Science.gov

Sample records for stably transfected bioluminescent

  1. Characterization of cell lines stably transfected with rubella virus replicons

    SciTech Connect

    Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Xu, Jie; Frey, Teryl K.

    2012-07-20

    Rubella virus (RUBV) replicons expressing a drug resistance gene and a gene of interest were used to select cell lines uniformly harboring the replicon. Replicons expressing GFP and a virus capsid protein GFP fusion (C-GFP) were compared. Vero or BHK cells transfected with either replicon survived drug selection and grew into a monolayer. However, survival was {approx}9-fold greater following transfection with the C-GFP-replicon than with the GFP-expressing replicon and while the C-GFP-replicon cells grew similarly to non-transfected cells, the GFP-replicon cells grew slower. Neither was due to the ability of the CP to enhance RNA synthesis but survival during drug selection was correlated with the ability of CP to inhibit apoptosis. Additionally, C-GFP-replicon cells were not cured of the replicon in the absence of drug selection. Interferon-alpha suppressed replicon RNA and protein synthesis, but did not cure the cells, explaining in part the ability of RUBV to establish persistent infections.

  2. Targeted Surface Expression of an Exogenous Antigen in Stably Transfected Babesia bovis

    PubMed Central

    Laughery, Jacob M.; Knowles, Donald P.; Schneider, David A.; Bastos, Reginaldo G.; McElwain, Terry F.; Suarez, Carlos E.

    2014-01-01

    Babesia bovis is a tick-borne intraerythocytic protozoan responsible for acute disease in cattle which can be controlled by vaccination with attenuated B. bovis strains. Emerging B. bovis transfection technologies may increase the usefulness of these live vaccines. One use of transfected B. bovis parasites may be as a vaccine delivery platform. Previous transfection methods for B. bovis were limited by single expression sites and intracellular expression of transfected antigens. This study describes a novel transfection system in which two exogenous genes are expressed: one for selection and the other for a selected antigen designed to be delivered to the surface of the parasites. The strategy for duplicating the number of transfected genes was based on the use of the putative bidirectional promoter of the B. bovis 1.4 Kb ef-1α intergenic region. The ability of this region to regulate two independent expression sites was demonstrated using a luciferase assay on transiently transfected B. bovis parasites and then incorporated into a stable transfection plasmid to control independent expression of the selectable marker GFP-BSD and another gene of interest. A chimeric gene was synthetized using sequences from the protective B-cell epitopes of Rhipicephalus microplus tick antigen Bm86 along with sequences from the surface exposed B. bovis major surface antigen-1. This chimeric gene was then cloned into the additional expression site of the transfection plasmid. Transfection of the B. bovis Mo7 strain with this plasmid resulted in stable insertion into the ef-1α locus and simultaneous expression of both exogenous genes. Expression of the Bm86 epitopes on the surface of transfected merozoites was demonstrated using immunofluorescence analyses. The ability to independently express multiple genes by the inclusion of a bidirectional promoter and the achievement of surface expression of foreign epitopes advances the potential of transfected B. bovis as a future vaccine

  3. Targeted surface expression of an exogenous antigen in stably transfected Babesia bovis.

    PubMed

    Laughery, Jacob M; Knowles, Donald P; Schneider, David A; Bastos, Reginaldo G; McElwain, Terry F; Suarez, Carlos E

    2014-01-01

    Babesia bovis is a tick-borne intraerythocytic protozoan responsible for acute disease in cattle which can be controlled by vaccination with attenuated B. bovis strains. Emerging B. bovis transfection technologies may increase the usefulness of these live vaccines. One use of transfected B. bovis parasites may be as a vaccine delivery platform. Previous transfection methods for B. bovis were limited by single expression sites and intracellular expression of transfected antigens. This study describes a novel transfection system in which two exogenous genes are expressed: one for selection and the other for a selected antigen designed to be delivered to the surface of the parasites. The strategy for duplicating the number of transfected genes was based on the use of the putative bidirectional promoter of the B. bovis 1.4 Kb ef-1α intergenic region. The ability of this region to regulate two independent expression sites was demonstrated using a luciferase assay on transiently transfected B. bovis parasites and then incorporated into a stable transfection plasmid to control independent expression of the selectable marker GFP-BSD and another gene of interest. A chimeric gene was synthetized using sequences from the protective B-cell epitopes of Rhipicephalus microplus tick antigen Bm86 along with sequences from the surface exposed B. bovis major surface antigen-1. This chimeric gene was then cloned into the additional expression site of the transfection plasmid. Transfection of the B. bovis Mo7 strain with this plasmid resulted in stable insertion into the ef-1α locus and simultaneous expression of both exogenous genes. Expression of the Bm86 epitopes on the surface of transfected merozoites was demonstrated using immunofluorescence analyses. The ability to independently express multiple genes by the inclusion of a bidirectional promoter and the achievement of surface expression of foreign epitopes advances the potential of transfected B. bovis as a future vaccine

  4. Targeted surface expression of an exogenous antigen in stably transfected babesia bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Babesia bovis is a tick-borne intraerythocytic protozoan responsible for acute disease in cattle which can be controlled by vaccination with attenuated B. bovis strains. Emerging B. bovis transfection technologies may increase the usefulness of these live vaccines. Here we propose using transfected ...

  5. Localization and functional analysis of CHIP28k water channels in stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, T; Frigeri, A; Tsai, S T; Verbavatz, J M; Verkman, A S

    1993-10-25

    CHIP28 is a major water transporting protein in erythrocytes and plasma membranes in kidney proximal tubule and thin descending limb of Henle. Chinese hamster ovary cells were stably transfected with the coding sequence of cloned rat kidney CHIP28k using expression vectors containing cytomegalovirus or Rous sarcoma virus promoters. Clonal cell populations expressed a 1.3-kilobase mRNA on Northern blot probed by CHIP28k cDNA and a 28-kDa protein on immunoblot probed by a polyclonal CHIP28 antibody. The clone with greatest expression produced approximately 8 x 10(6) copies of CHIP28k protein/cell. Plasma membrane osmotic water permeability (Pf), measured by stopped-flow light scattering, was 0.004 cm/s in control (vector-transfected) cells (10 degrees C) and 0.014 cm/s in the CHIP28k-transfected cells. Pf in CHIP28k-transfected cells had an activation energy of 4.9 kcal/mol and was reversibly inhibited by HgCl2. CHIP28k expression did not affect the transport of protons and the small polar non-electrolytes urea and formamide. CHIP28k immunoreactivity and function was then determined in subcellular fractions. Pf in 6-carboxyfluorescein-labeled endocytic vesicles, measured by a stopped-flow fluorescence quenching assay, was 0.002 cm/s (control cells) and 0.011 cm/s (CHIP28k-transfected cells); Pf in transfected cells was inhibited by HgCl2. Immunoblotting of fractionated endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, and plasma membranes revealed high densities of CHIP28k (approximately 5000 monomers/microns 2 in plasma membrane) with different glycosylation patterns; functional water transport activity was present only in Golgi and plasma membrane vesicles. Antibody detection of CHIP28k by confocal fluorescence microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy revealed localization to plasma membrane and intracellular vesicles. These studies establish a stably transfected somatic cell line that strongly expresses functional CHIP28k water channels. As in the original proximal tubule cells

  6. Establishment and characterization of an MDCK cell line stably-transfected with chicken Abcb1 encoding P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong; Guo, Tingting; Guo, Dawei; Guo, Li; Chen, Li; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Liping

    2016-06-01

    Chicken P-glycoprotein (chP-gp), encoded by Abcb1, determines the bioavailability because of its effect on pharmacokinetics of various drugs. However, comprehensive studies on chP-gp are still limited. In this study, the chicken full-length cDNA was first successfully cloned and then stably expressed in MDCK cell line. The open reading frame of chicken Abcb1 consists of 3864 nucleotides, encoding for a 1287-amino acid protein. Sequence alignments analysis showed that chicken P-gp had high identities with the homologues of turkey (95%), human (72%), pig (72%), rat (71%) and cattle (68%). The efflux ratio of rhodamine123 (Rho123, a human P-gp substrate) in chAbcb1 transfected MDCK cells was significantly higher than that in the wild type MDCK cell (6.24 vs 1.64, P<0.05), suggesting a good transporting function of chicken P-gp overexpressed in the transfected cell. Importantly, MDCK-chAbcb1 cells, unlike Caco-2 cells, exhibited biphasic saturation kinetics in transporting Rho123. In conclusion, an MDCK cell line stably expressing chAbcb1 was successfully established, which could provide a new cell model to screen its substrates and inhibitors and study the drug-drug interaction medicated via chicken P-gp. PMID:27234533

  7. HIV-1 Virus-Like Particles Produced by Stably Transfected Drosophila S2 Cells: a Desirable Vaccine Component

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lifei; Song, Yufeng; Li, Xiaomin; Huang, Xiaoxing; Liu, Jingjing; Ding, Heng; Zhu, Ping

    2012-01-01

    The development of a successful vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) likely requires immunogens that elicit both broadly neutralizing antibodies against envelope spikes and T cell responses that recognize multiple viral proteins. HIV-1 virus-like particles (VLP), because they display authentic envelope spikes on the particle surface, may be developed into such immunogens. However, in one way or the other current systems for HIV-1 VLP production have many limitations. To overcome these, in the present study we developed a novel strategy to produce HIV-1 VLP using stably transfected Drosophila S2 cells. We cotransfected S2 cells with plasmids encoding HIV-1 envelope, Gag, and Rev proteins and a selection marker. After stably transfected S2 clones were established, HIV-1 VLP and their immunogenicity in mice were carefully evaluated. Here, we report that HIV-1 envelope proteins are properly cleaved, glycosylated, and incorporated into VLP with Gag. The amount of VLP released into culture supernatants is comparable to those produced by insect cells infected with recombinant baculoviruses. Moreover, cryo-electron microscopy tomography revealed average 17 spikes per purified VLP, and antigenic epitopes on the spikes were recognized by the broadly neutralizing antibodies 2G12, b12, VRC01, and 4E10 but not by PG16. Finally, mice primed with DNA and boosted with VLP in the presence of CpG exhibited anti-envelope antibody responses, including ELISA-binding, neutralizing, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cell-mediated viral inhibition, as well as envelope and Gag-specific CD8 T cell responses. Thus, we conclude that HIV-1 VLP produced by the S2 expression system has many desirable features to be developed into a vaccine component against HIV-1. PMID:22553333

  8. Extracellular matrix and hormones transcriptionally regulate bovine. beta. -casein 5 prime sequences in stably transfected mouse mammary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidhauser, C. Bissell, M.J. ); Myers, C.A.; Casperson, G.F. )

    1990-12-01

    Milk protein regulation involves synergistic action of lactogenic hormones and extracellular matrix (ECM). It is well established that substratum has a dramatic effect on morphology and function of mammary cells. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the ECM- and hormone-dependent gene expression, however, have not been resolved. To address this question, a subpopulation (designated CID 9) of the mouse mammary epithelial cell strain COMMA-2D has been developed in which more than 35% of the cells express {beta}-casein, form alveoli-like structures when plated onto a reconstituted basement membrane, and secrete {beta}-casein undirectionally into a lumen. These cells were stably transfected with a series of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) fusion genes to study transcriptional regulation of the bovine {beta}-casein gene. The expression of CAT in these lines demonstrated a striking matrix and hormone dependency. This regulation occurered primarily at the transcriptional level and was dependent on the length of the 5{prime} flanking region of the {beta}-casein promotor. Both matrix and hormonal control of transcription occurred within at least the first 1790 base pairs upstream and/or 42 base pairs downstream of the transcriptional initiation site. The ECM effect was independent of glucocorticoid stimulation. However, prolactin was essential and hydrocortisone further increased CAT expression. Endogenous {beta}-casein expression in these lines was similar to that of the parent CID 9 cells. Our data indicate the existence of matrix-dependent elements that regulate transcription.

  9. Bioluminescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. Gail

    1993-01-01

    Describes bioluminescence and the chemistry of how it occurs. Presents information for conducting the following classroom activities: (1) firefly mimic; (2) modeling deep-sea fish; (3) sea fireflies; and (4) the chemistry of light. (PR)

  10. Expression of biologically active procorticotrophin-releasing hormone (proCRH) in stably transfected CHO-K1 cells: characterization of nuclear proCRH.

    PubMed

    Morrison, E; Tomasec, P; Linton, E A; Lowry, P J; Lowenstein, P R; Castro, M G

    1995-04-01

    Corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a 41 amino acid neuropeptide which is cleaved at a pair of dibasic amino acids from a larger precursor molecule (pre-proCRH) by the action of endopeptidases. In cells possessing a regulated secretory pathway, sorting of proneuropeptides and prohormones occurs within the trans-Golgi network, where they are finally packaged into secretory vesicles to be released in response to an external stimulus. Such cells also possess a constitutive secretory pathway, and neuropeptides are also translocated into this subcellular compartment. We have recently established stably transfected CHO-K1 cells expressing the rat pre-proCRH cDNA, and shown that proCRH was localized within the secretory pathway and the nucleus of transfected cells. Both the cytoplasmic and nuclear species of IR-CRH displayed an apparent molecular weight approximately 19 kDa, consistent with the size of the uncleaved CRH precursor molecule. In this paper, we further characterized the bitopological, i.e. nuclear and cytoplasmic localization of proCRH within transfected CHO-K1 cells. Immunoreactive nuclear CRH was not extractable using detergents (Triton X-100 and CHAPS), 10 mM salt washes or RNase digestion but could be abolished by digestion with DNase I. These results therefore suggest that nuclear proCRH is in close association with DNA/chromatin. Treatment of transfected cells with inhibitors of protein and RNA synthesis for up to 24 h had no effect upon immunoreactive nuclear CRH, indicating that it is very stable with a long half life. Brefeldin A treatment had no effect upon the nuclear translocation of newly synthesized proCRH, suggesting that late stages of the secretory pathway (i.e. post rough endoplasmic reticulum compartments) of the transfected cells do not play a role in proCRH nuclear transport. We also demonstrate that proCRH synthesized within stably transfected CHO-K1 cells is capable of stimulating ACTH release from primary cultures of anterior

  11. Polymeric vector-mediated gene transfection of MSCs for dual bioluminescent and MRI tracking in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun; Li, Jingguo; Pang, Pengfei; Liu, Jingjing; Zhu, Kangshun; Li, Dan; Cheng, Du; Chen, Junwei; Shuai, Xintao; Shan, Hong

    2014-09-01

    MSC's transplantation is a promising cell-based therapy for injuries in regenerative medicine, and in vivo visualization of transplanted MSCs with noninvasive technique is essential for the tracking of cell infusion and homing. A new cationic polymer, poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(l-aspartic acid)-grafted polyethylenimine functionalized with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (PAI/SPION), was constructed as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-visible non-viral vector for the delivery of plasmids DNA (pDNA) encoding for luciferase and red fluorescence protein (RFP) as reporter genes into MSCs. As a result, the MSCs were labeled with SPION and reporter genes. The PAI/SPION complexes exhibited high transfection efficiency in transferring pDNA into MSCs, which resulted in efficient luciferase and RFP co-expression. Furthermore, the complexes did not significantly affect the viability and multilineage differentiation capacity of MSCs. After the labeled MSCs were transplanted into the rats with acute liver injury via the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) injection, the migration behavior and organ-specific accumulation of the cells could be effectively monitored using the in vivo imaging system (IVIS) and MRI, respectively. The immunohistochemical analysis further confirmed that the transplanted MSCs were predominantly distributed in the liver parenchyma. Our results indicate that the PAI/SPION is a MRI-visible gene delivery agent which can effectively label MSCs to provide the basis for bimodal bioluminescence and MRI tracking in vivo. PMID:24976241

  12. Generation and preclinical immunogenicity study of dengue type 2 virus-like particles derived from stably transfected mosquito cells.

    PubMed

    Suphatrakul, Amporn; Yasanga, Thippawan; Keelapang, Poonsook; Sriburi, Rungtawan; Roytrakul, Thaneeya; Pulmanausahakul, Rojjanaporn; Utaipat, Utaiwan; Kawilapan, Yanee; Puttikhunt, Chunya; Kasinrerk, Watchara; Yoksan, Sutee; Auewarakul, Prasert; Malasit, Prida; Charoensri, Nicha; Sittisombut, Nopporn

    2015-10-13

    Recent phase IIb/III trials of a tetravalent live attenuated vaccine candidate revealed a need for improvement in the stimulation of protective immunity against diseases caused by dengue type 2 virus (DENV-2). Our attempts to develop particulate antigens for possibly supplementing live attenuated virus preparation involve generation and purification of recombinant DENV-2 virus-like particles (VLPs) derived from stably (prM+E)-expressing mosquito cells. Two VLP preparations generated with either negligible or enhanced prM cleavage exhibited different proportions of spherical particles and tubular particles of variable lengths. In BALB/c mice, VLPs were moderately immunogenic, requiring adjuvants for the induction of strong virus neutralizing antibody responses. VLPs with enhanced prM cleavage induced higher levels of neutralizing antibody than those without, but the stimulatory activity of both VLPs was similar in the presence of adjuvants. Comparison of EDIII-binding antibodies in mice following two adjuvanted doses of these VLPs revealed subtle differences in the stimulation of anti-EDIII binding antibodies. In cynomolgus macaques, VLPs with enhanced prM cleavage augmented strongly neutralizing antibody and EDIII-binding antibody responses in live attenuated virus-primed recipients, suggesting that these DENV-2 VLPs may be useful as the boosting antigen in prime-boost immunization. As the levels of neutralizing antibody induced in macaques with the prime-boost immunization were comparable to those infected with wild type virus, this virus-prime VLP-boost regimen may provide an immunization platform in which a need for robust neutralizing antibody response in the protection against DENV-2-associated illnesses could be tested. PMID:26382602

  13. Novel Stably Transfected Human Reporter Cell Line AIZ-AR as a Tool for an Assessment of Human Androgen Receptor Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bartonkova, Iveta; Novotna, Aneta; Dvorak, Zdenek

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor plays multiple physiological and pathological roles in human organism. In the current paper, we describe construction and characterization of a novel stably transfected human reporter cell line AIZ-AR for assessment of transcriptional activity of human androgen receptor. Cell line AIZ-AR is derived from human prostate carcinoma epithelial cell line 22Rv1 that was transfected with reporter plasmid containing 3 copies of androgen response regions (ARRs) followed by a single copy of androgen response element (ARE) from the promoter region of human prostate specific antigen (PSA) gene. AIZ-AR cells remained fully functional for more than 60 days and over 25 passages in the culture and even after cryopreservation. Time-course analyses showed that AIZ-AR cells allow detection of AR ligands as soon as after 8 hours of the treatment. We performed dose-response analyses with 23 steroids in 96-well plate format. We observed activation of AR by androgens, but not by estrogens and mineralocorticoids. Some glucocorticoids and progesterone also induced luciferase, but their potencies were 2-3 orders of magnitude weaker as compared to androgens. Taken together, we have developed a rapid, sensitive, selective, high-throughput and reproducible tool for detection of human AR ligands, with potential use in pharmacological and environmental applications. PMID:25811655

