and 0.47 per thousand, respectively, which suggested that lipid extraction in cephalopod isotope study is needed prior to stable carbon isotope analysis but not recommended for stable nitrogen isotope analysis. The results could help remove the effects of lipid contents and standardize SIA muscle samples, thereby getting better understanding of the isotopic change of neon flying squids in the future. PMID:25898636

  4. [Relationship between Fe, Al oxides and stable organic carbon, nitrogen in the yellow-brown soils].

    PubMed

    Heng, Li-Sha; Wang, Dai-Zhang; Jiang, Xin; Rao, Wei; Zhang, Wen-Hao; Guo, Chun-Yan; Li, Teng

    2010-11-01

    The stable organic carbon and nitrogen of the different particles were gained by oxidation of 6% NaOCl in the yellow-brown soils. The relationships between the contents of selective extractable Fe/Al and the stable organic carbon/nitrogen were investigated. It shown that amounts of dithionite-citrate-(Fe(d)) and oxalate-(Fe(o)) and pyrophosphate extractable (Fe(p)) were 6-60.8 g x kg(-1) and 0.13-4.8 g x kg(-1) and 0.03-0.47 g x kg(-1) in 2-250 microm particles, respectively; 43.1-170 g x kg(-1) and 5.9-14.0 g x kg(-1) and 0.28-0.78 g x kg(-1) in < 2 microm particles, respectively. The contents of oxalate-(Al(o)) and pyrophosphate extractable (Al(p)) were 0.08-1.34 g x kg(-10 and 0.11-0.47 g x kg(-1) in 2-250 microm particles, respectively; 2.96-6.20 g x kg(-1) and 0.38-0.78 g x kg(-1) in < 2 microm particles, respectively. And amounts of selective extractable Fe are generally higher in paddy yellow-brown soils than in arid yellow-brown soils, and that of selective extractable Al are lower in the former than in the latter. Amounts of the stable organic carbon and nitrogen, higher in paddy yellow-brown soils than in arid yellow-brown soils, were 0.93-6.0 g x kg(-1) and 0.05-0.36 g x kg(-1) in 2-250 microm particles, respectively; 6.05-19.3 g x kg(-1) and 0.61-2.1 g x kg(-1) in < 2 microm particles, respectively. The ratio of the stable organic carbon and nitrogen (C(stable)/N(stable)) were 9.50-22.0 in 2-250 microm particles and 7.43-11.54 in < 2 microm particles, respectively. The stabilization index (SI(C) and SI(N)) of the organic carbon and nitrogen were 14.3-50.0 and 11.9-55.6 in 2-250 microm particles, respectively; 53.72-88.80 and 40.64-70.0 in < 2 microm particles, respectively. According to SI, it is lower in arid yellow-brown soils than in paddy yellow-brown soils. The organic carbon and nitrogen are advantageously conserved in paddy yellow-brown soil. An extremely significant positive correlation of the stable organic carbon and nitrogen with selective

  5. Factors Controlling the Stable Nitrogen Isotopic Composition (δ15N) of Lipids in Marine Animals.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C; Middelburg, Jack J; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2016-01-01

    Lipid extraction of biomass prior to stable isotope analysis is known to cause variable changes in the stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of residual biomass. However, the underlying factors causing these changes are not yet clear. Here we address this issue by comparing the δ15N of bulk and residual biomass of several marine animal tissues (fish, crab, cockle, oyster, and polychaete), as well as the δ15N of the extracted lipids. As observed previously, lipid extraction led to a variable offset in δ15N of biomass (differences ranging from -2.3 to +1.8 ‰). Importantly, the total lipid extract (TLE) was highly depleted in 15N compared to bulk biomass, and also highly variable (differences ranging from -14 to +0.7 ‰). The TLE consisted mainly of phosphatidylcholines, a group of lipids with one nitrogen atom in the headgroup. To elucidate the cause for the 15N-depletion in the TLE, the δ15N of amino acids was determined, including serine because it is one of the main sources of nitrogen to N-containing lipids. Serine δ15N values differed by -7 to +2 ‰ from bulk biomass δ15N, and correlated well with the 15N depletion in TLEs. On average, serine was less depleted (-3‰) than the TLE (-7 ‰), possibly due to fractionation during biosynthesis of N-containing headgroups, or that other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as urea and choline, or recycled nitrogen contribute to the nitrogen isotopic composition of the TLE. The depletion in 15N of the TLE relative to biomass increased with the trophic level of the organisms. PMID:26731720

  6. Factors Controlling the Stable Nitrogen Isotopic Composition (δ15N) of Lipids in Marine Animals

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Middelburg, Jack J.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid extraction of biomass prior to stable isotope analysis is known to cause variable changes in the stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of residual biomass. However, the underlying factors causing these changes are not yet clear. Here we address this issue by comparing the δ15N of bulk and residual biomass of several marine animal tissues (fish, crab, cockle, oyster, and polychaete), as well as the δ15N of the extracted lipids. As observed previously, lipid extraction led to a variable offset in δ15N of biomass (differences ranging from -2.3 to +1.8 ‰). Importantly, the total lipid extract (TLE) was highly depleted in 15N compared to bulk biomass, and also highly variable (differences ranging from -14 to +0.7 ‰). The TLE consisted mainly of phosphatidylcholines, a group of lipids with one nitrogen atom in the headgroup. To elucidate the cause for the 15N-depletion in the TLE, the δ15N of amino acids was determined, including serine because it is one of the main sources of nitrogen to N-containing lipids. Serine δ15N values differed by -7 to +2 ‰ from bulk biomass δ15N, and correlated well with the 15N depletion in TLEs. On average, serine was less depleted (-3‰) than the TLE (-7 ‰), possibly due to fractionation during biosynthesis of N-containing headgroups, or that other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as urea and choline, or recycled nitrogen contribute to the nitrogen isotopic composition of the TLE. The depletion in 15N of the TLE relative to biomass increased with the trophic level of the organisms. PMID:26731720

  7. Application of nitrogen stable isotope analysis in size-based marine food web and macroecological research.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Simon; Barnes, Carolyn; Sweeting, Christopher J; Polunin, Nicholas V C

    2008-06-01

    Interacting human and environmental pressures influence the structure and dynamics of marine food webs. To describe and predict the effects of these pressures, theoretical advances need to be supported by a capacity to validate the underlying models and assumptions. Here, we review recent applications of nitrogen stable isotope analysis in marine food web and macroecological research, with a focus on work that has paralleled a resurgence of interest in the development and application of size-based models. Nitrogen stable isotope data have been used to estimate intra- and inter-specific variation in trophic level, predator-prey size ratios, transfer efficiency, food chain length, relationships between predator and prey species diversity and the dynamics of energy use. Many of these estimates have contributed to the development, testing and parameterisation of food web and ecosystem models, some of which have been used to establish baselines for assessing the scale of human impacts. The interpretation of results depends on assumed fractionation but, when supported by sensitivity analyses and experimental validation, nitrogen stable isotope data provide valuable insights into the structuring of marine communities and ecosystems. PMID:18438766

  8. Diet-animal fractionation of nitrogen stable isotopes reflects the efficiency of nitrogen assimilation in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Cantalapiedra-Hijar, G; Ortigues-Marty, I; Sepchat, B; Agabriel, J; Huneau, J F; Fouillet, H

    2015-04-14

    The natural abundance of ¹⁵N in animal proteins (δ¹⁵Nanimal) is greater than that in the diet consumed by the animals (δ¹⁵Ndiet), with a discrimination factor (Δ¹⁵N = δ¹⁵Nanimal - δ¹⁵Ndiet) that is known to vary according to nutritional conditions. The objectives of the present study were to test the hypothesis that Δ¹⁵N variations depend on the efficiency of nitrogen utilisation (ENU) in growing beef cattle, and to identify some of the physiological mechanisms responsible for this N isotopic fractionation in ruminants. Thus, we performed the regression of the Δ¹⁵N of plasma proteins obtained from thirty-five finishing beef cattle fed standard and non-conventional diets against different feed efficiency indices, including ENU. We also performed the regression of the Δ¹⁵N of different ruminant N pools (plasma and milk proteins, urine and faeces) against different splanchnic N fluxes obtained from multi-catheterised lactating dairy cows. The Δ¹⁵N of plasma proteins was negatively correlated with feed efficiency indices in beef cattle, especially ENU (body protein gain/N intake) and efficiency of metabolisable protein (MP) utilisation (body protein gain/MP intake). Although Δ¹⁵N obtained from different N pools in dairy cows were all negatively correlated with ENU, the highest correlation was found when Δ¹⁵N was calculated from plasma proteins. Δ¹⁵N showed no correlation with urea-N recycling or rumen NH₃ absorption, but exhibited a strong correlation with liver urea synthesis and splanchnic amino acid metabolism, which points to a dominant role of splanchnic tissues in the present N isotopic fractionation study. PMID:25716533

  9. Stable isotope signatures confirm carbon and nitrogen gain through ectomycorrhizas in the ghost orchid Epipogium aphyllum Swartz.

    PubMed

    Liebel, H T; Gebauer, G

    2011-03-01

    Epipogium aphyllum is a rare Eurasian achlorophyllous forest orchid known to associate with fungi that form ectomycorrhizas, while closely related orchids of warm humid climates depend on wood- or litter-decomposer fungi. We conducted (13) C and (15) N stable isotope natural abundance analyses to identify the organic nutrient source of E. aphyllum from Central Norway. These data for orchid shoot tissues, in comparison to accompanying autotrophic plants, document C and N flow from ectomycorrhizal fungi to the orchid. DNA data from fungal pelotons in the orchid root cortex confirm the presence of Inocybe and Hebeloma, which are both fungi that form ectomycorrhizas. The enrichment factors for (13) C and (15) N of E. aphyllum are used to calculate a new overall average enrichment factor for mycoheterotrophic plants living in association with ectomycorrhizal fungi (ε(13) C ± 1 SD of 7.2 ± 1.6 ‰ and ε(15) N ± 1 SD of 12.8 ± 3.9 ‰). These can be used to estimate the fungal contribution to organic nutrient uptake by partially mycoheterotrophic plants where fully mycoheterotrophic plants are lacking. N concentrations in orchid tissue were unusually high and significantly higher than in accompanying autotrophic leaf samples. This may be caused by N gain of E. aphyllum from obligate ectomycorrhizal fungi. We show that E. aphyllum is an epiparasitic mycoheterotrophic orchid that depends on ectomycorrhizal Inocybe and Hebeloma to obtain C and N through a tripartite system linking mycoheterotrophic plants through fungi with forest trees. PMID:21309973

  10. Seasonal variation in stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values of bats reflect environmental baselines.

    PubMed

    Popa-Lisseanu, Ana G; Kramer-Schadt, Stephanie; Quetglas, Juan; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; Kelm, Detlev H; Ibáñez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of animal tissues is commonly used to trace wildlife diets and analyze food chains. Changes in an animal's isotopic values over time are generally assumed to indicate diet shifts or, less frequently, physiological changes. Although plant isotopic values are known to correlate with climatic seasonality, only a few studies restricted to aquatic environments have investigated whether temporal isotopic variation in consumers may also reflect environmental baselines through trophic propagation. We modeled the monthly variation in carbon and nitrogen isotope values in whole blood of four insectivorous bat species occupying different foraging niches in southern Spain. We found a common pattern of isotopic variation independent of feeding habits, with an overall change as large as or larger than one trophic step. Physiological changes related to reproduction or to fat deposition prior to hibernation had no effect on isotopic variation, but juvenile bats had higher δ13C and δ15N values than adults. Aridity was the factor that best explained isotopic variation: bat blood became enriched in both 13C and 15N after hotter and/or drier periods. Our study is the first to show that consumers in terrestrial ecosystems reflect seasonal environmental dynamics in their isotope values. We highlight the danger of misinterpreting stable isotope data when not accounting for seasonal isotopic baselines in food web studies. Understanding how environmental seasonality is integrated in animals' isotope values will be crucial for developing reliable methods to use stable isotopes as dietary tracers. PMID:25700080

  11. Stable sulfur and nitrogen isotopic compositions of crude oil fractions from Southern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirner, A. V.; Graf, W.; Treibs, R.; Melzer, A. N.; Hahn-Weinheimer, P.

    1984-11-01

    Eleven samples of crude oil from the Molasse Basin of Southern Germany were fractionated and their contents of sulfur and nitrogen as well as the stable isotope compositions of these elements ( 34S /32S and 15N /14N , resp.) investigated. According to the δ34S determinations, all crude oils from the Tertiary base of the Western and Eastern Molasse belong to one oil family and differ significantly from the Triassic and Liassic oils in the Western Molasse. An enrichment of 34S was observed with increasing polarity of crude oil fractions. The isotope distributions of sulfur in the polar constituents of the biodegraded oils from the sandstones of Ampfing, however, approach a homogeneous distribution. The nitrogen isotope distribution is rather uniform in Southern German oils. A regional differentiation can be recognized, although the overall isotopic variation is small. The δ15N values of the crudes and asphaltenes do not correlate.

  12. Nitrogen stable isotope ratio in the manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum, reflects eutrophication levels in tidal flats.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Kodama, Masashi; Fukuda, Masaaki

    2009-10-01

    Understanding the effects of anthropogenic eutrophication on coastal fisheries may help in the enhancement of fishery production by effective utilization of sewage effluents, as well as in the consequent reduction of eutrophication. In this study, it was revealed that the nitrogen stable isotope ratio (delta(15)N) in the soft tissues of the manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum, can be used as an indicator of anthropogenic eutrophication levels in tidal flat environments by investigation of delta(15)N in dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), particulate organic matter (POM), sedimentary organic matter (SOM) and soft tissues of the clam in five tidal flats in Japan with different levels of DIN concentration. In addition, it was found that the acid insoluble fraction of the shell organic matrix, conchiolin, can be used as a proxy for the soft tissues in delta(15)N analyses. This will contribute in easier storage handling and the expansion of chances for sample acquisition. PMID:19647270

  13. Linking mercury, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotopes in Tibetan biota: Implications for using mercury stable isotopes as source tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Qianggong; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-05-01

    Tibetan Plateau is located at a mountain region isolated from direct anthropogenic sources. Mercury concentrations and stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and mercury were analyzed in sediment and biota for Nam Co and Yamdrok Lake. Biotic mercury concentrations and high food web magnification factors suggested that Tibetan Plateau is no longer a pristine site. The primary source of methylmercury was microbial production in local sediment despite the lack of direct methylmercury input. Strong ultraviolet intensity led to extensive photochemical reactions and up to 65% of methylmercury in water was photo-demethylated before entering the food webs. Biota displayed very high Δ199Hg signatures, with some highest value (8.6%) ever in living organisms. The δ202Hg and Δ199Hg in sediment and biotic samples increased with trophic positions (δ15N) and %methylmercury. Fish total length closely correlated to δ13C and Δ199Hg values due to dissimilar carbon sources and methylmercury pools in different living waters. This is the first mercury isotope study on high altitude lake ecosystems that demonstrated specific isotope fractionations of mercury under extreme environmental conditions.

  14. Linking mercury, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotopes in Tibetan biota: Implications for using mercury stable isotopes as source tracers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Qianggong; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan Plateau is located at a mountain region isolated from direct anthropogenic sources. Mercury concentrations and stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and mercury were analyzed in sediment and biota for Nam Co and Yamdrok Lake. Biotic mercury concentrations and high food web magnification factors suggested that Tibetan Plateau is no longer a pristine site. The primary source of methylmercury was microbial production in local sediment despite the lack of direct methylmercury input. Strong ultraviolet intensity led to extensive photochemical reactions and up to 65% of methylmercury in water was photo-demethylated before entering the food webs. Biota displayed very high Δ(199)Hg signatures, with some highest value (8.6%) ever in living organisms. The δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg in sediment and biotic samples increased with trophic positions (δ(15)N) and %methylmercury. Fish total length closely correlated to δ(13)C and Δ(199)Hg values due to dissimilar carbon sources and methylmercury pools in different living waters. This is the first mercury isotope study on high altitude lake ecosystems that demonstrated specific isotope fractionations of mercury under extreme environmental conditions. PMID:27151563

  15. Linking mercury, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotopes in Tibetan biota: Implications for using mercury stable isotopes as source tracers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Qianggong; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan Plateau is located at a mountain region isolated from direct anthropogenic sources. Mercury concentrations and stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and mercury were analyzed in sediment and biota for Nam Co and Yamdrok Lake. Biotic mercury concentrations and high food web magnification factors suggested that Tibetan Plateau is no longer a pristine site. The primary source of methylmercury was microbial production in local sediment despite the lack of direct methylmercury input. Strong ultraviolet intensity led to extensive photochemical reactions and up to 65% of methylmercury in water was photo-demethylated before entering the food webs. Biota displayed very high Δ199Hg signatures, with some highest value (8.6%) ever in living organisms. The δ202Hg and Δ199Hg in sediment and biotic samples increased with trophic positions (δ15N) and %methylmercury. Fish total length closely correlated to δ13C and Δ199Hg values due to dissimilar carbon sources and methylmercury pools in different living waters. This is the first mercury isotope study on high altitude lake ecosystems that demonstrated specific isotope fractionations of mercury under extreme environmental conditions. PMID:27151563

  16. Carbon and nitrogen biogeochemistry in the ocean: A study using stable isotope natural abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rau, G. H.; Desmarais, David J.

    1985-01-01

    Determining the biogeochemical pathways traveled by carbon and nitrogen in the ocean is fundamental to the understanding of how the ocean participates in the cycling of these elements within the biosphere. Because biological production, metabolism, and respiration can significantly alter the natural abundance of C-13 and N-15, these abundances can provide important information about the nature of these biological processes and their variability in the marine environment. The research initially seeks to characterize the spatial and temporal patterns of stable isotope abundances in organic matter, and to relate these abundances to C and N biogeochemical processes within selected areas of the northeastern Pacific Ocean.

  17. An integrated process of three-dimensional biofilm-electrode with sulfur autotrophic denitrification (3DBER-SAD) for wastewater reclamation.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ruixia; Meng, Chengcheng; Li, Jianbing

    2016-08-01

    A three-dimensional biofilm-electrode reactor (3DBER) was integrated with sulfur autotrophic denitrification (SAD) to improve nitrogen removal performance for wastewater reclamation. The impacts of influent carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio, electric current, and hydraulic retention time (HRT) were evaluated. The new process, abbreviated as 3DBER-SAD, achieved a more stable denitrification compared to the recently studied 3DBER in literature. Its nitrogen removal improved by about 45 % as compared to 3DBER, especially under low C/N ratio conditions. The results also revealed that the biofilm bacteria community of 3DBER-SAD contained 21.1 % of the genus Thauera, 19.3 % of the genus Thiobacillus and Sulfuricella, as well as 5.3 % of the genus Alicycliphilus, Pseudomonas, and Paracoccus. The synergy between these heterotrophic, sulfur autotrophic, and hydrogenotrophic denitrification bacteria was believed to cause the high and stable nitrogen removal performance under various operating conditions. PMID:27170320

  18. Autotrophic nitrite removal in the cathode of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Puig, Sebastià; Serra, Marc; Vilar-Sanz, Ariadna; Cabré, Marina; Bañeras, Lluís; Colprim, Jesús; Balaguer, M Dolors

    2011-03-01

    Nitrification to nitrite (nitritation process) followed by reduction to dinitrogen gas decreases the energy demand and the carbon requirements of the overall process of nitrogen removal. This work studies autotrophic nitrite removal in the cathode of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Special attention was paid to determining whether nitrite is used as the electron acceptor by exoelectrogenic bacteria (biologic reaction) or by graphite electrodes (abiotic reaction). The results demonstrated that, after a nitrate pulse at the cathode, nitrite was initially accumulated; subsequently, nitrite was removed. Nitrite and nitrate can be used interchangeably as an electron acceptor by exoelectrogenic bacteria for nitrogen reduction from wastewater while producing bioelectricity. However, if oxygen is present in the cathode chamber, nitrite is oxidised via biological or electrochemical processes. The identification of a dominant bacterial member similar to Oligotropha carboxidovorans confirms that autotrophic denitrification is the main metabolism mechanism in the cathode of an MFC. PMID:21262566

  19. Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen in the study of organochlorine contaminants in albatrosses and petrels.

    PubMed

    Colabuono, Fernanda I; Barquete, Viviane; Taniguchi, Satie; Ryan, Peter G; Montone, Rosalinda C

    2014-06-15

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in albatrosses and petrels collected off southern Brazil were compared with concentrations of organochlorine contaminants (OCs). δ(13)C and δ(15)N values, as well as OCs concentrations, exhibited a high degree of variability among individuals and overlap among species. δ(13)C values reflected latitudinal differences among species, with lower values found in Wandering and Tristan Albatrosses and higher values found in Black-browed and Atlantic Yellow-nosed Albatrosses and White-chinned Petrels. Some relationships were found between OCs and stable isotopes, but in general a partial 'uncoupling' was observed between OCs concentrations and stable isotopes ratios (especially for δ(15)N). δ(13)C and δ(15)N values in Procellariiformes tissues during the non-breeding season appear to be a better indicator of foraging habitats than of trophic relationships, which may partially explain the high degree of variability between concentrations of OCs and stable isotopes ratios in birds with a diversified diet and wide foraging range. PMID:24766898

  20. Trophic Discrimination Factors of Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopes in Hair of Corn Fed Wild Boar

    PubMed Central

    Holá, Michaela; Ježek, Miloš; Kušta, Tomáš; Košatová, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope measurements are increasingly being used to gain insights into the nutritional ecology of many wildlife species and their role in ecosystem structure and function. Such studies require estimations of trophic discrimination factors (i.e. differences in the isotopic ratio between the consumer and its diet). Although trophic discrimination factors are tissue- and species- specific, researchers often rely on generalized, and fixed trophic discrimination factors that have not been experimentally derived. In this experimental study, captive wild boar (Sus scrofa) were fed a controlled diet of corn (Zea mays), a popular and increasingly dominant food source for wild boar in the Czech Republic and elsewhere in Europe, and trophic discrimination factors for stable carbon (Δ13C) and nitrogen (Δ15N) isotopes were determined from hair samples. The mean Δ13C and Δ15N in wild boar hair were –2.3 ‰ and +3.5 ‰, respectively. Also, in order to facilitate future derivations of isotopic measurements along wild boar hair, we calculated the average hair growth rate to be 1.1 mm d-1. Our results serve as a baseline for interpreting isotopic patterns of free-ranging wild boar in current European agricultural landscapes. However, future research is needed in order to provide a broader understanding of the processes underlying the variation in trophic discrimination factors of carbon and nitrogen across of variety of diet types. PMID:25915400

  1. Trophic discrimination factors of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in hair of corn fed wild boar.

    PubMed

    Holá, Michaela; Ježek, Miloš; Kušta, Tomáš; Košatová, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope measurements are increasingly being used to gain insights into the nutritional ecology of many wildlife species and their role in ecosystem structure and function. Such studies require estimations of trophic discrimination factors (i.e. differences in the isotopic ratio between the consumer and its diet). Although trophic discrimination factors are tissue- and species-specific, researchers often rely on generalized, and fixed trophic discrimination factors that have not been experimentally derived. In this experimental study, captive wild boar (Sus scrofa) were fed a controlled diet of corn (Zea mays), a popular and increasingly dominant food source for wild boar in the Czech Republic and elsewhere in Europe, and trophic discrimination factors for stable carbon (Δ13C) and nitrogen (Δ15N) isotopes were determined from hair samples. The mean Δ13C and Δ15N in wild boar hair were -2.3‰ and +3.5‰, respectively. Also, in order to facilitate future derivations of isotopic measurements along wild boar hair, we calculated the average hair growth rate to be 1.1 mm d(-1). Our results serve as a baseline for interpreting isotopic patterns of free-ranging wild boar in current European agricultural landscapes. However, future research is needed in order to provide a broader understanding of the processes underlying the variation in trophic discrimination factors of carbon and nitrogen across of variety of diet types. PMID:25915400

  2. Seasonal Variation in Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Values of Bats Reflect Environmental Baselines

    PubMed Central

    Popa-Lisseanu, Ana G.; Kramer-Schadt, Stephanie; Quetglas, Juan; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; Kelm, Detlev H.; Ibáñez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of animal tissues is commonly used to trace wildlife diets and analyze food chains. Changes in an animal’s isotopic values over time are generally assumed to indicate diet shifts or, less frequently, physiological changes. Although plant isotopic values are known to correlate with climatic seasonality, only a few studies restricted to aquatic environments have investigated whether temporal isotopic varia-tion in consumers may also reflect environmental baselines through trophic propagation. We modeled the monthly variation in carbon and nitrogen isotope values in whole blood of four insectivorous bat species occupying different foraging niches in southern Spain. We found a common pattern of isotopic variation independent of feeding habits, with an overall change as large as or larger than one trophic step. Physiological changes related to reproduction or to fat deposition prior to hibernation had no effect on isotopic variation, but juvenile bats had higher δ13C and δ15N values than adults. Aridity was the factor that best explained isotopic variation: bat blood became enriched in both 13C and 15N after hotter and/or drier periods. Our study is the first to show that consumers in terrestrial ecosystems reflect seasonal environmental dynamics in their isotope values. We highlight the danger of misinterpreting stable isotope data when not accounting for seasonal isotopic baselines in food web studies. Understanding how environmental seasonality is inte-grated in animals’ isotope values will be crucial for developing reliable methods to use stable isotopes as dietary tracers. PMID:25700080

  3. Preliminary identification of ground-water nitrate sources using nitrogen and carbon stable isotopes, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Townsend, M.A.; Macko, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Increasing nitrate-N in ground water is a problem in areas with limited ground-water supplies, such as central Kansas. Nitrate-N concentrations in ground water in the study area in Ellis County range from 0.9 to 26 mg/L. Calculated mean values observed in soil cores are 1.2-15 mg/kg. The ??15N signatures of the ground waters are more enriched (+16.8 to +28.7???) than those of the soils (+8.4 to +1 3.7???), strongly suggesting that nitrate-N sources are not from mineralized and labile nitrogen present in the unsaturated zone. Soil cores were collected near municipal wells to determine if soil nitrogen was a contributing source to the ground water. Increased ??15N of total nitrogen with depth suggests that microbial mineralization processes and possible denitrification or volatilization isotope enrichments have affected the observed ?? 15N signatures in the soil. However, the observed soil-nitrogen values are not of sufficient magnitude to explain the nitrate-N concentrations or associated ??15N values observed in the ground water. Stable carbon isotopes provide some supporting evidence that soils are not a major contributor to the observed nitrate-N concentration in the ground water. ?? 13C values of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in soils generally become more enriched with depth while corresponding ground-water ??13C (DOC) values are more depleted than in the overlying soils. Carbon isotope values of the soils are indicative of a C4 plant source that is enriched by microbial processes. The ??13C (DOC) of ground water indicates C3 values that may reflect impacts from animal-waste sources.

  4. Titan Aerosol Formation as a Sink for Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainer, Melissa G.; Stern, Jennifer C.; Sebree, Joshua A.; Gautier, Thomas J.; Fuentes, Javier A.; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Mandt, Kathleen E.

    2015-11-01

    Stable isotope ratios of major elements can be used to infer much about local- and global-scale processes on a planet. On Titan, aerosol production is a significant sink of carbon and nitrogen in the atmosphere, and isotopic fractionation of these elements may be introduced during the advanced organic chemistry that leads to the condensed phase products. Several stable isotope pairs, including 12C/13C and 14N/15N, have been measured in situ or probed spectroscopically by Cassini-borne instruments, space telescopes, or through ground-based observations. However, the effect of a potentially critical pathway for isotopic fractionation - organic aerosol formation and subsequent deposition onto the surface of Titan - has not been considered due to insufficient data regarding fractionation during aerosol formation. To better understand the nature of this process, we have measured the isotopic fractionation associated with the formation of Titan aerosol analogs via far-UV irradiation of several methane (CH4) and nitrogen (N2) mixtures.Our initial results probed the fractionation of the aerosol product, relative to the reactant gases, as a function of CH4 abundance [1]. Our results show that the direction of carbon isotope fractionation during aerosol formation is in contrast to the expected result if the source of the fractionation is a kinetic isotope effect. The resultant fractionation in nitrogen favored the light (14N) isotope in the aerosol, with N/C ratios varying from 0.13 - 0.31. Ongoing work includes probing the effects of pressure and temperature on the direction and magnitude of the stable isotope fractionation. We will present results alongside interpretation of the driving processes, as well as implications for Titan if similar fractionation occurred during aerosol formation in the atmosphere.[1] Sebree, J.A., Stern, J.C., Mandt, K.E., Domagal-Goldman, S.D., and Trainer, M.G.: 13C and 15N Fractionation of CH4/N2 Mixtures during Photochemical Aerosol Formation

  5. Identification and characterization of anthropogenic nitrogen fluxes using stable isotopes and reactive hydrologic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'connell, M. T.; Macko, S. A.; Fu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Najinhe watershed is a topographically diverse, heavily agricultural watershed in northeastern China that provides opportunities for identification of the impact of land use on nitrogen cycling. In addition to agricultural soil amendments, seasonal variation in atmospheric flow introduces a signal of dry and wet deposition from urban and desert atmospheric N sources. Both agricultural amendments and atmospheric sources are significant sources of reactive N, at estimated annual rates of 450kg/hectare and 30kg/hectare respectively in the nearby North China Plain. Land use, both historic and current, influences the biological processing of nitrogen in a particular area. Soil conditions, including moisture, texture, and organic content, control the capacity of a parcel for processing reactive nitrogen. Compounds derived from natural and anthropogenic sources exhibit characteristic ratios of stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen that serve as tracers of origin as well as integrators of biological processes. Analysis of bulk soils (including both organic and inorganic N) in the system shows δ15N ranging from 1.3 - 8.6 ‰ suggesting varying influence of anthropogenic fertilizers, soil organic nitrogen, and atmospheric sources based on land use. A distributed hydrologic model coupled with one focusing on reactive transport is able to help determine locations with the highest impact on the dissolved N in this system. Spatial statistical methods are employed to determine the biogeochemical influence of model locations whereas δ18O and δ15N measurements from NO3- and NH4+ in surface water and soil extracts are used to calibrate and validate model predictions based on measured precipitation and streamflow values. Sources are integrated using a Bayesian mixing model to determine likely fate and transport parameters for various N inputs to the watershed. The application of the coupled hydrologic and transport models to a village scale catchment suggests integration and

  6. Identification and characterization of land use driven nitrogen fluxes using stable isotopes and reactive hydrologic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macko, S. A.; O'Connell, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Najinhe watershed is a topographically diverse, mixed agricultural and urban region in northeastern China that provides opportunities for identification of the impact of land use on nitrogen cycling. In addition to agricultural soil amendments, seasonal variation in atmospheric flow introduces dry and wet deposition from urban and desert sources. Both agricultural amendments and atmospheric sources are significant non-point inputs of reactive N, at estimated annual rates of 450 kg/ha and 30 kg/ha respectively in the nearby North China Plain.Both historic and current land use has influenced the biological processing of nitrogen in a particular area. Soil conditions, including moisture, texture, and organic content, control the capacity of a parcel for processing reactive nitrogen. Compounds derived from natural and anthropogenic sources exhibit characteristic stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen that serve as tracers of origin as well as integrators of biological processes. Analysis of bulk soils (including both organic and inorganic N contents) in the system shows δ15N ranging from 1.3 - 8.6 ‰ suggesting varying influence of anthropogenic inputs, fertilizers, soil organic nitrogen, and atmospheric sources based on land use.A distributed hydrologic model coupled with one focusing on reactive transport is able to help determine locations with the highest impact on the dissolved N in this system. Spatial statistical methods are employed to determine the biogeochemical influence of model locations whereas δ18O on soil NO3- and δ15N measurements on NO3- and NH4+ in surface water and soil extracts are used to calibrate and validate model predictions based on measured precipitation and streamflow values. Sources are integrated using a Bayesian mixing model to determine likely fate and transport parameters for various N inputs to the watershed. The application of the coupled hydrologic and transport models to a landscape scale catchment suggests integration and

  7. Mercury concentration correlates with the nitrogen stable isotope ratio in the animal food of Papuans.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, J; Suzuki, T; Hongo, T; Minagawa, M; Ohtsuka, R; Kawabe, T; Inaoka, T; Akimichi, T

    1992-08-01

    The relationships among element concentrations (Na, Mg, Al, P, K, Ca, Cr, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Sr, total Hg, organic Hg, inorganic Hg, Pb) and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (13C/12C and 15N/14N) in animals consumed by the people called Gidra, who inhabit the lowland of Papua New Guinea, were examined. Animals analyzed included mammal, bird, fish, shellfish, reptile, crustacean, and insect. Highly significantly positive correlations were observed between total Hg concentrations and 15N/14N (r = 0.796), between organic Hg concentrations and 15N/14N (r = 0.781), and between inorganic Hg concentrations and 15N/14N (r = 0.739). This was interpreted to indicate that Hg was an element which accumulates in animals along the food chain. Based on the regression function of Hg on delta 15N, the bioconcentration factor for total, organic, and inorganic Hg was estimated to be 5. PMID:1385077

  8. Growth versus metabolic tissue replacement in mouse tissues determined by stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macavoy, S. E.; Jamil, T.; Macko, S. A.; Arneson, L. S.

    2003-12-01

    Stable isotope analysis is becoming an extensively used tool in animal ecology. The isotopes most commonly used for analysis in terrestrial systems are those of carbon and nitrogen, due to differential carbon fractionation in C3 and C4 plants, and the approximately 3‰ enrichment in 15N per trophic level. Although isotope signatures in animal tissues presumably reflect the local food web, analysis is often complicated by differential nutrient routing and fractionation by tissues, and by the possibility that large organisms are not in isotopic equilibrium with the foods available in their immediate environment. Additionally, the rate at which organisms incorporate the isotope signature of a food through both growth and metabolic tissue replacement is largely unknown. In this study we have assessed the rate of carbon and nitrogen isotopic turnover in liver, muscle and blood in mice following a diet change. By determining growth rates, we were able to determine the proportion of tissue turnover caused by growth versus that caused by metabolic tissue replacement. Growth was found to account for approximately 10% of observed tissue turnover in sexually mature mice (Mus musculus). Blood carbon was found to have the shortest half-life (16.9 days), followed by muscle (24.7 days). Liver carbon turnover was not as well described by the exponential decay equations as other tissues. However, substantial liver carbon turnover was observed by the 28th day after diet switch. Surprisingly, these tissues primarily reflect the carbon signature of the protein, rather than carbohydrate, source in their diet. The nitrogen signature in all tissues was enriched by 3 - 5‰ over their dietary protein source, depending on tissue type, and the isotopic turnover rates were comparable to those observed in carbon.

  9. Stable Isotope Investigation of Marine-Terrestrial Nitrogen Linkages in Salmon Stream Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Welker, J. M.; Rogers, M.; Rinella, D. J.; Sveinbjornsson, B.; Wipfli, M.

    2005-12-01

    Our research is addressing marine-terrestrial nitrogen linkages using stable isotope techniques (δ15N). Throughout coastal Alaska, salmon migrate each year into riparian systems transporting marine-produced biomass (carbon, phosphorous and nitrogen) that is decomposed, recycled and used by juvenile fish, invertebrates, carnivores and in some cases aquatic and terrestrial vegetation. These inputs of N into the terrestrial landscape have a host of cascading implications including the maintenance of biodiversity, enhanced survivorship of juvenile salmon and support of a complex food web that includes primary and secondary consumers (bears and eagles) and herbivores such as moose. A central question regarding this marine-terrestrial linkage is whether vegetation (aquatic or terrestrial) uses marine-derived N in metabolism and whether this fertilization effect increases leaf N contents, leads to higher rates of plant growth, results in higher rates of leaf gas exchange, and increases forage quantity and quality. By analyzing the δ15N-values of plants we will be able to fingerprint marine N use by plants and the degree to which this N contributes to the nitrogen budget of riparian vegetation.We are quantifying marine N use by aquatic and terrestrial vegetation (trees, shrubs and grasses) within the Kenai River watershed using a comparative approach sampling streams with annual salmon runs and streams without runs (waterfall inhibiting salmon spawning). We will determine the relationship between local hydrology and marine nutrient access using a multi-isotope approach which examines the relationship between plant water sources and relations and marine N use. We will ascertain the ecological importance of this N source by comparing the growth and ecophysiology of riparian vegetation along salmon impacted and non impacted streams. Initial results indicate that riparian vegetation along streams with large salmon runs have higher leaf N contents and enriched δ15N values

  10. Nitrogen stable isotopes in streams: effects of agricultural sources and transformations.

    PubMed

    Diebel, Matthew W; Vander Zanden, M Jake

    2009-07-01

    The nitrogen stable isotope ratio of biological tissue has been proposed as an indicator of anthropogenic N inputs to aquatic ecosystems, but overlap in the isotopic signatures of various N sources and transformations make definitive attribution of processes difficult. We collected primary consumer invertebrates from streams in agricultural settings in Wisconsin, U.S.A., to evaluate the relative influence of animal manure, inorganic fertilizer, and denitrification on biotic delta15N. Variance in biotic delta15N was explained by inorganic fertilizer inputs and the percentage of wetland land cover in the watershed, but not by animal manure inputs. These results suggest that denitrification of inorganic fertilizer is the primary driver of delta15N variability among the study sites. Comparison with previously collected stream water NO3-N concentrations at the same sites supports the role of denitrification; for a given N application rate, streams with high biotic delta15N had low NO3-N concentrations. The lack of a manure signal in biotic delta15N may be due its high ammonia content, which can be dispersed outside the range of its application by volatilization. Based on our findings and on agricultural census data for the entire United States, inorganic fertilizer is more likely than manure to drive variability in biotic delta15N and to cause excessive nitrogen concentrations in streams. PMID:19688921

  11. Caution on the use of liquid nitrogen traps in stable hydrogen isotope-ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Coplen, Tyler B; Qi, Haiping

    2010-09-15

    An anomalous stable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of 4 ‰ in gaseous hydrogen has been correlated with the process of adding liquid nitrogen (LN(2)) to top off the dewar of a stainless-steel water trap on a gaseous hydrogen-water platinum equilibration system. Although the cause of this isotopic fractionation is unknown, its effect can be mitigated by (1) increasing the capacity of any dewars so that they do not need to be filled during a daily analytic run, (2) interspersing isotopic reference waters among unknowns, and (3) applying a linear drift correction and linear normalization to isotopic results with a program such as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes. With adoption of the above guidelines, measurement uncertainty can be substantially improved. For example, the long-term (months to years) δ(2)H reproducibility (1σ standard deviation) of nine local isotopic reference waters analyzed daily improved substantially from about 1 ‰ to 0.58 ‰. This isotopically fractionating mechanism might affect other isotope-ratio mass spectrometers in which LN(2) is used as a moisture trap for gaseous hydrogen. PMID:20718408

  12. Caution on the use of liquid nitrogen traps in stable hydrogen isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Qi, H.

    2010-01-01

    An anomalous stable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of 4 ??? in gaseous hydrogen has been correlated with the process of adding liquid nitrogen (LN2) to top off the dewar of a stainless-steel water trap on a gaseous hydrogen-water platinum equilibration system. Although the cause of this isotopic fractionation is unknown, its effect can be mitigated by (1) increasing the capacity of any dewars so that they do not need to be filled during a daily analytic run, (2) interspersing isotopic reference waters among unknowns, and (3) applying a linear drift correction and linear normalization to isotopic results with a program such as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes. With adoption of the above guidelines, measurement uncertainty can be substantially improved. For example, the long-term (months to years) ??2H reproducibility (1?? standard deviation) of nine local isotopic reference waters analyzed daily improved substantially from about 1 ??? to 0.58 ???. This isotopically fractionating mechanism might affect other isotope-ratio mass spectrometers in which LN2 is used as a moisture trap for gaseous hydrogen. ?? This article not subject to U.S. Copyright. Published 2010 by the American Chemical Society.

  13. Caution on the use of liquid nitrogen traps in stable hydrogen isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping

    2010-01-01

    An anomalous stable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of 4 ‰ in gaseous hydrogen has been correlated with the process of adding liquid nitrogen (LN2) to top off the dewar of a stainless-steel water trap on a gaseous hydrogen-water platinum equilibration system. Although the cause of this isotopic fractionation is unknown, its effect can be mitigated by (1) increasing the capacity of any dewars so that they do not need to be filled during a daily analytic run, (2) interspersing isotopic reference waters among unknowns, and (3) applying a linear drift correction and linear normalization to isotopic results with a program such as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes. With adoption of the above guidelines, measurement uncertainty can be substantially improved. For example, the long-term (months to years) δ2H reproducibility (1& sigma; standard deviation) of nine local isotopic reference waters analyzed daily improved substantially from about 1‰ to 0.58 ‰. This isotopically fractionating mechanism might affect other isotope-ratio mass spectrometers in which LN2 is used as a moisture trap for gaseous hydrogen

  14. Simultaneous Analysis of Nitrogen, Carbon and Sulfur Stable Isotopes and Concentrations in Organics and Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mambelli, S.; Brooks, P. D.; Sutka, R.; Hughes, S.; Finstad, K. M.; Pakes, M. J.; Dawson, T. E.

    2014-12-01

    To date, analysis of diet, food web complexities, biogeochemical cycles, and ecosystem functioning have largely focused on using variation in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stable isotope ratios. This is because a great deal is understood about what leads to this variation and because the dual stable isotope analysis of these two elements using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) is now commonplace. However, the aforementioned studies may all greatly benefit from the additional information one can get from also having sulfur (S) stable isotopes ratio data. Until very recently the analysis of δ34S has traditionally required an additional and often more difficult analytical procedure. Here, we report on the development of a new method that simultaneously analyzes the elemental and isotopic composition of N, C and S in a single sample. The new commercially available instrument includes a modified NCS elemental analyzer in line with an IRMS outfitted with 100 volt AD converters for wide dynamic range. We tested, and modified, this instrument to achieve maximum accuracy and precision for the isotopic measurements of all three elements. We found that the original design needed improvements to achieve our goals by: a) including a component (originally designed for trapping water) as buffer to reduce S memory and obtain reliable δ34S analysis; b) adding an external furnace for complete reduction of nitrogen oxides to N2 gas for accurate δ15N; c) adding a magnesium perchlorate water trap immediately after the reduction tube to minimize any water condensation that could also influence S memory. We analyzed a selection of organic materials and soils with approximately a 1:2 standards versus unknowns ratio per run. Using this NCS set-up, the precision of the N and C isotopic measurements was comparable to the one usually attained in NC mode alone (standard deviation of ± 0.13 δ15N in the range 30 to 400 µg N, and of ± 0.12 δ13C in the range 0.20 to 4 mg

  15. Autotrophic growth of nitrifying community in an agricultural soil

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Weiwei; Zhang, Caixia; Zeng, Xiaowei; Feng, Youzhi; Weng, Jiahua; Lin, Xiangui; Zhu, Jianguo; Xiong, Zhengqin; Xu, Jian; Cai, Zucong; Jia, Zhongjun

    2011-01-01

    The two-step nitrification process is an integral part of the global nitrogen cycle, and it is accomplished by distinctly different nitrifiers. By combining DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP) and high-throughput pyrosequencing, we present the molecular evidence for autotrophic growth of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in agricultural soil upon ammonium fertilization. Time-course incubation of SIP microcosms indicated that the amoA genes of AOB was increasingly labeled by 13CO2 after incubation for 3, 7 and 28 days during active nitrification, whereas labeling of the AOA amoA gene was detected to a much lesser extent only after a 28-day incubation. Phylogenetic analysis of the 13C-labeled amoA and 16S rRNA genes revealed that the Nitrosospira cluster 3-like sequences dominate the active AOB community and that active AOA is affiliated with the moderately thermophilic Nitrososphaera gargensis from a hot spring. The higher relative frequency of Nitrospira-like NOB in the 13C-labeled DNA suggests that it may be more actively involved in nitrite oxidation than Nitrobacter-like NOB. Furthermore, the acetylene inhibition technique showed that 13CO2 assimilation by AOB, AOA and NOB occurs only when ammonia oxidation is not blocked, which provides strong hints for the chemolithoautotrophy of nitrifying community in complex soil environments. These results show that the microbial community of AOB and NOB dominates the nitrification process in the agricultural soil tested. PMID:21326337

  16. Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism in Mycorrhizal Networks and Mycoheterotrophic Plants of Tropical Forests: A Stable Isotope Analysis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel; Walder, Florian; Boller, Thomas; Ineichen, Kurt; Wiemken, Andres; Rousteau, Alain; Selosse, Marc-André

    2011-01-01

    Most achlorophyllous mycoheterotrophic (MH) plants obtain carbon (C) from mycorrhizal networks and indirectly exploit nearby autotrophic plants. We compared overlooked tropical rainforest MH plants associating with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) to well-reported temperate MH plants associating with ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes. We investigated 13C and 15N abundances of MH plants, green plants, and AMF spores in Caribbean rainforests. Whereas temperate MH plants and fungi have higher δ13C than canopy trees, these organisms displayed similar δ13C values in rainforests, suggesting differences in C exchanges. Although temperate green and MH plants differ in δ15N, they display similar 15N abundances, and likely nitrogen (N) sources, in rainforests. Contrasting with the high N concentrations shared by temperate MH plants and their fungi, rainforest MH plants had lower N concentrations than AMF, suggesting differences in C/N of exchanged nutrients. We provide a framework for isotopic studies on AMF networks and suggest that MH plants in tropical and temperate regions evolved different physiologies to adapt in diverging environments. PMID:21527422

  17. USING STABLE ISOTOPES OF CARBON AND NITROGEN AS IN-SITU TRACERS FOR MONITORING THE NATURAL ATTENUATION OF EXPLOSIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope measurements from TNT was examined as a possible tool for monitoring the natural attenuation of TNT incubation studies of spiked soil samples were conducted. The concentration of TNT and the delta values for C-13 and N-15 of the soil ...

  18. Fluorescence Spectroscopic Investigation of Tillage, Cropping Management, and Nitrogen Application Effects on Stable and Water-Extractable Organic Matter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic matter (OM) controls many important soil ecosystem processes. Stable (humic and fulvic) and water-extractable OM was obtained from soils in a nine-year tillage, cropping management, and nitrogen application study and characterized for its composition using multi-dimensional fluorescence spec...

  19. Long-term Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics at SPRUCE Revealed through Stable Isotopes in Peat Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon and nitrogen turnover in peatlands is of considerable interest because peat is a large reservoir of stored carbon that could emit greenhouse gases in response to climate change. Because peat cores preserve a long-term record of system carbon and nitrogen dynamics, it is possible to use stable isotopes as markers of changes in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics over time. Here, we used δ15N and δ13C patterns throughout the depth profile of peat cores to understand controls over C-N cycling in the Marcell S1 forested bog in northern Minnesota. In multiple regression analyses, δ15N and δ13C correlated strongly with depth, plot location, %C, %N, and each other. Negative correlation of δ15N with %N presumably reflected removal of 15N-depleted N via denitrification, diffusion, or plant N transfer via mycorrhizal fungi. A step increase in the depth coefficient for δ15N of ~3‰ from -25 cm to -35 cm suggested that the N removal process primarily operates at a discrete depth corresponding to the juncture between aerobic and anaerobic layers defined by the water table. Higher δ15N and lower δ13C in plots closer to uplands may reflect distinct hydrology and accompanying shifts in C and N dynamics in the lagg area fringing the bog. The Suess effect (declining δ13CO2 since the Industrial Revoluation) and aerobic decomposition lowered δ13C in recent surficial samples. Small increases in δ13C at -112 cm (4300 calibrated years BP) and -85 cm (3800 calibrated years BP) may reflect C dynamics during a suspected transitional fen stage (based on paleoecology at a nearby bog), when reduced methanotrophy retained less 13C-depleted carbon derived from methane than in later periods. The C/N decreased until about -85 cm and thereafter remained steady, suggesting that the active zone of aerobic processing during drought may extend to this depth. The inflection point in calculated carbon accumulation rates at this depth supports this conclusion.

  20. Use of stable nitrogen isotope fractionation to estimate denitrification in small constructed wetlands treating agricultural runoff.

    PubMed

    Søvik, Anne Kristine; Mørkved, Pål Tore

    2008-03-15

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) in the agricultural landscape reduce non-point source pollution through removal of nutrients and particles. The objective of this study was to evaluate if measurements of natural abundance of (15)NO(3)(-) can be used to determine the fate of NO(3)(-) in different types of small CWs treating agricultural runoff. Nitrogen removal was studied in wetland trenches filled with different filter materials (T1--sand and gravel; T3--mixture of peat, shell sand and light-weight aggregates; T8--barley straw) and a trench formed as a shallow pond (T4). The removal was highest during summer and lowest during autumn and winter. Trench T8 had the highest N removal during summer. Measurements of the natural abundance of (15)N in NO(3)(-) showed that denitrification was not significant during autumn/winter, while it was present in all trenches during summer, but only important for nitrogen removal in trench T8. The (15)N enrichment factors of NO(3)(-) in this study ranged from -2.5 to -5.9 per thousand (T3 and T8, summer), thus smaller than enrichment factors found in laboratory tests of isotope discrimination in denitrification, but similar to factors found for denitrification in groundwater and a large CW. The low enrichment factors compared to laboratory studies was attributed to assimilation in plants/microbes as well as diffusion effect. Based on a modified version of the method presented by Lund et al. [Lund LJ, Horne AJ, Williams AE, Estimating denitrification in a large constructed wetland using stable nitrogen isotope ratios. Ecol Engineer 2000; 14: 67-76], denitrification and assimilation were estimated to account for 53 to 99 and 1 to 47%, respectively, of the total N removal during summer. This method is, however, based on a number of assumptions, and there is thus a need for a better knowledge of the effect of plant uptake, microbial assimilation as well as nitrification on N isotopic fractionation before this method can be used to evaluate

  1. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in fast food: signatures of corn and confinement.

    PubMed

    Jahren, A Hope; Kraft, Rebecca A

    2008-11-18

    Americans spend >100 billion dollars on restaurant fast food each year; fast food meals comprise a disproportionate amount of both meat and calories within the U.S. diet. We used carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes to infer the source of feed to meat animals, the source of fat within fries, and the extent of fertilization and confinement inherent to production. We sampled food from McDonald's, Burger King, and Wendy's chains, purchasing >480 servings of hamburgers, chicken sandwiches and fries within geographically distributed U.S. cities: Los Angeles, San Francisco, Denver, Detroit, Boston, and Baltimore. From the entire sample set of beef and chicken, only 12 servings of beef had delta(13)C < -21 per thousand; for these animals only was a food source other than corn possible. We observed remarkably invariant values of delta(15)N in both beef and chicken, reflecting uniform confinement and exposure to heavily fertilized feed for all animals. The delta(13)C value of fries differed significantly among restaurants indicating that the chains used different protocols for deep-frying: Wendy's clearly used only corn oil, whereas McDonald's and Burger King favored other vegetable oils; this differed from ingredient reports. Our results highlighted the overwhelming importance of corn agriculture within virtually every aspect of fast food manufacture. PMID:19001276

  2. Stable nitrogen isotope ratios and accumulation of various HOCs in northern Baltic aquatic food chains

    SciTech Connect

    Broman, D.; Axelman, J.; Bergqvist, P.A.; Naef, C.; Rolff, C.; Zebuehr, Y.

    1995-12-31

    Ratios of naturally occurring stable isotopes of nitrogen ({delta}{sup 15}N) can be used to numerically classify trophic levels of organisms in food chains. By combining analyses results of various HOCs (e.g. PCDD/Fs, PCBs, DDTs, HCHs and some other pesticides) the biomagnification of these substances can be quantitatively estimated. In this paper different pelagic and benthic northern Baltic food chains were studied. The {delta}{sup 15}N-data gave food chain descriptions qualitatively consistent with previous conceptions of trophic arrangements in the food chains. The different HOCs concentrations were plotted versus the {delta}{sup 15}N-values for the different trophic levels and an exponential model of the form e{sup (A+B*{delta}N)} was fitted to the data. The estimates of the constant B in the model allows for an estimation of a biomagnification power (B) of different singular, or groups of, contaminants. A B-value around zero indicates that a substance is flowing through the food chain without being magnified, whereas a value > 0 indicates that a substance is biomagnified. Negative B-values indicate that a substance is not taken up or is metabolized. The A-term of the expression is only a scaling factor depending on the background level of the contaminant.

  3. Nitrogen stable isotope composition (δ15N) of vehicle-emitted NOx.

    PubMed

    Walters, Wendell W; Goodwin, Stanford R; Michalski, Greg

    2015-02-17

    The nitrogen stable isotope ratio of NOx (δ(15)N-NOx) has been proposed as a regional indicator for NOx source partitioning; however, knowledge of δ(15)N values from various NOx emission sources is limited. This study presents a detailed analysis of δ(15)N-NOx emitted from vehicle exhaust, the largest source of anthropogenic NOx. To accomplish this, NOx was collected from 26 different vehicles, including gasoline and diesel-powered engines, using a modification of a NOx collection method used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and δ(15)N-NOx was analyzed. The vehicles sampled in this study emitted δ(15)N-NOx values ranging from -19.1 to 9.8‰ that negatively correlated with the emitted NOx concentrations (8.5 to 286 ppm) and vehicle run time because of kinetic isotope fractionation effects associated with the catalytic reduction of NOx. A model for determining the mass-weighted δ(15)N-NOx from vehicle exhaust was constructed on the basis of average commute times, and the model estimates an average value of -2.5 ± 1.5‰, with slight regional variations. As technology improvements in catalytic converters reduce cold-start emissions in the future, it is likely to increase current δ(15)N-NOx values emitted from vehicles. PMID:25621737

  4. Modelling food chain structure and contaminant bioaccumulation using stable nitrogen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabana, Gilbert; Rasmussen, Joseph B.

    1994-11-01

    THE nitrogen pools of animals are enriched in 15N relative to their food1, with the top predators having the highest concentrations of this stable isotope2. The use of δ15N to indicate trophic position depends on the degree to which it reflects variation in the underly-ing food-web structure, rather than variable fractionation along the food chain. Here we compare adult lake trout, a top pelagic predator, from a series of lakes, and find that δ15N values vary from 7.5 to 17.5%o, a surprisingly wide range for one species. The length of the food chain can explain this variation, supporting the idea that δ15N is a food-web descriptor. Food-chain length was measured by the presence or absence of two intermediate trophic levels, pelagic forage fish and the macrozooplankter, Mysis relicta, each of which when present contributes about three δ15N units to the trout signature. We find that δ15N can be used as a continuous, integrative measure of trophic position, which is supported by its correlation to mercury levels in lake trout.

  5. Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotopes in Fastfood: Signatures of Corn and Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahren, H.; Kraft, R.

    2008-12-01

    Americans spend more than one hundred billion dollars on restaurant fastfood each year; fastfood meals comprise a disproportionate amount of both meat and calories within the U.S. diet. Frustrated by futile attempts to gain information about the origin and production of fastfood from the companies themselves, we used carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes to infer the source of feed to meat animals, the source of fat within fries, and the extent of fertilization and confinement inherent to production. We sampled food from McDonald's, Burger King and Wendy's chains, purchasing more than 480 servings of hamburgers, chicken sandwiches and fries within geographically-distributed U.S. cities: Los Angeles, San Francisco, Denver, Detroit, Boston and Baltimore. From the entire sample set of beef and chicken, only 12 servings of beef had δ13C < -21 ‰; for these animals only was a food source other than corn possible. We observed remarkably invariant values of δ15N in both beef and chicken, reflecting uniform confinement and exposure to heavily fertilized feed for all animals. The δ13C value of fries differed significantly among restaurants indicating that the chains employed different protocols for deep- frying: Wendy's clearly employed only corn oil, while McDonald's and Burger King favored other vegetable oils; this differed from ingredient reports. Our results highlighted the overwhelming importance of corn agriculture within virtually every aspect of fastfood manufacture.

  6. Source apportionment of ammonium and nitrate ion using nitrogen stable isotope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, H.

    2013-12-01

    Suspended particulate matter (SPM), defined to particle size as 100 % cut-off aerodynamic diameter at 10 μm, has adverse effects on human health. In these years, stable isotope ratio of small sample volume can be analyzed high precision by isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupling with elemental analyzer. Recently some fields are using stable isotope ratio. For environmental field, it is expected such as powerful tool for source identification and understanding mechanism. But the existed researches intended for stable nitrogen isotope (δ15N) of particulate matter have been limited. We try to analysis δ15N-ammonium (δ15N-NH4+) and nitrate (δ15N-NO3-) of SPM, to estimate source of NH4+ and NO3- of SPM. Average δ15N-NH4+ and δ15N-NO3- of SPM in Akita prefecture, Japan were 15.9 ‰ (1.3‰ to 38.5 ‰) and - 0.7 ‰ (-4.6 ‰ to 4.8 ‰), respectively. Although δ15N-NH4+ do not show seasonal trend, δ15N-NO3- increased in winter markedly and decreasing in summer. In generally, the dominant origin of NO3- of SPM is produced from NOx emitted by combustion of some fuel and NO by agriculture source. Heaton (1990) summarized that δ15N-NOx is very different by temperature of combustion. They insisted that δ15N-NOx values are between -13 ‰ to -2 ‰ over 2000 °C (e.g. vehicle engine) and 6 ‰ to 13 ‰ under 1300 °C (e.g. coal combustion). Therefore, the reason of the winter high trend in this study might be combustion process such as coal combustion source. Moreover, the baseline might be made by vehicle sources. In addition, the reason of decreasing in summer seemed to be affected very low δ15N-NO of fertilizer and urea indicated by Li and Wang (2008). Bacteria were activated in summer, and NO from fertilizer and urea was emitted. This summary seemed to be very reasonable.

  7. Investigation of mixotrophic, heterotrophic, and autotrophic growth of Chlorella vulgaris under agricultural waste medium.

    PubMed

    Mohammad Mirzaie, M A; Kalbasi, M; Mousavi, S M; Ghobadian, B

    2016-01-01

    Growth of Chlorella vulgaris and its lipid production were investigated under autotrophic, heterotrophic, and mixotrophic conditions. Cheap agricultural waste molasses and corn steep liquor from industries were used as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. Chlorella vulgaris grew remarkably under this agricultural waste medium, which resulted in a reduction in the final cost of the biodiesel production. Maximum dry weight of 2.62 g L(-1) was obtained in mixotrophic growth with the highest lipid concentration of 0.86 g L(-1). These biomass and lipid concentrations were, respectively, 140% and 170% higher than autotrophic growth and 300% and 1200% higher than heterotrophic growth. In mixotrophic growth, independent or simultaneous occurrence of autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolisms was investigated. The growth of the microalgae was observed to take place first heterotrophically to a minimum substrate concentration with a little fraction in growth under autotrophic metabolism, and then the cells grew more autotrophically. It was found that mixotrophic growth was not a simple combination of heterotrophic and autotrophic growth. PMID:25807048

  8. Nitrogen Limitation Along The Kalahari Transect: Preliminary Results From A Stable Isotope Fertilization Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Macko, S.; D'Odorico, P.; Ries, L.

    2005-12-01

    Globally, savannas cover ~ 20% of the Earth's land area. Nutrients and soil moisture interactively control vegetation dynamics in many savannas although it is unclear how the relative importance of water and nutrient limitations (especially nitrogen) change with the mean climatic conditions. The Kalahari Transect (KT) in southern Africa traverses a dramatic aridity gradient (from ~ 200 mm to more than 1000 mm of mean annual precipitation (MAP), through the Republic of South Africa, Botswana, Namibia and Zambia), on relatively homogenous soils (deep Kalahari sands). This transect offers the ideal setting to study nutrient and vegetation dynamics without confounding soil effects. To improve the understanding of nitrogen and water controls on savanna vegetation, this study tested the hypothesis that the savannas in the Kalahari switch from conditions of water limitation in the dry areas to nutrient limitation in the wet areas. To this end, we conducted a large-scale stable isotope fertilization experiment using four study sites with different MAP. The transect included sites in Mongu, Zambia (MAP ~950mm), Pandamatenga, Ghanzi, and Tshane, Botswana with MAP ranging between 700 mm and 300 mm. The experimental design consisted of a randomized block design with four 21 m x 13 m plots at each site. Each plot was divided into four 10 m x 6 m subplots with 1 m buffer zone between each subplot. Four treatments (N addition, P addition, N+P addition and control) were randomly applied to the subplots. The experiment began during the dry season, in August, 2004, when 39g/m2 of Ca(NO3)2 (3.3g-N/ m2 ) was evenly applied to the N and N+P subplots, and 7.5g/m2 of Ca(H2PO4)2 (1.7g-P/m2) was applied to the P and N+P subplots, while the control subplots were left with no treatment. The N and N+P additions were enriched with 15N (Ca(15NO3)2 ) to a signature of 10.3 ‰. Before application, soil samples from two different layers (0cm and 50cm) outside the plots and foliar samples of the

  9. Molecular Ecological and Stable Isotopic Studies of Nitrogen Fixation in Modern Microbial Mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, B. M.; Crumbliss, L. L.; DesMarais, D. J.; Hogan, M. E.; Omoregie, E.; Turk, K. A.; Zehr, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    Nitrogen is usually the element limiting biological productivity in the marine environment. Microbial mats, laminated microbial communities analogous to some of the oldest forms of life on Earth, are often the sites of high rates of N fixation (the energetically expensive conversion of atmospheric dinitrogen into a biologically useful form). The N fixing enzyme nitrogenase is generally considered to be of ancient origin, and is widely distributed throughout the Bacterial and Archaeal domains of life, indicating an important role for this process over evolutionary time. The stable isotopic signature of N fixation is purportedly recognizable in organic matter (ancient kerogens as well as present-day microbial mats) as a delta (15)N(sub organic) near zero. We studied two microbial mats exhibiting different rates of N fixation in order to better understand the impact of N fixation on the delta (15)N (sub organic) of the mats, as well as what organisms are important in this process. Mats dominated by the cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes grow in permanently submerged hypersaline salterns, and exhibit low rates of N fixation, whereas mats dominated by the cyanobacterium Lyngbya spp grow in an intertidal area, and exhibit rates of N fixation an order of magnitude higher. To examine successional stages in mat growth, both developing and established mats at each location were sampled. PCR and RT-PCR based approaches were used to identify, respectively, the organisms containing nifH (one of the genes that encode nitrogenase) as well as those expressing nifH in these mats. Both mats exhibited a distinct diel cycle of N fixation, with highest rates occurring at night. The delta (15)N(sub organic) of the subtidal Microcoleus mats is near zero whereas the delta (15)N(sub organic) is slightly more positive (+ 2-3%), in the intertidal Lyngbya mats, an interesting difference in view of the fact that overall rates of activity in the intertidal mats are much higher that those

  10. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of aquatic and terrestrial plants of the San Francisco Bay estuarine system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, J.E.; Canuel, E.A.; Harris, D.

    2002-01-01

    We report measurements of seasonal variability in the C-N stable isotope ratios of plants collected across the habitat mosaic of San Francisco Bay, its marshes, and its tributary river system. Analyses of 868 plant samples were binned into 10 groups (e.g., terrestrial riparian, freshwater phytoplankton, salt marsh) to determine whether C-N isotopes can be used as biomarkers for tracing the origins of organic matter in this river-marsh-estuary complex. Variability of ??13C and ??15N was high (???5-10???) within each plant group, and we identified three modes of variability: (1) between species and their microhabitats, (2) over annual cycles of plant growth and senescence, and (3) between living and decomposing biomass. These modes of within-group variability obscure any source-specific isotopic signatures, confounding the application of C-N isotopes for identifying the origins of organic matter. A second confounding factor was large dissimilarity between the ??13C-??15N of primary producers and the organic-matter pools in the seston and sediments. Both confounding factors impede the application of C-N isotopes to reveal the food supply to primary consumers in ecosystems supporting diverse autotrophs and where the isotopic composition of organic matter has been transformed and become distinct from that of its parent plant sources. Our results support the advice of others: variability of C-N stable isotopes within all organic-matter pools is high and must be considered in applications of these isotopes to trace trophic linkages from primary producers to primary consumers. Isotope-based approaches are perhaps most powerful when used to complement other tools, such as molecular biomarkers, bioassays, direct measures of production, and compilations of organic-matter budgets.

  11. Assessment of trophic structure of Cretaceous communities based on stable nitrogen isotope analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrom, P. H.; Macko, S. A.; Engel, M. H.; Russell, D. A.

    1993-06-01

    New δ15N data suggest the retention of an indigenous signal in ancient high molecular weight organic material. These data open the possibility of obtaining new paleoecological information, based on isotopic analyses, on ancient, well-preserved fossil communities. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses were performed on high molecular weight organic material isolated from 22 taxa of Late Cretaceous vertebrates (Judith River Formation, Alberta,Canada). The majority of δ13C and δ15N values (-27‰ to -23‰ and 4‰ to 12‰, for δ13C and δ15N, respectively) are similar to those reported for modern consumers. An assessment of trophic levels based on δ15N is consistent with previous interpretations of food web structure derived from paleoecological interpretations. Among terrestrial consumers, carnivorous theropods (tyrannosaurids and dromaeosaurids) have high δ15N values (6.6‰ ±0.4‰ and 7.9‰, respectively) relative to those of the dominant megaherbivore (hadrosaurids, 4.7‰ ±0.5‰). Within aquatic environments, the values of δ15N of the bowfin Amia (11.6‰) and plesiosaur (11.0‰),distinguish the piscivorous tendencies of these organisms from those of tower trophic level consumers such as the benthic feeding sturgeon Acipenser and the turtle Aspideretes (δ15N = 5.1‰ and 4.5‰, respectively). The correlation in trophic position between δ15N values and paleoecological evidence is unlikely to be coincidental.

  12. Stable Isotopes Indicate Nitrogen Sources in Pinguicula vulgaris Across Contrasting Habitat Types in Sub-Arctic Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, D.; Hobbie, E. A.; Varner, R. K.; Steele, K.

    2012-12-01

    Like most carnivorous plant species, Pinguicula vulgaris (common butterwort) obtains nitrogen from both soil pools and insect prey. Prior studies have estimated percent prey-derived nitrogen (%PDN) for the entire plant, but it may be expected that %PDN varies between plant parts. By measuring stable isotopic ratios in the soil, plants, and naturally captured prey, this study estimated %PDN in both foliage and roots. Plants, soil and insects were collected during July 2012 in sub-arctic Sweden across two habitat types: dry heath and moist sphagnum. Insect samples were homogenized for each site, and all samples were cleaned, dried, and measured for δ15N in an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Roots showed consistent %PDN in both habitat types, whereas foliage in moist sphagnum sites had significantly greater %PDN than foliage in dry heath sites. Amount of captured prey did not differ significantly between habitat types. These results provide the framework for a rough model of the differential distribution of prey- and soil-derived nitrogen in P. vulgaris, where root nitrogen is split approximately evenly between the two sources, and foliar nitrogen varies by site, possibly dependent on the accessibility of nitrogen in the soil pool.

  13. Use of stable isotopes of nitrogen and water to identify sources of nitrogen in three urban creeks of Durham, North Carolina, 2011-12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSwain, Kristen Bukowski; Young, Megan B.; Giorgino, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of nitrate sources was conducted in three creeks that feed nutrient impaired Falls and Jordan Lakes in the vicinity of Durham County, North Carolina, from July 2011 to June 2012. Cabin Branch, Ellerbe Creek, and Third Fork Creek were sampled monthly to determine if sources of nitrate in surface water could be identified on the basis of their stable isotopic compositions. Land use differs in the drainage basins of the investigated creeks—the predominant land use in Cabin Branch Basin is forest, and the Ellerbe and Third Fork Creek Basins are predominantly developed urban areas. Total nutrient concentrations were below 1 milligram per liter (mg/L). All measured nitrate plus nitrite concentrations were below the North Carolina standard of 10 mg/L as nitrogen with the highest concentration of 0.363 mg/L measured in Third Fork Creek. Concentrations of ammonia were generally less than 0.1 mg/L as nitrogen in all creek samples. More than 50 percent of the total nitrogen measured in the creeks was in the form of organic nitrogen. Total phosphorus and orthophosphate concentrations in all samples were generally less than 0.2 mg/L as phosphorus. The isotopic composition of surface water (δ2HH20 and δ18OH2O) is similar to that of modern-day precipitation. During July and August 2011 and May and June 2012, surface-water samples displayed a seasonal difference in isotopic composition, indicating fractionation of isotopes as a result of evaporation and, potentially, mixing with local and regional groundwater. The dominant source of nitrate to Cabin Branch, Ellerbe Creek, and Third Fork Creek was the nitrification of soil nitrogen. Two stormflow samples in Ellerbe Creek and Third Fork Creek had nitrate sources that were a mixture of the nitrification of soil nitrogen and an atmospheric source that had bypassed some soil contact through impermeable surfaces within the drainage basin. No influence of a septic or wastewater source was found in Cabin

  14. Fluidization velocity assessment of commercially available sulfur particles for use in autotrophic denitrification biofilters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been no evaluation of sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification using fluidized biofilters in a recirculating aquaculture system to mitigate nitrate-nitrogen loads. The objectives of this work were to quantify the particle size distribution, specific surface area, and fluidization velocitie...

  15. Stable sulphur and nitrogen isotopes of the moss Haplocladium microphyllum at urban, rural and forested sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hua-Yun; Tang, Cong-Guo; Xiao, Hong-Wei; Liu, Xue-Yan; Liu, Cong-Qiang

    2010-11-01

    Elemental (S and N) and isotopic ( δ34S and δ15N) contents in the moss Haplocladium microphyllum at urban, rural and forested sites in acid rain area of South China have been analyzed for comparisons to show whether they are different and can be effectively used to identify S and N sources of atmospheric deposition. Average moss S content at rural sites (0.29 ± 0.06%) was found to be in between those at urban (0.35 ± 0.05%) and forested (0.25 ± 0.04%) sites, which are significantly different. Average N contents of urban (2.60 ± 0.56%) and rural mosses (2.84 ± 0.77%) are not significantly different, while both are significantly different to that of forested mosses at most areas, indicating that the atmosphere over rural sites has been polluted by N as seriously as that over urban sites. Nitrogen supply, relative to S supply, was in excess of the requirement for protein synthesis, especially at rural and forested sites. Moss stable isotope signatures have been proven to be effective tools for deciphering atmospheric S and N sources at these sites. Through moss δ34S signatures, we found that atmospheric S at urban and forested sites was mainly from local coal combustion and domestic biomass burning, respectively, whereas northerly air masses contributed more S to forested sites. The relatively negative moss δ15N values (-7.5 ± 3.0, -3.4 ± 2.1 and -0.8 ± 2.1‰) demonstrated that the main form in the N deposition was NH x in these sites. More negative δ15N signatures in urban mosses (-7.5 ± 3.0‰) indicated the contribution of NH 3 released from untreated city sewage and wastes, while relatively less negative δ15N for rural and forested mosses (3.4 ± 2.1 and -0.8 ± 2.1‰) was largely derived from agricultural NH 3.

  16. Preliminary characterization of nitrogen and phosphorus in groundwater discharging to Lake Spokane, northeastern Washington, using stable nitrogen isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Cox, Stephen E.; Spanjer, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    Lake Spokane, locally referred to as Long Lake, is a 24-mile-long section of the Spokane River impounded by Long Lake Dam that has, in recent decades, experienced water-quality problems associated with eutrophication. Consumption of oxygen by the decomposition of aquatic plants that have proliferated because of high nutrient concentrations has led to seasonally low dissolved oxygen concentrations in the lake. Of nitrogen and phosphorus, the two primary nutrients necessary for aquatic vegetation growth, phosphorus was previously identified as the limiting nutrient that regulates the growth of aquatic plants and, thus, dissolved oxygen concentrations in Lake Spokane. Phosphorus is delivered to Lake Spokane from municipal and industrial point-source inputs to the Spokane River upstream of Lake Spokane, but is also conveyed by groundwater and surface water from nonpoint-sources including septic tanks, agricultural fields, and wildlife. In response, the Washington State Department of Ecology listed Lake Spokane on the 303(d) list of impaired water bodies for low dissolved oxygen concentrations and developed a Total Maximum Daily Load for phosphorus in 1992, which was revised in 2010 because of continuing algal blooms and water-quality concerns.This report evaluates the concentrations of phosphorus and nitrogen in shallow groundwater discharging to Lake Spokane to determine if a difference exists between nutrient concentrations in groundwater discharging to the lake downgradient of residential development with on-site septic systems and downgradient of undeveloped land without on-site septic systems. Elevated nitrogen isotope values (δ15N) within the roots of aquatic vegetation were used as an indicator of septic-system derived nitrogen. δ15N values were measured in August and September 2014 downgradient of residential development near the lakeshore, of residential development on 300-ft-high terraces above the lake, and of undeveloped land in the eastern (upper) and

  17. Investigation into nitrogen attenuation in groundwater pathways in Irish RBDs through the use of stable isotopic signature analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Alison; Ofterdinger, Ulrich; Flynn, Raymond

    2010-05-01

    Nitrogen has been identified by the Water Framework Directive as a major pollutant of concern in terms of water quality. Nitrogen contamination can pose a threat to human health and excessive loading into surface waters can lead to eutrophication. This research aims to investigate groundwater pathways from diffuse sources of nitrogen contamination and attenuation processes in various geological settings in Ireland. As part of the EPA Strive Pathways Project, the overall purpose of this research is to improve the understanding of nitrogen attenuation processes in groundwater for the development of a catchment management tool to assess the risk posed by diffuse contamination to surface and groundwater receptors. This will be undertaken through examining nitrogen attenuation pathways in various geological settings in distinctly different catchments in Ireland. These catchments include Gortinlieve in Co. Donegal and Mattock in Co. Louth which are both poorly drained catchments and Nuenna in Co. Kilkenny which is a well drained limestone catchment. This research will be useful to develop further ongoing research carried out into the natural chemistry of the Gortinlieve catchment. The research will focus mainly on characterising the fractionation of stable nitrogen isotopes in groundwater. The use of the stable isotopes δ15N and δ18O in the study of denitrification has been well documented in literature. In addition, the isotopes δ13C and δ34S have also been shown to be useful in evaluating the influence of sulphur and carbon as electron donors in denitrification. For example FeS2 produced as a result of denitrification has a different isotopic signature than FeS2 produced from other processes. This research aims to apply these established stable isotope signatures to a new context in terms of the catchment geology and the broader integrated approach of the Pathways project. Furthermore factors influencing the rate of attenuation will be explored, such as: strata

  18. Analysis of Microbial Communities in Biofilms from CSTR-Type Hollow Fiber Membrane Biofilm Reactors for Autotrophic Nitrification and Hydrogenotrophic Denitrification.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung-Hun; Kim, Byung-Chun; Choi, Okkyoung; Kim, Hyunook; Sang, Byoung-In

    2015-10-28

    Two hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactors (HF-MBfRs) were operated for autotrophic nitrification and hydrogenotrophic denitrification for over 300 days. Oxygen and hydrogen were supplied through the hollow fiber membrane for nitrification and denitrification, respectively. During the period, the nitrogen was removed with the efficiency of 82-97% for ammonium and 87-97% for nitrate and with the nitrogen removal load of 0.09-0.26 kg NH4(+)-N/m(3)/d and 0.10-0.21 kg NO3(-)-N/m(3)/d, depending on hydraulic retention time variation by the two HF-MBfRs for autotrophic nitrification and hydrogenotrophic denitrification, respectively. Biofilms were collected from diverse topological positions in the reactors, each at different nitrogen loading rates, and the microbial communities were analyzed with partial 16S rRNA gene sequences in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Detected DGGE band sequences in the reactors were correlated with nitrification or denitrification. The profile of the DGGE bands depended on the NH4(+) or NO3(-) loading rate, but it was hard to find a major strain affecting the nitrogen removal efficiency. Nitrospira-related phylum was detected in all biofilm samples from the nitrification reactors. Paracoccus sp. and Aquaspirillum sp., which are an autohydrogenotrophic bacterium and an oligotrophic denitrifier, respectively, were observed in the denitrification reactors. The distribution of microbial communities was relatively stable at different nitrogen loading rates, and DGGE analysis based on 16S rRNA (341f /534r) could successfully detect nitrate-oxidizing and hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria but not ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the HF-MBfRs. PMID:26095385

  19. Bulk and Compound-Specific Stable Nitrogen Isotopes in Plankton Reveal Large Impact of Diazotrophy across the Subtropical North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mompean de la Rosa, M.; McCarthy, M.; Bode, A.

    2012-12-01

    Enhanced stratification linked to global warming is predicted to decrease nutrient input from deep waters, and may therefore increase oligotrophy in the subtropical ocean. However, nitrogen fixation in many subtropical regions also supports a significant fraction of primary production, a process likely to be enhanced by the same warm/stratified conditions. The shifting balance between major nutrient sources with global change may alter subtropical food webs, possibly strongly affecting the production and export of organic matter. In this study we examined the spatial variability of stable nitrogen isotopes in plankton size fractions in the upper 200 m in a high spatial resolution transect across the Atlantic (24N) during the Malaspina-2010. Our main goal was to determine the major origin of nitrogen for plankton production. Bulk stable isotopes in all size fractions showed a nearly symmetrical spatial distribution, with the lowest values (σ15N <1‰) in the central zone, and were inversely correlated to the abundance of the nitrogen-fixer Trichodesmium. Diazotrophy was estimated to account for >50% of organic nitrogen in the central zone, however it was also very significant (>30%) in eastern and western zones. The relative nitrogen contribution from diazotrophy also increased with increasing plankton size fraction, suggesting the increasing concentration (importance) of recently fixed nitrogen at higher trophic levels, with potential implication for sources of exported organic N. To further explore a possible linkage with trophic position, we also measured compound-specific σ15N values of amino acids, which allowed us to explicitly calculate average trophic position for different plankton size classes. The σ15N value of Phe was then used as direct molecular-level proxy for σ15N value of primary production across the plankton size spectrum. These results indicate that the zone influenced by diazotrophy in the North Atlantic is much larger than reported in

  20. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope turnover rates and diet-tissue discrimination in Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Alves-Stanley, Christy D; Worthy, Graham A J

    2009-08-01

    The Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) is a herbivorous marine mammal that occupies freshwater, estuarine and marine habitats. Despite being considered endangered, relatively little is known about its feeding ecology. The present study expands on previous work on manatee feeding ecology by providing critical baseline parameters for accurate isotopic data interpretation. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios were examined over a period of more than 1 year in the epidermis of rescued Florida manatees that were transitioning from a diet of aquatic forage to terrestrial forage (lettuce). The mean half-life for (13)C turnover was 53 and 59 days for skin from manatees rescued from coastal and riverine regions, respectively. The mean half-life for (15)N turnover was 27 and 58 days, respectively. Because of these slow turnover rates, carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis in manatee epidermis is useful in summarizing average dietary intake over a long period of time rather than assessing recent diet. In addition to turnover rate, a diet-tissue discrimination value of 2.8 per thousand for (13)C was calculated for long-term captive manatees on a lettuce diet. Determining both turnover rate and diet-tissue discrimination is essential in order to accurately interpret stable isotope data. PMID:19617427

  1. Stable Isotope Evidence of Variation in Nitrogen Fixation by Cyanobacteria in Coastal Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, V.; Clementz, M.

    2006-12-01

    Increased nutrient loading via both natural and anthropogenic factors has been reported as one possible mechanism for the recent increase in the occurrence and intensity of harmful algal blooms (HAB) in coastal ecosystems. Influx of iron, phosphorous, and organic carbon have proven to be significant stimulating factors for HAB, since the benthic cyanobacteria that often make up these blooms are capable of nitrogen-fixation and require these nutrients for this process as well as photosynthesis. These cyanobacteria can switch to direct uptake of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), however, when concentrations are high enough to energetically favor this source, suggesting that high nitrogen input may also stimulate HAB. Given the distinct isotope differences between atmospheric N2 (0‰) and anthropogenic sources of DIN (>6‰), measurement of the δ15N composition of cyanobacteria can provide a means of gauging the relative significance of anthropogenic versus atmospheric nitrogen to the growth of these blooms. Likewise, the δ13C composition of these primary producers is controlled by the δ13C composition of the DIC, and can be a second tracer of anthropogenic influx into marine ecosystems. A combined approach using both isotope tracers was employed to determine the significance of anthropogenic nitrogen on HAB in subtropical/tropical coastal marine ecosystems. Samples of cyanobacteria and associated macroalgae were collected from three coastal sites in Guam (Facpi Point, Tanguisson, and Ypao Beach), one locality in Hawaii, and three sites in southern Florida (Pepper Park, Fort Lauderdale, Florida Keys). Following removal of marine carbonates via an acid rinse, the δ13C and δ15N values were determined for each species. Cyanobacterial δ15N values ranged from -2.3‰ to 7.7‰ with the highest values reported from sites in Guam. Only cyanobacteria sampled from Hawaii showed no isotope evidence of an anthropogenic source for nitrogen. A strong negative correlation

  2. Post-depositional fractionation of nitrate stable isotopes in Antarctic snow: towards constraining past UV radiation and reactive nitrogen cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, M. M.; Morin, S.; Savarino, J. P.; Erbland, J.

    2009-12-01

    Recent studies on atmospheric particulate nitrate (NO3-) demonstrated that the nitrogen and triple oxygen stable isotopic composition of NO3- allows constraining not only atmospheric sources and sinks but also oxidation pathways of reactive nitrogen. However, extending this tool to past atmospheres using ice cores can be complicated by post-depositional mass loss and fractionation via UV-photolysis and evaporation. A new 60-yr firn record of 15N/14N and 18O/16O isotopic ratios in NO3- from Dome C, Antarctica (75° S, 123° E) shows strong fractionation compared to the atmospheric signal and a significant anti-correlation (r=-0.75, p<0.01). We propose that at low accumulation sites the nitrate stable isotope record preserves the imprint of processes driving post-depositional fractionation and therefore can be used to infer past levels of UV-radiation and NO3- loss from snow. The former is supported by a strong correlation between δ15N(NO3-) and modeled annual UV radiation at Dome C (r = 0.7, p<0.001). Furthermore, first quantum-chemical model calculations of the photolytic fractionation constant of the nitrogen isotope are consistent with field and lab observations and show a strong sensitivity to the spectrum of actinic flux. We discuss the proposed model framework as a first step towards an isotopic atmosphere-snow transfer function and implications not only for ice core interpretation but also for our understanding of reactive nitrogen cycling above snow surfaces.

  3. Climate and habitat reconstruction using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of collagen in prehistoric herbivore teeth from Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrose, Stanley H.; DeNiro, Michael J.

    1989-05-01

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios have been determined for tooth collagen of 27 prehistoric herbivores from a rock shelter in the central Rift Valley of Kenya. Collagen samples whose isotope ratios were not altered by diagenesis were identified using several analytical methods. During the later Holocene, when the climate was as dry or drier than at present, the isotopic compositions of individual animals are similar to those of modern individuals of the same species. During the earlier Holocene, when the climate was wetter than at present, the δ 15N and δ 13C values are lower than those for their modern counterparts. When diagenetic factors can be discounted and adequate modern comparative data are available, stable isotope analysis of herbivore teeth and bones can be used to evaluate prehistoric climate and habitat conditions.

  4. Nitrate removal and microbial analysis by combined micro-electrolysis and autotrophic denitrification.

    PubMed

    Xing, Wei; Li, Desheng; Li, Jinlong; Hu, Qianyi; Deng, Shihai

    2016-07-01

    A process combining micro-electrolysis and autotrophic denitrification (CEAD) with iron-carbon micro-electrolysis carriers was developed for nitrate removal. The process was performed using organic-free influent with a NO3(-)-N concentration of 40.0±3.0mg/L and provided an average nitrate removal efficiency of 95% in stable stages. The total nitrogen removal efficiency reached 75%, with 21% of NO3(-)-N converted into NH4(+)-N. The corresponding hydraulic retention time was 8-10h, and the optimal pH ranged from 8.5 to 9.5. Microbial analysis with high-throughput sequencing revealed that dominant microorganisms in the reactor belonged to the classes of β-, γ-, and α-Proteobacteria. The abundance of the genera Thermomonas significantly increased during the operation, comprising 21.4% and 24.1% in sludge attached to the carriers in the middle and at the bottom of the reactor, respectively. The developed CEAD achieved efficient nitrate removal from water without organics, which is suitable for practical application. PMID:27019127

  5. Stable isotope fractionation related to microbial nitrogen turnover in constructed wetlands treating contaminated groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voloshchenko, O.; Knoeller, K.

    2013-12-01

    To improve the efficiency of ground- and wastewater treatment in constructed wetlands (CWs), better understanding of the occurring processes is necessary. This research explores N-isotope fractionations associated with the removal of ammonium from contaminated groundwater in pilot-scale CWs downstream of the chemical industrial area Leuna, Germany. The groundwater at the site is contaminated mainly by organic (BTEX, MTBE) and inorganic compounds (ammonium). We assume that the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) plays an important role in nitrogen removal in these CWs. However, to date, interactions between processes of aerobic and anaerobic ammonium oxidation in CWs still have not been well explored. Especially, the importance of the ANAMMOX process for the nitrogen removal is generally accepted, but its role in CWs is quite unknown. For this aim, three CWs were chosen: planted horizontal subsurface flow (HSSF); unplanted HSSF, and floating plant root mat (FPRM). Water samples were taken at the inflow and outflow as well as from the pore space at different distances (1, 2.5 and 4 m) from the inlet and at different depths (20, 30 and 40 cm in the HSSF-CWs, 30 cm in the FPRM). Samples were collected in a time interval of 1 to 6 weeks during 1 year with the exception of the winter season. Physicochemical parameters, nitrogen isotope signatures of ammonium, as well as nitrogen and oxygen isotope signatures of nitrate were analysed. Within the CWs, spatial concentration gradients of the nitrogen species (ammonium and nitrate) are observed. N-isotope variations of ammonium and nitrate are interpreted according to the prevailing processes of the N-transformations. Based on isotope mass-balance approach microbial processes such as nitrification, denitrification, and ANAMMOX are quantified. DNA from biofilms at roots and gravel was extracted using FastDNA Spin Kit For Soil (MP Biomedicals). PCR, quantitative PCR, cloning, and sequencing were applied with the purpose of

  6. Metabolic turnover rates of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in captive juvenile snakes.

    PubMed

    Fisk, Aaron T; Sash, Kim; Maerz, John; Palmer, William; Carroll, John P; Macneil, M Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic turnover rates (m) of delta(15)N and delta(13)C were assessed in different tissues of newly hatched captive-raised corn snakes (Elaphe guttata guttata) fed maintenance diets consisting of earthworms (Eisenia foetida) that varied substantially in delta(15)N (by 644 per thousand) and delta(13)C (by 5.0 per thousand). Three treatments were used during this 144 day experiment that consisted of the same diet throughout (control), shifting from a depleted to an enriched stable isotope signature diet (uptake), and shifting from an enriched to depleted stable isotope signature diet (elimination). Values of delta(13)C in the liver, blood, and muscle of the control snakes reached equilibrium with and were, respectively, 1.73, 2.25 and 2.29 greater than in their diet, this increase is called an isotopic discrimination factor (Deltadelta(13)C = delta(13)C(snake) - delta(13)C(food)). Values of delta(15)N in snake tissues did not achieve equilibrium with the diets in any of the exposures and thus Delta(15)N could not be estimated. Values of metabolic turnover rates (m) for delta(13)C and delta(15)N were greater in liver than in muscle and blood, which were similar, and relative results remained the same if the fraction of (15)N and (13)C were modeled. Although caution is warranted because equilibrium values of stable isotopes in the snakes were not achieved, values of m were greater for delta(13)C than delta(15)N, resulting in shorter times to dietary equilibrium for delta(13)C upon a diet shift, and for both stable isotopes in all tissues, greater during an elimination than in an uptake shift in diet stable isotope signature. Multiple explanations for the observed differences between uptake and elimination shifts raise new questions about the relationship between animal and diet stable isotope concentrations. Based on this study, interpretation of feeding ecology using stable isotopes is highly dependent on the kind of stable isotope, tissue, direction of diet switch

  7. Ti(N5)4 as a Potential Nitrogen-Rich Stable High-Energy Density Material.

    PubMed

    Choi, Changhyeok; Yoo, Hae-Wook; Goh, Eun Mee; Cho, Soo Gyeong; Jung, Yousung

    2016-06-23

    We have studied molecular structures and kinetic stabilities of M(N5)3 (M = Sc, Y) and M(N5)4 (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) complexes theoretically. All of these compounds are found to be stable with more than a 13 kcal/mol of kinetic barrier. In particular, Ti(N5)4 showed the largest dissociation energy of 173.0 kcal/mol and thermodynamic stability. This complex had a high nitrogen content (85% by weight), and a significantly high nitrogen to metal ratio (20:1) among the neutral M(N5)n species studied here and in the literature. Ti(N5)4 is thus forecasted to be a good candidate for a nitrogen-rich high-energy density material (HEDM). We reveal in further detail using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations that the dissociation pathways of M(N5)n involve the rearrangements of the bonding configurations before dissociation. PMID:27266258

  8. Interchange for Joint Research Entitled: Measurement of Stable Nitrogen and Sulfur Isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Joseph F.; Valentin, Jose

    1997-01-01

    Viking measurements of the Martian atmosphere indicate a value of N-15/N-14 which is markedly greater than that found in Earth's atmosphere. These isotopic measurements provide a powerful diagnostic tool which may be used to derive valuable information regarding the past history of Mars and they have been used to place important constraints on the evolution of Mars' atmosphere. Initial partial pressures of nitrogen, outgassing rates, and integrated deposition of nitrogen into minerals have been calculated from this important atmospheric data (McElroy et al., 1976 and 1977; Fox and Dalgarno, 1983). The greater precision obtained in laser spectrometer isotopic measurements compared to the Viking data will greatly improve these calculated values. It has also been proposed that the N-15/N-14 value in Mars' atmosphere has increased monotonically over time (McElroy et al., 1977; Fox and Dalgarno, 1983; Wallis, 1989) owing to preferential escape of atmospheric 14N to space. Nitrogen isotopic ratios might be used to identify relatively ancient crustal rocks (R. Mancinelli, personal communication), and perhaps determine relative aces of surface samples. As a first step in successfully measuring nitrogen isotopes optically we have demonstrated the measurement of 15NI14N to a precision of 0.1% (See Figures 1-4) using a tunable diode laser and an available gas (N-,O) with spectral lines in the 2188 cm-1 region. The sample and reference gas cells contained gases of identical isotopic composition so that the 15NI14N absorption ratio determined from the sample cell, when divided by the 15NI14N absorption ratio determined from the reference cell, should yield an ideal value of unity. The average measured value of this "ratio of ratios" was 0.9983 with a standard deviation (20 values) of 0.0010. This corresponds to a precision of 0.1% (1 per mil) for nitrogen isotopes, a value sufficiently precise to provide important isotopic data of interest to exobiologists. The precision

  9. Trophic ecology and vertical patterns of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in zooplankton from oxygen minimum zone regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Rebecca L.; Wakeham, Stuart; McKinney, Rick; Wishner, Karen F.

    2014-08-01

    The unique physical and biogeochemical characteristics of oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) influence plankton ecology, including zooplankton trophic webs. Using carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes, this study examined zooplankton trophic webs in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) OMZ. δ13C values were used to indicate zooplankton food sources, and δ15N values were used to indicate zooplankton trophic position and nitrogen cycle pathways. Vertically stratified MOCNESS net tows collected zooplankton from 0 to 1000 m at two stations along a north-south transect in the ETNP during 2007 and 2008, the Tehuantepec Bowl and the Costa Rica Dome. Zooplankton samples were separated into four size fractions for stable isotope analyses. Particulate organic matter (POM), assumed to represent a primary food source for zooplankton, was collected with McLane large volume in situ pumps. The isotopic composition and trophic ecology of the ETNP zooplankton community had distinct spatial and vertical patterns influenced by OMZ structure. The most pronounced vertical isotope gradients occurred near the upper and lower OMZ oxyclines. Material with lower δ13C values was apparently produced in the upper oxycline, possibly by chemoautotrophic microbes, and was subsequently consumed by zooplankton. Between-station differences in δ15N values suggested that different nitrogen cycle processes were dominant at the two locations, which influenced the isotopic characteristics of the zooplankton community. A strong depth gradient in zooplankton δ15N values in the lower oxycline suggested an increase in trophic cycling just below the core of the OMZ. Shallow POM (0-110 m) was likely the most important food source for mixed layer, upper oxycline, and OMZ core zooplankton, while deep POM was an important food source for most lower oxycline zooplankton (except for samples dominated by the seasonally migrating copepod Eucalanus inermis). There was no consistent isotopic progression among the four

  10. Using Stable Isotopes of Carbon and Nitrogen to Evaluate Trophic Interactions in Aquatic Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, David R.; LaRoche, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a series of laboratory exercises for upper level biology courses, independent research and/or honors programs. Students sampled fish from a local water body with the assistance of a local fish and wildlife agency. Tissue samples from collected fish were utilized to obtain estimates of the stable isotopes delta[superscript 13]C…

  11. Implications of CO2 Geological Storage on Aquifers Autotrophic Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupraz, Sébastien; Fabbri, Antonin; Joulian, Catherine; Menez, Bénédicte; Gerard, Emanuelle; Henry, Benoit; Crouzet, Catherine; Guyot, François; Garrido, Francis

    2010-05-01

    In a global strategy of carbon emission reduction, a study about CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) feasibility in the case of a French beet sugar factory and distillery in the Parisian basin was undertaken by regional and state authorities. Besides, economical, geological and engineering questions, microbial interactions were also studied since the potential contribution of the deep biosphere on the storage zones appears to be an essential factor in terms of injectivity and CO2 mobilization. Biological processes like biofilm formation, biomineralization and carbon assimilation may hinder the injections or, to the contrary, improve the stability of the sequestration by shifting CO2 into more stable forms like carbonates and organic matter. Regarding those possibilities, it is thus mandatory to establish how the subsurface biosphere will react by determining which metabolisms will be able to sustain the stress due to high concentrations of CO2 and the resulting acidification. In that case, the study of autotrophic communities reactivity is essential because they are the only entrance for CO2 assimilation in the SLiMEs (Subsurface Litho autotrophic Microbial Ecosystems) and thus are accountable for the general biomass and biofilm production in the deep subsurface. Nevertheless, a simple assessment of the toxical effect induced on these strains cannot be representative of the possible interactions at the scale of a long term storage where adaptations should play a major role. For that reason, we decided to choose different strains, namely autotrophic methanogens (Methanothermococcus thermolithotrophicus and Archeoglobus fulgidus) and sulfate reducing bacteria strains (Desulfotomaculum geothermicum and Desulfotomaculum kuznetsovii), that best characterize the autotrophic communities of our injection site (aquifer of the Triassic Keuper sandstones) and to make them undergo a test of selection/adaptation toward a sequential increase of CO2 partial pressure from 0.05 to 5

  12. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes of leaves, litter and soils of the coastal Atlantic Forest of Southeast Brazil along an altitudinal range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lins, S. M.; Della Coletta, L.; Ravagnani, E.; Gragnani, J. G.; Antonio, J.; Mazzi, E. A.; Martinelli, L. A.

    2012-12-01

    In this study the carbon and nitrogen concentrations, and stable carbon (δ13C) and stable nitrogen (δ15N) isotopic composition were determined in samples of Fabaceae and non Fabaceae leaves, litter, and soil samples in two different altitudes (Lowland and Montane Forests) of the coastal Atlantic Forest situated in the Southeast region of Brazil. In both altitudes there were two main differences between Fabaceae and non Fabaceae specimens. Fabaceae had a higher foliar nitrogen content and lower foliar δ15N than non Fabaceae specimens. As a consequence it seems that most of the Fabaceae specimens are fixing nitrogen from the atmosphere in both altitudes. This fact is contrary to most of other studies that found that most Fabaceae are not fixing nitrogen in tropical forests. We speculate that the main reason that Fabaceae are actively fixing nitrogen in the coastal Atlantic Forest is the steepness of the terrain that leads to frequent landslides, causing frequent disturbances of the nitrogen cycle, fostering nitrogen fixation. The main difference between the Lowland and the Montane Forest plots was the higher δ15N in the former in comparison with the later. We speculated that this difference is caused by larger losses of nitrogen by denitrification and riverine output, leading an enriched 15N substrate.

  13. Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Sodium and Potassium Cyanide as a Forensic Signature

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; Horita, Juske; Moran, James J.; Tomkins, Bruce; Janszen, Derek B.; Carman, April J.

    2012-01-03

    Sodium and potassium cyanide are highly toxic, produced in large amounts by the chemical industry, and linked to numerous high-profile crimes. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified cyanide as one of the most probable agents to be used in a future chemical terrorism event. We investigated whether stable C and N isotopic content of sodium and potassium cyanide could serve as a forensic signature for sample matching, using a collection of 65 cyanide samples. A few of these samples displayed non-homogeneous isotopic content associated with degradation to a carbonate salt and loss of hydrogen cyanide. Most samples had highly reproducible isotope content. Of these, >95% could be properly matched based on C and N isotope ratios, with a false match rate <3%. These results suggest that stable C and N isotope ratios are a useful forensic signature for matching cyanide samples.

  14. Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Sodium and Potassium Cyanide as a Forensic Signature

    SciTech Connect

    Kruzer, Helen W; Horita, Juske; Moran, James J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Janszen, Derek B; Carman, April

    2012-01-01

    Sodium and potassium cyanide are highly toxic, produced in large amounts by the chemical industry, and linked to numerous high-profile crimes. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified cyanide as one of the most probable agents to be used in a future chemical terrorism event. We investigated whether stable C and N isotopic content of sodium and potassium cyanide could serve as a forensic signature for sample matching, using a collection of 65 cyanide samples. A few of these samples displayed non-homogeneous isotopic content associated with degradation to a carbonate salt and loss of hydrogen cyanide. Most samples had highly reproducible isotope content. Of these, >95% could be properly matched based on C and N isotope ratios, with a false match rate <3%. These results suggest that stable C and N isotope ratios are a useful forensic signature for matching cyanide samples.

  15. Differentiation of Pigment in Eggs Using Carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and Nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) Stable Isotopes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Feng M; Shi, Guang Y; Wang, Hui W

    2016-07-01

    Consumers prefer natural and healthy food, but artificial pigments are often abused in egg products. The study aimed at differentiating the origin of pigments in eggs by applying the technique of carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) stable isotope analysis. Five hundred sixty laying hens were randomly distributed into 14 treatments, which were divided into four groups: maize, carophyll red pigment, carophyll yellow pigment, and a mixture of carophyll red and yellow pigments. Eggs were collected and pretreated to determe the values of the Roche Yolk Color Fan (RCF), δ(13)C, and δ(15)N. With increasing maize content, the RCF and δ(13)C values of yolks increased. Moreover, the RCF values in the three pigment groups were significantly influenced by the artificial colors, but δ(13)C values were not significantly different, regardless of the existence of pigment. The δ(15)N values in all treatments did not vary as regularly as the carbon stable isotope. A strong positive correlation was found between RCF and δ(13)C in the maize group, but no such correlation was be observed in the pigment groups. It is concluded that carbon stable isotope ratio analysis (δ(13)C) of the yolk can be used to differentiate the origin of the pigment added to eggs. PMID:27302905

  16. Addressing Key Questions in the Bioatmospheric Nitrogen Cycle Using Stable Isotope Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggs, E. M.; Power, S. A.; Green, E.; Mair, L.; Prosser, J. I.

    2006-12-01

    The application of stable isotope techniques enables determination of the fate of applied or deposited reactive N, quantification of biogeochemical process rates, differentiation between microbial sources of N emissions, and determination of impacts on microbial biodiversity. Here we will introduce the 15N, 18O and 13C techniques we have developed and present results from studies where they have been applied to address the following key questions in the bioatmospheric N cycle: What is the fate of atmospheric deposited N in a plant-soil system? What impact does this N addition have on rates of key biogeochemical processes in the rhizosphere? What are the effects on the soil microbial community structure? How much of this N is returned to the atmosphere as N2O or N2? Using 15N and 18O enrichment techniques we are able to quantify gross mineralization rates and microbial immobilization, plant uptake and leaching of deposited or applied N, gross nitrification rates, quantify N2O and N2 production from ammonia oxidation, nitrifier denitrification and denitrification and distinguish between these sources, and derive a system N balance. These stable isotope techniques are being combined with molecular techniques (analysis of gene expression, 13C stable isotope probing (SIP)) to relate the measured processes to the microbial populations responsible and to assess effects of reactive N on community structure. Here we will give a synthesis of results from N deposition studies in semi-natural ecosystems and from N addition studies in agricultural systems, the information from which can be used to drive policy through the formulation of appropriate management and mitigation strategies for reactive N.

  17. Comparison of DNA and Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope-based Techniques for Identification of Prior Vertebrate Hosts of Ticks.

    PubMed

    Hamer, Sarah A; Weghorst, Alex C; Auckland, Lisa D; Roark, E Brendan; Strey, Otto F; Teel, Pete D; Hamer, Gabriel L

    2015-09-01

    Identification of the vertebrate hosts upon which hematophagous arthropods feed provides key information for understanding the ecology and transmission of vector-borne diseases. Bloodmeal analysis of ticks presents unique challenges relative to other vectors, given the long interval between bloodmeal acquisition and host-seeking, during which DNA degradation occurs. This study evaluates DNA-based and stable isotope-based bloodmeal analysis methodologies for the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (Linneaus, 1758), in an experimental study with chicken as the known host. We subjected ticks of different ages and environmental rearing conditions to three DNA-based approaches and a stable isotopic analysis, which relies on the natural variation of nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) and carbon ((13)C/(12)C) isotopes. While all three DNA-based approaches were successful in identifying the bloodmeal host of the engorged nymphs, only the probe-based RT-PCR was able to detect host DNA in aged ticks, the success of which was low and inconsistent across age and rearing treatments. In contrast, the stable isotope analysis showed utility in determining the host across all ages of ticks when isotopic values of ticks were compared with a panel of candidate vertebrate species. There was a positive shift in both δ(13)C and δ(15)N in adult A. americanum until 34 wk postnymphal bloodmeal. Through analyzing the isotopic signatures of eight potential vertebrate host species, we determined that the magnitude of this isotopic shift that occurred with tick age was minor compared with the heterogeneity in the δ(15)N and δ(13)C signatures among species. These results suggest that stable isotopes are a useful tool for understanding tick-host interactions. PMID:26336205

  18. Using semi-permeable membrane devices and stable nitrogen isotopes to detect anthropogenic influences on the Truckee River, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saito, L.; Rosen, Michael R.; Chandra, S.; Fritsen, C.H.; Arufe, J.A.; Redd, C.

    2008-01-01

    Stable nitrogen isotopes (??15N) and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were used together to provide evidence of potential anthropogenic connections to aquatic organisms in the Truckee River, which flows through the Reno/Sparks metropolitan area in Nevada. Crayfish, snail, and periphyton ??15N values, and SPMD toxicity data collected during high and low flow periods at seven primary sites on the river were used with water quality and flow data for the assessment. All biota showed an increase of ??15N on both dates at sites downstream of inflows of a water-quality impaired tributary and urban drain relative to upstream. In addition, most of the lowest ??15N values on each date occurred at the most downstream site on the river. SPMDs sample lipophilic organic contaminants and can be used to assess organic contaminant toxicity to aquatic organisms because they use a membrane that mimics organic contaminant uptake by fish. In this study, results from a fluoroscan test [pyrene index (PI)] of SPMD extracts that responds to higher molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) showed patterns similar to stable isotope data, although observed peaks in PI values occurred in the urban area upstream of where peak ??15N values occurred. The CYP1A biomarker test, which responds to PAHs, certain polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and organochlorines, showed peak toxic equivalents (TEQ) values farther downstream of the urban area. Thus, it is likely that PAHs were contributing to toxicity in the urban area, whereas other nonurban sources of organic carbon may have been present farther downstream. The combined use of stable isotope measurements and SPMDs provided a means of simultaneously examining whether aquatic biota are incorporating constituents from potential food sources (via stable isotopes) or exposure through water (via SPMDs). ?? Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2008.

  19. Evolutionarily stable strategy of carbon and nitrogen investments in forest leaves and its application in vegetation dynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, E.; Farrior, C.; Dybzinski, R.; Pacala, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Leaf mass per area (LMA) and leaf lifespan (LL) are two highly correlated plant traits that are key to plant physiological and ecological properties. Usually, low LMA means short LL, high nitrogen (N) content per unit mass, and fast turnover rates of nutrients; high LMA leads to long LL, low N content, and slow turnover rates. Deciduous trees with low LMA and short lifespan leaves have low carbon cost but high nitrogen demand; and evergreen trees, with high LMA and long lifespan leaves, have high carbon cost but low nitrogen demand. These relationships lead to: 1) evergreen trees have higher leaf area index than deciduous trees; 2) evergreen trees' carbon use efficiency is lower than the deciduous trees' because of their thick leaves and therefore high maintenance respiration; 3) the advantage of evergreens trees brought by their extra leaves over deciduous trees diminishes with increase N in ecosystem. These facts determine who will win when trees compete with each other in a N-limited ecosystem. In this study, we formulate a mathematical model according to the relationships between LMA, LL, leaf nitrogen, and leaf building and maintenance cost, where LMA is the fundamental variable determining the other three. We analyze the evolutionarily stable strategies (ESSs) of LMA with this mathematical model by examining the benefits of carbon and nitrogen investments to leaves in ecosystems with different N. The model shows the ESS converges to low LMA at high N and high LMA at low N. At intermediate N, there are two ESSs at low and high ends of LMA, respectively. The ESS also leads to low forest productivity by outcompeting the possible high productive strategies. We design a simulation scheme in an individual-based competition model (LM3-PPA) to simulate forest dynamics as results of the competition between deciduous and evergreen trees in three different biomes, which are temperate deciduous forest, deciduous-evergreen mixed forest, and boreal evergreen forest. The

  20. Use of stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in size segregated aerosol particles for the O/I penetration evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbaras, Andrius; Garbariene, Inga; Masalaite, Agne; Ceburnis, Darius; Krugly, Edvinas; Kvietkus, Kestutis; Remeikis, Vidmantas; Martuzevicius, Dainius

    2015-04-01

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratio are successfully used in the atmospheric aerosol particle source identification [1, 2], transformation, pollution [3] research. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the penetration of atmospheric aerosol particles from outdoor to indoor using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios. Six houses in Kaunas (Lithuania) were investigated during February and March 2013. Electrical low pressure impactor was used to measure in real time concentration and size distribution of outdoor aerosol particles. ELPI+ includes 15 channels covering the size range from 0.017 to 10.0 µm. The 25 mm diameter aluminium foils were used to collect aerosol particles. Gravimetric analysis of samples was made using microbalance. In parallel, indoor aerosol samples were collected with a micro-orifice uniform deposition impactor (MOUDI model 110), where the aerosol particles were separated with the nominal D50 cut-off sizes of 0.056, 0.1, 0.18,0.32,0.56, 1.0, 1.8, 3.2, 5.6, 10, 18 μm for impactor stages 1-11, respectively. The impactor was run at a flow rate of 30 L/min. Air quality meters were used to record meteorological conditions (temperature, relative humidity) during the investigated period. All aerosol samples were analyzed for total carbon (TC) and total nitrogen (TN) contents and their isotopic compositions using elemental analyzer (EA) connected to the stable isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). TC concentration in indoors ranged from 1.5 to 247.5 µg/m3. During the sampling period outdoors TN levels ranged from 0.1 to 10.9 µg/m3. The obtained outdoor δ13C(PM2.5) values varied from -24.21 to -26.3‰, while the δ15N values varied from 2.4 to 11.1 ‰ (average 7.2±2.5 ‰). Indoors carbonaceous aerosol particles were depleted in 13C compared to outdoors in all sampling sites. This depletion in δ13C varied from 0.1 to 3.2 ‰. We think that this depletion occurs due ongoing chemical reactions (oxidation) when aerosol

  1. Wastewater nitrogen and trace metal uptake by biota on a high-energy rocky shore detected using stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Joanne M; Eyre, Bradley D

    2015-11-15

    On high-energy rocky shores receiving treated wastewater, impacts are difficult to distinguish against a highly variable background and are localised due to rapid dilution. We demonstrate that nitrogen stable isotope values (δ(15)N) of rocky shore biota are highly sensitive to wastewater inputs. For macroalgae (Ulva lactuca and Endarachne binghamiae), grazing snails (Bembicium nanum and Nerita atramentosa), and predatory snails (Morula marginalba), δ(15)N was enriched near a wastewater outfall and declined with distance, returning to background levels within 290m. Any of these species therefore indicates the extent of influence of wastewater, allowing identification of an appropriate scale for studies of ecosystem impacts. For M. marginalba, significant regressions between δ(15)N and tissue copper, manganese, and zinc concentrations indicate a possible wastewater source for these metals. This suggests that δ(15)N is a proxy for exposure to wastewater contaminants, and may help to attribute variations in rocky shore communities to wastewater impacts. PMID:26323863

  2. High rate nitrogen removal by the CANON process at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Jiang, Jing; Yang, Jiachun; Hira, Daisuke; Furukawa, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) is a cost-effective nitrogen removal process. Implementation of the CANON process relies on the cooperation of ammonium-oxidizing and Anammox bacteria, as well as the inhibition of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. Strict limitations on dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in the reactor, and the addition of sufficient inorganic carbon in the influent, were adopted as the main operational strategies. The reactor was fed with synthetic inorganic wastewater composed mainly of NH(4)(+)-N, and operated for 106 days. Stable nitrogen removal rates (NRR) of around 1.4 kg N m(-3) d(-1) were obtained at ambient temperature. Morphological characteristics and analysis of bacterial community confirmed the formation of functional outer aerobic and inner anaerobic granular sludge, providing evidence of stable nitrogen removal. PMID:22546798

  3. Trophic Discrimination Factors and Incorporation Rates of Carbon- and Nitrogen-Stable Isotopes in Adult Green Frogs, Lithobates clamitans.

    PubMed

    Cloyed, Carl S; Newsome, Seth D; Eason, Perri K

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis is an increasingly useful ecological tool, but its accuracy depends on quantifying the tissue-specific trophic discrimination factors (TDFs) and isotopic incorporation rates for focal taxa. Despite the technique's ubiquity, most laboratory experiments determining TDFs and incorporation rates have focused on birds, mammals, and fish; we know little about terrestrial ectotherms, and amphibians in particular are understudied. In this study we used two controlled feeding experiments to determine carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) isotope TDFs for skin, whole blood, and bone collagen and incorporation rates for skin and whole blood in adult green frogs, Lithobates clamitans. The mean (±SD) TDFs for δ(13)C were 0.1‰ (±0.4‰) for skin, 0.5‰ (±0.5‰) for whole blood, and 1.6‰ (0.6‰) for bone collagen. The mean (±SD) TDFs for δ(15)N were 2.3‰ (±0.5‰) for skin, 2.3‰ (±0.4‰) for whole blood, and 3.1‰ (±0.6‰) for bone collagen. A combination of different isotopic incorporation models was best supported by our data. Carbon in skin was the only tissue in which incorporation was best explained by two compartments, which had half-lives of 89 and 8 d. The half-life of carbon in whole blood was 69 d. Half-lives for nitrogen were 75 d for skin and 71 d for whole blood. Our results help fill a taxonomic gap in our knowledge of stable isotope dynamics and provide ecologists with a method to measure anuran diets. PMID:26658253

  4. Regional nitrogen dynamics in the TERENO Bode River catchment, Germany, as constrained by stable isotope patterns.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Christin; Krieg, Ronald; Merz, Ralf; Knöller, Kay

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between hydrological characteristics and microbial activities affect the isotopic composition of dissolved nitrate in surface water. Nitrogen and oxygen isotopic signatures of riverine nitrate in 133 sampling locations distributed over the Bode River catchment in the Harz Mountains, Germany, were used to identify nitrate sources and transformation processes. An annual monitoring programme consisting of seasonal sampling campaigns in spring, summer and autumn was conducted. δ(15)N and δ(18)O of nitrate and corresponding concentrations were measured as well as δ(2)H and δ(18)O of water to determine the deuterium excess. In addition, precipitation on 25 sampling stations was sampled and considered as a potential input factor. The Bode River catchment is strongly influenced by agricultural land use which is about 70 % of the overall size of the catchment. Different nitrogen sources such as ammonia (NH4) fertilizer, soil nitrogen, organic fertilizer or nitrate in precipitation show partly clear nitrate isotopic differences. Processes such as microbial denitrification result in fractionation and lead to an increase in δ(15)N of nitrate. We observed an evident regional and partly temporal variation of nitrate isotope signatures which are clearly different between main landscape types. Spring water sections within the high mountains contain nitrate in low concentrations with low δ(15)NNO3 values of -3 ‰ and high δ(18)ONO3 values up to 13 ‰. High mountain stream water sub-catchments dominated by nearly undisturbed forest and grassland contribute nitrate with δ(15)NNO3 and δ(18)ONO3 values of -1 and -3.5 ‰, respectively. In the further flow path, which is affected by an increasing agricultural land use and urban sewage, we recognized an increase in δ(15)NNO3 and δ(18)ONO3 up to 22 and 18 ‰, respectively, with high variations during the year. A correlation seems to exist between the percentage of agricultural land use area and the

  5. Variation in the Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Composition of Plants and Soil along a Precipitation Gradient in Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian-Ying; Sun, Wei; Liu, Xiao-Ning; Chen, Fa-Hu

    2012-01-01

    Water availability is the most influential factor affecting plant carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope composition in arid and semi-arid environments. However, there are potential differences among locations and/or species in the sensitivity of plant δ13C and δ15N to variation in precipitation, which are important for using stable isotope signatures to extract paleo-vegetation and paleo-climate information. We measured δ13C and δ15N of plant and soil organic matter (SOM) samples collected from 64 locations across a precipitation gradient with an isotherm in northern China. δ13C and δ15N for both C3 and C4 plants decreased significantly with increasing mean annual precipitation (MAP). The sensitivity of δ13C to MAP in C3 plants (-0.6±0.07‰/100 mm) was twice as high as that in C4 plants (−0.3±0.08‰/100 mm). Species differences in the sensitivity of plant δ13C and δ15N to MAP were not observed among three main dominant plants. SOM became depleted in 13C with increasing MAP, while no significant correlations existed between δ15N of SOM and MAP. We conclude that water availability is the primary environmental factor controlling the variability of plant δ13C and δ15N and soil δ13C in the studied arid and semi-arid regions. Carbon isotope composition is useful for tracing environmental precipitation changes. Plant nitrogen isotope composition can reflect relative openness of ecosystem nitrogen cycling. PMID:23272186

  6. Use of sulfur and nitrogen stable isotopes to determine the importance of whitebark pine nuts to Yellowstone grizzly bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Felicetti, L.A.; Schwartz, C.C.; Rye, R.O.; Haroldson, M.A.; Gunther, K.A.; Phillips, D.L.; Robbins, C.T.

    2003-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) is a masting species that produces relatively large, fat- and protein-rich nuts that are consumed by grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis). Trees produce abundant nut crops in some years and poor crops in other years. Grizzly bear survival in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem is strongly linked to variation in pine-nut availability. Because whitebark pine trees are infected with blister rust (Cronartium ribicola), an exotic fungus that has killed the species throughout much of its range in the northern Rocky Mountains, we used stable isotopes to quantify the importance of this food resource to Yellowstone grizzly bears while healthy populations of the trees still exist. Whitebark pine nuts have a sulfur-isotope signature (9.2 ?? 1.3??? (mean ?? 1 SD)) that is distinctly different from those of all other grizzly bear foods (ranging from 1.9 ?? 1.7??? for all other plants to 3.1 ?? 2.6??? for ungulates). Feeding trials with captive grizzly bears were used to develop relationships between dietary sulfur-, carbon-, and nitrogen-isotope signatures and those of bear plasma. The sulfur and nitrogen relationships were used to estimate the importance of pine nuts to free-ranging grizzly bears from blood and hair samples collected between 1994 and 2001. During years of poor pine-nut availability, 72% of the bears made minimal use of pine nuts. During years of abundant cone availability, 8 ?? 10% of the bears made minimal use of pine nuts, while 67 ?? 19% derived over 51% of their assimilated sulfur and nitrogen (i.e., protein) from pine nuts. Pine nuts and meat are two critically important food resources for Yellowstone grizzly bears.

  7. Constraining the Biological Pump using Stable Nitrogen and Carbon Isotopes in the Glacial Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somes, C. J.; Schmittner, A.

    2010-12-01

    An increase in the strength of the biological pump during the last glacial maximum (LGM) relative to modern times may have significantly contributed to the deglacial rise in atmospheric CO2. As phytoplankton grow, they consume CO2 out of the surface ocean and atmosphere then transport it to the deep ocean and sea floor sediments through their sinking detrital matter, where it can remain for a long time. Two of the most important limiting nutrients for phytoplankton growth are fixed nitrogen (N) and iron (Fe). The ocean fixed-N inventory in controlled by the balance between denitrification, which occurs under suboxic conditions (O2 < 5 uM) in the water column and sea floor sediments, and N2 fixation, which occurs when specialized prokaryotes fix atmospheric N2 to meet their N requirement when fixed N is fully depleted at surface. N2-fixers also have relatively high Fe requirements that can limit their growth and ability to balance the N-loss from denitrification. Sediment and ice core records suggests that the ocean inventory of both fixed N and Fe may have been significantly higher during the last glacial maximum (LGM) relative to modern times. A colder, more well-oxygenated ocean would have likely reduced denitrification, which is consistent with a decrease in δ15N in present-day water column denitrification zones. Dust in ice core records also show massive spikes during the LGM that could reduce the extent of HNLC zones and stimulate more export production. We present a global Earth System Climate Model that includes both nitrogen (14N and 15N) and carbon (12C and 13C) isotopes that is run with LGM boundary conditions. Preliminary sensitivity experiments that include a parameterization for the effect of Fe on diazotroph and diatom growth, which are based on atmospheric dust deposition estimates are shown. Fe limitation of diazotrophy reduces the tight coupling of denitrification and N2 fixation and allows the global N inventory to increase by more than 5% during

  8. [Meta-analysis of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic enrichment factors for aquatic animals].

    PubMed

    Guo, Liang; Sun, Cui-ping; Ren, Wei-zheng; Zhang, Jian; Tang, Jian-iun; Hu, Liana-liang; Chen, Xin

    2016-02-01

    Isotopic enrichment factor (Δ, the difference between the δ value of food and a consumer tissue) is an important parameter in using stable isotope analysis (SIA) to reconstruct diets, characterize trophic relationships, elucidate patterns of resource allocation, and construct food webs. Isotopic enrichment factor has been considered as a constancy value across a broad range of animals. However, recent studies showed that the isotopic enrichment factor differed among various types of animals although the magnitude of variation was not clear. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis to synthesize and compare Δ13C and Δ15N among four types of aquatic animals (teleosts, crustaceans, reptiles and molluscs). We searched for papers published before 2014 on Web of Science and CNKI using the key words "stable isotope or isotopic fractionation or fractionation factor or isotopic enrichment or trophic enrichment". Forty-two publications that contain 140 studies on Δ13C and 159 studies on Δ15N were obtained. We conducted three parallel meta-analyses by using three types of weights (the reciprocal of variance as weights, the sample size as weights, and equal weights). The results showed that no significant difference in Δ13C among different animal types (teleosts 1.0 per thousand, crustaceans 1.3 per thousand, reptiles 0.5 per thousand, and molluscs 1.5 per thousand), while Δ15N values were significantly different (teleosts 2.4 per thousand, crustaceans 3.6 per thousand, reptiles 1.0 per thousand and molluscs 2.5 per thousand). Our results suggested that the overall mean of Δ13C could be used as a general enrichment factor, but Δ15N should be chosen according to the type of aquatic animals in using SIA to analyze trophic relationships, patterns of resource allocation and food webs. PMID:27396136

  9. [Element Sulfur Autotrophic Denitrification Combined Anaerobic Ammonia Oxidation].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Huang, Yong; Liu, Xin; Yuan, Yi; Li Xiang; Wangyan, De-qing; Ding, Liang; Shao, Jing-wei; Zhao, Rong

    2016-03-15

    A novel element sulfur autotrophic denitrification combined anaerobic ammonia oxidation process, reacted in CSTR, was used to investigate the sulfate production and alkalinity consumption during the whole process. The element sulfur dosage was 50 g · L⁻¹. The inoculation volume of ANAMMOX granular sludge was 100 g · L⁻¹. The agitation rate and environment reaction temperature of the CSTR were set to 120 r · min⁻¹ and 35°C ± 0.5°C, respectively. The pH of influent was maintained in range of 8. 0-8. 4. During the start-up stage of sulfur based autotrophic denitrification, the nitrogen removal loading rate could reach 0.56-0.71 kg · (m³ · d) ⁻¹ in the condition of 5.3 h hydrogen retention time and 200 mg · L⁻¹ nitrate nitrogen. After the addition of 60 mg · L⁻¹ ammonia nitrogen, Δn(SO₄²⁻):Δn(NO₃⁻) decreased from 1.21 ± 0.06 to 1.01 ± 0.10, Δ(IC): Δ(NO₃⁻-N) decreased from 0.72 ± 0.1 to 0.51 ± 0.11, and the effluent pH increased from 6.5 to 7.2. During the combined stage, the ammonia concentration of effluent was 10.1-19.2 mg · L⁻¹, and the nitrate-nitrogen removal loading rate could be maintained in range of 0.66-0.88 kg · (m³ · d)⁻¹. The Δn (NH₄⁺): Δn (NO₃⁻) ratio reached 0.43, and the NO₃⁻ removal rate was increased by 60% in the simultaneous ammonia and nitrate removal reaction under the condition of G(T) = 22-64 s⁻¹ and pH = 8.08, while improper conditions reduced the efficiency of simultaneous reaction. PMID:27337901

  10. Temporal variation in mycorrhizal diversity and carbon and nitrogen stable isotope abundance in the wintergreen meadow orchid Anacamptis morio.

    PubMed

    Ercole, Enrico; Adamo, Martino; Rodda, Michele; Gebauer, Gerhard; Girlanda, Mariangela; Perotto, Silvia

    2015-02-01

    Many adult orchids, especially photoautotrophic species, associate with a diverse range of mycorrhizal fungi, but little is known about the temporal changes that might occur in the diversity and functioning of orchid mycorrhiza during vegetative and reproductive plant growth. Temporal variations in the spectrum of mycorrhizal fungi and in stable isotope natural abundance were investigated in adult plants of Anacamptis morio, a wintergreen meadow orchid. Anacamptis morio associated with mycorrhizal fungi belonging to Tulasnella, Ceratobasidium and a clade of Pezizaceae (Ascomycetes). When a complete growing season was investigated, multivariate analyses indicated significant differences in the mycorrhizal fungal community. Among fungi identified from manually isolated pelotons, Tulasnella was more common in autumn and winter, the pezizacean clade was very frequent in spring, and Ceratobasidium was more frequent in summer. By contrast, relatively small variations were found in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stable isotope natural abundance, A. morio samples showing similar (15)N enrichment and (13)C depletion at the different sampling times. These observations suggest that, irrespective of differences in the seasonal environmental conditions, the plant phenological stages and the associated fungi, the isotopic content in mycorrhizal A. morio remains fairly constant over time. PMID:25382295

  11. Trophic Relationships and Habitat Preferences of Delphinids from the Southeastern Brazilian Coast Determined by Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope Composition

    PubMed Central

    Bisi, Tatiana Lemos; Dorneles, Paulo Renato; Lailson-Brito, José; Lepoint, Gilles; Azevedo, Alexandre de Freitas; Flach, Leonardo; Malm, Olaf; Das, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the foraging habitats of delphinids in southeastern Brazil, we analyzed stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes in muscle samples of the following 10 delphinid species: Sotalia guianensis, Stenella frontalis, Tursiops truncatus, Steno bredanensis, Pseudorca crassidens, Delphinus sp., Lagenodelphis hosei, Stenella attenuata, Stenella longirostris and Grampus griseus. We also compared the δ13C and δ15N values among four populations of S. guianensis. Variation in carbon isotope results from coast to ocean indicated that there was a significant decrease in δ13C values from estuarine dolphins to oceanic species. S. guianensis from Guanabara Bay had the highest mean δ13C value, while oceanic species showed significantly lower δ13C values. The highest δ15N values were observed for P. crassidens and T. truncatus, suggesting that these species occupy the highest trophic position among the delphinids studied here. The oceanic species S. attenuata, G. griseus and L. hosei had the lowest δ15N values. Stable isotope analysis showed that the three populations of S. guianensis in coastal bays had different δ13C values, but similar δ15N results. Guiana dolphins from Sepetiba and Ilha Grande bays had different foraging habitat, with specimens from Ilha Grande showing more negative δ13C values. This study provides further information on the feeding ecology of delphinids occurring in southeastern Brazil, with evidence of distinctive foraging habitats and the occupation of different ecological niches by these species in the study area. PMID:24358155

  12. Trophic relationships and habitat preferences of delphinids from the southeastern Brazilian coast determined by carbon and nitrogen stable isotope composition.

    PubMed

    Bisi, Tatiana Lemos; Dorneles, Paulo Renato; Lailson-Brito, José; Lepoint, Gilles; Azevedo, Alexandre de Freitas; Flach, Leonardo; Malm, Olaf; Das, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the foraging habitats of delphinids in southeastern Brazil, we analyzed stable carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) isotopes in muscle samples of the following 10 delphinid species: Sotalia guianensis, Stenella frontalis, Tursiops truncatus, Steno bredanensis, Pseudorca crassidens, Delphinus sp., Lagenodelphis hosei, Stenella attenuata, Stenella longirostris and Grampus griseus. We also compared the δ(13)C and δ(15)N values among four populations of S. guianensis. Variation in carbon isotope results from coast to ocean indicated that there was a significant decrease in δ(13)C values from estuarine dolphins to oceanic species. S. guianensis from Guanabara Bay had the highest mean δ(13)C value, while oceanic species showed significantly lower δ(13)C values. The highest δ(15)N values were observed for P. crassidens and T. truncatus, suggesting that these species occupy the highest trophic position among the delphinids studied here. The oceanic species S. attenuata, G. griseus and L. hosei had the lowest δ(15)N values. Stable isotope analysis showed that the three populations of S. guianensis in coastal bays had different δ(13)C values, but similar δ(15)N results. Guiana dolphins from Sepetiba and Ilha Grande bays had different foraging habitat, with specimens from Ilha Grande showing more negative δ(13)C values. This study provides further information on the feeding ecology of delphinids occurring in southeastern Brazil, with evidence of distinctive foraging habitats and the occupation of different ecological niches by these species in the study area. PMID:24358155

  13. Carbon isotope effects associated with autotrophic acetogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gelwicks, J.T.; Risatti, J.B.; Hayes, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The carbon kinetic isotope effects associated with synthesis of acetate from CO2 and H2 during autotrophic growth of Acetobacterium woodii at 30??C have been measured by isotopic analyses of CO2, methyl-carbon, and total acetate. Closed systems allowing construction of complete mass balances at varying stages of growth were utilized, and the effects of the partitioning of carbon between CO2 and HCO3- were taken into account. For the overall reaction, total carbonate ??? total acetate, isotope effects measured in replicate experiments ranged from -59.0 ?? 0.9% to - 57.2 ?? 2.3z%. Taking into account all measurements, the weighted mean and standard deviation are -58.6 ?? 0.7%. There is no evidence for intramolecular ordering in the acetate. The carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary acetate, otherwise expected to be near that of sedimentary organic carbon, is likely to be depleted in environments in which autotrophic acetogenesis is occurring. ?? 1989.

  14. Impact of Aquifer Heterogeneities on Autotrophic Denitrification.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, A.; Roques, C.; Selker, J. S.; Istok, J. D.; Pett-Ridge, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrate contamination in groundwater is a big challenge that will need to be addressed by hydrogeologists throughout the world. With a drinking water standard of 10mg/L of NO3-, innovative techniques will need to be pursued to ensure a decrease in drinking water nitrate concentration. At the pumping site scale, the influence and relationship between heterogeneous flow, mixing, and reactivity is not well understood. The purpose of this project is to incorporate both physical and chemical modeling techniques to better understand the effect of aquifer heterogeneities on autotrophic denitrification. We will investigate the link between heterogeneous hydraulic properties, transport, and the rate of autotrophic denitrification. Data collected in previous studies in laboratory experiments and pumping site scale experiments will be used to validate the models. The ultimate objective of this project is to develop a model in which such coupled processes are better understood resulting in best management practices of groundwater.

  15. Carbon isotope effects associated with autotrophic acetogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gelwicks, J T; Risatti, J B; Hayes, J M

    1989-01-01

    The carbon kinetic isotope effects associated with synthesis of acetate from CO2 and H2 during autotrophic growth of Acetobacterium woodii at 30 degrees C have been measured by isotopic analyses of CO2, methyl-carbon, and total acetate. Closed systems allowing construction of complete mass balances at varying stages of growth were utilized, and the effects of the partitioning of carbon between CO2 and HCO3- were taken account. For the overall reaction, total carbonate --> total acetate, isotope effects measured in replicate experiments ranged from -59.0 +/- 0.9% to -57.2 +/- 2.3%. Taking into account all measurements, the weighted mean and standard deviation are -58.6 +/- 0.7%. There is no evidence for intramolecular ordering in the acetate. The carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary acetate, otherwise expected to be near that of sedimentary organic carbon, is likely to be depleted in environments in which autotrophic acetogenesis is occurring. PMID:11542159

  16. Carbon isotope effects associated with autotrophic acetogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelwicks, J. T.; Risatti, J. B.; Hayes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    The carbon kinetic isotope effects associated with synthesis of acetate from CO2 and H2 during autotrophic growth of Acetobacterium woodii at 30 degrees C have been measured by isotopic analyses of CO2, methyl-carbon, and total acetate. Closed systems allowing construction of complete mass balances at varying stages of growth were utilized, and the effects of the partitioning of carbon between CO2 and HCO3- were taken account. For the overall reaction, total carbonate --> total acetate, isotope effects measured in replicate experiments ranged from -59.0 +/- 0.9% to -57.2 +/- 2.3%. Taking into account all measurements, the weighted mean and standard deviation are -58.6 +/- 0.7%. There is no evidence for intramolecular ordering in the acetate. The carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary acetate, otherwise expected to be near that of sedimentary organic carbon, is likely to be depleted in environments in which autotrophic acetogenesis is occurring.

  17. Stable nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios indicate traditional and market food intake in an indigenous circumpolar population.

    PubMed

    Nash, Sarah H; Bersamin, Andrea; Kristal, Alan R; Hopkins, Scarlett E; Church, Rebecca S; Pasker, Renee L; Luick, Bret R; Mohatt, Gerald V; Boyer, Bert B; O'Brien, Diane M

    2012-01-01

    The transition of a society from traditional to market-based diets (termed the nutrition transition) has been associated with profound changes in culture and health. We are developing biomarkers to track the nutrition transition in the Yup'ik Eskimo population of Southwest Alaska based on naturally occurring variations in the relative abundances of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes (δ(15)N and δ(13)C values). Here, we provide three pieces of evidence toward the validation of these biomarkers. First, we analyzed the δ(15)N and δ(13)C values of a comprehensive sample of Yup'ik foods. We found that δ(15)N values were elevated in fish and marine mammals and that δ(13)C values were elevated in market foods containing corn or sugar cane carbon. Second, we evaluated the associations between RBC δ(15)N and δ(13)C values and self-reported measures of traditional and market food intake (n = 230). RBC δ(15)N values were correlated with intake of fish and marine mammals (r = 0.52; P < 0.0001). RBC δ(13)C values were correlated with intake of market foods made from corn and sugar cane (r = 0.46; P < 0.0001) and total market food intake (r = 0.46; P < 0.0001). Finally, we assessed whether stable isotope ratios captured population-level patterns of traditional and market intake (n = 1003). Isotopic biomarkers of traditional and market intake were associated with age, community location, sex, and cultural identity. Self-report methods showed variations by age and cultural identity only. Thus, stable isotopes show potential as biomarkers for monitoring dietary change in indigenous circumpolar populations. PMID:22157543

  18. Using the stable carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions of vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) to examine questions in ethnoprimatology.

    PubMed

    Loudon, James E; Grobler, J Paul; Sponheimer, Matt; Moyer, Kimberly; Lorenz, Joseph G; Turner, Trudy R

    2014-01-01

    This study seeks to understand how humans impact the dietary patterns of eight free-ranging vervet monkey (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) groups in South Africa using stable isotope analysis. Vervets are omnivores that exploit a wide range of habitats including those that have been anthropogenically-disturbed. As humans encroach upon nonhuman primate landscapes, human-nonhuman primate interconnections become increasingly common, which has led to the rise of the field of ethnoprimatology. To date, many ethnoprimatological studies have examined human-nonhuman primate associations largely in qualitative terms. By using stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope analysis, we use quantitative data to understand the degree to which humans impact vervet monkey dietary patterns. Based on initial behavioral observations we placed the eight groups into three categories of anthropogenic disturbance (low, mid, and high). Using δ13C and δ15N values we estimated the degree to which each group and each anthropogenically-disturbed category was consuming C4 plants (primarily sugar cane, corn, or processed foods incorporating these crops). δ13C values were significantly different between groups and categories of anthropogenic-disturbance. δ15N values were significantly different at the group level. The two vervet groups with the highest consumption of C4 plants inhabited small nature reserves, appeared to interact with humans only sporadically, and were initially placed in the mid level of anthropogenic-disturbance. However, further behavioral observations revealed that the high δ13C values exhibited by these groups were linked to previously unseen raiding of C4 crops. By revealing these cryptic feeding patterns, this study illustrates the utility of stable isotopes analysis for some ethnoprimatological questions. PMID:25010211

  19. Using the Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Compositions of Vervet Monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) to Examine Questions in Ethnoprimatology

    PubMed Central

    Loudon, James E.; Grobler, J. Paul; Sponheimer, Matt; Moyer, Kimberly; Lorenz, Joseph G.; Turner, Trudy R.

    2014-01-01

    This study seeks to understand how humans impact the dietary patterns of eight free-ranging vervet monkey (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) groups in South Africa using stable isotope analysis. Vervets are omnivores that exploit a wide range of habitats including those that have been anthropogenically-disturbed. As humans encroach upon nonhuman primate landscapes, human-nonhuman primate interconnections become increasingly common, which has led to the rise of the field of ethnoprimatology. To date, many ethnoprimatological studies have examined human-nonhuman primate associations largely in qualitative terms. By using stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope analysis, we use quantitative data to understand the degree to which humans impact vervet monkey dietary patterns. Based on initial behavioral observations we placed the eight groups into three categories of anthropogenic disturbance (low, mid, and high). Using δ13C and δ15N values we estimated the degree to which each group and each anthropogenically-disturbed category was consuming C4 plants (primarily sugar cane, corn, or processed foods incorporating these crops). δ13C values were significantly different between groups and categories of anthropogenic-disturbance. δ15N values were significantly different at the group level. The two vervet groups with the highest consumption of C4 plants inhabited small nature reserves, appeared to interact with humans only sporadically, and were initially placed in the mid level of anthropogenic-disturbance. However, further behavioral observations revealed that the high δ13C values exhibited by these groups were linked to previously unseen raiding of C4 crops. By revealing these cryptic feeding patterns, this study illustrates the utility of stable isotopes analysis for some ethnoprimatological questions. PMID:25010211

  20. Trace Elements and Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotopes in Organisms from a Tropical Coastal Lagoon

    PubMed Central

    van Hattum, B.; de Boer, J.; van Bodegom, P. M.; Rezende, C. E.; Salomons, W.

    2010-01-01

    Trace elements (Fe, Mn, Al, Zn, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Cd, Hg, and As) and stable isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) were analyzed in sediments, invertebrates, and fishes from a tropical coastal lagoon influenced by iron ore mining and processing activities to assess the differences in trace element accumulation patterns among species and to investigate relations with trophic levels of the organisms involved. Overall significant negative relations between trophic level (given by 15N) and trace element concentrations in gastropods and crustaceans showed differences in internal controls of trace element accumulation among the species of different trophic positions, leading to trace element dilution. Generally, no significant relation between δ15N and trace element concentrations was observed among fish species, probably due to omnivory in a number of species as well as fast growth. Trace element accumulation was observed in the fish tissues, with higher levels of most trace elements found in liver compared with muscle and gill. Levels of Fe, Mn, Al, and Hg in invertebrates, and Fe and Cu in fish livers, were comparable with levels in organisms and tissues from other contaminated areas. Trace element levels in fish muscle were below the international safety baseline standards for human consumption. PMID:20217062

  1. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 26 plants in 16 states in the United States. Of the total ammonia production capacity, 55% was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas. US producers operated at 66% of their rated capacity. In descending order, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, Agrium and PCS Nitrogen accounted for 81% of the US ammonia production capacity.

  2. Stable isotopic biogeochemistry of carbon and nitrogen in a perennially ice-covered Antarctic lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wharton, R. A. Jr; Lyons, W. B.; Des Marais, D. J.; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    remineralized as it falls through the water column. At nearby Lake Fryxell, the substantial (relative to Lake Hoare) glacial meltstream input overprints Fryxell's shallow-water biological delta 13C signal with delta 13C-depleted DIC. In contrast, Lake Hoare is not significantly affected by surface-water input and mixing, and therefore the delta 13C patterns observed arise primarily from biological dynamics within the lake. Organic matter in Lake Hoare is depleted in 15N, which we suggest is partially the result of the addition of relatively light inorganic nitrogen into the lake system from terrestrial sources.