  14. Development of stably transfected human and rat hepatoma cell lines for the species-specific assessment of xenobiotic response enhancer module (XREM)-dependent induction of drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fery, Yvonne; Mueller, Stefan O; Schrenk, Dieter

    2010-11-01

    Based on our current knowledge, PXR holds a key position in the induction of a selective battery of enzymes and transporters of drug metabolism. In order to prevent serious adverse drug effects or unpredicted drug-drug interactions (DDI), it is compulsory to investigate the possible inducing potency of drugs under development. Furthermore, analysis of the inducing potency of environmental pollutants and new or manufactured chemicals is part of toxicological risk assessment. In non-transfected human HepG2 and rat H4IIE hepatoma cells, we examined the characteristics of expression of 45 genes involved in drug metabolism. A few gene products such as CYP2B6 or CYP3A4 mRNA were prominent in HepG2 cells while their major rat counterparts were, e.g., CYP2B3 or CYP3A1/3A3. Furthermore, a number of xenobiotic receptors including PXR were expressed in both cell lines. A number of genes were regulated in a cell type and species-specific manner after incubation with the prototypical PXR agonists rifampicin or dexamethasone, respectively. Then, we established cell-based reporter gene assays for screening for PXR-dependent induction of drug metabolism. HepG2 and H4IIE cells were stably transfected with a reporter gene containing PXR responsive elements (XREMs) which mediate the induction of PXR target genes such as CYP3A enzymes. With both stable cell lines the CYP inducers clotrimazole, dexamethasone, omeprazole, phenobarbital, rifampicin, as well as the drug candidate EMD 392949 and the brominated flame retardants hexabromocylododecane (HBCD) and a pentabromodiphenyl ether (pentaBDE) mixture were screened. In the human HepG2-XREM3 and rat H4IIE-XREM3 cells, clotrimazole and HBCD were found as common activators of the human and rat PXR whereas pentaBDE was more effective with the human cell system. Omeprazole and phenobarbital did not induce the rat PXR-dependent reporter gene expression in H4IIE-XREM3 cells, while a moderate increase was found in HepG2-XREM3 cells. EMD 392949

  15. How efficacious are 5-HT1B/D receptor ligands: an answer from GTP gamma S binding studies with stably transfected C6-glial cell lines.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, P J; Tardif, S; Palmier, C; Wurch, T; Colpaert, F C

    1997-01-01

    The intrinsic activity of a series of 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT) receptor ligands was analysed at recombinant h5-HT1B and h5-HT1D receptor sites using a [35S]GTP gamma S binding assay and membrane preparations of stably transfected C6-glial cell lines. Compounds either stimulated or inhibited [35S]GTP gamma S binding to a membrane preparation containing either h5-HT1B or h5-HT1D receptors. The potencies observed for most of the compounds at the h5-HT1B receptor subtype correlated with their potencies measured by inhibition of stimulated cAMP formation on intact cells. Apparent agonist potencies in the [35S]GTP gamma S binding assay to C6-glial/h5-HT1D membranes were, with the exception of 2-[5-[3-(4-methylsulphonylamino)benzyl-1 2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]-1H-indol-3-yl] ethanamine (L694247), 5- to 13-times lower than in the cAMP assay on intact cells. This suggests that receptor coupling in the h5-HT1D membrane preparation is less efficient than that in the intact cell. It further appeared that 6-times more h5-HT1D than h5-HT1B binding sites were required to attain a similar, maximal (73%), 5-HT-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding response: Hence, the h5-HT1B receptor in C6-glial cell membranes could be more efficiently coupled, even though some compounds more readily displayed intrinsic activity at h5-HT1D receptor sites [e.g. dihydroergotamine and (2'-methyl-4'-(5-methyl[1,2,4]oxadiazol-3-yl)biphenyl-4-carboxylic acid [4-methoxy-3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)phenyl]amide (GR127935)]. Efficacy differences were apparent for most of the compounds (sumatriptan, zolmitriptan, rizatriptan, N-methyl-3-[pyrrolidin-2(R)-ylmethyl]-1H-indol-5-ylmethyl sulfonamide (CP122638), dihydroergotamine, naratriptan and GR127935) that stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding compared to the native agonist 5-HT. The observed maximal responses were different for the h5-HT1B and h5-HT1D receptor subtypes. Few compounds behaved as full agonists: L694247, zolmitriptan and sumatriptan did so at

  16. Screening for (anti)androgenic properties using a standard operation protocol based on the human stably transfected androgen sensitive PALM cell line. First steps towards validation.

    PubMed

    Freyberger, A; Witters, H; Weimer, M; Lofink, W; Berckmans, P; Ahr, H-J

    2010-08-01

    Despite more than a decade of research in the field of endocrine active compounds targeting the androgen receptor (AR), and although suitable cell lines can be obtained, no validated human stably transfected androgen sensitive transactivation assay is available. Bayer Schering Pharma (BSP) and the Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), partners within the EU-sponsored 6th framework project ReProTect, made first steps towards such a validation. A standard operation protocol (SOP) developed at BSP based on the androgen sensitive PALM cell line was transferred to VITO and its performance and transferability were thoroughly studied. The investigation followed a generic protocol prepared for all reporter gene assays evaluated within ReProTect, and in both laboratories at least three independent experiments were performed. The highest concentration to be tested was limited to 10 microM, if needed. A few compounds, 17alpha-methyltestosterone (17alpha-MT), vinclozolin and linuron, were studied using a real world scenario, i.e., assuming that their interaction with the AR was not known: A prescreening for agonism and true, competitive antagonism was used to select conditions such as the appropriate mode of action, and the working range excluding cytotoxicity for the final screening. All other compounds were tested according to the generic protocol: Compounds screened for agonism were the reference androgen 17alpha-methyldihydrotestosterone (MDHT), levonorgestrel, norethynodrel, progesterone, o,p'-DDT, and dibutylphthalate (DBP), while compounds screened for antagonism were the reference anti-androgen flutamide, prochloraz, o,p'-DDT, progesterone, norethynodrel, and DBP. Cytotoxicity was assessed in parallel as lactate dehydrogenase release. The prescreen classified 17alpha-MT as androgenic, vinclozolin and linuron as anti-androgenic and compounds were tested accordingly. In the absence of cytotoxicity, appropriate androgenic properties of reference and test

  17. Production and characterization of active recombinant interleukin-12/eGFP fusion protein in stably-transfected DF1 chicken cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsing Chieh; Chen, Yu San; Shen, Pin Chun; Shien, Jui Hung; Lee, Long Huw; Chiu, Hua Hsien

    2015-01-01

    The adjuvant activity of chicken interleukin-12 (chIL-12) protein has been described as similar to that of mammalian IL-12. Recombinant chIL-12 can be produced using several methods, but chIL-12 production in eukaryotic cells is lower than that in prokaryotic cells. Stimulating compounds, such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), can be added to animal cell cultures to overcome this drawback. In this study, we constructed a cell line, DF1/chIL-12 which stably expressed a fusion protein, chIL-12 and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) connected by a (G4 S)3 linker sequence. Fusion protein production was increased when cells were cultured in the presence of DMSO. When 1 × 10(6) DF1/chIL-12 cells were inoculated in a T-175 flask containing 30 mL of media, incubated for 15 h, and further cultivated in the presence of 4% DMSO for 48 h, the production of total fusion protein was mostly enhanced compared with the production of total fusion protein by using cell lysates induced with DMSO at other concentrations. The concentrations of the unpurified and purified total fusion proteins in cell lysates were 2,781 ± 2.72 ng mL(-1) and 2,207 ± 3.28 ng mL(-1) , respectively. The recovery rate was 79%. The fusion protein stimulated chicken splenocytes to produce IFN-γ, which was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, in the culture supernatant, indicating that treating DF1/chIL-12 cells with DMSO or producing chIL-12 in a fusion protein form does not have adverse effects on the bioactivity of chIL-12. PMID:25583174

  18. Intracellular localization of the PDE4A cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase splice variant RD1 (RNPDE4A1A) in stably transfected human thyroid carcinoma FTC cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Pooley, L; Shakur, Y; Rena, G; Houslay, M D

    1997-01-01

    Cells of two human follicular thyroid carcinoma cell lines (FTC133, FTC236) were stably transfected with a cDNA encoding the PDE4A cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) splice variant RD1 (RNPDE4A1A) so as to generate the cloned cell lines, FTC133A and FTC236A. This allowed the expression of a novel rolipram-inhibited cAMP-specific PDE activity in these cells. Unlike the parent cell lines in which Ca2+/calmodulin caused a profound activation (approx. 3-4-fold) of homogenate PDE activity, no such stimulation was evident in the RD1-expressing cell lines, indicating loss of PDE1 activity. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis indicated that this was due to the down-regulation of the PDE1C isoform. The novel PDE4 activity in transfected cells was located exclusively in the membrane fraction, as was immunoreactive RD1. Low concentrations of the detergent Triton X-100, but not high NaCl concentrations, allowed RD1 to be solubilized. Laser scanning confocal immunofluorescence analyses identified RD1 immunoreactivity in a discrete perinuclear region of these RD1-expressing transfected cell lines. A similar pattern of labelling was observed using the antiserum Tex1, which specifically identified the Golgi apparatus. Treatment of FTC133A cells with the Golgi-perturbing agents monensin and brefeldin A led to a similar redistribution of immunoreactive species detected using both the Tex1 and anti-RD1 antisera. It is suggested that the PDE4A splice variant RD1 contains a membrane-association signal which allows the targeted expression of RD1 within the Golgi complex of these human follicular thyroid carcinoma cell lines. PMID:9003417

  19. COL1A1 transgene expression in stably transfected osteoblastic cells. Relative contributions of first intron, 3'-flanking sequences, and sequences derived from the body of the human COL1A1 minigene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breault, D. T.; Lichtler, A. C.; Rowe, D. W.

    1997-01-01

    Collagen reporter gene constructs have be used to identify cell-specific sequences needed for transcriptional activation. The elements required for endogenous levels of COL1A1 expression, however, have not been elucidated. The human COL1A1 minigene is expressed at high levels and likely harbors sequence elements required for endogenous levels of activity. Using stably transfected osteoblastic Py1a cells, we studied a series of constructs (pOBColCAT) designed to characterize further the elements required for high level of expression. pOBColCAT, which contains the COL1A1 first intron, was expressed at 50-100-fold higher levels than ColCAT 3.6, which lacks the first intron. This difference is best explained by improved mRNA processing rather than a transcriptional effect. Furthermore, variation in activity observed with the intron deletion constructs is best explained by altered mRNA splicing. Two major regions of the human COL1A1 minigene, the 3'-flanking sequences and the minigene body, were introduced into pOBColCAT to assess both transcriptional enhancing activity and the effect on mRNA stability. Analysis of the minigene body, which includes the first five exons and introns fused with the terminal six introns and exons, revealed an orientation-independent 5-fold increase in CAT activity. In contrast the 3'-flanking sequences gave rise to a modest 61% increase in CAT activity. Neither region increased the mRNA half-life of the parent construct, suggesting that CAT-specific mRNA instability elements may serve as dominant negative regulators of stability. This study suggests that other sites within the body of the COL1A1 minigene are important for high expression, e.g. during periods of rapid extracellular matrix production.

  20. Safety and Efficacy of Activated Transfected Killer Cells for Neutropenic Fungal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Baquir, Beverlie; Fu, Yue; Applebaum, David; Schwartz, Julie; Wang, Amy; Avanesian, Valentina; Spellberg, Brad

    2010-01-01

    Background Invasive fungal infections cause considerable morbidity and mortality in neutropenic patients. White blood cell transfusions are a promising treatment for such infections, but technical barriers have prevented their widespread use. Methods To recapitulate white blood cell transfusions, we are developing a cell-based immunotherapy using a phagocytic cell line, HL-60. We sought to stably transfect HL-60 cells with a suicide trap (herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase), to enable purging of the cells when desired, and a bioluminescence marker, to track the cells in vivo in mice. Results Transfection was stable despite 20 months of continuous culture or storage in liquid nitrogen. Activation of these transfected cells with retinoic acid and dimethyl sulfamethoxazole enhanced their microbicidal effects. Activated transfected killer (ATAK) cells were completely eliminated after exposure to ganciclovir, confirming function of the suicide trap. ATAK cells improved the survival of neutropenic mice with lethal disseminated candidiasis and inhalational aspergillosis. Bioluminescence and histopathologic analysis confirmed that the cells were purged from surviving mice after ganciclovir treatment. Comprehensive necropsy, histopathology, and metabolomic analysis revealed no toxicity of the cells. Conclusions These results lay the groundwork for continued translational development of this promising, novel technology for the treatment of refractory infections in neutropenic hosts. PMID:20397927

  1. Changing serine-485 to alanine in the opossum parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide receptor enhances PTH stimulation of phospholipase C in a stably transfected human kidney cell line: a useful model for PTH-analog screening?

    PubMed

    John, M R; Bösel, J; Breit, S; Wickert, H; Ziegler, R; Blind, E

    2001-02-01

    Using site-directed mutagenesis, we have introduced a serine-485-to-alanine mutation in the opossum parathyroid hormone (PTH) receptor. This amino acid is considered to be phosphorylated by protein kinase A upon ligand binding. Both wild-type (WT) and mutant receptor were stably expressed in 293-EBNA HEK cells. The mutant receptor showed comparable binding characteristics and only a slight increase in cAMP production compared with WT. However, the PTH dose-dependent increase in inositol phosphate production was 24-fold for the mutant receptor vs. 6-fold for the WT receptor. This mutant might prove useful in the sensitive detection of phospholipase C activation through various ligands, as the PTH receptor becomes a target of therapeutic intervention in osteoporosis. PMID:11182376

  2. Destabilized bioluminescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Michael S.; Rakesh, Gupta; Gary, Sayler S.

    2007-07-31

    Purified nucleic acids, vectors and cells containing a gene cassette encoding at least one modified bioluminescent protein, wherein the modification includes the addition of a peptide sequence. The duration of bioluminescence emitted by the modified bioluminescent protein is shorter than the duration of bioluminescence emitted by an unmodified form of the bioluminescent protein.

  3. Stably stratified building wakes

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, K.M.; Peterka, J.A.; Meroney, R.N.

    1980-01-01

    The velocity and temperature wake behind an isolated building placed in a stably stratified turbulent boundary layer has been investigated utilizing wind tunnel tests and mathematical analysis. The mean velocity and mean temperature decrease but turbulence intensity and temperature fluctuation intensity increase as a result of the momentum wake. However, the vortex wake increases mean velocity and mean temperature, and decreases turbulence intensity and temperature fluctuation intensity along the centerline of the wake.

  4. Monitoring and quantitative assessment of tumor burden using in vivo bioluminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chia-Chi; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Ting, Gann; Tseng, Yun-Long; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Whang-Peng, Jaqueline

    2007-02-01

    In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a sensitive imaging modality that is rapid and accessible, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating tumor growth. In this study, the kinetic of tumor growth has been assessed in C26 colon carcinoma bearing BALB/c mouse model. The ability of BLI to noninvasively quantitate the growth of subcutaneous tumors transplanted with C26 cells genetically engineered to stably express firefly luciferase and herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (C26/ tk-luc). A good correlation ( R2=0.998) of photon emission to the cell number was found in vitro. Tumor burden and tumor volume were monitored in vivo over time by quantitation of photon emission using Xenogen IVIS 50 and standard external caliper measurement, respectively. At various time intervals, tumor-bearing mice were imaged to determine the correlation of in vivo BLI to tumor volume. However, a correlation of BLI to tumor volume was observed when tumor volume was smaller than 1000 mm 3 ( R2=0.907). γ Scintigraphy combined with [ 131I]FIAU was another imaging modality used for verifying the previous results. In conclusion, this study showed that bioluminescence imaging is a powerful and quantitative tool for the direct assay to monitor tumor growth in vivo. The dual reporter genes transfected tumor-bearing animal model can be applied in the evaluation of the efficacy of new developed anti-cancer drugs.

  5. Laser-induced bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, G.D.; Lynch, R.V. III

    1981-01-01

    A project has been initiated to determine the feasibility of developing a complete airborne remote sensing system for rapidly mapping high concentration patches of bioluminescent organisms in the world's oceans. Conceptually, this system would be composed of a laser illuminator to induce bioluminescence and a low light level image intensifier for detection of light. Initial laboratory measurements consisted of using a 2-J flash lamp pulsed optical dye laser to excite bioluminescence in the marine dinoflagellate Pyrocustis lunula at ambient temperature using Rhodamine 6G as the lasing dye (585 nm) and a laser pulse width of 1 microsec. After a latency period of 15-20 msec, the bioluminescence maximum occurred in the blue (480 nm is the wavelength maximum for most dinoflagellate bioluminescence) with the peaking occurring approximately 65 msec after the laser pulse. Planned experiments will investigate the effect of different excitation wavelengths and energies at various temperatures and salinities of the cultures.

  6. A multi-phase level set framework for source reconstruction in bioluminescence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Heyu; Qu Xiaochao; Liang Jimin; He Xiaowei; Chen Xueli; Yang Da'an; Tian Jie

    2010-07-01

    We propose a novel multi-phase level set algorithm for solving the inverse problem of bioluminescence tomography. The distribution of unknown interior source is considered as piecewise constant and represented by using multiple level set functions. The localization of interior bioluminescence source is implemented by tracing the evolution of level set function. An alternate search scheme is incorporated to ensure the global optimal of reconstruction. Both numerical and physical experiments are performed to evaluate the developed level set reconstruction method. Reconstruction results show that the proposed method can stably resolve the interior source of bioluminescence tomography.