  3. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes and amino acids in Holocene sediments of Lake Lonar, central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Philip; Gaye, Birgit; Wiesner, Martin; Basavaiah, Nathani; Prasad, Sushma; Stebich, Martina; Anoop, Ambili; Riedel, Nils

    2013-04-01

    Investigations on surface sediments and a sediment core from Lake Lonar in central India were carried out within the framework of the HIMPAC (Himalaya: Modern and Past Climate) programme. The aim was to understand recent productivity, sedimentation, and degradation processes and to reconstruct variations in Holocene lake conditions on the basis of biogeochemical analysis on a 10 m long sediment core retrieved from the centre of Lake Lonar. Located in India's core monsoon zone, Lake Lonar offers valuable information about the climate development of the whole region. The lake is situated at the floor of a meteorite impact structure on the Deccan plateau basalt. The modern lake is characterised by brackish water, high alkalinity, severe eutrophication, and bottom water anoxia. The lake is about 6 m deep and fed by rainfall during the SW monsoon season and three perennial streams. Since no out-flowing stream is present and no seepage loss occurs, the lake level is highly sensitive to the balance of precipitation and evaporation. Here we present C/N, carbon and nitrogen isotope, and amino acid data of bulk organic matter from modern lake and Holocene core sediments. Modern conditions are mainly related to human activity which started to have persistent influence on the biological and chemical lake properties at ~1200 cal a BP. The distribution of δ13C in the modern sediments is driven by the ratio between terrestrial and aquatic organic matter, while δ15N seems to be influenced by redox conditions at the sediment-water-interface with elevated values at shallow oxic stations. Differences in the amino acid assemblages of oxic and anoxic surface sediment samples were used to calculate an Ox/Anox ratio indicating the redox conditions during organic matter degradation. The onset of the monsoon reconstructed from the sediment core occurred at ca. 11450 cal a BP. The early Holocene core sediments are characterised by low sedimentation rate, low aquatic productivity, and

  4. Use of Multiple Stable Isotopes to Quantify Nitrogen Deposition in Arid-Urban Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riha, K. M.; Michalski, G. M.; Hale, R. L.; Earl, S.; Turnbull, L.; Grimm, N. B.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) input to soils and surfaces in arid environments is of growing concern due to increased N emissions and N use associated with urbanization. Atmospheric N that falls as wet (rain or snow) or dry (dust or aerosols) deposition can lead to eutrophication, soil acidification, and groundwater contamination through leaching of excess nitrate. Other nitrate sources include anthropogenic fertilizer from agriculture practices or lawn application, septic systems, and animal waste. Urbanization increases imperviousness and alters natural flowpaths through construction of stormwater infrastructure, which alters hydrological connectivity. Following a rain pulse, nitrate deposited on impervious surfaces during dry periods may be mobilized and, depending on the type of stormwater infrastructure, has the potential to reach aquifers. In this study, we investigate the sources of nitrate found in urban stormwater by undertaking multiple-isotope analysis (δ15N, δ18O and Δ17O) on water samples collected from several sub-catchments within the Indian Bend Wash catchment in Scottsdale, Arizona, that represent different types of stormwater infrastructure, including pipes, engineered washes, retention basins and mixed infrastructure at larger spatial scales. We use δ15N of nitrate to distinguish among nitrate sources; pairing δ15N and δ18O provides more precise separation due to distinct signatures (e.g., fertilizer is unique from septic sources). Because atmospheric nitrate is anomalously enriched in 17O (denoted Δ17O) and nitrate produced from nitrification, denitrification and assimilation have a Δ17O = 0, we are able to use the Δ17O measurement to determine the proportion of nitrate in runoff that is derived from atmospheric sources. Multiple isotopic analyses were performed using the denitrifier method on runoff samples collected during summer (monsoonal) and winter storms that occurred between 2010 and 2011. Typical ranges of atmospheric nitrate inputs

  5. Autotrophic denitrification and its effect on metal speciation during marine sediment remediation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Mingfei; Zhang, Tong; Fang, Herbert H P

    2009-07-01

    Denitrification-based remediation has been proved as a cost-effective approach for organic removal in sediment. However, little attention has been drawn on the concomitant autotrophic denitrification process and its impacts during such treatment. In this study, a contaminated marine sediment sample was treated with nitrate in a series of experiments to characterize the autotrophic denitrification and its impacts on metal speciation. Through treatment, as the consequence of autotrophic denitrification which accounts for 73.9% of nitrate reduction, approximately 98.8% acid volatile sulfide (AVS) was oxidized to sulfate, causing changes of Zn, Cu and Pb speciation in the sediment. Their oxidizable fractions decreased by 71.7%, 13% and 71% respectively while the bound-to-carbonate fractions increased by 52.0%, >700% and >40%, and the reducible fractions also increased by 276%, >280% and 140%. Thus, the relatively stable oxidizable phase of Zn, Cu and Pb was generally transferred to the more mobile bound-to-carbonate and reducible phases. According to SEM (simultaneously extracted metal) analysis, most of extractable Zn and Pb were no longer present in the form of metal sulfides after denitrification. The (Zn+Pb)/AVS ratio increased from 0.030 to 3.1. Both sequential extraction and AVS-SEM suggested a possible increase of heavy metal mobility and, thus, toxicity. Two major species responsible for autotrophic denitrification were identified to be phylogenetically related with Sulfurimonas paralvinellae and Thiohalophilus thiocyanoxidans. PMID:19476962

  6. Preservation Methods Alter Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope Values in Crickets (Orthoptera: Grylloidea).

    PubMed

    Jesus, Fabiene Maria; Pereira, Marcelo Ribeiro; Rosa, Cassiano Sousa; Moreira, Marcelo Zacharias; Sperber, Carlos Frankl

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA) is an important tool for investigation of animal dietary habits for determination of feeding niche. Ideally, fresh samples should be used for isotopic analysis, but logistics frequently demands preservation of organisms for analysis at a later time. The goal of this study was to establish the best methodology for preserving forest litter-dwelling crickets for later SIA analysis without altering results. We collected two cricket species, Phoremia sp. and Mellopsis doucasae, from which we prepared 70 samples per species, divided among seven treatments: (i) freshly processed (control); preserved in fuel ethanol for (ii) 15 and (iii) 60 days; preserved in commercial ethanol for (iv) 15 and (v) 60 days; fresh material frozen for (vi) 15 and (vii) 60 days. After oven drying, samples were analyzed for δ15N, δ13C values, N(%), C(%) and C/N atomic values using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. All preservation methods tested, significantly impacted δ13C and δ15N and C/N atomic values. Chemical preservatives caused δ13C enrichment as great as 1.5‰, and δ15N enrichment as great as 0.9‰; the one exception was M. doucasae stored in ethanol for 15 days, which had δ15N depletion up to 1.8‰. Freezing depleted δ13C and δ15N by up to 0.7 and 2.2‰, respectively. C/N atomic values decreased when stored in ethanol, and increased when frozen for 60 days for both cricket species. Our results indicate that all preservation methods tested in this study altered at least one of the tested isotope values when compared to fresh material (controls). We conclude that only freshly processed material provides adequate SIA results for litter-dwelling crickets. PMID:26390400

  7. Preservation Methods Alter Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope Values in Crickets (Orthoptera: Grylloidea)

    PubMed Central

    Jesus, Fabiene Maria; Pereira, Marcelo Ribeiro; Rosa, Cassiano Sousa; Moreira, Marcelo Zacharias; Sperber, Carlos Frankl

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA) is an important tool for investigation of animal dietary habits for determination of feeding niche. Ideally, fresh samples should be used for isotopic analysis, but logistics frequently demands preservation of organisms for analysis at a later time. The goal of this study was to establish the best methodology for preserving forest litter-dwelling crickets for later SIA analysis without altering results. We collected two cricket species, Phoremia sp. and Mellopsis doucasae, from which we prepared 70 samples per species, divided among seven treatments: (i) freshly processed (control); preserved in fuel ethanol for (ii) 15 and (iii) 60 days; preserved in commercial ethanol for (iv) 15 and (v) 60 days; fresh material frozen for (vi) 15 and (vii) 60 days. After oven drying, samples were analyzed for δ15N, δ13C values, N(%), C(%) and C/N atomic values using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. All preservation methods tested, significantly impacted δ13C and δ15N and C/N atomic values. Chemical preservatives caused δ13C enrichment as great as 1.5‰, and δ15N enrichment as great as 0.9‰; the one exception was M. doucasae stored in ethanol for 15 days, which had δ15N depletion up to 1.8‰. Freezing depleted δ13C and δ15N by up to 0.7 and 2.2‰, respectively. C/N atomic values decreased when stored in ethanol, and increased when frozen for 60 days for both cricket species. Our results indicate that all preservation methods tested in this study altered at least one of the tested isotope values when compared to fresh material (controls). We conclude that only freshly processed material provides adequate SIA results for litter-dwelling crickets. PMID:26390400

  8. Measuring synthesis rates of nitrogen-containing polymers by using stable isotope tracers.

    PubMed

    Fan, M Z; Chiba, L I; Matzat, P D; Yang, X; Yin, Y L; Mine, Y; Stein, H H

    2006-04-01

    The major N-containing polymer compounds in the body include protein, RNA, and DNA. The endogenous gastrointestinal secretions as well as the portal-drained visceral and peripheral immune responses are basic physiological functions. Elevated endogenous secretions and immune activities, as affected by developmental stages, diets, and management factors, decrease the availability of dietary nutrients for peripheral muscle synthesis and deposition. Measurements of in vivo protein, RNA, and DNA synthesis rates associated with the viscera, peripheral immune cells, and skeletal muscles should, in principle, be the sensitive biochemical and cellular endpoints for studying factors affecting nonruminant nutrition, metabolism, and growth. The selection of stable isotope tracers for precursors, routes of tracer delivery, and mass spectrometric analyses of tracer enrichments are the major methodological considerations. To measure in vivo protein, RNA, and DNA synthesis rates, oral feeding with heavy water (2H2O), and continuous infusion of [U-13C]glucose and [15N]Gly intravenously for labeling the sugar moieties ribose and deoxyribose and de novo purine base synthesis have been established. Flooding doses of tracer Phe, for example, L-[ring-2H5]Phe, via the i.p. route are reliable and cost-effective for measuring in vivo protein synthesis rates, especially for the viscera in small nonruminants. Therefore, measurements of the major N-containing polymer synthesis rates in the viscera, the peripheral immune cells, and muscles through oral feeding with 2H2O and/or i.p. flooding doses of Phe tracers are the emerging tools for studying nonruminant nutrition, metabolism, and growth under research and field test conditions. PMID:16582095

  9. Expression of Heterogenous Arsenic Resistance Genes in the Obligately Autotrophic Biomining Bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Peng, J B; Yan, W M; Bao, X Z

    1994-07-01

    Two arsenic-resistant plasmids were constructed and introduced into Thiobacillus ferrooxidans strains by conjugation. The plasmids with the replicon of wide-host-range plasmid RSF1010 were stable in T. ferrooxidans. The arsenic resistance genes originating from the heterotroph were expressed in this obligately autotrophic bacterium, but the promoter derived from T. ferrooxidans showed no special function in its original host. PMID:16349341

  10. Impact of contamination and pre-treatment on stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of charred plant remains

    PubMed Central

    Vaiglova, Petra; Snoeck, Christophe; Nitsch, Erika; Bogaard, Amy; Lee-Thorp, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Stable isotope analysis of archaeological charred plants has become a useful tool for interpreting past agricultural practices and refining ancient dietary reconstruction. Charred material that lay buried in soil for millennia, however, is susceptible to various kinds of contamination, whose impact on the grain/seed isotopic composition is poorly understood. Pre-treatment protocols have been adapted in distinct forms from radiocarbon dating, but insufficient research has been carried out on evaluating their effectiveness and necessity for stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis. Methods The effects of previously used pre-treatment protocols on the isotopic composition of archaeological and modern sets of samples were investigated. An archaeological sample was also artificially contaminated with carbonates, nitrates and humic acid and subjected to treatment aimed at removing the introduced contamination. The presence and removal of the contamination were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and δ13C and δ15N values. Results The results show a ca 1‰ decrease in the δ15N values of archaeological charred plant material caused by harsh acid treatments and ultra-sonication. This change is interpreted as being caused by mechanical distortion of the grains/seeds rather than by the removal of contamination. Furthermore, specific infrared peaks have been identified that can be used to detect the three types of contaminants studied. We argue that it is not necessary to try to remove humic acid contamination for stable isotope analysis. The advantages and disadvantages of crushing the grains/seeds before pre-treatment are discussed. Conclusions We recommend the use of an acid-only procedure (0.5 M HCl for 30 min at 80°C followed by three rinses in distilled water) for cleaning charred plant remains. This study fills an important gap in plant stable isotope research that will enable future researchers to evaluate potential

  11. Differential processing of anthropogenic carbon and nitrogen in benthic food webs of A Coruña (NW Spain) traced by stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bode, Antonio; Fernández, Consolación; Mompeán, Carmen; Parra, Santiago; Rozada, Fernando; Valencia-Vila, Joaquín; Viana, Inés G.

    2014-08-01

    In this study the effect of inputs of organic matter and anthropogenic nitrogen at small spatial scales were investigated in the benthos of the Ria of A Coruña (NW Spain) using stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes. This ria is characteristically enriched in nutrients provided either by marine processes (as coastal upwelling) or by urban and agricultural waste. Stable isotope composition in trophic guilds of infaunal benthos revealed spatial differences related to their nutrient inputs. The main difference was the presence of an additional chemoautotrophic food web at the site with a large accumulation of organic matter. The enrichment in heavy nitrogen isotopes observed in most compartments suggests the influence of sewage-derived nitrogen, despite large inputs of marine nitrogen. Macroalgae (Fucus vesiculosus) resulted significantly enriched at the site influenced by estuarine waters. In contrast, no differences were found in mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis), thus suggesting a major dependence on marine nutrient sources for this species. However, the estimations of anthropogenic influence were largely dependent on assumptions required to model the different contributions of sources. The measurement of stable isotope signatures in various compartments revealed that, despite anthropogenic nutrients are readily incorporated into local food webs, a major influence of natural marine nutrient sources cannot be discarded.

  12. Infant feeding practice in medieval Japan: stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of human skeletons from Yuigahama-minami.

    PubMed

    Tsutaya, Takumi; Shimomi, Akina; Nagaoka, Tomohito; Sawada, Junmei; Hirata, Kazuaki; Yoneda, Minoru

    2015-02-01

    A longer breastfeeding duration provides various positive effects in subadult health because of abundant immunological factors and nutrients in human breast milk, and decreases the natural fertility of a population through lactational amenorrhea. In this study, we measured stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in the bone collagen of three adults and 45 subadults from the Yuigahama-minami site (from 12th to 14th century) in Kamakura, the early medieval capital of Japan. Marine foods, C3 -based terrestrial foods, and freshwater fish are the primarily protein sources for adults. The changes in the nitrogen isotope ratios of subadults suggest that the relative dietary protein contribution from breast milk started to decrease from 1.1 years of age and ended at 3.8 years. The age at the end of weaning in the Yuigahama-minami population was greater than that in the typical non-industrial populations, a premodern population in the Edo period Japan, and medieval populations in the UK. Skeletons of townspeople from medieval Kamakura indicate severe nutritional stress (e.g., enamel hypoplasia and cribra orbitalia), yet this longer duration of breastfeeding did not compensate adverse effects for nutritional deficiency. The longer breastfeeding period may have been a consequence of complementary food shortage and bad health of subadults. Kamakura experienced urbanization and population increase in the early medieval period. The younger age-at-death distribution and high nutritional stresses in the Yuigahama-minami population and later weaning, which is closely associated with longer inter-birth interval for mothers, suggests that Kamakura developed and increased its population by immigration during urbanization. PMID:25331669

  13. Calibration of Nitrogen Stable Isotopes and N-dynamics in a Western Boundary Current System (Brazil) during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, A. L.; Fontana, L.

    2015-12-01

    This research documents changes in relative nitrate utilization and sources based on δ15N of nitrate and sinking particles in an oligotrophic Western Boundary to improve the efficience of the δ15N to provide an understanding of the N-dynamic during the Holocene from sediment records. The Continental Shelf of Southeastern Brazil is dominated by the oligotrophic Brazil Current, whose instabilities promote an untypical western boundary upwelling of South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) and consequently increases of primary productivity. The inorganic nitrogen concentration and the δ15N­nitrate and δ15N of sinking particles was characterized for each water masses present on the shelf (SACW, Tropical Water and Coastal Water). Cross­shelf gradients of nitrogen concentration and stable isotopes were observed. The SACW showed δ15N­nitrate signature around 5­6‰ characterizing the inner and mid­shelf conditions, where the input of new nitrate from upwelling is rapidly used by organisms in the euphotic zone without any fractionation. On the other hands, the dominance of N­ limited TW on the outer shelf provided a δ15N­nitrate and δ15N­sinking particles signals (­2.0 to 3.0‰) lower than the SACW average indicating N­fixation as a dominant source of nitrogen. The δ15N fractionation during upwelling events are also identified, but in smaller scale. The information of preliminary δ15N results from Holocene sediment record along a cross-shelf gradient showed values ranging from 3 to 8 ‰. In general, the tendency of low values recorded in middle Holocene indicates low availability of N during these low productivity stages. These results agreed pretty well with the δ13C records. In contrast, during late Holocene the values were heavy, probably indicating another processes (e.g. complete use of N-pool), which are still under investigation in association with another proxies (e.g. degraded pigments, opal, CaCO3).

  14. Sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification from the micro-polluted water.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weili; Liu, Xu; Dong, Xiaojing; Wang, Zheng; Yuan, Ying; Wang, Hui; He, Shengbing

    2016-06-01

    Eutrophication caused by high concentrations of nutrients is a huge problem for many natural lakes and reservoirs. Removing the nitrogen contamination from the low C/N water body has become an urgent need. Autotrophic denitrification with the sulfur compound as electron donor was investigated in the biofilter reactors. Through the lab-scale experiment, it was found that different sulfur compounds and different carriers caused very different treatment performances. Thiosulfate was selected to be the best electron donor and ceramsite was chosen as the suitable carrier due to the good denitrification efficiency, low cost and the good resistibility against the high hydraulic loads. Later the optimum running parameters of the process were determined. Then the pilot-scale experiment was carried out with the real micro-polluted water from the West Lake, China. The results indicated that the autotrophic denitrification with thiosulfate as electron donor was feasible and applicable for the micro-polluted lake water. PMID:27266314

  15. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ammonia is the principal source of fixed nitrogen. It was produced by 17 companies at 34 plants in the United States during 2003. Fifty-three percent of U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock.

  16. Tracing nitrogenous disinfection byproducts after medium pressure UV water treatment by stable isotope labeling and high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kolkman, Annemieke; Martijn, Bram J; Vughs, Dennis; Baken, Kirsten A; van Wezel, Annemarie P

    2015-04-01

    Advanced oxidation processes are important barriers for organic micropollutants (e.g., pharmaceuticals, pesticides) in (drinking) water treatment. Studies indicate that medium pressure (MP) UV/H2O2 treatment leads to a positive response in Ames mutagenicity tests, which is then removed after granulated activated carbon (GAC) filtration. The formed potentially mutagenic substances were hitherto not identified and may result from the reaction of photolysis products of nitrate with (photolysis products of) natural organic material (NOM). In this study we present an innovative approach to trace the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) of MP UV water treatment, based on stable isotope labeled nitrate combined with high resolution mass spectrometry. It was shown that after MP UV treatment of artificial water containing NOM and nitrate, multiple nitrogen containing substances were formed. In total 84 N-DBPs were detected at individual concentrations between 1 to 135 ng/L bentazon-d6 equivalents, with a summed concentration of 1.2 μg/L bentazon-d6 equivalents. The chemical structures of three byproducts were confirmed. Screening for the 84 N-DBPs in water samples from a full-scale drinking water treatment plant based on MP UV/H2O2 treatment showed that 22 of the N-DBPs found in artificial water were also detected in real water samples. PMID:25760315

  17. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes reveal the use of pelagic resources by the invasive Ponto-Caspian mysid Limnomysis benedeni.

    PubMed

    Fink, Patrick; Harrod, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The Ponto-Caspian mysid shrimp Limnomysis benedeni has rapidly invaded freshwater systems throughout Europe and is now found in extremely high abundances in invaded systems. However, very little is known about the trophic ecology of this mysid in invaded ecosystems, in particular the relative degree of herbivory, carnivory and detritivory of this potentially omnivorous species and where it derives its energy, i.e. via carbon fixed by algae inhabiting benthic or pelagic habitats or through allochthonous inputs. Here, we investigate the trophic ecology of L. benedeni in a recently established population in North-Western Germany using stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes. Our results suggest that in contrast to its previous classifications as a benthic or bentho-pelagic herbivore, L. benedeni is an omnivorous species, which can derive the bulk of its carbon from pelagic resources. Its trophic niche in different invaded ecosystems will be determined by multiple, system-dependent factors which have to be considered in order to predict the mysids' invasion potential. PMID:24117428

  18. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios and mercury concentration in the scalp hair of residents from Taiji, a whaling town.

    PubMed

    Endo, Tetsuya; Hayasaka, Moriaki; Hisamichi, Yohsuke; Kimura, Osamu; Haraguchi, Koichi

    2013-04-15

    We analyzed stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) as well as mercury (Hg) concentration in the scalp hair of Japanese who consumed whale meat and those who did not, and investigated the relationships among the δ(13)C and δ(15)N values and Hg concentration. The average δ(15)N and δ(13)C values of whale meat-eaters (10.11‰ and -18.5‰) were significantly higher than those of non-eaters (9.28‰ and -18.9‰), respectively. The average Hg concentration of whale meat-eaters (20.6 μg/g) was significantly higher than that of non-eaters (2.20 μg/g). Significant positive correlations were found between the δ(13)C and δ(15)N values and between the δ(15)N value and Hg concentration in the hair of whale meat-eaters, while the correlation between the δ(15)N value and Hg concentration was not statistically significant in the non-eaters. The consumption of whale meat may increase Hg concentration as well as δ(15)N and δ(13)C values in scalp hair. PMID:23453817

  19. Mercury concentrations in fish from forest harvesting and fire-impacted Canadian Boreal lakes compared using stable isotopes of nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Edenise; Carignan, Richard

    2005-03-01

    Total mercury (Hg) concentration was determined in several piscivorous and nonpiscivorous species of fish from 38 drainage lakes with clear-cut, burnt, or undisturbed catchments located in the Canadian Boreal Shield. Mercury concentrations increased with increasing fish trophic position as estimated using stable isotopes of nitrogen (N; r2 = 0.52, 0.49, and 0.30 for cut, reference, and burnt lakes, respectively; p < 0.01). Mercury biomagnification per thousand delta15N varied from 22 to 29% in the three groups of lakes. Mercury availability to organisms at the base of the food chain in lakes with cut catchments was higher than that in reference lakes. In cut lakes, Hg concentrations in fish were significantly related to ratio of the clear-cut area to lake area (or lake volume; r = +0.82 and +0.74, respectively, p < 0.01). Both impact ratios were, in turn, significantly correlated with dissolved organic carbon. These findings suggest that differential loading of organic matter-bound Hg to lakes can affect Hg cycling. In addition, Hg concentrations exceeded the advisory limit for human consumption (0.5 microg/g wet wt) from the World Health Organization in all top predatory species (northern pike, walleye, and burbot) found in cut and in two partially burnt lakes. Thus, high Hg concentrations in fish from forest-harvested and partially burnt lakes may reflect increased exposure to Hg relative to that in lakes not having these watershed disturbances. PMID:15779770

  20. Sustainable energy recovery in wastewater treatment by microbial fuel cells: stable power generation with nitrogen-doped graphene cathode.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Liu, Hong; Wang, Chuan; Hou, Shuang-Xia; Yang, Nuan

    2013-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) recover energy sustainably in wastewater treatment. Performance of non-noble cathode catalysts with low cost in neutral medium is vital for stable power generation. Nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) as cathode catalyst was observed to exhibit high and durable activity at buffered pH 7.0 during electrochemical measurements and in MFCs with respect to Pt/C counterpart. Electrochemical measurements showed that the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on NG possessed sustained activity close to the state-of-art Pt/C in terms of onset potential and electron transfer number. NG-MFCs displayed maximum voltage output of 650 mV and maximum power density of 776 ± 12 mW m(-2), larger than 610 mV and 750 ± 19 mW m(-2) of Pt/C-MFCs, respectively. Furthermore, long-time test lasted over 90 days, during which the maximum power density of NG-MFCs declined by 7.6%, with stability comparable to Pt/C-MFCs. Structure characterization of NG implied that the relatively concentrated acidic oxygen-containing groups improved such long-time stability by repelling the protons due to the same electrostatic force, and thus the C-N active centers for ORR were left undestroyed. These findings demonstrated the competitive advantage of NG to advance the application of MFCs for recovering biomass energy in treatment of wastewater with neutral pH. PMID:24219223

  1. Facile synthesis of vanadium nitride/nitrogen-doped graphene composite as stable high performance anode materials for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balamurugan, Jayaraman; Karthikeyan, Gopalsamy; Thanh, Tran Duy; Kim, Nam Hoon; Lee, Joong Hee

    2016-03-01

    Novel vanadium nitride/nitrogen-doped graphene (VN/NG) composite was fabricated and used as stable high performance anode materials for supercapacitors. The VN/NG composite anode material exhibited excellent rate capability, outstanding cycling stability, and superior performance. FE-SEM and TEM studies of VN/NG composite revealed that ultra-thin VN nanostructures were homogeneously distributed on flexible NG nanosheets. The NG provided a highly conductive network to boost the charge transport involved during the capacitance generation and also aided the dispersion of nanostructured VN within the NG network. The synergetic VN/NG composite exhibited an ultra-high specific capacitance of 445 F g-1 at 1 Ag-1 with a wide operation window (-1.2 to 0 V) and showed outstanding rate capability (98.66% capacity retention after 10,000 cycles at 10 Ag-1). The VN/NG electrode offered a maximum energy density (∼81.73 Wh kg-1) and an ultra-high power density (∼28.82 kW kg-1 at 51.24 Wh kg-1). The cycling performance of the VN/NG composite was superior to that of pure VN nanostructure. These finding open a new path way to the designated fabrication of VN/NG composite as anode materials in the development of high performance energy storage devices.

  2. Nitrogen-doped carbon onions encapsulating metal alloys as efficient and stable catalysts for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chongyang; Xu, Feng; Chen, Jing; Min, Huihua; Dong, Hui; Tong, Ling; Qasim, Khan; Li, Shengli; Sun, Litao

    2016-01-01

    Designing a new class of non-noble metal catalysts with triiodide reduction activity and stability comparable to those of conventional Pt is extremely significant for the application of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Here, we demonstrate newly designed counter electrode (CE) materials of onion-like nitrogen-doped carbon encapsulating metal alloys (ONC@MAs) such as FeNi3 (ONC@FeNi3) or FeCo (ONC@FeCo), by a facile and scalable pyrolysis method. The resulting composite catalysts show superior catalytic activities towards the triiodide reduction and exhibit low charge transfer resistance between the electrode surfaces and electrolytes. As a result, the DSSCs based on ONC@FeCo and ONC@FeNi3 achieve outstanding power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of 8.26% and 8.87%, respectively, which can rival the 8.28% of Pt-based DSSC. Moreover, the excellent electrochemical stabilities for both the two catalysts also have been corroborated by electrochemical impendence spectra and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Noticeably, TEM investigation further reveals that the N-doped graphitic carbon onions exhibit the high structural stability in iodine-containing medium even subject to hundreds of CV scanning. These results make ONC@MAs the promising candidates to supersede costly Pt as efficient and stable CEs for DSSCs.

  3. Stable silver nanoclusters electrochemically deposited on nitrogen-doped graphene as efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shi; Chen, Man; Dong, Haifeng; He, Bingyu; Lu, Huiting; Su, Lei; Dai, Wenhao; Zhang, Qiaochu; Zhang, Xueji

    2015-01-01

    Metal nanoclusters exhibit unusually high catalytic activity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) due to their small size and unique electronic structures. However, controllable synthesis of stable metal nanoclusters is a challenge, and the durability of metal clusters suffers from the deficiency of dissolution, aggregation, and sintering during catalysis reactions. Herein, silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) (diameter < 2 nm) were controllably electrochemically reduced on nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) using effective single-stranded oligonucleotide sequences (ssDNA) as the performed template in absence of any other reluctant. The ssDNA is significant for providing AgNCs with growth template and anchoring the cluster on graphene surface. The strong interaction between the AgNCs, ssDNA and NG renders the as-synthesized AgNCs/NG composite with high-performance onset potential, half-wave potential and mass activity for ORR approaching to commercial Pt/C catalyst, and remarkably superior ORR performance than NG and Ag nanoparticle/NG. Importantly, the AgNCs/NG composite shows excellent methanol tolerance and accelerated electrochemical stability (8000 cycles), which is vital in high performance fuel cells, batteries and nanodevices.

  4. Spatial shifts in food sources for macrozoobenthos in an estuarine ecosystem: Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, Hideyuki; Matsumasa, Masatoshi; Toya, Terumasa; Satoh, Nobuya; Mizota, Chitoshi; Maki, Yonosuke; Kikuchi, Eisuke

    2005-08-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ( δ13C and δ15N, respectively) analyses were made on estuarine macrozoobenthos in order to examine the relationships between their feeding habits (feeding mode and food selectivity) and the spatial shifts in food sources from upstream to downstream in an estuary. The δ13C values of two ocypodid crabs were similar to those of benthic diatoms, indicating that they use their specialized mouth parts to selectively feed on benthic diatoms. The δ13C values of a gastropod and another ocypodid crab at the site furthest downstream were higher than values at an upstream site, suggesting that these unselective deposit feeders shift from feeding mainly on benthic diatoms downstream to feeding on sediment organic matter (SOM) upstream. The δ13C values of deposit feeding polychaetes were not significantly different among sampling sites, indicating that they feed mainly on SOM at all sites. These results show that species- and site-specific feeding habits must be considered when evaluating the roles of macrozoobenthos in regulating estuarine material flows.

  5. Late Quaternary environmental changes inferred from stable carbon, nitrogen and oxygen isotope values at Teshekpuk Lake, North Slope, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, J. J.; Booth, A. L.; Wooller, M. J.; Jones, B. M.; Gaglioti, B.

    2012-12-01

    Global surface air temperatures increased by ~0.74°C between 1906-2005, with average temperatures in the Arctic increasing at almost twice the rate as the rest of the planet. The Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska is particularly susceptible and responsive to these fluctuations in climate. Better understanding both short- and long-term climate variability is important as this ecosystem provides food and habitat for hundreds of thousands of migratory birds and caribou. Despite the ecological importance of the Arctic Coastal Plain, relatively few studies exist that provide multi-proxy paleoclimatic data for the region and thus the rate at which climate and ecosystems have changed during the past century lack a longer term context. Here we present stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values from the analysis of bulk organic matter in samples from a ~6 m sediment core from Teshekpuk Lake, 80 miles southeast of Barrow, Alaska. AMS 14C dates on a nearby core indicate a basal age of ~15 kyr. The relatively low C/N values (mean <11) throughout the core infer that the organic matter is largely composed of autochthonous organic matter. Stable carbon isotope values from analyses of this organic material increase from ~-27‰ at the base of the core to peaks of ~-23‰ between ~10 and 8 kyr, inferring highs in lake production during this time. We also present stable oxygen isotope values from analyses of chironomid and aquatic invertebrate chitin preserved in the core. Non-biting midges in the family Chironomidae begin their lifecycles in freshwater. During their larval stages chironomids synthesize and molt chitinous head capsules. These head capsules record the oxygen isotopic composition of the lake water present at the time of synthesis, and are well preserved in lake sediments. These isotopic results are interpreted in terms of other recent isotope data from the north slope of Alaska in addition to a pollen reconstruction from the same core and their implications in terms of

  6. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 25 plants in 16 states in the United States during 2006. Fifty-seven percent of U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2006, U.S. producers operated at about 72 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, PCS Nitro-gen, and Agrium, in descending order, accounted for 79 percent U.S. ammonia production capacity. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  7. Cross effect of temperature, pH and free ammonia on autotrophic denitrification process with sulphide as electron donor.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, Carmen; Mora, Mabel; Fernández, Isaac; Mosquera-Corral, Anuska; Campos, José Luis; Méndez, Ramón

    2014-02-01

    Autotrophic denitrification is a suitable technology to simultaneously remove oxidised nitrogen compounds and reduced sulphur compounds yielding nitrogen gas, sulphur and sulphate as the main products. In this work, several batch tests were conducted to investigate the cross effect of temperature, pH and free ammonia on the autotrophic denitrification. Denitrification efficiencies above 95% were achieved at 35°C and pH 7.5-8.0 with maximum specific autotrophic denitrifying activities up to 188mgN2g(-1)VSSd(-1). Free ammonia did not show any effect on denitrification at concentrations up to 53mg NH3-NL(-1). Different sulphide concentrations were also tested with stoichiometric nitrite and nitrate concentrations. Sulphide inhibited denitrification at concentrations higher than 200mgS(2-)L(-1). A 50% inhibition was also found at nitrite concentrations above 48mg NO2(-)-NL(-1). The maximum specific activity decreased until a value of 25mgN2g(-1) VSSd(-1) at 232mg NO2(-)-NL(-1). The Haldane model was used to describe denitrification inhibition caused by nitrite. Kinetic parameters determined from the fitting of experimental data were rmax=176mgN2g(-1)VSSd(-1), Ks=10.7mg NO2(-)-NL(-1) and Ki=34.7mg NO2(-)-NL(-1). The obtained model allowed optimising an autotrophic denitrification process by avoiding situations of inhibition and thus obtaining higher denitrification efficiencies. PMID:24216266

  8. Spatial changes in carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of sludge and associated organisms in a biological sewage treatment system.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Takashi; Kanaya, Gen; Syutsubo, Kazuaki; Miyaoka, Yuma; Hatamoto, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N) have been utilized as powerful tools for tracing energy or material flows within food webs in a range of environmental studies. However, the techniques have rarely been applied to the study of biological wastewater treatment technologies. We report on the spatial changes in δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N in sludge and its associated biotic community in a wastewater treatment system. This system consisted of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and a down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) which is a novel type of trickling filter. The results showed clear spatial changes in the δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N of suspended solids (SS), retained sludge, and macrofauna (oligochaetes and fly larvae) in the system. The δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N was used as a natural tracer to determine the SS dynamic throughout the system. The results imply that SS in the DHS effluent was mainly eluted from the retained sludge in the lower section of the DHS reactor. The δ¹⁵N of the retained sludge in the DHS reactor increased drastically from the inlet towards to the outlet, from -0.7‰ to 10.3‰. This phenomenon may be attributed to nitrogen conversion processes (i.e. nitrification and denitrification). The δ¹⁵N of oligochaetes also increased from the inlet to the outlet, which corresponded well to that of the retained sludge. Thus, the δ¹⁵N of the oligochaetes might simply mirror the δ¹⁵N of the retained sludge. On the other hand, the δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N of sympatric fly larvae differed from those of the oligochaetes sampled, indicating dietary differences between the taxa. Therefore δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N reflected both treatment and dietary characteristics. We concluded that δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N values are potentially useful as alternative indicators for investigating microbial ecosystems and treatment characteristics of biological wastewater treatment systems. PMID:25462745

  9. Clostridium difficile Is an Autotrophic Bacterial Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Köpke, Michael; Straub, Melanie; Dürre, Peter

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, Clostridium difficile infection showed a dramatic increase in incidence and virulence in the Northern hemisphere. This incessantly challenging disease is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated and nosocomial infectious diarrhea and became life-threatening especially among elderly people. It is generally assumed that all human bacterial pathogens are heterotrophic organisms, being either saccharolytic or proteolytic. So far, this has not been questioned as colonization of the human gut gives access to an environment, rich in organic nutrients. Here, we present data that C. difficile (both clinical and rumen isolates) is also able to grow on CO2+H2 as sole carbon and energy source, thus representing the first identified autotrophic bacterial pathogen. Comparison of several different strains revealed high conservation of genes for autotrophic growth and showed that the ability to use gas mixtures for growth decreases or is lost upon prolonged culturing under heterotrophic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of C. difficile (heterotrophic growth on various substrates as well as autotrophy) could allow the organism in the gut to avoid competition by niche differentiation and contribute to its survival when stressed or in unfavorable conditions that cause death to other bacteria. This may be an important trait for the pathogenicity of C. difficile. PMID:23626782

  10. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of pelagic zooplankton elucidate ecohydrographic features in the oligotrophic Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürten, Benjamin; Al-Aidaroos, Ali M.; Kürten, Saskia; El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M.; Devassy, Reny P.; Struck, Ulrich; Zarokanellos, Nikolaos; Jones, Burton H.; Hansen, Thomas; Bruss, Gerd; Sommer, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Although zooplankton occupy key roles in aquatic biogeochemical cycles, little is known about the pelagic food web and trophodynamics of zooplankton in the Red Sea. Natural abundance stable isotope analysis (SIA) of carbon (δ13C) and N (δ15N) is one approach to elucidating pelagic food web structures and diet assimilation. Integrating the combined effects of ecological processes and hydrography, ecohydrographic features often translate into geographic patterns in δ13C and δ15N values at the base of food webs. This is due, for example, to divergent 15N abundances in source end-members (deep water sources: high δ15N, diazotrophs: low δ15N). Such patterns in the spatial distributions of stable isotope values were coined isoscapes. Empirical data of atmospheric, oceanographic, and biological processes, which drive the ecohydrographic gradients of the oligotrophic Red Sea, are under-explored and some rather anticipated than proven. Specifically, five processes underpin Red Sea gradients: (a) monsoon-related intrusions of nutrient-rich Indian Ocean water; (b) basin scale thermohaline circulation; (c) mesoscale eddy activity that causes up-welling of deep water nutrients into the upper layer; (d) the biological fixation of atmospheric nitrogen (N2) by diazotrophs; and (e) the deposition of dust and aerosol-derived N. This study assessed relationships between environmental samples (nutrients, chlorophyll a), oceanographic data (temperature, salinity, current velocity [ADCP]), particulate organic matter (POM), and net-phytoplankton, with the δ13C and δ15N values of zooplankton collected in spring 2012 from 16°28‧ to 26°57‧N along the central axis of the Red Sea. The δ15N of bulk POM and most zooplankton taxa increased from North (Duba) to South (Farasan). The potential contribution of deep water nutrient-fueled phytoplankton, POM, and diazotrophs varied among sites. Estimates suggested higher diazotroph contributions in the North, a greater contribution of

  11. Stable nitrogen isotope ratios and accumulation of PCDD/F and PCB in Baltic aquatic food chains

    SciTech Connect

    Broman, D.; Naef, C.; Rolff, C.; Zebuehr, Y.

    1994-12-31

    Ratios of naturally occurring stable isotopes of nitrogen ({delta}{sup 15}N) can be used to numerically classify trophic levels of organisms in food chains. By combining analyses results of PCDD/Fs and non-ortho PCBs the biomagnification of these substances can be quantitatively estimated. The two Baltic food chains studied were one pelagic (phytoplankton -- settling particulate matter (SPM) -- zooplankton -- mysids -- herring -- cod) and one littoral (phytoplankton -- SPM -- blue mussel -- eider duck). The {delta}{sup 15}N-data gave food chain descriptions qualitatively consistent with previous conceptions of trophic arrangements in the food chains. Phytoplankton showed the lowest average {delta}{sup 15}N-value and the juvenile eider duck and the cod showed the highest average {delta}{sup 15}N-values for the littoral and pelagic food chains, respectively. The PCDD/Fs and PCBs concentrations were plotted versus the {delta}{sup 15}N-values for the different trophic levels and an exponential model of the form e{sup (A + B*{delta}N)} was fitted to the data. The estimates of the constant B in the model allows for an estimation of a biomagnification power (B) of different singular, or groups of, contaminants. A B-value around zero indicates that a substance is flowing through the food chain without being magnified, whereas a value > 0 indicates that a substance is biomagnified. Negative B-values indicate that a substance is not taken up or is metabolized. The A-term of the expression is only a scaling factor depending on the background level of the contaminant.

  12. Tracking sources of unsaturated zone and groundwater nitrate contamination using nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopes at the Hanford site, Washington.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Michael J; Woods, Katharine N; Conrad, Mark E; Depaolo, Donald J; Dresel, P Evan

    2005-05-15

    The nitrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of nitrate in pore water extracts from unsaturated zone (UZ) core samples and groundwater samples indicate at least four potential sources of nitrate in groundwaters at the U.S. DOE Hanford Site in south-central Washington. Natural sources of nitrate identified include microbially produced nitrate from the soil column (delta15N of 4 - 8 per thousand, delta18O of -9 to 2 per thousand) and nitrate in buried caliche layers (delta15N of 0-8 per thousand, delta 18O of -6to 42 per thousand). Isotopically distinctindustrial sources of nitrate include nitric acid in low-level disposal waters (delta15N approximately per thousand, delta 18O approximately 23%o) per thousandnd co-contaminant nitrate in high-level radioactive waste from plutonium processing (6'5delta1of 8-33 % o, per thousand18delta oO -9 to 7%0). per thousandThe isotopic compositions of nitrate from 97 groundwater wells with concentrations up to 1290 mg/L NO3- have been analyzed. Stable isotope analyses from this study site, which has natural and industrial nitrate sources, provide a tool to distinguish nitrate sources in an unconfined aquiferwhere concentrations alone do not. These data indicate that the most common sources of high nitrate concentrations in groundwater at Hanford are nitric acid and natural nitrate flushed out of the UZ during disposal of low-level wastewater. Nitrate associated with high-level radioactive UZ contamination does not appear to be a major source of groundwater nitrate at this time. PMID:15952359

  13. Trophic structure of mesopelagic fishes in the western Mediterranean based on stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valls, M.; Olivar, M. P.; Fernández de Puelles, M. L.; Molí, B.; Bernal, A.; Sweeting, C. J.

    2014-10-01

    Mesopelagic fishes play an important role in the transfer of organic material in the photic zone to depth although the trophodynamic partitioning amongst co-existing and presumably competing species is unclear. This study employs combined carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analyses (δ13C and δ15N) of the 18 most abundant western Mediterranean mesopelagic fishes to explore niche partitioning in this group. Sampling was conducted along the water column from the shelf and slope grounds of the Balearic Islands in two contrasting periods (late autumn and summer). Trophodynamics were explored at assemblage level and at inter- and intra-species resolutions respectively using Bayesian diet mixing models and size specific behaviour respectively. Seasonal δ13C differences in near basal particulate organic matter (POM) and zooplankton fractions were almost directly replicated in higher fauna suggesting strong isotopic coupling between mesopelagic fishes and planktonic production. Despite reliance on similar basal production, species were segregated by trophic position with a graduation from 2.9 for the small Gonostomatidae Cyclothone braueri to 4.0 for the Myctophidae Lobianchia dofleini. Mixing model data reflected basic trophic position estimates with higher contributions of small fish and zooplankton/POM in higher and lower trophic level species respectively. Species could be categorized as showing preference for i) mesozooplankton/POM as for C. braueri, (in the lower TrL), ii) euphausiids and fish prey as for L. dofleini and the near bottom Lampanyctus crocodilus (in the upper TrL) and iii) mesozooplankton/euphausiids as Ceratoscopelus maderensis, Lampanyctus pusillus or the migrating L. crocodilus. There was little evidence of size based inter-population trophodynamics, with size-isotope trends explained by co-varying lipid content.

  14. Examination of the bioaccumulation of halogenated dimethyl bipyrroles in an Arctic marine food web using stable nitrogen isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Tittlemier, Sheryl A; Fisk, Aaron T; Hobson, Keith A; Norstrom, Ross J

    2002-01-01

    Concentrations of four possibly naturally produced organohalogens--1,1'-dimethyl-3,3',4-tribromo-4,5,5'-trichloro-2,2'-bipyrrole (DBP-Br3Cl3), 1,1'-dimethyl-3,3',4,4'-tetrabromo-5,5'-dichloro-2,2'-bipyrrole (DBP-Br4Cl2), 1,1'-dimethyl-3,3',4,4',5-pentabromo-5'-chloro-2,2'-bipyrrole (DBP-Br5Cl) and 1,1'-dimethyl-3,3',4,4',5,5'-hexabromo-2,2'-bipyrrole (DBP-Br6)--were quantitated and the extent of their magnification through an entire Arctic marine food web [measured as integrated trophic magnification factors (TMFs)] were calculated. The food web consisted of three zooplankton species (Calanus hyperboreus, Mysis oculata, and Sagitta sp.), one fish species [Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida)], four seabird species [dovekie (Alle alle), black guillemot (Cepphus grylle), black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla), and glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus)], and one marine mammal species [ringed seal (Phoca hispida)]. Trophic levels in the food web were calculated from ratios of stable isotopes of nitrogen (15N/14N). All halogenated dimethyl bipyrrole (HDBP) congeners were found to significantly (P<0.02) biomagnify, or increase in concentration with trophic level in the invertebrate--fish--seabird food web. DBP-Br4Cl2 (TMF= 14.6) was found to biomagnify to a greater extent than DBP-Br3Cl3 (TMF = 5.2), DBP-Br5Cl (TMF = 6.9), or DBP-Br6 (TMF = 7.0), even though the Kow of DBP-Br4CI2 was predicted to be lower than those of DBP-Br5Cl and DBP-Br6. None of the four HDBP congeners in ringed seals followed the general trend of increasing concentration with trophic level, which was possibly due to an ability of the seals to metabolize HDBPs. PMID:11808557

  15. Engineering the Autotroph Methanococcus maripaludis for Geraniol Production.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Zhe; Jain, Rachit; Smith, Peyton; Fetchko, Travis; Yan, Yajun; Whitman, William B

    2016-07-15

    The rapid autotrophic growth of the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis on H2 and CO2 makes it an attractive microbial chassis to inexpensively produce biochemicals. To explore this potential, a synthetic gene encoding geraniol synthase (GES) derived from Ocimum basilicum was cloned into a M. maripaludis expression vector under selection for puromycin resistance. Recombinant expression of GES in M. maripaludis during autotrophic growth on H2/CO2 or formate yielded geraniol at 2.8 and 4.0 mg g(-1) of dry weight, respectively. The yield of geraniol decreased 2-3-fold when organic carbon sources were added to stimulate heterotrophic growth. In the absence of puromycin, geraniol production during autotrophic growth on formate increased to 4.6 mg g(-1) of dry weight. A conceptual model centered on the autotrophic acetyl coenzyme A biosynthetic pathway identified strategies to divert more autotrophic carbon flux to geraniol production. PMID:26886063

  16. Dynamics of Autotrophic Marine Planktonic Thaumarchaeota in the East China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Anyi; Yang, Zao; Yu, Chang-Ping; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitous and abundant distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota in marine environments is now well documented, and their crucial role in the global nitrogen cycle has been highlighted. However, the potential contribution of Thaumarchaeota in the carbon cycle remains poorly understood. Here we present for the first time a seasonal investigation on the shelf region (bathymetry≤200 m) of the East China Sea (ECS) involving analysis of both thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA and autotrophy-related genes (acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene, accA). Quantitative PCR results clearly showed a higher abundance of thaumarchaeal 16S and accA genes in late-autumn (November) than summer (August), whereas the diversity and community structure of autotrophic Thaumarchaeota showed no statistically significant difference between different seasons as revealed by thaumarchaeal accA gene clone libraries. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that shallow ecotypes dominated the autotrophic Thaumarchaeota in the ECS shelf (86.3% of total sequences), while a novel non-marine thaumarchaeal accA lineage was identified in the Changjiang estuary in summer (when freshwater plumes become larger) but not in autumn, implying that Changjiang freshwater discharge played a certain role in transporting terrestrial microorganisms to the ECS. Multivariate statistical analysis indicated that the biogeography of the autotrophic Thaumarchaeota in the shelf water of the ECS was influenced by complex hydrographic conditions. However, an in silico comparative analysis suggested that the diversity and abundance of the autotrophic Thaumarchaeota might be biased by the ‘universal’ thaumarchaeal accA gene primers Cren529F/Cren981R since this primer set is likely to miss some members within particular phylogenetic groups. Collectively, this study improved our understanding of the biogeographic patterns of the autotrophic Thaumarchaeota in temperate coastal waters, and suggested that new accA primers with improved

  17. Phosphorus removal in a sulfur-limestone autotrophic denitrification (SLAD) biofilter.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruihua; Yuan, Yulin; Zhan, Xinmin; Liu, Bo

    2014-01-01

    The sulfur-limestone autotrophic denitrification (SLAD) biofilter was able to remove phosphorous from wastewater during autotrophic denitrification. Parameters influencing autotrophic denitrification in the SLAD biofilter, such as hydraulic retention time (HRT), influent nitrate (NO3(-)), and influent PO4(3-) concentrations, had significant effects on P removal. P removal was well correlated with total oxidized nitrogen (TON) removed in the SLAD biofilter; the more TON removed, the more efficient P removal was achieved. When treating the synthetic wastewater containing NO3(-)-N of 30 mg L(-1) and PO4(3-)-P of 15 mg L(-1), the SLAD biofilter removed phosphorus of 45% when the HRT was 6 h, in addition with TN removal of nearly 100%. The optimal phosphorus removal in the SLAD biofilter was around 60%. For the synthetic wastewater containing a PO4(3-)-P concentration of 15 mg L(-1), the main mechanism of phosphorus removal was the formation of calcium phosphate precipitates. PMID:23846955

  18. [Densification of autotrophic bacteria sludge and its characteristics for wastewater treatment].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-hua; Guo, Qiang; Wu, Jie; Zhang, Ting; Tan, Zhou-quan; Liu, Fang; Wang, Xiao-chang

    2010-03-01

    Autotrophic granular sludge was developed in an SBR reactor using inorganic carbonal substrate. The variation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) during the densification process and their effects on granulation have been evaluated. It was found that the autotrophic bacteria granular sludge was compact with the density reached up to 1.06 g/mL, and the rod-like bacteria predominated in granules on the evidence of scanning electron microscopic (SEM) results. Ammonia, nitrite and nitrate in the effluent were 4.5-15.2 mg/L, 10.2-20.3 mg/L and 17.9-30.1 mg/L, respectively, and the ammonia removal efficiency was 78% -92%. By evaluating the profile of various types of nitrogen and their conversion rates, it was found that short settling time was the main factor that enriched the AOB at the beginning of this experiment, and the granulation did not correlate with AOB. On the contrary, nitrification rate well correlated with granulation, and evidence demonstrated that the formation of granulation was in favorate of immoblization of NOB and the metabolite of NOB stabilized granules, therefore granules and NOB mutually enhanced. Additionally, it was found that the autotrophic denitrification was gradually increased with the process of granulation. PMID:20358836

  19. Autotrophic denitrification of nitrate and nitrite using thiosulfate as an electron donor.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jinwook; Amin, Khurram; Kim, Seungjin; Yoon, Seungjoon; Kwon, Kiwook; Bae, Wookeun

    2014-07-01

    This study was carried out to determine the possibility of autotrophic denitritation using thiosulfate as an electron donor, compare the kinetics of autotrophic denitrification and denitritation, and to study the effects of pH and sulfur/nitrogen (S/N) ratio on the denitrification rate of nitrite. Both nitrate and nitrite were removed by autotrophic denitrification using thiosulfate as an electron donor at concentrations up to 800 mg-N/L. Denitrification required a S/N ratio of 5.1 for complete denitrification, but denitritation was complete at a S/N ratio of 2.5, which indicated an electron donor cost savings of 50%. Also, pH during denitrification decreased but increased with nitrite, implying additional alkalinity savings. Finally, the highest specific substrate utilization rate of nitrite was slightly higher than that of nitrate reduction, and biomass yield for denitrification was relatively higher than that of denitritation, showing less sludge production and resulting in lower sludge handling costs. PMID:24755301

  20. The abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in activated sludge under autotrophic domestication.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Ma, Chao; Sun, Shifang; Xie, Hui; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Jun; Song, Cunjiang

    2013-04-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) play a key role in nitrogen-removal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) as they can transform ammonia into nitrite. AOB can be enriched in activated sludge through autotrophic domestication although they are difficult to be isolated. In this study, autotrophic domestication was carried out in a lab-scale sequencing-batch-reactor (SBR) system with two activated sludge samples. The ammonia removal capacity of the sludge samples increased during the domestication, and pH exhibited a negative correlation with the ammonia removal amount, which indicated that it was one important factor of microbial ammonia oxidation. The count of AOB, measured by the most probable number (MPN) method, increased significantly during autotrophic domestication as ammonia oxidation efficiency was enhanced. We investigated the changes in the community structure of AOB before and after domestication by amoA clone library and T-RFLP profile. It showed that AOB had been successfully enriched and the community structure significantly shifted during the domestication. Two groups of AOB were found in sludge samples: Nitrosomonas-like group remained predominant all the time and Nitrosospira-like group changed obviously. Simultaneously, the total heterotrophic bacteria were investigated by MPN and Biolog assay. The metabolic diversity of heterotrophs had changed minutely, although the count of them decreased significantly and lost superiority of microbial communities in the sludge. PMID:24620598

  1. Thermally stable oxygen and nitrogen implant isolation of C-doped Al{sub 0.35}Ga{sub 0.65}As

    SciTech Connect

    Zolper, J.C.; Sherwin, M.E.; Baca, A.G.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    Oxygen and nitrogen ion implantation have been applied to C-doped Al{sub 0.35}Ga{sub 0.65}As layers to produce high resistivity regions ({rho}{sub s} {ge} l {times} 10{sup 10} {Omega}/{open_square} that are stable after annealing at 900C. A dose threshold for stable compensation for both O and N ions was found above 8 {times} 10{sup l3} cm{sup {minus}2} for samples doped at 2 {times} 10{sup l8} cm{sup {minus}3}. Although O implantation has been reported to form stable compensation in Si-doped and Be-doped AlGaAs, the ability of nitrogen implantation to produce thermally stable compensation has not been previously reported and may be due to a C-N complex. The existence of this C-N complex is supported by results for O- and N-implants into C-doped GaAs where N formed thermally stable compensation but O did not. Sheet resistance data versus anneal temperature and estimates of the depth of the defect levels are reported. This result will have application to hetcrojunction bipolar transistors and complementary heterostructure field effect transistor technologies that employ C-doped AlGaAs or GaAs layers along with high temperature post-isolation processing.

  2. Apparatus and method for controlling autotroph cultivation

    SciTech Connect

    Fuxman, Adrian M; Tixier, Sebastien; Stewart, Gregory E; Haran, Frank M; Backstrom, Johan U; Gerbrandt, Kelsey

    2013-07-02

    A method includes receiving at least one measurement of a dissolved carbon dioxide concentration of a mixture of fluid containing an autotrophic organism. The method also includes determining an adjustment to one or more manipulated variables using the at least one measurement. The method further includes generating one or more signals to modify the one or more manipulated variables based on the determined adjustment. The one or more manipulated variables could include a carbon dioxide flow rate, an air flow rate, a water temperature, and an agitation level for the mixture. At least one model relates the dissolved carbon dioxide concentration to one or more manipulated variables, and the adjustment could be determined by using the at least one model to drive the dissolved carbon dioxide concentration to at least one target that optimize a goal function. The goal function could be to optimize biomass growth rate, nutrient removal and/or lipid production.

  3. From the landscape to the continent: Gaining insight into the sources and fate of atmospheric reactive nitrogen emissions using stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, E. M.

    2011-12-01

    National wet and dry deposition monitoring networks are the foundation for our understanding of atmospheric nitrogen deposition to landscapes. Thus deposition monitored at these sites frequently serves as key inputs to watershed nitrogen budgets. However, siting requirements for wet and dry monitoring sites generally preclude monitoring near emission and deposition hotspots, such as roads and urban areas. Further, isotopic analysis of nitrate deposition from the Northeastern U.S. indicates that industrial point sources of NOx dominate nitrate deposition reaching these sites. This evidence demonstrates the need to more thoroughly consider spatial distributions of reactive N emission sources and their fate in the environment. Here, in highlights from several ongoing studies, we explore how stable isotopes of reactive nitrogen can be used to document fluxes and fates of atmospheric emissions of reactive nitrogen from both natural and anthropogenic sources. In studies spanning spatial scales ranging from a near-road landscape, to a cityscape, to the continent, we illustrate how reactive nitrogen isotope chemistry is a strong complement to traditional monitoring studies and remote sensing of atmospheric chemistry. Together, the results from these studies indicate that: 1) we are underestimating the total load of atmospheric N deposited to landscapes; 2) this load is not uniform in pattern, but disproportionately concentrated near highways, urban, and agricultural areas; and 3) the implications of this spatial distribution need to be considered as a factor influencing management of surface water quality, air quality, and ecosystem and human health.

  4. The Stable Level of Glutamine synthetase 2 Plays an Important Role in Rice Growth and in Carbon-Nitrogen Metabolic Balance

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Aili; Zhao, Zhuqing; Ding, Guangda; Shi, Lei; Xu, Fangsen; Cai, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase 2 (GS2) is a key enzyme involved in the ammonium metabolism in plant leaves. In our previous study, we obtained GS2-cosuppressed plants, which displayed a normal growth phenotype at the seedling stage, while at the tillering stage they showed a chlorosis phenotype. In this study, to investigate the chlorosis mechanism, we systematically analyzed the plant growth, carbon-nitrogen metabolism and gene expressions between the GS2-cosuppressed rice and wild-type plants. The results revealed that the GS2-cosuppressed plants exhibited a poor plant growth phenotype and a poor nitrogen transport ability, which led to nitrogen accumulation and a decline in the carbon/nitrogen ratio in the stems. Interestingly, there was a higher concentration of soluble proteins and a lower concentration of carbohydrates in the GS2-cosuppressed plants at the seedling stage, while a contrasting result was displayed at the tillering stage. The analysis of the metabolic profile showed a significant increase of sugars and organic acids. Additionally, gene expression patterns were different in root and leaf of GS2-cosuppressed plants between the seedling and tillering stage. These results indicated the important role of a stable level of GS2 transcription during normal rice development and the importance of the carbon-nitrogen metabolic balance in rice growth. PMID:26053400

  5. Use of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes to trace the larval striped bass food chain in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Estuary, California, April to September 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rast, Walter; Sutton, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    To assess one potential cause for the decline of the striped bass fishery in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Estuary, stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios were used to examine the trophic structures of the larval striped bass food chain, and to trace the flux of these elements through the food chain components. Study results generally confirm a food chain consisting of the elements, phytoplankton/detritus-->zooplankton/Neomysis shrimp-->larval striped bass. The stable isotope ratios generally become more positive as one progresses from the lower to the higher trophic level food chain components, and no unusual trophic structure was found in the food chain. However, the data indicate an unidentified consumer organism occupying an intermediate position between the lower and higher trophic levels of the larval striped bass food chain. Based on expected trophic interactions, this unidentified consumer would have a stable carbon isotope ratio of about 28/mil and a stable nitrogen isotope ratio of about 8/mi. Three possible feeding stages for larval striped bass also were identified, based on their lengths. The smallest length fish seem to subsist on their yolk sac remnants, and the largest length fish subsist on Neomysis shrimp and zooplankton. The intermediate-length fish represent a transition stage between primary food sources and/or use of a mixture of food sources. (USGS)

  6. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope variation in the northern lampfish and Neocalanus, marine survival rates of pink salmon, and meso-scale eddies in the Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, Thomas C., Jr.

    2010-10-01

    Northern lampfish (NLF), Stenobrachius leucopsarus (Myctophidae), the dominant pelagic fish taxon of the subarctic North Pacific Ocean, were sampled opportunistically in MOCNESS tows made on continental slope waters of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) as well as in deep areas of Prince William Sound (PWS) during 1997-2006. The overall mean whole-body lipid-corrected stable carbon isotope value of NLF from the GOA was -21.4 (SD = 0.7) whereas that from PWS was -19.5 (SD = 0.9). This pattern is similar to that observed for late feeding stage Neocalanus cristatus copepods thus confirming a mean cross-shelf carbon stable isotope gradient. As well, there was a statistically significant positive correlation between the considerable temporal variation in the monthly mean carbon stable isotope composition of GOA Neocalanus and GOA NLF ( r = 0.69, P < 0.001). In contrast, NLF nitrogen stable isotope values were bi-modal with most data fitting the upper mode value of ∼+11.5. NLF nitrogen stable isotope values are a better indicator of trophic level or food chain length whereas carbon stable isotopes reflect organic carbon production. The carbon stable isotope values of NLF, measured in May, were positively correlated to marine survival rate of PWS hatchery salmon cohorts entering the marine environment the same year ( r = 0.84, P < 0.001). The carbon stable isotope values for Neocalanus in May were also positively correlated to salmon marine survival ( r = 0.82, P < 0.001). Processes thus manifested through the carbon stable isotope value of biota from the continental slope more closely predicted marine survival rate than that of the salmon themselves. The incipient relationships suggested by the correlations are consistent with the hypothesis that exchange between coastal and oceanic waters in the study area is driven by meso-scale eddies. These eddies facilitate the occurrence of slope phytoplankton blooms as well as drive oceanic zooplankton subsidies into coastal waters. The

  7. Assessment of dissolved nutrients dispersal derived from offshore fish-farm using nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ 15N) in macroalgal bioassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Sanz, T.; Ruiz, J. M.; Pérez, M.; Ruiz, M.

    2011-02-01

    In this study, the dispersal of wastes from offshore fish farms was evaluated by analyzing nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ 15N) in macroalgae incubated in the water column at sites located at an increasing distance from the fish cages. Bioassays were performed at three fish farms situated in separate localities with different nutritional conditions (Canary Islands, Murcia and Catalonia) and varying in size, species of fish reared and annual production. Macroalgal bioassays were carried out in two different directions (DI and DII) and they were replicated at each distance in order to evaluate the effect of small-scale variability on the spatial extent of fish farm wastes. The results obtained with δ 15N contribute to a better understanding of the application of nitrogen stable isotopes ratios in macroalgae as an effective bioindicator for tracing the dispersion of offshore fish farm wastes, and demonstrate that fish farm wastes can be traced even over distances of some km from the pollution source. In the Canary Islands, the maximum distance obtained for detection of fish farm wastes was between 450 and 700 m. Of the three installations studied, Murcia presented the greatest distance for detection of fish farm waste influence, ranging from between 1550 and 2450 m, whilst in Catalonia this distance was less than 120 m. In Catalonia, the results were masked by the influence of other sources of nitrogen, and thus fish farm wastes were detected at more reduced distances than expected. These results confirm that fish farm wastes can be traced using the nitrogen stable isotope ratios of macroalgae and that this method can also be useful for identifying areas of potential risk to some sensitive ecosystems, and as an early signal that changes in the community structure might occur.

  8. Coupled transformation of inorganic stable carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 isotopes into higher trophic levels in a eutrophic shallow lake

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    Enclosure and bag experiments were done in a eutrophic shallow lake with simultaneous use of inorganic /sup 13/C and /sup 15/N isotopes. It was demonstrated that coupled transformation of inorganic carbon and nitrogen can occur into herbivorous zooplankton through phytoplankton. Direct evidence is provided that there is an apparent coupling between photosynthesis and organic nitrogen uptake by phytoplankton during daytime under natural conditions and that the coupling occurs at a constant ratio.

  9. Dose-dependent response of nitrogen stable isotope ratio to proportion of legumes in diet to authenticate lamb meat produced from legume-rich diets.

    PubMed

    Devincenzi, T; Delfosse, O; Andueza, D; Nabinger, C; Prache, S

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the dose-dependent response in lamb meat of stable nitrogen isotope ratio to the dietary proportion of legumes, and the ability of the nitrogen isotope signature of the meat to authenticate meat produced from legume-rich diets. Four groups of nine male Romane lambs grazing a cocksfoot pasture were supplemented with different levels of fresh alfalfa forage to obtain four dietary proportions of alfalfa (0%, 25%, 50% and 75%) for 98 days on average before slaughter (groups L0, L25, L50 and L75). We measured the stable nitrogen isotope ratio in the forages and in the longissimus thoracis muscle. The δ(15)N value of the meat decreased linearly with the dietary proportion of alfalfa. The distribution of the δ(15)N values of the meat discriminated all the L0 lambs from the L75 lambs, and gave a correct classification score of 85.3% comparing lambs that ate alfalfa with those that did not. PMID:24444961

  10. Beyond the Calvin Cycle: Autotrophic Carbon Fixation in the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hügler, Michael; Sievert, Stefan M.

    2011-01-01

    Organisms capable of autotrophic metabolism assimilate inorganic carbon into organic carbon. They form an integral part of ecosystems by making an otherwise unavailable form of carbon available to other organisms, a central component of the global carbon cycle. For many years, the doctrine prevailed that the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle is the only biochemical autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway of significance in the ocean. However, ecological, biochemical, and genomic studies carried out over the last decade have not only elucidated new pathways but also shown that autotrophic carbon fixation via pathways other than the CBB cycle can be significant. This has ramifications for our understanding of the carbon cycle and energy flow in the ocean. Here, we review the recent discoveries in the field of autotrophic carbon fixation, including the biochemistry and evolution of the different pathways, as well as their ecological relevance in various oceanic ecosystems.

  11. An Experiment in Autotrophic Fermentation: Microbial Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sublette, Kerry L.

    1989-01-01

    Described is an experiment which uses an autotrophic bacterium to anaerobically oxidize hydrogen sulfide to sulfate in a batch-stirred tank reactor. Discusses background information, experimental procedure, and sample results of this activity. (CW)

  12. Mannitol in six autotrophic stramenopiles and Micromonas.

    PubMed

    Dittami, Simon M; Aas, Hoai T N; Paulsen, Berit S; Boyen, Catherine; Edvardsen, Bente; Tonon, Thierry

    2011-08-01

    Mannitol plays a central role in brown algal physiology since it represents an important pathway used to store photoassimilate. Several specific enzymes are directly involved in the synthesis and recycling of mannitol, altogether forming the mannitol cycle. The recent analysis of algal genomes has allowed tracing back the origin of this cycle in brown seaweeds to a horizontal gene transfer from bacteria, and furthermore suggested a subsequent transfer to the green microalga Micromonas. Interestingly, genes of the mannitol cycle were not found in any of the currently sequenced diatoms, but were recently discovered in pelagophytes and dictyochophytes. In this study, we quantified the mannitol content in a number of ochrophytes (autotrophic stramenopiles) from different classes, as well as in Micromonas. Our results show that, in accordance with recent observations from EST libraries and genome analyses, this polyol is produced by most ochrophytes, as well as the green alga tested, although it was found at a wide range of concentrations. Thus, the mannitol cycle was probably acquired by a common ancestor of most ochrophytes, possibly after the separation from diatoms, and may play different physiological roles in different classes. PMID:21720212

  13. Biogas desulfurization using autotrophic denitrification process.

    PubMed

    Bayrakdar, Alper; Tilahun, Ebrahim; Calli, Baris

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of an autotrophic denitrification process for desulfurization of biogas produced from a chicken manure digester. A laboratory scale upflow fixed bed reactor (UFBR) was operated for 105 days and fed with sodium sulfide or H2S scrubbed from the biogas and nitrate as electron donor and acceptor, respectively. The S/N ratio (2.5 mol/mol) of the feed solution was kept constant throughout the study. When the UFBR was fed with sodium sulfide solution with an influent pH of 7.7, about 95 % sulfide and 90 % nitrate removal efficiencies were achieved. However, the inlet of the UFBR was clogged several times due to the accumulation of biologically produced elemental sulfur particles and the clogging resulted in operational problems. When the UFBR was fed with the H2S absorbed from the biogas and operated with an influent pH of 8-9, around 98 % sulfide and 97 % nitrate removal efficiencies were obtained. In this way, above 95 % of the H2S in the biogas was removed as elemental sulfur and the reactor effluent was reused as scrubbing liquid without any clogging problem. PMID:26428238

  14. Analysis of biomagnification of persistent organic pollutants in the aquatic food web of the Mekong Delta, South Vietnam using stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes.

    PubMed

    Ikemoto, Tokutaka; Tu, Nguyen Phuc Cam; Watanabe, Michio X; Okuda, Noboru; Omori, Koji; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Tuyen, Bui Cach; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2008-05-01

    The present study elucidated the biomagnification profiles of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) through a tropical aquatic food web of Vietnam based on trophic characterization using stable nitrogen analysis. Various biological samples collected from the main stream of the Mekong Delta were provided for the analysis for both POPs, and stable nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios. Of the POPs analyzed, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs) were the predominant contaminants with concentrations ranging from 0.058 to 12 ng/g wet weight, followed by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at 0.017-8.9 ng/g, chlordane compounds (CHLs) at 0.0043-0.76 ng/g, tris-4-chlorophenyl methane (TCPMe) at N.D.-0.26 ng/g, hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs) at N.D.-0.20 ng/g and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) at 0.0021-0.096 ng/g. Significant positive increases of concentrations in DDTs, CHLs, and TCPMe against the stable nitrogen ratio (delta(15)N) were detected, while, concentrations of HCHs and HCB showed no significant increase. The slopes of the regression equations between the log-transformed concentrations of these POPs and delta(15)N were used as indices of biomagnification. The slopes of the POPs for which positive biomagnification was detected ranged from 0.149 to 0.177 on a wet weight basis. The slopes of DDTs and CHLs were less than those reported for a marine food web of the Arctic Ocean, indicating that less biomagnification had occurred in the tropical food web. Of the isomers of CHLs, unlike the studies of the Arctic Ocean, oxychlordane did not undergo significant biomagnification through the food web of the Mekong Delta. This difference is considered to be due to a lack of marine mammals, which might metabolize cis- and trans-chlordane to oxychlordane, in the Mekong Delta ecosystem. The biomagnification profile of TCPMe is reported for the first time in the present study. PMID:18313720

  15. Novel Transcriptional Regulons for Autotrophic Cycle Genes in Crenarchaeota

    PubMed Central

    Leyn, Semen A.; Rodionova, Irina A.; Li, Xiaoqing

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autotrophic microorganisms are able to utilize carbon dioxide as their only carbon source, or, alternatively, many of them can grow heterotrophically on organics. Different variants of autotrophic pathways have been identified in various lineages of the phylum Crenarchaeota. Aerobic members of the order Sulfolobales utilize the hydroxypropionate-hydroxybutyrate cycle (HHC) to fix inorganic carbon, whereas anaerobic Thermoproteales use the dicarboxylate-hydroxybutyrate cycle (DHC). Knowledge of transcriptional regulation of autotrophic pathways in Archaea is limited. We applied a comparative genomics approach to predict novel autotrophic regulons in the Crenarchaeota. We report identification of two novel DNA motifs associated with the autotrophic pathway genes in the Sulfolobales (HHC box) and Thermoproteales (DHC box). Based on genome context evidence, the HHC box regulon was attributed to a novel transcription factor from the TrmB family named HhcR. Orthologs of HhcR are present in all Sulfolobales genomes but were not found in other lineages. A predicted HHC box regulatory motif was confirmed by in vitro binding assays with the recombinant HhcR protein from Metallosphaera yellowstonensis. For the DHC box regulon, we assigned a different potential regulator, named DhcR, which is restricted to the order Thermoproteales. DhcR in Thermoproteus neutrophilus (Tneu_0751) was previously identified as a DNA-binding protein with high affinity for the promoter regions of two autotrophic operons. The global HhcR and DhcR regulons reconstructed by comparative genomics were reconciled with available omics data in Metallosphaera and Thermoproteus spp. The identified regulons constitute two novel mechanisms for transcriptional control of autotrophic pathways in the Crenarchaeota. IMPORTANCE Little is known about transcriptional regulation of carbon dioxide fixation pathways in Archaea. We previously applied the comparative genomics approach for reconstruction of Dtx

  16. Quantifying seasonal shifts in nitrogen sources to Oregon estuaries using a transport model combined with stable isotopes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying the sources of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) in estuaries is complicated by the multiple sources, temporal variability in inputs, and variations in transport. We used a hydrodynamic model to simulate the transport and uptake of three sources of DIN (oceanic, riv...

  17. Tracking sources of unsaturated zone and groundwater nitrate contamination using nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopes at the Hanford Site, WA.

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, Michael J.; Woods, Katharine N.; Conrad, Mark E.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Dresel, P Evan

    2005-04-15

    The nitrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of nitrate in pore water extracts from unsaturated zone core samples and groundwater samples indicate at least four potential sources of nitrate plumes in groundwaters at the USDOE Hanford Site in south-central Washington.

  18. SPATIAL AND TEMPROAL RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN TOTAL NITROGEN AND PALNKTONIC CHLOROPHYLL IN LONG ISLAND SOUND: HOW STABLE ARE THEY?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our purpose is to examine seasonal and year-to-year variability of relationships between concentrations of total nitrogen and chlorophyll in the water column of an estuary. Understanding this variability gives guidance to those developing methods to assess risk of eutrophication ...

  19. Carbon and nitrogen gain during the growth of orchid seedlings in nature.

    PubMed

    Stöckel, Marcus; Těšitelová, Tamara; Jersáková, Jana; Bidartondo, Martin I; Gebauer, Gerhard

    2014-04-01

    For germination and establishment, orchids depend on carbon (C) and nutrients supplied by mycorrhizal fungi. As adults, the majority of orchids then appear to become autotrophic. To compare the proportional C and nitrogen (N) gain from fungi in mycoheterotrophic seedlings and in adults, here we examined in the field C and N stable isotope compositions in seedlings and adults of orchids associated with ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi. Using a new highly sensitive approach, we measured the isotope compositions of seedlings and adults of four orchid species belonging to different functional groups: fully and partially mycoheterotrophic orchids associated with narrow or broad sets of ectomycorrhizal fungi, and two adult putatively autotrophic orchids associated exclusively with saprotrophic fungi. Seedlings of orchids associated with ectomycorrhizal fungi were enriched in (13) C and (15) N similarly to fully mycoheterotrophic adults. Seedlings of saprotroph-associated orchids were also enriched in (13) C and (15) N, but unexpectedly their enrichment was significantly lower, making them hardly distinguishable from their respective adult stages and neighbouring autotrophic plants. We conclude that partial mycoheterotrophy among saprotroph-associated orchids cannot be identified unequivocally based on C and N isotope compositions alone. Thus, partial mycoheterotrophy may be much more widely distributed among orchids than hitherto assumed. PMID:24444001

  20. Interannual variability in seagrass carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes from the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourqurean, J. W.; Fourqurean, J. W.; Anderson, W. T.; Anderson, W. T.

    2001-12-01

    The shallow marine waters surrounding the southern tip of Florida provide an ideal environment for seagrasses, which are the most common benthic community in the region. Yet, these communities are susceptible to a variety of anthropogenic disturbances, especially changes in water quality caused by an increase the nutrient flux to the near shore environment. In order to better understand the carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratio in marine plants, an extensive times series analysis was constructed from quarterly sampling of Thalassia testudinum (the dominate species in the study area) from 1996 through 1998. Sites for study where selected from permanent stations within the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS), from both sides of the Florida Keys - two stations on the bay side and two stations on the reef side. These data will also help to constrain elements of the carbon and nitrogen cycles affecting this region. The data analyzed over the three year study period show unique cyclic trends associated with seasonal changes in primary productivity and potentially changes in the nitrogen and carbon pools. Additionally, the analysis of our time series indicates that isotope food web studies need to take into account spatial and temporal changes when evaluating trophic levels. The mean carbon and nitrogen isotope values of T. testudinum from all 4 stations vary respectively from -7.2 per mil to -10.41 and 1.1 per mil to 2.2 per mil (n = 48). However, certain stations displayed anonymously depleted nitrogen isotope values, values as low as -1.2 per mil. These values potentially indicated that biogeochmical processes like N fixation, ammonification and denitrification cause regional pattern in the isotopic composition of the source DIN. Both carbon and nitrogen isotopes displayed seasonal enrichment-depletion trends, with maximum enrichment occurring during the summer. The overall seasonal variation for carbon 13 from the different stations ranged from 1 per mil to

  1. Identifying nitrogen sources to thermal tide pools in Kapoho, Hawai'i, U.S.A, using a multi-stable isotope approach.

    PubMed

    Wiegner, Tracy N; Mokiao-Lee, Ambyr U; Johnson, Erik E

    2016-02-15

    Nitrogen (N) enrichment often results in coastal eutrophication, even in remote areas like Hawai'i. Therefore, determining N sources to coastal waters is important for their management. This study identified N sources to tide pools in Kapoho, Hawai'i, and determined their relative importance using three stable isotopes (δ(15)N, δ(18)O, δ(11)B). Surface waters and macroalgal tissues were collected along 100-m onshore-offshore transects in areas of high groundwater input for three months at low tide. Water samples from possible N sources were also collected. Mixing model output, along with macroalgal δ(15)N values, indicated that agriculture soil (34%) was the largest anthropogenic N source followed by sewage (27%). These findings suggest that more effective fertilizer application techniques and upgrading sewage treatment systems can minimize N leaching into groundwater. Overall, our multi-stable isotope approach for identifying N sources was successful and may be useful in other coastal waters. PMID:26769108

  2. Establishment of trophic continuum in the food web of the Yellow Sea and East China Sea ecosystem: insight from carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Cai, Deling; Li, Hongyan; Tang, Qisheng; Sun, Yao

    2005-12-01

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (delta (13)C and delta (15)N) are used to study the trophic structure of food web in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea ecosystem. The trophic continuum of pelagic food web from phytoplankton to top preyer was elementarily established, and a trophic structure diagram in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea was outlined in combination with carbon isotopic data of benthic organisms, which is basically consistent with and makes some improvements on the simplified Yellow Sea food web and the trophic structure diagram drawn based on the biomass of main resource population during 1985-1986. This result indicates that the stable isotope method is a potential useful means for further studying the complete marine food web trophic continuum from viruses to top predators and food web stability. PMID:16483132

  3. Growth rate, organic carbon and nutrient removal rates of Chlorella sorokiniana in autotrophic, heterotrophic and mixotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunjin; Park, Jeong-eun; Cho, Yong-Beom; Hwang, Sun-Jin

    2013-09-01

    This study sought to investigate the growth rate and organic carbon and nutrient removal efficiency of Chlorella sorokiniana under autotrophic, heterotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. Growth rates of the microalgae were 0.24 d(-1), 0.53 d(-1) and 0.44 d(-1) in autotrophic, heterotrophic and mixotrophic conditions, respectively. The growth rate of C. sorokiniana was significantly higher for that grown under heterotrophic conditions. The nitrogen removal rates were 13.1 mg-N/L/day, 23.9 mg-N/L/day and 19.4 mg-N/L/day, respectively. The phosphorus removal rates reached to 3.4 mg-P/L/day, 5.6 mg-P/L/day and 5.1 mg-P/L/day, respectively. Heterotrophic conditions were superior in terms of the microalgae growth and removal of nitrogen and phosphorus compared to autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions, suggesting that microalgae cultured under this condition would be most useful for application in wastewater treatment systems. PMID:23850820

  4. Characterization and kinetics of sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification in batch reactors containing suspended and immobilized cells.

    PubMed

    Moraes, B S; Souza, T S O; Foresti, E

    2011-01-01

    Sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification is an advantageous alternative over heterotrophic denitrification, and may have potential for nitrogen removal of low-strength wastewaters, such as anaerobically pre-treated domestic sewage. This study evaluated the fundamentals and kinetics of this process in batch reactors containing suspended and immobilized cells. Batch tests were performed for different NOx-/S2- ratios and using nitrate and nitrite as electron acceptors. Autotrophic denitrification was observed for both electron acceptors, and NOx-/S2- ratios defined whether sulfide oxidation was complete or not. Kinetic parameter values obtained for nitrate were higher than for nitrite as electron acceptor. Zero-order models were better adjusted to profiles obtained for suspended cell reactors, whereas first-order models were more adequate for immobilized cell reactors. However, in the latter, mass transfer physical phenomena had a significant effect on kinetics based on biochemical reactions. Results showed that sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification can be successfully established for low-strength wastewaters and have potential for nitrogen removal from anaerobically pre-treated domestic sewage. PMID:22097054

  5. Identification of Nitrogen-Incorporating Bacteria in Petroleum-Contaminated Arctic Soils by Using [15N]DNA-Based Stable Isotope Probing and Pyrosequencing ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Terrence H.; Yergeau, Etienne; Martineau, Christine; Juck, David; Whyte, Lyle G.; Greer, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    Arctic soils are increasingly susceptible to petroleum hydrocarbon contamination, as exploration and exploitation of the Arctic increase. Bioremediation in these soils is challenging due to logistical constraints and because soil temperatures only rise above 0°C for ∼2 months each year. Nitrogen is often added to contaminated soil in situ to stimulate the existing microbial community, but little is known about how the added nutrients are used by these microorganisms. Microbes vary widely in their ability to metabolize petroleum hydrocarbons, so the question becomes: which hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms most effectively use this added nitrogen for growth? Using [15N]DNA-based stable isotope probing, we determined which taxonomic groups most readily incorporated nitrogen from the monoammonium phosphate added to contaminated and uncontaminated soil in Canadian Forces Station-Alert, Nunavut, Canada. Fractions from each sample were amplified with bacterial 16S rRNA and alkane monooxygenase B (alkB) gene-specific primers and then sequenced using lage-scale parallel-pyrosequencing. Sequence data was combined with 16S rRNA and alkB gene C quantitative PCR data to measure the presence of various phylogenetic groups in fractions at different buoyant densities. Several families of Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria that are directly involved in petroleum degradation incorporated the added nitrogen in contaminated soils, but it was the DNA of Sphingomonadaceae that was most enriched in 15N. Bacterial growth in uncontaminated soils was not stimulated by nutrient amendment. Our results suggest that nitrogen uptake efficiency differs between bacterial groups in contaminated soils. A better understanding of how groups of hydrocarbon-degraders contribute to the catabolism of petroleum will facilitate the design of more targeted bioremediation treatments. PMID:21498745

  6. Conbined noble gas and stable isotope constraints on nitrogen gas sources within sedimentary basins. Final report for period 15 March 1996 - 14 March 1999 extended to 14 March 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Ballentine, C.J.; Halliday, Alexander N.; Lollar, B. Sherwood

    2001-05-01

    Nitrogen is one of the major non-hydrocarbon gases found in natural gas reservoirs. The objective of this work was to combine the information available from both noble gas and stable isotope systematics to understand the origin of nitrogen and related gas sources, transport behavior, and mass balance within natural gas reservoirs and sedimentary basin systems. The goals achieved are summarized under the following headings: Noble gas and stable isotopes in nitrogen-rich natural gases; Noble gases in groundwater; and Characterization of magmatic and crustal noble gas input into basin systems. Lists of publications and presentations are included.

  7. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes of well-preserved Middle Pleistocene bone collagen from Schöningen (Germany) and their paleoecological implications.

    PubMed

    Kuitems, Margot; van der Plicht, Johannes; Drucker, Dorothée G; Van Kolfschoten, Thijs; Palstra, Sanne W L; Bocherens, Hervé

    2015-12-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in bone collagen can provide valuable information about the diet and habitat of mammal species. However, bone collagen degrades in normal circumstances very rapidly, and isotope analyses are therefore usually restricted to fossil material with a Late Pleistocene or Holocene age. The Middle Pleistocene site of Schöningen, dated to around 300,000 years ago, yielded bones and teeth with an exceptionally good state of collagen preservation. This allowed us to measure reliable biogenic carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios for different herbivorous taxa from the families Elephantidae, Rhinocerotidae, Equidae, Cervidae, and Bovidae. The results provide insights regarding the paleoenvironmental setting in which Middle Pleistocene hominins operated. The vegetation consumed by the herbivores from the famous spear horizon originates from open environments. During the climatic Reinsdorf Interglacial optimum, the landscape seems to have been relatively open as well, but certainly included parts that were forested. The results also indicate some niche partitioning; different herbivore species used different plant resources. For instance, the horses seem to have been predominantly browsers, while the straight-tusked elephants were feeding chiefly on grass. PMID:25824673

  8. Effects of sample preparation on stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen in marine invertebrates: implications for food web studies using stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Miguel A; Serrano, Oscar; Serrano, Laura; Michener, Robert H

    2008-08-01

    Trophic ecology has benefitted from the use of stable isotopes for the last three decades. However, during the last 10 years, there has been a growing awareness of the isotopic biases associated with some pre-analytical procedures that can seriously hamper the interpretation of food webs. We have assessed the extent of such biases by: (1) reviewing the literature on the topic, and (2) compiling C and N isotopic values of marine invertebrates reported in the literature with the associated sample preparation protocols. The factors considered were: acid-washing, distilled water rinsing (DWR), sample type (whole individuals or pieces of soft tissues), lipid content, and gut contents. Two-level ANOVA revealed overall large and highly significant effects of acidification for both delta(13)C values (up to 0.9 per thousand decrease) and delta(15) N values (up to 2.1 per thousand decrease in whole individual samples, and up to 1.1 per thousand increase in tissue samples). DWR showed a weak overall effect with delta(13)C increments of 0.6 per thousand (for the entire data set) or decrements of 0.7 per thousand in delta(15) N values (for tissue samples). Gut contents showed no overall significant effect, whereas lipid extraction resulted in the greatest biases in both isotopic signatures (delta(13)C, up to -2.0 per thousand in whole individuals; delta(15)N, up to +4.3 per thousand in tissue samples). The study analyzed separately the effects of the various factors in different taxonomic groups and revealed a very high diversity in the extent and direction of the effects. Maxillopoda, Gastropoda, and Polychaeta were the classes that showed the largest isotopic shifts associated with sample preparation. Guidelines for the standardization of sample preparation protocols for isotopic analysis are proposed both for large and small marine invertebrates. Broadly, these guidelines recommend: (1) avoiding both acid washing and DWR, and (2) performing lipid extraction and gut

  9. Autotrophic acetyl coenzyme A biosynthesis in Methanococcus maripaludis.

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, J; Whitman, W B

    1988-01-01

    To detect autotrophic CO2 assimilation in cell extracts of Methanococcus maripaludis, lactate dehydrogenase and NADH were added to convert pyruvate formed from autotrophically synthesized acetyl coenzyme A to lactate. The lactate produced was determined spectrophotometrically. When CO2 fixation was pulled in the direction of lactate synthesis, CO2 reduction to methane was inhibited. Bromoethanesulfonate (BES), a potent inhibitor of methanogenesis, enhanced lactate synthesis, and methyl coenzyme M inhibited it in the absence of BES. Lactate synthesis was dependent on CO2 and H2, but H2 + CO2-independent synthesis was also observed. In cell extracts, the rate of lactate synthesis was about 1.2 nmol min-1 mg of protein-1. When BES was added, the rate of lactate synthesis increased to 2.3 nmol min-1 mg of protein-1. Because acetyl coenzyme A did not stimulate lactate synthesis, pyruvate synthase may have been the limiting activity in these assays. Radiolabel from 14CO2 was incorporated into lactate. The percentages of radiolabel in the C-1, C-2, and C-3 positions of lactate were 73, 33, and 11%, respectively. Both carbon monoxide and formaldehyde stimulated lactate synthesis. 14CH2O was specifically incorporated into the C-3 of lactate, and 14CO was incorporated into the C-1 and C-2 positions. Low concentrations of cyanide also inhibited autotrophic growth, CO dehydrogenase activity, and autotrophic lactate synthesis. These observations are in agreement with the acetogenic pathway of autotrophic CO2 assimilation. PMID:3133359

  10. Ammonium Removal by the Oxygen-Limited Autotrophic Nitrification-Denitrification System

    PubMed Central

    Kuai, Linping; Verstraete, Willy

    1998-01-01

    The present lab-scale research reveals the potential of implementation of an oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification-denitrification (OLAND) system with normal nitrifying sludge as the biocatalyst for the removal of nitrogen from nitrogen-rich wastewater in one step. In a sequential batch reactor, synthetic wastewater containing 1 g of NH4+-N liter−1 and minerals was treated. Oxygen supply to the reactor was double-controlled with a pH controller and a timer. At a volumetric loading rate (Bv) of 0.13 g of NH4+-N liter−1 day−1, about 22% of the fed NH4+-N was converted to NO2−-N or NO3−-N, 38% remained as NH4+-N, and the other 40% was removed mainly as N2. The specific removal rate of nitrogen was on the order of 50 mg of N liter−1 day−1, corresponding to 16 mg of N g of volatile suspended solids−1 day−1. The microorganisms which catalyzed the OLAND process are assumed to be normal nitrifiers dominated by ammonium oxidizers. The loss of nitrogen in the OLAND system is presumed to occur via the oxidation of NH4+ to N2 with NO2− as the electron acceptor. Hydroxylamine stimulated the removal of NH4+ and NO2−. Hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) or an HAO-related enzyme might be responsible for the loss of nitrogen. PMID:9797314

  11. PATTERNS OF NITROGEN AND CARBON STABLE ISOTOPE RATIOS IN MACROFUNGI, PLANTS AND SOILS IN TWO OLD-GROWTH CONIFER FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural abundance stable isotope ratios represent a potentially valuable tool for studying fungal ecology. We measured 15N and 13C in ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic macrofungi from two old-growth conifer forests, and in plants, woody debris, and soils. Fungi, plants, and so...

  12. Use of the Stable Nitrogen Isotope to Reveal the Source-Sink Regulation of Nitrogen Uptake and Remobilization during Grain Filling Phase in Maize.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lan; Guo, Song; Chen, Qinwu; Chen, Fanjun; Yuan, Lixing; Mi, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    Although the remobilization of vegetative nitrogen (N) and post-silking N both contribute to grain N in maize (Zea mays L.), their regulation by grain sink strength is poorly understood. Here we use 15N labeling to analyze the dynamic behaviors of both pre- and post-silking N in relation to source and sink manipulation in maize plants. The results showed that the remobilization of pre-silking N started immediately after silking and the remobilized pre-silking N had a greater contribution to grain N during early grain filling, with post-silking N importance increasing during the later filling stage. The amount of post-silking N uptake was largely driven by post-silking dry matter accumulation in both grain as well as vegetative organs. Prevention of pollination during silking had less effect on post-silking N uptake, as a consequence of compensatory growth of stems, husk + cob and roots. Also, leaves continuously export N even though grain sink was removed. The remobilization efficiency of N in the leaf and stem increased with increasing grain yield (hence N requirement). It is suggested that the remobilization of N in the leaf is controlled by sink strength but not the leaf per se. Enhancing post-silking N uptake rather than N remobilization is more likely to increase grain N accumulation. PMID:27606628

  13. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of ambient aerosols collected from Okinawa Island in the western North Pacific Rim, an outflow region of Asian dusts and pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunwar, Bhagawati; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Zhu, Chunmao

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope ratios were measured for total carbon (TC) and nitrogen (TN), respectively, in aerosol (TSP) samples collected at Cape Hedo, Okinawa, an outflow region of Asian pollutants, during 2009-2010. The averaged δ13C and δ15N ratios are -22.2‰ and +12.5‰, respectively. The δ13C values are similar in both spring (-22.5‰) and winter (-22.5‰), suggesting the similar sources and/or source regions. We found that δ13C from Okinawa aerosols are ca. 2‰ higher than those reported from Chinese megacities probably due to photochemical aging of organic aerosols. A strong correlation (r = 0.81) was found between nss-Ca and TSP, suggesting that springtime aerosols are influenced from Asian dusts. However, carbonates in the Asian dusts were titrated with acidic species such as sulfuric acid and oxalic acid during atmospheric transport although two samples suggested the presence of remaining carbonate. No correlations were found between δ13C and tracer compounds (levoglucosan, elemental carbon, oxalic acid, and Na+). During winter and spring, coal burning is significant source in China. Based on isotopic mass balance, contribution of coal burning origin particles to total aerosol carbon was estimated as ca. 97% in winter, which is probably associated with the high emissions in China. Contribution of NO3- to TN was on average 45% whereas that of NH4+ was 18%. These results suggest that vehicular exhaust is an important source of TN in Okinawa aerosols. Concentration of water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) is higher in summer, suggesting that WSON is more emitted from the ocean in warmer season whereas inorganic nitrogen is more emitted in winter and spring from pollution sources in the Asian continent.

  14. The influence of trophic level and feeding location of the levels of organochlorine contaminants in seabird eggs as revealed by stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hobson, K.; Jarman, W.M.; Bott, J.A.; Bacon, C.E.; Sydeman, W.

    1994-12-31

    Seabird eggs have been used extensively to assay contaminants in marine food webs, but links to trophic level or feeding location have remained poorly understood due to limitations inherent in conventional dietary studies. Stable-isotope analysis of bird eggs may be used to infer trophic position and feeding location of adult seabirds and can be readily correlated with measurements of egg contaminant levels. The authors measured stable-carbon ({delta}{sup 13}C) and nitrogen ({delta}{sup 15}N) isotope abundance, and organochlorine contaminants (DDTs, PCBs, chlordanes, etc.) in eggs from Cassin`s Auklet (Ptychoramphus aleutica), Common Murre (Uria aalge), Pigeon Guillemot (Cepphus columba). Rhinoceros Auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata), Pelagic Cormorant (Phalacrocorax pelagicus), Brandt`s Cormorant (Phalacrocorax penicillatus), and Western Gull (Larus) from Southeast Farallon Island together with rockfish (Sebastes spp.), anchovy (Engraulis spp.), and euphausiid prey from the Gulf of the Farallones. Consistent with its planktivorous diet and pelagic feeding habits, Cassin`s Auklet showed the lowest mean {delta}{sup 15}N value and the least enriched {delta}{sup 13}C values. Measures of trophic level and foraging location were constructed for all other seabirds relative to these isotopic endpoints. Contaminant levels in the eggs and fish will be interpreted in light of the stable-isotope results.

  15. High CO2 subsurface environment enriches for novel microbial lineages capable of autotrophic carbon fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probst, A. J.; Jerett, J.; Castelle, C. J.; Thomas, B. C.; Sharon, I.; Brown, C. T.; Anantharaman, K.; Emerson, J. B.; Hernsdorf, A. W.; Amano, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tringe, S. G.; Woyke, T.; Banfield, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Subsurface environments span the planet but remain little understood from the perspective of the capacity of the resident organisms to fix CO2. Here we investigated the autotrophic capacity of microbial communities in range of a high-CO2 subsurface environments via analysis of 250 near-complete microbial genomes (151 of them from distinct species) that represent the most abundant organisms over a subsurface depth transect. More than one third of the genomes belonged to the so-called candidate phyla radiation (CPR), which have limited metabolic capabilities. Approximately 30% of the community members are autotrophs that comprise 70% of the microbiome with metabolism likely supported by sulfur and nitrogen respiration. Of the carbon fixation pathways, the Calvin Benson Basham Cycle was most common, but the Wood-Ljungdhal pathway was present in the greatest phylogenetic diversity of organisms. Unexpectedly, one organism from a novel phylum sibling to the CPR is predicted to fix carbon by the reverse TCA cycle. The genome of the most abundant organism, an archaeon designated "Candidatus Altiarchaeum hamiconexum", was also found in subsurface samples from other continents including Europe and Asia. The archaeon was proven to be a carbon fixer using a novel reductive acetyl-CoA pathway. These results provide evidence that carbon dioxide is the major carbon source in these environments and suggest that autotrophy in the subsurface represents a substantial carbon dioxide sink affecting the global carbon cycle.

  16. Effect of S/N ratio on sulfide removal by autotrophic denitrification.

    PubMed

    Dolejs, Petr; Paclík, Ladislav; Maca, Josef; Pokorna, Dana; Zabranska, Jana; Bartacek, Jan

    2015-03-01

    In this study a completely stirred tank reactor was used to study the effect of sulfide to nitrate (S/N) ratio on sulfide removal while nitrate was used as electron acceptor. Several S/N ratios were studied for this purpose ranging from 0.3 to 2.4 mol/mol. The complete sulfide removal was achieved when S/N ratio 0.85 mol/mol was used with the autotrophic denitrification efficiency up to 80 %. No nitrite accumulation was observed, and the main product of sulfide oxidation was sulfate. Dissimilatory nitrogen reduction to ammonia occurred and subsequently, elemental sulfur accumulated while S/N ratio was higher than 1.3 mol/mol. The specific autotrophic denitrification rates under S/N ratios 0.8 and 1.2 were 5 and 26 mg g(-1) h(-1) (N-NO3 (-), VSS), respectively. Thiobacillus denitrificans and Thiomicrospira denitrificans were detected in the reactor by fluorescent in situ hybridization, but their overall representation was not more than 5 % of the entire microbial populations. PMID:25698511

  17. Microalgae as part of the autotrophic component of life support systems for future planetary bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sychev, Vladimir; Levinskikh, Margarita

    and the algal-bacterial community will act as a backup. Nonetheless, microalgae will still be functioning within the autotrophic component though their proportion will depend on the amount of nitrogen compounds subjected to utilization in the system.

  18. Stable and null current hysteresis perovskite solar cells based nitrogen doped graphene oxide nanoribbons hole transport layer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongmo; Mat Teridi, Mohd Asri; Mohd Yusoff, Abd. Rashid bin; Jang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells are becoming one of the leading technologies to reduce our dependency on traditional power sources. However, the frequently used component poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) has several shortcomings, such as an easily corroded indium-tin-oxide (ITO) interface at elevated temperatures and induced electrical inhomogeneity. Herein, we propose solution-processed nitrogen-doped graphene oxide nanoribbons (NGONRs) as a hole transport layer (HTL) in perovskite solar cells, replacing the conducting polymer PEDOT:PSS. The conversion efficiency of NGONR-based perovskite solar cells has outperformed a control device constructed using PEDOT:PSS. Moreover, our proposed NGONR-based devices also demonstrate a negligible current hysteresis along with improved stability. This work provides an effective route for substituting PEDOT:PSS as the effective HTL. PMID:27277388

  19. Stable and null current hysteresis perovskite solar cells based nitrogen doped graphene oxide nanoribbons hole transport layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeongmo; Mat Teridi, Mohd Asri; Mohd Yusoff, Abd. Rashid Bin; Jang, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Perovskite solar cells are becoming one of the leading technologies to reduce our dependency on traditional power sources. However, the frequently used component poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) has several shortcomings, such as an easily corroded indium-tin-oxide (ITO) interface at elevated temperatures and induced electrical inhomogeneity. Herein, we propose solution-processed nitrogen-doped graphene oxide nanoribbons (NGONRs) as a hole transport layer (HTL) in perovskite solar cells, replacing the conducting polymer PEDOT:PSS. The conversion efficiency of NGONR-based perovskite solar cells has outperformed a control device constructed using PEDOT:PSS. Moreover, our proposed NGONR-based devices also demonstrate a negligible current hysteresis along with improved stability. This work provides an effective route for substituting PEDOT:PSS as the effective HTL.

  20. Selenium and stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen in the benthic clam Corbula amurensis from Northern San Francisco Bay, California: May 1995-February 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kleckner, Amy E.; Stewart, A. Robin; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2010-01-01

    The clam-based food webs of San Francisco Bay, California efficiently bioaccumlate selenium and thus provide pathways for exposure to predators important to the estuary. This study documents changes in monthly selenium concentrations for the clam Corbula amurensis, a keystone species of the estuary, at five locations in northern San Francisco Bay from 1995 through 2010. Samples were collected from designated U.S. Geological Survey stations and prepared and analyzed by U.S. Geological Survey methods. Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen in soft tissues of clams also were measured as an indicator of sources of selenium for the clams. These monitoring data indicate that clam selenium concentrations ranged from a low of 2 to a high of 22 micrograms per gram dry weight with strong spatial and seasonal variation over the period of study.

  1. Relationship of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and polychlorinated dibenzofuran levels to stable-nitrogen isotope abundance in marine birds and mammals in coastal California

    SciTech Connect

    Jarman, W.M.; Sydeman, W.J.; Hobson, K.A.; Bergqvist, P.A.

    1997-05-01

    Levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) were determined in common murre (Uria aalge), Brandt`s cormorant (Phalacrocorax penicillatus), rhinoceros auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata), and pigeon guillemot (Cepphus columba) eggs, and Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) blubber collected from the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary in 1993. In addition, the samples were analyzed for stable-nitrogen isotopes ({delta}{sup 15}N). Of the PCDDs and PCDFs, the 2,3,7,8-TCDD (TCDD) and 2,3,7,8-TCDF (TCDF) congeners were the most prominent in the birds. The levels of TCDD in the eggs ranged from 0.2 to 6.6 ng/wet kg in the pigeon guillemot and Brandt`s cormorant, respectively. The TCDF ranged from 0.30 to 2.25 ng/kg in the pigeon guillemot and Brandt`s cormorant eggs, respectively. Other prominent PCDD and PCDF congeners detected in all bird species were 1,2,3,6,7,8-HxCDD, 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF, 1,2,3,7,8-PeCDD and 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDD. In the Steller sea lion the most prominent congeners were 1,2,3,7,8-PeCDD at 3.2 ng/kg, 2,3,7,8-TCDD at 2.9 ng/kg, OCDF at 2.2 ng/kg, 1,2,3,6,7,8-HxCDD at 1.92 ng/kg, and 1,2,3,4,7,8-HxCDF at 1.3 ng/kg. Stable-nitrogen values ranged from 16.9% in the pigeon guillemot and rhinoceros auklet to 19.8% in the Steller sea lion.

  2. Use of inorganic and organic nitrogen by Synechococcus spp. and diatoms on the west Florida shelf as measured using stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Wawrik, Boris; Callaghan, Amy V; Bronk, Deborah A

    2009-11-01

    The marine nitrogen (N) cycle is a complex network of biological transformations in different N pools. The linkages among these different reservoirs are often poorly understood. Traditional methods for measuring N uptake rely on bulk community properties and cannot provide taxonomic information. (15)N-based stable isotope probing (SIP), however, is a technique that allows detection of uptake of individual N sources by specific microorganisms. In this study we used (15)N SIP methodology to assess the use of different nitrogen substrates by Synechococcus spp. and diatoms on the west Florida shelf. Seawater was incubated in the presence of (15)N-labeled ammonium, nitrate, urea, glutamic acid, and a mixture of 16 amino acids. DNA was extracted and fractionated using CsCl density gradient centrifugation. Quantitative PCR was used to quantify the amounts of Synechococcus and diatom DNA as a function of density, and (15)N tracer techniques were used to measure rates of N uptake by the microbial community. The ammonium, nitrate, urea, and dissolved primary amine uptake rates were 0.077, 0.065, 0.013, and 0.055 micromol N liter(-1) h(-1), respectively. SIP data indicated that diatoms and Synechococcus spp. actively incorporated N from [(15)N]nitrate, [(15)N]ammonium, and [(15)N]urea. Synechococcus also incorporated nitrogen from [(15)N]glutamate and (15)N-amino acids, but no evidence indicating uptake of labeled amino acids by diatoms was detected. These data suggest that N flow in communities containing Synechococcus spp. and diatoms has more plasticity than the new-versus-recycled production paradigm suggests and that these phytoplankters should not be viewed strictly as recycled and new producers, respectively. PMID:19734334

  3. Estimating autotrophic respiration in streams using daily metabolism data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowing the fraction of gross primary production (GPP) that is immediately respired by autotrophs and their closely associated heterotrophs (ARf) is necessary to understand the trophic base and carbon spiraling in streams. We show a means to estimate ARf from daily metabolism da...

  4. Assessing the Utility of Hydrogen, Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotopes in Estimating Consumer Allochthony in Two Shallow Eutrophic Lakes.

    PubMed

    Syväranta, Jari; Scharnweber, Kristin; Brauns, Mario; Hilt, Sabine; Mehner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen stable isotopes (δ2H) have recently been used to complement δ13C and δ15N in food web studies due to their potentially greater power to separate sources of organic matter in aquatic food webs. However, uncertainties remain regarding the use of δ2H, since little is known about the potential variation in the amount of exchangeable hydrogen (Hex) among common sample materials or the patterns of δ2H when entire food webs are considered. We assessed differences in Hex among the typical sample materials in freshwater studies and used δ2H, δ13C and δ15N to compare their effectiveness in tracing allochthonous matter in food webs of two small temperate lakes. Our results showed higher average amounts of Hex in animal tissues (27% in fish and macroinvertebrates, 19% in zooplankton) compared to most plant material (15% in terrestrial plants and 8% in seston/periphyton), with the exception of aquatic vascular plants (23%, referred to as macrophytes). The amount of Hex correlated strongly with sample lipid content (inferred from C:N ratios) in fish and zooplankton samples. Overall, the three isotopes provided good separation of sources (seston, periphyton, macrophytes and allochthonous organic matter), particularly the δ2H followed by δ13C. Aquatic macrophytes revealed unexpectedly high δ2H values, having more elevated δ2H values than terrestrial organic matter with direct implications for estimating consumer allochthony. Organic matter from macrophytes significantly contributed to the food webs in both lakes highlighting the need to include macrophytes as a potential source when using stable isotopes to estimate trophic structures and contributions from allochthonous sources. PMID:27167517

  5. Assessing the Utility of Hydrogen, Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotopes in Estimating Consumer Allochthony in Two Shallow Eutrophic Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Syväranta, Jari; Scharnweber, Kristin; Brauns, Mario; Hilt, Sabine; Mehner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen stable isotopes (δ2H) have recently been used to complement δ13C and δ15N in food web studies due to their potentially greater power to separate sources of organic matter in aquatic food webs. However, uncertainties remain regarding the use of δ2H, since little is known about the potential variation in the amount of exchangeable hydrogen (Hex) among common sample materials or the patterns of δ2H when entire food webs are considered. We assessed differences in Hex among the typical sample materials in freshwater studies and used δ2H, δ13C and δ15N to compare their effectiveness in tracing allochthonous matter in food webs of two small temperate lakes. Our results showed higher average amounts of Hex in animal tissues (27% in fish and macroinvertebrates, 19% in zooplankton) compared to most plant material (15% in terrestrial plants and 8% in seston/periphyton), with the exception of aquatic vascular plants (23%, referred to as macrophytes). The amount of Hex correlated strongly with sample lipid content (inferred from C:N ratios) in fish and zooplankton samples. Overall, the three isotopes provided good separation of sources (seston, periphyton, macrophytes and allochthonous organic matter), particularly the δ2H followed by δ13C. Aquatic macrophytes revealed unexpectedly high δ2H values, having more elevated δ2H values than terrestrial organic matter with direct implications for estimating consumer allochthony. Organic matter from macrophytes significantly contributed to the food webs in both lakes highlighting the need to include macrophytes as a potential source when using stable isotopes to estimate trophic structures and contributions from allochthonous sources. PMID:27167517

  6. Stable nitrogen isotopes in the turtle grass Thalassia testudinum from the Mexican Caribbean: Implications of anthropogenic development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Alberto; Ortiz-Hernández, Ma. Concepción; Talavera-Sáenz, Ana; Aguíñiga-García, Sergio

    2013-12-01

    Nutrient inputs associated with population growth threaten the integrity of coastal ecosystems. To assess the rapid increase in tourism, we compared the δ15N from Thalassia testudinum collected at sites with different levels of tourism development to detect the N inputs of wastewater discharge (WD) along the coast of Quintana Roo. The contributions of nitrogen enriched in 15N are directly related to the increase of WD inputs in areas of tourism development (Nichupte Lagoon in Cancun) and decreased toward Bahia Akumal and Tulum. The δ15N from T. testudinum was significantly lower at Mahahual and Puerto Morelos. In areas of the lowest development and with tourist activity restricted, such as the Yum Balam Reserve and Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve, the δ15N values were relatively enriched compared to Mahahual and Puerto Morelos. Therefore, Puerto Morelos and Mahahual may be used for baseline isotopic monitoring where tourist activities are growing and can lead to environmental pressure on the reef lagoon ecosystem. The anthropogenic N input has the potential to impact, both environmentally and economically, the seagrass meadows and the coral reefs along the coast of Quintana Roo and the Caribbean.

  7. Long-term trends of aerosol carbon and nitrogen, their stable isotopic compositions, and water-soluble organic carbon in the western North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.; Tachibana, E.; Umomoto, N.

    2009-12-01

    The western North Pacific is an outflow region of Asian dusts and pollutants. A rapid industrial development in China and East Asian countries for last two decades may have seriously altered the air quality of the North Pacific. However, long-term changes of atmospheric composition have not been studied in this region. To better understand long-term atmospheric changes in the western North Pacific, we collected marine aerosols on weekly basis in 2001-2009 at a remote island, Chichijima (27°04'E; 142°13'N) using high volume air sampler and pre-combusted quartz filter. The island is located in the boundary of westerly (winter and spring) and trade wind (summer and autumn) regimes. Here, the aerosol samples were analyzed for total carbon (TC) and nitrogen (TN) and their stable isotopic compositions as well as water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Concentrations of aerosol TC and TN were in a range of 0.21-4.58 (average 1.07) ug/m3 and 0.01-3.43 (av. 0.29) ng/m3. These values are ca. 20 times lower than the concentrations in urban Tokyo. C/N weight ratios ranged from 0.50 to 41 (av. 6.6) with summer maxima. Both TC and TN showed a gradual increase with winter/spring maxima probably due to the enhanced anthropogenic activities such as fossil fuel combustion and fertilizer usage in East Asia. On the other hand, stable carbon isotopic ratios (d13C) of TC ranged from -27.3 to -15.1‰; however, no systematic trend was detected. Nitrogen isotopic ratios of TN (d15N) ranged from +1.56 to +25.2‰ with lower values in winter and higher values in summer. Interestingly, d15N values showed a long-term trend of increase by 4‰ from 2001 to 2009. This may be caused by an increased emission of nitrogen species (NH3, NOx) from biomass burning sources in East Asia and other regions. WSOC (0.05-2.46 ug/m3, av. 0.40 ug/m3) also showed a long-term increase probably due to the increased emissions of organic aerosols and their precursors and subsequent oxidations in the atmosphere

  8. Systems and Photosystems: Cellular Limits of Autotrophic Productivity in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Burnap, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the modeling of microbial growth and metabolism have shown that growth rate critically depends upon the optimal allocation of finite proteomic resources among different cellular functions and that modeling growth rates becomes more realistic with the explicit accounting for the costs of macromolecular synthesis, most importantly, protein expression. The “proteomic constraint” is considered together with its application to understanding photosynthetic microbial growth. The central hypothesis is that physical limits of cellular space (and corresponding solvation capacity) in conjunction with cell surface-to-volume ratios represent the underlying constraints on the maximal rate of autotrophic microbial growth. The limitation of cellular space thus constrains the size the total complement of macromolecules, dissolved ions, and metabolites. To a first approximation, the upper limit in the cellular amount of the total proteome is bounded this space limit. This predicts that adaptation to osmotic stress will result in lower maximal growth rates due to decreased cellular concentrations of core metabolic proteins necessary for cell growth owing the accumulation of compatible osmolytes, as surmised previously. The finite capacity of membrane and cytoplasmic space also leads to the hypothesis that the species-specific differences in maximal growth rates likely reflect differences in the allocation of space to niche-specific proteins with the corresponding diminution of space devoted to other functions including proteins of core autotrophic metabolism, which drive cell reproduction. An optimization model for autotrophic microbial growth, the autotrophic replicator model, was developed based upon previous work investigating heterotrophic growth. The present model describes autotrophic growth in terms of the allocation protein resources among core functional groups including the photosynthetic electron transport chain, light-harvesting antennae, and the

  9. Influence of Reproduction on Stable-Isotope Ratios: Nitrogen and Carbon Isotope Discrimination between Mothers, Fetuses, and Milk in the Fin Whale, a Capital Breeder.

    PubMed

    Borrell, A; Gómez-Campos, E; Aguilar, A

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, the influence of gestation and lactation on the tissue stable-isotope ratios of females, fetuses, and milk remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the incidence of these events on δ(13)C and δ(15)N values in fin whales sampled off northwestern Spain between 1983 and 1985. The effect of gestation on tissue stable-isotope ratios was examined in the muscle of pregnant females (n = 13) and their fetuses (n = 10) and that of lactation in the muscle of nursing females (n = 21) and their milk (n = 25). Results suggest that fetuses are enriched compared to their mothers in both (15)N (Δ(15)N = 1.5‰) and (13)C (Δ(13)C =1.1‰), while, compared to muscle, milk is enriched in (15)N (Δ(15)N = 0.3‰) but depleted in (13)C (Δ(13)C = -0.62‰). This pattern is consistent with that previously observed for other species that, like the fin whale, rely on endogenous energy during reproduction, and it substantiates a general difference in the physiological processing of nitrogen and carbon balances between income and capital breeders. These findings are relevant to the understanding of the energetic balance of mammals during gestation and lactation and are central when inferences on trophic ecology are drawn from isotopic values of reproductive females. PMID:27082523

  10. Food web of a confined and anthropogenically affected coastal basin (the Mar Piccolo of Taranto) revealed by carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes analyses.

    PubMed

    Bongiorni, Lucia; Fiorentino, Federica; Auriemma, Rocco; Aubry, Fabrizio Bernardi; Camatti, Elisa; Camin, Federica; Nasi, Federica; Pansera, Marco; Ziller, Luca; Grall, Jacques

    2016-07-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis was used to examine the food web of the Mar Piccolo of Taranto, a coastal basin experiencing several anthropogenic impacts. Main food sources (algal detritus, seaweeds, particulate organic matter (POM) and sediment organic matter (SOM)) and benthic and pelagic consumers were collected during two contrasting seasons (June and April), at four sites distributed over two inlets, and characterized by different level of confinements, anthropogenic inputs and the presence of mussels farming. δ(13)C values of organic sources revealed an important contribution of POM to both planktonic and benthic pathways, as well as the influence of terrigenous inputs within both inlets, probably due to high seasonal land runoff. Although δ(13)C of both sources and consumers varied little between sampling sites and dates, δ(15)N spatial variability was higher and clearly reflected the organic enrichment in the second inlet as well as the uptake of anthropogenically derived material by benthic consumers. On the other hand, within the first inlet, the isotopic composition of consumers did not change in response to chemical contamination. However, the impact of polluted sediments near the Navy Arsenal in the first inlet was detectable at the level of the macrobenthic trophic structure, showing high dominance of motile, upper level consumers capable to face transient conditions and the reduction of the more resident deposit feeders. We therefore underline the great potential of matching stable isotope analysis with quantitative studies of community structure to assess the effects of multiple anthropogenic stressors. PMID:26381790

  11. Large-scale demonstration of the sulfate reduction autotrophic denitrification nitrification integrated (SANI(®)) process in saline sewage treatment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Ekama, George A; Chui, Ho-Kwong; Wang, Bo; Cui, Yan-Xiang; Hao, Tian-Wei; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the Sulfate reduction Autotrophic denitrification Nitrification Integrated (SANI(®)) process was developed for the removal of organics and nitrogen with sludge minimization in the treatment of saline sewage (with a Sulfate-to-COD ratio > 0.5 mg SO4(2-)-S/mg COD) generated from seawater used for toilet flushing or salt water intrusion. Previously investigated in lab- and pilot-scale, this process has now been scaled up to a 800-1000 m(3)/d full-scale demonstration plant. In this paper, the design and operating parameters of the SANI demo plant built in Hong Kong are analyzed. After a 4-month start-up period, a stable sulfur cycle-based biological nitrogen removal system having a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 12.5 h was developed, thereby reducing the amount of space needed by 30-40% compared with conventional activated sludge (CAS) plants in Hong Kong. The demo plant satisfactorily met the local effluent discharge limits during both the summer and winter periods. In winter (sewage temperature of 21 ± 1 °C), the maximum volumetric loading rates for organic conversion, nitrification, and denitrification were 2 kg COD/(m(3)·d), 0.39 kg N/(m(3)·d), and 0.35 kg N/(m(3)·d), respectively. The biological sludge production rate of SANI process was 0.35 ± 0.08 g TSSproduced/g BOD5 (or 0.19 ± 0.05 g TSS/g COD), which is 60-70% lower than that of the CAS process in Hong Kong. While further process optimization is possible, this study demonstrates the SANI process can be potentially implemented for the treatment of saline sewage. PMID:27232994

  12. [Effects of Land Use Type on Soil Microbial Biomass Carbon and Nitrogen in Water-Stable Aggregates in Jinyun Mountain].

    PubMed

    Li, Zeng-quan; Jiang, Chang-sheng; Hao, Qing-ju

    2015-11-01

    In this study, four land use types including subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest (abbreviation: forest), sloping farmland, orchard and abandoned land were selected to collect soil samples from 0 to 60 cm depth at the same altitude in Jinyun Mountain. Four sizes of large macroaggregates (> 2 mm), small macroaggregates (0.25-2 mm), microaggregates (0.053-0.25 mm) and silt + clay (< 0.053 mm) were achieved by wet sieving method and the contents of microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN) in each aggregate fraction were measured to study the impacts of the different land use types on MBC and MBN in soil aggregates. The results showed that the contents of MBC and MBN in all aggregates in the four land use types decreased with the increasing soil depth. Except large macroaggregetes, the contents of MBC and MBN in the other three soil aggregates decreased when the forest was reclamated into orchard and sloping farmland. MBC and MBN contents in large macroaggregates, small macroaggregates and microaggregates all increased when the sloping farmland was abandoned. The storages of organic carbon and nitrogen in soil depth of 0-60 cm in the four proportions were calculated by the equivalent soil mass method. The results revealed that MBC storages in the other three sizes except silt + clay were higher in the forest than those in orchard and sloping land. And MBC storages in the all aggregates were higher in the abandoned land than those in the sloping land. MBN storages in small macroaggregates and microaggregates were higher in the forest than those in orchard and sloping land. And MBN storages in the other three aggregates except silt + clay were higher in the abandoned land than those in the sloping land. Generally speaking, the storages of MBC in soil aggregates of forest and abandoned land were higher than in orchard and sloping land, MBN storage in soil aggregates of forest was nearly equal to the storage in orchard. However, the storages

  13. Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope Composition of OM From Florida Bay, the Initial Results of a Paleoenvironmental Seagrass Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, S. L.; Anderson, W. T.; Fourqurean, J. W.; Jaffe, R.; Gaiser, E. E.; Collins, L. S.; Holmes, C. W.

    2002-12-01

    The shallow marine waters of Florida Bay provide an ideal environment for seagrasses, which are the most common benthic community in the region. However, these communities are susceptible to a variety of anthropogenic disturbances, particularly changes in water quality, and environmental conditions in Florida Bay have become a concern due to recent increases in salinity, the frequency of algal blooms, and seagrass die-off. These changes have been attributed to 20th century decreases in freshwater discharge from the Everglades to Florida Bay, deteriorated water quality, and changes in exchange between Florida Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. In order to better understand environmental change over long timescales, sediment cores were collected in the summer, 2002, from four locations in Florida Bay for multiple proxy analyses of seagrass abundance, which is an excellent indicator of water quality. Sediment depths ranged from 96 to 244 cm, potentially representing a 5000-year time series. Cores were sampled in 2-cm increments representing an average of 2-10 years for bulk isotopic analysis of sediment organic content. In 2 cores analyzed, δ15N values ranged between 3.2 and 7.6‰ , following an oscillating pattern over time. δ13C values ranged between -11.2 and -8.6‰ along a progressive enrichment trend that is inconsistent with the adjacent development of the metro Miami area and agricultural activities. These patterns show evidence of decoupling between carbon and nitrogen isotopic systems, although values throughout suggest that buried organic matter at these 2 sites is seagrass-derived. Further bulk isotopic analyses of remaining cores, together with organic biomarker analyses, diatom and foraminiferal community analyses, and development of an age model for the cores, will allow more definitive interpretation of the isotope patterns with implications to seagrass productivity levels, and thus, water quality, over time in Florida

  14. Impact of different nitrogen emission sources on tree physiology as assessed by a triple stable isotope approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrieri, M. R.; Siegwolf, R. T. W.; Saurer, M.; Jäggi, M.; Cherubini, P.; Ripullone, F.; Borghetti, M.

    The importance that nitrogen (N) deposition has in driving the carbon (C) sequestration of forests has recently been investigated using both experimental and modeling approaches. Whether increased N deposition has positive or negative effects on such ecosystems depends on the status of the N and the duration of the deposition. By combining δ13C, δ18O, δ15N and dendrochronological approaches, we analyzed the impact of two different sources of NO x emissions on two tree species, namely: a broadleaved species ( Quercus cerris) that was located close to an oil refinery in Southern Italy, and a coniferous species ( Picea abies) located close to a freeway in Switzerland. Variations in the ci/ ca ratio and the distinction between stomatal and photosynthetic responses to NO x emissions in trees were assessed using a conceptual model, which combines δ13C and δ18O. δ15N in leaves, needles and tree rings was found to be a bioindicator of N input from anthropogenic emissions, especially at the oil refinery site. We observed that N fertilization had a stimulatory effect on tree growth near the oil refinery, while the opposite effect was found for trees at the freeway site. Changes in the ci/ ca ratio were mostly related to variations in δ13C at the freeway site and, thus, were driven by photosynthesis. At the oil refinery site they were mainly related to stomatal conductance, as assessed using δ18O. This study demonstrates that a single method approach does not always provide a complete picture of which physiological traits are more affected by N emissions. The triple isotope approach combined with dendrochronological analyses proved to be a very promising tool for monitoring the ecophysiological responses of trees to long-term N deposition.

  15. Meta-analysis of amino acid stable nitrogen isotope ratios for estimating trophic position in marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens M; Popp, Brian N; Winder, Monika

    2015-07-01

    Estimating trophic structures is a common approach used to retrieve information regarding energy pathways, predation, and competition in complex ecosystems. The application of amino acid (AA) compound-specific nitrogen (N) isotope analysis (CSIA) is a relatively new method used to estimate trophic position (TP) and feeding relationships in diverse organisms. Here, we conducted the first meta-analysis of δ(15)N AA values from measurements of 359 marine species covering four trophic levels, and compared TP estimates from AA-CSIA to literature values derived from food items, gut or stomach content analysis. We tested whether the AA trophic enrichment factor (TEF), or the (15)N enrichment among different individual AAs is constant across trophic levels and whether inclusion of δ(15)N values from multiple AAs improves TP estimation. For the TEF of glutamic acid relative to phenylalanine (Phe) we found an average value of 6.6‰ across all taxa, which is significantly lower than the commonly applied 7.6‰. We found that organism feeding ecology influences TEF values of several trophic AAs relative to Phe, with significantly higher TEF values for herbivores compared to omnivores and carnivores, while TEF values were also significantly lower for animals excreting urea compared to ammonium. Based on the comparison of multiple model structures using the metadata of δ(15)N AA values we show that increasing the number of AAs in principle improves precision in TP estimation. This meta-analysis clarifies the advantages and limitations of using individual δ(15)N AA values as tools in trophic ecology and provides a guideline for the future application of AA-CSIA to food web studies. PMID:25843809

  16. Using Stable Isotopes of Carbon and Nitrogen to Mark Wild Populations of Anopheles and Aedes Mosquitoes in South-Eastern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Opiyo, Mercy A.; Hamer, Gabriel L.; Lwetoijera, Dickson W.; Auckland, Lisa D.; Majambere, Silas; Okumu, Fredros O.

    2016-01-01

    Background Marking wild mosquitoes is important for understanding their ecology, behaviours and role in disease transmission. Traditional insect marking techniques include using fluorescent dyes, protein labels, radioactive labels and tags, but such techniques have various limitations; notably low marker retention and inability to mark wild mosquitoes at source. Stable isotopes are gaining wide spread use for non-invasive marking of arthropods, permitting greater understanding of mosquito dispersal and responses to interventions. We describe here a simple technique for marking naturally-breeding malaria and dengue vectors using stable isotopes of nitrogen (15N) and carbon (13C), and describe potential field applications. Methods We created man-made aquatic mosquito habitats and added either 15N-labelled potassium nitrate or 13C-labelled glucose, leaving non-adulterated habitats as controls. We then allowed wild mosquitoes to lay eggs in these habitats and monitored their development in situ. Pupae were collected promptly as they appeared and kept in netting cages. Emergent adults (in pools of ~4 mosquitoes/pool) and individually stored pupae were desiccated and analysed using Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS). Findings Anopheles gambiae s.l and Aedes spp. from enriched 13C and enriched 15N larval habitats had significantly higher isotopic levels than controls (P = 0.005), and both isotopes produced sufficient distinction between marked and unmarked mosquitoes. Mean δ15N for enriched females and males were 275.6±65.1 and 248.0±54.6, while mean δ15N in controls were 2.1±0.1 and 3.9±1.7 respectively. Similarly, mean δ13C for enriched females and males were 36.08±5.28 and 38.5±6.86, compared to -4.3±0.2 and -7.9±3.6 in controls respectively. Mean δ15N and δ13C was significantly higher in any pool containing at least one enriched mosquito compared to pools with all unenriched mosquitoes, P<0.001. In all cases, there were variations in standardized

  17. Molecular and Stable Isotope Investigation of Nitrite Respiring Bacterial Communities Capable of Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (ANAMMOX) and Denitrifying Anaerobic Methane Oxidation (DAMO) in Nitrogen Contaminated Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, B.; Hirsch, M.; Taylor, J.; Smith, R. L.; Repert, D.; Tobias, C. R.

    2010-12-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) and denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) are two recently discovered N2 production pathways in the microbial nitrogen cycle. ANAMMOX has been relatively well investigated in various aquatic ecosystems, while DAMO has been examined only in freshwater wetlands. However, neither ANAMMOX nor DAMO have been studied in groundwater ecosystems as microbial N removal processes where they could compliment or compete with denitrification to remediate N contaminated aquifers. Thus, we conducted molecular and stable isotope analyses to detect and measure ANAMMOX and DAMO in a nitrogen contaminated aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The study site has a plume of nitrogen contaminated groundwater as a result of continuous discharge of treated wastewater over 60 years. Groundwater was collected from multiport sampling devices installed at two sites, near the waste-water disposal location (A) and more than 3 km down gradient (B) along the contamination plume. Biomass was collected from water samples for DNA extraction and 15N tracer incubation experiments. PCR with specific 16S rRNA gene primers detected the presence of ANAMMOX and DAMO bacteria at both sites. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes revealed that the ANAMMOX community at site A was most associated with Kuenenia spp. while site B had a community more closely related to Brocadia spp. The DAMO communities at the two sites were quite different based on 16S rRNA gene analysis. The communities at site B are closely associated with Candidatus “Methylomirabilis oxyfera”, which is the first enriched DAMO culture. Most of the 16S rRNA sequences detected in site A were related to those found in other DAMO enrichment cultures established from a eutrophic ditch sediment. In order to determine active members of ANAMMOX communities, the transcriptional expression of hydrazine oxidase (hzo) and hydrazine hydrolase (hh) genes was examined at both sites. In addition, 15N tracer

  18. Reconstructing the diets of Greek Byzantine populations (6th-15th centuries AD) using carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios.

    PubMed

    Bourbou, Chryssi; Fuller, Benjamin T; Garvie-Lok, Sandra J; Richards, Michael P

    2011-12-01

    Documentary evidence and artistic representations have traditionally served as the primary sources of information about Byzantine diet. According to these sources, Byzantine diet was based on grain (primarily wheat and barley), oil, and wine, supplemented with legumes, dairy products, meat, and marine resources. Here, we synthesize and compare the results of stable isotope ratio analyses of eight Greek Byzantine populations (6th-15th centuries AD) from throughout Greece. The δ(13) C and δ(15) N values are tightly clustered, suggesting that all of these populations likely consumed a broadly similar diet. Both inland and coastal Byzantine populations consumed an essentially land-based C(3) diet, significant amounts of animal protein, and possibly some C(4) plants, while no evidence of a general dependence on low-δ(15) N legumes was observed. One interesting result observed in the isotopic data is the evidence for the consumption of marine protein at both coastal sites (a reasonable expectation given their location) and for some individuals from inland sites. This pattern contrasts with previous isotopic studies mainly on prehistoric Greek populations, which have suggested that marine species contributed little, or not at all, to the diet. The possibility that fasting practices contributed to marine protein consumption in the period is discussed, as are possible parallels with published isotope data from western European medieval sites. PMID:21952735

  19. Strong evidence for terrestrial support of zooplankton in small lakes based on stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Jonathan J.; Carpenter, Stephen R.; Kitchell, Jim; Pace, Michael L.; Solomon, Christopher T.; Weidel, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Cross-ecosystem subsidies to food webs can alter metabolic balances in the receiving (subsidized) system and free the food web, or particular consumers, from the energetic constraints of local primary production. Although cross-ecosystem subsidies between terrestrial and aquatic systems have been well recognized for benthic organisms in streams, rivers, and the littoral zones of lakes, terrestrial subsidies to pelagic consumers are more difficult to demonstrate and remain controversial. Here, we adopt a unique approach by using stable isotopes of H, C, and N to estimate terrestrial support to zooplankton in two contrasting lakes. Zooplankton (Holopedium, Daphnia, and Leptodiaptomus) are comprised of ≈20–40% of organic material of terrestrial origin. These estimates are as high as, or higher than, prior measures obtained by experimentally manipulating the inorganic 13C content of these lakes to augment the small, natural contrast in 13C between terrestrial and algal photosynthesis. Our study gives credence to a growing literature, which we review here, suggesting that significant terrestrial support of pelagic crustaceans (zooplankton) is widespread. PMID:21245299

  20. Strong evidence for terrestrial support of zooplankton in small lakes based on stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, J.J.; Carpenter, S.R.; Kitchell, J.; Pace, M.L.; Solomon, C.T.; Weidel, B.

    2011-01-01

    Cross-ecosystem subsidies to food webs can alter metabolic balances in the receiving (subsidized) system and free the food web, or particular consumers, from the energetic constraints of local primary production. Although cross-ecosystem subsidies between terrestrial and aquatic systems have been well recognized for benthic organisms in streams, rivers, and the littoral zones of lakes, terrestrial subsidies to pelagic consumers are more difficult to demonstrate and remain controversial. Here, we adopt a unique approach by using stable isotopes of H, C, and N to estimate terrestrial support to zooplankton in two contrasting lakes. Zooplankton (Holopedium, Daphnia, and Leptodiaptomus) are comprised of ???20-40% of organic material of terrestrial origin. These estimates are as high as, or higher than, prior measures obtained by experimentally manipulating the inorganic 13C content of these lakes to augment the small, natural contrast in 13C between terrestrial and algal photosynthesis. Our study gives credence to a growing literature, which we review here, suggesting that significant terrestrial support of pelagic crustaceans (zooplankton) is widespread.

  1. A triple stable isotope approach in tree rings for detecting the impact of nitrogen emissions on tree physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrieri, M. R.; Siegwolf, R. T. W.; Saurer, M.; Jaeggi, M.; Cherubini, P.; Ripullone, F.; Borghetti, M.

    2009-04-01

    Over the last decades, human activities have contributed to increase reactive nitrogen (N) in the atmosphere (such as NOx and NHx compounds) and their deposition on terrestrial ecosystems. The relevance of the current N deposition (Ndep) on carbon (C) sequestration has lately been questioned by both experimental and modelling approaches. Widely a different estimates of C sensitivity to Ndep have been reported in recent investigations (Magnani et al., 2007; Högberg 2007; De Vries et al. 2008; Magnani et al. 2008; Sutton et al. 2008, which highlights the need for a through re-assessment of all the physiological mechanisms and processes involved. The impact of Ndep on forest ecosystems can be investigated near the pollution sources, where the effects are expected to be easily detectable. Therefore, tree rings represent a valuable archive for disturbances due to pollution events, which can be detected by combining d13C, d18O, d15N and dendrochronological approaches. The aim of this research was to investigate the impact of long term exposure to NOx emissions on two tree species, namely: a broadleaved species (Quercus cerris) that was located close to an oil refinery in Southern Italy, and a coniferous species (Picea abies) located close to a freeway in Switzerland. The analysis of d15N in tree rings allowed to detect the input of N from anthropogenic emissions. Further, variations in the ratio of intercellular and ambient CO2 concentrations (ci/ca) and the distinction between stomatal (gs) and photosynthetic (A) responses to NOx emissions in trees were assessed using a conceptual model (Scheidegger et al., 2000), which combines d13C and d18O in tree rings. The strongest fingerprint of N emissions was detected for Q. cerris at the oil refinery site, as assessed by d15N. Long-term exposure to NOx emissions had a different impact on the ci/ca ratio in the two experimental sites: at the oil refinery (Quercus cerris), gs influenced ci/ca more, as assessed by d18O, while at

  2. Tracing seasonal nitrate sources and loads in the San Joaquin River using nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. B.; Kendall, C.; Silva, S.; Stringfellow, W. T.; Dahlgren, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    The San Joaquin River (SJR) is a heavily impacted river draining a major agricultural basin in central California. This river receives nitrate inputs from multiple point and non-point sources including agriculture, livestock, waste water treatment plants, septic systems, urban run-off, and natural soil leaching. Nitrate inputs to the SJR may play a significant role in driving algal blooms and reducing overall water quality. The San Joaquin River discharges into the San Francisco Bay-Delta ecosystem, and reduced water quality and large algal blooms in the SJR may play a significant role in driving critically low oxygen levels in the Stockton Deep Water Shipping Channel. Correct identification of the major nitrate sources to the SJR is important for coordinating mitigation efforts throughout the SJR-Delta-San Francisco Bay region. Measurements of the nitrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of nitrate were made monthly to bimonthly from 2005 through 2007 within the Lower SJR, major tributaries, and various other water input sources in order to assess spatial and temporal variations in nitrate inputs and cycling in this heavily impacted watershed. The oxygen and hydrogen isotopic composition of water was also measured to better distinguish water sources and identify changes in water inputs. A very wide range of δ15N-NO3 and δ18O-NO3 values were observed in the main stem SJR and tributaries. The δ15N values ranged from +2 to +17 ‰, and the δ18O values ranged from -1 to +18 ‰. Except for a major agricultural drain site (San Luis Drain), all the sites showed temporal changes in both δ15N-NO3 and δ18O-NO3 much greater than the differences seen between individual sites. In general, the δ15N values of nitrate in the larger tributary rivers (Merced, Tuolumne and Stanislaus) were much lower than those of the main stem SJR from April to May; however, after June the tributary values began to rise toward the values in the main stem river. Some of the highest δ15N-NO3

  3. Spatial variation of the stable nitrogen isotope ratio of woody plants along a topoedaphic gradient in a subtropical savanna.

    PubMed

    Bai, Edith; Boutton, Thomas W; Liu, Feng; Wu, X Ben; Archer, Steven R; Hallmark, C Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Variation in the stable N isotope ratio (delta15N) of plants and soils often reflects the influence of environment on the N cycle. We measured leaf delta15N and N concentration ([N]) on all individuals of Prosopis glandulosa (deciduous tree legume), Condalia hookeri (evergreen shrub), and Zanthoxylum fagara (evergreen shrub) present within a belt transect 308 m long x 12 m wide in a subtropical savanna ecosystem in southern Texas, USA in April and August 2005. Soil texture, gravimetric water content (GWC), total N and delta15N were also measured along the transect. At the landscape scale, leaf delta15N was negatively related to elevation for all the three species along this topoedaphic sequence. Changes in soil delta15N, total N, and GWC appeared to contribute to this spatial pattern of leaf delta15N. In lower portions of the landscape, greater soil N availability and GWC are associated with relatively high rates of both N mineralization and nitrification. Both soil delta15N and leaf [N] were positively correlated with leaf delta15N of non-N2 fixing plants. Leaf delta15N of P. glandulosa, an N2-fixing legume, did not correlate with leaf [N]; the delta15N of P. glandulosa's leaves were closer to atmospheric N2 and significantly lower than those of C. hookeri and Z. fagara. Additionally, at smaller spatial scales, a proximity index (which reflected the density and distance of surrounding P. glandulosa trees) was negatively correlated with leaf delta15N of C. hookeri and Z. fagara, indicating the N2-fixing P. glandulosa may be important to the N nutrition of nearby non-N2-fixing species. Our results indicate plant 15N natural abundance can reflect the extent of N retention and help us better understand N dynamics and plant-soil interactions at ecosystem and landscape scales. PMID:19085012

  4. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes and metal concentration in food webs from a mining-impacted coastal lagoon.

    PubMed

    Marín-Guirao, Lázaro; Lloret, Javier; Marin, Arnaldo

    2008-04-01

    Two food webs from the Mar Menor coastal lagoon, differing in the distance from the desert-stream through which mining wastes were discharged, were examined by reference to essential (Zn and Cu) and non-essential (Pb and Cd) metal concentrations and stable isotopes content (C and N). The partial extraction technique applied, which reflects the availability of metals to organisms after sediment ingestion, showed higher bioavailable metal concentrations in sediments from the station influenced by the mining discharges, in agreement with the higher metal concentrations observed in organisms, which in many cases exceeded the regulatory limits established in Spanish legislation concerning seafood. Spatial differences in essential metal concentrations in the fauna suggest that several organisms are exposed to metal levels above their regulation capacity. Differences in isotopic composition were found between both food webs, the wadi-influenced station showing higher delta(15)N values and lower delta(13)C levels, due to the discharge of urban waste waters and by the entrance of freshwater and allochthonous marsh plants. The linear-regressions between trophic levels (as indicated by delta(15)N) and the metal content indicated that biomagnification does not occur. In the case of invertebrates, since the "handle strategy" of the species and the physiological requirements of the organisms, among other factors, determine the final concentration of a specific element, no clear relationships between trophic level and the metal content are to be expected. For their part, fish communities did not show clear patterns in the case of any of the analyzed metals, probably because most fish species have similar metal requirements, and because biological factors also intervened. Finally, since the study deals with metals, assumptions concerning trophic transfer factors calculation may not be suitable since the metal burden originates not only from the prey but also from adsorption over

  5. Fate of process solution cyanide and nitrate at three nevada gold mines inferred from stable carbon and nitrogen isotope measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.A.; Grimes, D.J.; Rye, R.O.

    2000-01-01

    Stable isotope methods have been used to identify the mechanisms responsible for cyanide consumption at three heap-leach operations that process Carlin-type gold ores in Nevada, U.S.A. The reagent cyanide had ??15N values ranging from -5 to -2??? and ??13C values from -60 to -35???. The wide ??13C range reflects the use by different suppliers of isotopically distinct natural-gas feedstocks and indicates that isotopes may be useful in environmental studies where there is a need to trace cyanide sources. In heap-leach circuits displaying from 5 to 98% consumption of cyanide, barren-solution and pregnant-solution cyanide were isotopically indistinguishable. The similarity is inconsistent with cyanide loss predominantly by HCN offgassing (a process that in laboratory experiments caused substantial isotopic changes), but it is consistent with cyanide retention within the heaps as solids, a process that caused minimal isotopic changes in laboratory simulations, or with cyanide oxidation, which also appears to cause minimal changes. In many pregnant solutions cyanide was carried entirely as metal complexes, which is consistent with ferrocyanides having precipitated or cyanocomplexes having been adsorbed within the heaps. It is inferred that gaseous cyanide emissions from operations of this type are less important than has generally been thought and that the dissolution or desorption kinetics of solid species is an important control on cyanide elution when the spent heaps undergo rinsing. Nitrate, nitrite and ammonium had ??15N values of 1-16???. The data reflect isotopic fractionation during ammonia offgassing or denitrification of nitrate - particularly in reclaim ponds - but do not indicate the extent to which nitrate is derived from cyanide or from explosive residues. ?? The Institution of Mining and Metallurgy 2000.