  7. Optimization of Gene Transfection in Murine Myeloma Cell Lines using Different Transfection Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Shabani, Mahdi; Hemmati, Sheyda; Hadavi, Reza; Amirghofran, Zahra; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjatallah; Shokri, Fazel

    2010-01-01

    Purification and isolation of cellular target proteins for monoclonal antibody (MAb) production is a difficult and time-consuming process. Immunization of mice with murine cell lines stably transfected with genes coding for xenogenic target molecules is an alternative method for mouse immunization and MAb production. Here we present data on transfection efficiency of some commercial reagents used for transfection of murine myeloma cell lines. Little is known about transfectability of murine myeloma cell lines by different transfection reagents. Mouse myeloma cell lines (SP2/0, NS0, NS1, Ag8, and P3U1) were transfected with pEGFP-N1 vector using Lipofectamine 2000, jetPEI and LyoVec commercial transfection reagents in different combinations. The transfection permissible HEK293-FT cell line was used as a control in transfection procedure. Transfected cells, expressing the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP), were analyzed by flow cytometry 48 hrs post transfection. Our results showed transfection efficiency of 71%, 57% and 22% for HEK293-FT, 5.5%, 3.4% and 1% for SP2/0, 55.7%, 21.1% and 9.3% for NS0, 8.2%, 6% and 5.5% for NS1, 22%, 49.2% and 5.5% for Ag8 and 6.3%, 21.5% and 4.6% for P3U1 cell lines after transfection with Lipofectamine 2000, jetPEI and LyoVec reagents, respectively. Our data indicate that NS0 and Ag8 are efficiently transfected by Lipofectamine 2000 and jetPEI reagents. Finally, we propose Ag8 and NS0 cell lines as suitable host cells for efficient expression of target genes which can be used for mouse immunization and MAb production. PMID:23408356

  8. Optimization of Gene Transfection in Murine Myeloma Cell Lines using Different Transfection Reagents.

    PubMed

    Shabani, Mahdi; Hemmati, Sheyda; Hadavi, Reza; Amirghofran, Zahra; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjatallah; Shokri, Fazel

    2010-07-01

    Purification and isolation of cellular target proteins for monoclonal antibody (MAb) production is a difficult and time-consuming process. Immunization of mice with murine cell lines stably transfected with genes coding for xenogenic target molecules is an alternative method for mouse immunization and MAb production. Here we present data on transfection efficiency of some commercial reagents used for transfection of murine myeloma cell lines. Little is known about transfectability of murine myeloma cell lines by different transfection reagents. Mouse myeloma cell lines (SP2/0, NS0, NS1, Ag8, and P3U1) were transfected with pEGFP-N1 vector using Lipofectamine 2000, jetPEI and LyoVec commercial transfection reagents in different combinations. The transfection permissible HEK293-FT cell line was used as a control in transfection procedure. Transfected cells, expressing the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP), were analyzed by flow cytometry 48 hrs post transfection. Our results showed transfection efficiency of 71%, 57% and 22% for HEK293-FT, 5.5%, 3.4% and 1% for SP2/0, 55.7%, 21.1% and 9.3% for NS0, 8.2%, 6% and 5.5% for NS1, 22%, 49.2% and 5.5% for Ag8 and 6.3%, 21.5% and 4.6% for P3U1 cell lines after transfection with Lipofectamine 2000, jetPEI and LyoVec reagents, respectively. Our data indicate that NS0 and Ag8 are efficiently transfected by Lipofectamine 2000 and jetPEI reagents. Finally, we propose Ag8 and NS0 cell lines as suitable host cells for efficient expression of target genes which can be used for mouse immunization and MAb production. PMID:23408356

  9. Bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Michael L.; Sayler, Gary S.; Paulus, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed are monolithic bioelectronic devices comprising a bioreporter and an OASIC. These bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit are useful in detecting substances such as pollutants, explosives, and heavy-metals residing in inhospitable areas such as groundwater, industrial process vessels, and battlefields. Also disclosed are methods and apparatus for environmental pollutant detection, oil exploration, drug discovery, industrial process control, and hazardous chemical monitoring.

  10. Establishment of human cell lines showing circadian rhythms of bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Aki; Shimada, Hiroko; Numazawa, Kahori; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Ikeda, Masaaki; Kawashima, Minae; Kato, Nobumasa; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Ebisawa, Takashi

    2008-11-28

    We have established human retinal pigment epithelial cell lines stably expressing the luciferase gene, driven by the human Bmal1 promoter, to obtain human-derived cells that show circadian rhythms of bioluminescence after dexamethasone treatment. The average circadian period of bioluminescence for the obtained clones was 24.07+/-0.48 h. Lithium (10 mM) in the medium significantly lengthened the circadian period of bioluminescence, which is consistent with previous reports, while 2 mM or 5 mM lithium had no effect. This is the first report on the establishment of human-derived cell lines that proliferate infinitely and show circadian rhythms of bioluminescence, and also the first to investigate the effects of low-dose lithium on the circadian rhythms of human-derived cells in vitro. The established cells will be useful for various in vitro studies of human circadian rhythms and for the development of new therapies for human disorders related to circadian rhythm disturbances. PMID:18809466

  11. Quantitative bioluminescence imaging of transgene expression in intact porcine antral follicles in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The porcine oocyte maturation in vivo occurs within the ovarian follicle and is regulated by the interactions between oocytes and surrounding follicular components, including theca, granulosa, and cumulus cells, and follicular fluid. Therefore, the antral follicle is an essential microenvironment for efficient oocyte maturation and its developmental competence. Quantitative bioluminescence imaging of firefly luciferase reporter genes in an intact antral follicle would allow investigation of changes in cellular and molecular events and in the context of the whole follicles. In this study, we investigate factors influencing bioluminescence measurements as a first step towards developing a new bioluminescence imaging system for intact antral follicles. Methods We analyzed the time course of bioluminescence emitted from transfected living intact follicles using a cationic lipid mediated gene transfer method with increasing doses (1-3 μg) of firefly luciferase reporter gene (pGL4). In addition, a standard luciferase assay was used to confirm the luciferase expression in granulosa cells in the transfected intact antral follicles. Finally, the dose effects of substrate, D-luciferin, were determined for optimal quantitative bioluminescence imaging of intact porcine antral follicles in vitro. Results The level of luciferase activity of follicles with 3 μg pGL4 was significantly (P < 0.05) greater than the 1 μg and 2 μg groups at 1 min after D-luciferin injection. The bioluminescence intensity of transfected follicles reached a peak at 1 min, and then it was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced within 2 min after injection of D-luciferin; with the level of bioluminescence emission remained constant from 2.5 to 10 min. The bioluminescence emission was maximal with 300 μg of D-luciferin. Conclusions The results of this study suggested that the investigation of factors influencing bioluminescence measurements is a critical step toward developing a

  12. BIOLUMINESCENCE IMAGING: PROGRESS AND APPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Christian E.; Tannous, Bakhos A.

    2015-01-01

    Application of bioluminescence imaging has grown tremendously in the past decade and has significantly contributed to the core conceptual advances in biomedical research. This technology provides valuable means for monitoring of different biological processes for immunology, oncology, virology and neuroscience. In this review, we will discuss current trends in bioluminescence and its application in different fields with emphasis on cancer research. PMID:21788092

  13. Single cell optical transfection.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, David J; Gunn-Moore, Frank J; Campbell, Paul; Dholakia, Kishan

    2010-06-01

    The plasma membrane of a eukaryotic cell is impermeable to most hydrophilic substances, yet the insertion of these materials into cells is an extremely important and universal requirement for the cell biologist. To address this need, many transfection techniques have been developed including viral, lipoplex, polyplex, capillary microinjection, gene gun and electroporation. The current discussion explores a procedure called optical injection, where a laser field transiently increases the membrane permeability to allow species to be internalized. If the internalized substance is a nucleic acid, such as DNA, RNA or small interfering RNA (siRNA), then the process is called optical transfection. This contactless, aseptic, single cell transfection method provides a key nanosurgical tool to the microscopist-the intracellular delivery of reagents and single nanoscopic objects. The experimental possibilities enabled by this technology are only beginning to be realized. A review of optical transfection is presented, along with a forecast of future applications of this rapidly developing and exciting technology. PMID:20064901

  14. Chemiluminescence and bioluminescence microbe detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. E.; Chappelle, E.; Picciolo, G. L.; Jeffers, E. L.; Thomas, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    Automated biosensors for online use with NASA Water Monitoring System employs bioluminescence and chemiluminescence techniques to rapidly measure microbe contamination of water samples. System eliminates standard laboratory procedures requiring time duration of 24 hours or longer.

  15. Ultrasound mediated gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Rene G.; Apfel, Robert E.; Brandsma, Janet L.

    2002-05-01

    Gene therapy is a promising modality for the treatment of a variety of human diseases both inherited and acquired, such as cystic fibrosis and cancer. The lack of an effective, safe method for the delivery of foreign genes into the cells, a process known as transfection, limits this effort. Ultrasound mediated gene transfection is an attractive method for gene delivery since it is a noninvasive technique, does not introduce any viral particles into the host and can offer very good temporal and spatial control. Previous investigators have shown that sonication increases transfection efficiency with and without ultrasound contrast agents. The mechanism is believed to be via a cavitation process where collapsing bubble nuclei permeabilize the cell membrane leading to increased DNA transfer. The research is focused on the use of pulsed wave high frequency focused ultrasound to transfect DNA into mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo. A better understanding of the mechanism behind the transfection process is also sought. A summary of some in vitro results to date will be presented, which includes the design of a sonication chamber that allows us to model the in vivo case more accurately.

  16. Graphene based gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Liangzhu; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Zhuang

    2011-03-01

    Graphene as a star in materials research has been attracting tremendous attentions in the past few years in various fields including biomedicine. In this work, for the first time we successfully use graphene as a non-toxic nano-vehicle for efficient gene transfection. Graphene oxide (GO) is bound with cationic polymers, polyethyleneimine (PEI) with two different molecular weights at 1.2 kDa and 10 kDa, forming GO-PEI-1.2k and GO-PEG-10k complexes, respectively, both of which are stable in physiological solutions. Cellular toxicity tests reveal that our GO-PEI-10k complex exhibits significantly reduced toxicity to the treated cells compared to the bare PEI-10k polymer. The positively charged GO-PEI complexes are able to further bind with plasmid DNA (pDNA) for intracellular transfection of the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene in HeLa cells. While EGFP transfection with PEI-1.2k appears to be ineffective, high EGFP expression is observed using the corresponding GO-PEI-1.2k as the transfection agent. On the other hand, GO-PEI-10k shows similar EGFP transfection efficiency but lower toxicity compared with PEI-10k. Our results suggest graphene to be a novel gene delivery nano-vector with low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency, promising for future applications in non-viral based gene therapy.Graphene as a star in materials research has been attracting tremendous attentions in the past few years in various fields including biomedicine. In this work, for the first time we successfully use graphene as a non-toxic nano-vehicle for efficient gene transfection. Graphene oxide (GO) is bound with cationic polymers, polyethyleneimine (PEI) with two different molecular weights at 1.2 kDa and 10 kDa, forming GO-PEI-1.2k and GO-PEG-10k complexes, respectively, both of which are stable in physiological solutions. Cellular toxicity tests reveal that our GO-PEI-10k complex exhibits significantly reduced toxicity to the treated cells compared to the bare PEI

  17. Engineering Bioluminescent Proteins: Expanding their Analytical Potential

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Laura; Dikici, Emre; Daunert, Sylvia

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Bioluminescence has been observed in nature since the dawn of time, but now, scientists are harnessing it for analytical applications. Laura Rowe, Emre Dikici, and Sylvia Daunert of the University of Kentucky describe the origins of bioluminescent proteins and explore their uses in the modern chemistry laboratory. The cover features spectra of bioluminescent light superimposed on an image of jellyfish, which are a common source of bioluminescent proteins. Images courtesy of Emre Dikici and Shutterstock. PMID:19725502

  18. Bioluminescence Imaging to Detect Late Stage Infection of African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Burrell-Saward, Hollie; Ward, Theresa H

    2016-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a multi-stage disease that manifests in two stages; an early blood stage and a late stage when the parasite invades the central nervous system (CNS). In vivo study of the late stage has been limited as traditional methodologies require the removal of the brain to determine the presence of the parasites. Bioluminescence imaging is a non-invasive, highly sensitive form of optical imaging that enables the visualization of a luciferase-transfected pathogen in real-time. By using a transfected trypanosome strain that has the ability to produce late stage disease in mice we are able to study the kinetics of a CNS infection in a single animal throughout the course of infection, as well as observe the movement and dissemination of a systemic infection. Here we describe a robust protocol to study CNS infections using a bioluminescence model of African trypanosomiasis, providing real time non-invasive observations which can be further analyzed with optional downstream approaches. PMID:27284970

  19. Stably stratified canopy flow in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Yi, C.; Kutter, E.

    2015-07-01

    Stably stratified canopy flow in complex terrain has been considered a difficult condition for measuring net ecosystem-atmosphere exchanges of carbon, water vapor, and energy. A long-standing advection error in eddy-flux measurements is caused by stably stratified canopy flow. Such a condition with strong thermal gradient and less turbulent air is also difficult for modeling. To understand the challenging atmospheric condition for eddy-flux measurements, we use the renormalized group (RNG) k-ϵ turbulence model to investigate the main characteristics of stably stratified canopy flows in complex terrain. In this two-dimensional simulation, we imposed persistent constant heat flux at ground surface and linearly increasing cooling rate in the upper-canopy layer, vertically varying dissipative force from canopy drag elements, buoyancy forcing induced from thermal stratification and the hill terrain. These strong boundary effects keep nonlinearity in the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations high enough to generate turbulent behavior. The fundamental characteristics of nighttime canopy flow over complex terrain measured by the small number of available multi-tower advection experiments can be reproduced by this numerical simulation, such as (1) unstable layer in the canopy and super-stable layers associated with flow decoupling in deep canopy and near the top of canopy; (2) sub-canopy drainage flow and drainage flow near the top of canopy in calm night; (3) upward momentum transfer in canopy, downward heat transfer in upper canopy and upward heat transfer in deep canopy; and (4) large buoyancy suppression and weak shear production in strong stability.

  20. Stably stratified canopy flow in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Yi, C.; Kutter, E.

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of stably stratified canopy flows in complex terrain are investigated by employing the Renormalized Group (RNG) k-ɛ turbulence model. In this two-dimensional simulation, we imposed persistent constant heat flux at ground surface and linearly increasing cooling rate in the upper canopy layer, vertically varying dissipative force from canopy drag elements, buoyancy forcing induced from thermal stratification and the hill terrain. These strong boundary effects keep nonlinearity in the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations high enough to generate turbulent behavior. The fundamental characteristics of nighttime canopy flow over complex terrain measured by a few multi-tower advection experiments can be produced by this numerical simulation, such as: (1) unstable layer in the canopy, (2) super-stable layer associated with flow decoupling in deep canopy and near the top of canopy, (3) upward momentum transfer in canopy, and (4) large buoyancy suppression and weak shear production in strong stability.

  1. Plasma-mediated transfection of RPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, D.; Chalberg, T.; Vankov, A.; Huie, P.; Molnar, F. E.; Butterwick, A.; Calos, M.; Marmor, M.; Blumenkranz, M. S.

    2006-02-01

    A major obstacle in applying gene therapy to clinical practice is the lack of efficient and safe gene delivery techniques. Viral delivery has encountered a number of serious problems including immunological reactions and malignancy. Non-viral delivery methods (liposomes, sonoporation and electroporation) have either low efficiency in-vivo or produce severe collateral damage to ocular tissues. We discovered that tensile stress greatly increases the susceptibility of cellular membranes to electroporation. For synchronous application of electric field and mechanical stress, both are generated by the electric discharge itself. A pressure wave is produced by rapid vaporization of the medium. To prevent termination of electric current by the vapor cavity it is ionized thus restoring its electric conductivity. For in-vivo experiments with rabbits a plasmid DNA was injected into the subretinal space, and RPE was treated trans-sclerally with an array of microelectodes placed outside the eye. Application of 250-300V and 100-200 μs biphasic pulses via a microelectrode array resulted in efficient transfection of RPE without visible damage to the retina. Gene expression was quantified and monitored using bioluminescence (luciferase) and fluorescence (GFP) imaging. Transfection efficiency of RPE with this new technique exceeded that of standard electroporation by a factor 10,000. Safe and effective non-viral DNA delivery to the mammalian retina may help to materialize the enormous potential of the ocular gene therapy. Future experiments will focus on continued characterization of the safety and efficacy of this method and evaluation of long-term transgene expression in the presence of phiC31 integrase.

  2. Luciferase expression and bioluminescence does not affect tumor cell growth in vitro or in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tiffen, Jessamy C; Bailey, Charles G; Ng, Cynthia; Rasko, John E J; Holst, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Live animal imaging is becoming an increasingly common technique for accurate and quantitative assessment of tumor burden over time. Bioluminescence imaging systems rely on a bioluminescent signal from tumor cells, typically generated from expression of the firefly luciferase gene. However, previous reports have suggested that either a high level of luciferase or the resultant light reaction produced upon addition of D-luciferin substrate can have a negative influence on tumor cell growth. To address this issue, we designed an expression vector that allows simultaneous fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), we generated clonal cell populations from a human breast cancer (MCF-7) and a mouse melanoma (B16-F10) cell line that stably expressed different levels of luciferase. We then compared the growth capabilities of these clones in vitro by MTT proliferation assay and in vivo by bioluminescence imaging of tumor growth in live mice. Surprisingly, we found that neither the amount of luciferase nor biophotonic activity was sufficient to inhibit tumor cell growth, in vitro or in vivo. These results suggest that luciferase toxicity is not a necessary consideration when designing bioluminescence experiments, and therefore our approach can be used to rapidly generate high levels of luciferase expression for sensitive imaging experiments. PMID:21092230

  3. Bioluminescence imaging in live cells and animals.

    PubMed

    Tung, Jack K; Berglund, Ken; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Hochgeschwender, Ute; Gross, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    The use of bioluminescent reporters in neuroscience research continues to grow at a rapid pace as their applications and unique advantages over conventional fluorescent reporters become more appreciated. Here, we describe practical methods and principles for detecting and imaging bioluminescence from live cells and animals. We systematically tested various components of our conventional fluorescence microscope to optimize it for long-term bioluminescence imaging. High-resolution bioluminescence images from live neurons were obtained with our microscope setup, which could be continuously captured for several hours with no signs of phototoxicity. Bioluminescence from the mouse brain was also imaged noninvasively through the intact skull with a conventional luminescence imager. These methods demonstrate how bioluminescence can be routinely detected and measured from live cells and animals in a cost-effective way with common reagents and equipment. PMID:27226972

  4. Bioluminescence under static magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.; Ueno, S.

    1998-06-01

    In the present study, the effect of magnetic fields on the emission of light by a living system was studied. The fireflies Hotaria parvula and Luciola cruciata were used as the bioluminescence systems. The firefly light organ was fixed at the edge of an optical fiber. The emitted light was introduced into a single-channel photon-counting system using an optical fiber. We measured both the spectrum of a constant light emission and, the time course of bioluminescence pulses. Two horizontal-type superconducting magnets, which produced 8 and 14 T magnetic fields at their center, were used as the magnetic-field generators. We also carried out an in vitro study of bioluminescence. The enzymatic activity of luciferase was measured under a 14 T magnetic field. We measured emission spectra of bioluminescence over the interval 500-600 nm at 25 °C in a stable emission state. It was observed that the peak wavelength around 550 nm shifted to 560 nm under a 14 T magnetic field. However, the effects of magnetic fields were not significant. Also, we measured the time course of emissions at 550 nm in a transient emission state. The rate in the light intensity under a 14 T magnetic field increased compared to the control. There is a possibility that the change in the emission intensities under a magnetic field is related to a change in the biochemical systems of the firefly, such as the enzymatic process of luciferase and the excited singlet state with subsequent light emission.

  5. Microbiological assay using bioluminescent organism

    SciTech Connect

    Stiffey, A.V.