  6. Nitrogen-doped graphene interpenetrated 3D Ni-nanocages: efficient and stable water-to-dioxygen electrocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhavale, Vishal M.; Gaikwad, Sachin S.; George, Leena; Devi, R. Nandini; Kurungot, Sreekumar

    2014-10-01

    Herein, we report the synthesis of a nitrogen-doped graphene (NGr) interpenetrated 3D Ni-nanocage (Ni-NGr) electrocatalyst by a simple water-in-oil (w/o) emulsion technique for oxidation of water to dioxygen. Correlation of adsorption of NGr and subsequent interpenetration through the specific surface plane of nickel particles as well as the concomitant interaction of N and C with Ni in the nano-regime has been investigated. Apart from the benefits of the synergistic interactions between Ni, N, and C, the overall integrity of the structure and its intra-molecular connectivity within the framework help in achieving better oxygen evolution characteristics at a significantly reduced overpotential. The engineered Ni-NGr nanocage displays a substantially low overpotential of ~290 mV at a practical current density of 20 mA cm-2 in 0.1 M KOH. In comparison, NGr and Ni-particles as separate entities give overpotentials of ~570 and ~370 mV under similar conditions. Moreover, the long term stability of Ni-NGr was investigated by anodic potential cycling for 500 cycles and an 8.5% increment in the overpotential at 20 mA cm-2 was observed. Additionally, a chronoamperometric test was performed for 15 h at 20 mA cm-2, which highlights the better sustainability of Ni-NGr under the actual operating conditions. Finally, the quantitative estimation of evolved oxygen was monitored by gas chromatography and was found to be 70 mmol h-1 g-1 of oxygen, which is constant in the second cycle as well.Herein, we report the synthesis of a nitrogen-doped graphene (NGr) interpenetrated 3D Ni-nanocage (Ni-NGr) electrocatalyst by a simple water-in-oil (w/o) emulsion technique for oxidation of water to dioxygen. Correlation of adsorption of NGr and subsequent interpenetration through the specific surface plane of nickel particles as well as the concomitant interaction of N and C with Ni in the nano-regime has been investigated. Apart from the benefits of the synergistic interactions between Ni, N

  7. Identification of microbial populations assimilating nitrogen from RDX in munitions contaminated military training range soils by high sensitivity stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Andeer, Peter; Stahl, David A; Lillis, Lorraine; Strand, Stuart E

    2013-09-17

    The leaching of RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine) from particulates deposited in live-fire military training range soils contributes to significant pollution of groundwater. In situ microbial degradation has been proposed as a viable method for onsite containment of RDX. However, there is only a single report of RDX degradation in training range soils and the soil microbial communities involved in RDX degradation were not identified. Here we demonstrate aerobic RDX degradation in soils taken from a target area of an Eglin Air Force Base bombing range, C52N Cat's Eye, (Eglin, Florida U.S.A.). RDX-degradation activity was spatially heterogeneous (found in less than 30% of initial target area field samples) and dependent upon the addition of exogenous carbon sources to the soils. Therefore, biostimulation (with exogenous carbon sources) and bioaugmentation may be necessary to sustain timely and effective in situ microbial biodegradation of RDX. High sensitivity stable isotope probing analysis of extracted soils incubated with fully labeled (15)N-RDX revealed several organisms with (15)N-labeled DNA during RDX-degradation, including xplA-bearing organisms. Rhodococcus was the most prominent genus in the RDX-degrading soil slurries and was completely labeled with (15)N-nitrogen from the RDX. Rhodococcus and Williamsia species isolated from these soils were capable of using RDX as a sole nitrogen source and possessed the genes xplB and xplA associated with RDX-degradation, indicating these genes may be suitable genetic biomarkers for assessing RDX degradation potential in soils. Other highly labeled species were primarily Proteobacteria, including: Mesorhizobium sp., Variovorax sp., and Rhizobium sp. PMID:23909596

  8. Organic Reference Materials for Hydrogen, Carbon, and Nitrogen Stable Isotope-Ratio Measurements: Caffeines, n-Alkanes, Fatty Acid Methyl Esters, Glycines, L-Valines, Polyethylenes, and Oils.

    PubMed

    Schimmelmann, Arndt; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B; Brand, Willi A; Fong, Jon; Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram; Kemp, Helen F; Toman, Blaza; Ackermann, Annika; Assonov, Sergey; Aerts-Bijma, Anita T; Brejcha, Ramona; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Darwish, Tamim; Elsner, Martin; Gehre, Matthias; Geilmann, Heike; Gröning, Manfred; Hélie, Jean-François; Herrero-Martín, Sara; Meijer, Harro A J; Sauer, Peter E; Sessions, Alex L; Werner, Roland A

    2016-04-19

    An international project developed, quality-tested, and determined isotope-δ values of 19 new organic reference materials (RMs) for hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotope-ratio measurements, in addition to analyzing pre-existing RMs NBS 22 (oil), IAEA-CH-7 (polyethylene foil), and IAEA-600 (caffeine). These new RMs enable users to normalize measurements of samples to isotope-δ scales. The RMs span a range of δ(2)H(VSMOW-SLAP) values from -210.8 to +397.0 mUr or ‰, for δ(13)C(VPDB-LSVEC) from -40.81 to +0.49 mUr and for δ(15)N(Air) from -5.21 to +61.53 mUr. Many of the new RMs are amenable to gas and liquid chromatography. The RMs include triads of isotopically contrasting caffeines, C16 n-alkanes, n-C20-fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), glycines, and l-valines, together with polyethylene powder and string, one n-C17-FAME, a vacuum oil (NBS 22a) to replace NBS 22 oil, and a (2)H-enriched vacuum oil. A total of 11 laboratories from 7 countries used multiple analytical approaches and instrumentation for 2-point isotopic normalization against international primary measurement standards. The use of reference waters in silver tubes allowed direct normalization of δ(2)H values of organic materials against isotopic reference waters following the principle of identical treatment. Bayesian statistical analysis yielded the mean values reported here. New RMs are numbered from USGS61 through USGS78, in addition to NBS 22a. Because of exchangeable hydrogen, amino acid RMs currently are recommended only for carbon- and nitrogen-isotope measurements. Some amino acids contain (13)C and carbon-bound organic (2)H-enrichments at different molecular sites to provide RMs for potential site-specific isotopic analysis in future studies. PMID:26974360

  9. Investigating the contribution of mussel N regeneration to coastal primary production using stable isotope tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pather, S.; Altabet, M. A.; Pfister, C. A.; Post, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Determining the sources, pathways and sinks of inorganic nitrogen is integral to our understanding of one of the main determinants of primary productivity in the marine environment. The current view of rocky shore productivity is that it is largely fuelled by ‘new’ inorganic nitrogen brought to surface waters by the physical process of upwelling. However, along the rocky shores of the Washington State outer coast, the high densities of mussels (Mytilus californianus) colonizing these shores produce significant quantities of ‘regenerated’ inorganic nitrogen in the form of ammonium, a preferred nitrogen source for primary production. In this study, we seek to determine to what extent regenerated nitrogen is responsible for fueling primary production in these environments. To this end, we employed stable isotope tracers (15NH4 and 15NO3) to track the pathway of inorganic nitrogen in several rocky shore tidepools over the course of half a tidal cycle. Half of all the pools contained mussels in their natural abundance, while half were mussel control pools in which most of the mussels had been physically removed. Discrete water and algal tissue samples were taken at several time points within the study period for mass spectrometric stable isotope analysis. Preliminary results show isotope dilution of tidepool ammonium in pools containing mussels over half a tidal cycle, due to continued ammonium production by mussels. Combined concentration data, regeneration rates as well as removal rates due to autotrophic uptake and/or microbially-mediated ammonium oxidation (nitrification) will be calculated. Isotopic analysis of algal tissue samples and of the other nitrogen pools will shed further light on the contribution of regenerated ammonium to tidepool biogeochemical cycling and ultimately to coastal primary production.

  10. THE DEVELOPMENT OF A PREDICTIVE TOLL USING LARGEMOUTH BASS (MICROPTERUS SALMOIDES) SCALES TO ESTIMATE MERCURY (HG) CONCENTRATIONS AND STABLE-NITROGEN (15N/14N) ISOTOPE RATIOS IN FISH MUSCLE TISSUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowledge of the trophic structure of biota in aquatic sites offers potential for the construction of models to allow the prediction of contaminant bioaccumulation. Measurements of trophic position have been conducted using stable-nitrogen isotope ratios ( 15N) measured in fish m...

  11. Calcification rate and the stable carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen isotopes in the skeleton, host tissue, and zooxanthellae of bleached and recovering Hawaiian corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Lisa J.; Grottoli, Andréa G.

    2006-06-01

    We tested the effectiveness of stable isotopes as recorders of physiological changes that occur during coral bleaching and recovery. Montipora capitata and Porites compressa fragments were bleached in outdoor tanks with seawater temperature raised to 30 °C (treatment corals) for one month. Additional fragments were maintained at 27 °C in separate tanks (control corals). After one month, (0 months recovery), buoyant weight was measured and a subset of fragments was frozen. Remaining fragments were returned to the reef for recovery. After 1.5, 4, and 8 months, fragments were collected, measured for buoyant weight, and frozen. Fragments were analyzed for stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of the skeleton (δ 13C s; δ 18O s) and nitrogen and carbon isotopic compositions of the host tissue (δ 15N h; δ 13C h) and zooxanthellae (δ 15N z; δ 13C z). δ 13C s decreased immediately after bleaching in M. capitata, but not in P. compressa. δ 18O s of both species failed to record the warming event. During the remaining months of recovery, δ 13C s and δ 18O s were more enriched in treatment than control corals due to decreases in calcification and metabolic fractionation during that time. Increased δ 15N h of treatment P. compressa may be due to expelled zooxanthellae during bleaching and recovery. Increased δ 15N z at 1.5 months in treatment fragments of both species reflects the increased incorporation of dissolved inorganic nitrogen to facilitate mitotic cell division and/or chl a/cell recovery. Changes in δ 13C h and δ 13C z at 1.5 months in treatment M. capitata indicated a large increase in heterotrophically acquired carbon relative to photosynthetically fixed carbon. We experimentally show that isotopes in coral skeleton, host tissue and zooxanthellae can be used to verify physiological changes during bleaching and recovery, but their use as a proxy for past bleaching events in the skeletal record is limited.

  12. Identification of a Thiomicrospira denitrificans-Like Epsilonproteobacterium as a Catalyst for Autotrophic Denitrification in the Central Baltic Sea†

    PubMed Central

    Brettar, Ingrid; Labrenz, Matthias; Flavier, Sébastien; Bötel, Julia; Kuosa, Harri; Christen, Richard; Höfle, Manfred G.

    2006-01-01

    Identification and functional analysis of key members of bacterial communities in marine and estuarine environments are major challenges for obtaining a mechanistic understanding of biogeochemical processes. In the Baltic Sea basins, as in many other marine environments with anoxic bodies of water, the oxic-anoxic interface is considered a layer of high bacterial turnover of sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon compounds that has a great impact on matter balances in the whole ecosystem. We focused on autotrophic denitrification by oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds as a biogeochemically important process mediating concomitant turnover of sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon. We used a newly developed approach consisting of molecular analyses in stimulation experiments and in situ abundance. The molecular approach was based on single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the bacterial community RNA, which allowed identification of potential denitrifiers based on the sequences of enhanced SSCP bands and monitoring of the overall bacterial community during the experiments. Sequences of the SSCP bands of interest were used to design highly specific primers that enabled (i) generation of almost complete 16S rRNA gene sequences using experimental and environmental DNA as templates and (ii) quantification of the bacteria of interest by real-time PCR. By using this approach we identified the bacteria responsible for autotrophic denitrification as a single taxon, an epsilonproteobacterium related to the autotrophic denitrifier Thiomicrospira denitrificans. This finding was confirmed by material balances in the experiments that were consistent with those obtained with continuous cultures of T. denitrificans. The presence and activity of a bacterium that is phylogenetically and physiologically closely related to T. denitrificans could be relevant for the carbon budget of the central Baltic Sea because T. denitrificans exhibits only one-half the efficiency for carbon

  13. Field-scale application of spent sulfidic caustic as a source of alternative electron donor for autotrophic denitrification.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Ho; Park, Jeung-Jin; Choi, Gi-Choong; Byun, Im-Gyu; Park, Tae-Joo; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Biological reuse of spent sulfidic caustic (SSC) originating from oil refineries is a promising method for the petrochemical industry because of low handling cost. SSC typically contains high concentrations of sulfur, with the most dominant sulfur compounds being sulfide (S(2-)). SSC is also characterized by a high pH and elevated alkalinity up to 5-15% by weight. Because of these characteristics, SSC can be used for denitrification of NO3(-)-N in the biological nitrogen removal process as both the electron donor and buffering agent in sulfur-utilizing autotrophic denitrification. In this study, two kinds of SSC (SSC I, SSC II) produced from two petrochemical companies were used for autotrophic denitrification in a field-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The effluent total nitrogen (TN) concentration in this process was about 10.5 mg/L without any external carbon sources and the nitrification efficiency was low, about 93.0%, because of alkalinity deficiency in the influent. The injection of SSC I, but not SSC II, promoted nitrification efficiency, which was attributed to the difference in the NaOH/S ratio between SSC I and II. SSC was injected based on sulfide concentration of SSC required to denitrify NO3(-)-N in the WWTP. SSC I had higher NaOH/S than SSC II and thus could supply more alkalinity for nitrification than SSC II. On the other hand, additional TN removal of about 9.0% was achieved with the injection of both SSCs. However, denitrification efficiency was not proportionally increased with increasing SSC injection because of NO3(-)-N deficiency in the anoxic tank due to the limited capacity of the recycling pump. For the same reason, sulfate concentration, which is the end product of sulfur-utilizing autotrophic denitrificaiton in the effluent, was also not increased with increasing SSC injection. PMID:23863444

  14. Stable isotope composition of suspended particulate organic matter in twenty reservoirs from Guangdong, southern China: implications for pelagic carbon and nitrogen cycling.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wei; Gu, Binhe; Lin, Qiuqi; Gu, Jiguang; Han, Bo-Ping

    2013-07-01

    We studied seasonal variations in the carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) of particulate organic matter (POM) in the surface water of 20 man-made reservoirs in southern China during March, August and December 2010. These reservoirs are located from subtropical to tropical region, varied in trophic states and were influenced by several types of human activities. The geomorphometric and biogeochemical gradients in tropical/subtropical regions are complicated and poorly understood because of low variation in temperature and high variation in hydrological processes. The POM samples were collected from all the reservoirs to assess the seasonal variation patterns of δ(13)CPOM and δ(15)NPOM. Variation in δ(13)CPOM followed seasonal thermal and hydrological cycles. By contrast, δ(15)NPOM did not seasonally differ, which may have been complicated by phytoplankton assimilation of N originating in agricultural waste entering the reservoirs and of atmospheric nitrogen during the wet season as well as an increased relative contribution of animal waste in the reservoirs in the dry season. Within each sampling period, nutrient availability is more important than thermal and solar radiation inputs in the summer, and these physical drivers are more important during the dry and cold winter month in controlling δ(13)CPOM and δ(15)NPOM. On an annual basis, trophic states (total P, total N and chlorophyll a) are the primary drivers for the changes in both δ(13)CPOM and δ(15)NPOM across reservoirs. When the seasonal effect is removed using annual averages from each reservoir, we found that latitude, trophic states, pH, rainfall, water temperature, reservoir age, catchment area to reservoir area (CA:RA) ratio and together explained about 80% of the variance in both δ(13)CPOM and δ(15)NPOM. Our findings also suggest that the trend of δ(15)NPOM is less predictable than δ(13)CPOM. The consistent (15)N depletion and enrichment of POM in different reservoirs

  15. Pacific sleeper shark Somniosus pacificus trophic ecology in the eastern North Pacific Ocean inferred from nitrogen and carbon stable-isotope ratios and diet.

    PubMed

    Courtney, D L; Foy, R

    2012-04-01

    Stable-isotope ratios of nitrogen (δ¹⁵N) and lipid-normalized carbon (δ¹³C') were used to examine geographic and ontogenetic variability in the trophic ecology of a high latitude benthopelagic elasmobranch, the Pacific sleeper shark Somniosus pacificus. Mean muscle tissue δ¹³C' values of S. pacificus differed significantly among geographic regions of the eastern North Pacific Ocean. Linear models identified significant ontogenetic and geographic variability in muscle tissue δ¹⁵N values of S. pacificus. The trophic position of S. pacificus in the eastern North Pacific Ocean estimated here from previously published stomach-content data (4·3) was within the range of S. pacificus trophic position predicted from a linear model of S. pacificus muscle tissue δ¹⁵N (3·3-5·7) for fish of the same mean total length (L(T) ; 201·5 cm), but uncertainty in predicted trophic position was very high (95% prediction intervals ranged from 2·9 to 6·4). The relative trophic position of S. pacificus determined here from a literature review of δ¹⁵N by taxa in the eastern North Pacific Ocean was also lower than would be expected based on stomach-content data alone when compared to fishes, squid and filter feeding whales. Stable-isotope analysis revealed wider variability in the feeding ecology of S. pacificus in the eastern North Pacific Ocean than shown by diet data alone, and expanded previous conclusions drawn from analyses of stomach-content data to regional and temporal scales meaningful for fisheries management. PMID:22497395

  16. Isotopes Will Let the Cat Out of the Bag: A Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotopic Analysis of Dry Cat Food Brands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelanko, P. M.

    2011-12-01

    There are a plethora of healthy cat food brands that make a wide variety of claims about the nutrition of their product and the lack of nutrition of their competitors. The claims range from "No sugar or corn" to "Real meat is always the 1st ingredient". The two major disagreements in the cat food market are the nutritional value of corn and the realness of meat products. Here I present a carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic analysis of a wide range of dry cat food brands. The beginning assumption was brands with claims of no corn would be depleted in δ13C compared to brands with corn and brands with real meat as the 1st ingredient would be enriched in δ 15N compared to brands with meat as a lesser ingredient. Preliminary results show brands with no corn (δ13C ~ -22%) are depleted compared to brands with corn (δ13C ~ -17%), which is to be expected. However, brands that claim real meat is the 1st ingredient are slightly depleted (δ15N ~ 3.5%) compared to brands with proportionally less meat (δ15N ~ 5%); the opposite of what was anticipated. Also, the stable isotopes of three house cats, that were all fed the same dry diet (corn as major ingredient), were tracked over time as they were switched to a diet with no corn. Variation was present in the first round of analysis and persisted throughout the dietary change, suggesting individual cats may absorb nutrients from the identical diets differently.

  17. Infant and child diet in Neolithic hunter-fisher-gatherers from Cis-Baikal, Siberia: intra-long bone stable nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios.

    PubMed

    Waters-Rist, Andrea L; Bazaliiskii, Vladimir I; Weber, Andrzej W; Katzenberg, M Anne

    2011-10-01

    Analysis of stable nitrogen and carbon isotopes (δ(15) N and δ(13) C) from subadults and adults allows for assessment of age-related dietary changes, including breastfeeding and weaning, and adoption of an adult diet. In one of the first studies of hunter-fisher-gatherer subadults from Eurasia, three Neolithic (8,800-5,200 calBP) mortuary sites from southwestern Siberia are analyzed to evaluate hypothesized differences in weaning age between Early versus Late Neolithic groups. An intra-individual sampling methodology is used to compare bone formed at different ages. Collagen samples (n = 143) from three different growth areas of long bones-the proximal metaphysis, diaphysis, and distal metaphysis-were obtained from 49 subadults aged birth to 10 years. In infants (birth to 3 years, n = 23) contrasting the δ(15) N values of the metaphysis, which contains newer bone, to the δ(15) N values of the diaphysis, which contains older bone, permits a more precise determination of breastfeeding-weaning status. In Early and Late Neolithic groups breast milk was the major protein source until the age of 2-3 years. However, there are differences in the age of weaning completion and duration: Early Neolithic groups weaned their infants at a later age and over a shorter amount of time. Differences may have affected infant morbidity and mortality, and female fecundity and inter-birth intervals. Stable isotope values in older subadults (4-10 years, n = 26) do not differ from adults suggesting the absence of age-based food allocation. PMID:21837688

  18. Partitioning Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Respiration at Howland Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, M. S.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Davidson, E. A.; Hughes, H.; Savage, K. E.

    2014-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystem respiration is the combined flux of CO2 to the atmosphere from above- and below-ground, plant (autotrophic) and microbial (heterotrophic) sources. Flux measurements alone (e.g., from eddy covariance towers or soil chambers) cannot distinguish the contributions from these sources, which may change seasonally and respond differently to temperature and moisture. The development of improved process-based models that can predict how plants and microbes respond to changing environmental conditions (on seasonal, interannual, or decadal timescales) requires data from field experiments to distinguish among these respiration sources. We tested the viability of partitioning of soil and ecosystem respiration into autotrophic and heterotrophic components with different approaches at the Howland Forest in central Maine, USA. These include an experimental manipulation using the classic root trenching approach, combined with continuous measurements of d13CO2 as well as targeted ∆14CO2 measurements. For the isotopic measurements, we used a two-end member isotope mass balance approach to determine the fraction of soil respiration from autotrophic and heterotrophic sources. Results from these approaches will be compared, and together used in a model-data fusion context to better constrain the partitioning of ecosystem respiration in the ecosystem model, FöBAAR.

  19. The Rnf Complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii Is a Proton-Translocating Ferredoxin:NAD+ Oxidoreductase Essential for Autotrophic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Zhang, Tian; Dar, Shabir A.; Leang, Ching; Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has been predicted that the Rnf complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii is a proton-translocating ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase which contributes to ATP synthesis by an H+-translocating ATPase under both autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions. The recent development of methods for genetic manipulation of C. ljungdahlii made it possible to evaluate the possible role of the Rnf complex in energy conservation. Disruption of the C. ljungdahlii rnf operon inhibited autotrophic growth. ATP synthesis, proton gradient, membrane potential, and proton motive force collapsed in the Rnf-deficient mutant with H2 as the electron source and CO2 as the electron acceptor. Heterotrophic growth was hindered in the absence of a functional Rnf complex, as ATP synthesis, proton gradient, and proton motive force were significantly reduced with fructose as the electron donor. Growth of the Rnf-deficient mutant was also inhibited when no source of fixed nitrogen was provided. These results demonstrate that the Rnf complex of C. ljungdahlii is responsible for translocation of protons across the membrane to elicit energy conservation during acetogenesis and is a multifunctional device also implicated in nitrogen fixation. PMID:23269825

  20. Vertical distribution of vibrational energy of molecular nitrogen in a stable auroral red arc and its effect on ionospheric electron densities. Ph.D. Thesis - Catholic Univ. of Am.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, G. P.

    1973-01-01

    Previous solutions of the problem of the distribution of vibrationally excited molecular nitrogen in the thermosphere have either assumed a Boltzmann distribution and considered diffusion as one of the loss processes or solved for the energy level populations and neglected diffusion. Both of the previous approaches are combined by solving the time dependent continuity equations, including the diffusion process, for the first six energy levels of molecular nitrogen for conditions in the thermosphere corresponding to a stable auroral red arc. The primary source of molecular nitrogen excitation was subexcitation, and inelastic collisions between thermal electrons and molecular nitrogen. The reaction rates for this process were calculated from published cross section calculations. The loss processes for vibrational energy were electron and atomic oxygen quenching and vibrational energy exchange. The coupled sets of nonlinear, partial differential equations were solved numerically by employing finite difference equations.

  1. Assessment of marine-derived nutrients in the Copper River Delta, Alaska, using natural abundance of the stable isotopes of nitrogen, sulfur, and carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kline, Thomas C.; Woody, Carol Ann; Bishop, Mary Anne; Powers, Sean P.; Knudsen, E. Eric

    2007-01-01

    We performed nitrogen, sulfur, and carbon stable isotope analysis (SIA) on maturing and juvenile anadromous sockeye and coho salmon, and periphyton in two Copper River delta watersheds of Alaska to trace salmonderived nutrients during 2003–2004. Maturing salmon were isotopically enriched relative to alternate freshwater N, S, and C sources as expected, with differences consistent with species trophic level differences, and minor system, sex, and year-to-year differences, enabling use of SIA to trace these salmon-derived nutrients. Periphyton naturally colonized, incubated, and collected using Wildco Periphtyon Samplers in and near spawning sites was 34S- and 15N-enriched, as expected, and at all freshwater sites was 13C-depleted. At nonspawning and coho-only sites, periphyton 34S and 15N was generally low. However, 34S was low enough at some sites to be suggestive of sulfate reduction, complicating the use of S isotopes. Juvenile salmon SIA ranged in values consistent with using production derived from re-mineralization as well as direct utilization, but only by a minority fraction of coho salmon. Dependency on salmon-derived nutrients ranged from relatively high to relatively low, suggesting a space-limited system. No one particular isotope was found to be superior for determining the relative importance of salmon-derived nutrients.

  2. Pan-Arctic concentrations of mercury and stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) in marine zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Pomerleau, Corinne; Stern, Gary A; Pućko, Monika; Foster, Karen L; Macdonald, Robie W; Fortier, Louis

    2016-05-01

    Zooplankton play a central role in marine food webs, dictating the quantity and quality of energy available to upper trophic levels. They act as "keystone" species in transfer of mercury (Hg) up through the marine food chain. Here, we present the first Pan-Arctic overview of total and monomethylmercury concentrations (THg and MMHg) and stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) in selected zooplankton species by assembling data collected between 1998 and 2012 from six arctic regions (Laptev Sea, Chukchi Sea, southeastern Beaufort Sea, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, Hudson Bay and northern Baffin Bay). MMHg concentrations in Calanus spp., Themisto spp. and Paraeuchaeta spp. were found to increase with higher δ(15)N and lower δ(13)C. The southern Beaufort Sea exhibited both the highest THg and MMHg concentrations. Biomagnification of MMHg between Calanus spp. and two of its known predators, Themisto spp. and Paraeuchaeta spp., was greatest in the southern Beaufort Sea. Our results show large geographical variations in Hg concentrations and isotopic signatures for individual species related to regional ecosystem features, such as varying water masses and freshwater inputs, and highlight the increased exposure to Hg in the marine food chain of the southern Beaufort Sea. PMID:26874765

  3. Stable Carbon and Nitrogen isotopic characterization of bulk atmospheric particles over Indian coastal site (Goa) during monsoon, post-monsoon and winter periods of 2011-12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, K.; Agnihotri, R.; Sarma, V. V.; Karapurkar, S. G.; Poosarla, P. K.; Kumar, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    respectively; Narukawa et al., 2008). Furthermore, the inter-relationships between C and N isotopic composition with their mass concentrations, aerosol ions, and contemporary meteorological data are being examined and will be presented. Keywords: Bulk aerosols, Goa, Isotopes, carbonaceous material, monsoon References: Agnihotri, R., Mandal, T. K., Karapurkar, S., Naja, M., Gadi, R., Ahammed, Y. N., Kumar, A., Saud, T., and Saxena, M. (2011) Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of bulk aerosols over India and Northern Indian Ocean, Atmos. Environ., 45, 2828-2835, 2011. Narukawa, M., K. Kawamura, N. Takeuchi, and T. Nakajima (1999) Distributions of dicarboxylic acids and carbon isotopic compositions in aerosols from 1997 Indonesian forest fires, Geophys. Res. Lett., 26(20), 3101-3104, doi:10.1029/1999GL010810.

  4. Sedimentary organic matter in two Spitsbergen fjords: Terrestrial and marine contributions based on carbon and nitrogen contents and stable isotopes composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koziorowska, Katarzyna; Kuliński, Karol; Pempkowiak, Janusz

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the spatial variability of organic carbon (Corg) and total nitrogen (Ntot) concentrations, Corg/Ntot ratios, stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen (δ13Corg, δ15Ntot) and the proportions of autochthonous and allochtonous organic matter within recently deposited sediments of two Spitsbergen fjords: the Hornsund and the Adventfjord, which are affected to a different degree by the West Spitsbergen Current. Corg concentrations ranged from 1.38% to 1.98% in the Hornsund and from 1.73% to 3.85% in the Adventfjord. In both fjords the highest Corg concentrations were measured at the innermost stations and they decreased towards the mouths of the fjords. This suggests fresh water runoff to be an important source of organic matter (OM) for surface sediments. The results showed that both fjords differ significantly in terms of sedimentary organic matter characteristics. The samples from the Hornsund, except those from the innermost station in the Brepollen, had relatively low Corg/Ntot ratios, all within a narrow range (from 9.7 to 11.3). On the other hand significantly higher Corg/Ntot ratios, varying within a broad range (from 14.6 to 33.0), were measured in the Adventfjord. The samples from the Hornsund were characterized by higher δ13Corg (from -24.90‰ to -23.87‰) and δ15Ntot (from 3.02‰ to 4.93‰) than those from the Adventfjord (-25.94‰ to -24.69‰ and from 0.71‰ to 4.00‰, respectively). This is attributed to a larger proportion of marine organic matter. Using the two end-member approach proportions of terrestrial organic matter were evaluated. Terrestrial OM contribution for the Adventfjord was in the range of 82-83%, while in case of the Hornsund the results were in the range of 69-75%, with the exception of the innermost part of the fjord, where terrestrial organic matter contribution ranged from 80 to 82%. The strong positive correlation between δ13Corg and δ15Ntot was revealed. This was taken as an indicator

  5. Photolysis imprint in the nitrate stable isotope signal in snow and atmosphere of East Antarctica and implications for reactive nitrogen cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, M. M.; Savarino, J.; Morin, S.; Erbland, J.; Martins, J. M. F.

    2009-11-01

    The nitrogen (δ15N) and triple oxygen (δ17O and δ18O) isotopic composition of nitrate (NO3-) was measured year-round in the atmosphere and snow pits at Dome C, Antarctica (DC, 75.1° S, 123.3° E), and in surface snow on a transect between DC and the coast. Comparison to the isotopic signal in atmospheric NO3- shows that snow NO3- is significantly enriched in δ15N by >200‰ and depleted in δ18O by <40‰. Post-depositional fractionation in Δ17O(NO3-) is small, potentially allowing reconstruction of past shifts in tropospheric oxidation pathways from ice cores. Assuming a Rayleigh-type process we find fractionation constants ɛ of -60±15‰, 8±2‰ and 1±1‰, for δ15N, δ18O and Δ17O, respectively. A photolysis model yields an upper limit for the photolytic fractionation constant 15ɛ of δ15N, consistent with lab and field measurements, and demonstrates a high sensitivity of 15ɛ to the incident actinic flux spectrum. The photolytic 15ɛ is process-specific and therefore applies to any snow covered location. Previously published 15ɛ values are not representative for conditions at the Earth surface, but apply only to the UV lamp used in the reported experiment (Blunier et al., 2005; Jacobi et al., 2006). Depletion of oxygen stable isotopes is attributed to photolysis followed by isotopic exchange with water and hydroxyl radicals. Conversely, 15N enrichment of the NO3- fraction in the snow implies 15N depletion of emissions. Indeed, δ15N in atmospheric NO3- shows a strong decrease from background levels (4±7‰) to -35‰ in spring followed by recovery during summer, consistent with significant snowpack emissions of reactive nitrogen. Field and lab evidence therefore suggest that photolysis is an important process driving fractionation and associated NO3- loss from snow. The Δ17O signature confirms previous coastal measurements that the peak of atmospheric NO3- in spring is of stratospheric origin. After sunrise photolysis drives then redistribution

  6. Photolytic control of the nitrate stable isotope signal in snow and atmosphere of East Antarctica and implications for reactive nitrogen cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, M. M.; Savarino, J.; Morin, S.; Erbland, J.; Martins, J. M. F.

    2009-05-01

    The nitrogen (δ15N) and triple oxygen (δ17/18O) isotopic composition of nitrate (NO3-) was measured year-round in the atmosphere and snow pits at Dome C (DC, 75.1° S, 123.3° E), and in surface snow on a transect between DC and the coast. Snow pit profiles of δ15N (δ18O) in NO3- show significant enrichment (depletion) of >200 (<40) ‰ compared to the isotopic signal in atmospheric NO3-, whereas post-depositional fractionation in Δ17O(NO3-) is small, allowing reconstruction of past shifts in tropospheric oxidation pathways from ice cores. Assuming a Rayleigh-type process we find in the DC04 (DC07) pit fractionation factors ɛ of -50±10 (-71±12) ‰, 6±3 (9±2) ‰ and 1±0.2 (2±0.6) ‰, for δ15N, δ18O and Δ17O, respectively. A photolysis model reproduces ɛ for δ15N within the range of uncertainty at DC and for lab experiments reported by Blunier et al. (2005), suggesting that the current literature value for photolytic isotopic fractionation in snow is significantly underestimated. Depletion of oxygen stable isotopes is attributed to photolysis followed by isotopic exchange with water and hydroxyl radicals. Conversely, 15N enrichment of the NO3- fraction in the snow implies 15N depletion of emissions. Indeed, δ15N in atmospheric NO3- shows a strong decrease from background levels (4.4±6.8‰) to -35.1‰ in spring followed by recovery during summer, consistent with significant snow pack emissions of reactive nitrogen. Field and lab evidence therefore suggest that photolysis dominates fractionation and associated NO3- loss from snow in the low-accumulation regions of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS). The Δ17O signature confirms previous coastal measurements that the peak of atmospheric NO3- in spring is of stratospheric origin. After sunrise photolysis drives then redistribution of NO3- from the snowpack photic zone to the atmosphere and a snow surface skin layer, thereby concentrating NO3- at the surface. Little NO3- is exported off the EAIS

  7. Quantifying sediment source contributions in coastal catchments impacted by the Fukushima nuclear accident with carbon and nitrogen elemental concentrations and stable isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laceby, J. Patrick; Huon Huon, Sylvain; Onda, Yuichi; Evrard, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accidental release of radioactive contaminants resulted in the significant fallout of radiocesium over several coastal catchments in the Fukushima Prefecture. Radiocesium, considered to be the greatest risk to the short and long term health of the local community, is rapidly bound to fine soil particles and thus is mobilized and transported during soil erosion and runoff processes. As there has been a broad-scale decontamination of rice paddy fields and rural residential areas in the contaminated region, one important long term question is whether there is, or may be, a downstream transfer of radiocesium from forests that covered over 65% of the most contaminated region. Accordingly, carbon and nitrogen elemental concentrations and stable isotope ratios are used to determine the relative contributions of forests and rice paddies to transported sediment in three contaminated coastal catchments. Samples were taken from the three main identified sources: cultivated soils (rice paddies and fields, n=30), forest soils (n=45), and subsoils (channel bank and decontaminated soils, n = 25). Lag deposit sediment samples were obtained from five sampling campaigns that targeted the main hydrological events from October 2011 to October 2014. In total, 86 samples of deposited sediment were analyzed for particulate organic matter elemental concentrations and isotope ratios, 24 from the Mano catchment, 44 from the Niida catchment, and 18 from the Ota catchment. Mann-Whitney U-tests were used to examine the source discrimination potential of this tracing suite and select the appropriate tracers for modelling. The discriminant tracers were modelled with a concentration-dependent distribution mixing model. Preliminary results indicate that cultivated sources (predominantly rice paddies) contribute disproportionately more sediment per unit area than forested regions in these contaminated catchments. Future research will examine if there are

  8. Diurnal variations of carbonaceous components, major ions, and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in suburban aerosols from northern vicinity of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Nannan; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Kanaya, Yugo; Wang, Zifa

    2015-12-01

    We report diurnal variations of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and major ions as well as stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) in ambient aerosols at a suburban site (Mangshan), 40 km north of Beijing, China. We found that aerosol chemical compositions were largely controlled by the air mass transport from Beijing in daytime with southerly winds and by relatively fresh air mass in nighttime from the northern forest areas with northerly winds. Higher concentrations of aerosol mass and total carbon were obtained in daytime. Further, higher OC/EC ratios were recorded in daytime (4.0 ± 1.7) than nighttime (3.2 ± 0.7), suggesting that OC is formed by photochemical oxidation of gaseous precursors in daytime. Contributions of WSOC to OC were slightly higher in daytime (38%) than nighttime (34%), possibly due to secondary formation of WSOC in daytime. We also found higher concentrations of Ca2+ in daytime, which was originated from the construction dust in Beijing area and transported to the sampling site. δ13C ranged from -25.3 to -21.2‰ (ave. -23.5 ± 0.9‰) in daytime and -29.0 to -21.4‰ (-24.0 ± 1.5‰) in nighttime, suggesting that Mangshan aerosols were more influenced by fossil fuel combustion products in daytime and by terrestrial C3 plants in nighttime. This study suggests that daytime air mass delivery from megacity Beijing largely influence the air quality at the receptor site in the north together with photochemical processing of organic aerosols during the atmospheric transport, whereas the Mangshan site is covered with relatively clean air masses at night.

  9. Particulate matter fluxes in the southern and central Kara Sea compared to sediments: Bulk fluxes, amino acids, stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes, sterols and fatty acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaye, Birgit; Fahl, Kirsten; Kodina, Lyudmila A.; Lahajnar, Niko; Nagel, Birgit; Unger, Daniela; Gebhardt, A. Catalina

    2007-12-01

    The Kara Sea is one of the arctic marginal seas strongly influenced by fresh water and river suspension. The highly seasonal discharge by the two major rivers Yenisei and Ob induces seasonal changes in hydrography, sea surface temperature, ice cover, primary production and sedimentation. In order to obtain a seasonal pattern of sedimentation in the Kara Sea, sediment traps were deployed near the river mouth of the Yenisei (Yen) as well as in the central Kara Sea (Kara) within the framework of the German-Russian project "Siberian River run-off; SIRRO". Two and a half years of time-series flux data were obtained between September 2000 and April 2003 and were analyzed for bulk components, amino acids, stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes as well as sterols and fatty acids. Sediment trap data show that much of the annual deposition occurred under ice cover, possibly enhanced by zooplanktonic activity and sediment resuspension. An early bloom of ice-associated algae in April/May occurred in the polynya area and may have been very important to sustain the life cycles of higher organisms after the light limitation of the winter months due to no/low insolation and ice cover. The strong river input dominated the months June-August in the southern part of the Kara Sea. The central Kara Sea had a much shorter productive period starting in August and was less affected by the river plumes. Despite different time-scales of sampling and trapping biases, total annual fluxes from traps were in the same order of magnitude as accumulation rates in surface sediments. Terrestrial organic carbon accumulation decreased from 10.7 to 0.3 g C m -2 a -1 from the riverine source to the central Kara Sea. Parallel to this, preservation of marine organic matter decreased from 10% to 2% of primary productivity which was probably related to decreasing rates of sedimentation.

  10. Sediment source detection by stable isotope analysis, carbon and nitrogen content and CSSI in a small river of the Swiss Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SchindlerWildhaber, Yael; Alewell, Christine; Birkholz, Axel

    2014-05-01

    Suspended sediment (SS) and organic matter in rivers can harm the fauna by affecting health and fitness of free swimming fish and by causing siltation of the riverbed. The temporal and spatial dynamics of sediment, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) during the brown trout spawning season in a small river of the Swiss Plateau were assessed and C isotopes as well as the C/N atomic ratio were used to distinguish autochthonous and allochthonous sources of organic matter in SS loads. The visual basic program IsoSource with 13Ctot and 15N as input isotopes was used to quantify the temporal and spatial sources of SS. We determined compound specific stable carbon isotopes (CSSI) in fatty acids of possible sediment source areas to the stream in addition and compared them to SS from selected high flow and low flow events. Organic matter concentrations in the infiltrated and suspended sediment were highest during low flow periods with small sediment loads and lowest during high flow periods with high sediment loads. Peak values in nitrate and dissolved organic C were measured during high flow and high rainfall, probably due to leaching from pasture and arable land. The organic matter was of allochthonous sources as indicated by the C/N atomic ratio and δ13Corg. Organic matter in SS increased from up- to downstream due to an increase in sediment delivery from pasture and arable land downstream of the river. While the major sources of SS are pasture and arable land during base flow conditions, SS from forest soils increased during heavy rain events and warmer winter periods most likely due to snow melt which triggered erosion. Preliminary results of CSSI analysis of sediment source areas and comparison to SS of selected events indicate that differences in d13C values of individual fatty acids are too small to differentiate unambiguously between sediment sources.

  11. Diurnal variations of carbonaceous components, major ions, and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in suburban aerosols from northern vicinity of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Nannan; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Kanaya, Yugo; Wang, Zifa

    2015-12-01

    We report diurnal variations of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and major ions as well as stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) in ambient aerosols at a suburban site (Mangshan), 40 km north of Beijing, China. We found that aerosol chemical compositions were largely controlled by the air mass transport from Beijing in daytime with southerly winds and by relatively fresh air mass in nighttime from the northern forest areas with northerly winds. Higher concentrations of aerosol mass and total carbon were obtained in daytime. Further, higher OC/EC ratios were recorded in daytime (4.0 ± 1.7) than nighttime (3.2 ± 0.7), suggesting that OC is formed by photochemical oxidation of gaseous precursors in daytime. Contributions of WSOC to OC were slightly higher in daytime (38%) than nighttime (34%), possibly due to secondary formation of WSOC in daytime. We also found higher concentrations of Ca2+ in daytime, which was originated from the construction dust in Beijing area and transported to the sampling site. δ13C ranged from -25.3 to -21.2‰ (ave. -23.5 ± 0.9‰) in daytime and -29.0 to -21.4‰ (-24.0 ± 1.5‰) in nighttime, suggesting that Mangshan aerosols were more influenced by fossil fuel combustion products in daytime and by terrestrial C3 plants in nighttime. This study suggests that daytime air mass delivery from megacity Beijing largely influence the air quality at the receptor site in the north together with photochemical processing of organic aerosols during the atmospheric transport, whereas the Mangshan site is covered with relatively clean air masses at night.

  12. Benthic trophic network in the Bay of Banyuls-sur-Mer (northwest Mediterranean, France): An assessment based on stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlier, Antoine; Riera, Pascal; Amouroux, Jean-Michel; Bodiou, Jean-Yves; Grémare, Antoine

    2007-03-01

    The benthic trophic network in the Bay of Banyuls-sur-Mer was studied through the carbon and nitrogen isotopic characterization of a large set of soft-bottom macrobenthic invertebrates, fishes and potential food sources. Continental inputs as well as seagrass meadows did not contribute significantly to this benthic trophic network as indicated by: (1) the difference between their δ 13C signatures (respectively -28.4‰ and -9.5‰) and those of sampled animals (between -21.0‰ and -14.6‰); and (2) their low inputs to the bay. Benthic primary consumers fed mostly on surface sediment organic matter (SSOM), which tightly interacts with suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM) and sedimenting organic matter (STOM) due to sediment resuspension. Our results also suggest the occurrence of a transfer between marine SPOM and some invertebrates (e.g. Veretillum cynomorium) and fishes (e.g. Boops boops and Spicara melanurus) through zooplankton. Moreover, the different types of primary consumers (i.e., suspension-feeders, interface-feeders, surface deposit-feeders and subsurface deposit-feeders) preferentially used distinct fractions of the heterogeneous SPOM-STOM-SSOM pool. These differences were mostly related with feeding depth and resulted in distinct isotopic signatures. Differences in the stable isotopic ratios of suspension and interface-feeders could also partly reflect the use of microphytobenthos by the later. Assuming a 15N-enrichment factor of 3.4‰ between the lower and upper ranges of two successive trophic levels, we estimated that the benthic food web of the Bay of Banyuls-sur-Mer was composed of 4 trophic levels. The comparison with our δ 13C values suggests that the whole trophic food chain is affected by continental inputs at the immediate vicinity of the Rhône River mouth even though these effects are maximal for deposit-feeding and carnivorous polychaetes.

  13. Nitrogen Inputs via Nitrogen Fixation in Northern Plants and Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorp, N. R.; Wieder, R. K.; Vile, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Dominated by cold and often acidic water logged environments, mineralization of organic matter is slow in the majority of northern ecosystems. Measures of extractable ammonium and nitrate are generally low and can be undetectable in peat pore waters. Despite this apparent nitrogen limitation, many of these environments produce deep deposits of soil organic matter. Biological nitrogen fixation carried out by autotrophic and heterotrophic diazotrophs associated with cryptograms provides the majority of known nitrogen inputs in these northern ecosystems. Nitrogen fixation was assessed in a variety of northern soils within rhizospheres of dominant plant communities. We investigated the availability of this newly fixed nitrogen to the vascular plant community in nitrogen limited northern plant communities. We tracked nitrogen flow from 15N2 gas fixed in Sphagnum mosses into tissues of two native vascular plant species, boreal cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccus) and black spruce (Picea mariana). 15N-labeled Sphagnum microcosms were grown within variable mesh size exclusion/inclusion fabrics in a nitrogen addition experiment in situ in order to investigate the role of mycorrhizal fungi in the uptake of newly fixed nitrogen. Up to 24% of daily fixed 15N label was transferred to vascular plant tissues during 2 months. Nitrogen addition resulted in decreased N2 fixation rates; however, with higher nitrogen availability there was a higher rate of 15N label uptake into the vascular plants, likely the result of increased production of dissolved organic nitrogen. Reliance on mycorrhizal networks for nitrogen acquisition was indicated by nitrogen isotope fractionation patterns. Moreover, N2 fixation activities in mosses were stimulated when vascular plants were grown in moss microcosms versus "moss only" treatments. Results indicate that bog vascular plants may derive considerable nitrogen from atmospheric N2 biologically fixed within Sphagnum mosses. This work demonstrates that

  14. Particulate Pyrite Autotrophic Denitrification (PPAD) for Remediation of Nitrate-contaminated Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, S.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, L. C.; Henderson, M.; Feng, C.; Ergas, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    The rapid movement of human civilization towards urbanization, industrialization, and increased agricultural activities has introduced a large amount of nitrate into groundwater. Nitrate is a toxic substance discharged from groundwater to rivers and leads to decreased dissolved oxygen and eutrophication. For this experiment, an electron donor is needed to convert nitrate into non-toxic nitrogen gas. Pyrite is one of the most abundant minerals in the earth's crust making it an ideal candidate as an electron donor. The overall goal of this research was to investigate the potential for pyrite to be utilized as an electron donor for autotrophic denitrification of nitrate-contaminated groundwater. Batch studies of particulate pyrite autotrophic denitrification (PPAD) of synthetic groundwater (100 mg NO3--N L-1) were set up with varying biomass concentration, pyrite dose, and pyrite particle size. Reactors were seeded with mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (VSS) from a biological nitrogen removal wastewater treatment facility. PPAD using small pyrite particles (<0.45mm) resulted in a favorable nitrate removal. The nitrate removal rate increased from 0.26 to 0.34 mg L-1h-1 and then to 0.86 mg L-1h-1, approaching that of the sulfur oxidizing denitrification (SOD) rate of 1.19 mg L-1h-1. Based on Box-Behnken design (BBD) and response surface methodology (RSM), the optimal amount of biomass concentration, pyrite dose, and pyrite particle size were 1,250 mg VSS L-1, 125 g L-1, and 0.815-1.015 mm, respectively. PPAD exhibited substantial nitrate removal rate, lower sulfate accumulation (5.46 mg SO42-/mg NO3--N) and lower alkalinity consumption (1.70 mg CaCO3/mg NO3--N) when compared to SOD (7.54 mg SO42-/mg NO3--N, 4.57 mg CaCO3/mg NO3--N based on stoichiometric calculation). This research revealed that the PPAD process is a promising technique for nitrate-contaminated groundwater treatment and promoted the utilization of pyrite in the field of environmental remediation.

  15. A robust nitrifying community in a bioreactor at 50 °C opens up the path for thermophilic nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Courtens, Emilie Np; Spieck, Eva; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Bodé, Samuel; Boeckx, Pascal; Schouten, Stefan; Jauregui, Ruy; Pieper, Dietmar H; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Boon, Nico

    2016-09-01

    The increasing production of nitrogen-containing fertilizers is crucial to meet the global food demand, yet high losses of reactive nitrogen associated with the food production/consumption chain progressively deteriorate the natural environment. Currently, mesophilic nitrogen-removing microbes eliminate nitrogen from wastewaters. Although thermophilic nitrifiers have been separately enriched from natural environments, no bioreactors are described that couple these processes for the treatment of nitrogen in hot wastewaters. Samples from composting facilities were used as inoculum for the batch-wise enrichment of thermophilic nitrifiers (350 days). Subsequently, the enrichments were transferred to a bioreactor to obtain a stable, high-rate nitrifying process (560 days). The community contained up to 17% ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOAs) closely related to 'Candidatus Nitrososphaera gargensis', and 25% nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOBs) related to Nitrospira calida. Incorporation of (13)C-derived bicarbonate into the respective characteristic membrane lipids during nitrification supported their activity as autotrophs. Specific activities up to 198±10 and 894±81 mg N g(-1) VSS per day for AOAs and NOBs were measured, where NOBs were 33% more sensitive to free ammonia. The NOBs were extremely sensitive to free nitrous acid, whereas the AOAs could only be inhibited by high nitrite concentrations, independent of the free nitrous acid concentration. The observed difference in product/substrate inhibition could facilitate the development of NOB inhibition strategies to achieve more cost-effective processes such as deammonification. This study describes the enrichment of autotrophic thermophilic nitrifiers from a nutrient-rich environment and the successful operation of a thermophilic nitrifying bioreactor for the first time, facilitating opportunities for thermophilic nitrogen removal biotechnology. PMID:26894446

  16. Metabolic potential of microbial mats and microbialites: Autotrophic capabilities described by an in silico stoichiometric approach from shared genomic resources.

    PubMed

    Cerqueda-García, Daniel; Falcón, Luisa I

    2016-08-01

    Microbialites and microbial mats are complex communities with high phylogenetic diversity. These communities are mostly composed of bacteria and archaea, which are the earliest living forms on Earth and relevant to biogeochemical evolution. In this study, we identified the shared metabolic pathways for uptake of inorganic C and N in microbial mats and microbialites based on metagenomic data sets. An in silico analysis for autotrophic pathways was used to trace the paths of C and N to the system, following an elementary flux modes (EFM) approach, resulting in a stoichiometric model. The fragility was analyzed by the minimal cut sets method. We found four relevant pathways for the incorporation of CO2 (Calvin cycle, reverse tricarboxylic acid cycle, reductive acetyl-CoA pathway, and dicarboxylate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle), some of them present only in archaea, while nitrogen fixation was the most important source of N to the system. The metabolic potential to incorporate nitrate to biomass was also relevant. The fragility of the network was low, suggesting a high redundancy of the autotrophic pathways due to their broad metabolic diversity, and highlighting the relevance of reducing power source. This analysis suggests that microbial mats and microbialites are "metabolic pumps" for the incorporation of inorganic gases and formation of organic matter. PMID:27324427

  17. Estimating tissue-specific discrimination factors and turnover rates of stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon in the smallnose fanskate Sympterygia bonapartii (Rajidae).

    PubMed

    Galván, D E; Jañez, J; Irigoyen, A J

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to estimate trophic discrimination factors (TDFs) and metabolic turnover rates of nitrogen and carbon stable isotopes in blood and muscle of the smallnose fanskate Sympterygia bonapartii by feeding six adult individuals, maintained in captivity, with a constant diet for 365 days. TDFs were estimated as the difference between δ(13) C or δ(15) N values of the food and the tissues of S. bonapartii after they had reached equilibrium with their diet. The duration of the experiment was enough to reach the equilibrium condition in blood for both elements (estimated time to reach 95% of turnover: C t95%blood  = 150 days, N t95%blood  = 290 days), whilst turnover rates could not be estimated for muscle because of variation among samples. Estimates of Δ(13) C and Δ(15) N values in blood and muscle using all individuals were Δ(13) Cblood = 1·7‰, Δ(13) Cmuscle = 1·3‰, Δ(15) Nblood = 2·5‰ and Δ(15) Nmuscle = 1·5‰, but there was evidence of differences of c.0·4‰ in the Δ(13) C values between sexes. The present values for TDFs and turnover rates constitute the first evidence for dietary switching in batoids based on long-term controlled feeding experiments. Overall, the results showed that S. bonapartii has relatively low turnover rates and isotopic measurements would not track seasonal movements adequately. The estimated Δ(13) C values in S. bonapartii blood and muscle were similar to previous estimations for elasmobranchs and to generally accepted values in bony fishes (Δ(13) C = 1·5‰). For Δ(15) N, the results were similar to published reports for blood but smaller than reports for muscle and notably smaller than the typical values used to estimate trophic position (Δ(15) N c. 3·4‰). Thus, trophic position estimations for elasmobranchs based on typical Δ(15) N values could lead to underestimates of actual trophic positions. Finally, the evidence of differences in TDFs between sexes reveals a need for more

  18. Chlordane components and metabolites in seven species of Arctic seabirds from the Northwater Polynya: relationships with stable isotopes of nitrogen and enantiomeric fractions of chiral components.

    PubMed

    Fisk, A T; Moisey, J; Hobson, K A; Karnovsky, N J; Norstrom, R J

    2001-01-01

    The Northwater Polynya (NOW) is a large area of year-round open water found in the high Arctic between Ellesmere Island and Greenland. NOW has high biological productivity compared with other arctic marine areas, and supports large populations of several seabird species. Seven species of seabirds, dovekie (Alle alle, DOVE), thick-billed murre (Uria lomvia, TBMU), black guillemot (Cepphus grylle, BLGU), black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla, BLKI), ivory gull (Pagophila eburnea, IVGU), glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus, GLGU) and northern fulmar (Fulmaris glacialis, NOFU) were collected in May and June 1998 to determine chlordane concentrations in liver and fat and to examine species differences, relationships with stable isotopes of nitrogen, and enantiomeric fractions (EFs) of chiral components. sigma CHLOR concentrations varied over an order of magnitude among species, from a low of 176 +/- 19 ng/g (lipid corrected) in TMBU liver to a high of 3190 +/- 656 ng/g (lipid corrected) in NOFU liver. Lipid-corrected concentrations of chlordane did not vary between sex for any species or between fat and liver except for the DOVE, that had fat concentrations that were significantly greater than the liver. delta 15N values described a significant percentage of the variability of concentrations for most chlordane components, although less than what has been reported for whole food chains. Slopes of delta 15N versus concentration of chlordane components and sigma CHLOR were similar with the exception of those which were metabolized (trans-chlordane) or formed through biotransformation (oxychlordane). The relative proportions of chlordane components in seabirds were related to phylogeny; the procellariid (NOFU) had the greatest percentage of oxychlordane (> 70%), followed by the larids (BLKI, IVGU and GLGU; 40-50%) and the alcids (DOVE and BLGU; 10-20%). The exception was TBMU, an alcid, where oxychlordane made up > 40% of its chlordane. EFs of chiral components failed to

  19. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope measurements and X-ray photoabsorption spectroscopy of microbial-mat-containing gypsum crust in modern saline pan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaji, Yuta; Kawahata, Hodaka; Yoshimura, Toshihiro; Kuroda, Junichiro; Ogawa, Nanako O.; Jimenez-Espejo, Francis J.; Lugli, Stefano; Manzi, Vinicio; Roveri, Marco; Tamenori, Yusuke; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2015-04-01

    A gypsum crust collected from the Sosalt commercial salt work at Trapani (western Sicily, Italy), which was deposited in several years, has a remarkable layered structure with different colors and physical appearance (from the top to the bottom: transparent gypsum, green layer, and granulous layer containing black particles), each color representing a different microbial community. Previous studies suggest that the colored layers consist of different cyanobacterial communities, purple sulfur bacteria and sulfur reducing bacteria, respectively, and that their biochemical processes are intimately connected (e.g. Caumette et al., 1994; Canfield et al., 2004). In this study we performed stable carbon and nitrogen isotope measurements, elemental mapping, and bulk chemical analyses to describe geochemical characteristics of this layered evaporite deposit. Lower values of δ13C and δ15N in the colored layers compared to the topmost transparent layer indicate active biochemical processes by the bacterial communities, as expected. To further describe the differences between the layers, a synchrotron based micro-X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) was used to acquire the spatial distributions of Na, Mg, Sr, S, Cl, and P in the each layer of different color. The elemental mapping combined with chemical speciation of S K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of the gypsum crust showed that the transparent and the green layers were uniformly filled with gypsum crystals, while a somewhat high concentration of elements other than sulfur were observed in the interparticle realm of the bottom gypsum layer. This indicates an earliest alteration at the bottom layer probably as a result of sulfur reduction by sulfur reducing bacteria inhabiting the interparticle realm. It is noteworthy that no reduced sulfur compounds, except for gypsum, was detected in the sample by μ-XANES analysis, despite the presence of a layer inhabited by sulfur reducing bacteria. Since gypsum is

  20. Spatial, ontogenetic and interspecific variability in stable isotope ratios of nitrogen and carbon of Merluccius capensis and Merluccius paradoxus off South Africa.

    PubMed

    Van Der Lingen, C D; Miller, T W

    2014-08-01

    General linear models (GLMs) were used to determine the relative importance of interspecific, ontogenetic and spatial effects in explaining variability in stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (δ(15) N) and carbon (δ(13) C) of the co-occurring Cape hakes Merluccius capensis and Merluccius paradoxus off South Africa. Significant GLMs were derived for both isotopes, explaining 74 and 56% of observed variance in Merluccius spp. δ(15) N and δ(13) C, respectively. Spatial effects (west or south coast) contributed most towards explaining variability in the δ(15) N model, with Merluccius spp. off the west coast having higher (by c. 1.4‰) δ(15) N levels than Merluccius spp. off the south coast. Fish size and species were also significant in explaining variability in δ(15) N, with both species showing significant linear increases in δ(15) N with size and M. capensis having higher (by c. 0.7‰) δ(15) N values than M. paradoxus. Species and coast explained most and similar amounts of variability in the δ(13) C model, with M. capensis having higher (by c. 0.8‰) δ(13) C values than M. paradoxus, and values being lower (by c. 0.7‰) for fishes off the west coast compared with the south coast. These results not only corroborate the knowledge of Merluccius spp. feeding ecology gained from dietary studies, in particular the ontogenetic change in trophic level corresponding to a changing diet, but also that M. capensis feeds at a slightly higher trophic level than M. paradoxus. The spatial difference in Merluccius spp. δ(15) N appears due to a difference in isotopic baseline, and not as a result of Merluccius spp. feeding higher in the food web off the west than the south coast, and provides new evidence that corroborates previous observations of biogeographic differences in isotopic baselines around the South African coast. This study also provides quantitative data on the relative trophic level and trophic width of Cape hakes over a large size range that can be used

  1. Food-web structure and trophodynamics of mesopelagic-suprabenthic bathyal macrofauna of the Algerian Basin based on stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, E.; Cartes, J. E.; Rumolo, P.; Sprovieri, M.

    2009-09-01

    The trophodynamics of mesopelagic (macrozooplankton/micronekton) and benthic boundary layer (suprabenthos=hyperbenthos) faunas from the Algerian Basin were characterized on a seasonal scale through stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic analyses of a total of 34 species and two broad taxa (Copepoda and Cumacea). This is the first study simultaneously focused on trophodynamics of deep-sea zooplankton and suprabenthos. Samples were collected southeast of Mallorca (Algerian Basin, Western Mediterranean), on the continental slope close to Cabrera Archipelago, at 650-780 m depths, ca. bi-monthly between August 2003 and June 2004. Mean δ 13C values of suprabenthos ranged from -21.1‰ ( Munnopsurus atlanticus) to -16.7‰ ( Cyclaspis longicaudata). Values of δ 15N ranged from 2.8‰ ( Lepechinella manco) to 9.9‰ (larvae of Gnathia sp.). The stable isotope ratios of suprabenthic fauna displayed a continuum of values, confirming a wide spectrum of feeding guilds (from filter feeders/surface deposit feeders to predators). According to the available information on diets for suprabenthic species, the highest annual mean δ 15N values were found for the hematophagous isopod Gnathia sp. parasite on fish (represented by Praniza larvae) and carnivorous amphipods (e.g. Rhachotropis spp., Nicippe tumida) consuming copepods, and the lowest δ 15N values were found for two cumaceans ( Cyclaspis longicaudata and Platysympus typicus) feeding on detritus. Assuming a 15N-enrichment factor of 2.5‰ and deposit feeders as baseline, we found three trophic levels in suprabenthic food webs. δ 13C ranges were particularly wide among deposit feeders (ranging from -21.8% to -17.3‰) and omnivores (from -20.5% to -18.8‰), suggesting exploitation of particulate organic matter (POM) of different characteristics. Our isotopic analyses revealed lower ranges of δ 13C and δ 15N for macrozooplankton/micronekton, compared with suprabenthos. δ 13C values of zooplankton taxa ranged from -21.1

  2. Metabolic engineering of Cupriavidus necator for heterotrophic and autotrophic alka(e)ne production.

    PubMed

    Crépin, Lucie; Lombard, Eric; Guillouet, Stéphane E

    2016-09-01

    Alkanes of defined carbon chain lengths can serve as alternatives to petroleum-based fuels. Recently, microbial pathways of alkane biosynthesis have been identified and enabled the production of alkanes in non-native producing microorganisms using metabolic engineering strategies. The chemoautotrophic bacterium Cupriavidus necator has great potential for producing chemicals from CO2: it is known to have one of the highest growth rate among natural autotrophic bacteria and under nutrient imbalance it directs most of its carbon flux to the synthesis of the acetyl-CoA derived polymer, polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), (up to 80% of intracellular content). Alkane synthesis pathway from Synechococcus elongatus (2 genes coding an acyl-ACP reductase and an aldehyde deformylating oxygenase) was heterologously expressed in a C. necator mutant strain deficient in the PHB synthesis pathway. Under heterotrophic condition on fructose we showed that under nitrogen limitation, in presence of an organic phase (decane), the strain produced up to 670mg/L total hydrocarbons containing 435mg/l of alkanes consisting of 286mg/l of pentadecane, 131mg/l of heptadecene, 18mg/l of heptadecane, and 236mg/l of hexadecanal. We report here the highest level of alka(e)nes production by an engineered C. necator to date. We also demonstrated the first reported alka(e)nes production by a non-native alkane producer from CO2 as the sole carbon source. PMID:27212691

  3. Mathematical modeling of autotrophic denitrification (AD) process with sulphide as electron donor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guihua; Yin, Fengjun; Chen, Shaohua; Xu, Yuanjian; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-03-15

    Autotrophic denitrification (AD) plays a critical role in nitrate removal from organic carbon-deficient wastewaters with a high level of nitrogen oxides. However, the AD process is not included in the current denitrification models, which limits the application of AD technology for wastewater treatment. In this work, a kinetic model for AD process involved 4 processes and 5 components with 9 parameters is established to describe the sulphide biooxidation and nitrite removal process. In this model, 4 oxidation-reduction reactions using sulphide as electronic donor in the AD process are taken into account. The model parameters are optimized by fitting data from the experiments with different combinations of sulphide, sulphur, sulphate, nitrate and nitrite at various concentrations. Model calibration and validation results demonstrate that the developed model is able to reasonably describe the removal rates of nitrate, nitrite, sulphide and sulphur in the AD process. The model simulation results also show that the sulphur term (η(S)) in the kinetic equations of nitrate, nitrite, sulphur and sulphate remains constant, rather than being controlled by its own concentration. Furthermore, with this model the products of sulphide biooxidation in the AD process, sulphur and sulphate, and their concentrations can be accurately predicted. Therefore, this model provides a strategy to control the sulphate concentration below the discharge limits or recover sulphur as the main end product from sulphide biooxidation. PMID:26799712

  4. Nitrogen removal from digested black water by one-stage partial nitritation and anammox.

    PubMed

    Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Terada, Akihiko; Smets, Barth F; van der Linden, Davy; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy; Carballa, Marta

    2009-07-01

    This study assessed the technical feasibility to treat digested black water from vacuum toilets (> 1000 mg NH4(+)-N L(-1)) in a lab-scale oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification/denitrification (OLAND) rotating biological contactor. After an adaptation period of 2.5 months, a stable nitrogen removal rate of ca. 700 mg N L(-1) d(-1) was reached over the subsequent 5 months. Suppression of the nitrite oxidizing bacteria at free ammonia levels above 3 mg N L(-1) resulted in a nitrogen removal efficiency of 76%. The favorable ratios of both organic and inorganic carbon to nitrogen guaranteed endured anammox activity and sufficient buffering capacity, respectively. Quantitative FISH showed that aerobic and anoxic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AerAOB and AnAOB) made up 43 and 8% of the biofilm, respectively. Since a part of the AerAOB was probably present in anoxic biofilm zones; their specific ammonium conversion was very low, in contrast to the high specific AnAOB activity. DGGE analysis showed that the dominant AerAOB and AnAOB species were resistant to the transition from synthetic medium to digested black water. This study demonstrates high-rate nitrogen removal from digested black water by one-stage partial nitritation and anammox, which will allow a significant decrease in operational costs compared to conventional nitrification/ denitrification. PMID:19673303

  5. Autotrophic growth and lipid production of Chlorella sorokiniana in lab batch and BIOCOIL photobioreactors: Experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Concas, Alessandro; Malavasi, Veronica; Costelli, Cristina; Fadda, Paolo; Pisu, Massimo; Cao, Giacomo

    2016-07-01

    A novel mathematical model for the quantitative assessment of the effect of dissolved nitrogen on the autotrophic batch-growth and lipid accumulation of Chlorella sorokiniana, is proposed in this work. Model results have been validated through comparison with suitable experimental data performed in lab photobioreactors. Further experiments have been then performed using the BIOCOIL photobioreactor operated in fed-batch mode. The experimental results, which show that a maximum growth rate of 0.52day(-1) and a lipid content equal to 25%wt can be achieved with the BIOICOIL, have been successfully predicted through the proposed model. Therefore, the model might represent a first step toward the development of a tool for the scale-up and optimization of the operating conditions of BIOCOIL photobioreactors. Finally, the fatty acid methyl esters obtained by trans-esterification of lipids extracted from C. sorokiniana, have been analyzed in view of the assessment of their usability for producing biodiesel. PMID:27030952

  6. A bicyclic autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway in Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

    PubMed

    Herter, Sylvia; Fuchs, Georg; Bacher, Adelbert; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2002-06-01

    Phototrophic CO(2) assimilation by the primitive, green eubacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus has been shown earlier to proceed in a cyclic mode via 3-hydroxypropionate, propionyl-CoA, succinyl-CoA, and malyl-CoA. The metabolic cycle could be closed by cleavage of malyl-CoA affording glyoxylate (the primary CO(2) fixation product) with regeneration of acetyl-CoA serving as the starter unit of the cycle. The pathway of glyoxylate assimilation to form gluconeogenic precursors has not been elucidated to date. We could now show that the incubation of cell extract with a mixture of glyoxylate and [1,2,3-(13)C(3)]propionyl-CoA afforded erythro-beta-[1,2,2'-(13)C(3)]methylmalate and [1,2,2'-(13)C(3)]citramalate. Similar experiments using a partially purified protein fraction afforded erythro-beta-[1,2,2'-(13)C(3)]methylmalyl-CoA and [1,2,2'-(13)C(3)]mesaconyl-CoA. Cell extracts of C. aurantiacus were also shown to catalyze the conversion of citramalate into pyruvate and acetyl-CoA in a succinyl-CoA-dependent reaction. The data suggest that glyoxylate obtained by the cleavage of malyl-CoA can be utilized by condensation with propionyl-CoA affording erythro-beta-methylmalyl-CoA, which is converted to acetyl-CoA and pyruvate. This reaction sequence regenerates acetyl-CoA, which serves as the precursor of propionyl-CoA in the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle. Autotrophic CO(2) fixation proceeds by combination of the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle with the methylmalyl-CoA cycle. The net product of that bicyclic autotrophic CO(2) fixation pathway is pyruvate serving as an universal building block for anabolic reactions. PMID:11929869

  7. Complex interactions between autotrophs in shallow marine and freshwater ecosystems: implications for community responses to nutrient stress.

    PubMed

    Havens, K E; Hauxwell, J; Tyler, A C; Thomas, S; McGlathery, K J; Cebrian, J; Valiela, I; Steinman, A D; Hwang, S J

    2001-01-01

    The relative biomass of autotrophs (vascular plants, macroalgae, microphytobenthos, phytoplankton) in shallow aquatic ecosystems is thought to be controlled by nutrient inputs and underwater irradiance. Widely accepted conceptual models indicate that this is the case both in marine and freshwater systems. In this paper we examine four case studies and test whether these models generally apply. We also identify other complex interactions among the autotrophs that may influence ecosystem response to cultural eutrophication. The marine case studies focus on macroalgae and its interactions with sediments and vascular plants. The freshwater case studies focus on interactions between phytoplankton, epiphyton, and benthic microalgae. In Waquoit Bay, MA (estuary), controlled experiments documented that blooms of macroalgae were responsible for the loss of eelgrass beds at nutrient-enriched locations. Macroalgae covered eelgrass and reduced irradiance to the extent that the plants could not maintain net growth. In Hog Island Bay, VA (estuary), a dense lawn of macroalgae covered the bottom sediments. There was reduced sediment-water nitrogen exchange when the algae were actively growing and high nitrogen release during algal senescence. In Lakes Brobo (West Africa) and Okeechobee (FL), there were dramatic seasonal changes in the biomass and phosphorus content of planktonic versus attached algae, and these changes were coupled with changes in water level and abiotic turbidity. Deeper water and/or greater turbidity favored dominance by phytoplankton. In Lake Brobo there also was evidence that phytoplankton growth was stimulated following a die-off of vascular plants. The case studies from Waquoit Bay and Lake Okeechobee support conceptual models of succession from vascular plants to benthic algae to phytoplankton along gradients of increasing nutrients and decreasing under-water irradiance. The case studies from Hog Island Bay and Lake Brobo illustrate additional effects

  8. How Stable Is Stable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baehr, Marie

    1994-01-01

    Provides a problem where students are asked to find the point at which a soda can floating in some liquid changes its equilibrium between stable and unstable as the soda is removed from the can. Requires use of Newton's first law, center of mass, Archimedes' principle, stable and unstable equilibrium, and buoyant force position. (MVL)

  9. Dual stable isotopic analysis of nitrogen and oxygen to evaluate sources and sinks of atmospheric anthropogenic nitrate in the Colorado Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, M. D.; Allen, E. B.; Sickman, J. O.

    2010-12-01

    Industrial, automotive, and agricultural emissions release nitrogen into the atmosphere which is subsequently deposited to the surrounding terrestrial ecosystem. The Colorado Desert is impacted by nitrogen deposition from the west due to inputs from the Los Angeles air basin as well as nearby sources from agriculture in the Coachella Valley (CV). Current research within the Colorado Desert has demonstrated that anthropogenic N deposition contributes to the increased biomass of exotic invasive grasses, which compete with native species and can create enough biomass to carry fire in areas of high deposition. To measure the anthropogenic nitrogen within the CV, an array of passive air samplers was erected spanning the valley from west to east. Each sampler contained filters to passively collect both nitric acid and ammonia ions. To evaluate the degree to which the local ecosystem is supplemented by atmospheric N and determine how nitrogen pools are transformed, surface soil and leaf tissue of the dominant shrub, Larrea tridentata, were collected at each site. Only nitrate data from the samplers has currently been analyzed. δ15N, δ17O, and δ18O were obtained from atmospheric and 1M KCl soil extracts using dual isotopic analysis of NO3-. δ15N of vegetation was obtained through combustion of dried leaf tissue. The highest concentrations of atmospheric nitrate are located on the western edge of the desert in the direction toward Los Angeles, and there is also high nitrate near the Salton Sea. The isoscape produced by the isotopic analysis provides a map further describing how NO3- molecules are moving through the desert. This map shows which sources are influencing deposition sinks across the valley. Soil concentrations of nitrogen increase along the same gradient and have an inverse relationship with δ15N. Plant tissue is also less enriched in δ15N at high deposition sites, which correlates with soil values and may be caused by increased fractionation of nitrogen

  10. Protein Retention Assessment of Four Levels of Poultry By-Product Substitution of Fishmeal in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Diets Using Stable Isotopes of Nitrogen (δ15N) as Natural Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Badillo, Daniel; Herzka, Sharon Z.; Viana, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    This is second part from an experiment where the nitrogen retention of poultry by-product meal (PBM) compared to fishmeal (FM) was evaluated using traditional indices. Here a quantitative method using stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (δ15N values) as natural tracers of nitrogen incorporation into fish biomass is assessed. Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were fed for 80 days on isotopically distinct diets in which 0, 33, 66 and 100% of FM as main protein source was replaced by PBM. The diets were isonitrogenous, isolipidic and similar in gross energy content. Fish in all treatments reached isotopic equilibrium by the end of the experiment. Two-source isotope mixing models that incorporated the isotopic composition of FM and PBM as well as that of formulated feeds, empirically derived trophic discrimination factors and the isotopic composition of fish that had reached isotopic equilibrium to the diets were used to obtain a quantitative estimate of the retention of each source of nitrogen. Fish fed the diets with 33 and 66% replacement of FM by PBM retained poultry by-product meal roughly in proportion to its level of inclusion in the diets, whereas no differences were detected in the protein efficiency ratio. Coupled with the similar biomass gain of fishes fed the different diets, our results support the inclusion of PBM as replacement for fishmeal in aquaculture feeds. A re-feeding experiment in which all fish were fed a diet of 100% FM for 28 days indicated isotopic turnover occurred very fast, providing further support for the potential of isotopic ratios as tracers of the retention of specific protein sources into fish tissues. Stable isotope analysis is a useful tool for studies that seek to obtain quantitative estimates of the retention of different protein sources. PMID:25226392

  11. Stable Carbon Isotope Discrimination by Form IC Rubisco Enzymes of the Extremely Metabolically Versatile Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Ralstonia eutropha}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, P. J.; Boller, A. J.; Zhao, Z.; Tabita, F. R.; Cavanaugh, C. M.; Scott, K. M.

    2006-12-01

    Variations in the relative amounts of 12C and 13C in microbial biomass can be used to infer the pathway(s) autotrophs use to fix and assimilate dissolved inorganic carbon. Discrimination against 13C by the enzymes catalyzing autotrophic carbon fixation is a major factor dictating biomass stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C = {[13C/12Csample/13C/12Cstandard] - 1} × 1000). Five different forms of RubisCO (IA, IB, IC, ID, and II) are utilized by algae and autotrophic bacteria reliant on the Calvin-Benson cycle for carbon fixation. To date, isotope discrimination has been measured for form IA, IB, and II RubisCOs, and their ɛ values (={[12k/13k] - 1} × 1000; 12k and 13k = rates of 12C and 13C fixation) range from 18 to 29‰, explaining the variation in biomass δ13C values of autotrophs utilizing these enzymes. Isotope discrimination by form IC RubisCO has not been measured, despite the presence of this enzyme in many proteobacteria of ecological interest, including marine manganese-oxidizing bacteria, some nitrifying and nitrogen-fixing bacteria, and extremely metabolically versatile organisms such as Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Ralstonia eutropha. The purpose of this work was to determine the ɛ values for form IC RubisCO enzymes from R. sphaeroides and R. eutropha. Recombinant form IC RubisCOs were purified by conventional column chromatography procedures. Assay conditions (pH, dissolved inorganic carbon concentration) were tested to determine which parameters were conducive to the high rates of carbon fixation necessary for ɛ determination. Under standard conditions (pH 8.5 and 5 mM DIC), form IC RubisCO activities were sufficient for ɛ determination. Experiments are currently being conducted to measure the ɛ values of these enzymes. Sampling the full phylogenetic breadth of RubisCO enzymes for isotopic discrimination makes it possible to constrain the range of δ13C values of organisms fixing carbon via the Calvin-Benson cycle. These results are

  12. Performance of nitrate-dependent anaerobic ferrous oxidizing (NAFO) process: a novel prospective technology for autotrophic denitrification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Zheng, Ping; Li, Wei; Wang, Ru; Ding, Shuang; Abbas, Ghulam

    2015-03-01

    Nitrate-dependent anaerobic ferrous oxidizing (NAFO) is a valuable biological process, which utilizes ferrous iron to convert nitrate into nitrogen gas, removing nitrogen from wastewater. In this work, the performance of NAFO process was investigated as a nitrate removal technology. The results showed that NAFO system was feasible for autotrophic denitrification. The volumetric loading rate (VLR) and volumetric removal rate (VRR) under steady state were 0.159±0.01 kg-N/(m(3) d) and 0.073±0.01 kg-N/(m(3) d), respectively. In NAFO system, the effluent pH was suggested as an indicator which demonstrated a good correlation with nitrogen removal. The nitrate concentration was preferred to be less than 130 mg-N/L. Organic matters had little influence on NAFO performance. Abundant iron compounds were revealed to accumulate in NAFO sludge with peak value of 51.73% (wt), and they could be recycled for phosphorus removal, with capacity of 16.57 mg-P/g VS and removal rate of 94.77±2.97%, respectively. PMID:25576990

  13. Complex nitrogen cycling in the sponge Geodia barretti.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Friederike; Radax, Regina; Woebken, Dagmar; Holtappels, Moritz; Lavik, Gaute; Rapp, Hans Tore; Schläppy, Marie-Lise; Schleper, Christa; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2009-09-01

    Marine sponges constitute major parts of coral reefs and deep-water communities. They often harbour high amounts of phylogenetically and physiologically diverse microbes, which are so far poorly characterized. Many of these sponges regulate their internal oxygen concentration by modulating their ventilation behaviour providing a suitable habitat for both aerobic and anaerobic microbes. In the present study, both aerobic (nitrification) and anaerobic (denitrification, anammox) microbial processes of the nitrogen cycle were quantified in the sponge Geodia barretti and possible involved microbes were identified by molecular techniques. Nitrification rates of 566 nmol N cm(-3) sponge day(-1) were obtained when monitoring the production of nitrite and nitrate. In support of this finding, ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (crenarchaeotes) were found by amplification of the amoA gene, and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria of the genus Nitrospira were detected based on rRNA gene analyses. Incubation experiments with stable isotopes ((15)NO(3)(-) and (15)NH(4)(+)) revealed denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) rates of 92 nmol N cm(-3) sponge day(-1) and 3 nmol N cm(-3) sponge day(-1) respectively. Accordingly, sequences closely related to 'Candidatus Scalindua sorokinii' and 'Candidatus Scalindua brodae' were detected in 16S rRNA gene libraries. The amplification of the nirS gene revealed the presence of denitrifiers, likely belonging to the Betaproteobacteria. This is the first proof of anammox and denitrification in the same animal host, and the first proof of anammox and denitrification in sponges. The close and complex interactions of aerobic, anaerobic, autotrophic and heterotrophic microbial processes are fuelled by metabolic waste products of the sponge host, and enable efficient utilization and recirculation of nutrients within the sponge-microbe system. Since denitrification and anammox remove inorganic nitrogen from the environment, sponges may function as

  14. BIOLOGICAL LINKAGES BETWEEN LANDUSE AND WATER QUALITY: THE USE OF NITROGEN STABLE ISOTOPES FOR DIAGNOSING THE CAUSE AND SOURCE OF WATER POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A shortcoming in developing nutrient TMDLs is accurately linking the causes and sources of the anthropogenic nutrients at the landscape scale. Previous research of others has shown that anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen to a watershed enhances the proportion of N15 to N14 assimila...

  15. Nitrogen control of 13C enrichment in heterotrophic organs relative to leaves in a landscape-building desert plant species

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, J.; Gu, L.; Bao, F.; Cao, Y.; Hao, Y.; He, J.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Ren, Y.; Wang, F.; et al

    2014-09-10

    A longstanding puzzle in isotope studies of C3 plant species is that heterotrophic plant organs (e.g., stems, roots, seeds, and fruits) tend to be enriched in 13C compared to the autotrophic organ (leaves) that provides them with photosynthate. Our inability to explain this puzzle suggests key deficiencies in understanding post-photosynthetic metabolic processes. It also limits the effectiveness of applications of stable carbon isotope analyses in a variety of scientific disciplines ranging from plant physiology to global carbon cycle studies. To gain insight into this puzzle, we excavated whole plant architectures of Nitraria tangutorum Bobrov, a C3 species that has anmore » exceptional capability of fixing sands and building sand dunes, in two deserts in northwestern China. We systematically and simultaneously measured carbon isotope ratios and nitrogen and phosphorous contents of different parts of the excavated plants. We also determined the seasonal variations in leaf carbon isotope ratios on nearby intact plants of N. tangutorum. We found, for the first time, that higher nitrogen contents in heterotrophic organs were significantly correlated with increased heterotrophic 13C enrichment compared to leaves. However, phosphorous contents had no effect on the enrichment. In addition, new leaves had carbon isotope ratios similar to roots but were progressively depleted in 13C as they matured. We concluded that a nitrogen-mediated process, probably the refixation of respiratory CO2 by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, was responsible for the differences in 13C enrichment among different heterotrophic organs while processes within leaves or during phloem loading may contribute to the overall autotrophic – heterotrophic difference in carbon isotope compositions.« less

  16. Nitrogen control of 13C enrichment in heterotrophic organs relative to leaves in a landscape-building desert plant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Gu, L.; Bao, F.; Cao, Y.; Hao, Y.; He, J.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Ren, Y.; Wang, F.; Wu, R.; Yao, B.; Zhao, Y.; Lin, G.; Wu, B.; Lu, Q.; Meng, P.

    2015-01-01

    A longstanding puzzle in isotope studies of C3 plant species is that heterotrophic plant organs (e.g., stems, roots, seeds, and fruits) tend to be enriched in 13C compared to the autotrophic organ (leaves) that provides them with photosynthate. Our inability to explain this puzzle suggests key deficiencies in understanding post-photosynthetic metabolic processes. It also limits the effectiveness of applications of stable carbon isotope analyses in a variety of scientific disciplines ranging from plant physiology to global carbon cycle studies. To gain insight into this puzzle, we excavated whole plant architectures of Nitraria tangutorum Bobrov, a C3 species that has an exceptional capability of fixing sands and building sand dunes, in two deserts in northwestern China. We systematically and simultaneously measured carbon isotope ratios and nitrogen and phosphorous contents of different parts of the excavated plants. We also determined the seasonal variations in leaf carbon isotope ratios on nearby intact plants of N. tangutorum. We found, for the first time, that higher nitrogen contents in heterotrophic organs were significantly correlated with increased heterotrophic 13C enrichment compared to leaves. However, phosphorous contents had no effect on the enrichment. In addition, new leaves had carbon isotope ratios similar to roots but were progressively depleted in 13C as they matured. We concluded that a nitrogen-mediated process, hypothesized to be the refixation of respiratory CO2 by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, was responsible for the differences in 13C enrichment among different heterotrophic organs, while processes such as fractionating foliar metabolism and preferentially loading into phloem of 13C-enriched sugars may contribute to the overall autotrophic-heterotrophic difference in carbon isotope compositions.

  17. Nitrogen control of 13C enrichment in heterotrophic organs relative to leaves in a landscape-building desert plant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Gu, L.; Bao, F.; Cao, Y.; Hao, Y.; He, J.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Ren, Y.; Wang, F.; Wu, R.; Yao, B.; Zhao, Y.; Lin, G.; Wu, B.; Lu, Q.; Meng, P.

    2014-09-01

    A longstanding puzzle in isotope studies of C3 plant species is that heterotrophic plant organs (e.g., stems, roots, seeds, and fruits) tend to be enriched in 13C compared to the autotrophic organ (leaves) that provides them with photosynthate. Our inability to explain this puzzle suggests key deficiencies in understanding post-photosynthetic metabolic processes. It also limits the effectiveness of applications of stable carbon isotope analyses in a variety of scientific disciplines ranging from plant physiology to global carbon cycle studies. To gain insight into this puzzle, we excavated whole plant architectures of Nitraria tangutorum Bobrov, a C3 species that has an exceptional capability of fixing sands and building sand dunes, in two deserts in northwestern China. We systematically and simultaneously measured carbon isotope ratios and nitrogen and phosphorous contents of different parts of the excavated plants. We also determined the seasonal variations in leaf carbon isotope ratios on nearby intact plants of N. tangutorum. We found, for the first time, that higher nitrogen contents in heterotrophic organs were significantly correlated with increased heterotrophic 13C enrichment compared to leaves. However, phosphorous contents had no effect on the enrichment. In addition, new leaves had carbon isotope ratios similar to roots but were progressively depleted in 13C as they matured. We concluded that a nitrogen-mediated process, probably the refixation of respiratory CO2 by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, was responsible for the differences in 13C enrichment among different heterotrophic organs while processes within leaves or during phloem loading may contribute to the overall autotrophic - heterotrophic difference in carbon isotope compositions.

  18. Interactions Between Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Strains Improve CO₂ Fixing Efficiency of Non-photosynthetic Microbial Communities.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiajun; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Shiping; Xi, Xuefei; Le, Yiquan; Fu, Xiaohua; Tsang, Yiufai; Gao, Mintian

    2015-07-01

    Five autotrophic strains isolated from non-photosynthetic microbial communities (NPMCs), which were screened from oceans with high CO2 fixing capability, were identified as Ochrobactrum sp. WH-2, Stenotrophomonas sp. WH-11, Ochrobactrum sp. WH-13, Castellaniella sp. WH-14, and Sinomicrobium oceani WH-15. The CO2 fixation pathways of all these strains were Calvin-Benson-Bassham pathway. These strains could metabolize multifarious organic compounds, which allowed switching them to autotrophic culture after enrichment in heterotrophic culture. The central composite response surface method indicated that these strains possessed many interactive effects, which increased the CO2 fixing efficiency of a combined community composed of these strains by 56 %, when compared with that of the single strain. Furthermore, another combined community composed of these autotrophic strains and NPMC had richer interactive relationships, with CO2 fixing efficiency being 894 % higher than that of the single strain and 148 % higher than the theoretical sum of the CO2 fixing efficiency of each of its microbial components. The interaction between strictly heterotrophic bacteria in NPMC and isolated autotrophic strains played a crucial role in improving the CO2 fixing efficiency, which not only eliminated self-restraint of organic compounds generated during the growth of autotrophic bacteria but also promoted its autotrophic pathway. PMID:25947620

  19. Substrate preference, uptake kinetics and bioenergetics in a facultatively autotrophic, thermoacidophilic crenarchaeote.

    PubMed

    Urschel, Matthew R; Hamilton, Trinity L; Roden, Eric E; Boyd, Eric S

    2016-05-01

    Facultative autotrophs are abundant components of communities inhabiting geothermal springs. However, the influence of uptake kinetics and energetics on preference for substrates is not well understood in this group of organisms. Here, we report the isolation of a facultatively autotrophic crenarchaeote, strain CP80, from Cinder Pool (CP, 88.7°C, pH 4.0), Yellowstone National Park. The 16S rRNA gene sequence from CP80 is 98.8% identical to that from Thermoproteus uzonensis and is identical to the most abundant sequence identified in CP sediments. Strain CP80 reduces elemental sulfur (S8°) and demonstrates hydrogen (H2)-dependent autotrophic growth. H2-dependent autotrophic activity is suppressed by amendment with formate at a concentration in the range of 20-40 μM, similar to the affinity constant determined for formate utilization. Synthesis of a cell during growth with low concentrations of formate required 0.5 μJ compared to 2.5 μJ during autotrophic growth with H2 These results, coupled to data indicating greater C assimilation efficiency when grown with formate as compared to carbon dioxide, are consistent with preferential use of formate for energetic reasons. Collectively, these results provide new insights into the kinetic and energetic factors that influence the physiology and ecology of facultative autotrophs in high-temperature acidic environments. PMID:27037359

  20. Bioremediation of toxic heavy metals using acidothermophilic autotrophes.

    PubMed

    Umrania, Valentina V

    2006-07-01

    Investigations were carried out to isolate microbial strains from soil, mud and water samples from metallurgically polluted environment for bioremediation of toxic heavy metals. As a result of primary and secondary screening various 72 acidothermophilic autotrophic microbes were isolated and adapted for metal tolerance and biosorption potentiality. The multi-metal tolerance was developed with higher gradient of concentrations of Ag, As, Bi, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Hg, Li, Mo, Pb, Sn and Zn. The isolates were checked for their biosolubilization ability with copper containing metal sulfide ores. In case of chalcopyrite 85.82% and in covellite as high as 97.5% copper solubilization occurred in presence of 10(-3) M multi-heavy metals on fifth day at 55 degrees C and pH 2.5. Chemical analyses were carried out by inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP) for metal absorption. The selected highly potential isolate (ATh-14) showed maximum adsorption of Ag 73%, followed by Pb 35%, Zn 34%, As 19%, Ni 15% and Cr 9% in chalcopyrite. PMID:16324838

  1. Autotrophic processes in meromictic Big Soda Lake, Nevada.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, J.E.; Cole, B.E.; Oremland, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    Daily rates of oxygenic photosynthesis (OP) by phytoplankton, anoxygenic photosynthesis (AP) by purple sulfur bacteria, and chemoautotrophic productivity (CP = dark CO2 assimilation) were measured once each season. Total daily productivity and the relative importance of each autotrophic process varied with seasonal changes in vertical mixing, light availability, and the biomass of phototrophs. Daily productivity was highest (2830 mg C.m-2) and was dominated by OP in winter when the mixolimnion was isothermal, the biomass of phytoplankton was high, and the biomass of purple sulfur bacteria was low. During the summer-fall period of thermal stratification, phytoplankton biomass decreased, a plate of purple sulfur bacteria formed below the oxycline, and daily rates of dark CO2 assimilation (CP = 390-680 mg C.m-2) exceeded phototrophic productivity (OP + AP = 200-370 mg C.m-2). Total annual productivity was approx 500 g C.m-2, of which 60% was produced by phytoplankton (mostly in winter), 30% by chemoautotrophs (nitrifying and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria), and only 10% by photosynthetic bacteria. -Authors

  2. Photosynthetic biomaterials: a pathway towards autotrophic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Schenck, Thilo Ludwig; Hopfner, Ursula; Chávez, Myra Noemi; Machens, Hans-Günther; Somlai-Schweiger, Ian; Giunta, Riccardo Enzo; Bohne, Alexandra Viola; Nickelsen, Jörg; Allende, Miguel L; Egaña, José Tomás

    2015-03-01

    Engineered tissues are highly limited by poor vascularization in vivo, leading to hypoxia. In order to overcome this challenge, we propose the use of photosynthetic biomaterials to provide oxygen. Since photosynthesis is the original source of oxygen for living organisms, we suggest that this could be a novel approach to provide a constant source of oxygen supply independently of blood perfusion. In this study we demonstrate that bioartificial scaffolds can be loaded with a solution containing the photosynthetic microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, showing high biocompatibility and photosynthetic activity in vitro. Furthermore, when photosynthetic biomaterials were engrafted in a mouse full skin defect, we observed that the presence of the microalgae did not trigger a native immune response in the host. Moreover, the analyses showed that the algae survived for at least 5 days in vivo, generating chimeric tissues comprised of algae and murine cells. The results of this study represent a crucial step towards the establishment of autotrophic tissue engineering approaches and suggest the use of photosynthetic cells to treat a broad spectrum of hypoxic conditions. PMID:25536030

  3. Nitrate removal with sulfur-limestone autotrophic denitrification processes

    SciTech Connect

    Flere, J.M.; Zhang, T.C.

    1999-08-01

    Nitrate removal using sulfur and limestone autotrophic denitrification (SLAD) processes was evaluated with four laboratory-scale fixed-bed column reactors. The research objectives were (1) to determine the optimum design criteria of the fixed-bed SLAD columns; and (2) to evaluate the effects of biofouling on the SLAD column performance. A maximum denitrification rate of 384 g NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N(m{sup 3}{center_dot}day) was achieved at a loading rate between 600 and 700 g NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N(m{sup 3}{center_dot}day). The effluent nitrite concentration started to rise gradually once the loading rate was above 600 g NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N(m{sup 3}{center_dot}day). A loading rate between 175 and 225 g NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N(m{sup 3}{center_dot}day) achieved the maximum nitrate-N removal efficiency ({approximately}95%). Biofouling was evaluated based on tracer studies, the measured biofilm thickness, and modeling. The porosities of the columns fluctuated with time, and the elongation of the filter media was observed. Biofouling caused short-circuiting and decreased nitrate removal efficiency. A SLAD column will require backwashing after 6 months of operation when the influent is synthetic ground water but will foul and require backwashing within 1--2 months when the influent is real ground water.

  4. Autotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing actinobacteria in acidic environments.

    PubMed

    Norris, Paul R; Davis-Belmar, Carol S; Brown, Carly F; Calvo-Bado, Leonides A

    2011-03-01

    Some novel actinobacteria from geothermal environments were shown to grow autotrophically with sulfur as an energy source. These bacteria have not been formally named and are referred to here as "Acidithiomicrobium" species, as the first of the acidophilic actinobacteria observed to grow on sulfur. They are related to Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans with which they share a capacity for ferrous iron oxidation. Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is active in CO(2) fixation by Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans, which appears to have acquired its RuBisCO-encoding genes from the proteobacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans or its ancestor. This lateral transfer of RuBisCO genes between a proteobacterium and an actinobacterium would add to those noted previously among proteobacteria, between proteobacteria and cyanobacteria and between proteobacteria and plastids. "Acidithiomicrobium" has RuBisCO-encoding genes which are most closely related to those of Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, and has additional RuBisCO genes of a different lineage. 16S rRNA gene sequences from "Acidithiomicrobium" species dominated clone banks of the genes extracted from mixed cultures of moderate thermophiles growing on copper sulfide and polymetallic sulfide ores in ore leaching columns. PMID:21308384

  5. Effect of inorganic carbon on nitrogen removal and microbial communities of CANON process in a membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojing; Yu, Boyang; Zhang, Nan; Zhang, Haojing; Wang, Chaonan; Zhang, Hongzhong

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a membrane bioreactor (MBR) was adopted for completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process. Inorganic carbon (IC) was step-wise decreased to analyze the IC influence on nitrogen removal and microbial communities, finally IC was elevated to study its recovery capability. The bioactivities of functional organisms were detected by batch experiments. Results showed that the bioactivity and biodiversity of aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AAOB) both decreased due to the IC shortage, while nitrite-oxidizing bacteria bioactivity showed a contrary result. When the concentration ratio of IC to nitrogen (IC/N) decreased to 1.0, the nitrogen removal sharply deteriorated, which then recovered when the ratio increased to 2.5. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis results showed that Nitrosomonas sp. of AOB and Candidatus Brocadia fulgida of AAOB could survive in the condition of IC deficit. The prominent IC/N ratio for high-rate and stable CANON was between 1.5-2.0. PMID:26706724

  6. Nitrogen-doped, FeNi alloy nanoparticle-decorated graphene as an efficient and stable electrode for electrochemical supercapacitors in acid medium.

    PubMed

    El-Deen, Ahmed G; El-Newehy, Mohamed; Kim, Cheol Sang; Barakat, Nasser Am

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene decorated by iron-nickel alloy is introduced as a promising electrode material for supercapacitors. Compared to pristine and Ni-decorated graphene, in acid media, the introduced electrode revealed excellent specific capacitance as the corresponding specific capacitance was multiplied around ten times with capacity retention maintained at 94.9% for 1,000 cycles. Briefly, iron acetate, nickel acetate, urea, and graphene oxide were ultrasonicated and subjected to MW heating and then sintered with melanin in Ar. The introduced N-doped FeNi@Gr exhibits remarkable electrochemical behavior with long-term stability. PMID:25852399

  7. Nitrogen-doped, FeNi alloy nanoparticle-decorated graphene as an efficient and stable electrode for electrochemical supercapacitors in acid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Deen, Ahmed G.; El-Newehy, Mohamed; Kim, Cheol Sang; Barakat, Nasser AM

    2015-03-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene decorated by iron-nickel alloy is introduced as a promising electrode material for supercapacitors. Compared to pristine and Ni-decorated graphene, in acid media, the introduced electrode revealed excellent specific capacitance as the corresponding specific capacitance was multiplied around ten times with capacity retention maintained at 94.9% for 1,000 cycles. Briefly, iron acetate, nickel acetate, urea, and graphene oxide were ultrasonicated and subjected to MW heating and then sintered with melanin in Ar. The introduced N-doped FeNi@Gr exhibits remarkable electrochemical behavior with long-term stability.

  8. New anaerobic process of nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnyi, S; Gladchenko, M; Mulder, A; Versprille, B

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on successful laboratory testing of a new nitrogen removal process called DEAMOX (DEnitrifying AMmonium OXidation) for the treatment of strong nitrogenous wastewater such as baker's yeast effluent. The concept of this process combines the recently discovered ANAMMOX (ANaerobic AMMonium OXidation) reaction with autotrophic denitrifying conditions using sulfide as an electron donor for the production of nitrite within an anaerobic biofilm. The achieved results with a nitrogen loading rate of higher than 1,000 mg/L/d and nitrogen removal of around 90% look very promising because they exceed (by 9-18 times) the corresponding nitrogen removal rates of conventional activated sludge systems. The paper describes also some characteristics of DEAMOX sludge, as well as the preliminary results of its microbiological characterization. PMID:17163025

  9. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic inventory of the most abundant demersal fish captured by benthic gears in southwestern Iceland (North Atlantic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarà, Gianluca; de Pirro, Maurizio; Sprovieri, Mario; Rumolo, Paola; Halldórsson, Halldór Pálmar; Svavarsson, Jörundur

    2009-12-01

    Stable isotopes (δ13C and δ15N) were used to examine the origin of organic matter for the most representative demersal species of the SW Icelandic fishery, accounting for over 70% of landings of those species in the North Atlantic. Samples were collected during a 2-week period in early September 2004 from landings and directly during fishing cruises. Stable isotopes showed that particulate organic matter and sedimentary organic matter were at the base of the food web and appeared to fill two different compartments: the pelagic and the benthic. The pelagic realm was composed of only capelin and sandeel; krill and redfish occupied an intermediate position between pelagic and benthic realms; while anglerfish, haddock, cod and ling resulted as the true demersal species while tusk, rays and plaice were strongly linked to the benthic habitat.

  10. Coupling between anammox and autotrophic denitrification for simultaneous removal of ammonium and sulfide by enriched marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Rios-Del Toro, E Emilia; Cervantes, Francisco J

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, the capacity of enrichments derived from marine sediments collected from different sites of the Mexican littoral to perform anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) coupled to sulfide-dependent denitrification for simultaneous removal of ammonium and sulfide linked to nitrite reduction was evaluated. Sulfide-dependent denitrification out-competed anammox during the simultaneous oxidation of sulfide and ammonium. Significant accumulation of elemental sulfur (ca. 14-30 % of added sulfide) occurred during the coupling between the two respiratory processes, while ammonium was partly oxidized (31-47 %) due to nitrite limitation imposed in sediment incubations. Nevertheless, mass balances revealed up to 38 % more oxidation of the electron donors available (ammonium and sulfide) than that expected from stoichiometry. Recycling of nitrite, from nitrate produced through anammox, is proposed to contribute to extra oxidation of sulfide, while additional ammonium oxidation is suggested by sulfate-reducing anammox (SR-anammox). The complex interaction between nitrogenous and sulfurous compounds occurring through the concomitant presence of autotrophic denitrification, conventional anammox and SR-anammox may significantly drive the nitrogen and sulfur fluxes in marine environments. PMID:26994921

  11. Organic and inorganic components of aerosols over the central Himalayas: winter and summer variations in stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Prashant; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Joshi, H; Naja, M

    2016-04-01

    The aerosol samples were collected from a high elevation mountain site, Nainital, in India (1958 m asl) during September 2006 to June 2007 and were analyzed for water-soluble inorganic species, total carbon, nitrogen, and their isotopic composition (δ(13)C and δ(15)N, respectively). The chemical and isotopic composition of aerosols revealed significant anthropogenic influence over this remote free-troposphere site. The amount of total carbon and nitrogen and their isotopic composition suggest a considerable contribution of biomass burning to the aerosols during winter. On the other hand, fossil fuel combustion sources are found to be dominant during summer. The carbon aerosol in winter is characterized by greater isotope ratios (av. -24.0 ‰), mostly originated from biomass burning of C4 plants. On the contrary, the aerosols in summer showed smaller δ(13)C values (-26.0 ‰), indicating that they are originated from vascular plants (mostly of C3 plants). The secondary ions (i.e., SO4 (2-), NH4 (+), and NO3 (-)) were abundant due to the atmospheric reactions during long-range transport in both seasons. The water-soluble organic and inorganic compositions revealed that they are aged in winter but comparatively fresh in summer. This study validates that the pollutants generated from far distant sources could reach high altitudes over the Himalayan region under favorable meteorological conditions. PMID:26490923

  12. Expanding leaves of mature deciduous forest trees rapidly become autotrophic.

    PubMed

    Keel, Sonja G; Schädel, Christina

    2010-10-01

    Emerging leaves in evergreen tree species are supplied with carbon (C) from the previous year's foliage. In deciduous trees, no older leaves are present, and the early phase of leaf development must rely on C reserves from other tissues. How soon developing leaves become autotrophic and switch from being C sinks to sources has rarely been studied in mature forest trees, and simultaneous comparisons of species are scarce. Using a canopy crane and a simple (13)CO(2)-pulse-labelling technique, we demonstrate that young leaves of mature trees in three European deciduous species (Fagus sylvatica L., Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl., Tilia platyphyllos Scop.) start assimilating CO(2) at a very early stage of development (10-50% expanded). One month after labelling, all leaves were still strongly (13)C enriched, suggesting that recent photosynthates had been incorporated into slow turnover pools such as cellulose or lignin and thus had contributed to leaf growth. In line with previous studies performed at the same site, we found stronger incorporation of recent photosynthates into growing tissues of T. platyphyllos compared with F. sylvatica and Q. petraea. Non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) concentrations analysed for one of the three study species (F. sylvatica) showed that sugar and starch pools rapidly increased during leaf development, suggesting that newly developed leaves soon produce more NSC than can be used for growth. In conclusion, our findings indicate that expanding leaves of mature deciduous trees become C autonomous at an early stage of development despite the presence of vast amounts of mobile carbohydrate reserves. PMID:20688879

  13. Intra-annual variability of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in suspended organic matter in waters of the western continental shelf of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maya, M. V.; Karapurkar, S. G.; Naik, H.; Roy, R.; Shenoy, D. M.; Naqvi, S. W. A.

    2011-11-01

    Intra-annual variations of δ13C and δ15N of water-column suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM) have been investigated to understand the biogeochemical cycling of C and N in the Western Continental Shelf of India (WCSI). The key issues being addressed are: how the δ15N of SPOM is affected by seasonally varying processes of organic matter production and respiration and how it relates to the δ15N of sedimentary organic matter that appears to show a decreasing trend despite an apparent intensification of seasonal oxygen deficiency over the past few decades? A secondary objective was to evaluate the sources of organic carbon. Elemental carbon and nitrogen concentrations, C/N ratios in SPOM, along with ancillary chemical and biological variables including phytoplankton pigment abundance were also determined on a seasonal basis (from March 2007 to September 2008), with the partial exception of the southwest (SW) monsoon period. The results reveal significant shifts in isotopic signatures, especially δ15N, of SPOM before and after the onset of SW monsoon. Very low δ15N values, reaching a minimum of -4.17 ‰, are found during the pre-monsoon period. Our results provide the first direct evidence for the addition of substantial amounts of isotopically light nitrogen by the diazotrophs, especially Trichodesmium, in the region. The δ15N of SPOM is generally lower than the mean value (7.38 ‰) for surficial sediments, presumably because of diagenetic enrichment. The results support the view that sedimentary δ15N may not necessarily reflect denitrification intensity in the overlying waters due to diverse sources of nitrogen and variability of its isotopic composition. The observed intra-annual variability of δ13C of SPOM during the pre-monsoon and post-monsoon periods is generally small. Phytoplankton production and probably species composition could drive some of the observed changes. The largest changes (depletion of δ13C and increase in C/N) appear to occur

  14. Autotrophic carbon budget in coral tissue: a new 13C-based model of photosynthate translocation.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Pascale; Grover, Renaud; Maguer, Jean François; Legendre, Louis; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine

    2012-04-15

    Corals live in symbiosis with dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinum. These dinoflagellates translocate a large part of the photosynthetically fixed carbon to the host, which in turn uses it for its own needs. Assessing the carbon budget in coral tissue is a central question in reef studies that still vexes ecophysiologists. The amount of carbon fixed by the symbiotic association can be determined by measuring the rate of photosynthesis, but the amount of carbon translocated by the symbionts to the host and the fate of this carbon are more difficult to assess. In the present study, we propose a novel approach to calculate the budget of autotrophic carbon in the tissue of scleractinian corals, based on a new model and measurements made with the stable isotope (13)C. Colonies of the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata were incubated in H(13)CO (-)(3)-enriched seawater, after which the fate of (13)C was followed in the symbionts, the coral tissue and the released particulate organic carbon (i.e. mucus). Results obtained showed that after 15 min, ca. 60% of the carbon fixed was already translocated to the host, and after 48 h, this value reached 78%. However, ca. 48% of the photosynthetically fixed carbon was respired by the symbiotic association, and 28% was released as dissolved organic carbon. This is different from other coral species, where <1% of the total organic carbon released is from newly fixed carbon. Only 23% of the initially fixed carbon was retained in the symbionts and coral tissue after 48 h. Results show that our (13)C-based model could successfully trace the carbon flow from the symbionts to the host, and the photosynthetically acquired carbon lost from the symbiotic association. PMID:22442377

  15. Tritium, stable isotopes, and nitrogen in flow from selected springs that discharge to the Snake River, Twin Falls-Hagerman area, Idaho, 1990-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mann, L.J.; Low, W.H.

    1994-01-01

    In 1990-93, water from 19 springs along the north side of the Snake River near Twin Falls and Hagerman contained from 9.2+0.6 to 78.4+5.1 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) of tritium. The springs were placed into three categories based on their locations and tritium concentrations: Category I was the upstream most and contained from 52.8+3.2 to 78.4+5.1 pCi/L of tritium; Category 11 was downstream from those in Category I and contained from 9.2+0.6 to 18.6+1.2 pCi/L; and Category III was the farthest downstream and contained from 28.3+1.9 to 47.7+3.2 pCi/L. Differences in tritium concentrations in the Category I, II, and III springs are a function of the ground-water flow regime, land use, and irrigation practices in and hydraulically upgradient from each category of springs. A comparatively large part of the water from the Category I springs is derived from recharge in heavily irrigated areas in which the irrigation water largely is diverted from the Snake River. A large part of the recharge for Category II springs occurs as much as 140 miles upgradient. Tritium concentrations in Category III springs indicate an intermediate proportion of the recharge is from excess applied-irrigation water. The concept that recharge from excess applied- irrigation water from the Snake River has affected tritium in the aquifer is supported by isotopic and nitrogen data. Deuterium and oxygen-18 isotopic values, and nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen concentrations in the flow of some springs has been impacted by irrigation.

  16. Partitioning Soil Respiration Between Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Components in a Mature Boreal Black Spruce Stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaumont-Guay, D.; Black, T. A.; Barr, A. G.; Jassal, R. S.; Morgenstern, K.; Nesic, Z.

    2005-12-01

    A root-exclusion experiment conducted in mature boreal black spruce stand (125 year-old) in Saskatchewan, Canada, from September 2003 to December 2004 allowed the partitioning of soil respiration between autotrophic (roots, mycorrhizae and decomposers associated with the rhizosphere) and heterotrophic (free-living organisms) components using continuous automated chamber measurements of soil CO2 efflux. The exclusion of live roots caused a 25% reduction in soil respiration three weeks after the application of the treatment in September 2003, which suggested a strong link between tree photosynthesis and belowground respiration processes. Annual estimates of autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration were 324 and 230 g C m-2 y-1 in 2004, accounting for 53 and 38% of soil respiration, respectively, after correcting for the decomposition of roots killed by trenching (78 g C m-2 y-1). The remainder (57 g C m-2 y-1) originated from live-moss respiration. Over the course of the year, there was a gradual transition from heterotrophic to autotrophic-dominated respiration with three distinctive phases: (1) autotrophic respiration was negligible during winter when the trees were dormant; (2) heterotrophic respiration dominated soil respiration during the shoulder periods of April-May and October-November when soil temperature was low; (3) autotrophic respiration exceeded heterotrophic respiration from mid-July to mid-September when soil temperature was high and trees were active. Both components of respiration increased exponentially with soil temperature during the growing season but autotrophic respiration showed greater temperature sensitivity than heterotrophic respiration. The replenishment of soil water following spring snowmelt induced a sustained increase in heterotrophic respiration. Pulses in autotrophic respiration were observed during summer following large rainfalls that were attributed to rhizosphere priming effects. After normalizing autotrophic respiration for

  17. Sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrification significantly reduces N2O emissions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weiming; Zhao, Qing; Lu, Hui; Ding, Zhi; Meng, Liao; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-03-01

    The Sulfate reduction-Autotrophic denitrification-Nitrification Integrated (SANI) process build on anaerobic carbon conversion through biological sulfate reduction and autotrophic denitrification by using the sulfide byproduct from the previous reaction. This study confirmed extra decreases in N2O emissions from the sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrification by investigating N2O reduction, accumulation, and emission in the presence of different sulfide/nitrate (S/N) mass ratios at pH 7 in a long-term laboratory-scale granular sludge autotrophic denitrification reactor. The N2O reduction rate was linearly proportional to the sulfide concentration, which confirmed that no sulfide inhibition of N2O reductase occurred. At S/N = 5.0 g-S/g-N, this rate resulted by sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrifying granular sludge (average granule size = 701 μm) was 27.7 mg-N/g-VSS/h (i.e., 2 and 4 times greater than those at 2.5 and 0.8 g-S/g-N, respectively). Sulfide actually stimulates rather than inhibits N2O reduction no matter what granule size of sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrifying sludge engaged. The accumulations of N2O, nitrite and free nitrous acid (FNA) with average granule size 701 μm of sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrifying granular sludge engaged at S/N = 5.0 g-S/g-N were 4.7%, 11.4% and 4.2% relative to those at 3.0 g-S/g-N, respectively. The accumulation of FNA can inhibit N2O reduction and increase N2O accumulation during sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrification. In addition, the N2O gas emission level from the reactor significantly increased from 14.1 ± 0.5 ppmv (0.002% of the N load) to 3707.4 ± 36.7 ppmv (0.405% of the N load) as the S/N mass ratio in the influent decreased from 2.1 to 1.4 g-S/g-N over the course of the 120-day continuous monitoring period. Sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrification may significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions from biological nutrient removal when sulfur conversion processes are applied. PMID

  18. A review of the global relationship among freshwater fish, autotrophic activity, and regional climate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deines, Andrew M.; Bunnell, David B.; Rogers, Mark W.; Beard, T. Douglas, Jr.; Taylor, William W.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between autotrophic activity and freshwater fish populations is an important consideration for ecologists describing trophic structure in aquatic communities, fisheries managers tasked with increasing sustainable fisheries development, and fish farmers seeking to maximize production. Previous studies of the empirical relationships of autotrophic activity and freshwater fish yield have found positive relationships but were limited by small sample sizes, small geographic scopes, and the inability to compare patterns among many types of measurement techniques. Individual studies and reviews have also lacked consistent consideration of regional climate factors which may inform relationships between fisheries and autotrophic activity. We compiled data from over 700 freshwater systems worldwide and used meta-analysis and linear models to develop a comprehensive global synthesis between multiple metrics of autotrophic activity, fisheries, and climate indicators. Our results demonstrate that multiple metrics of fish (i.e., catch per unit effort, yield, and production) increase with autotrophic activity across a variety of fisheries. At the global scale additional variation in this positive relationship can be ascribed to regional climate differences (i.e., temperature and precipitation) across systems. Our results provide a method and proof-of-concept for assessing inland fisheries production at the global scale, where current estimates are highly uncertain, and may therefore inform the continued sustainable use of global inland fishery resources.

  19. Woodchip-sulfur based heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification (WSHAD) process for nitrate contaminated water remediation.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Feng, Chuanping; Hu, Weiwu; Xi, Beidou; Chen, Nan; Zhao, Baowei; Liu, Ying; Hao, Chunbo; Pu, Jiaoyang

    2016-02-01

    Nitrate contaminated water can be effectively treated by simultaneous heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification (HAD). In the present study, woodchips and elemental sulfur were used as co-electron donors for HAD. It was found that ammonium salts could enhance the denitrifying activity of the Thiobacillus bacteria, which utilize the ammonium that is produced by the dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in the woodchip-sulfur based heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification (WSHAD) process. The denitrification performance of the WSHAD process (reaction constants range from 0.05485 h(-1) to 0.06637 h(-1)) is better than that of sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification (reaction constants range from 0.01029 h(-1) to 0.01379 h(-1)), and the optimized ratio of woodchips to sulfur is 1:1 (w/w). No sulfate accumulation is observed in the WSHAD process and the alkalinity generated in the heterotrophic denitrification can compensate for alkalinity consumption by the sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification. The symbiotic relationship between the autotrophic and the heterotrophic denitrification processes play a vital role in the mixotrophic environment. PMID:26650451

  20. Spatial and temporal expression of vegetation and atmospheric variability from stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of bat guano in the southern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, Christopher M.; McFarlane, Donald A.; Bird, Michael I.

    2007-07-01

    Stable isotopes of faeces contain information related to the animals feeding ecology. The use of stable isotope values from subfossil faeces as a palaeoenvironmental indicator depends on how faithfully the animal records their local environment. Here we present insectivorous bat guano δ 13C and δ 15N values from a precipitation gradient across the southern United States and northern Mexico to compare with local vegetation and climate. We find δ 13C values to be an excellent predictor of expected C 4/CAM vegetation, indicating that the bats are non-selective in their diet. Moreover, we find bat guano δ 13C values to be strongly correlated with summer precipitation amount and winter precipitation ratio. We also find evidence for a significant relationship with mean annual temperature. In general, we do not find δ 15N values to be related to any parameters along the climatic gradient we examined. Additionally, we measured δ 13C and δ 15N values of bulk guano deposited annually from 1968 to 1987 in a varved guano deposit at Eagle Creek Cave, Arizona. Neither δ 13C nor δ 15N values were significantly related to various local meteorological variables; however, we found δ 13C values of guano to be significantly related to drought and to the North American Monsoon indicating bat guano δ 13C values preserve an interpretable record of large-scale atmospheric variability.

  1. Stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen in pollen grains in order to characterize plant functional groups and photosynthetic pathway types.

    PubMed

    Descolas-Gros, Chantal; Schölzel, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of delta(13)C, delta(15)N and C : N ratios on modern pollen grains from temperate plants, including whole grains as well as extracted sporopollenin, were analysed in order to characterize physiological plant types at the pollen level and to determine the variation of these parameters in modern pollen grains of the same climatic area. Measurements are presented for 95 batches of whole modern pollen from 58 temperate species and on the stable fraction of modern pollen grains, chemically extracted sporopollenin, for two modern species. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and cross-polarization and magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) sporopollenin spectra were conducted in parallel. C(3) and C(4) plants can be separated by delta(13)C measurements based on pollen. Probabilistic assignments to plant functional groups (herbaceous, deciduous woody, evergreen woody) of C(3) plants by the means of a discriminant analysis can be made for C : N ratios and for delta(13)C. The results are related to other studies on sporopollenin in order to use this method in future work on fossil samples. Stable isotope measurements on pollen allow improved pollen diagrams, including forms that cannot be differentiated at species level, increasing the accuracy and resolution of plant physiological type distribution in quaternary and older fossil sediments. PMID:17888118

  2. Metal Concentrations in the Liver and Stable Isotope Ratios of Carbon and Nitrogen in the Muscle of Silvertip Shark (Carcharhinus albimarginatus) Culled off Ishigaki Island, Japan: Changes with Growth

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Tetsuya; Kimura, Osamu; Ohta, Chiho; Koga, Nobuyuki; Kato, Yoshihisa; Fujii, Yukiko; Haraguchi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed Hg, Cd, Zn, Cu and Fe concentrations in liver samples as well as the Hg concentration and stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen (δ13C and δ15N) in muscle samples from silvertip sharks (Carcharhinus albimarginatus) in Japan. Muscular and hepatic Hg concentrations increased with increased body length. However, these increases were more prominent in the liver than in the muscle samples, and appeared to occur after maturation. Hepatic Zn and Cu concentrations decreased during the growth stage, and then increased concomitantly thereafter with increases in Cd burden. Hepatic Fe concentration from males increased proportionally with increases in body length, whereas no increase was observed in samples from females, probably due to the mother-to-embryo transfer of Fe. The δ13C values tended to decrease with increases in body length, whereas no decrease in the δ15N values was observed. PMID:26859569

  3. Metal Concentrations in the Liver and Stable Isotope Ratios of Carbon and Nitrogen in the Muscle of Silvertip Shark (Carcharhinus albimarginatus) Culled off Ishigaki Island, Japan: Changes with Growth.

    PubMed

    Endo, Tetsuya; Kimura, Osamu; Ohta, Chiho; Koga, Nobuyuki; Kato, Yoshihisa; Fujii, Yukiko; Haraguchi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed Hg, Cd, Zn, Cu and Fe concentrations in liver samples as well as the Hg concentration and stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen (δ13C and δ15N) in muscle samples from silvertip sharks (Carcharhinus albimarginatus) in Japan. Muscular and hepatic Hg concentrations increased with increased body length. However, these increases were more prominent in the liver than in the muscle samples, and appeared to occur after maturation. Hepatic Zn and Cu concentrations decreased during the growth stage, and then increased concomitantly thereafter with increases in Cd burden. Hepatic Fe concentration from males increased proportionally with increases in body length, whereas no increase was observed in samples from females, probably due to the mother-to-embryo transfer of Fe. The δ13C values tended to decrease with increases in body length, whereas no decrease in the δ15N values was observed. PMID:26859569

  4. Nitrogen control of 13C enrichment in heterotrophic organs relative to leaves in a landscape-building desert plant species

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Gu, L.; Bao, F.; Cao, Y.; Hao, Y.; He, J.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Ren, Y.; Wang, F.; Wu, R.; Yao, B.; Zhao, Y.; Lin, G.; Wu, B.; Lu, Q.; Meng, P.

    2014-09-10

    A longstanding puzzle in isotope studies of C3 plant species is that heterotrophic plant organs (e.g., stems, roots, seeds, and fruits) tend to be enriched in 13C compared to the autotrophic organ (leaves) that provides them with photosynthate. Our inability to explain this puzzle suggests key deficiencies in understanding post-photosynthetic metabolic processes. It also limits the effectiveness of applications of stable carbon isotope analyses in a variety of scientific disciplines ranging from plant physiology to global carbon cycle studies. To gain insight into this puzzle, we excavated whole plant architectures of Nitraria tangutorum Bobrov, a C3 species that has an exceptional capability of fixing sands and building sand dunes, in two deserts in northwestern China. We systematically and simultaneously measured carbon isotope ratios and nitrogen and phosphorous contents of different parts of the excavated plants. We also determined the seasonal variations in leaf carbon isotope ratios on nearby intact plants of N. tangutorum. We found, for the first time, that higher nitrogen contents in heterotrophic organs were significantly correlated with increased heterotrophic 13C enrichment compared to leaves. However, phosphorous contents had no effect on the enrichment. In addition, new leaves had carbon isotope ratios similar to roots but were progressively depleted in 13C as they matured. We concluded that a nitrogen-mediated process, probably the refixation of respiratory CO2 by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, was responsible for the differences in 13C enrichment among different heterotrophic organs while processes within leaves or during phloem loading may contribute to the overall autotrophic – heterotrophic difference in carbon isotope compositions.

  5. Autotrophic fixation of geogenic CO2 by microorganisms contributes to soil organic matter formation and alters isotope signatures in a wetland mofette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, M. E.; Beulig, F.; von Fischer, J.; Muhr, J.; Küsel, K.; Trumbore, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    To quantify the contribution of autotrophic microorganisms to organic matter (OM) formation in soils, we investigated natural CO2 vents (mofettes) situated in a wetland in northwest Bohemia (Czech Republic). Mofette soils had higher soil organic matter (SOM) concentrations than reference soils due to restricted decomposition under high CO2 levels. We used radiocarbon (Δ14C) and stable carbon (δ13C) isotope ratios to characterize SOM and its sources in two mofettes and compared it with respective reference soils, which were not influenced by geogenic CO2. The geogenic CO2 emitted at these sites is free of radiocarbon and enriched in 13C compared to atmospheric CO2. Together, these isotopic signals allow us to distinguish C fixed by plants from C fixed by autotrophic microorganisms using their differences in 13C discrimination. We can then estimate that up to 27 % of soil organic matter in the 0-10 cm layer of these soils was derived from microbially assimilated CO2. Isotope values of bulk SOM were shifted towards more positive δ13C and more negative Δ14C values in mofettes compared to reference soils, suggesting that geogenic CO2 emitted from the soil atmosphere is incorporated into SOM. To distinguish whether geogenic CO2 was fixed by plants or by CO2 assimilating microorganisms, we first used the proportional differences in radiocarbon and δ13C values to indicate the magnitude of discrimination of the stable isotopes in living plants. Deviation from this relationship was taken to indicate the presence of microbial CO2 fixation, as microbial discrimination should differ from that of plants. 13CO2-labelling experiments confirmed high activity of CO2 assimilating microbes in the top 10 cm, where δ13C values of SOM were shifted up to 2 ‰ towards more negative values. Uptake rates of microbial CO2 fixation ranged up to 1.59 ± 0.16 μg gdw-1 d-1. We inferred that the negative δ13C shift was caused by the activity of autotrophic microorganisms using the Calvin

  6. Autotrophic ammonia removal from landfill leachate in anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Suneethi, S; Joseph, Kurian

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) process, an advanced biological nitrogen removal, removes ammonia using nitrite as the electron acceptor without oxygen. In this paper, ANAMMOX process was adopted for removing NH4+-N from landfill leachate having low COD using anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR). The AnMBR was optimized for nitrogen loading rate (NLR) varying from 0.025 to 5 kg NH4+-N/m3/d with hydraulic retention time (HRT) ranging from 1 to 3d. NH4+-N removal efficacy of 85.13 +/- 9.67% with the mean nitrogen removal rate of 5.54 +/- 0.63 kg NH4+-N/m3/d was achieved with NLR of 6.51 +/- 0.20kg NH4+-N/m3/d at 1.5 d HRT. The nitrogen transformation intermediates in the form of hydrazine (N2H4) and hydroxylamine (NH2OH) were 0.008 +/- 0.005 and 0.006 +/- 0.001 mg/l, respectively, indicating co-existence of aerobic ammonia oxidizers and ANAMMOX. The free ammonia (NH3) and free nitrous acid (HNO2) concentrations were 26.61 +/- 16.54 mg/l and (1.66 +/- 0.95) x 10(-5) mg/l, preventing NO2(-)-N oxidation to NO3(-)-N enabling sustained NH4+-N removal. PMID:24617075

  7. The Rnf Complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii Is a Proton-Translocating Ferredoxin:NAD(+) Oxidoreductase Essential for Autotrophic Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, PL; Zhang, T; Dar, SA; Leang, C; Lovley, DR

    2012-12-26

    It has been predicted that the Rnf complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii is a proton-translocating ferredoxin: NAD(+) oxidoreductase which contributes to ATP synthesis by an H+-translocating ATPase under both autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions. The recent development of methods for genetic manipulation of C. ljungdahlii made it possible to evaluate the possible role of the Rnf complex in energy conservation. Disruption of the C. ljungdahlii rnf operon inhibited autotrophic growth. ATP synthesis, proton gradient, membrane potential, and proton motive force collapsed in the Rnf-deficient mutant with H-2 as the electron source and CO2 as the electron acceptor. Heterotrophic growth was hindered in the absence of a functional Rnf complex, as ATP synthesis, proton gradient, and proton motive force were significantly reduced with fructose as the electron donor. Growth of the Rnf-deficient mutant was also inhibited when no source of fixed nitrogen was provided. These results demonstrate that the Rnf complex of C. ljungdahlii is responsible for translocation of protons across the membrane to elicit energy conservation during acetogenesis and is a multifunctional device also implicated in nitrogen fixation. IMPORTANCE Mechanisms for energy conservation in the acetogen Clostridium ljungdahlii are of interest because of its potential value as a chassis for the production of biocommodities with novel electron donors such as carbon monoxide, syngas, and electrons derived from electrodes. Characterizing the components implicated in the chemiosmotic ATP synthesis during acetogenesis by C. ljungdahlii is a prerequisite for the development of highly productive strains. The Rnf complex has been considered the prime candidate to be the pump responsible for the formation of an ion gradient coupled with ATP synthesis in multiple acetogens. However, experimental evidence for a proton-pumping Rnf complex has been lacking. This study establishes the C. ljungdahlii Rnf complex as

  8. Diversity and distribution of autotrophic microbial community along environmental gradients in grassland soils on the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Guo, Guangxia; Kong, Weidong; Liu, Jinbo; Zhao, Jingxue; Du, Haodong; Zhang, Xianzhou; Xia, Pinhua

    2015-10-01

    Soil microbial autotrophs play a significant role in CO2 fixation in terrestrial ecosystem, particularly in vegetation-constrained ecosystems with environmental stresses, such as the Tibetan Plateau characterized by low temperature and high UV. However, soil microbial autotrophic communities and their driving factors remain less appreciated. We investigated the structure and shift of microbial autotrophic communities and their driving factors along an elevation gradient (4400-5100 m above sea level) in alpine grassland soils on the Tibetan Plateau. The autotrophic microbial communities were characterized by quantitative PCR, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), and cloning/sequencing of cbbL genes, encoding the large subunit for the CO2 fixation protein ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO). High cbbL gene abundance and high RubisCO enzyme activity were observed and both significantly increased with increasing elevations. Path analysis identified that soil RubisCO enzyme causally originated from microbial autotrophs, and its activity was indirectly driven by soil water content, temperature, and NH4 (+) content. Soil autotrophic microbial community structure dramatically shifted along the elevation and was jointly driven by soil temperature, water content, nutrients, and plant types. The autotrophic microbial communities were dominated by bacterial autotrophs, which were affiliated with Rhizobiales, Burkholderiales, and Actinomycetales. These autotrophs have been well documented to degrade organic matters; thus, metabolic versatility could be a key strategy for microbial autotrophs to survive in the harsh environments. Our results demonstrated high abundance of microbial autotrophs and high CO2 fixation potential in alpine grassland soils and provided a novel model to identify dominant drivers of soil microbial communities and their ecological functions. PMID:26084890

  9. A Dual-Carbon-and-Nitrogen Stable Isotope Ratio Model Is Not Superior to a Single-Carbon Stable Isotope Ratio Model for Predicting Added Sugar Intake in Southwest Virginian Adults12

    PubMed Central

    Hedrick, Valisa E; Zoellner, Jamie M; Jahren, A Hope; Woodford, Natalie A; Bostic, Joshua N; Davy, Brenda M

    2015-01-01

    Background: An objective measure of added sugar (AS) and sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake is needed. The δ13C value of finger-stick blood is a novel validated biomarker of AS/SSB intake; however, nonsweetener corn products and animal protein also carry a δ13C value similar to AS sources, which may affect blood δ13C values. The δ15N value of blood has been proposed as a “correction factor” for animal protein intake. Objectives: The objectives were to 1) identify foods associated with δ13C and δ15N blood values, 2) determine the contribution of nonsweetener corn to the diet relative to AS intake, and 3) determine if the dual-isotope model (δ13C and δ15N) is a better predictor of AS/SSB intake than δ13C alone. Methods: A cross-sectional sample of southwest Virginian adults (n = 257; aged 42 ± 15 y; 74% overweight/obese) underwent dietary intake assessments and provided finger-stick blood samples, which were analyzed for δ13C and δ15N values by using natural abundance stable isotope mass spectrometry. Statistical analyses included ANOVAs, paired-samples t tests, and multiple linear regressions. Results: The mean ± SD daily AS intake was 88 ± 59 g and nonsweetener corn intake was 13 ± 13 g. The mean δ13C value was −19.1 ± 0.9‰, which was significantly correlated with AS and SSB intakes (r = 0.32 and 0.39, respectively; P ≤ 0.01). The δ13C value and nonsweetener corn intake and the δ15N value and animal protein intake were not correlated. AS intake was significantly greater than nonsweetener corn intake (mean difference = 76.2 ± 57.2 g; P ≤ 0.001). The δ13C value was predictive of AS/SSB intake (β range: 0.28–0.35; P ≤ 0.01); however, δ15N was not predictive and minimal increases in R2 values were observed when the δ15N value was added to the model. Conclusions: The data do not provide evidence that the dual-isotope method is superior for predicting AS/SSB intakes within a southwest Virginian population. Our results support

  10. DEAMOX--new biological nitrogen removal process based on anaerobic ammonia oxidation coupled to sulphide-driven conversion of nitrate into nitrite.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnyi, Sergey; Gladchenko, Marina; Mulder, Arnold; Versprille, Bram

    2006-11-01

    This paper reports about the successful laboratory testing of a new nitrogen removal process called DEAMOX (DEnitrifying AMmonium OXidation) for treatment of typical strong nitrogenous wastewater such as baker's yeast effluent. The concept of this process combines the recently discovered anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) reaction with autotrophic denitrifying conditions using sulphide as an electron donor for the production of nitrite from nitrate within an anaerobic biofilm. To generate sulphide and ammonia, a Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) reactor was used as a pre-treatment step. The UASB effluent was split and partially fed to a nitrifying reactor (to generate nitrate) and the remaining part was directly fed to the DEAMOX reactor where this stream was mixed with the nitrified effluent. Stable process performance and volumetric nitrogen loading rates of the DEAMOX reactor well above 1000 mgN/l/d with total nitrogen removal efficiencies of around 90% were obtained after long-term (410 days) optimisation of the process. Important prerequisites for this performance are appropriate influent ratios of the key species fed to the DEAMOX reactor, namely influent N-NO(x)/N-NH(4) ratios >1.2 (stoichiometry of the anammox reaction) and influent S-H(2)S/N-NO(3) ratios >0.57 mgS/mgN (stoichiometry of the sulphide-driven denitrification of nitrate to nitrite). The paper further describes some characteristics of the DEAMOX sludge as well as the preliminary results of its microbiological characterisation. PMID:16893559

  11. Production Response and Digestive Enzymatic Activity of the Pacific White Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone, 1931) Intensively Pregrown in Microbial Heterotrophic and Autotrophic-Based Systems

    PubMed Central

    Becerra-Dórame, Manuel J.; Martínez-Porchas, Marcel; Martínez-Córdova, Luis R.; Rivas-Vega, Martha E.; Lopez-Elias, José A.; Porchas-Cornejo, Marco A.

    2012-01-01

    Shrimp postlarvae were reared into different microcosm systems without water exchange; a traditional system based on simple fertilization to improve microalgae concentration (control), an autotrophic system (AS) based on the promotion of biofloc and biofilm by the addition of fertilizer and artificial substrates and a heterotrophic system (HS) based on the promotion of heterotrophic bacteria by the addition of nitrogenous and carbonaceous sources and artificial substrates. Better growth performance and survival were registered in shrimp from the AS and HS compared to the control. Feed conversion ratios were below 0.7 for all treatments, but AS and HS were significantly lower than the control. Regarding digestive performance, no significant differences were observed for trypsin, amylase and lipase activities among AS and control shrimp; however, shrimp from HS showed a higher trypsin and amylase activities, suggesting a higher digestive activity caused by the presence of microbial bioflocs. The presence of biofilm and bioflocs composed by either autotrophic or heterotrophic organisms in combination with formulated feed improved the growth performance and survival of shrimp. Apparently, such combination fits the nutritional requirements of shrimp. PMID:22649317

  12. Variation of Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopic Composition of PM10 at Urban Sites of Indo Gangetic Plain (IGP) of India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S K; Mandal, T K; Shenoy, D M; Bardhan, Pratirupa; Srivastava, Manoj K; Chatterjee, A; Saxena, Mohit; Saraswati; Singh, B P; Ghosh, S K

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the variation of elemental concentrations of total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN) and isotopic ratios of δ13C and δ15N along with δ13OC and OC of PM10 mass over Delhi, Varanasi and Kolkata of the Indo Gangetic Plain (IGP), India. For Delhi, the average concentrations of TC and TN of PM10 were 53.0±33.6 and 14.9±10.8 µg m(-3), whereas δ13C and δ15N of PM10 were -25.5±0.5 and 9.6±2.8‰, respectively. For Varanasi, the average values of δ13C and δ15N of PM10 were -25.4±0.8 and 6.8±2.4‰, respectively. For Kolkata, TC and TN values for PM10 ranged from 9.1-98.2 to 1.4-25.9 µg m(-3), respectively with average values of 32.6±24.9 and 9.3±8.2 µg m(-3), respectively. The average concentrations of δ13C and δ15N were -26.0±0.4 and 7.4±2.7‰, respectively over Kolkata with ranges of -26.6 to -24.9‰ and 2.8±11.5‰, respectively. The isotopic analysis revealed that biomass burning, vehicular emission and secondary inorganic aerosols were likely sources of PM10 mass over IGP, India. PMID:26438175

  13. Stable Carbon and Nitrogen isoscapes of the California Coast: integrated δ15N and δ13C of suspended particulate organic matter inferred from tissues of the California Mussel (mytilus californianus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokhshoori, N. L.; McCarthy, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    Spatial maps of isotopic variability in a single species, or isoscapes, can characterize the natural variability in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) isotope ratios across ecosystems on broad spatial scales, trace the signature of a source across a given area, as well as constrain animal migration patterns (Graham et al. 2002). In this study, isoscapes of stable carbon (13C) and nitrogen (15N) isotopes were constructed using intertidal mussels for northeast Pacific coastal waters of California. In this region biogeochemical cycling is primarily controlled by upwelling intensity and large-scale transport of the California Current System (CCS). We hypothesize that sampling specific tissues of filter-feeding organisms can provide an integrated measure of variation in 15N and 13C of the suspended particulate organic matter (POM) pool vs. latitude within the CCS, as well indicate main sources of both organic C and N to littoral food webs. California mussels (mytilus californianus) were collected from 28 sites between Coos Bay, OR and La Jolla, CA in the winter of 2009-2010 and summer of 2011, and adductor tissue was analyzed for δ13C and δ15N. Mussel size classes were chosen to provide ~ 1 yr integrated signal. Spatial trends in δ15N from the winter sampling show a strong linear trend in increasing δ15N values with latitude north to south (δ15N values range from 7 % to 12%) consistent with slowly attenuating northward transport of 15N-depleted nitrate via California Undercurrent (Altabet et al. 1999). The δ13C values have no strong north to south correlation, but exhibit strong location-specific variability. The δ13C values range between -13 % and -18%. We propose the site-specific signature of δ13C indicates relative source of primary productin to POM at a given region (i.e. kelp, phytoplankton, zooplankton). Overall, these results suggest that isoscapes for filter-feeding organisms may offer a more accurate integrated picture of 15N and 13C values of POM than is

  14. The effects of anthropogenic organic matter inputs on stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in organisms from different trophic levels in a southern Mediterranean coastal area.

    PubMed

    Vizzini, Salvatrice; Mazzola, Antonio

    2006-09-15

    Stable isotope ratios were used to determine the impact of anthropogenically derived organic matter from onshore and offshore fish farming and a sewage outfall on organisms at different trophic levels (primary producers and consumers) on the south-east coast of Sicily (Italy, Mediterranean). Representative macroalgae and consumers were collected in three sampling locations: "Impact" and two putative "Controls" sited to the north of the impacted location. While delta(13)C values of both organic matter sources and consumers varied little between locations, delta(15)N spatial variability was higher and delta(15)N was shown to be a good descriptor of organic enrichment and uptake of anthropogenically derived material within coastal food webs. Isotopic data were analysed using a multivariate approach. Organic matter sources and benthic components were more sensitive to pollution than nektobenthic species and revealed that the effects of anthropogenic activities seem to be detectable over a wide area. The study site is characterised by wide waste dispersal, which brings a reduction in impact in the area directly affected by organic matter inputs and enlarges the area of moderate impact. PMID:16540153

  15. Stable isotope analyses on archived fish scales reveal the long-term effect of nitrogen loads on carbon cycling in rivers.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Jean-Marc; Perrier, Charles; Erkinaro, Jaakko; Niemelä, Eero; Cunjak, Richard A; Huteau, Dominique; Riera, Pascal

    2014-02-01

    Stable isotope analysis of organic matter in sediment records has long been used to track historical changes in productivity and carbon cycling in marine and lacustrine ecosystems. While flow dynamics preclude stratigraphic measurements of riverine sediments, such retrospective analysis is important for understanding biogeochemical cycling in running waters. Unique collections of riverine fish scales were used to analyse δ(15) N and δ(13) C variations in the food web of two European rivers that experience different degrees of anthropogenic pressure. Over the past four decades, dissolved inorganic N loading remained low and constant in the Teno River (70°N, Finland); in contrast, N loading increased fourfold in the Scorff River (47°N, France) over the same period. Archived scales of Atlantic salmon parr, a riverine life-stage that feeds on aquatic invertebrates, revealed high δ(15) N values in the Scorff River reflecting anthropogenic N inputs to that riverine environment. A strong correlation between dissolved inorganic N loads and δ(13) C values in fish scales was observed in the Scorff River, whereas no trend was found in the Teno River. This result suggests that anthropogenic N-nutrients enhanced atmospheric C uptake by primary producers and its transfer to fish. Our results illustrate for the first time that, as for lakes and marine ecosystems, historical changes in anthropogenic N loading can affect C cycling in riverine food webs, and confirm the long-term interactions between N and C biogeochemical cycles in running waters. PMID:23765587

  16. Intra-specific diet shift in manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) as revealed by carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes and fatty acid biomarker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Y.; Shin, K.