    1987-12-21

    This invention relates to testing processes for toxicity involving microorganisms and, more particularly, to testing processes for toxicity involving bioluminescent organisms. The present known method of testing oil-well drilling fluids for toxicity employs the mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia) as the assay organism. The shrimp are difficult to raise and handle as laboratory assay organisms. This method is labor-intensive, because it requires a assay time of about 96 hours. Summary of the Invention: A microbiological assay in which the assay organism is the dinoflagellate, Pyrocystis lunula. A sample of a substance to be assayed is added to known numbers of the bioluminescent dinoflagellate and the mixture is agitated to subject the organisms to a shear stress causing them to emit light. The amount of light emitted is measured and compared with the amount of light emitted by a known non-toxic control mixture to determine if there is diminution or non-diminution of light emitted by the sample under test which is an indication of the presence or absence of toxicity, respectively. Accordingly, an object of the present invention is the provision of an improved method of testing substances for toxicity. A further object of the invention is the provision of an improved method of testing oil-well drilling fluids for toxicity using bioluminescent dinoflagellate (Pyrocystis lunula).

  6. Energy transfer in stably stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yoshifumi; Herring, Jackson

    2015-11-01

    Energy transfer in forced stable stratified turbulence is investigated using pseudo-spectral DNS of the Navier-Stokes equations under the Boussinesq approximation with 10243 grid points. Making use of the Craya-Herring decomposition, the velocity field is decomposed into vortex (Φ1) and wave (Φ2) modes. To understand the anisotropy of stably stratified turbulence, the energy flues in terms of the spherical, the horizontal and the vertical wave numbers, are investigated for the total kinetic, Φ1, Φ2 energies, respectively. Among the three fluxes, the spherical and the horizontal look similar for strong stratification, and Φ1 flux shows a wave number region of constant value, which implies Kolmogorov's inertial range. The corresponding spectral power are, however, k - 5 / 2 for the spherical and k⊥- 5 / 3 for the horizontal cases. In contrast to these, the vertical energy fluxes show completely different features. We have observed the saturation spectrum E (kz) ~ CN2kz-3 for strong stratification as before, but the mechanism to produce this spectrum seems different from the Kolmogorov picture.

  7. Stably trapped proton limits for Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, C.

    1972-01-01

    A general introduction to pitch-angle diffusion for Earth and Jupiter magnetospheres is given. The instabilities which might limit the trapped fluxes in the earth magnetosphere are identified as the interchange or ballooning mode, electrostatic loss cone modes, and electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave. The instability theory of the ion cyclotron wave is discussed. This wave can be unstable only if protons can be in cyclotron resonance with the wave. The instability growth rate is proportional to the cyclotron frequency, the fractional number density of fast particles, and the anisotropy of the fast particle distribution. The critical proton energy is the lowest energy for which the stably trapped limit applies, and is calculated to be 150 MeV at L = 2 and for 10 ion pairs/cu cm. Particles above the critical threshold energy are considered and their stability limit is approximately 3 x 10 to the 10th power/sq cm/sec divided by L to the 4th power.

  8. Migration of Adipose-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Stably Expressing Chondroitinase ABC In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian-Huang; Li, Miao; Liang, Yan; Lu, Tao; Duan, Chun-Yue

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several studies have revealed that adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) can be used as seed cells for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) decomposes chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in the glial scar that forms following SCI, allowing stem cells to penetrate through the scar and promote recovery of nerve function. This study aimed to establish ADSCs that stably express ChABC (ChABC-ADSCs) and evaluate the migratory capability of ChABC-ADSCs in vitro. Methods: ADSCs were obtained from Sprague-Dawley rats using secondary collagenase digestion. Their phenotypes were characterized using flow cytometry detection of cell surface antigens and their stem cell properties were confirmed by induction of differentiation. After successful culture, ADSCs were transfected with lentiviral vectors and ChABC-ADSCs were obtained. Proliferation curves of ChABC-ADSCs were determined using the Cell Counting Kit-8 method, ChABC expression was verified using Western blotting, and the migration of ChABC-ADSCs was analyzed using the transwell assay. Results: Secondary collagenase digestion increased the isolation efficiency of primary ADSCs. Following transfection using lentiviral vectors, the proliferation of ChABC-ADSCs was reduced in comparison with control ADSCs at 48 h (P < 0.05). And the level of ChABC expression in the ChABC-ADSC group was significantly higher than that of the ADSC group (P < 0.05). Moreover, ChABC-ADSC migration in matrigel was significantly enhanced in comparison with the control (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Secondary collagenase digestion can be used to effectively isolate ADSCs. ChABC-ADSCs constructed using lentiviral vector transfection stably express ChABC, and ChABC expression significantly enhances the migratory capacity of ADSCs. PMID:27364797

  9. Intracranial implantation with subsequent 3D in vivo bioluminescent imaging of murine gliomas.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, Mohammed G; Sankar, Tejas; Preul, Mark C; Scheck, Adrienne C

    2011-01-01

    The mouse glioma 261 (GL261) is recognized as an in vivo model system that recapitulates many of the features of human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The cell line was originally induced by intracranial injection of 3-methyl-cholantrene into a C57BL/6 syngeneic mouse strain (1); therefore, immunologically competent C57BL/6 mice can be used. While we use GL261, the following protocol can be used for the implantation and monitoring of any intracranial mouse tumor model. GL261 cells were engineered to stably express firefly luciferase (GL261-luc). We also created the brighter GL261-luc2 cell line by stable transfection of the luc2 gene expressed from the CMV promoter. C57BL/6-cBrd/cBrd/Cr mice (albino variant of C57BL/6) from the National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD were used to eliminate the light attenuation caused by black skin and fur. With the use of albino C57BL/6 mice; in vivo imaging using the IVIS Spectrum in vivo imaging system is possible from the day of implantation (Caliper Life Sciences, Hopkinton, MA). The GL261-luc and GL261-luc2 cell lines showed the same in vivo behavior as the parental GL261 cells. Some of the shared histological features present in human GBMs and this mouse model include: tumor necrosis, pseudopalisades, neovascularization, invasion, hypercellularity, and inflammation (1). Prior to implantation animals were anesthetized by an intraperitoneal injection of ketamine (50 mg/kg), xylazine (5 mg/kg) and buprenorphine (0.05 mg/kg), placed in a stereotactic apparatus and an incision was made with a scalpel over the cranial midline. A burrhole was made 0.1 mm posterior to the bregma and 2.3mm to the right of the midline. A needle was inserted to a depth of 3mm and withdrawn 0.4 mm to a depth of 2.6 mm. Two μl of GL261-luc or GL261-luc2 cells (10(7) cells/ml) were infused over the course of 3 minutes. The burrhole was closed with bonewax and the incision was sutured. Following stereotactic implantation the bioluminescent cells are

  10. Transfection of Platyhelminthes

    PubMed Central

    Moguel, Bárbara; Bobes, Raúl J.; Carrero, Julio C.; Laclette, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Flatworms are one of the most diverse groups within Lophotrochozoa with more than 20,000 known species, distributed worldwide in different ecosystems, from the free-living organisms in the seas and lakes to highly specialized parasites living in a variety of hosts, including humans. Several infections caused by flatworms are considered major neglected diseases affecting countries in the Americas, Asia, and Africa. For several decades, a particular interest on free-living flatworms was due to their ability to regenerate considerable portions of the body, implying the presence of germ cells that could be important for medicine. The relevance of reverse genetics for this group is clear; understanding the phenotypic characteristics of specific genes will shed light on developmental traits of free-living and parasite worms. The genetic manipulation of flatworms will allow learning more about the mechanisms for tissue regeneration, designing new and more effective anthelmintic drugs, and explaining the host-parasite molecular crosstalk so far partially inaccessible for experimentation. In this review, availability of transfection techniques is analyzed across flatworms, from the initial transient achievements to the stable manipulations now developed for free-living and parasite species. PMID:26090388

  11. REVIEW OF ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS OF BIOLUMINESCENCE MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review of the recent literature on environmental applications of bioluminescence systems will focus on in vivo and in vitro bioluminescence methods that have been utilized to elucidate properties of chemicals, toxic and mutagenic effects, and to estimate biomass. he unifying...

  12. Assessing laser-tissue damage with bioluminescent imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmink, Gerald J.; Opalenik, Susan R.; Beckham, Josh T.; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Jansen, Eric D.

    2006-07-01

    Effective medical laser procedures are achieved by selecting laser parameters that minimize undesirable tissue damage. Traditionally, human subjects, animal models, and monolayer cell cultures have been used to study wound healing, tissue damage, and cellular effects of laser radiation. Each of these models has significant limitations, and consequently, a novel skin model is needed. To this end, a highly reproducible human skin model that enables noninvasive and longitudinal studies of gene expression was sought. In this study, we present an organotypic raft model (engineered skin) used in combination with bioluminescent imaging (BLI) techniques. The efficacy of the raft model was validated and characterized by investigating the role of heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) as a sensitive marker of thermal damage. The raft model consists of human cells incorporated into an extracellular matrix. The raft cultures were transfected with an adenovirus containing a murine hsp70 promoter driving transcription of luciferase. The model enables quantitative analysis of spatiotemporal expression of proteins using BLI. Thermal stress was induced on the raft cultures by means of a constant temperature water bath or with a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser (λ=10.6 µm, 0.679 to 2.262 W/cm2, cw, unfocused Gaussian beam, ωL=4.5 mm, 1 min exposure). The bioluminescence was monitored noninvasively with an IVIS 100 Bioluminescent Imaging System. BLI indicated that peak hsp70 expression occurs 4 to 12 h after exposure to thermal stress. A minimum irradiance of 0.679 W/cm2 activated the hsp70 response, and a higher irradiance of 2.262 W/cm2 was associated with a severe reduction in hsp70 response due to tissue ablation. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that hsp70 mRNA levels increased with prolonged heating exposures. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent protein assays confirmed that luciferase was an accurate surrogate for hsp70 intracellular protein levels. Hematoxylin and

  13. Bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuits (BBICs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Michael L.; Sayler, Gary S.; Nivens, David; Ripp, Steve; Paulus, Michael J.; Jellison, Gerald E.

    1998-07-01

    As the workhorse of the integrated circuit (IC) industry, the capabilities of CMOS have been expanded well beyond the original applications. The full spectrum of analog circuits from switched-capacitor filters to microwave circuit blocks, and from general-purpose operational amplifiers to sub- nanosecond analog timing circuits for nuclear physics experiments have been implemented in CMOS. This technology has also made in-roads into the growing area of monolithic sensors with devices such as active-pixel sensors and other electro-optical detection devices. While many of the processes used for MEMS fabrication are not compatible with the CMOS IC process, depositing a sensor material onto a previously fabricated CMOS circuit can create a very useful category of sensors. In this work we report a chemical sensor composed of bioluminescent bioreporters (genetically engineered bacteria) deposited onto a micro-luminometer fabricated in a standard CMOS IC process. The bioreporter used for this work emitted 490-nm light when exposed to toluene. This luminescence was detected by the micro- luminometer giving an indication of the concentration of toluene. Other bioluminescent bioreporters sensitive to explosives, mercury, and other organic chemicals and heavy metals have been reported. These could be incorporated (individually or in combination) with the micro-luminometer reported here to form a variety of chemical sensors.

  14. Quick preparation of nanoluciferase-based tracers for novel bioluminescent receptor-binding assays of protein hormones: Using erythropoietin as a model.

    PubMed

    Song, Ge; Wu, Qing-Ping; Xu, Ting; Liu, Ya-Li; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Zhang, Shi-Fu; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2015-12-01

    Nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) is a newly developed small luciferase reporter with the so far brightest bioluminescence. In recent studies, we developed NanoLuc as an ultrasensitive probe for novel bioluminescent receptor-binding assays of some protein/peptide hormones. In the present study, we proposed a simple method for quick preparation of the NanoLuc-based protein tracers using erythropoietin (Epo) as a model. Epo is a glycosylated cytokine that promotes erythropoiesis by binding and activating the cell membrane receptor EpoR. For quick preparation of a bioluminescent Epo tracer, an Epo-Luc fusion protein carrying a NanoLuc-6 × His-tag at the C-terminus was secretorily overexpressed in transiently transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 T cells. The Epo-Luc fusion protein retained high-binding affinities with EpoR either overexpressed in HEK293T cells or endogenously expressed in mouse erythroleukemia cells, representing a novel ultrasensitive bioluminescent tracer for non-radioactive receptor-binding assays. Sufficient Epo-Luc tracer for thousands of assays could be quickly obtained within 2 days through simple transient transfection. Thus, our present work provided a simple method for quick preparation of novel NanoLuc-based bioluminescent tracers for Epo and some other protein hormones to facilitate their ligand-receptor interaction studies. PMID:26506452

  15. Spatial and Temporal Control of Cavitation Allows High In Vitro Transfection Efficiency in the Absence of Transfection Reagents or Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Chettab, Kamel; Roux, Stéphanie; Mathé, Doriane; Cros-Perrial, Emeline; Lafond, Maxime; Lafon, Cyril; Dumontet, Charles; Mestas, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Sonoporation using low-frequency high-pressure ultrasound (US) is a non-viral approach for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. In this study, we developed a new sonoporation device designed for spatial and temporal control of ultrasound cavitation. The regulation system incorporated in the device allowed a real-time control of the cavitation level during sonoporation. This device was evaluated for the in vitro transfection efficiency of a plasmid coding for Green Fluorescent Protein (pEGFP-C1) in adherent and non-adherent cell lines. The transfection efficiency of the device was compared to those observed with lipofection and nucleofection methods. In both adherent and non-adherent cell lines, the sonoporation device allowed high rate of transfection of pEGFP-C1 (40–80%), as determined by flow cytometry analysis of GFP expression, along with a low rate of mortality assessed by propidium iodide staining. The transfection efficiency and toxicity of sonoporation on the non-adherent cell lines Jurkat and K562 were similar to those of nucleofection, while these two cell lines were resistant to transfection by lipofection. Moreover, sonoporation was used to produce three stably transfected human lymphoma and leukemia lines. Significant transfection efficiency was also observed in two fresh samples of human acute myeloid leukemia cells. In conclusion, we developed a user-friendly and cost-effective ultrasound device, well adapted for routine in vitro high-yield transfection experiments and which does not require the use of any transfection reagent or gas micro-bubbles. PMID:26274324

  16. Analytical Applications of Bioluminescence and Chemiluminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W. (Editor); Picciolo, G. L. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Bioluminescence and chemiluminescence studies were used to measure the amount of adenosine triphosphate and therefore the amount of energy available. Firefly luciferase - luciferin enzyme system was emphasized. Photometer designs are also considered.

  17. Repeated and Widespread Evolution of Bioluminescence in Marine Fishes.

    PubMed

    Davis, Matthew P; Sparks, John S; Smith, W Leo

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence is primarily a marine phenomenon with 80% of metazoan bioluminescent genera occurring in the world's oceans. Here we show that bioluminescence has evolved repeatedly and is phylogenetically widespread across ray-finned fishes. We recover 27 independent evolutionary events of bioluminescence, all among marine fish lineages. This finding indicates that bioluminescence has evolved many more times than previously hypothesized across fishes and the tree of life. Our exploration of the macroevolutionary patterns of bioluminescent lineages indicates that the present day diversity of some inshore and deep-sea bioluminescent fish lineages that use bioluminescence for communication, feeding, and reproduction exhibit exceptional species richness given clade age. We show that exceptional species richness occurs particularly in deep-sea fishes with intrinsic bioluminescent systems and both shallow water and deep-sea lineages with luminescent systems used for communication. PMID:27276229

  18. Repeated and Widespread Evolution of Bioluminescence in Marine Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Matthew P.; Sparks, John S.; Smith, W. Leo

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence is primarily a marine phenomenon with 80% of metazoan bioluminescent genera occurring in the world’s oceans. Here we show that bioluminescence has evolved repeatedly and is phylogenetically widespread across ray-finned fishes. We recover 27 independent evolutionary events of bioluminescence, all among marine fish lineages. This finding indicates that bioluminescence has evolved many more times than previously hypothesized across fishes and the tree of life. Our exploration of the macroevolutionary patterns of bioluminescent lineages indicates that the present day diversity of some inshore and deep-sea bioluminescent fish lineages that use bioluminescence for communication, feeding, and reproduction exhibit exceptional species richness given clade age. We show that exceptional species richness occurs particularly in deep-sea fishes with intrinsic bioluminescent systems and both shallow water and deep-sea lineages with luminescent systems used for communication. PMID:27276229

  19. Circadian control sheds light on fungal bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Anderson G; Stevani, Cassius V; Waldenmaier, Hans E; Viviani, Vadim; Emerson, Jillian M; Loros, Jennifer J; Dunlap, Jay C

    2015-03-30

    Bioluminescence, the creation and emission of light by organisms, affords insight into the lives of organisms doing it. Luminous living things are widespread and access diverse mechanisms to generate and control luminescence [1-5]. Among the least studied bioluminescent organisms are phylogenetically rare fungi-only 71 species, all within the ∼ 9,000 fungi of the temperate and tropical Agaricales order-are reported from among ∼ 100,000 described fungal species [6, 7]. All require oxygen [8] and energy (NADH or NADPH) for bioluminescence and are reported to emit green light (λmax 530 nm) continuously, implying a metabolic function for bioluminescence, perhaps as a byproduct of oxidative metabolism in lignin degradation. Here, however, we report that bioluminescence from the mycelium of Neonothopanus gardneri is controlled by a temperature-compensated circadian clock, the result of cycles in content/activity of the luciferase, reductase, and luciferin that comprise the luminescent system. Because regulation implies an adaptive function for bioluminescence, a controversial question for more than two millennia [8-15], we examined interactions between luminescent fungi and insects [16]. Prosthetic acrylic resin "mushrooms," internally illuminated by a green LED emitting light similar to the bioluminescence, attract staphilinid rove beetles (coleopterans), as well as hemipterans (true bugs), dipterans (flies), and hymenopterans (wasps and ants), at numbers far greater than dark control traps. Thus, circadian control may optimize energy use for when bioluminescence is most visible, attracting insects that can in turn help in spore dispersal, thereby benefitting fungi growing under the forest canopy, where wind flow is greatly reduced. PMID:25802150

  20. Circadian Control Sheds Light on Fungal Bioluminescence

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Anderson G.; Stevani, Cassius V.; Waldenmaier, Hans E.; Viviani, Vadim; Emerson, Jillian M.; Loros, Jennifer J.; Dunlap, Jay C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bioluminescence, the creation and emission of light by organisms, affords insight into the lives of organisms doing it. Luminous living things are widespread and access diverse mechanisms to generate and control luminescence [1-5]. Among the least studied bioluminescent organisms are phylogenetically rare fungi – only 71 species, all within the ~9000 fungi of the temperate and tropical Agaricales Order - are reported from among ~100,000 described fungal species [6,7]. All require oxygen [8] and energy (NADH or NADPH) for bioluminescence, and are reported to emit green light (λmax 530 nm) continuously, implying a metabolic function for bioluminescence, perhaps as a by-product of oxidative metabolism in lignin degradation. Here, however, we report that bioluminescence from the mycelium of Neonothopanus gardneri is controlled by a temperature compensated circadian clock, the result of cycles in content/activity of the luciferase, reductase, and the luciferin that comprise the luminescent system. Because regulation implies an adaptive function for bioluminescence, a controversial question for more than two millenia [8-15], we examined interactions between luminescent fungi and insects [16]. Prosthetic acrylic resin “mushrooms”, internally illuminated by a green LED emitting light similar to the bioluminescence, attract staphilinid rove beetles (coleopterans) as well as hemipterans (true bugs), dipterans (flies), and hymenopterans (wasps and ants) at numbers far greater than dark control traps. Thus, circadian control may optimize energy use for when bioluminescence is most visible, attracting insects that can in turn help in spore dispersal, thereby benefitting fungi growing under the forest canopy where wind flow is greatly reduced. PMID:25802150

  1. Ecology of colors of firefly bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Lall, A.B.; Seliger, H.H.; Biggley, W.H.; Lloyd, J.E.

    1980-10-31

    Dark-active North American fireflies emit green bioluminescence and dusk-active species emit yellow, in general. Yellow light and yellow visual spectral sensitivity may be adaptations to increase the signal-to-noise (that is, foliage-reflected ambient light) ratio for sexual signaling during twilight. The peaks of the electroretinogram visual spectral sensitivities of four species tested, two dark- and two dusk-active, correspond with the peak of their bioluminescent emissions.

  2. Rapid obtention of stable, bioluminescent tumor cell lines using a tCD2-luciferase chimeric construct

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bioluminescent tumor cell lines are experimental tools of major importance for cancer investigation, especially imaging of tumors in xenografted animals. Stable expression of exogenous luciferase in tumor cells combined to systemic injection of luciferin provides an excellent signal/background ratio for external optical imaging. Therefore, there is a need to rationalize and speed up the production of luciferase-positive tumor cell lines representative of multiple tumor phenotypes. For this aim we have designed a fusion gene linking the luciferase 2 protein to the c-terminus of a truncated form of the rat CD2 protein (tCD2-luc2). To allow simultaneous assessment of the wild-type luciferase 2 in a context of tCD2 co-expression, we have made a bicistronic construct for concomitant but separate expression of these two proteins (luc2-IRES-tCD2). Both the mono- and bi-cistronic constructs were transduced in lymphoid and epithelial cells using lentiviral vectors. Results The tCD2-luc2 chimera behaves as a type I membrane protein with surface presentation of CD2 epitopes. One of these epitopes reacts with the OX34, a widely spread, high affinity monoclonal antibody. Stably transfected cells are sorted by flow cytometry on the basis of OX34 staining. In vitro and, moreover, in xenografted tumors, the tCD2-luc2 chimera retains a substantial and stable luciferase activity, although not as high as the wild-type luciferase expressed from the luc2-IRES-tCD2 construct. Expression of the tCD2-luc2 chimera does not harm cell and tumor growth. Conclusion Lentiviral transduction of the chimeric tCD2-luc2 fusion gene allows selection of cell clones with stable luciferase expression in less than seven days without antibiotic selection. We believe that it will be helpful to increase the number of tumor cell lines available for in vivo imaging and assessment of novel therapeutic modalities. On a longer term, the tCD2-luc2 chimera has the potential to be expressed from multi

  3. Integrated Electrowetting Nanoinjector for Single Cell Transfection

    PubMed Central

    Shekaramiz, Elaheh; Varadarajalu, Ganeshkumar; Day, Philip J.; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Single cell transfection techniques are essential to understand the heterogeneity between cells. We have developed an integrated electrowetting nanoinjector (INENI) to transfect single cells. The high transfection efficiency, controlled dosage delivery and ease of INENI fabrication promote the widespread application of the INENI in cell transfection assays. PMID:27374766

  4. Characterization of a Madin-Darby canine kidney cell line stably expressing TRPV5.

    PubMed

    den Dekker, Els; Schoeber, Joost; Topala, Catalin N; van de Graaf, Stan F J; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Bindels, René J M

    2005-07-01

    To provide a cell model for studying specifically the regulation of Ca2+ entry by the epithelial calcium channel transient receptor potential-vanilloid-5 (TRPV5), green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged TRPV5 was expressed stably in Madin-Darby canine kidney type I (MDCK) cells. The localization of GFP-TRPV5 in this cell line showed an intracellular granular distribution. Ca2+ uptake in GFP-TRPV5-MDCK cells cultured on plastic supports was threefold higher than in non-transfected cells. Moreover, apical Ca2+ uptake in GFP-TRPV5-MDCK cells cultured on permeable supports was eightfold higher than basolateral Ca2+ uptake, indicating that GFP-TRPV5 is expressed predominantly in the apical membrane. Patch-clamp analysis showed the presence of typical electrophysiological features of GFP-TRPV5, such as inwardly rectifying currents, inhibition by divalent cations and Ca2+-dependent inactivation. Moreover, the TRPV5 inhibitor ruthenium red completely inhibited Ca2+ uptake in GFP-TRPV5-MDCK cells, whereas Ca2+ uptake in non-transfected cells was not inhibited. The characterized GFP-TRPV5-MDCK cell line was used to assess the regulation of TRPV5. The protein kinase C activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and the cAMP-elevating compounds forskolin/3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, 8-Br-cAMP and PGE2 stimulated TRPV5 activity in GFP-TRPV5-MDCK cells by 121+/-7, 79+/-5, 55+/-4 and 61+/-7%, respectively. These compounds did not affect Ca2+ uptake in non-transfected cells. In conclusion, the GFP-TRPV5-MDCK cell line provides a model to specifically study the regulation of TRPV5 activity. PMID:15924239

  5. D-luciferin analogues: a multicolor toolbox for bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuan-Qiang; Liu, Jing; Wang, Pi; Zhang, Jingyu; Guo, Wei

    2012-08-20

    Colorful mixture: Three types of luciferin analogues, that is, alkylaminoluciferins, aminoselenoluciferin, and luciferins with a benzimidazole scaffold, have been reported. These analogues show excellent bioluminescent properties and great potential in bioluminescence imaging. PMID:22807027

  6. Fluorescent and Bioluminescent Reporter Myxoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Rostad, Christina A.; Currier, Michael C.; Moore, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of virus reverse genetics has enabled the incorporation of genetically encoded reporter proteins into replication-competent viruses. These reporters include fluorescent proteins which have intrinsic chromophores that absorb light and re-emit it at lower wavelengths, and bioluminescent proteins which are luciferase enzymes that react with substrates to produce visible light. The incorporation of these reporters into replication-competent viruses has revolutionized our understanding of molecular virology and aspects of viral tropism and transmission. Reporter viruses have also enabled the development of high-throughput assays to screen antiviral compounds and antibodies and to perform neutralization assays. However, there remain technical challenges with the design of replication-competent reporter viruses, and each reporter has unique advantages and disadvantages for specific applications. This review describes currently available reporters, design strategies for incorporating reporters into replication-competent paramyxoviruses and orthomyxoviruses, and the variety of applications for which these tools can be utilized both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27527209

  7. Fluorescent and Bioluminescent Reporter Myxoviruses.

    PubMed

    Rostad, Christina A; Currier, Michael C; Moore, Martin L

    2016-01-01

    The advent of virus reverse genetics has enabled the incorporation of genetically encoded reporter proteins into replication-competent viruses. These reporters include fluorescent proteins which have intrinsic chromophores that absorb light and re-emit it at lower wavelengths, and bioluminescent proteins which are luciferase enzymes that react with substrates to produce visible light. The incorporation of these reporters into replication-competent viruses has revolutionized our understanding of molecular virology and aspects of viral tropism and transmission. Reporter viruses have also enabled the development of high-throughput assays to screen antiviral compounds and antibodies and to perform neutralization assays. However, there remain technical challenges with the design of replication-competent reporter viruses, and each reporter has unique advantages and disadvantages for specific applications. This review describes currently available reporters, design strategies for incorporating reporters into replication-competent paramyxoviruses and orthomyxoviruses, and the variety of applications for which these tools can be utilized both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27527209

  8. Nanostructured bioluminescent sensor for rapidly detecting thrombin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Longyan; Bao, Yige; Denstedt, John; Zhang, Jin

    2016-03-15

    Thrombin plays a key role in thrombosis and hemostasis. The abnormal level of thrombin in body fluids may lead to different diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, glomerulonephritis, etc. Detection of thrombin level in blood and/or urine is one of important methods for medical diagnosis. Here, a bioluminescent sensor is developed for non-invasively and rapidly detecting thrombin in urine. The sensor is assembled through conjugating gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and a recombinant protein containing Renilla luciferase (pRluc) by a peptide, which is thrombin specific substrate. The luciferase-catalyzed bioluminescence can be quenched by peptide-conjugating Au NPs. In the presence of thrombin, the short peptide conjugating luciferase and Au NPs is digested and cut off, which results in the recovery of bioluminescence due to the release of luciferase from Au NPs. The bioluminescence intensity at 470 nm is observed, and increases with increasing concentration of thrombin. The bioluminescence intensity of this designed sensor is significantly recovered when the thrombin digestion time lasts for 10 min. In addition, a similar linear relationship between luminescence intensity and the concentration of thrombin is found in the range of 8 nM to 8 μM in both buffer and human urine spiked samples. The limit of detection is as low as 80 pM. It is anticipated that our nanosensor could be a promising tool for clinical diagnosis of thrombin in human urine. PMID:26397418

  9. Immobilized Bioluminescent Reagents in Flow Injection Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Abdul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Bioluminescent reactions exhibits two important characteristics from an analytical viewpoint; they are selective and highly sensitive. Furthermore, bioluminescent emissions are easily measured with a simple flow-through detector based on a photomultiplier tube and the rapid and reproducible mixing of sample and expensive reagent is best achieved by a flow injection manifold. The two most important bioluminescent systems are the enzyme (luciferase)/substrate (luciferin) combinations extracted from fireflies (Photinus pyralis) and marine bacteria (Virio harveyi) which requires ATP and NAD(P)H respectively as cofactors. Reactions that generate or consume these cofactors can also be coupled to the bioluminescent reaction to provide assays for a wide range of clinically important species. A flow injection manifold for the study of bioluminescent reactions is described, as are procedures for the extraction, purification and immobilization of firefly and bacterial luciferase and oxidoreductase. Results are presented for the determination of ATP using firefly system and the determination of other enzymes and substrates participating in ATP-converting reactions e.g. creatine kinase, ATP-sulphurylase, pyruvate kinase, creatine phosphate, pyrophosphate and phophoenolypyruvate. Similarly results are presented for the determination of NAD(P)H, FMN, FMNH_2 and several dehydrogenases which produce NAD(P)H and their substrates, e.g. alcohol, L-lactate, L-malate, L-glutamate, Glucose-6-phosphate and primary bile acid.

  10. Discovery of New Substrates for LuxAB Bacterial Bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tianyu; Wang, Weishan; Wu, Xingkang; Wu, Wenxiao; Bai, Haixiu; Ma, Zhao; Shen, Yuemao; Yang, Keqian; Li, Minyong

    2016-08-01

    In this article, four novel substrates with long halftime have been designed and synthesized successfully for luxAB bacterial bioluminescence. After in vitro and in vivo biological evaluation, these molecules can emit obvious bioluminescence emission with known bacterial luciferase, thus indicating a new promising approach to developing the bacterial bioluminescent system. PMID:26896339

  11. Optimisation of acquisition time in bioluminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Shelley L.; Mason, Suzannah K. G.; Glinton, Sophie; Cobbold, Mark; Styles, Iain B.; Dehghani, Hamid

    2015-03-01

    Decreasing the acquisition time in bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and bioluminescence tomography (BLT) will enable animals to be imaged within the window of stable emission of the bioluminescent source, a higher imaging throughput and minimisation of the time which an animal is anaesthetised. This work investigates, through simulation using a heterogeneous mouse model, two methods of decreasing acquisition time: 1. Imaging at fewer wavelengths (a reduction from five to three); and 2. Increasing the bandwidth of filters used for imaging. The results indicate that both methods are viable ways of decreasing the acquisition time without a loss in quantitative accuracy. Importantly, when choosing imaging wavelengths, the spectral attenuation of tissue and emission spectrum of the source must be considered, in order to choose wavelengths at which a high signal can be achieved. Additionally, when increasing the bandwidth of the filters used for imaging, the bandwidth must be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm.

  12. A Multichannel Bioluminescence Determination Platform for Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Bae; Naganawa, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    The present protocol introduces a multichannel bioluminescence determination platform allowing a high sample throughput determination of weak bioluminescence with reduced standard deviations. The platform is designed to carry a multichannel conveyer, an optical filter, and a mirror cap. The platform enables us to near-simultaneously determine ligands in multiple samples without the replacement of the sample tubes. Furthermore, the optical filters beneath the multichannel conveyer are designed to easily discriminate colors during assays. This optical system provides excellent time- and labor-efficiency to users during bioassays. PMID:27424912

  13. Transient transfection of purified Babesia bovis merozoites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transient transfection of intraerythrocytic Babesia bovis parasites has been previously reported. In this study, we describe the development and optimization of methods for transfection of purified B. bovis merozoites using either nucleofection (Amaxa) or conventional electroporation (Gene Pulser II...

  14. Eco-evo bioluminescence on land and in the sea.

    PubMed

    Oba, Yuichi; Schultz, Darrin T

    2014-01-01

    This review discusses the evolution of bioluminescence organisms that inhabit various environments based on the current understanding of their unique ecologies and biochemistries. As shown here, however, there are still many unanswered questions regarding the functions and mechanisms of bioluminescence, which should be investigated in further studies. To facilitate future research in this field, we introduce our recent attempt, the bioluminescent organism DNA barcode initiative. This genetic reference library will provide resources for other scientists to efficiently identify unstudied bioluminescent organisms, focus their biochemical and genetic research goals, and will generally promote bioluminescence as a field of scientific study. PMID:25084993

  15. The viral RNA-based transfection of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in the parasitic protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Ding, He; Zhang, Xinxin; Cao, Lili; Li, Jianhua; Gong, Pengtao; Li, He; Zhang, Guocai; Li, Shuhong; Zhang, Xichen

    2012-03-01

    Here we have developed methods to transiently and stably transfect the human pathogenic protist Trichomonas vaginalis. The viral RNA-based transfection vector pTVV-EGFP/NEO was constructed by using enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (EGFP) and neomycin resistance gene (NEO) in tandem to replace the whole gene encoding region of T. vaginalis virus (TVV). The in vitro transcripts of linearized pTVV-EGFP/NEO were electroporated into trophozoites and the transfectants transiently expressed EGFP after 16 h postincubation. Stable expression of EGFP was persistently detected by fluorescence microscopy and by RT-PCR in transfected trophozoites under G418 selection. Our study provides a novel and valuable approach for genetic study of T. vaginalis. PMID:21861063

  16. Bioluminescence for determining energy state of plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ching, T. M.

    1975-01-01

    Bioluminescence produced by the luciferin-luciferase system is a very sensitive assay for ATP content in extracts of plant materials. The ATP test for seed and pollen viability and vigor is presented, along with prediction of high growth potential and productivity in new crosses and selections of breeding materials. ATP as an indicator for environmental quality, stresses, and metabolic regulation is also considered.

  17. Bioluminescence lights the way to food safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovko, Lubov Y.; Griffiths, Mansel W.

    2003-07-01

    The food industry is increasingly adopting food safety and quality management systems that are more proactive and preventive than those used in the past which have tended to rely on end product testing and visual inspection. The regulatory agencies in many countries are promoting one such management tool, Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP), as a way to achieve a safer food supply and as a basis for harmonization of trading standards. Verification that the process is safe must involve microbiological testing but the results need not be generated in real-time. Of all the rapid microbiological tests currently available, the only ones that come close to offering real-time results are bioluminescence-based methods. Recent developments in application of bioluminescence for food safety issues are presented in the paper. These include the use of genetically engineered microorganisms with bioluminescent and fluorescent phenotypes as a real time indicator of physiological state and survival of food-borne pathogens in food and food processing environments as well as novel bioluminescent-based methods for rapid detection of pathogens in food and environmental samples. Advantages and pitfalls of the methods are discussed.

  18. Bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit detection methods

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Michael L.; Paulus, Michael J.; Sayler, Gary S.; Applegate, Bruce M.; Ripp, Steven A.

    2005-06-14

    Disclosed are monolithic bioelectronic devices comprising a bioreporter and an OASIC. These bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit are useful in detecting substances such as pollutants, explosives, and heavy-metals residing in inhospitable areas such as groundwater, industrial process vessels, and battlefields. Also disclosed are methods and apparatus for detection of particular analytes, including ammonia and estrogen compounds.

  19. Multicolor Bioluminescence Obtained Using Firefly Luciferin.

    PubMed

    Kiyama, Masahiro; Saito, Ryohei; Iwano, Satoshi; Obata, Rika; Niwa, Haruki; Maki, Shojiro A

    2016-01-01

    Firefly bioluminescence is widely used in life science research as a useful analysis tool. For example, the adenosine-5`-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent enzymatic firefly bioluminescence reaction has long been utilized as a microbial monitoring tool. Rapid and sensitive firefly luciferin-luciferase combinations are used not only to measure cell viability but also for reporter-gene assays. Recently, bioluminescence was utilized as a noninvasive, real-time imaging tool for living subjects to monitor cells and biological events. However, the number of commercialized luciferase genes is limited and tissue-permeable near-infrared (NIR) region emitting light is required for in vivo imaging. In this review, recent studies describing synthetic luciferin analogues predicted to have red-shifted bioluminescence are summarized. Luciferase substrates emitting red, green, and blue light that were designed and developed in our laboratory are presented. The longest emission wavelength of the synthesized luciferin analogues was recorded at 675 nm, which is within the NIR region. This compound is now commercially available as "Aka Lumine®". PMID:27072707

  20. Bubble stimulation efficiency of dinoflagellate bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Deane, Grant B; Stokes, M Dale; Latz, Michael I

    2016-02-01

    Dinoflagellate bioluminescence, a common source of bioluminescence in coastal waters, is stimulated by flow agitation. Although bubbles are anecdotally known to be stimulatory, the process has never been experimentally investigated. This study quantified the flash response of the bioluminescent dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum to stimulation by bubbles rising through still seawater. Cells were stimulated by isolated bubbles of 0.3-3 mm radii rising at their terminal velocity, and also by bubble clouds containing bubbles of 0.06-10 mm radii for different air flow rates. Stimulation efficiency, the proportion of cells producing a flash within the volume of water swept out by a rising bubble, decreased with decreasing bubble radius for radii less than approximately 1 mm. Bubbles smaller than a critical radius in the range 0.275-0.325 mm did not stimulate a flash response. The fraction of cells stimulated by bubble clouds was proportional to the volume of air in the bubble cloud, with lower stimulation levels observed for clouds with smaller bubbles. An empirical model for bubble cloud stimulation based on the isolated bubble observations successfully reproduced the observed stimulation by bubble clouds for low air flow rates. High air flow rates stimulated more light emission than expected, presumably because of additional fluid shear stress associated with collective buoyancy effects generated by the high air fraction bubble cloud. These results are relevant to bioluminescence stimulation by bubbles in two-phase flows, such as in ship wakes, breaking waves, and sparged bioreactors. PMID:26061152

  1. Wave motions in a stably-neutrally stratified ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznik, G. M.

    2015-11-01

    Wave spectrum of rotating stably-neutrally stratified fluid consisting of the stably stratified upper layer and the homogeneous lower one is studied. The density and other fields are assumed to be continuous at the interface between the layers. The study does not use the traditional (when the horizontal component of the Earth's rotation is neglected) and hydrostatic approximations. The spectrum is rather complicated and consists of the super-inertial internal waves, the sub-inertial gyroscopic waves, and the sub- and super-inertial internal inertio-gravity waves. In the long-wave approximation the internal and internal inertio-gravity waves span both the layers, whereas the gyroscopic waves are localized in the lower layer and are close to the inertial oscillations. The sub-inertial wave motions observed in the nearly barotropic deep Western Mediterranean can be related to the gyroscopic waves.