    2011-12-01

    Manila clams sampled in Seonjae Island, Korea with shell lengths (SL) below 19.76 mm in average showed a significantly depleted carbon and nitrogen isotope values (P<0.05) by 0.80~1.41 %. This size related variation can be caused by either altered carbon and nutrient source or by affected isotopic incorporation rates and discrimination factors. In order to examine size-related diet shift in manila clams, R. philippinarum with different sizes that were constantly fed on known mixed microalgae for several months were sampled from Incheon Fisheries Hacheries Research Institute (IFRI). These manila clams have shown a high intra-species variation in growth rate with a maximum difference of more or less 2.30 cm. The smallest size groups (3.68±0.17 mm and 6.88±0.21 mm) obtained their nutrition from both P. tricornutum and aggregated organic matter that consists of dead or decomposed microalgae or other detritus. Bigger size groups (10.92±0.34 mm and 14.81±0.25 mm) obtained most of their energy from P.tricorutum and also from other phytoplankton unlike the biggest size group (21.15±1.02 mm) that feeds mainly on fresh microalgae of all diets fed. This variation in diet reveals that smaller clams mostly inhale dead or decomposed microalgae that sinks on the bottom while the bigger clams uptake more fresh ones that are still alive. This variation in feeding behavior could have been caused by morphological constraints such as limited siphon length. The results suggest that manila clams greater than and below 19.76 mm in average have different feeding behavior and P. tricornutum and I. galbana were the two most preferred diets for manila clams cultured in IFHRI. The result of fatty acid composition of manila clams in relation to size or growth rate suggests that fast growing clams would have rapid metabolism of fatty acids not required by the animals and an accumulation of the essential fatty acids (PUFA). In addition, their higher energy requirement and more active state

  17. Tritium, stable isotopes and nitrogen in flow from selected springs that discharge to the Snake River, Twin Falls-Hagerman area, Idaho, 1990-93

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, L.J.; Low, W.H.

    1994-12-01

    In 1990-93, tritium concentrations in water from 19 springs along the north side of the Snake River near Twin Falls and Hagerman ranged from 9.2{+-}0.6 to 78.4{+-}5.1 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). The springs were placed into three categories on the basis of their locations and tritium concentrations: Category I springs are the farthest upstream and contained from 52.8{+-}3.2 to 78.4{+-}5.1 pCi/L of tritium; Category It springs are downstream from those in Category I and contained from 9.2{+-}0.6 to 18.5{+-}1.2 pCi/L; and Category III springs are the farthest downstream and contained from 28.3{+-}1.9 to 47.7{+-}3.2 pCi/L. Tritium concentrations in precipitation and in the Snake River were relatively large in the 1950`s and 1960`s owing to atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons. Conversely, tritium concentrations in ground water with a residence time of several tens to a few hundred years, as occurs in the Snake River Plain aquifer hydraulically upgradient from the Category II springs, are comparatively small because of the 12.4-year half-life of tritium. The conclusion that recharge from excess applied-irrigation water from the Snake River has affected tritium in the Snake River Plain aquifer is supported by differences in the deuterium (2H) and oxygen-18 (180) ratios of water. These ratios indicate that water discharged by the springs is recharged by waters of different origins. Irrigation recharge is more enriched in 2H and 180 than the regional ground water. Water from Category I springs is more enriched in 2H and 180 than is water from Category II or III springs because a large proportion of irrigation recharge mixes with the regional ground water in Category I springs. Nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen concentrations also are greater in water from Category I springs than in water from Category II springs.

  18. Carbon (δ13C) and Nitrogen (δ15N) Stable Isotope Signatures in Bat Fur Indicate Swarming Sites Have Catchment Areas for Bats from Different Summering Areas

    PubMed Central

    Segers, Jordi L.; Broders, Hugh G.

    2015-01-01

    Migratory patterns of bats are not well understood and traditional methods to study this, like capture-mark-recapture, may not provide enough detail unless there are many records. Stable isotope profiles of many animal species have been used to make inferences about migration. Each year Myotis lucifugus and M. septentrionalis migrate from summering roosts to swarming caves and mines in the fall, but the pattern of movement between them is not well understood. In this study, fur δ13C and δ15N values of 305 M. lucifugus and 200 M. septentrionalis were analyzed to make inferences about migration patterns between summering areas and swarming sites in Nova Scotia, Canada. We expected that there would be greater variability in δ13C and δ15N among individuals at swarming sites because it was believed that these sites are used by individuals originating from many summering areas. There was extensive overlap in the standard ellipse area, corrected for small sample sizes (SEAc), of bats at swarming sites and much less overlap in SEAc among groups sampled at summering areas. Meaningful inference could not be made on M. septentrionalis because their low variation in SEAc may have been the result of sampling only 3 summering areas. However, for M. lucifugus, swarming sites had larger SEAc than summering areas and predictive discriminant analysis assigned swarming bats to multiple summering areas, supporting the contention that swarming bats are mixed aggregations of bats from several summering areas. Together, these data support the contention that swarming sites have catchment areas for bats from multiple summering areas and it is likely that the catchment areas for swarming sites overlap. These data suggest that δ13C and δ15N profiling of bat fur offer some potential to make inferences about regional migration in bats. PMID:25923696

  19. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope quantitative structural assessment of dominant species from the Vaccarès Lagoon trophic web (Camargue Biosphere Reserve, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persic, Ana; Roche, Hélène; Ramade, François

    2004-06-01

    The Vaccarès Lagoon (Camargue Biosphere Reserve), a complex brackish ecosystem, is the natural habitat for numerous freshwater, marine and euryhaline species forming a particularly intricate food web. The main objectives of this study were to describe its trophic relations and investigate factors influencing its structure and dynamics. The combined stable C and N isotope method was used to establish a quantitative assessment of the trophic status of Vaccarès organisms. Although the levels of δ15N and δ13C showed large intraspecific and interspecific variations, the isotopic signatures of the species assessed revealed a general trend of 15N enrichment with trophic level. Distribution of the biota into four trophic compartments—depositivore, zooplanktivore, predator, and top-predator—was corroborated by the general analysis of the relationship between δ13C and δ15N. Analysis of seasonal and annual isotopic variations showed that natural environmental changes (increase in food abundance, climatic and salinity variations) as well as individual metabolic capacities would affect the relative stability of an organism's trophic position. No significant correlation was found between isotopic variation and size and growth in fishes except for the eel population where the positive correlation between these two parameters confirmed intra-population trophic variations. Finally, separately examined species exhibited significant, although incoherent, correlation between their isotopic signature and lipid content. This study confirms the efficiency of the isotopic approach in trophic studies and highlights the need for further investigations of anthropic environmental modifications occurring in this protected area and frequently disturbing its food web.

  20. Identification of Missing Genes and Enzymes for Autotrophic Carbon Fixation in Crenarchaeota▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Vera, W. Hugo; Weiss, Michael; Strittmatter, Eric; Kockelkorn, Daniel; Fuchs, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Two autotrophic carbon fixation cycles have been identified in Crenarchaeota. The dicarboxylate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle functions in anaerobic or microaerobic autotrophic members of the Thermoproteales and Desulfurococcales. The 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle occurs in aerobic autotrophic Sulfolobales; a similar cycle may operate in autotrophic aerobic marine Crenarchaeota. Both cycles form succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA) from acetyl-CoA and two molecules of inorganic carbon, but they use different means. Both cycles have in common the (re)generation of acetyl-CoA from succinyl-CoA via identical intermediates. Here, we identified several missing enzymes/genes involved in the seven-step conversion of succinyl-CoA to two molecules of acetyl-CoA in Thermoproteus neutrophilus (Thermoproteales), Ignicoccus hospitalis (Desulfurococcales), and Metallosphaera sedula (Sulfolobales). The identified enzymes/genes include succinyl-CoA reductase, succinic semialdehyde reductase, 4-hydroxybutyrate-CoA ligase, bifunctional crotonyl-CoA hydratase/(S)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, and beta-ketothiolase. 4-Hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydratase, which catalyzes a mechanistically intriguing elimination of water, is well conserved and rightly can be considered the key enzyme of these two cycles. In contrast, several of the other enzymes evolved from quite different sources, making functional predictions based solely on genome interpretation difficult, if not questionable. PMID:21169482

  1. Estimation of autotrophic soil respiration in a boreal forest using three different approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulmala, Liisa; Pumpanen, Jukka; Heinonsalo, Jussi

    2016-04-01

    It is generally challenging to separate autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration. The reason for these difficulties is connected with the intimate interaction of the key processes in soil. Root-associated microbes practically colonize the whole soil volume while decomposition processes occur in the same matrix. Therefore, autotrophic and heterotrophic processes cannot be separated in natural systems. However, there are several methods that can be used to better understand the dynamics of these two. A classical method is called 'trenching' where a trench is dug around a known volume of soil and the roots entering the soil are cut from the living trees thus blocking the C flow from them. The second way to separate autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration relies on the difference in the isotopic signature (13C) of plant-derived or decomposition-derived CO2. The third way to separate the sources is to study the differences in the short- and long-term temperature dependencies in CO2 soil emissions. This is possible especially in boreal forests where the biological activity has a strong seasonal cycle. We compared these three methods in an experiment conducted in a southern boreal middle-aged Scots pine stand in Finland. Our data provides a unique possibility to critically evaluate current methods for estimating autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration. The knowledge is needed to study further plant physiology and plant-microbe interactions in soil.

  2. Conifers, Angiosperm Trees, and Lianas: Growth, Whole-Plant Water and Nitrogen Use Efficiency, and Stable Isotope Composition (δ13C and δ18O) of Seedlings Grown in a Tropical Environment1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Cernusak, Lucas A.; Winter, Klaus; Aranda, Jorge; Turner, Benjamin L.

    2008-01-01

    Seedlings of several species of gymnosperm trees, angiosperm trees, and angiosperm lianas were grown under tropical field conditions in the Republic of Panama; physiological processes controlling plant C and water fluxes were assessed across this functionally diverse range of species. Relative growth rate, r, was primarily controlled by the ratio of leaf area to plant mass, of which specific leaf area was a key component. Instantaneous photosynthesis, when expressed on a leaf-mass basis, explained 69% of variation in r (P < 0.0001, n = 94). Mean r of angiosperms was significantly higher than that of the gymnosperms; within angiosperms, mean r of lianas was higher than that of trees. Whole-plant nitrogen use efficiency was also significantly higher in angiosperm than in gymnosperm species, and was primarily controlled by the rate of photosynthesis for a given amount of leaf nitrogen. Whole-plant water use efficiency, TEc, varied significantly among species, and was primarily controlled by ci/ca, the ratio of intercellular to ambient CO2 partial pressures during photosynthesis. Instantaneous measurements of ci/ca explained 51% of variation in TEc (P < 0.0001, n = 94). Whole-plant 13C discrimination also varied significantly as a function of ci/ca (R2 = 0.57, P < 0.0001, n = 94), and was, accordingly, a good predictor of TEc. The 18O enrichment of stem dry matter was primarily controlled by the predicted 18O enrichment of evaporative sites within leaves (R2 = 0.61, P < 0.0001, n = 94), with some residual variation explained by mean transpiration rate. Measurements of carbon and oxygen stable isotope ratios could provide a useful means of parameterizing physiological models of tropical forest trees. PMID:18599645

  3. Effects of tillage on contents of organic carbon, nitrogen, water-stable aggregates and light fraction for four different long-term trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andruschkewitsch, R.; Geisseler, D.; Koch, H.-J.; Ludwig, B.

    2012-04-01

    Despite increasing interest in tillage techniques as a factor affecting organic carbon (Corg) dynamics and stabilization mechanisms little is known about the underlying processes. Our objectives were (i) to quantify the impact of different tillage treatments on the amount and distribution of of labile Corg pools, on the water-stable macro-aggregate (>250 µm) contents and on organic carbon (Corg) storage and (ii) to quantify the ability of soils under different tillage treatments, light fraction (LF) inputs and clay contents in macro-aggregate formation. Therefore four long-term tillage trials on loess soil in Germany with regular conventional tillage (CT, to 30 cm), mulch tillage (MT, to 10 cm), and no-tillage (NT) treatments. Samples were taken in 0-5 cm, 5-25 cm and 25-40 cm depth after 18-25 years of different tillage treatments and investigated on free and occluded LF (fLF and oLF, respectively) and on macro-aggregate contents. Furthermore an incubation experiment for the quantifcation of macro-aggregate formation was conducted. Macro-aggregates in soils from CT and NT treatments (0-5 and 5-25 cm soil depth) were destroyed and different amounts of light fraction (LF) and clay were applied. The four long-term tillage trials, differing in texture and climatic conditions, revealed consistent results in Corg storage among each other. Based on the equivalent soil mass approach (CT: 0-40, MT: 0-38, NT: 0-36 cm) the Corg stocks in the sampled profile were significantly higher for the MT treatment than for the CT and NT treatments. Significantly lower Corg, fLF, oLF, and macro-aggregate contents for the soils under CT treatment in comparison with the soils under NT and MT treatments were restricted on the top 5 cm. The correlation of the macro-aggregate content against the fLF and oLF contents suggested that the macro-aggregate content is influenced to a lesser extent directly by the physical impact of the different tillage treatments but by the contents of available

  4. Development and optimisation of VFA driven DEAMOX process for treatment of strong nitrogenous anaerobic effluents.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnyi, S V; Gladchenko, M A; Kang, Ho; Mulder, A; Versprille, A

    2008-01-01

    The recently proposed DEAMOX (DEnitrifying AMmonium OXidation) process combines the anammox reaction with autotrophic denitrifying conditions using sulphide as an electron donor for the production of nitrite from nitrate within an anaerobic biofilm. This paper firstly presents a feasibility study of the DEAMOX process using synthetic (ammonia + nitrate) wastewater where sulphide is replaced by volatile fatty acids (VFA) as a more widespread electron donor for partial denitrification. Under the influent N-NH+4/N-NO3(-) and COD/N-NO3(-) ratios of 1 and 2.3, respectively, the typical efficiencies of ammonia removal were around 40% (no matter whether a VFA mixture or only acetate were used) for nitrogen loading rates (NLR) up to 1236 mg N/l/d. This parameter increased to 80% by increasing the influent COD/N-NO3(-) ratio to 3.48 and decreasing the influent N-NH4 +/N-NO3(-) ratio to 0.29. As a result, the total nitrogen removal increased to 95%. The proposed process was further tested with typical strong nitrogenous effluent such as reject water (total N, 530-566 mg N/l; total COD, 1530-1780 mg/l) after thermophilic sludge anaerobic digestion. For this, the raw wastewater was split and partially ( approximately 50%) fed to a nitrifying reactor (to generate nitrate) and the remaining part ( approximately 50%) was directed to the DEAMOX reactor where this stream was mixed with the nitrified effluent. Stable process performance up to NLR of 1,243 mg N/l/d in the DEAMOX reactor was achieved resulting in 40, 100, and 66% removal of ammonia, NOx(-), and total nitrogen, respectively. PMID:18309208

  5. Stimulation of Autotrophic Denitrification by Intrusions of the Bosporus Plume into the Anoxic Black Sea

    PubMed Central

    Fuchsman, Clara A.; Murray, James W.; Staley, James T.

    2012-01-01

    Autotrophic denitrification was measured in the southwestern coastal Black Sea, where the Bosporus Plume injects oxidized chemical species (especially O2 and NO3−) into the oxic, suboxic, and anoxic layers. Prominent oxygen intrusions caused an overlap of NOx− and sulfide at the same station where autotrophic denitrification activity was detected with incubation experiments. Several bacteria that have been proposed to oxidize sulfide in other low oxygen environments were found in the Black Sea including SUP05, Sulfurimonas, Arcobacter, and BS-GSO2. Comparison of TRFLP profiles from this mixing zone station and the Western Gyre (a station not affected by the Bosporus Plume) indicate the greatest relative abundance of Sulfurimonas and Arcobacter at the appropriate depths at the mixing zone station. The autotrophic gammaproteobacterium BS-GSO2 correlated with ammonium fluxes rather than with sulfide fluxes and the maximum in SUP05 peak height was shallower than the depths where autotrophic denitrification was detected. Notably, anammox activity was not detected at the mixing zone station, though low levels of DNA from the anammox bacteria Candidatus Scalindua were present. These results provide evidence for a modified ecosystem with different N2 production pathways in the southwest coastal region compared to that found in the rest of the Black Sea. Moreover, the same Sulfurimonas phylotype (BS139) was previously detected on >30 μm particles in the suboxic zone of the Western Gyre along with DNA of potential sulfate reducers, so it is possible that particle-attached autotrophic denitrification may be an overlooked N2 production pathway in the central Black Sea as well. PMID:22826706

  6. Long-term Trends in Particulate Organic Carbon from a Low-Gradient Autotrophic Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, J.; Ford, W. I., III

    2014-12-01

    Recent insights from low-gradient streams dominated by fine surficial sediments have shown fluvial organic matter dynamics are governed by coupled hydrologic and biotic controls at event to seasonal timescales. Notwithstanding the importance of shorter timescales, quantity and quality of carbon in stream ecosystems at annual and decadal scales is of increased interest in order to understand if stream ecosystems are net stores or sinks of carbon and how stream carbon behaves under dynamic climate conditions. As part of an ongoing study in a low-gradient, agricultural watershed in the Bluegrass Region of Central Kentucky, an eight year dataset of transported particulate organic carbon (POC) was analyzed for the present study. The objective was to investigate if POC dynamics at multi-year timescales are governed by biotic or hydrologic processes. A statistical analysis using Empirical Mode Decomposition was performed on an 8 year dataset of transported sediment carbon, temperature, and log-transformed flowrates at the watershed outlet. Simulations from a previously validated, process-based, organic carbon model were utilized as further verification of drivers. Results from the analysis suggest that a 4 degree Celsius mean annual temperature shift corresponds to a 63% increase in organic carbon content at the main-stem, third order outlet and a 33% increase in organic carbon content at the main-stem inlet. Model and stable isotope results for the 8 year study support that long-term increases in organic carbon concentration are governed by biotic growth and humification of algal biomass in which increasing annual temperatures promote increased organic carbon production, relative to ecosystem respiration. This result contradicts conventional wisdom, suggesting projected warming trends will shift autotrophic freshwater systems to net heterotrophic, which has significant implications for the role of benthic stream ecosystems under changing climate conditions. Future work

  7. Stable silylenes.

    PubMed

    Haaf, M; Schmedake, T A; West, R

    2000-10-01

    The field of stable silylene research has grown dramatically since the first isolation of a stable silylene in 1994. Prior to 1994, silylenes existed only as reactive intermediates, isolable only in low-temperature matrixes. Since then, several stable silylenes have been synthesized, some in fact showing remarkable thermal stability. This Account highlights the developments in stable silylene chemistry, including theoretical and experimental studies attempting to explain the remarkable stability of the silylenes as well as the rapidly expanding reaction chemistry of the stable silylenes. PMID:11041835

  8. Development of biological platform for the autotrophic production of biofuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Nymul

    of the current status of metabolic engineering of chemolithoautotrophs is carried out in order to identify the challenges and likely routes to overcome them. This is presented in Chapter 3 of this dissertation. The initial metabolic engineering and bioreactor studies was carried out using a number of gene-constructs on R. capsulatus and R. eutropha. The gene-constructs consisted of Plac promoter followed by the triterpene synthase genes (SS or BS) and other upstream genes. A comparison of the production of triterpenes were done in the different growth modes that R. capsulatus was capable of growing---aerobic heterotrophic, anaerobic photoheterotrophic and aerobic chemoautotrophic. Autotrophic productivity could likely be improved much further by increasing the available mass-transfer of the reactor. These efforts are presented in Chapter 4 of this dissertation. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  9. Enhanced bioaccumulation of mercury in deep-sea fauna from the Bay of Biscay (north-east Atlantic) in relation to trophic positions identified by analysis of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouvelon, T.; Spitz, J.; Caurant, F.; Mèndez-Fernandez, P.; Autier, J.; Lassus-Débat, A.; Chappuis, A.; Bustamante, P.

    The Bay of Biscay (north-east Atlantic) is an open marine ecosystem of particular concern in current European environmental policies. Indeed, it supports both a high biological diversity and numerous anthropogenic activities such as important fisheries. For the first time, stable isotope analyses (SIA) of carbon and nitrogen and analysis of total mercury (T-Hg) concentrations in the muscle (edible flesh) were performed on adult stages of a wide range of species (i.e., 120 species) from various taxa and various habitats of this ecosystem. Concentrations of this non-essential metal, toxic to all living organisms, ranged from 39 to 5074 ng g-1 dry weight. Calculations of species' trophic positions (TPs) through SIA revealed a limited effect of TP in explaining Hg bioaccumulation by high trophic level consumers in particular. On the contrary, our results suggest an important role of habitat and/or feeding zone, which strongly influence muscle Hg bioaccumulation. Deep-sea fish species effectively presented the highest Hg concentrations. Possible interactions between biological factors (e.g., age of deep-sea organisms) and bioavailability of the metal in the deep-sea environment are discussed to explain such enhanced bioaccumulation of Hg by deep-sea fauna in the Bay of Biscay. This study also highlights a potential risk for human health when deep-sea fish are consumed frequently.

  10. Water-related occupations and diet in two Roman coastal communities (Italy, first to third century AD): correlation between stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values and auricular exostosis prevalence.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Fiona; Sperduti, Alessandra; O'Connell, Tamsin C; Craig, Oliver E; Kirsanow, Karola; Germoni, Paola; Macchiarelli, Roberto; Garnsey, Peter; Bondioli, Luca

    2010-07-01

    The reconstruction of dietary patterns in the two Roman imperial age coastal communities of Portus and Velia (I-III AD) by means of stable isotope analysis of bone remains has exposed a certain degree of heterogeneity between and within the two samples. Results do not correlate with any discernible mortuary practices at either site, which might have pointed to differential social status. The present study tests the hypothesis of a possible connection between dietary habits and occupational activities in the two communities. Among skeletal markers of occupation, external auricular exostosis (EAE) has proved to be very informative. Clinical and retrospective epidemiological surveys have revealed a strong positive correlation between EAE development and habitual exposure to cold water. In this study, we show that there is a high rate of occurrence of EAE among adult males in both skeletal samples (21.1% in Portus and 35.3% in Velia). Further, there is a statistically significant higher prevalence of EAE among those individuals at Velia with very high nitrogen isotopic values. This points to fishing (coastal, low-water fishing) as the sea-related occupation most responsible for the onset of the ear pathology. For Portus, where the consumption of foods from sea and river seems to be more widespread through the population, and where the scenario of seaport and fluvial activities was much more complex than in Velia, a close correlation between EAE and fish consumption by fishermen is less easy to establish. PMID:20014179

  11. Compound-specific amino acid δ15N patterns in marine algae: Tracer potential for cyanobacterial vs. eukaryotic organic nitrogen sources in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Matthew D.; Lehman, Jennifer; Kudela, Raphael

    2013-02-01

    Stable nitrogen isotopic analysis of individual amino acids (δ15N-AA) has unique potential to elucidate the complexities of food webs, track heterotrophic transformations, and understand diagenesis of organic nitrogen (ON). While δ15N-AA patterns of autotrophs have been shown to be generally similar, prior work has also suggested that differences may exist between cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae. However, δ15N-AA patterns in differing oceanic algal groups have never been closely examined. The overarching goals of this study were first to establish a more quantitative understanding of algal δ15N-AA patterns, and second to examine whether δ15N-AA patterns have potential as a new tracer for distinguishing prokaryotic vs. eukaryotic N sources. We measured δ15N-AA from prokaryotic and eukaryotic phytoplankton cultures and used a complementary set of statistical approaches (simple normalization, regression-derived fractionation factors, and multivariate analyses) to test for variations. A generally similar δ15N-AA pattern was confirmed for all algae, however significant AA-specific variation was also consistently identified between the two groups. The relative δ15N fractionation of Glx (glutamine + glutamic acid combined) vs. total proteinaceous N appeared substantially different, which we hypothesize could be related to differing enzymatic forms. In addition, the several other AA (most notably glycine and leucine) appeared to have strong biomarker potential. Finally, we observed that overall patterns of δ15N values in algae correspond well with the Trophic vs. Source-AA division now commonly used to describe variable AA δ15N changes with trophic transfer, suggesting a common mechanistic basis. Overall, these results show that autotrophic δ15N-AA patterns can differ between major algal evolutionary groupings for many AA. The statistically significant multivariate results represent a first approach for testing ideas about relative eukaryotic vs. prokaryotic

  12. Heterotrophic bacteria from cultures of autotrophic Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: relationships as studied by means of deoxyribonucleic acid homology.

    PubMed

    Harrison, A P; Jarvis, B W; Johnson, J L

    1980-07-01

    From several presumably pure cultures of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, we isolated a pair of stable phenotypes. One was a strict autotroph utilizing sulfur or ferrous iron as the energy source and unable to utilize glucose; the other phenotype was an acidophilic obligate heterotroph capable of utilizing glucose but not sulfur or ferrous iron. The acidophilic obligate heterotroph not only was encountered in cultures of T. ferrooxidans, but also was isolated with glucose-mineral salts medium, pH 2.0, directly from coal refuse. By means of deoxyribonucleic acid homology, we have demonstrated that the acidophilic heterotrophs are of a different genotype from T. ferrooxidans, not closely related to this species; we have shown also that the acidophilic obligate heterotrophs, regardless of their source of isolation, are related to each other. Therefore, cultures of T. ferrooxidans reported capable of utilizing organic compounds should be carefully examined for contamination. The acidophilic heterotrophs isolated by us are different from T. acidophilis, which is also associated with T. ferrooxidans but is facultative, utilizing both glucose and elemental sulfur as energy sources. Since they are so common and tenacious in T. ferrooxidans cultures, the heterotrophs must be associated with T. ferrooxidans in the natural habitat. PMID:7400100

  13. Microbes mediate carbon and nitrogen retention in shallow photic sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardison, A.; Anderson, I.; Canuel, E. A.; Tobias, C.; Veuger, B.

    2009-12-01

    Sediments in shallow coastal bays are sites of intense biogeochemical cycling facilitated by a complex microbial consortium. Unlike deeper coastal environments, much of the benthos is illuminated by sunlight in these bays. As a result, benthic autotrophs such as benthic microalgae (BMA) and macroalgae play an integral role in nutrient cycling. Investigating pathways of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) flow through individual compartments within the sediment microbial community has previously proved challenging due to methodological difficulties. However, it is now possible using stable isotopes and microbial biomarkers such as fatty acids and amino acids to track C and N flow through individual microbial pools. We investigated the uptake and retention of C and N by bacteria and BMA in a shallow subtidal system. Using bulk and compound specific isotopic analysis, we traced the pathways of dissolved inorganic 13C and 15N under various treatments: 1) in ambient light or dark, 2) from porewater or water column sources, and 3) in the presence or absence of bloom forming nuisance macroalgae. Excess 13C and 15N in THAAs and excess 13C in total PLFAs showed a strong dependence on light. Enrichment of these pools represents uptake by the microbial community, which can include both autotrophic and heterotrophic components. Higher excess 13C in benthic microalgal fatty acids (C20, C22 PUFAs) provides evidence that benthic microalgae were fixing 13C. Aditionally, the ratio of excess 13C in branched fatty acids to microbial fatty acids (BAR) and excess 13C and 15N in D-Ala to L-Ala (D/L-Ala) were low, suggesting dominance by benthic microalgae over bacteria to total label incorporation. Our results support uptake and retention of C and N by the sediment microbial community and indicate a tight coupling between BMA and bacteria in shallow illuminated systems. This uptake is diminished in the presence of macroalgae, likely due to shading and/or nutrient competition. Therefore

  14. Uses of stable isotopes in fish ecology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analyses of fish tissues (other than otoliths) for stable isotope ratios can provide substantial information on fish ecology, including physiological ecology. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon frequently are used to determine the mix of diet sources for consumers. Stable i...

  15. Autotrophic fixation of geogenic CO2 by microorganisms contributes to soil organic matter formation and alters isotope signatures in a wetland mofette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, M. E.; Beulig, F.; von Fischer, J.; Muhr, J.; Küsel, K.; Trumbore, S. E.

    2015-09-01

    To quantify the contribution of autotrophic microorganisms to organic matter formation (OM) in soils, we investigated natural CO2 vents (mofettes) situated in a wetland in NW Bohemia (Czech Republic). Mofette soils had higher SOM concentrations than reference soils due to restricted decomposition under high CO2 levels. We used radiocarbon (Δ14C) and stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) to characterize SOM and its sources in two moffetes and compared it with respective reference soils, which were not influenced by geogenic CO2. The geogenic CO2 emitted at these sites is free of radiocarbon and enriched in δ13C compared to atmospheric CO2. Together, these isotopic signals allow us to distinguish C fixed by plants from C fixed by autotrophic microorganisms using their differences in δ13C discrimination. We can then estimate that up to 27 % of soil organic matter in the 0-10 cm layer of these soils was derived from microbially assimilated CO2. Isotope values of bulk SOM were shifted towards more positive δ13C and more negative Δ14C values in mofettes compared to reference soils, suggesting that geogenic CO2 emitted from the soil atmosphere is incorporated into SOM. To distinguish whether geogenic CO2 was fixed by plants or by CO2 assimilating microorganisms, we first used the proportional differences in radiocarbon and δ13C values to indicate the magnitude of discrimination of the stable isotopes in living plants. Deviation from this relationship was taken to indicate the presence of microbial CO2 fixation, as microbial discrimination should differ from that of plants. 13CO2-labelling experiments confirmed high activity of CO2 assimilating microbes in the top 10 cm, where δ13C values of SOM were shifted up to 2 ‰ towards more negative values. Uptake rates of microbial CO2 fixation ranged up to 1.59 ± 0.16 μg gdw-1 d-1. We inferred that the negative δ13C shift was caused by the activity of chemo-lithoautotrophic microorganisms, as indicated from

  16. COMPLEX INTERACTIONS BETWEEN AUTOTROPHS IN SHALLOW MARINE AND FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS: IMPLICATIONS FOR COMMUNITY RESPONSES TO NUTRIENT STRESS. (U915532)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relative biomass of autotrophs (vascular plants, macroalgae, microphytobenthos, phytoplankton) in shallow aquatic ecosystems is thought to be controlled by nutrient inputs and underwater irradiance. Widely accepted conceptual models indicate that this is the case both in m...

  17. Lactate dehydrogenase from autotrophic and heterotrophic cells of the marine diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis Reimann & Lewin.

    PubMed

    Darley, W M; Smiley, R H

    1976-10-01

    Cultures of Cylindrotheca furisormis grown either autotrohpically or heterotrophically on lactate contained significant amounts of NAD-dependent L(+)-lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27). Polyacylamide gel electrophoresis of crude enzyme extracts revealed a single band which was indistinguishable between autotrohpic and heterotrohpic cells. The Km for lactate of partially purified preparations was lower under heterotrophic conditions. The specific activity in crude extracts was higher under autotrophic than heterotrophic conditions; it dropped precipitously when autotrophic cells were transferred to the dark, increasing again only in the presence of lactate. These and related observations suggest that this enzyme has at most only a minor role in the assimilation of lactate during heterotrophic growth on lactate. PMID:184899

  18. Gases generated from simulated thermal degradation of autotrophic and heterotrophic chlorella

    SciTech Connect

    Qingyu Wu )

    1992-01-01

    The content of crude lipid in the cells of heterotrophic Chlorella protothecoides is 4.4 times as high as in the autotrophic algal cells. The gases thermally degraded from autotrophic cells at 200-300[degrees]C contain mainly CO[sub 2], while the heterotrophic algal cells produce hydrocarbon gas at a much higher rate than autotraophic algal cells. With the rise in temperature, both kinds of cells display a rapid drop in the acid/alkane ratio of the gas components and the ratio of ethane to ethylene increases regularly. Their ratio of normal and isomeric alkanes are all above 1. The study reveals that the actual potential of microplanktonic algae in producing oil and natural gas should be much greater than what people have recognized before.

  19. Autotrophic Microbe Metagenomes and Metabolic Pathways Differentiate Adjacent Red Sea Brine Pools

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Cao, Huiluo; Zhang, Guishan; Bougouffa, Salim; Lee, On On; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    In the Red Sea, two neighboring deep-sea brine pools, Atlantis II and Discovery, have been studied extensively, and the results have shown that the temperature and concentrations of metal and methane in Atlantis II have increased over the past decades. Therefore, we investigated changes in the microbial community and metabolic pathways. Here, we compared the metagenomes of the two pools to each other and to those of deep-sea water samples. Archaea were generally absent in the Atlantis II metagenome; Bacteria in the metagenome were typically heterotrophic and depended on aromatic compounds and other extracellular organic carbon compounds as indicated by enrichment of the related metabolic pathways. In contrast, autotrophic Archaea capable of CO2 fixation and methane oxidation were identified in Discovery but not in Atlantis II. Our results suggest that hydrothermal conditions and metal precipitation in the Atlantis II pool have resulted in elimination of the autotrophic community and methanogens. PMID:23624511

  20. Nitrate and bromate removal by autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification processes: batch experiments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The effects of various parameters on bromate reduction were tested using lab-scale batch reactors with sulfur based autotrophic and methanol based heterotrophic denitrification processes. The initial bromate (BrO3–) concentration of 100 and 500 μg/L was completely reduced and bromide (Br-) was produced stoichiometrically from bromate in all batch reactors. In all experiments, nitrate was completely reduced to below detection limit. Kinetic studies showed that the sulfur-based autotrophic nitrate reduction rate increased with increasing initial nitrate concentration. At stoichiometrically sufficient methanol concentration as an external carbon source, nitrate and bromate were reduced to below US EPA drinking water limits in heterotrophic denitrification conditions. The methanol was completely depleted at the end of the heterotrophic operation conditions. PMID:24354945

  1. Decadal warming causes a consistent and persistent shift from heterotrophic to autotrophic respiration in contrasting permafrost ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Hicks Pries, Caitlin E; van Logtestijn, Richard S P; Schuur, Edward A G; Natali, Susan M; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Aerts, Rien; Dorrepaal, Ellen

    2015-12-01

    Soil carbon in permafrost ecosystems has the potential to become a major positive feedback to climate change if permafrost thaw increases heterotrophic decomposition. However, warming can also stimulate autotrophic production leading to increased ecosystem carbon storage-a negative climate change feedback. Few studies partitioning ecosystem respiration examine decadal warming effects or compare responses among ecosystems. Here, we first examined how 11 years of warming during different seasons affected autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration in a bryophyte-dominated peatland in Abisko, Sweden. We used natural abundance radiocarbon to partition ecosystem respiration into autotrophic respiration, associated with production, and heterotrophic decomposition. Summertime warming decreased the age of carbon respired by the ecosystem due to increased proportional contributions from autotrophic and young soil respiration and decreased proportional contributions from old soil. Summertime warming's large effect was due to not only warmer air temperatures during the growing season, but also to warmer deep soils year-round. Second, we compared ecosystem respiration responses between two contrasting ecosystems, the Abisko peatland and a tussock-dominated tundra in Healy, Alaska. Each ecosystem had two different timescales of warming (<5 years and over a decade). Despite the Abisko peatland having greater ecosystem respiration and larger contributions from heterotrophic respiration than the Healy tundra, both systems responded consistently to short- and long-term warming with increased respiration, increased autotrophic contributions to ecosystem respiration, and increased ratios of autotrophic to heterotrophic respiration. We did not detect an increase in old soil carbon losses with warming at either site. If increased autotrophic respiration is balanced by increased primary production, as is the case in the Healy tundra, warming will not cause these ecosystems to become

  2. Coassimilation of organic substrates via the autotrophic 3-hydroxypropionate bi-cycle in Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

    PubMed

    Zarzycki, Jan; Fuchs, Georg

    2011-09-01

    Chloroflexus aurantiacus is a facultative autotrophic green nonsulfur bacterium that grows phototrophically in thermal springs and forms microbial mats with cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria produce glycolate during the day (photorespiration) and excrete fermentation products at night. C. aurantiacus uses the 3-hydroxypropionate bi-cycle for autotrophic carbon fixation. This pathway was thought to be also suited for the coassimilation of various organic substrates such as glycolate, acetate, propionate, 3-hydroxypropionate, lactate, butyrate, or succinate. To test this possibility, we added these compounds at a 5 mM concentration to autotrophically pregrown cells. Although the provided amounts of H(2) and CO(2) allowed continuing photoautotrophic growth, cells immediately consumed most substrates at rates equaling the rate of autotrophic carbon fixation. Using [(14)C]acetate, half of the labeled organic carbon was incorporated into cell mass. Our data suggest that C. aurantiacus uses the 3-hydroxypropionate bi-cycle, together with the glyoxylate cycle, to channel organic substrates into the central carbon metabolism. Enzyme activities of the 3-hydroxypropionate bi-cycle were marginally affected when cells were grown heterotrophically with such organic substrates. The 3-hydroxypropionate bi-cycle in Chloroflexi is unique and was likely fostered in an environment in which traces of organic compounds can be coassimilated. Other bacteria living under oligotrophic conditions acquired genes of a rudimentary 3-hydroxypropionate bi-cycle, possibly for the same purpose. Examples are Chloroherpeton thalassium, Erythrobacter sp. strain NAP-1, Nitrococcus mobilis, and marine gammaproteobacteria of the OM60/NOR5 clade such as Congregibacter litoralis. PMID:21764971

  3. Advanced low carbon-to-nitrogen ratio wastewater treatment by electrochemical and biological coupling process.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shihai; Li, Desheng; Yang, Xue; Zhu, Shanbin; Xing, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Nitrogen pollution in ground and surface water significantly affects the environment and its organisms, thereby leading to an increasingly serious environmental problem. Such pollution is difficult to degrade because of the lack of carbon sources. Therefore, an electrochemical and biological coupling process (EBCP) was developed with a composite catalytic biological carrier (CCBC) and applied in a pilot-scale cylindrical reactor to treat wastewater with a carbon-to-nitrogen (C/N) ratio of 2. The startup process, coupling principle, and dynamic feature of the EBCP were examined along with the effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT), dissolved oxygen (DO), and initial pH on nitrogen removal. A stable coupling system was obtained after 51 days when plenty of biofilms were cultivated on the CCBC without inoculation sludge. Autotrophic denitrification, with [Fe(2+)] and [H] produced by iron-carbon galvanic cells in CCBC as electron donors, was confirmed by equity calculation of CODCr and nitrogen removal. Nitrogen removal efficiency was significantly influenced by HRT, DO, and initial pH with optimal values of 3.5 h, 3.5 ± 0.1 mg L(-1), and 7.5 ± 0.1, respectively. The ammonia, nitrate, and total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiencies of 90.1 to 95.3 %, 90.5 to 99.0 %, and 90.3 to 96.5 % were maintained with corresponding initial concentrations of 40 ± 2 mg L(-1) (NH3-N load of 0.27 ± 0.01 kg NH3-N m(-3) d(-1)), 20 ± 1 mg L(-1), and 60 ± 2 mg L(-1) (TN load of 0.41 ± 0.02 kg TN m(-3) d(-1)). Based on the Eckenfelder model, the kinetics equation of the nitrogen transformation along the reactor was N e  = N 0 exp (-0.04368 h/L(1.8438)). Hence, EBCP is a viable method for advanced low C/N ratio wastewater treatment. PMID:26564190

  4. Evaluation of simultaneous autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification processes and bacterial community structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guihua; Peng, Jingjing; Feng, Cuijie; Fang, Fang; Chen, Shaohua; Xu, Yuanjian; Wang, Xingzu

    2015-08-01

    This study demonstrated that a combined heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification (HAD) process is highly effective for the simultaneous removal of acetate, nitrate, and sulfide at an efficiency of 100, 80, and 100 %, respectively. In the HAD system, simultaneous sulfide, acetate, and nitrate removals were observed, which indicated that heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification occurred simultaneously. When the sulfide was existed in HAD reactor, the main product of sulfide biooxidation was S(0). Once the sulfide was exhausted, the sulfate concentration in the HAD reactor increased and became the main end product. These results provided an alternative method to control the end sulfide biooxidation product by online monitoring sulfide concentration. Nearly half (43 %) of the total clones in our mix-trophic reactor were amphitrophy denitrifiers. The autotrophic denitrifiers, heterotrophic denitrifiers, and amphitrophy denitrifiers coexisted in the HAD reactor to complete the denitrification process. Retrieved bacterial 16S rRNA gene clones affiliated with uncultured Xanthomonadaceae, Thauera, Thiobacillus, and Chromatiales were dominant. PMID:25825049

  5. Impact of Sulfur Starvation in Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Cultures of the Extremophilic Microalga Galdieria phlegrea (Cyanidiophyceae).

    PubMed

    Carfagna, Simona; Bottone, Claudia; Cataletto, Pia Rosa; Petriccione, Milena; Pinto, Gabriele; Salbitani, Giovanna; Vona, Vincenza; Pollio, Antonino; Ciniglia, Claudia

    2016-09-01

    In plants and algae, sulfate assimilation and cysteine synthesis are regulated by sulfur (S) accessibility from the environment. This study reports the effects of S deprivation in autotrophic and heterotrophic cultures of Galdieria phlegrea (Cyanidiophyceae), a unicellular red alga isolated in the Solfatara crater located in Campi Flegrei (Naples, Italy), where H2S is the prevalent form of gaseous S in the fumarolic fluids and S is widespread in the soils near the fumaroles. This is the first report on the effects of S deprivation on a sulfurous microalga that is also able to grow heterotrophically in the dark. The removal of S from the culture medium of illuminated cells caused a decrease in the soluble protein content and a significant decrease in the intracellular levels of glutathione. Cells from heterotrophic cultures of G. phlegrea exhibited high levels of internal proteins and high glutathione content, which did not diminish during S starvation, but rather glutathione significantly increased. The activity of O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL), the enzyme synthesizing cysteine, was enhanced under S deprivation in a time-dependent manner in autotrophic but not in heterotrophic cells. Analysis of the transcript abundance of the OASTL gene supports the OASTL activity increase in autotrophic cultures under S deprivation. PMID:27388343

  6. The heterotrophic-combined-with-autotrophic denitrification process: performance and interaction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guihua; Feng, Cuijie; Fang, Fang; Chen, Shaohua; Xu, Yuanjian; Wang, Xingzu

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the interaction mechanisms between an autotrophic denitrification (AD) and heterotrophic denitrification (HD) process in a heterotrophic-autotrophic denitrification (HAD) system were investigated, and the performance of the HAD system under different S/Ac(-) molar ratios was also evaluated. The results demonstrated that the heterotrophic-combined-with-autotrophic denitrification process is a promising technology which can remove chemical oxygen demand (COD), sulfide and nitrate simultaneously. The reduction rate of NO(3)(-) to NO(2)(-) by the HD process was much faster than that of reducing NO(2)(-) to N₂, while the reduction rate of NO(3)(-) to NO(2)(-) by the AD process was slower than that of NO(2)(-) to N₂. Therefore, the AD process could use the surplus NO(2)(-) produced by the HD process. This could alleviate the NO(2)(-)-N accumulation and increase the denitrification rate. In addition, the inhibition effects of acetate on AD bacteria and sulfide on HD were observed, and the inhibition was compensated by the promotion effects on NO(2)(-). Therefore, the processes of AD and HD seem to react in parallel, without disturbing each other, in our HAD system. PMID:25909732

  7. Effect of phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency on heterotrophic and autotrophic carbon metabolism of Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed Central

    Reutz, I; Schobert, P; Bowien, B

    1982-01-01

    Mutants of Alcaligenes eutrophus were isolated on the basis of their inability to grow on succinate as the sole source of carbon and energy. The mutants also failed to grow on other gluconeogenic substrates, including pyruvate, acetate, and citrate. Simultaneously, they had lost their capability for autotrophic growth. The mutants grew, but slower than the wild type, on fructose or gluconate. Growth retardation on gluconate was more pronounced. The mutants lacked phosphoglycerate mutase activity, and spontaneous revertants of normal growth phenotype had regained the activity. The physiological characteristics of the mutants indicate the role of phosphoglycerate mutase in heterotrophic and autotrophic carbon metabolism of A. eutrophus. Although the enzyme is necessary for gluconeogenesis during heterotrophic growth on three- or four-carbon substrates, its glycolytic function is not essential for the catabolism of fructose or gluconate via the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. The enzyme is required during autotrophic growth as a catalyst in the biosynthetic route leading from glycerate 3-phosphate to pyruvate. It is suggested that the mutants accomplish the complete degradation of fructose and gluconate mutase lesion. The catabolically produced triose phosphates are converted to fructose 6-phosphate which is rechanneled into the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. This carbon recycling mechanism operates less effectively in mutant cells growing on gluconate. PMID:6282814

  8. Selective enhancement of autotrophic acetate production with genetically modified Acetobacterium woodii.

    PubMed

    Straub, Melanie; Demler, Martin; Weuster-Botz, Dirk; Dürre, Peter

    2014-05-20

    Great interest has emerged in the recent past towards the potential of autotrophic acetogenic bacteria for the sustainable production of fuels and chemicals. This group of microorganisms possesses an ancient pathway for the fixation of carbon dioxide in the presence of hydrogen, making them highly attractive for the utilization of gas mixtures as a cheap and abundant carbon and energy source. As more and more genome sequence data of acetogens becomes available, the genetic tools are being developed concomitantly. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the genetic modification of the well-characterized acetogen Acetobacterium woodii. This microorganism selectively produces acetate under autotrophic conditions, but seems to be limited at high acetate concentrations. To increase the carbon flow through the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway and therefore increase the efficiency of CO2 fixation, genes of enzyme groups of this pathway were selectively overexpressed (the four THF-dependent enzymes for the processing of formate as well as phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase to enhance an ATP-generation step). Acetate production with genetically modified strains was increased in a batch process under pH-controlled reaction conditions in a stirred-tank reactor with continuous sparging of H2 and CO2. Final acetate concentrations of more than 50gL(-1) acetate were thus measured with the recombinant strains at low cell concentrations of 1.5-2gL(-1) dry cell mass in less than four days under autotrophic conditions. PMID:24637370

  9. Stable carbon ((12/13)C) and nitrogen ((14/15)N) isotopes as a tool for identifying the sources of cyanide in wastes and contaminated soils--a method development.

    PubMed

    Weihmann, Jenny; Mansfeldt, Tim; Schulte, Ulrike

    2007-01-23

    The occurrence of iron-cyanide complexes in the environment is of concern, since they are potentially hazardous. In order to determine the source of iron-cyanide complexes in contaminated soils and wastes, we developed a method based on the stable isotope ratios (13)C/(12)C and (15)N/(14)N of the complexed cyanide-ion (CN(-)). The method was tested on three pure chemicals and two industrials wastes: blast-furnace sludge (BFS) and gas-purifier waste (GPW). The iron-cyanide complexes were converted into the solid cupric ferrocyanide, Cu(2)[Fe(CN)(6)].7H(2)O, followed by combustion and determination of the isotope-ratios by continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Cupric ferrocyanide was obtained from the materials by (i) an alkaline extraction with 1M NaOH and (ii) a distillate digestion. The [Fe(CN)(6)](4-) of the alkaline extraction was precipitated after adding Cu(2+). The CN(-) of the distillate digestion was at first complexed with Fe(2+) under inert conditions and then precipitated after adding Cu(2+). The delta(13)C-values obtained by the two methods differed slightly up to 1-3 per thousand for standards and BFS. The difference was larger for alkaline-extracted GPW (4-7 per thousand), since non-cyanide C was co-extracted and co-precipitated. Therefore the distillate digestion technique is recommended when determining the C isotope ratios in samples rich in organic carbon. Since the delta(13)C-values of BFS are in the range of -30 to -24 per thousand and of -17 to -5 per thousand for GPW, carbon seems to be a suitable tracer for identifying the source of cyanide in both wastes. However, the delta(15)N-values overlapped for BFS and GPW, making nitrogen unsuitable as a tracer. PMID:17386516

  10. Bacteria morphology and diversity of the combined autotrophic nitritation and sulfur-carbon three-dimensional-electrode denitrification process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyan; Zhou, Yuexi; Yuan, Quan; Zhao, Hua; Dai, Xin

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial morphology and diversity in the reactors of a combined autotrophic nitritation and sulfur-carbon three-dimensional-electrode denitrification (CANSCTED) process operating under steady-state conditions were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and partial 16S rDNA cloning and sequencing. The CANSCTED process consisted of two parts, i.e., the nitritation membrane bioreactor (NMBR) and the sulfur-carbon three-dimensional-electrode denitrification reactor (SCTED). When the influent NH₄(+) concentration of NMBR ranged from 854 to 1086 mg N L(-1), with about 50% NH₄(+) removal efficiency and NO₂(-) accumulation rate, the spherical and spheroidal ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were predominant, with community successions of β-Proteobacteria (60.0%), Bacteroidetes (28.3%) and Chloroflexi (11.7%). The NMBR effluent with 429∼543 mg N L(-1) NH₄(+) and 519∼578 mg N L(-1) NO₂(-) was continuously supplied to SCTED for sulfur denitrification, bioelectrochemical hydrogen denitrification, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation. The predominant bacterial community successions were β-Proteobacteria (78.3%) and ϵ-Proteobacteria (21.7%). When the SCTED influent was supplied with only NO₂(-) (412-525 mg N L(-1)) as nitrogen substrate, the predominant bacteria in SCTED were short-bacilliform and spheroidal denitrification bacteria, β-Proteobacteria (82.0%), ϵ-Proteobacteria (16.4%) and γ-Proteobacteria (1.6%). Although the predominant bacterial communities were both β-Proteobacteria and ϵ-Proteobacteria in SCTED, the species and quantity of each community varied with the change of SCTED influent composition, which indicated that the composition influence the bacterial morphology and diversity in SCTED. PMID:24117082

  11. Stable isotope fractionation in photosynthesis: Analysis of autotrophic competence following transformation of the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Boynton, J.E.; Gillham, N.W.; Osmond, C.B.

    1991-06-15

    Isotopic techniques needed to assess the interactions between photosynthesis and respiration in Chlamydomonas have been devised for {sup 13}C, using plate and liquid cultures. The effectiveness of various transformation strategies for the chloroplast psbA gene has been evaluated with respect to their utility in constructing and characterizing strains homoplasmic for site-directed mutations in an otherwise isogenic background. Our analysis of the first site-directed change in the D-1 protein of Chlamydomonas indicates that a second site mutation (arg{sub 238} > lys) in the loop between transmembrane helices IV -- V can partially compensate for the reduced photosynthetic performance that accompanies the atrazine resistant mutation (ser{sub 264} > ala/gly) in this alga and in higher plants grown under high light intensities. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Treatment of nitrogen-rich wastewater using partial nitrification and anammox in the CANON process.

    PubMed

    Third, K A; Paxman, J; Schmid, M; Strous, M; Jetten, M S M; Cord-Ruwisch, R

    2005-01-01

    Partial nitrification combined with Anammox in a single reactor (the CANON process) is an energy-efficient N-removal technology that could substantially lower the N-load of a WWTP by separate treatment of nitrogen-rich side streams, preventing the need for extensive expansion and reducing the total energy requirement. This study looks at the enrichment of Anammox from activated sludge and its application in the CANON process on lab-scale. The aim was to identify the critical process control parameters necessary for successful operation of CANON. An Anammox culture capable of removing 0.6 kg N/m3/d was enriched in 14 weeks in a sequencing batch reactor. Nitrifying biomass was inoculated into the Anammox reactor (10% v/v) together with limited oxygen supply (< 8 mL/min) to initiate the CANON process in continuous culture. The small flocs formed by the biomass (< 1000 microm) were sensitive to low O2 concentrations (< 0.1 mg/L) which prevented simultaneous nitrification and Anammox. Operation with 20 min aerobiosis and 30 min anaerobiosis was necessary to achieve sustained, completely autotrophic N-removal for an extended period at a rate of 0.08 kg N/m3/d. Essential process control parameters for stable CANON operation were the nitrite concentration, oxygen concentration, pH and the temperature. PMID:16235745

  13. Effects of paraquat on photosynthetic pigments, antioxidant enzymes, and gene expression in Chlorella pyrenoidosa under mixotrophic compared with autotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiguo; Liu, Min; Zhang, Peiliang; Yu, Fugen; Lu, Shan; Li, Pengfu; Zhou, Junying

    2014-11-01

    Only limited information is available on herbicide toxicity to algae under mixotrophic conditions. In the present study, we studied the effects of the herbicide paraquat on growth, photosynthetic pigments, antioxidant enzymes, and gene expression in Chlorella pyrenoidosa under mixotrophic compared with autotrophic conditions. The mean measured exposure concentrations of paraquat under mixotrophic and autotrophic conditions were in the range of 0.3-3.4 and 0.6-3.6 μM, respectively. Exposure to paraquat for 72 h under both autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions induced decreased growth and chlorophyll (Chl) content, increased superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activities, and decreased transcript abundances of three photosynthesis-related genes (light-independent protochlorophyllide reductase subunit, photosystem II protein D1, and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit [rbcL]). Compared with autotrophic conditions, the inhibition percentage of growth rate under mixotrophic conditions was lower at 0.8 μM paraquat, whereas it was greater at 1.8 and 3.4 μM paraquat. With exposure to 0.8-3.4 μM paraquat, the inhibition rates of Chl a and b content under mixotrophic conditions (43.1-52.4% and 54.6-59.7%, respectively) were greater compared with autotrophic conditions, whereas the inhibition rate of rbcL gene transcription under mixotrophic conditions (35.7-44.0%) was lower. These data showed that similar to autotrophic conditions, paraquat affected the activities of antioxidant enzymes and decreased Chl synthesis and transcription of photosynthesis-related genes in C. pyrenoidosa under mixotrophic conditions, but a differential susceptibility to paraquat toxicity occurred between autotrophically versus mixotrophically grown cells. PMID:25038722

  14. Axenic cultures of Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi in autotrophic conditions: a new protocol for kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Farges, B; Poughon, L; Roriz, D; Creuly, C; Dussap, C-G; Lasseur, C

    2012-07-01

    As a part of a natural biological N-cycle, nitrification is one of the steps included in the conception of artificial ecosystems designed for extraterrestrial life support systems (LSS) such as Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) project, which is the LSS project of the European Space Agency. Nitrification in aerobic environments is carried out by two groups of bacteria in a two-step process. The ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (Nitrosomonas europaea) realize the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite, and the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (Nitrobacter winogradskyi), the oxidation of nitrite to nitrate. In both cases, the bacteria achieve these oxidations to obtain an energy and reductant source for their growth and maintenance. Furthermore, both groups also use CO₂ predominantly as their carbon source. They are typically found together in ecosystems, and consequently, nitrite accumulation is rare. Due to the necessity of modeling accurately conversion yields and transformation rates to achieve a complete modeling of MELiSSA, the present study focuses on the experimental determination of nitrogen to biomass conversion yields. Kinetic and mass balance studies for axenic cultures of Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi in autotrophic conditions are performed. The follow-up of these cultures is done using flow cytometry for assessing biomass concentrations and ionic chromatography for ammonium, nitrite, and nitrate concentrations. A linear correlation is observed between cell count and optical density (OD) measurement (within a 10 % accuracy) validating OD measurements for an on-line estimation of biomass quantity even at very low biomass concentrations. The conversion between cell count and biomass concentration has been determined: 7.1 × 10¹² cells g dry matter (DM)⁻¹ for Nitrobacter and 6.3 × 10¹² cells g DM⁻¹ for Nitrosomonas. Nitrogen substrates and products are assessed redundantly showing excellent agreement for mass

  15. Coupling autotrophic sulfide mineral weathering with dolomite dissolution in a subglacial ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, E. S.; Hamilton, T. L.; Havig, J. R.; Lange, R.; Murter, E.; Skidmore, M. L.; Peters, J.; Shock, E.

    2013-12-01

    Evidence in the rock record suggests that glaciers have been present and covered a significant portion of the Earth's surface since the putative Mozaan Glaciation (circa 2.9 Ga) and were demonstrated recently to host active microbial communities that impact local and global biogeochemical cycles. In the present study, we applied a microcosm-based radioisotopic biocarbonate tracer approach to quantify rates of inorganic carbon assimilation in sediments sampled from beneath Robertson Glacier (RG), Alberta, Canada at 4°C. Rates of inorganic carbon assimilation were stimulated by the addition of ammonium and phosphate, suggesting that these nutrients might be of limited supply in the subglacial environment or, in the case of ammonia, might be serving as a source of reductant fueling inorganic carbon fixation. Geochemical analyses were used to assess the potential redox couples that might be fueling autotrophic activity. The difference in the concentration of sulfate (2.4 mM) in unamended microcosm fluids when compared to fluids sampled from killed controls following 180 days incubation suggests that inorganic carbon assimilation in microcosms is driven by microbial populations involved in the oxidation of mineral sulfides, most likely pyrite. Amendment of microcosms with 1 mM ammonia led to near stoichiometric production of nitrate (~890 μM) and lower production of sulfate (~1.5 mM), indicating that the enhanced activity observed in ammonia treated microcosms is likely due to the stimulation of autotrophic ammonia oxidizing populations. The isotopic composition of dissolved organic carbon in subglacial meltwaters ranged was -24.40 ‰ versus VPDB, which is consistent with a source for this organic carbon via the activity of autotrophs that use the Calvin cycle of inorganic carbon fixation. Quantification and sequencing of transcripts of Calvin cycle biomarker genes (ribulose-1,5 bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, encoded by cbbL) suggest the presence of a ubiquitous

  16. Enhanced start-up of anaerobic facultatively autotrophic biocathodes in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Zaybak, Zehra; Pisciotta, John M; Tokash, Justin C; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-12-01

    Biocathodes in bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) can be used to convert CO2 into diverse organic compounds through a process called microbial electrosynthesis. Unfortunately, start-up of anaerobic biocathodes in BESs is a difficult and time consuming process. Here, a pre-enrichment method was developed to improve start-up of anaerobic facultatively autotrophic biocathodes capable of using cathodes as the electron donor (electrotrophs) and CO2 as the electron acceptor. Anaerobic enrichment of bacteria from freshwater bog sediment samples was first performed in batch cultures fed with glucose and then used to inoculate BES cathode chambers set at -0.4V (versus a standard hydrogen electrode; SHE). After two weeks of heterotrophic operation of BESs, CO2 was provided as the sole electron acceptor and carbon source. Consumption of electrons from cathodes increased gradually and was sustained for about two months in concert with a significant decrease in cathode chamber headspace CO2. The maximum current density consumed was -34 ± 4 mA/m(2). Biosynthesis resulted in organic compounds that included butanol, ethanol, acetate, propionate, butyrate, and hydrogen gas. Bacterial community analyses based on 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed Trichococcus palustris DSM 9172 (99% sequence identity) as the prevailing species in biocathode communities, followed by Oscillibacter sp. and Clostridium sp. Isolates from autotrophic cultivation were most closely related to Clostridium propionicum (99% sequence identity; ZZ16), Clostridium celerecrescens (98-99%; ZZ22, ZZ23), Desulfotomaculum sp. (97%; ZZ21), and Tissierella sp. (98%; ZZ25). This pre-enrichment procedure enables simplified start-up of anaerobic biocathodes for applications such as electrofuel production by facultatively autotrophic electrotrophs. PMID:24126154

  17. Effects of Forest Age on Soil Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Respiration Differ between Evergreen and Deciduous Forests

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zeng, Wenjing; Chen, Weile; Yang, Yuanhe; Zeng, Hui

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of forest stand age on soil respiration (SR) including the heterotrophic respiration (HR) and autotrophic respiration (AR) of two forest types. We measured soil respiration and partitioned the HR and AR components across three age classes ∼15, ∼25, and ∼35-year-old Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica (Mongolia pine) and Larix principis-rupprechtii (larch) in a forest-steppe ecotone, northern China (June 2006 to October 2009). We analyzed the relationship between seasonal dynamics of SR, HR, AR and soil temperature (ST), soil water content (SWC) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, a plant greenness and net primary productivity indicator). Our results showed that ST and SWC were driving factors for the seasonal dynamics of SR rather than plant greenness, irrespective of stand age and forest type. For ∼15-year-old stands, the seasonal dynamics of both AR and HR were dependent on ST. Higher Q10 of HR compared with AR occurred in larch. However, in Mongolia pine a similar Q10 occurred between HR and AR. With stand age, Q10 of both HR and AR increased in larch. For Mongolia pine, Q10 of HR increased with stand age, but AR showed no significant relationship with ST. As stand age increased, HR was correlated with SWC in Mongolia pine, but for larch AR correlated with SWC. The dependence of AR on NDVI occurred in ∼35-year-old Mongolia pine. Our study demonstrated the importance of separating autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration components of SR when stimulating the response of soil carbon efflux to environmental changes. When estimating the response of autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration to environmental changes, the effect of forest type on age-related trends is required. PMID:24282560

  18. Effects of hydrogen partial pressure on autotrophic growth and product formation of Acetobacterium woodii.

    PubMed

    Kantzow, Christina; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2016-08-01

    Low aqueous solubility of the gases for autotrophic fermentations (e.g., hydrogen gas) results in low productivities in bioreactors. A frequently suggested approach to overcome mass transfer limitation is to increase the solubility of the limiting gas in the reaction medium by increasing the partial pressure in the gas phase. An increased inlet hydrogen partial pressure of up to 2.1 bar (total pressure of 3.5 bar) was applied for the autotrophic conversion of hydrogen and carbon dioxide with Acetobacterium woodii in a batch-operated stirred-tank bioreactor with continuous gas supply. Compared to the autotrophic batch process with an inlet hydrogen partial pressure of 0.4 bar (total pressure of 1.0 bar) the final acetate concentration after 3.1 days was reduced to 50 % (29.2 g L(-1) compared to 59.3 g L(-1)), but the final formate concentration was increased by a factor of 18 (7.3 g L(-1) compared to 0.4 g L(-1)). Applying recombinant A. woodii strains overexpressing either genes for enzymes in the methyl branch of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway or the genes phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase at an inlet hydrogen partial pressure of 1.4 bar reduced the final formate concentration by up to 40 % and increased the final dry cell mass and acetate concentrations compared to the wild type strain. Solely the overexpression of the two genes for ATP regeneration at the end of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway resulted in an initial switch off of formate production at increased hydrogen partial pressure until the maximum of the hydrogen uptake rate was reached. PMID:27059835

  19. Adaptation of the autotrophic acetogen Sporomusa ovata to methanol accelerates the conversion of CO2 to organic products.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Höglund, Daniel; Koza, Anna; Bonde, Ida; Zhang, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Acetogens are efficient microbial catalysts for bioprocesses converting C1 compounds into organic products. Here, an adaptive laboratory evolution approach was implemented to adapt Sporomusa ovata for faster autotrophic metabolism and CO2 conversion to organic chemicals. S. ovata was first adapted to grow quicker autotrophically with methanol, a toxic C1 compound, as the sole substrate. Better growth on different concentrations of methanol and with H2-CO2 indicated the adapted strain had a more efficient autotrophic metabolism and a higher tolerance to solvent. The growth rate on methanol was increased 5-fold. Furthermore, acetate production rate from CO2 with an electrode serving as the electron donor was increased 6.5-fold confirming that the acceleration of the autotrophic metabolism of the adapted strain is independent of the electron donor provided. Whole-genome sequencing, transcriptomic, and biochemical studies revealed that the molecular mechanisms responsible for the novel characteristics of the adapted strain were associated with the methanol oxidation pathway and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway of acetogens along with biosynthetic pathways, cell wall components, and protein chaperones. The results demonstrate that an efficient strategy to increase rates of CO2 conversion in bioprocesses like microbial electrosynthesis is to evolve the microbial catalyst by adaptive laboratory evolution to optimize its autotrophic metabolism. PMID:26530351

  20. Adaptation of the autotrophic acetogen Sporomusa ovata to methanol accelerates the conversion of CO2 to organic products

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Höglund, Daniel; Koza, Anna; Bonde, Ida; Zhang, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Acetogens are efficient microbial catalysts for bioprocesses converting C1 compounds into organic products. Here, an adaptive laboratory evolution approach was implemented to adapt Sporomusa ovata for faster autotrophic metabolism and CO2 conversion to organic chemicals. S. ovata was first adapted to grow quicker autotrophically with methanol, a toxic C1 compound, as the sole substrate. Better growth on different concentrations of methanol and with H2-CO2 indicated the adapted strain had a more efficient autotrophic metabolism and a higher tolerance to solvent. The growth rate on methanol was increased 5-fold. Furthermore, acetate production rate from CO2 with an electrode serving as the electron donor was increased 6.5-fold confirming that the acceleration of the autotrophic metabolism of the adapted strain is independent of the electron donor provided. Whole-genome sequencing, transcriptomic, and biochemical studies revealed that the molecular mechanisms responsible for the novel characteristics of the adapted strain were associated with the methanol oxidation pathway and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway of acetogens along with biosynthetic pathways, cell wall components, and protein chaperones. The results demonstrate that an efficient strategy to increase rates of CO2 conversion in bioprocesses like microbial electrosynthesis is to evolve the microbial catalyst by adaptive laboratory evolution to optimize its autotrophic metabolism. PMID:26530351

  1. Ordered Semiconducting Nitrogen-Graphene Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, H. J.; Huang, B.; Li, Z. Y.; Wei, S. H.; Yang, J. L.; Gong, X. G.

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between substitutional nitrogen atoms in graphene is studied by performing first-principles calculations. The effective nearest-neighbor interaction between nitrogen dopants is found to be highly repulsive because of the strong electrostatic repulsion between nitrogen atoms. This interaction prevents the full nitrogen-carbon phase separation in nitrogen-doped graphene. Interestingly, there are two relatively stable nitrogen-nitrogen pair configurations, whose stability can be attributed to the anisotropy in the charge redistribution induced by nitrogen doping. We reveal two stable, ordered, semiconducting N-doped graphene structures, C{sub 3}N and C{sub 12}N, through the cluster-expansion technique and particle-swarm optimization method. In particular, we show that C{sub 12}N has a direct band gap of 0.98 eV. The heterojunctions between C{sub 12}N and graphene nanoribbons might be a promising basis for organic solar cells.

  2. Stable compactifications

    SciTech Connect

    Accetta, F.S.; Gleiser, M.; Holman, R.; Kolb, E.W.

    1986-03-01

    We show that compactifications of theories with extra dimensions are unstable if due to monopole configurations of an antisymmetric tensor field balanced against one-loop Casimir corrections. In the case of ten dimensional supergravity, it is possible, at least for a portion of the phase space, to achieve a stable compactification without fine-tuning by including the contribution of fermionic condensates to the monopole configurations. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casciotti, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  4. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle.