  2. Efficacy assessment of sustained intraperitoneal paclitaxel therapy in a murine model of ovarian cancer using bioluminescent imaging

    PubMed Central

    Vassileva, V; Moriyama, E H; De Souza, R; Grant, J; Allen, C J; Wilson, B C; Piquette-Miller, M

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the pre-clinical efficacy of a novel intraperitoneal (i.p.) sustained-release paclitaxel formulation (PTXePC) using bioluminescent imaging (BLI) in the treatment of ovarian cancer. Human ovarian carcinoma cells stably expressing the firefly luciferase gene (SKOV3Luc) were injected i.p. into SCID mice. Tumour growth was evaluated during sustained or intermittent courses of i.p. treatment with paclitaxel (PTX). In vitro bioluminescence strongly correlated with cell survival and cytotoxicity. Bioluminescent imaging detected tumours before their macroscopic appearance and strongly correlated with tumour weight and survival. As compared with intermittent therapy with Taxol®, sustained PTXePC therapy resulted in significant reduction of tumour proliferation, weight and BLI signal intensity, enhanced apoptosis and increased survival times. Our results demonstrate that BLI is a useful tool in the pre-clinical evaluation of therapeutic interventions for ovarian cancer. Moreover, these results provide evidence of enhanced therapeutic efficacy with the sustained PTXePC implant system, which could potentially translate into successful clinical outcomes. PMID:19034272

  3. Effects of AC/DC magnetic fields, frequency, and nanoparticle aspect ratio on cellular transfection of gene vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Kris; Mair, Lamar; Fisher, Mike; Rowshon Alam, Md.; Juliano, Rudolph; Superfine, Richard

    2008-10-01

    In order to make non-viral gene delivery a useful tool in the study and treatment of genetic disorders, it is imperative that these methodologies be further refined to yield optimal results. Transfection of magnetic nanoparticles and nanorods are used as non-viral gene vectors to transfect HeLa EGFP-654 cells that stably express a mutated enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene. We deliver antisense oligonucleotides to these cells designed to correct the aberrant splicing caused by the mutation in the EGFP gene. We also transfect human bronchial endothelial cells and immortalized WI-38 lung cells with pEGFP-N1 vectors. To achieve this we bind the genes to magnetic nanoparticles and nanorods and introduce magnetic fields to effect transfection. We wish to examine the effects of magnetic fields on the transfection of these particles and the benefits of using alternating (AC) magnetic fields in improving transfection rates over direct (DC) magnetic fields. We specifically look at the frequency dependence of the AC field and particle aspect ratio as it pertains to influencing transfection rate. We posit that the increase in angular momentum brought about by the AC field and the high aspect ratio of the nanorod particles, is vital to generating the force needed to move the particle through the cell membrane.

  4. Bioluminescence microscopy using a short focal-length imaging lens.

    PubMed

    Ogoh, K; Akiyoshi, R; May-Maw-Thet; Sugiyama, T; Dosaka, S; Hatta-Ohashi, Y; Suzuki, H

    2014-03-01

    Bioluminescence from cells is so dim that bioluminescence microscopy is performed using an ultra low-light imaging camera. Although the image sensor of such cameras has been greatly improved over time, such improvements have not been made commercially available for microscopes until now. Here, we customized the optical system of a microscope for bioluminescence imaging. As a result, bioluminescence images of cells could be captured with a conventional objective lens and colour imaging camera. As bioluminescence microscopy requires no excitation light, it lacks the photo-toxicity associated with fluorescence imaging and permits the long-term, nonlethal observation of living cells. Thus, bioluminescence microscopy would be a powerful tool in cellular biology that complements fluorescence microscopy. PMID:24386879

  5. Transfection in the third dimension

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Anandika; Oshita, Victor; Segura, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of parameters that modulate gene transfer in 3-D will assist in the formation of gene delivery systems and scaffolds, which can mediate efficient non-viral delivery for guiding in-vivo tissue regeneration and therapy. We have previously demonstrated the cell area and length, integrin expression, and RhoGTPases mediated signalling to be pivotal parameters that guide gene transfer to mouse mesenchymal stem cells (mMSCs) cultured in 2-D and are modulated by ECM proteins. In this study, we were interested in determining if cationic polymer mediated gene transfer to cells seeded in 3-D would occur through different mechanisms as compared to 2-D. In particular, we examined the endocytosis pathways used to internalize polyplexes, and the role of cytoskeletal dynamics and RhoGTPases on non-viral gene transfer for cells seeded in 2-D and 3-D. Inhibition of clathrin- and caveolae- mediated endocytosis resulted in more drastic decrease in overall transgene expression for cells seeded in 3-D than those in 2-D. In addition, polyplex internalization was only significantly decreased in 3-D when clathrin-mediated endocytosis was inhibited, while caveolae-mediated endocytosis inhibition for cells seeded in 2-D resulted in the strongest polyplex internalization inhibition. Actin and microtubule polymerization affected 2-D and 3-D transfection differently. Microtubule depolymerization enhanced transgene expression in 2-D, but inhibited transgene expression in 3-D. Last, inhibition of RhoGTPases also affected 2-D and 3-D transfection differently. The inhibition of ROCK effector resulted in a decrease of transgene expression and internalization for cells seeded in 3-D, but not 2-D and the inhibition of effector PAK1 resulted in an increase of transgene expression for both 2-D and 3-D. Overall, our study suggests that the process of gene transfer occurs through different mechanisms for cells seeded in 2-D compared to those seeded in 3-D. PMID:23929354

  6. Bioluminescent Probe for Detecting Mercury(II) in Living Mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tianyu; Ke, Bowen; Chen, Hui; Wang, Weishan; Du, Lupei; Yang, Keqian; Li, Minyong

    2016-08-01

    A novel bioluminescence probe for mercury(II) was obtained on the basis of the distinct deprotection reaction of dithioacetal to decanal, so as to display suitable sensitivity and selectivity toward mercury(II) over other ions with bacterial bioluminescence signal. These experimental results indicated such a probe was a novel promising method for mercury(II) bioluminescence imaging in environmental and life sciences ex vivo and in vivo. PMID:27412583

  7. Cloning and characterization of new bioluminescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szent-Gyorgyi, Christopher; Ballou, Byron T.; Dagnal, Erich; Bryan, Bruce

    1999-07-01

    Over the past two years Prolume has undertaken a comprehensive program to clone luciferases and associated 'green fluorescent proteins' (GFPs) from marine animals that use coelenterazine as the luciferin. To data we have cloned several bioluminescent proteins, including two novel copepod luciferases and two anthozoan GFPs. These four proteins have sequences that differ greatly form previously cloned analogous proteins; the sequence diversity apparently is due to independent evolutionary origins and unusual evolutionary constraints. Thus coelenterazine-based bioluminescent systems may also manifest a variety of useful properties. We discuss form this taxonomic perspective the initial biochemical and spectral characterization of our cloned proteins. Emphasis is placed on the anthozoan luciferase-GFP systems, whose efficient resonance energy transfer has elicited much current interest.

  8. Practical enzymology course based on bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Kratasyuk, V A; Kudinova, I Y

    1999-01-01

    We describe our experience with laboratory courses in enzymology based on the phenomenon of bioluminescence. The soluble and immobilized enzymes of luminous bacteria are used and the practical enzymological course consists of four main courses: (1) training in measuring the activities of soluble and immobilized enzymes; (2) the investigation of kinetic characteristics (kinetic constants) and enzyme-substrate and enzyme-inhibitor interactions in the bacterial bioluminescent reaction; (3) The testing of physico-chemical characteristics of enzymes (pH, temperature, ion strength, etc.); (4) the effect of inhibitors on enzymes. Training is possible in groups of about ten persons. Our practice work has been introduced in the biological, pedagogical and physical departments of Krasnoyarsk State University. Students of the pedagogical department have created a popular and interesting series of laboratory works for high school children aged 14-17 years. PMID:10441047

  9. Normal Expression of a Rearranged and Mutated c-myc Oncogene after Transfection into Fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Adam; Hayday, Adrian

    1989-10-01

    Expression of the c-myc oncogene is deregulated in a variety of malignancies. Rearrangement and mutation of the c-myc locus is a characteristic feature of human Burkitt's lymphoma. Whether deregulation is solely a result of mutation of c-myc or whether it is influenced by the transformed B cell context has not been determined. A translocated and mutated allele of c-myc was stably transfected into fibroblasts. The rearranged allele was expressed indistinguishably from a normal c-myc gene: it had serum-regulated expression, was transcribed with normal promoter preference, and was strongly attenuated. Thus mutations by themselves are insufficient to deregulate c-myc transcription.

  10. Transformation Experiment Using Bioluminescence Genes of "Vibrio fischeri."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slock, James

    1995-01-01

    Bioluminescence transformation experiments show students the excitement and power of recombinant DNA technology. This laboratory experiment utilizes two plasmids of "Vibrio fischeri" in a transformation experiment. (LZ)

  11. Energy spectrum of stably-stratified and convective turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Mahendra; Kumar, Abhishek

    2015-11-01

    In the inertial range of fluid turbulence, the energy flux is constant, while the energy spectrum scales as k - 5 / 3 (k=wavenumber). The buoyancy however could change the phenomenology dramatically. Bolgiano and Obukhov (1959) had conjectured that stably stratified flows (as in atmosphere) exhibits a decrease in the energy flux as k - 4 / 5 due to the conversion of kinetic energy to the potential energy, consequently, the energy spectrum scales as k - 11 / 5. We show using detailed numerical analysis that the stably stratified flows indeed exhibit k - 11 / 5 energy spectrum for Froude numbers Fr near unity. The flow becomes anisotropic for small Froude numbers. For weaker buoyancy (large Fr), the kinetic energy follows Kolmogorov's spectrum with a constant energy flux. However, in convective turbulence, the energy flux is a nondecreasing function of wavenumber since the buoyancy feeds positively into the kinetic energy. Hence, the kinetic energy spectrum is Kolmogorov-like (k - 5 / 3) or shallower. We also demonstrate the above scaling using a shell model of buoyancy-driven turbulence.

  12. TRANSFECTION OF INSECT CELL LINES USING POLYETHYLENIMINE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect cell lines have been widely used in recombinant baculovirus expression systems and transient gene expression studies. Critical to these applications have been the transfection of foreign DNA. This has been widely done using labor intensive and cytotoxic liposome-based transfection reagents....

  13. Nerve growth factor (NGF) induces neuronal differentiation in neuroblastoma cells transfected with the NGF receptor cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushima, H.; Bogenmann, E. )

    1990-09-01

    Human nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor (NGFR) cDNA was transfected into a neuroblastoma cell line (HTLA 230) which does not express a functional NGF-NGFR signal transduction cascade. Short-term treatment of stably transfected cells (98-3) expressing membrane-bound NGF receptor molecules resulted in a cell cycle-dependent, transient expression of the c-fos gene upon treatment with NGF, suggesting the presence of functional high-affinity NGFR. Extensive outgrowth of neurites and cessation of DNA synthesis occurred in transfectants grown on an extracellular matrix after long-term treatment with NGF, suggesting terminal differentiation. Our data support the idea that introduction of a constitutively expressed NGFR cDNA into cells with neuronal background results in the assembly of a functional NGF-NGFR signal cascade in a permissive extracellular environment.

  14. Transfected Type II Interleukin-1 Receptor Impairs Responsiveness of Human Keratinocytes to Interleukin-1

    PubMed Central

    Bossú, Paola; Visconti, Ugo; Ruggiero, Paolo; Macchia, Giovanni; Muda, Marco; Bertini, Riccardo; Bizzarri, Cinzia; Colagrande, Antonella; Sabbatini, Vilma; Maurizi, Giovanni; Del Grosso, Egidio; Tagliabue, Aldo; Boraschi, Diana

    1995-01-01

    Of the two known types of specific receptors for interleukin (IL)-1, the function of the type II IL-1 receptor (IL-IRII) is stil elusive. IL-1RII, is alleg-edly devoid of signaling capacity and is therefore thought to act by trapping and inbibiting IL-1. To directly assess the functional role of IL-1RII, a human keratinocyte cell line has been stably transfected with a cDNA coding for IL-1RII, and its responsiveness to IL-1 has been compared with that of nontransfected cells. Parental cells express IL-1RI and are responsive to low doses of IL-1, whereas transfected cells overexpress IL-1RII, both in its membrane and soluble form, and show a dramatically impaired response to IL-1. Selective block of IL-1RII restores the ability of transfected keratinocytes to respond to IL-1, indicating that the overexpressed IL-1RII, is in fact uniquely responsible for their refractori-ness to IL-1. The main mechanism of unrespon-siveness in transfected keratinocytes appears to be the capture and neutralization of IL-1 by the soluble form of IL-1RII. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:7495308

  15. Detection of ATP and NADH: A Bioluminescent Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selig, Ted C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Described is a bioluminescent assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and reduced nicotineamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH) that meets the requirements of an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. The 3-hour experiment provides students with experience in bioluminescence and analytical biochemistry yet requires limited instrumentation,…

  16. Single-cell bioluminescence and GFP in biofilm research

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.J. Jr, Sayler, G., White, D.C.; Phiefer, C.

    1996-12-31

    Using flow cells and a combination of microscopy techniques, we can unequivocally identify single bacterial cells that express bioluminescent and fluorescent bioreporters. We have shown that, for attached cells, bioluminescence output within a bacterial strain can vary greatly from cell to cell.

  17. A REVIEW OF ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS OF BIOLUMINESCENCE MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review of the recent literature on environmental applications of bioluminescence systems will focus on in vivo and in vitro bioluminescence methods that have been utilized to elucidate properties of chemicals, toxic and mutagenic effects, and to estimate biomass. The unifyin...

  18. Asymptotically reduced equations for rapidly rotating and stably stratified flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves, David; Julien, Keith

    2015-11-01

    Observations by van Haren & Millot (2005) of the deep Western Mediterranean Sea and by Timmermans et al. (2006) of the deep Canadian Basin find vertical fluid motions to be as significant as horizontal motions for ocean dynamics. Since the classical quasi-geostrophic equations do not allow for such vertical motions reduced equations for geostrophically balanced flow with O(1) vertical motions are presented alongside their numerical solutions and results. The reduced equations describe flow constrained by rapid rotation and stable stratification and, in fact, are the stably stratified counterpart to the reduced equations used by Julien et al. in successful studies of rapidly rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection. Specifically, the equations are valid in the small Rossby number (Ro 1) and O(1) Froude number limit. The focus here is a comparison to similar studies of rotating and stratified flow by Smith & Waleffe (2002), Wingate et al. (2011), and Marino et al. (2013) among others.

  19. Stably maintained dendritic spines are associated with lifelong memories

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Pan, Feng; Gan, Wen-Biao

    2016-01-01

    Changes in synaptic connections are considered essential for learning and memory formation1–6. However, it is unknown how neural circuits undergo continuous synaptic changes during learning while maintaining lifelong memories. Here we show, by following postsynaptic dendritic spines over time in the mouse cortex7–8, that learning and novel sensory experience lead to spine formation and elimination by a protracted process. The extent of spine remodelling correlates with behavioural improvement after learning, suggesting a crucial role of synaptic structural plasticity in memory formation and storage. Importantly, a small fraction of new spines induced by novel experience, together with most spines formed early during development and surviving experience-dependent elimination, are preserved throughout the entire life of an animal. These studies indicate that learning and daily sensory experience leave minute but permanent marks on cortical connections and suggest that lifelong memories are stored in largely stably connected synaptic networks. PMID:19946265

  20. Bioluminescence in the high Arctic during the polar night.

    PubMed

    Berge, J; Båtnes, A S; Johnsen, G; Blackwell, S M; Moline, M A

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the composition and activity of the planktonic community during the polar night in the high Arctic Kongsfjord, Svalbard. Our results are the first published evidence of bioluminescence among zooplankton during the Arctic polar night. The observations were collected by a bathyphotometer detecting bioluminescence, integrated into an autonomous underwater vehicle, to determine the concentration and intensity of bioluminescent flashes as a function of time of day and depth. To further understand community dynamics and composition, plankton nets were used to collect organisms passing through the bathyphotometer along with traditional vertical net tows. Additionally, using a moored bathyphotometer closed to the sampling site, the bioluminescence potential itself was shown not to have a diurnal or circadian rhythm. Rather, our results provide evidence for a diel vertical migration of bioluminescent zooplankton that does not correspond to any externally detectable changes in illumination. PMID:24489409

  1. Lighting up bioluminescence with coelenterazine: strategies and applications.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tianyu; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong

    2016-04-13

    Bioluminescence-based techniques, such as bioluminescence imaging, BRET and dual-luciferase reporter assay systems, have been widely used to examine a myriad of biological processes. Coelenterazine (CTZ), a luciferin or light-producing compound found in bioluminescent organisms, has sparked great curiosity and interest in searching for analogues with improved photochemical properties. This review summarizes the current development of coelenterazine analogues, their bioluminescence properties, and the rational design of caged coelenterazine towards biotargets, as well as their applications in bioassays. It should be emphasized that the design of caged luciferins can provide valuable insight into detailed molecular processes in organisms and will be a trend in the development of bioluminescent molecules. PMID:27009907

  2. Application of enzyme bioluminescence in ecology.

    PubMed

    Esimbekova, Elena; Kratasyuk, Valentina; Shimomura, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    : This review examines the general principles of bioluminescent enzymatic toxicity bioassays and describes the applications of these methods and the implementation in commercial biosensors. Bioluminescent enzyme system technology (BEST) has been proposed in the bacterial coupled enzyme system, wherein NADH:FMN-oxidoreductase-luciferase substitutes for living organisms. BEST was introduced to facilitate and accelerate the development of cost-competitive enzymatic systems for use in biosensors for medical, environmental, and industrial applications. For widespread use of BEST, the multicomponent reagent "Enzymolum" has been developed, which contains the bacterial luciferase, NADH:FMN-oxidoreductase, and their substrates, co-immobilized in starch or gelatin gel. Enzymolum is the central part of Portable Laboratory for Toxicity Detection (PLTD), which consists of a biodetector module, a sampling module, a sample preparation module, and a reagent module. PLTD instantly signals chemical-biological hazards and allows us to detect a wide range of toxic substances. Enzymolum can be integrated as a biological module into the portable biodetector-biosensor originally constructed for personal use. Based on the example of Enzymolum and the algorithm for creating new enzyme biotests with tailored characteristics, a new approach was demonstrated in biotechnological design and construction. The examples of biotechnological design of various bioluminescent methods for ecological monitoring were provided. Possible applications of enzyme bioassays are seen in the examples for medical diagnostics, assessment of the effect of physical load on sportsmen, analysis of food additives, and in practical courses for higher educational institutions and schools. The advantages of enzymatic assays are their rapidity (the period of time required does not exceed 3-5 min), high sensitivity, simplicity and safety of procedure, and possibility of automation of ecological monitoring; the required

  3. In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging of Intratumoral Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Michelle; Akin, Ali R; Francis, Kevin P; Tangney, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of whole-body bioluminescent imaging (BLI) for the study of bacterial trafficking in live mice, with an emphasis on the use of bacteria in therapy of cancer. Bacteria present an attractive class of vector for cancer therapy, possessing a natural ability to grow preferentially within tumors following systemic administration. Bacteria engineered to express the lux gene cassette permit BLI detection of the bacteria and tumor sites concurrently. The location and levels of bacteria within tumors over time can be readily examined, visualized in two or three dimensions. The method is applicable to a wide range of bacterial species and tumor xenograft types. This article describes the protocol for analysis of bioluminescent bacteria within subcutaneous tumor-bearing mice. This powerful, and inexpensive, real-time imaging strategy represents an ideal method for the study of bacteria in vivo in the context of cancer research. This protocol outlines the procedure for studying lux-tagged Escherichia coli and Bifidobacterium breve in mice, demonstrating the spatial and temporal readout from 2D and 3D BLI achievable with whole-body in vivo luminescence imaging. PMID:26846803

  4. A bioluminescent assay for measuring glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Valley, Michael P; Karassina, Natasha; Aoyama, Natsuyo; Carlson, Coby; Cali, James J; Vidugiriene, Jolanta

    2016-07-15

    Identifying activators and inhibitors of glucose uptake is critical for both diabetes management and anticancer therapy. To facilitate such studies, easy-to-use nonradioactive assays are desired. Here we describe a bioluminescent glucose uptake assay for measuring glucose transport in cells. The assay is based on the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose and the enzymatic detection of the 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate that accumulates. Uptake can be measured from a variety of cell types, it can be inhibited by known glucose transporter inhibitors, and the bioluminescent assay yields similar results when compared with the radioactive method. With HCT 116 cells, glucose uptake can be detected in as little as 5000 cells and remains linear up to 50,000 cells with signal-to-background values ranging from 5 to 45. The assay can be used to screen for glucose transporter inhibitors, or by multiplexing with viability readouts, changes in glucose uptake can be differentiated from overall effects on cell health. The assay also can provide a relevant end point for measuring insulin sensitivity. With adipocytes and myotubes, insulin-dependent increases in glucose uptake have been measured with 10- and 2-fold assay windows, respectively. Significant assay signals of 2-fold or more have also been measured with human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes and skeletal myoblasts. PMID:27130501

  5. Improved Biolistic Transfection of Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Peter G.

    2012-01-01

    Transient transfection of hair cells has proven challenging. Here we describe modifications to the Bio-Rad Helios Gene Gun that, along with an optimized protocol, improve transfection of bullfrog, chick, and mouse hair cells. The increased penetrating power afforded by our method allowed us to transfect mouse hair cells from the basal side, through the basilar membrane; this configuration protects hair bundles from damage during the procedure. We characterized the efficiency of transfection of mouse hair cells with fluorescently-tagged actin fusion protein using both the optimized procedure and a published procedure; while the efficiency of the two methods was similar, the morphology of transfected hair cells was improved with the new procedure. In addition, using the improved method, we were able to transfect hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus and chick cochlea for the first time. We used fluorescent-protein fusions of harmonin b (USH1C) and PMCA2 (ATP2B2; plasma-membrane Ca2+-ATPase isoform 2) to examine protein distribution in hair cells. While PMCA2-EGFP localization was similar to endogenous PMCA2 detected with antibodies, high levels of harmonin-EGFP were found at stereocilia tapers in bullfrog and chick, but not mouse; by contrast, harmonin-EGFP was concentrated in stereocilia tips in mouse hair cells. PMID:23049715

  6. Ballistic transfection of mammalian cells in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnikov, V.A.; Zelenin, A.V.; Zelenina, I.A.

    1995-11-01

    The method of ballistic transfection initially proposed for genetic transformation of plants was used for animal cells in vitro and in situ. The method consists in bombarding the transfected cells with microparticles of heavy metals carrying foreign DNA. Penetrating the cell nucleus, the microparticles transport the introduced gene. Successful genetic transformation of the cultured mouse cells and fish embryos was realized, and this allowed the study of mammalian cells in situ. The performed studies allowed us to demonstrate expression of the reporter genes of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, galactosidase, and neomycin phosphotransferase in the mouse liver, mammary gland and kidney explants, in the liver and cross-striated muscle of mouse and rat in situ, and in developing mouse embryos at the stages of two-cell embryo, morula, and blastocyst. All these genes were introduced by ballistic transfection. In the liver and cross-striated muscle the transgene activity was detected within two to three months after transfection. Thus, the ballistic introduction of the foreign genes in the cells in situ was demonstrated, and this opens possibilities for the use of this method in gene therapy. Methodical aspects of the bombarding and transfection are considered in detail, and the published data on transfection and genetic transformation of mammalian cells are discussed. 41 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Improved biolistic transfection of hair cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyu; Avenarius, Matthew R; Gillespie, Peter G

    2012-01-01

    Transient transfection of hair cells has proven challenging. Here we describe modifications to the Bio-Rad Helios Gene Gun that, along with an optimized protocol, improve transfection of bullfrog, chick, and mouse hair cells. The increased penetrating power afforded by our method allowed us to transfect mouse hair cells from the basal side, through the basilar membrane; this configuration protects hair bundles from damage during the procedure. We characterized the efficiency of transfection of mouse hair cells with fluorescently-tagged actin fusion protein using both the optimized procedure and a published procedure; while the efficiency of the two methods was similar, the morphology of transfected hair cells was improved with the new procedure. In addition, using the improved method, we were able to transfect hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus and chick cochlea for the first time. We used fluorescent-protein fusions of harmonin b (USH1C) and PMCA2 (ATP2B2; plasma-membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase isoform 2) to examine protein distribution in hair cells. While PMCA2-EGFP localization was similar to endogenous PMCA2 detected with antibodies, high levels of harmonin-EGFP were found at stereocilia tapers in bullfrog and chick, but not mouse; by contrast, harmonin-EGFP was concentrated in stereocilia tips in mouse hair cells. PMID:23049715

  8. Combining nebulization-mediated transfection and polymer microarrays for the rapid determination of optimal transfection substrates.

    PubMed

    Unciti-Broceta, Asier; Díaz-Mochón, Juan J; Mizomoto, Hitoshi; Bradley, Mark

    2008-01-01

    In this manuscript, we report how transfection efficiencies vary as a function of the substrate upon which cells adhere using a polymer microarray platform to allow rapid analysis of a large number of substrates. During these studies, traditional transfection protocols were nonsatisfactory, and thus we developed an approach in which an ultrasonic nebulizer was used to dispense lipoplexes onto cell-based microarrays in the absence of liquid. Under these conditions, droplets were directly deposited onto the cells thereby enhancing transfection. This approach was successfully applied to the transfection of various cell lines immobilized on a library of polyacrylates and permitted the identification of highly efficient transfection/polymer combinations, while showing that specific polymer-cell interactions may promote the efficacy of chemical transfection. PMID:18247582

  9. DNA nanoparticles: detection of long-term transgene activity in brain using bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Yurek, David M; Fletcher, Anita M; McShane, Matthew; Kowalczyk, Tomasz H; Padegimas, Linas; Weatherspoon, Marcy R; Kaytor, Michael D; Cooper, Mark J; Ziady, Assem G

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we used bioluminescence imaging (BLI) to track long-term transgene activity following the transfection of brain cells using a nonviral gene therapy technique. Formulations of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) combined with 30-mer lysine polymers (substituted with 10 kDa polyethylene glycol) form nanoparticles that transfect brain cells in vivo and produce transgene activity. Here we show that a single intracerebral injection of these DNA nanoparticles (DNPs) into the rat cortex, striatum, or substantia nigra results in long-term and persistent luciferase transgene activity over an 8- to 11-week period as evaluated by in vivo BLI analysis, and single injections of DNPs into the mouse striatum showed stable luciferase transgene activity for 1 year. Compacted DNPs produced in vivo signals 7- to 34-fold higher than DNA alone. In contrast, ex vivo BLI analysis, which is subject to less signal quenching from surrounding tissues, demonstrated a DNP to DNA alone ratio of 76- to 280-fold. Moreover, the ex vivo BLI analysis confirmed that signals originated from the targeted brain structures. In summary, BLI permits serial analysis of luciferase transgene activity at multiple brain locations following gene transfer with DNPs. Ex vivo analysis may permit more accurate determination of relative activities of gene transfer vectors. PMID:21521549

  10. Two phenomenological constants explain similarity laws in stably stratified turbulence.

    PubMed

    Katul, Gabriel G; Porporato, Amilcare; Shah, Stimit; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2014-02-01

    In stably stratified turbulent flows, the mixing efficiency associated with eddy diffusivity for heat, or equivalently the turbulent Prandtl number (Pr(t)), is fraught with complex dynamics originating from the scalewise interplay between shear generation of turbulence and its dissipation by density gradients. A large corpus of data and numerical simulations agree on a near-universal relation between Pr(t) and the Richardson number (R(i)), which encodes the relative importance of buoyancy dissipation to mechanical production of turbulent kinetic energy. The Pr(t)-R(i) relation is shown to be derivable solely from the cospectral budgets for momentum and heat fluxes if a Rotta-like return to isotropy closure for the pressure-strain effects and Kolmogorov's theory for turbulent cascade are invoked. The ratio of the Kolmogorov to the Kolmogorov-Obukhov-Corrsin phenomenological constants, and a constant associated with isotropization of the production whose value (= 3/5) has been predicted from Rapid Distortion Theory, explain all the macroscopic nonlinearities. PMID:25353571

  11. DNS of stably stratified Ekman flow with surface cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohari, S. M. Iman; Sarkar, Sutanu

    2015-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of stably stratified Ekman flow are performed to study turbulence in an atmospheric boundary layer under surface cooling. Stability, classified by the normalized Monin-Obukhov (MO) length scale, is varied by imposing a range of cooling fluxes at the surface to mimic ground radiative cooling. The subsequent flow stability, measured by the MO length scale and bulk Richardson number, changes significantly as the flow evolves. We find considerable qualitative differences when a neutrally stratified Ekman flow is exposed to a constant surface cooling rather than a constant temperature, i.e. changes in the veering angle, super-gesotrophic velocity, surface shear velocity and the boundary layer height. Under strongly stable condition, the transient evolution shows the presence of intermittent turbulent patches. These patches contain small-scale, inclined hairpin structures that are organized into near-surface streaks. A low-level jet forms at steady state and the high-shear region between the surface and the low level jet is found to play a vital role in promoting turbulence. Our simplified setup is sufficient to observe turbulence collapse, intermittency and the low-level jet formation, indicating the applicability of this model to atmospheric problems.

  12. Stably Levitated Large Bubbles in Vertically Vibrating Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hern, Timothy; Shelden, Bion; Romero, Louis; Torczynski, John

    2012-11-01

    Vertical vibration of a liquid can cause small gas bubbles to move downward against the buoyancy force. Downward bubble motion is caused by the oscillating bubble volume (induced by the oscillating pressure field) interacting with the bubble drag force. The volume-drag asymmetry and the oscillating pressure gradient produce net downward bubble motion analogous to that caused by the Bjerknes force in high-frequency vibrations. Low-frequency (below 300 Hz) experiments demonstrate downward bubble motion over a range of vibration conditions, liquid properties, and pressure in the air above the free surface. Small bubbles deep in a quasi-two-dimensional test cell usually coalesce to form a much larger bubble that is stably levitated well below the free surface. The size and position of this levitated bubble can be controlled by varying the vibration conditions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Stably Doped Conducting Polymer Nanoshells by Surface Initiated Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Li, Junwei; Yoon, Soon Joon; Hsieh, Bao-Yu; Tai, Wanyi; O'Donnell, Matthew; Gao, Xiaohu

    2015-12-01

    Despite broad applications ranging from electronics to biomedical sensing and imaging, a long-standing problem of conducting polymers is the poor resistance to dedoping, which directly affects their signature electrical and optical properties. This problem is particularly significant for biomedical uses because of fast leaching of dopant ions in physiological environments. Here, we describe a new approach to engineer multimodal core-shell nanoparticles with a stably doped conductive polymer shell in biological environments. It was achieved by making a densely packed polymer brush rather than changing its molecular structure. Polyaniline (PANI) was used as a model compound due to its concentrated near-infrared (NIR) absorption. It was grafted onto a magnetic nanoparticle via a polydopamine intermediate layer. Remarkably, at pH 7 its conductivity is ca. 2000× higher than conventional PANI nanoshells. Similarly, its NIR absorption is enhanced by 2 orders of magnitude, ideal for photothermal imaging and therapy. Another surprising finding is its nonfouling property, even outperforming polyethylene glycol. This platform technology is also expected to open exciting opportunities in engineering stable conductive materials for electronics, imaging, and sensing. PMID:26588215

  14. Construction of a bioluminescent reporter strain to detect polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, A.C.; Muccini, M.; Ghosh, M.M.; Sayler, G.S.

    1998-12-01

    A bioluminescent reporter strain, Ralstonia eutropha ENV307 (pUTK60), was constructed for the detection of polychlorinated biphenyls by inserting the biphenyl promoter upstream of the bioluminescence genes. In the presence of a nonionic surfactant, which enhances the solubility of chlorinated biphenyls, bioluminescence was induced three- to fourfold over background by biphenyl, monochlorinated biphenyls, and Aroclor 1242. The minimum detection limits for these compounds ranged from 0.15 mg/liter for 4-chlorobiphenyl to 1.5 mg/liter for Aroclor 1242.

  15. Bioluminescent determination of free fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kather, H; Wieland, E

    1984-08-01

    A simple, highly specific, and sensitive bioluminescent method for determination of free fatty acids in unextracted plasma or serum has been developed. The method is based on the activation of free fatty acids by acyl-CoA synthetase (EC 6.2.1.3). The pyrophosphate formed is used to phosphorylate fructose 6-phosphate in a reaction catalyzed by the enzyme pyrophosphate-fructose-6-phosphate phosphotransferase (EC 4.1.2.13). The triosephosphates produced from fructose 1,6-bisphosphate by aldolase are oxidized by NAD in the presence of arsenate to 3-phosphoglycerate. The NADH is detected via the bacterial NADH-linked luciferase system. Excellent agreement has been obtained by comparison with accepted methods. In addition, for the determination of serum free fatty acids, the method is particularly applicable for following lipolysis of isolated adipocytes. PMID:6486422

  16. Evolution: Bioluminescent Courtship as an Engine of Diversity.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Michael E

    2016-07-25

    A new study finds that the evolution of bioluminescent sexual displays drives high species richness across animal lineages, providing a crucial link between microevolutionary and macroevolutionary explanations of biodiversity. PMID:27458910

  17. Bioluminescence: a versatile technique for imaging cellular and molecular features

    PubMed Central

    Paley, Miranda A.

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence is a ubiquitous imaging modality for visualizing biological processes in vivo. This technique employs visible light and interfaces readily with most cell and tissue types, making it a versatile technology for preclinical studies. Here we review basic bioluminescence imaging principles, along with applications of the technology that are relevant to the medicinal chemistry community. These include noninvasive cell tracking experiments, analyses of protein function, and methods to visualize small molecule metabolites. In each section, we also discuss how bioluminescent tools have revealed insights into experimental therapies and aided drug discovery. Last, we highlight the development of new bioluminescent tools that will enable more sensitive and multi-component imaging experiments and, thus, expand our broader understanding of living systems.

  18. Bioluminescence-Activated Deep-Tissue Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yi Rang; Kim, Seonghoon; Choi, Jin Woo; Choi, Sung Yong; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kim, Homin; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Koh, Gou Young; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Optical energy can trigger a variety of photochemical processes useful for therapies. Owing to the shallow penetration of light in tissues, however, the clinical applications of light-activated therapies have been limited. Bioluminescence resonant energy transfer (BRET) may provide a new way of inducing photochemical activation. Here, we show that efficient bioluminescence energy-induced photodynamic therapy (PDT) of macroscopic tumors and metastases in deep tissue. For monolayer cell culture in vitro incubated with Chlorin e6, BRET energy of about 1 nJ per cell generated as strong cytotoxicity as red laser light irradiation at 2.2 mW/cm2 for 180 s. Regional delivery of bioluminescence agents via draining lymphatic vessels killed tumor cells spread to the sentinel and secondary lymph nodes, reduced distant metastases in the lung and improved animal survival. Our results show the promising potential of novel bioluminescence-activated PDT. PMID:26000054

  19. Nanoparticles of compacted DNA transfect postmitotic cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ge; Li, DeShan; Pasumarthy, Murali K; Kowalczyk, Tomasz H; Gedeon, Christopher R; Hyatt, Susannah L; Payne, Jennifer M; Miller, Timothy J; Brunovskis, Peter; Fink, Tamara L; Muhammad, Osman; Moen, Robert C; Hanson, Richard W; Cooper, Mark J

    2003-08-29

    Charge-neutral DNA nanoparticles have been developed in which single molecules of DNA are compacted to their minimal possible size. We speculated that the small size of these DNA nanoparticles may facilitate gene transfer in postmitotic cells, permitting nuclear uptake across the 25-nm nuclear membrane pore. To determine whether DNA nanoparticles can transfect nondividing cells, growth-arrested neuroblastoma and hepatoma cells were transfected with DNA/liposome mixtures encoding luciferase. In both models, growth-arrested cells were robustly transfected by compacted DNA (6,900-360-fold more than naked DNA). To evaluate mechanisms responsible for enhanced transfection, HuH-7 cells were microinjected with naked or compacted plasmids encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein. Cytoplasmic microinjection of DNA nanoparticles generated a approximately 10-fold improvement in transgene expression as compared with naked DNA; this enhancement was reversed by the nuclear pore inhibitor, wheat germ agglutinin. To determine the upper size limit for gene transfer, DNA nanoparticles of various sizes were microinjected into the cytoplasm. A marked decrease in transgene expression was observed as the minor ellipsoidal diameter approached 25 nm. In summary, suitably sized DNA nanoparticles productively transfect growth arrested cells by traversing the nuclear membrane pore. PMID:12807905

  20. Tangling clustering of inertial particles in stably stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidelman, A.; Elperin, T.; Kleeorin, N.; Melnik, B.; Rogachevskii, I.