    PubMed

    Casciotti, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status. PMID:26747521

  5. Simultaneous sulfate and zinc removal from acid wastewater using an acidophilic and autotrophic biocathode.

    PubMed

    Teng, Wenkai; Liu, Guangli; Luo, Haiping; Zhang, Renduo; Xiang, Yinbo

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) with a novel acidophilic and autotrophic biocathode for treatment of acid wastewater. A biocathode was developed using acidophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria as the catalyst. Artificial wastewater with 200mgL(-1) sulfate and different Zn concentrations (0, 15, 25, and 40 mg L(-1)) was used as the MEC catholyte. The acidophilic biocathode dominated by Desulfovibrio sp. with an abundance of 66% (with 82% of Desulfovibrio sequences similar to Desulfovibrio simplex) and achieved a considerable sulfate reductive rate of 32 gm(-3)d(-1). With 15 mg L(-1) Zn added, the sulfate reductive rate of MEC improved by 16%. The formation of ZnS alleviated the inhibition from sulfide and sped the sulfate reduction. With 15 and 25 mgL(-1) Zn added, more than 99% of Zn was removed from the wastewater. Dissolved Zn ions in the catholyte were converted into insoluble Zn compounds, such as zinc sulfide and zinc hydroxide, due to the sulfide and elevated pH produced by sulfate reduction. The MEC with acidophilic and autotrophic biocathode can be used as an alternative to simultaneously remove sulfate and metals from acid wastewaters, such as acid mine drainage. PMID:26561748

  6. Community structure and nutrient level control the tolerance of autotrophic biofilm to silver contamination.

    PubMed

    Leflaive, J; Felten, V; Ferriol, J; Lamy, A; Ten-Hage, L; Bec, A; Danger, M

    2015-09-01

    Autotrophic biofilms are complex and fundamental biological compartments of many aquatic ecosystems. Since microbial species differ in their sensitivity to stressors, biofilms have long been proposed for assessing the quality of aquatic ecosystems. Among the many stressors impacting aquatic ecosystems, eutrophication and metal pollution are certainly the most common. Despite that these stressors often occur together, their effects on biofilms have been far much studied separately than interactively. In this study, we evaluated the interactive effects of silver (Ag), a reemerging contaminant, and phosphorus (P), a nutrient often associated with freshwater eutrophication, on the structure and functioning of two types of autotrophic biofilms, one dominated by diatoms and another one dominated by cyanobacteria. We hypothesized that P would alleviate the toxic effects of Ag, either directly, through the contribution of P in metal detoxification processes, or indirectly, through P-mediated shifts in biofilm community compositions and associated divergences in metal tolerance. Results showed that Ag impacted biofilm community structure and functioning but only at unrealistic concentrations (50 μg/L). P availability led to significant shifts in biofilm community composition, these changes being more pronounced in diatom- than those in cyanobacteria-dominated biofilm. In addition, P tended to reduce the impact of Ag but only for the cyanobacteria-dominated biofilm. More generally, our results highlight the preponderant role of the initial community structure and nutrient level on biofilm response to metallic pollutants. PMID:25422116

  7. Bio-electrochemical synthesis of commodity chemicals by autotrophic acetogens utilizing CO2 for environmental remediation.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, Gugan; Farooq, Robina

    2016-09-01

    Bio-electrochemical synthesis (BES) is a technique in which electro-autotrophic bacteria such as Clostridium ljungdahlii utilize electric currents as an electron source from the cathode to reduce CO2 to extracellular, multicarbon, exquisite products through autotrophic conversion. The BES of volatile fatty acids and alcohols directly from CO2 is a sustainable alternative for non-renewable, petroleum-based polymer production. This conversion of CO2 implies reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. The synthesis of heptanoic acid, heptanol, hexanoic acid and hexanol, for the first time, by Clostridium ljungdahlii was a remarkable achievement of BES. In our study, these microorganisms were cultivated on the cathode of a bio-electrochemical cell at -400 mV by a DC power supply at 37 degree Centrigrade, pH 6.8, and was studied for both batch and continuous systems. Pre-enrichment of bio-cathode enhanced the electroactivity of cells and resulted in maximizing extracellular products in less time. The main aim of the research was to investigate the impact of low-cost substrate CO2, and the longer cathode recovery range was due to bacterial reduction of CO2 to multicarbon chemical commodities with electrons driven from the cathode. Reactor design was simplified for cost-effectiveness and to enhance energy efficiencies. The Columbic recovery of ethanoic acid, ethanol, ethyl butyrate, hexanoic acid, heptanoic acid and hexanol being in excess of 80 percent proved that BES was a remarkable technology. PMID:27581929

  8. Novel autotrophic arsenite-oxidizing bacteria isolated from soil and sediments.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Dominguez, Elizabeth; Mumford, Adam; Rhine, Elizabeth Danielle; Paschal, Amber; Young, Lily Y

    2008-11-01

    Arsenic oxidation is recognized as being mediated by both heterotrophic and chemoautotrophic microorganisms. Enrichment cultures were established to determine whether chemoautotrophic microorganisms capable of oxidizing arsenite As(III) to arsenate As(V) are present in selected contaminated but nonextreme environments. Three new organisms, designated as strains OL-1, S-1 and CL-3, were isolated and found to oxidize 10 mM arsenite to arsenate under aerobic conditions using CO2-bicarbonate (CO2/HCO3-) as a carbon source. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses, strain OL-1 was 99% most closely related to the genus Ancylobacter, strain S-1 was 99% related to Thiobacillus and strain CL-3 was 98% related to the genus Hydrogenophaga. The isolates are facultative autotrophs and growth of isolated strains on different inorganic electron donors other than arsenite showed that all three had a strong preference for several sulfur species, while CL-3 was also able to grow on ammonium and nitrite. The RuBisCO Type I (cbbL) gene was positively amplified and sequenced in strain CL-3, and the Type II (cbbM) gene was detected in strains OL-1 and S-1, supporting the autotrophic nature of the organisms. PMID:18717738

  9. Heterotrophic and Autotrophic Microbial Populations in Cold Perennial Springs of the High Arctic ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Perreault, Nancy N.; Greer, Charles W.; Andersen, Dale T.; Tille, Stefanie; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Whyte, Lyle G.

    2008-01-01

    The saline springs of Gypsum Hill in the Canadian high Arctic are a rare example of cold springs originating from deep groundwater and rising to the surface through thick permafrost. The heterotrophic bacteria and autotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (up to 40% of the total microbial community) isolated from the spring waters and sediments were classified into four phyla (Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria) based on 16S rRNA gene analysis; heterotrophic isolates were primarily psychrotolerant, salt-tolerant, facultative anaerobes. Some of the isolates contained genes for thiosulfate oxidation (soxB) and anoxygenic photosynthesis (pufM), possibly enabling the strains to better compete in these sulfur-rich environments subject to long periods of illumination in the Arctic summer. Although leucine uptake by the spring water microbial community was low, CO2 uptake was relatively high under dark incubation, reinforcing the idea that primary production by chemoautotrophs is an important process in the springs. The small amounts of hydrocarbons in gases exsolving from the springs (0.38 to 0.51% CH4) were compositionally and isotopically consistent with microbial methanogenesis and possible methanotrophy. Anaerobic heterotrophic sulfur oxidation and aerobic autotrophic sulfur oxidation activities were demonstrated in sediment slurries. Overall, our results describe an active microbial community capable of sustainability in an extreme environment that experiences prolonged periods of continuous light or darkness, low temperatures, and moderate salinity, where life seems to rely on chemolithoautotrophy. PMID:18805995

  10. The sulfocyanic theory on the origin of life: towards a critical reappraisal of an autotrophic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perezgasga, L.; Silva, E.; Lazcano, A.; Negrin-Mendoza, A.

    2003-10-01

    In the early 1930s, Alfonso L. Herrera proposed his so-called sulfocyanic theory on the origin of life, an autotrophic proposal on the first living beings according to which NH4SCN and H2CO acted as raw materials for the synthesis of bio-organic compounds inside primordial photosynthetic protoplasmic structures. Although the work of Herrera is frequently cited in historical analysis of the development of the origin of life studies, very little attention has been given to the chemical significance of the reactions he published. In this paper we report the results of our search for amino acids obtained from a reactive mixture used by Herrera from 1933 onwards. Chromatograms using the high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique suggest the presence of several amino acids, the total yield being 2% of the initial thiocyanate used. Preliminary identification based on HPLC retention times suggests the presence of glycine, alanine, cysteine and methionine. Alanine was the most abundant amino acid in all samples of fractionated material analysed. Although the starting materials used by Herrera were determined by his autotrophic hypothesis on the origin of cells, our results show that his experiments may provide insights into the abiotic synthesis of sulfur-containing amino acids within the framework of a heterotrophic emergence of life.

  11. Perchlorate reduction by hydrogen autotrophic bacteria and microbial community analysis using high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wan, Dongjin; Liu, Yongde; Niu, Zhenhua; Xiao, Shuhu; Li, Daorong

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen autotrophic reduction of perchlorate have advantages of high removal efficiency and harmless to drinking water. But so far the reported information about the microbial community structure was comparatively limited, changes in the biodiversity and the dominant bacteria during acclimation process required detailed study. In this study, perchlorate-reducing hydrogen autotrophic bacteria were acclimated by hydrogen aeration from activated sludge. For the first time, high-throughput sequencing was applied to analyze changes in biodiversity and the dominant bacteria during acclimation process. The Michaelis-Menten model described the perchlorate reduction kinetics well. Model parameters q(max) and K(s) were 2.521-3.245 (mg ClO4(-)/gVSS h) and 5.44-8.23 (mg/l), respectively. Microbial perchlorate reduction occurred across at pH range 5.0-11.0; removal was highest at pH 9.0. The enriched mixed bacteria could use perchlorate, nitrate and sulfate as electron accepter, and the sequence of preference was: NO3(-) > ClO4(-) > SO4(2-). Compared to the feed culture, biodiversity decreased greatly during acclimation process, the microbial community structure gradually stabilized after 9 acclimation cycles. The Thauera genus related to Rhodocyclales was the dominated perchlorate reducing bacteria (PRB) in the mixed culture. PMID:26714962

  12. pH variation and influence in an autotrophic nitrogen removing biofilm system using an efficient numerical solution strategy.

    PubMed

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Mauricio-Iglesias, Miguel; Valverde-Pérez, Borja; Gernaey, Krist V; Sin, Gürkan

    2013-01-01

    A pH simulator consisting of an efficient numerical solver of a system of nine nonlinear equations was constructed and implemented in the modeling software MATLAB. The pH simulator was integrated in a granular biofilm model and used to simulate the pH profiles within granules performing the nitritation-anammox process for a range of operating points. The simulation results showed that pH profiles were consistently increasing with increasing depth into the granule, since the proton-producing aerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were located close to the granule surface. Despite this pH profile, more NH3 was available for AOB than for anaerobic ammonium oxidizers, located in the center of the granules. However, operating at a higher oxygen loading resulted in steeper changes in pH over the depth of the granule and caused the NH3 concentration profile to increase from the granule surface towards the center. The initial value of the background charge and influent bicarbonate concentration were found to greatly influence the simulation result and should be accurately measured. Since the change in pH over the depth of the biofilm was relatively small, the activity potential of the microbial groups affected by the pH did not change more than 5% over the depth of the granules. PMID:23752396

  13. Synthesis and stereochemical assignments of diastereomeric Ni(II) complexes of glycine Schiff base with (R)-2-(N-{2-[N-alkyl-N-(1-phenylethyl)amino]acetyl}amino)benzophenone; a case of configurationally stable stereogenic nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Resch, Daniel; Li, Hengguang; Ojima, Iwao; Takeda, Ryosuke; Aceña, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    Summary A family of chiral ligands derived from α-phenylethylamine and 2-aminobenzophenone were prepared by alkylation of the nitrogen atom. Upon reaction with glycine and a Ni(II) salt, these ligands were transformed into diastereomeric complexes, as a result of the configurational stability of the stereogenic nitrogen atom. Different diastereomeric ratios were observed depending on the substituent R introduced in the starting ligand, and stereochemical assignments were based on X-ray analysis, along with NMR studies and optical rotation measurements. PMID:24605164

  14. Selective isolation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria from autotrophic nitrifying granules by applying cell-sorting and sub-culturing of microcolonies

    PubMed Central

    Fujitani, Hirotsugu; Kumagai, Asami; Ushiki, Norisuke; Momiuchi, Kengo; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Nitrification is a key process in the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle and biological wastewater treatment that consists of two stepwise reactions, ammonia oxidation by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) or archaea followed by nitrite oxidation by nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. One of the representatives of the AOB group is Nitrosomonas mobilis species. Although a few pure strains of this species have been isolated so far, approaches to their preservation in pure culture have not been established. Here, we report isolation of novel members of the N. mobilis species from autotrophic nitrifying granules used for ammonia-rich wastewater treatment. We developed an isolation method focusing on microcolonies formation of nitrifying bacteria. Two kinds of distinctive light scattering signatures in a cell-sorting system enabled to separate microcolonies from single cells and heterogeneous aggregates within granule samples. Inoculation of a pure microcolony into 96-well microtiter plates led to successful sub-culturing and increased probability of isolation. Obtained strain Ms1 is cultivated in the liquid culture with relatively high ammonia or nitrite concentration, not extremely slow growing. Considering environmental clones that were closely related to N. mobilis and detected in various environments, the availability of this novel strain would facilitate to reveal this member’s ecophysiology in a variety of habitats. PMID:26528282

  15. Coniochaeta ligniaria: antifungal activity of the cryptic endophytic fungus associated with autotrophic cultures of the medicinal plant Smallanthus sonchifolius (Asteraceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Few studies have addressed the presence and bioactivity of endophytic fungi living in plantlets growing under in vitro conditions. We isolated a fungus UM 109 from autotrophic cultures of the medicinal plant Smallanthus sonchifolius (yacon). The species was identified as Coniochaeta ligniaria using ...

  16. Signatures of Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Metabolic Activity in Enrichment Cultures from a Sulphur Oxidizing Acid Mine Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, G. F.; Bernier, L.; Cowie, B. R.; Warren, L. A.

    2006-12-01

    Delineating the role of microorganisms in geochemical processes of interest in natural environments requires the development of tools that provide the ability to distinguish amongst microbial activity associated with different metabolic guilds. The gap between phylogenetic characterization and phenotypic understanding remains, underscoring the need to consider alternative methods. Compound specific analysis of cellular components has the potential to differentiate between active metabolic processes supporting microbial communities and may be especially useful in extreme environments. The goal of this study was to determine whether the phospholipids fatty acid (PLFA) distribution and isotopic signatures associated with autotrophs and heterotrophs enriched from an acid mine drainage (AMD) system differed, and further whether natural consortial autotrophic isolates showed similar signatures to autotrophic pure strains of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and A. thiooxidans. Two distinct initial enrichments with tetrathionate and CO2 yielded primarily autotrophic (95%) Acidithiobaccillus spp. sulphur oxidizing communities. The remaining microbial members of theses enrichments (<5%) were morphologically distinct and heterotrophic, as subculture of the consortial isolates in a medium amended with glucose but without tetrathionate selectively resulted in their visible growth. PLFA profiles and δ13C signatures from autotrophic (1) natural enrichments, pure cultures of (2) A. ferrooxidans and (3) A. thiooxidans were similar, but collectively differed from those of the natural heterotrophic enrichment cultures. The PLFA profiles for the heterotrophic communities were made up of primarily (88-99%) C16:0 and two isomers of C18:1. In contrast, the autotrophic communities had high proportions of C16:1 (up to 18%) as well as cyclo C17 and cyclo C19 PLFA that combined comprised 18 to 58% of the observed PLFA. The δ13C signatures of the PLFA also differed strongly between the two

  17. Identifying the missing steps of the autotrophic 3-hydroxypropionate CO2 fixation cycle in Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    PubMed Central

    Zarzycki, Jan; Brecht, Volker; Müller, Michael; Fuchs, Georg

    2009-01-01

    The phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus uses a yet unsolved 3-hydroxypropionate cycle for autotrophic CO2 fixation. It starts from acetyl-CoA, with acetyl-CoA and propionyl-CoA carboxylases acting as carboxylating enzymes. In a first cycle, (S)-malyl-CoA is formed from acetyl-CoA and 2 molecules of bicarbonate. (S)-Malyl-CoA cleavage releases the CO2 fixation product glyoxylate and regenerates the starting molecule acetyl-CoA. Here we complete the missing steps devoted to glyoxylate assimilation. In a second cycle, glyoxylate is combined with propionyl-CoA, an intermediate of the first cycle, to form β-methylmalyl-CoA. This condensation is followed by dehydration to mesaconyl-C1-CoA. An unprecedented CoA transferase catalyzes the intramolecular transfer of the CoA moiety to the C4 carboxyl group of mesaconate. Mesaconyl-C4-CoA then is hydrated by an enoyl-CoA hydratase to (S)-citramalyl-CoA. (S)-Citramalyl-CoA is cleaved into acetyl-CoA and pyruvate by a tri-functional lyase, which previously cleaved (S)-malyl-CoA and formed β-methylmalyl-CoA. Thus, the enigmatic disproportionation of glyoxylate and propionyl-CoA into acetyl-CoA and pyruvate is solved in an elegant and economic way requiring only 3 additional enzymes. The whole bicyclic pathway results in pyruvate formation from 3 molecules of bicarbonate and involves 19 steps but only 13 enzymes. Elements of the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle may be used for the assimilation of small organic molecules. The 3-hydroxypropionate cycle is compared with the Calvin–Benson–Bassham cycle and other autotrophic pathways. PMID:19955419

  18. Identification of a novel gene, aut, involved in autotrophic growth of Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed Central

    Freter, A; Bowien, B

    1994-01-01

    The aerobic facultative chemoautotroph Alcaligenes eutrophus was found to possess a novel gene, designated aut, required for both lithoautotrophic (hydrogen plus carbon dioxide) and organoautotrophic (formate) growth (Aut+ phenotype). Insertional mutagenesis by transposon Tn5-Mob localized the gene on a chromosomal 13-kbp EcoRI fragment. Physiological characterization of various Aut- mutants revealed pleiotropic effects caused by the transposon insertion. Heterotrophic growth of the mutants on substrates catabolized via the glycolytic pathway was slower than that of the parent strains, and the colony morphology of the mutants was altered when grown on nutrient agar. The heterotrophic derepression of the cbb operons encoding Calvin cycle enzymes was abolished, although their expression was still inducible in the presence of formate. Apparently, the mutation did not affect the cbb genes directly but impaired the autotrophic growth in a more general manner. The conjugally transferred wild-type EcoRI fragment allowed phenotypic in trans complementation of the mutants. Further subcloning and sequencing identified a single open reading frame (aut) of 495 bp that was sufficient for complementation. The monocistronic aut gene was constitutively transcribed into a 0.65-kb mRNA. However, its expression appeared to be low. Heterologous expression of aut was achieved in Escherichia coli, resulting in overproduction of an 18-kDa protein. Database searches yielded weak partial sequence similarities of the deduced Aut protein sequence to some cytidylyltransferases, but no indication for the exact function of the aut gene was obtained. Hybridizing DNA sequences that might be similar to the aut gene were detected by Southern hybridization in the genome of two other autotrophic bacteria. Images PMID:8071217

  19. Analysing structural error and parameter uncertainty of two Eucalyptus models differing in representation of autotrophic respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minunno, F.; van Oijen, M.; Cameron, D. R.; Cerasoli, S.; Pereira, J. S.; Tomé, M.

    2012-04-01

    In the context of global climate change, the quantification of carbon fluxes in forest ecosystems and how they vary inter-annually are important issues. Process-based models are flexible tools that permit assessing ecosystem productivity at different spatial and temporal scales and for different management and environmental conditions. On the other hand, carbon and water fluxes at the ecosystem scale may be measured using eddy covariance techniques, thus providing useful data for testing and validation of models. The principal aim of the work was to calibrate and evaluate two versions of a process-based model that differ in the autotrophic respiration (RA) modelling. The original version (3PGN) is based on a constant ratio between the net primary production (PN) and the gross primary production (PG), while, in a new version (3PGN*), developed by the authors, RA was modelled as a function of temperature and biomass. The two model versions were calibrated and evaluated using a comprehensive dataset consisting of forest growth experimental data and eddy-covariance measurements. The two model versions were calibrated and evaluated under a Bayesian framework consisting in model calibration, model comparison and analysis of model-data mismatch. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of 3PGN and 3PGN* were also carried out. The BC showed that the data were informative for almost 70% of the parameters. BC also allowed identification of the parameters to which the models were most sensitive and to assess parameter correlations. Key parameters were those for carbon allocation, some of the parameters related to water stress and site fertility. Bayesian model comparison showed that the 3PGN*, with the new autotrophic respiration model based on maintenance and growth respiration, has higher conditional probability of being correct than the original 3PGN, based on the simple NPP vs. GPP ratio.

  20. Can we distinguish autotrophic respiration from heterotrophic respiration in a field site using high temporal resolution CO2 flux measurements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biro, Beatrice; Berger, Sina; Praetzel, Leandra; Blodau, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The processes behind C-cycling in peatlands are important to understand for assessing the vulnerability of peatlands as carbon sinks under changing climate conditions. Especially boreal peatlands are likely to underlie strong alterations in the future. It is expected that C-pools that are directly influenced by vegetation and water table fluctuations can be easily destabilized. The CO2 efflux through respiration underlies autotrophic and heterotrophic processes that show different feedbacks on changing environmental conditions. In order to understand the respiration fluxes better for more accurate modelling and prognoses, the determination of the relative importance of different respiration sources is necessary. Earlier studies used e.g. exfoliation experiments, incubation experiments or modelling approaches to estimate the different respiration sources for the total ecosystem respiration (Reco). To further the understanding in this topic, I want to distinguish autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration using high temporal resolution measurements. The study site was selected along a hydrological gradient in a peatland in southern Ontario (Canada) and measurements were conducted from May to September 2015 once per month. Environmental controls (water table, soil temperature and soil moisture) that effect the respiration sources were recorded. In my study I used a Li-COR 6400XT and a Los Gatos greenhouse gas analyzer (GGA). Reco was determined by chamber flux measurements with the GGA, while simultaneously CO2 respiration measurements on different vegetation compartments like roots, leaves and mosses were conducted using the Li-COR 6400XT. The difference between Reco and autotrophic respiration equals heterotrophic respiration. After the measurements, the vegetation plots were harvested and separated for all compartments (leaves, roots, mosses, soil organic matter), dried and weighed. The weighted respiration rates from all vegetation compartments sum up to

  1. Residence time of carbon substrate for autotrophic respiration of a grassland ecosystem correlates with the carbohydrate status of its vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostler, Ulrike; Lehmeier, Christoph A.; Schleip, Inga; Schnyder, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Ecosystem respiration is composed of two component fluxes: (1) autotrophic respiration, which comprises respiratory activity of plants and plant-associated microbes that feed on products of recent photosynthetic activity and (2) heterotrophic respiration of microbes that decompose organic matter. The mechanistic link between the availability of carbon (C) substrate for ecosystem respiration and its respiratory activity is not well understood, particularly in grasslands. Here, we explore, how the kinetic features of the supply system feeding autotrophic ecosystem respiration in a temperate humid pasture are related to the content of water-soluble carbohydrates and remobilizable protein (as potential respiratory substrates) in vegetation biomass. During each September 2006, May 2007 and September 2007, we continuously labeled 0.8 m2 pasture plots with 13CO2/12CO2 and observed ecosystem respiration and its tracer content every night during the 14-16 day long labeling periods. We analyzed the tracer kinetics with a pool model, which allowed us to precisely partition ecosystem respiration into its autotrophic and heterotrophic flux components. At the end of a labeling campaign, we harvested aboveground and belowground plant biomass and analyzed its non-structural C contents. Approximately half of ecosystem respiration did not release any significant amount of tracer during the labeling period and was hence characterized as heterotrophic. The other half of ecosystem respiration was autotrophic, with a mean residence time of C in the respiratory substrate pool between 2 and 6 d. Both the rate of autotrophic respiration and the turnover of its substrate supply pool were correlated with plant carbohydrate content, but not with plant protein content. These findings are in agreement with studies in controlled environments that revealed water-soluble carbohydrates as the main substrate and proteins as a marginal substrate for plant respiration under favorable growth conditions

  2. Nitrogen Index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a need to improve the management of nitrogen inputs to agricultural systems because they increase the potential for losses of reactive nitrogen to the environment, resulting in negative impacts to water and air resources. There is a need to reduce nitrate leaching, emissions of N2O from agr...

  3. Fractional contributions by autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration to soil-surface CO2 efflux in Boreal forests.

    PubMed

    Högberg, Peter; Nordgren, Anders; Högberg, Mona N; Ottosson-Löfvenius, Mikaell; Bhupinderpal-Singh; Olsson, Per; Linder, Sune

    2005-01-01

    Soil-surface CO2 efflux ('soil respiration') accounts for roughly two-thirds of forest ecosystem respiration, and can be divided into heterotrophic and autotrophic components. Conventionally, the latter is defined as respiration by plant roots. In Boreal forests, however, fine roots of trees are invariably covered by ectomycorrhizal fungi, which by definition are heterotrophs, but like the roots, receive sugars derived from photosynthesis. There is also a significant leaching of labile carbon compounds from the ectomycorrhizal roots. It is, therefore, more meaningful in the context of carbon balance studies to include mycorrhizal fungi and other mycorrhizosphere organisms, dependent on the direct flux of labile carbon from photosynthesis, in the autotrophic component. Hence, heterotrophic activity becomes reserved for the decomposition of more complex organic molecules in litter and other forms of soil organic matter. In reality, the complex situation is perhaps best described as a continuum from strict autotrophy to strict heterotrophy. As a result of this, and associated methodological problems, estimates of the contribution of autotrophic respiration to total soil respiration have been highly variable. Based on recent stand-scale tree girdling experiments we have estimated that autotrophic respiration in boreal forest accounts for up to 50-65% of soil respiration during the snow-free part of the year. Girdling experiments and studies of the delta(13)C of the soil CO2 efflux show that there is a lag of a few days between the carbon uptake by photosynthesis and the release by autotrophic soil respiration of the assimilated carbon. In contrast, estimates of 'bomb 14C' and other approaches have suggested that it takes years to decades between carbon uptake via photosynthesis and the bulk of soil heterotrophic activity. Temperature is normally used as a driver in models of soil processes and it is often assumed that autotrophic soil activity is more sensitive to

  4. a Modified Denitrifying Bacteria Method for Dual Stable Isotopic Analysis of of Soil Nitrate in Kcl Extracts: Identification of Bioindicators of Nitrogen Deposition Along a Gradient in the Sonoran Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, M. D.; Sickman, J. O.; Allen, E. B.

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies performing dual isotopic analysis of nitrate in KCl soil extracts using denitrifying bacteria have not incorporated alterations in the method to compensate for the increased N2O blank produced when the bacteria are exposed to KCl in solution. When 1M KCl is used as a blank, the amount of N2O released from the concentrated bacteria solution is more than four times as high as when using a DI water blank. The excess N2O produced is not an artifact of nitrate impurity in the KCl, although the blank increases with the molarity of KCl up to 1M. The introduction of N2O gas is significant enough to alter the values of IAEA USGS standards (3 μg in 3ml KCl) which in turn results in an inaccurate regression for unknown samples. We reduced the size of the KCl blank and its effect on the standards by adding 3ml of KCl to the bacteria solution prior to purging the sample with He gas. This removes the N2O gas which is released by the bacteria when they initially come in contact with the KCl, and allows for standards to be calibrated to a precision of ± 0.1 % δ15N and ± 0.2 % δ18O. Using this new method, we measured δ15N and δ18O of nitrate in 1M KCl soil extracts taken from surface soil (5cm cores) along a nitrogen deposition gradient spanning the Coachella Valley in the western Sonoran Desert during the summer. Early germinating winter annual plant species (Schismus barbatus, Chaenactic fremontii, and Malacothrix glabrata) were collected as seedlings early in the growing season and again in late spring before senescence. Leaves from the dominant shrub, Larrea tridentata, were also collected from each site. Soil nitrogen from sites on the eastern edge of the valley had δ18O values between +30 and +41%, indicating an influence of atmospheric nitrate in plant available nitrate. There was an inverse correlation (r2=0.907) between soil δ18O and the δ15N of the C.fremontii leaf tissue, which suggests that in areas of high N deposition, some seedlings are

  5. Targeting Autotrophic and Lithotrophic Microorganisms from Fumarolic Ice Caves of Mt. Erebus, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anitori, R.; Davis, R.; Connell, L.; Kelley, M.; Staudigel, H.; Tebo, B. M.

    2011-12-01

    Terrestrial and aquatic volcanic oligotrophic environments can host microorganisms that obtain their energy from reduced inorganic chemicals present in volcanic rocks and soils. We sampled basaltic rock from terrestrial Dark Oligotrophic Volcanic Ecosystems (DOVEs) located in two fumarole ice caves, Warren and Warren West, located near the summit of Mt. Erebus, Antarctica. For reference, we sampled a similar cave, Harry's Dream, which receives continuous light during the Austral summer. We report here culturing data for bacterial and eukaryotic microbes from rocky soils in these caves when targeting lithotrophic organisms using media containing reduced inorganic compounds (Mn2+, Fe2+, NH4+). In addition, to test for the possible presence of inorganic carbon fixation, we screened samples for the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) gene. Culturing of soil samples on media targeting both autotrophs and heterotrophs yielded a diverse collection of generally slow-growing colonies of bacteria (majority), fungi and non-fungal eukaryotes. Manganese(II)-oxidizing colonies were identified in Warren and Harry's Dream, and these exhibited two colony morphotypes upon subculturing. Sequencing of the PCR amplified 16S rRNA gene identified a bacterium distantly related to Pseudonocardia sp., a genus with known manganese oxidizers. Other bacteria enriched included members of the Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. There was a low diversity in cultured eukaryotes representing several potential undescribed species (Geomyces sp., Penicillium sp.) and isolates that may represent alternate, previously undescribed habitats and forms (Psilolechia leprosa, Alternaria alternata). One Warren isolate was a 99% 16S rRNA match to the N2 fixer Bradyrhizobium sp.; when inoculated into liquid medium specific for N2 fixers, growth was maintained upon subculture. Putative iron oxidizers were also enriched from the two DOVE caves, using slush agar iron

  6. Stable isotope laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, J. F.; Yaldaei, Ramil; Mckay, Christopher P.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor laser technology have produced a reliable lightweight device ideally suited for a spacecraft high resolution molecular spectrometer. Lead-salt tunable diode lasers (TDL) emit in several spectral modes, each with a very narrow linewidth of -0.0003/cm. This spectral resolution is much narrower than typical Doppler broadened molecular linewidths in the mid-IR range. Thus it is possible to detect individual rotational lines within the vibrational band and measure their intensity, which can be used to determine gas concentration. The narrow spectral lines of any impurity gas tend to lie between the narrow lines of the gas of interest. This represents a major advantage over the accepted gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) technique for measuring gas concentrations and isotope ratios. The careful and extensive gas purification procedures required to remove impurities for reliable GCMS measurements will not be required for an IR laser gas analysis. The infrared laser gas analysis technique is being developed to measure stable isotopic ratios of gases such as CO2, CH4, N2O, and NH3. This will eventually lead to development of instruments capable of in situ istopic measurements on planets such as Mars. The carbon (C-12, C-13) isotope ratio is indicative of the type of carbon fixation mechanisms (e.g., photosynthesis, respiration) in operation on a planet, while the nitrogen (N-14, N-15) isotope ratio can probably be used to date nitrogen-bearing Martian samples. The absorbance ratio of two adjacent lines of CO2 in the 2300/cm (4.3 micron) region of the spectrum was measured. The precision of the measurement is presently better than 1 percent and significant improvement is anticipated as rapid sweep-integration techniques and computer controlled data acquistion capabilities are incorporated.

  7. Stable isotope laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. F.; Yaldaei, Ramil; McKay, Christopher P.

    1989-03-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor laser technology have produced a reliable lightweight device ideally suited for a spacecraft high resolution molecular spectrometer. Lead-salt tunable diode lasers (TDL) emit in several spectral modes, each with a very narrow linewidth of -0.0003/cm. This spectral resolution is much narrower than typical Doppler broadened molecular linewidths in the mid-IR range. Thus it is possible to detect individual rotational lines within the vibrational band and measure their intensity, which can be used to determine gas concentration. The narrow spectral lines of any impurity gas tend to lie between the narrow lines of the gas of interest. This represents a major advantage over the accepted gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) technique for measuring gas concentrations and isotope ratios. The careful and extensive gas purification procedures required to remove impurities for reliable GCMS measurements will not be required for an IR laser gas analysis. The infrared laser gas analysis technique is being developed to measure stable isotopic ratios of gases such as CO2, CH4, N2O, and NH3. This will eventually lead to development of instruments capable of in situ istopic measurements on planets such as Mars. The carbon (C-12, C-13) isotope ratio is indicative of the type of carbon fixation mechanisms (e.g., photosynthesis, respiration) in operation on a planet, while the nitrogen (N-14, N-15) isotope ratio can probably be used to date nitrogen-bearing Martian samples. The absorbance ratio of two adjacent lines of CO2 in the 2300/cm (4.3 micron) region of the spectrum was measured. The precision of the measurement is presently better than 1 percent and significant improvement is anticipated as rapid sweep-integration techniques and computer controlled data acquistion capabilities are incorporated.

  8. New concepts of microbial treatment processes for the nitrogen removal: effect of protein and amino acids degradation.

    PubMed

    González-Martínez, Alejandro; Calderón, Kadiya; González-López, Jesús

    2016-05-01

    High concentrations of proteins and amino acids can be found in wastewater and wastewater stream produced in anaerobic digesters, having shown that amino acids could persist over different managements for nitrogen removal affecting the nitrogen removal processes. Nitrogen removal is completely necessary because of their implications and the significant adverse environmental impact of ammonium such as eutrophication and toxicity to aquatic life on the receiving bodies. In the last decade, the treatment of effluents with high ammonium concentration through anammox-based bioprocesses has been enhanced because these biotechnologies are cheaper and more environmentally friendly than conventional technologies. However, it has been shown that the presence of important amounts of proteins and amino acids in the effluents seriously affects the microbial autotrophic consortia leading to important losses in terms of ammonium oxidation efficiency. Particularly the presence of sulfur amino acids such as methionine and cysteine has been reported to drastically decrease the autotrophic denitrification processes as well as affect the microbial community structure promoting the decline of ammonium oxidizing bacteria in favor of other phylotypes. In this context we discuss that new biotechnological processes that improve the degradation of protein and amino acids must be considered as a priority to increase the performance of the autotrophic denitrification biotechnologies. PMID:26856581

  9. Carbon-Isotope Fractionations of Autotrophic Bacteria: Relevance to Primary Production and Microbial Evolution in Hot Springs and Hydrothermal Vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C. L.; Romanek, C. S.; Mills, G.

    2004-12-01

    Terrestrial hot springs and marine hydrothermal vents are often dominated by autotrophic microorganisms. Species of the Bacteria Domain in these environments are known to use different pathways for CO2 fixation. These may include the Calvin cycle, the Acetyl CoA pathway, the reverse TCA cycle, and the 3-HP pathway. Each cycle or pathway may be characterized by distinct patterns of carbon isotope fractionation. This presentation will summarize isotope fractionation patterns associated with known autotrophic bacteria and to use these patterns for interpreting natural isotopic variations. Examples will include hot springs from the Yellowstone National Park and Nevada desert, USA and Kamchatka, Russia, and hydrothermal vents from the East Pacific Rise. An attempt will be made to discuss isotopic variations within a particular pathway in the context of species evolution through horizontal gene transfer.

  10. Effects of dissolved oxygen and pH on nitrous oxide production rates in autotrophic partial nitrification granules.

    PubMed

    Rathnayake, Rathnayake M L D; Oshiki, Mamoru; Ishii, Satoshi; Segawa, Takahiro; Satoh, Hisashi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2015-12-01

    The effects of dissolved oxygen (DO) and pH on nitrous oxide (N2O) production rates and pathways in autotrophic partial nitrification (PN) granules were investigated at the granular level. N2O was primarily produced by betaproteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, mainly Nitrosomonas europaea, in the oxic surface layer (<200μm) of the autotrophic PN granules. N2O production increased with increasing bulk DO concentration owing to activation of the ammonia (i.e., hydroxylamine) oxidation in this layer. The highest N2O emissions were observed at pH 7.5, although the ammonia oxidation rate was unchanged between pH 6.5 and 8.5. Overall, the results of this study suggest that in situ analyses of PN granules are essential to gaining insight into N2O emission mechanisms in a granule. PMID:26318242

  11. Studies on Scenedesmus actus growth. I. Effect of autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions on the growth of scenedesmus acutus

    SciTech Connect

    Shamala, T.R.; Drawert, F.; Leupold, G.

    1982-06-01

    Among sugars, glucose and mannose were found to be the most suitable substrates for mixotrophic growth, uptake of galactose and its influence on growth was negligible, and sucrose and fructose occupied intermediary positions. The optimum temperature for sugar uptake was 30 degrees C both under light and in darkness. Enhancement in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolution rate, based on the utilization of substrates, was foremost in the presence of glucose, followed by mannose, sucrose, and fructose. Industrial by-products such as sugarcane molasses also were utilized to increase the algal growth under mixotrophic conditions. A maximum yield in biomass was obtained subsequent to the combined supply of sugarcane molasses with carbon dioxide to indoor as well as outdoor mixotrophic cultures. Doubling the carbon dioxide supply alone above a certain level, under autotrophic and mixotrophic outdoor conditions, did not produce a pronounced increase in the algal growth rate. The results on autotrophic and mixotrophic growth variations are discussed in this article. (Refs. 36).

  12. Coassimilation of Organic Substrates via the Autotrophic 3-Hydroxypropionate Bi-Cycle in Chloroflexus aurantiacus▿†

    PubMed Central

    Zarzycki, Jan; Fuchs, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Chloroflexus aurantiacus is a facultative autotrophic green nonsulfur bacterium that grows phototrophically in thermal springs and forms microbial mats with cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria produce glycolate during the day (photorespiration) and excrete fermentation products at night. C. aurantiacus uses the 3-hydroxypropionate bi-cycle for autotrophic carbon fixation. This pathway was thought to be also suited for the coassimilation of various organic substrates such as glycolate, acetate, propionate, 3-hydroxypropionate, lactate, butyrate, or succinate. To test this possibility, we added these compounds at a 5 mM concentration to autotrophically pregrown cells. Although the provided amounts of H2 and CO2 allowed continuing photoautotrophic growth, cells immediately consumed most substrates at rates equaling the rate of autotrophic carbon fixation. Using [14C]acetate, half of the labeled organic carbon was incorporated into cell mass. Our data suggest that C. aurantiacus uses the 3-hydroxypropionate bi-cycle, together with the glyoxylate cycle, to channel organic substrates into the central carbon metabolism. Enzyme activities of the 3-hydroxypropionate bi-cycle were marginally affected when cells were grown heterotrophically with such organic substrates. The 3-hydroxypropionate bi-cycle in Chloroflexi is unique and was likely fostered in an environment in which traces of organic compounds can be coassimilated. Other bacteria living under oligotrophic conditions acquired genes of a rudimentary 3-hydroxypropionate bi-cycle, possibly for the same purpose. Examples are Chloroherpeton thalassium, Erythrobacter sp. strain NAP-1, Nitrococcus mobilis, and marine gammaproteobacteria of the OM60/NOR5 clade such as Congregibacter litoralis. PMID:21764971

  13. Using Bathymodiolus tissue stable isotope signatures to infer biogeochemical process at hydrocarbon seeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, D.; Kiel, S.; Qiu, J.; Yang, Q.; Zhou, H.; Peng, Y.; Chen, D.

    2015-12-01

    Here we use stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in the tissue of two bathymodiolin mussel species with different chemotrophic symbionts (methanotrophs in B. platifrons and sulfide-oxidizers in B. aduloides) to gain insights into the biogeochemical processes at an active site in 1120 m depth on the Formosa Ridge, called Site F. Because mussels with methanotrophic symbionts acquire the isotope signature of the used methane, the average δ13C values of B. platifrons (-70.3‰; n=36) indicates a biogenic methane source at Site F, consistent with the measured carbon isotope signature of methane (-61.1‰ to -58.7‰) sampled 1.5 m above the mussel beds. The only small offset between the δ13C signatures of the ascending methane and the authigenic carbonate at site F (as low as -55.3‰) suggests only minor mixing of the pore water with marine bicarbonate, which in turn may be used as an indicator for advective rather than diffusive seepage at this site. B. aduloides has much higher average δ13C values of -34.4‰ (n=9), indicating inorganic carbon (DIC) dissolved in epibenthic bottom water as its main carbon source. The DIC was apparently marine bicarbonate with a small contribution of 13C-depleted carbon from locally oxidized methane. The δ34S values of the two mussel species indicate that they used two different sulfur sources. B. platifrons (average δ34S = +6.4±2.6‰; n=36) used seawater sulfate mixed with isotopically light re-oxidized sulfide from the sulfate-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), while the sulfur source of B. aduloides (δ34S = -8.0±3.1‰; n=9) was AOM-derived sulfide used by its symbionts. δ15N values differed between the mussels, with B. platifrons having a wider range of on average slightly lower values (mean = +0.5±0.7‰, n=36) than B. aduloides (mean = +1.1±0.0‰). These values are significantly lower than δ15N values of South China Sea deep-sea sediments (+5‰ to +6‰), indicating that the organic nitrogen

  14. Autotrophic hydrogen-producing biofilm growth sustained by a cathode as the sole electron and energy source.

    PubMed

    Jourdin, Ludovic; Freguia, Stefano; Donose, Bogdan C; Keller, Jurg

    2015-04-01

    It is still unclear whether autotrophic microbial biocathode biofilms are able to self-regenerate under purely cathodic conditions without any external electron or organic carbon sources. Here we report on the successful development and long-term operation of an autotrophic biocathode whereby an electroactive biofilm was able to grow and sustain itself with CO2 as a sole carbon source and using the cathode as electron source, with H2 as sole product. From a small inoculum of 15 mg COD (in 250 mL), containing 30.3% Archaea, the bioelectrochemical system operating at -0.5 V vs. SHE enabled an estimated biofilm growth of 300 mg as COD over a period of 276 days. A dramatic change in the microbial population was observed during this period with Archaea disappearing completely (<0.1% of population). The predominant phyla enriched were Proteobacteria (57.3%), Firmicutes (12.4%), Bacteroidetes (11.6%) and Actinobacteria (1.1%). Up to 9.2 L H2 m(-2) day(-1) (1.88 A m(-2)) was achieved when the cathode potential was decreased to -0.75 V vs. SHE. This study demonstrates that purely autotrophic biofilm growth coupled to proton reduction to hydrogen alone can be sustained with a cathode as the sole electron source, while avoiding the development of H2-consuming microorganisms such as methanogens and acetogens. PMID:25497168

  15. Targeted Enhancement of H2 and CO2 Uptake for Autotrophic Production of Biodiesel in the Lithoautotrophic Bacterium Ralsonia Eutropha

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, C. A.; Sullivan, R.; Johnson, C.; Yu, J.; Maness, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    CO2 and H2 are promising feedstocks for production of valuable biocompounds. Ralstonia eutropha utilizes these feedstocks to generate energy (ATP) and reductant (NAD(P)H) via oxidation of H2 by a membrane-bound (MBH) and a soluble hydrogenase (SH) for CO2 fixation by the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle. Increased expression of the enzyme that fixes CO2 (RubisCO) resulted in 6-fold activity improvement in vitro, while increased expression of the MBH operon or the SH operon plus MBH operon maturation factors necessary for activity resulted in a 10-fold enhancement. Current research involves genetic manipulation of two endogenous cbb operons for increased expression, analysis of expression and activity of CBB/MBH/SH, cofactor ratios, and downstream products during autotrophic growth in control versus enhanced strains, and development of strategies for long-term, optimal overexpression. These studies will improve our understanding of autotrophic metabolism and provide a chassis strain for autotrophic production of biodiesel and other valuable carbon biocompounds.

  16. The Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium aceticum: a Missing Link between Rnf- and Cytochrome-Containing Autotrophic Acetogens

    PubMed Central

    Poehlein, Anja; Cebulla, Martin; Ilg, Marcus M.; Bengelsdorf, Frank R.; Schiel-Bengelsdorf, Bettina; Whited, Gregg; Andreesen, Jan R.; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Daniel, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium aceticum was the first isolated autotrophic acetogen, converting CO2 plus H2 or syngas to acetate. Its genome has now been completely sequenced and consists of a 4.2-Mbp chromosome and a small circular plasmid of 5.7 kbp. Sequence analysis revealed major differences from other autotrophic acetogens. C. aceticum contains an Rnf complex for energy conservation (via pumping protons or sodium ions). Such systems have also been found in C. ljungdahlii and Acetobacterium woodii. However, C. aceticum also contains a cytochrome, as does Moorella thermoacetica, which has been proposed to be involved in the generation of a proton gradient. Thus, C. aceticum seems to represent a link between Rnf- and cytochrome-containing autotrophic acetogens. In C. aceticum, however, the cytochrome is probably not involved in an electron transport chain that leads to proton translocation, as no genes for quinone biosynthesis are present in the genome. PMID:26350967

  17. Immobilization of uranium and arsenic by injectible iron and hydrogen stimulated autotrophic sulphate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burghardt, D.; Simon, E.; Knöller, K.; Kassahun, A.

    2007-12-01

    The main object of the study was the development of a long-term efficient and inexpensive in-situ immobilization technology for uranium (U) and arsenic (As) in smaller and decentralized groundwater discharges from abandoned mining processing sites. Therefore, corrosion of grey cast iron (gcFe) and nano-scale iron particles (naFe) as well as hydrogen stimulated autotrophic sulphate reduction (aSR) were investigated. Two column experiments with sulphate reducing bacterias (SRB) (biotic gcFe , biotic naFe) and one abiotic gcFe-column experiment were performed. In the biotic naFe column, no particle translocation was observed and a temporary but intensive naFe corrosion indicated by a decrease in Eh, a pH increase and H 2 evolution. Decreasing sulphate concentrations and 34S enrichment in the column effluent indicated aSR. Fe(II) retention could be explained by siderite and consequently FeS precipitation by geochemical modeling (PhreeqC). U and As were completely immobilised within the biotic naFe column. In the biotic gcFe column, particle entrapment in open pore spaces resulted in a heterogeneous distribution of Fe-enriched zones and an increase in permeability due to preferential flow. However, Fe(II) concentrations in the effluent indicated a constant and lasting gcFe corrosion. An efficient immobilization was found for As, but not for U.

  18. Investigating the association between photosynthetic efficiency and generation of biophotoelectricity in autotrophic microbial fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Ciniciato, Gustavo P. M. K.; Ng, Fong-Lee; Phang, Siew-Moi; Jaafar, Muhammad Musoddiq; Fisher, Adrian C.; Yunus, Kamran; Periasamy, Vengadesh

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells operating with autotrophic microorganisms are known as biophotovoltaic devices. It represents a great opportunity for environmentally-friendly power generation using the energy of the sunlight. The efficiency of electricity generation in this novel system is however low. This is partially reflected by the poor understanding of the bioelectrochemical mechanisms behind the electron transfer from these microorganisms to the electrode surface. In this work, we propose a combination of electrochemical and fluorescence techniques, giving emphasis to the pulse amplitude modulation fluorescence. The combination of these two techniques allow us to obtain information that can assist in understanding the electrical response obtained from the generation of electricity through the intrinsic properties related to the photosynthetic efficiency that can be obtained from the fluorescence emitted. These were achieved quantitatively by means of observed changes in four photosynthetic parameters with the bioanode generating electricity. These are the maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm), alpha (α), light saturation coefficient (Ek) and maximum rate of electron transfer (rETRm). The relationship between the increases in the current density collected by the bioanode to the decrease of the rETRm values in the photosynthetic pathway for the two microorganisms was also discussed. PMID:27502051

  19. Investigating the association between photosynthetic efficiency and generation of biophotoelectricity in autotrophic microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ciniciato, Gustavo P M K; Ng, Fong-Lee; Phang, Siew-Moi; Jaafar, Muhammad Musoddiq; Fisher, Adrian C; Yunus, Kamran; Periasamy, Vengadesh

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells operating with autotrophic microorganisms are known as biophotovoltaic devices. It represents a great opportunity for environmentally-friendly power generation using the energy of the sunlight. The efficiency of electricity generation in this novel system is however low. This is partially reflected by the poor understanding of the bioelectrochemical mechanisms behind the electron transfer from these microorganisms to the electrode surface. In this work, we propose a combination of electrochemical and fluorescence techniques, giving emphasis to the pulse amplitude modulation fluorescence. The combination of these two techniques allow us to obtain information that can assist in understanding the electrical response obtained from the generation of electricity through the intrinsic properties related to the photosynthetic efficiency that can be obtained from the fluorescence emitted. These were achieved quantitatively by means of observed changes in four photosynthetic parameters with the bioanode generating electricity. These are the maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm), alpha (α), light saturation coefficient (Ek) and maximum rate of electron transfer (rETRm). The relationship between the increases in the current density collected by the bioanode to the decrease of the rETRm values in the photosynthetic pathway for the two microorganisms was also discussed. PMID:27502051

  20. Immobilization of uranium and arsenic by injectible iron and hydrogen stimulated autotrophic sulphate reduction.

    PubMed

    Burghardt, D; Simon, E; Knöller, K; Kassahun, A

    2007-12-01

    The main object of the study was the development of a long-term efficient and inexpensive in-situ immobilization technology for uranium (U) and arsenic (As) in smaller and decentralized groundwater discharges from abandoned mining processing sites. Therefore, corrosion of grey cast iron (gcFe) and nano-scale iron particles (naFe) as well as hydrogen stimulated autotrophic sulphate reduction (aSR) were investigated. Two column experiments with sulphate reducing bacterias (SRB) (biotic gcFe , biotic naFe) and one abiotic gcFe-column experiment were performed. In the biotic naFe column, no particle translocation was observed and a temporary but intensive naFe corrosion indicated by a decrease in E(h), a pH increase and H(2) evolution. Decreasing sulphate concentrations and (34)S enrichment in the column effluent indicated aSR. Fe(II) retention could be explained by siderite and consequently FeS precipitation by geochemical modeling (PhreeqC). U and As were completely immobilised within the biotic naFe column. In the biotic gcFe column, particle entrapment in open pore spaces resulted in a heterogeneous distribution of Fe-enriched zones and an increase in permeability due to preferential flow. However, Fe(II) concentrations in the effluent indicated a constant and lasting gcFe corrosion. An efficient immobilization was found for As, but not for U. PMID:17719126

  1. Remediation of nitrate-contaminated surface water using sulfur and limestone autotrophic denitrification processes

    SciTech Connect

    Flere, J.M.; Zhang, T.C.

    1997-12-31

    The feasibility of using the sulfur/limestone autotrophic denitrification (SLAD) process as an in situ method for remediation of nitrate-contaminated surface water was investigated. Four bench-scale pond systems with working volumes of 21.4 liters each and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 30 days were operated under mixed conditions. Under mixed (aerobic) conditions, with the addition of alkalinity to raise pH, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N removal in the SLAD ponds was 85--100%, while the control reactor showed negative removal. Sulfate production under mixed conditions was between 1,000--2,500 mg/l SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, which shows that 40--60 mg/l of SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} is produced for every 1 mg/l of NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N reduced. Although the system is very efficient in removing nitrates under simulated surface water conditions, the sulfate production makes the process questionable for use under aerobic conditions. However, batch experiments under anaerobic conditions demonstrate that system maybe very efficient in removing nitrate while not producing insufferable amounts of sulfates.

  2. Characterization of large, autotrophic Beggiatoa spp. abundant at hydrothermal vents of the Guaymas Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.C. ); Wirsen, C.O.; Jannasch, H.W. )

    1989-11-01

    Filamentous bacteria, identified as members of the genus Beggiatoa by gliding motility and internal globules of elemental sulfur, occur in massive aggregations at the deep-sea hydrothermal vents of the Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California. Cell aggregates covering the surface of sulfide-emanating sediments and rock chimneys were collected by DS R/V Alvin and subjected to shipboard and laboratory experiments. Each sample collected contained one to three discrete width classes of this organism usually accompanied by a small number of flexibacteria (width, 1.5 to 4 {mu}m). The average widths of the Beggiatoa classes were 24 to 32, 40 to 42, and 116 to 122 {mu}m. As indicated by electron microscopy and cell volume/protein ratios, the dominant bacteria are hollow cells, i.e., a thin layer of cytoplasm surrounding a large central liquid vacuole. Activities of Calvin-cycle enzymes indicated that at least two of the classes collected possess autotrophic potential. Judging from temperature dependence of enzyme activities and whole-cell CO{sub 2} incorporation, the widest cells were mesophiles. The narrowest Beggiatoa sp. was either moderately thermophilic or mesophilic with unusually thermotolerant enzymes. This was consistent with its occurrence on the flanks of hot smoker chimneys with highly variable exit temperatures. In situ CO{sub 2} fixation rates, sulfide stimulation of incorporation, and autoradiographic studies suggest that these Beggiatoa spp. contribute significantly as lithoautrophic primary producers to the Guaymas Basin vent ecosystems.

  3. Oxidation rate of iron sulfides as affected by surface area, morphology, oxygen concentration and autotrophic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, C.E.

    1984-05-01

    The relationship between surface area and rate of oxidation of Fe sulphides (pyrite and marcasite) separated from Texas lignite was studied. The reaction kinetics with respect to Fe sulphide morphology and particle size were evaluated. The oxygen concentration and the presence of autotrophic Fe and S-oxidizing bacteria (thiobacillus ferro-oxidans) on the rate of oxidation were also evaluated. The formation of sulphate from Fe sulphide was selected to measure the rate of oxidation. Relative reaction rates for different morphological forms of Fe sulphide were: marcasite > framboidal pyrite > massive pyrite. As the surface area of pyrite doubled, reaction rate increased by a factor of 1.5. Sulphate production for the 5 to 2 ..mu..m fraction was twice that of the 50 to 20 ..mu..m fraction. Reaction rate was approximately fivefold greater for non-inoculated treatments at 20% O/sub 2/ compared with 0% O/sub 2/ and was approximately ninefold greater for the same treatment inoculated with T. ferro-oxidans.

  4. Autotrophic, hydrogen-oxidizing, denitrifying bacteria in groundwater, potential agents for bioremediation of nitrate contamination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Ceazan, M.L.; Brooks, M.H.

    1994-01-01

    Addition of hydrogen or formate significantly enhanced the rate of consumption of nitrate in slurried core samples obtained from an active zone of denitrification in a nitrate-contaminated sand and gravel aquifer (Cape Cod, Mass.). Hydrogen uptake by the core material was immediate and rapid, with an apparent K(m) of 0.45 to 0.60 ??M and a V(max) of 18.7 nmol cm-3 h-1 at 30??C. Nine strains of hydrogen-oxidizing denitrifying bacteria were subsequently isolated from the aquifer. Eight of the strains grew autotrophically on hydrogen with either oxygen or nitrate as the electron acceptor. One strain grew mixotrophically. All of the isolates were capable of heterotrophic growth, but none were similar to Paracoccus denitrificans, a well-characterized hydrogen-oxidizing denitrifier. The kinetics for hydrogen uptake during denitrification were determined for each isolate with substrate depletion progress curves; the K(m)s ranged from 0.30 to 3.32 ??M, with V(max)s of 1.85 to 13.29 fmol cell-1 h-1. Because these organisms appear to be common constituents of the in situ population of the aquifer, produce innocuous end products, and could be manipulated to sequentially consume oxygen and then nitrate when both were present, these results suggest that these organisms may have significant potential for in situ bioremediation of nitrate contamination in groundwater.

  5. Modeling of nitrous oxide production by autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria with multiple production pathways.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Peng, Lai; Law, Yingyu; Guo, Jianhua; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2014-04-01

    Autotrophic ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) have been recognized as a major contributor to N2O production in wastewater treatment systems. However, so far N2O models have been proposed based on a single N2O production pathway by AOB, and there is still a lack of effective approach for the integration of these models. In this work, an integrated mathematical model that considers multiple production pathways is developed to describe N2O production by AOB. The pathways considered include the nitrifier denitrification pathway (N2O as the final product of AOB denitrification with NO2(-) as the terminal electron acceptor) and the hydroxylamine (NH2OH) pathway (N2O as a byproduct of incomplete oxidation of NH2OH to NO2(-)). In this model, the oxidation and reduction processes are modeled separately, with intracellular electron carriers introduced to link the two types of processes. The model is calibrated and validated using experimental data obtained with two independent nitrifying cultures. The model satisfactorily describes the N2O data from both systems. The model also predicts shifts of the dominating pathway at various dissolved oxygen (DO) and nitrite levels, consistent with previous hypotheses. This unified model is expected to enhance our ability to predict N2O production by AOB in wastewater treatment systems under varying operational conditions. PMID:24571180

  6. Constraining the role of iron in environmental nitrogen transformations. Dual stable isotope systematics of abiotic NO2- reduction by Fe(II) and its production of N2O

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, David; Wankel, Scott David; Buchwald, Carolyn; Hansel, Colleen

    2015-09-16

    Redox reactions involving nitrogen and iron have been shown to have important implications for mobilization of priority contaminants. Thus, an understanding of the linkages between their biogeochemical cycling is critical for predicting subsurface mobilization of radionuclides such as uranium. Despite mounting evidence for biogeochemical interactions between iron and nitrogen, our understanding of their environmental importance remains limited. Here we present an investigation of abiotic nitrite (NO2-) reduction by Fe(II) or ‘chemodenitrification,’ and its relevance to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O), specifically focusing on dual (N and O) isotope systematics under a variety of environmentally relevant conditions. We observe a range of kinetic isotope effects that are regulated by reaction rates, with faster rates at higher pH (~8), higher concentrations of Fe(II) and in the presence of mineral surfaces. A clear non-linear relationship between rate constant and kinetic isotope effects of NO2- reduction was evident (with larger isotope effects at slower rates) and is interpreted as reflecting the dynamics of Fe(II)-N reaction intermediates. N and O isotopic composition of product N2O also suggests a complex network of parallel and/or competing pathways. Our findings suggest that NO2- reduction by Fe(II) may represent an important abiotic source of environmental N2O, especially in iron-rich environments experiencing dynamic redox variations. This study provides a multi-compound, multi-isotope framework for evaluating the environmental occurrence of abiotic NO2- reduction and N2O formation, helping future studies constrain the relative roles of abiotic and biological N2O production pathways.

  7. Using Stable Isotope Compositions of Animal Tissues to Infer Trophic Interactions in Gulf of Mexico Lower Slope Seep Communities

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Erin L.; Cordes, Erik E.; Macko, Stephen A.; Lee, Raymond W.; Fisher, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed the tissue carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur stable isotope contents of macrofaunal communities associated with vestimentiferan tubeworms and bathymodiolin mussels from the Gulf of Mexico lower continental slope (970-2800 m). Shrimp in the genus Alvinocaris associated with vestimentiferans from shallow (530 m) and deep (1400-2800 m) sites were used to test the hypothesis that seep animals derive a greater proportion of their nutrition from seeps (i.e. a lower proportion from the surface) at greater depths. To account for spatial variability in the inorganic source pool, we used the differences between the mean tissue δ13C and δ15N of the shrimp in each collection and the mean δ 13C and δ15N values of the vestimentiferans from the same collection, since vestimentiferans are functionally autotrophic and serve as a baseline for environmental isotopic variation. There was a significant negative relationship between this difference and depth for both δ13C and δ15N (p=0.02 and 0.007, respectively), which supports the hypothesis of higher dependence on seep nutrition with depth. The small polychaete worm Protomystides sp. was hypothesized to be a blood parasite of the vestimentiferan Escarpialaminata. There was a highly significant linear relationship between the δ13C values of Protomystides sp. and the E. laminata individuals to which they were attached across all collections (p < 0.001) and within a single collection (p = 0.01), although this relationship was not significant for δ15N and δ34S. We made several other qualitative inferences with respect to the feeding biology of the taxa occurring in these lower slope seeps, some of which have not been described prior to this study. PMID:24324572

  8. Achieving Stable Nitritation for Mainstream Deammonification by Combining Free Nitrous Acid-Based Sludge Treatment and Oxygen Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongbo; Wang, Qilin; Laloo, Andrew; Xu, Yifeng; Bond, Philip L.; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    Stable nitritation is a critical bottleneck for achieving autotrophic nitrogen removal using the energy-saving mainstream deammonification process. Herein we report a new strategy to wash out both the Nitrospira sp. and Nitrobacter sp. from the treatment of domestic-strength wastewater. The strategy combines sludge treatment using free nitrous acid (FNA) with dissolved oxygen (DO) control in the nitritation reactor. Initially, the nitrifying reactor achieved full conversion of NH4+ to NO3−. Then, nitrite accumulation at ~60% was achieved in the reactor when 1/4 of the sludge was treated daily with FNA at 1.82 mg N/L in a side-stream unit for 24 h. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) revealed FNA treatment substantially reduced the abundance of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) (from 23.0 ± 4.3 to 5.3 ± 1.9%), especially that of Nitrospira sp. (from 15.7 ± 3.9 to 0.4 ± 0.1%). Nitrite accumulation increased to ~80% when the DO concentration in the mainstream reactor was reduced from 2.5–3.0 to 0.3–0.8 mg/L. FISH revealed the DO limitation further reduced the abundance of NOB (to 2.1 ± 1.0%), especially that of Nitrobacter sp. (from 4.9 ± 1.2 to 1.8 ± 0.8%). The strategy developed removes a major barrier for deammonification in low-strength domestic wastewater. PMID:27151247

  9. Achieving Stable Nitritation for Mainstream Deammonification by Combining Free Nitrous Acid-Based Sludge Treatment and Oxygen Limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongbo; Wang, Qilin; Laloo, Andrew; Xu, Yifeng; Bond, Philip L.; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-05-01

    Stable nitritation is a critical bottleneck for achieving autotrophic nitrogen removal using the energy-saving mainstream deammonification process. Herein we report a new strategy to wash out both the Nitrospira sp. and Nitrobacter sp. from the treatment of domestic-strength wastewater. The strategy combines sludge treatment using free nitrous acid (FNA) with dissolved oxygen (DO) control in the nitritation reactor. Initially, the nitrifying reactor achieved full conversion of NH4+ to NO3‑. Then, nitrite accumulation at ~60% was achieved in the reactor when 1/4 of the sludge was treated daily with FNA at 1.82 mg N/L in a side-stream unit for 24 h. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) revealed FNA treatment substantially reduced the abundance of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) (from 23.0 ± 4.3 to 5.3 ± 1.9%), especially that of Nitrospira sp. (from 15.7 ± 3.9 to 0.4 ± 0.1%). Nitrite accumulation increased to ~80% when the DO concentration in the mainstream reactor was reduced from 2.5–3.0 to 0.3–0.8 mg/L. FISH revealed the DO limitation further reduced the abundance of NOB (to 2.1 ± 1.0%), especially that of Nitrobacter sp. (from 4.9 ± 1.2 to 1.8 ± 0.8%). The strategy developed removes a major barrier for deammonification in low-strength domestic wastewater.

  10. Achieving Stable Nitritation for Mainstream Deammonification by Combining Free Nitrous Acid-Based Sludge Treatment and Oxygen Limitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongbo; Wang, Qilin; Laloo, Andrew; Xu, Yifeng; Bond, Philip L; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    Stable nitritation is a critical bottleneck for achieving autotrophic nitrogen removal using the energy-saving mainstream deammonification process. Herein we report a new strategy to wash out both the Nitrospira sp. and Nitrobacter sp. from the treatment of domestic-strength wastewater. The strategy combines sludge treatment using free nitrous acid (FNA) with dissolved oxygen (DO) control in the nitritation reactor. Initially, the nitrifying reactor achieved full conversion of NH4(+) to NO3(-). Then, nitrite accumulation at ~60% was achieved in the reactor when 1/4 of the sludge was treated daily with FNA at 1.82 mg N/L in a side-stream unit for 24 h. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) revealed FNA treatment substantially reduced the abundance of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) (from 23.0 ± 4.3 to 5.3 ± 1.9%), especially that of Nitrospira sp. (from 15.7 ± 3.9 to 0.4 ± 0.1%). Nitrite accumulation increased to ~80% when the DO concentration in the mainstream reactor was reduced from 2.5-3.0 to 0.3-0.8 mg/L. FISH revealed the DO limitation further reduced the abundance of NOB (to 2.1 ± 1.0%), especially that of Nitrobacter sp. (from 4.9 ± 1.2 to 1.8 ± 0.8%). The strategy developed removes a major barrier for deammonification in low-strength domestic wastewater. PMID:27151247

  11. Nitrogen mineralization rates of the acidic, xeric soils of the New Jersey Pinelands: field rates

    SciTech Connect

    Poovarodom, S.; Tate, R.L. III; Bloom, R.A.

    1988-04-01

    Using the buried-bag procedure, the authors quantified nitrogen mineralization rates in the xeric, acidic Lakehurst, and Atsion sands of the New Jersey Pine Barrens. Average annual nitrogen yields in the upper 15 cm for the Lakehurst and the Atsion sands were 38.4 and 53.0 kg N/ha, corresponding to 4.5 and 2.5% of the total nitrogen, respectively. Net nitrogen mineralization in both soils exhibited distinct seasonal patterns with maxima in summer and minimum rates in the winter. Nitrification accounted for only 5% of the total N mineralized in both soils. This is consistent with the finding of low populations of autotrophic nitrifiers in these soils.

  12. Nitrogen elimination mechanisms in an organic media aerated biofilter treating pig manure.

    PubMed

    Garzón-Zúñiga, M; Lessard, P; Aubry, G; Buelna, G

    2005-04-01

    Biofilters using organic media are known to procure efficient treatment for different types of wastewater, but the nitrogen removal pathways implied are still not well understood. In this study, a lab-scale aerated biofilter using peat and treating pig manure was operated for 180 days, in order to quantify the nitrogen transformations occurring in it. It was shown that stripping was important during the start-up, until nitrification took place. Simultaneous nitrification and denitrification, proved by N2 production, became the principal mechanism after some time. The production of N2O did not seem to come only from heterotrophic denitrification, but also from chemodenitrification and autotrophic denitrification. It has also been found that part of the influent nitrogen was retained in the system during the first 150 days, due to filtration, sorption and assimilation. During the last periods of operation, the nitrogen previously retained has been used by microorganisms, leading to an excessive N2 discharge. PMID:15906487

  13. The effect of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on marine nitrogen cycling throughout the global ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somes, Christopher; Oschlies, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    The rapidly increasing rate of anthropogenic nitrogen deposition has the potential to perturb marine ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles because nitrogen is one of the major limiting nutrients in the ocean. We use an Earth System Climate Model that includes ocean biogeochemistry to assess the impact of atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Experiments are conducted where we artificially add nitrogen to nearly all locations individually throughout the global surface ocean using a nitrogen deposition rate of 700 mg N m-2 yr-1, which is consistent with modern estimates near industrial areas. We identify oceanic "biomes" that respond differently to atmospheric nitrogen deposition. (1) When nitrogen is deposited near oxygen minimum zones where water column denitrification occurs, locally increased primary production stimulates additional denitrification. Since water column denitrification removes 7 mol N for every mol N of newly formed organic matter respired, the global oceanic nitrogen inventory declines in response to nitrogen deposition in these areas. This slow, but steady decline persists for at least 1,000 years. (2) When nitrogen is deposited above shallow continental shelves where benthic denitrification occurs, our benthic denitrification model predicts an increase that is nearly equal to the nitrogen deposited and thus no net change in the global nitrogen inventory. (3) When nitrogen is deposited into the high latitude open ocean far removed from nitrogen fixation and denitrification, all of this deposited nitrogen initially accumulates in the ocean. This nitrogen eventually circulates into the tropical oxygen minimum zones where it fuels additional primary production and denitrification, which removes nitrogen at a rate equal to the deposition after 1,000 years and leads to a stable, but increased nitrogen inventory in our model. (4) When nitrogen is deposited into the open ocean where nitrogen fixation occurs, nitrogen fixation decreases due to less nitrogen

  14. Nitrogen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harries, J. E.; Brasseur, G.; Coffey, M. T.; Fischer, H.; Gille, J.; Jones, R.; Louisnard, N.; McCormick, M. P.; Noxon, J.; Owens, A. J.

    Total odd nitrogen, NO(y), may be defined as the sum of all active nitrogen species that interchange photochemically with one another on a time scale of the order of weeks or less. As noted, NO + NO2 reactions dominate the processes controlling the ozone balance in the contemporary stratosphere. The observational data from non-satellite platforms are reviewed. The growth in available satellite data in the past four years is considered. Some of the most important scientific issues are discussed, taking into account new results from atmospheric models (mainly 2-D). The model results are compared with the observational data.

  15. Nitrogen species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, J. E.; Brasseur, G.; Coffey, M. T.; Fischer, H.; Gille, J.; Jones, R.; Louisnard, N.; Mccormick, M. P.; Noxon, J.; Owens, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    Total odd nitrogen, NO(y), may be defined as the sum of all active nitrogen species that interchange photochemically with one another on a time scale of the order of weeks or less. As noted, NO + NO2 reactions dominate the processes controlling the ozone balance in the contemporary stratosphere. The observational data from non-satellite platforms are reviewed. The growth in available satellite data in the past four years is considered. Some of the most important scientific issues are discussed, taking into account new results from atmospheric models (mainly 2-D). The model results are compared with the observational data.

  16. Constraining the role of iron in environmental nitrogen transformations: Dual stable isotope systematics of abiotic NO2- reduction by Fe(II) and its production of N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchwald, Carolyn; Grabb, Kalina; Hansel, Colleen M.; Wankel, Scott D.

    2016-08-01

    Despite mounting evidence for biogeochemical interactions between iron and nitrogen, our understanding of their environmental importance remains limited. Here we present an investigation of abiotic nitrite (NO2-) reduction by Fe(II) or 'chemodenitrification', and its relevance to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O), specifically focusing on dual (N and O) isotope systematics under a variety of environmental conditions. We observe a range of kinetic isotope effects that are regulated by reaction rates, with faster rates at higher pH (∼8), higher concentrations of Fe(II) and in the presence of mineral surfaces. A clear non-linear relationship between rate constant and kinetic isotope effects of NO2- reduction was evident (with larger isotope effects at slower rates) and is interpreted as reflecting the dynamics of Fe(II)-N reaction intermediates. N and O isotopic composition of product N2O also suggests a complex network of parallel and/or competing pathways. Our findings suggest that NO2- reduction by Fe(II) may represent an important abiotic source of environmental N2O, especially in iron-rich environments experiencing dynamic redox variations. This study provides a multi-compound, multi-isotope framework for evaluating the environmental occurrence of abiotic NO2- reduction and N2O formation, helping future studies constrain the relative roles of abiotic and biological N2O production pathways.

  17. Carbon Stable Isotopes as Indicators of Coastal Eutrophication

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal ecologists and managers have frequently used nitrogen stable isotopes (δ15N) to trace and monitor anthropogenic nitrogen (N) in coastal ecosystems. However, the interpretation of δ15N data can often be challenging, if not confounding, as the isotope values fractionate su...

  18. Nitrogen dioxide

    Integrated Risk Information Syste