    2010-05-01

    We have predicted theoretically and detected in laboratory experiments a tangling clustering of inertial particles in a stably stratified turbulence with imposed mean vertical temperature gradient. In the stratified turbulence a spatial distribution of the mean particle number density is nonuniform due to the phenomenon of turbulent thermal diffusion, i.e., the inertial particles are accumulated in the vicinity of the minimum of the mean temperature of the surrounding fluid, and a nonzero gradient of the mean particle number density, ∇N , is formed. It causes generation of fluctuations of the particle number density by tangling of the large-scale gradient ∇N by velocity fluctuations. In addition, the mean temperature gradient ∇T produces the temperature fluctuations by tangling of the large-scale gradient ∇T by velocity fluctuations. The anisotropic temperature fluctuations contribute to the two-point correlation function of the divergence of the particle velocity field, i.e., they increase the rate of formation of the particle clusters in small scales. We have demonstrated that in the laboratory stratified turbulence this tangling clustering is much more effective than a pure inertial clustering (preferential concentration) that has been observed in isothermal turbulence. In particular, in our experiments in oscillating grid isothermal turbulence in air without imposed mean temperature gradient, the inertial clustering is very weak for solid particles with the diameter of ≈10μm and Reynolds numbers based on turbulent length scale and rms velocity, Re=250 . In the experiments the correlation function for the inertial clustering in isothermal turbulence is much smaller than that for the tangling clustering in nonisothermal turbulence. The size of the tangling clusters is on the order of several Kolmogorov length scales. The clustering described in our study is found for inertial particles with small Stokes numbers and with the material density that is

  1. Bioluminescent imaging of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Rhodnius prolixus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Usually the analysis of the various developmental stages of Trypanosoma cruzi in the experimentally infected vertebrate and invertebrate hosts is based on the morphological observations of tissue fragments from animals and insects. The development of techniques that allow the imaging of animals infected with parasites expressing luciferase open up possibilities to follow the fate of bioluminescent parasites in infected vectors. Methods D-luciferin (60 μg) was injected into the hemocoel of the whole insect before bioluminescence acquisition. In dissected insects, the whole gut was incubated with D-luciferin in PBS (300 μg/ml) for ex vivo bioluminescence acquisition in the IVIS® Imaging System, Xenogen. Results Herein, we describe the results obtained with the luciferase gene integrated into the genome of the Dm28c clone of T. cruzi, and the use of these parasites to follow, in real time, the infection of the insect vector Rhodnius prolixus, by a non- invasive method. The insects were evaluated by in vivo bioluminescent imaging on the feeding day, and on the 7 th, 14 th, 21 st and 28 th days after feeding. To corroborate the bioluminescent imaging made in vivo, and investigate the digestive tract region, the insects were dissected. The bioluminescence emitted was proportional to the number of protozoans in regions of the gut. The same digestive tracts were also macerated to count the parasites in distinct morphological stages with an optical microscope, and for bioluminescence acquisition in a microplate using the IVIS® Imaging System. A positive correlation of parasite numbers and bioluminescence in the microplate was obtained. Conclusions This is the first report of bioluminescent imaging in Rhodnius prolixus infected with trypomastigotes of the Dm28c-luc stable strain, expressing firefly luciferase. In spite of the distribution limitations of the substrate (D-luciferin) in the insect body, longitudinal evaluation of infected insects by

  2. Biological water quality monitoring using chemiluminescent and bioluminescent techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    Automated chemiluminescence and bioluminescence sensors were developed for the continuous monitoring of microbial levels in water supplies. The optimal chemical procedures were determined for the chemiluminescence system to achieve maximum sensitivity. By using hydrogen peroxide, reaction rate differentiation, ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), and carbon monoxide pretreatments, factors which cause interference were eliminated and specificity of the reaction for living and dead bacteria was greatly increased. By employing existing technology with some modifications, a sensitive and specific bioluminescent system was developed.

  3. Real-Time Bioluminescence Imaging of Nitroreductase in Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ping; Zhang, Huateng; Deng, Quankun; Liu, Wei; Yang, Linghui; Li, Guobo; Chen, Guo; Du, Lupei; Ke, Bowen; Li, Minyong

    2016-06-01

    Nitroreductase (NTR) is an endogenous reductase overexpressed in hypoxic tumors; however, its precise detection in living cells and animals remains a considerable challenge. Herein, we developed three reaction-based probes and a related bioluminescence assay for the real-time NTR detection. The high sensitivity and selectivity of probe 3, combined with its remarkable potential of bioluminescence imaging, affords a valuable approach for in vivo imaging of NTR in a tumor model mouse. PMID:27197544

  4. Interactive graphic editing tools in bioluminescent imaging simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Tian, Jie; Luo, Jie; Wang, Ge; Cong, Wenxiang

    2005-04-01

    It is a challenging task to accurately describe complicated biological tissues and bioluminescent sources in bioluminescent imaging simulation. Several graphic editing tools have been developed to efficiently model each part of the bioluminescent simulation environment and to interactively correct or improve the initial models of anatomical structures or bioluminescent sources. There are two major types of graphic editing tools: non-interactive tools and interactive tools. Geometric building blocks (i.e. regular geometric graphics and superquadrics) are applied as non-interactive tools. To a certain extent, complicated anatomical structures and bioluminescent sources can be approximately modeled by combining a sufficient large number of geometric building blocks with Boolean operators. However, those models are too simple to describe the local features and fine changes in 2D/3D irregular contours. Therefore, interactive graphic editing tools have been developed to facilitate the local modifications of any initial surface model. With initial models composed of geometric building blocks, interactive spline mode is applied to conveniently perform dragging and compressing operations on 2D/3D local surface of biological tissues and bioluminescent sources inside the region/volume of interest. Several applications of the interactive graphic editing tools will be presented in this article.

  5. Bioluminescence tomography with structural and functional a priori information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Han; Unlu, Mehmet B.; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2010-02-01

    Multispectral bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is one of the seemingly promising approaches to recover 3D tomographic images of bioluminescence source distribution in vivo. In bioluminescence tomography, internal light source, such as luciferase is activated within a volume and multiple wavelength emission data from the internal bioluminescence sources is acquired for reconstruction. The underline non-uniqueness problem associated with non-spectrally resolved intensity-based bioluminescence tomography was demonstrated by Dehghani et al. and it also shown that using a spectrally resolved technique, an accurate solution for the source distribution can be calculated from the measured data if both functional and anatomical a priori information are at hand. Thus it is of great desire to develop an imaging system that is capable of simultaneously acquiring both the optical and structural a priori information as well as acquiring the bioluminescence data. In this paper we present our first combined optical tomography and CT system which constitutes with a cool CCD camera ( perkin elmer "cold blue"), laser launching units and Xray CT( Dxray proto-type). It is capable of acquiring non contact diffuse optical tomography (DOT) data which is used for functional a priori; X-ray CT images which yields the structure information; and BLT images. Physical phantom experiments are designed to verify the system accuracy, repeatability and resolution. These studies shows the feasibility of such imaging system and its potential.

  6. Measuring IL-1β Processing by Bioluminescence Sensors II: The iGLuc System.

    PubMed

    Bartok, Eva; Kampes, Maria; Hornung, Veit

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multimeric protein complexes that proteolytically activate caspase-1, which subsequently matures cytokines of the IL-1 family and initiates the induction of pyroptotic cell death. Although this process is central both to pathogen defense and sterile inflammatory processes, there is currently no standard readout available for inflammasome activation which would be suitable for high-throughput applications. We have recently developed a new method for measuring inflammasome activation via the use of a novel proteolytic reporter iGLuc, an IL-1β Gaussia luciferase (iGLuc) fusion protein. Here, we provide detailed protocols for the use of iGLuc in transiently transfected or stably transduced cell lines. Using these protocols, IL-1β maturation as the result of inflammasome activation or other processes can be indirectly measured via the gain of Gaussia luciferase activity of cleaved iGLuc, allowing for rapid inflammasome reconstitution assays and high-throughput screening of inflammasome activity. PMID:27221484

  7. Tumor cell-specific bioluminescence platform to identify stroma-induced changes to anticancer drug activity.

    PubMed

    McMillin, Douglas W; Delmore, Jake; Weisberg, Ellen; Negri, Joseph M; Geer, D Corey; Klippel, Steffen; Mitsiades, Nicholas; Schlossman, Robert L; Munshi, Nikhil C; Kung, Andrew L; Griffin, James D; Richardson, Paul G; Anderson, Kenneth C; Mitsiades, Constantine S

    2010-04-01

    Conventional anticancer drug screening is typically performed in the absence of accessory cells of the tumor microenvironment, which can profoundly alter antitumor drug activity. To address this limitation, we developed the tumor cell-specific in vitro bioluminescence imaging (CS-BLI) assay. Tumor cells (for example, myeloma, leukemia and solid tumors) stably expressing luciferase are cultured with nonmalignant accessory cells (for example, stromal cells) for selective quantification of tumor cell viability, in presence versus absence of stromal cells or drug treatment. CS-BLI is high-throughput scalable and identifies stroma-induced chemoresistance in diverse malignancies, including imatinib resistance in leukemic cells. A stroma-induced signature in tumor cells correlates with adverse clinical prognosis and includes signatures for activated Akt, Ras, NF-kappaB, HIF-1alpha, myc, hTERT and IRF4; for biological aggressiveness; and for self-renewal. Unlike conventional screening, CS-BLI can also identify agents with increased activity against tumor cells interacting with stroma. One such compound, reversine, shows more potent activity in an orthotopic model of diffuse myeloma bone lesions than in conventional subcutaneous xenografts. Use of CS-BLI, therefore, enables refined screening of candidate anticancer agents to enrich preclinical pipelines with potential therapeutics that overcome stroma-mediated drug resistance and can act in a synthetic lethal manner in the context of tumor-stroma interactions. PMID:20228816

  8. Optimizacion of Babesia bovis transfection methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The tick borne Babesia parasites remain an important limitation for development of cattle industries worldwide. A stable transfection of Babesia bovis will be useful for functional analysis of the recently sequenced B. bovis genome and to design improved methods to control Babesia infections. In thi...

  9. Transfection of Mammalian Cells with Plasmid DNA by Scrape Loading and Sonication Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fechheimer, Marcus; Boylan, John F.; Parker, Sandra; Sisken, Jesse E.; Patel, Gordhan L.; Zimmer, Stephen G.

    1987-12-01

    Scrape loading and sonication loading are two recently described methods of introducing macromolecules into living cells. We have tested the efficacy of these methods for transfection of mammalian cells with exogenous DNA, using selection systems based either on resistance to the drug G418 (Geneticin) or on acquisition of the ability to utilize the salvage pathway of pyrimidine biosynthesis. These loading methods can be employed to generate cell lines that express the gene product of the transfected DNA molecules both transiently and stably. Optimal transfection is observed when the DNA is added to cells in physiological saline lacking divalent cations and containing K+ in place of Na+. DNA molecules 7.1 to 30 kilobases long have been introduced by the scrape loading procedure. In addition, the scrape loading procedure has been employed for cotransfection and subsequent expression of nonselectable genes encoded on DNA molecules added in a mixture with DNA molecules whose expression is selected. Cell lines expressing oncogenes or proteins that are important for regulation of cell growth and division have been obtained by this procedure. The scrape loading procedure is also useful for studies of the cellular changes that occur upon expression of an exogenous gene. As many as 80% of cells scrape loaded with the plasmid pC6, which encodes the simian virus 40 large tumor antigen, contained this protein in the nucleus between 1 and 5 days after transfection. Thus, scrape loading and sonication loading are simple, economical, and reproducible methods for introduction of DNA molecules into adherent and nonadherent cells, and these methods may be useful in the future for experimentation at both fundamental and applied levels.

  10. Effect of targeted ovarian cancer therapy using amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells transfected with enhanced green fluorescent protein-human interleukin-2 in vivo.

    PubMed

    You, Qi; Yao, Yuan; Zhang, Yuanlong; Fu, Songbin; Du, Mei; Zhang, Guangmei

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of using amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells (AF-MSCs) in targeted ovarian cancer therapy in vivo. AF-MSCs were isolated from human second trimester AF and a plasmid, enhanced green fluorescent protein‑human interleukin‑2 (pEGFP‑hIL‑2) was formed. The plasmid was stably transfected into the AF‑MSCs and the cells were intravenously injected into ovarian cancer nude mice models. Following stable transfection of the vector, tumor formation, and the expression and activity of hIL‑2 were investigated, and microscopic pathological examinations of the tumor were performed. It was found that AF‑MSCs exhibited high motility during migration in vivo, and the vector, pEGFP‑hIL‑2 can be stably transfected into AF‑MSCs. Following stable transfection, this type of stem cell is able to successfully transport the therapeutic gene, IL-2, migrate to the ovarian cancer tumor site to secrete the functional IL-2 and treat the tumor. Thus, AF-MSCs may serve as transporters for therapeutic genes targeting ovarian tumor sites and, therefore, be involved in the treatment of tumors. PMID:26179662

  11. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Tumor Bioluminescence Implicates Efflux, and Not Influx, as the Bigger Hurdle in Cancer Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Hoon; Bibee, Kristin; Wickline, Samuel A.; Sept, David

    2010-01-01

    In vivo bioluminescence imaging is a powerful tool for assessing tumor burden and quantifying therapeutic response in xenograft models. However this technique exhibits significant variability as a consequence of differences in substrate administration, as well as the tumor size, type, and location. Here we present a novel pharmacokinetic (PK) approach that utilizes bioluminescence image data. The sample data are taken from mice implanted with a melanoma tumor cell line that was transfected to express the firefly (Photinus pyralis) luciferase gene. At 5, 7 and 10 days post-implant, IP injections of D-luciferin were given to monitor the uptake into the tumor, and the tumor volume was measured using ultrasound. A multi-compartment PK model was used to simultaneously fit all experiments for each mouse. We observed that the rates of luciferin transport in and out of the tumor exhibited a clear dependence on the tumor volume. Also, the rate of tumor influx increased faster than did the efflux, resulting in a shortening of the time to peak luciferin concentration as the tumor grows. The time of the peak concentration correlated poorly with the tumor volume, but the peak bioluminescence signal and the area under the curve both exhibited a dependence on the tumor surface area. These results agree with Starling’s hypothesis relating the higher interstitial fluid pressure in the tumor with flux across the boundary, and suggest that drug transport may depend more strongly on the surface area of the tumor than its volume. These observations provide a quantitative physical rationale for molecular targeting of therapeutics that enhance trapping and overcome the accelerated efflux kinetics. PMID:21123454

  12. Turbidity Currents In The Ocean; Are They Stably Stratified?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneller, B. C.; Nasr-Azadani, M.; Meiburg, E. H.

    2013-12-01

    A large proportion of the sediment generated by erosion of the continents is ultimately delivered to the deep ocean to form submarine fans, being carried to the margins of these fans by turbidity currents that flow through submarine channels that may be hundreds or even thousands of kilometers long. The persistence of these flows over extremely long distances with gradients that may be 10-4 or less, while maintaining sediment as coarse as fine-grained sand in suspension, is enigmatic, given the drag that one would expect to be experienced by such flows, and the effects of progressive dilution by entrainment of ambient seawater. The commonly-held view of the flow structure of turbidity currents, based on many laboratory and numerical simulations and rare observations in the ocean, is that of a vertical profile of time-averaged horizontal velocity with a maximum value close the bed, largely due to much higher drag on the upper boundary than on the lower. This upper boundary drag is related to Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instabilities generated by shear between the current and the ambient seawater. K-H instabilities result when fluid shear dominates over density stratification within the turbidity current; the dimensionless ratio of these two influences is the gradient Richardson number. When this exceeds a value of 0.25 the stratification is stable, and no K-H instabilities will form, eliminating much of the drag and entrainment. The majority of the entrainment of ambient seawater into the turbidity current also occurs via the K-H instabilities. Analysis by Birman et al. (2009) suggests that there may be little or no entrainment of ambient fluid in turbidity currents flowing over low gradients, implying that K-H instabilities may be absent under these conditions. We examine the case of flows on the extremely low gradients of the ocean floor, and suggest some conditions that may lead to stably-stratified currents, with dramatically reduced drag, and a fundamentally

  13. The study of turbulence and optical instability in stably stratified Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovadlo, P. G.; Shihovtsev, A. Y.

    2015-11-01

    It is shown that atmospheric turbulence is not suppressed completely in strongly stably stratified conditions when Richardson's number exceeds its critical value. It is worth to note that airflow is laminar according classical ideas of the turbulence theory when Richardson's number values are supercritical. It is shown that in the stably stratified atmospheric surface layer under conditions of large vertical temperature gradients and low wind speeds, atmospheric turbulence is often characterized by intermittent structure and in some parts of space intensity of fluctuations can reach high values. The results of experimental investigations of optical instability conducted out along the horizontal path in the stably stratified atmospheric surface layer are discussed.

  14. Enhanced efflux of (/sup 3/H)vinblastine from Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with a full-length complementary DNA clone for the mdr1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, J.R.; Johnstone, R.M.; Gros, P.

    1989-07-15

    Multidrug-resistant Chinese hamster ovary cell clones stably transfected with, and overexpressing, the mouse mdr1 complementary DNA clone along with drug-sensitive Chinese hamster ovary control cells were characterized for their capacities to accumulate and retain (/sup 3/H)vinblastine. Multidrug-resistant mdr1 transfectants show a 3-4-fold decrease in (/sup 3/H)vinblastine accumulation, compared to their drug-sensitive counterparts. After ATP depletion, this difference in (/sup 3/H)vinblastine accumulation between mdr1 transfectants and control cells effectively disappears. This ATP-dependent decreased drug accumulation is paralleled in mdr1 transfectants by an enhanced capacity of these cells to extrude the drug in an ATP-dependent manner. In medium containing glucose and glutamine, the mdr1 transfectants release preloaded drug at a rate five times that of control, drug-sensitive cells. In ATP-depleted control and mdr1-transfected cells, there is little difference in the rate or extent of (/sup 3/H)vinblastine release. The observation that the mdr1 transfectants show a decreased (/sup 3/H)vinblastine accumulation and an increased vinblastine release, both of which are abolished when cellular ATP levels are reduced, provides a direct demonstration that the product of the transfected mdr1 gene is responsible for a mechanism controlling cellular drug levels in an ATP-dependent manner. However, attempts to establish competition for (/sup 3/H)vinblastine transport by vincristine, daunomycin, and actinomycin D were only partly successful in mdr1 transfectants.

  15. Lipid-based Transfection Reagents Exhibit Cryo-induced Increase in Transfection Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Sork, Helena; Nordin, Joel Z; Turunen, Janne J; Wiklander, Oscar Pb; Bestas, Burcu; Zaghloul, Eman M; Margus, Helerin; Padari, Kärt; Duru, Adil D; Corso, Giulia; Bost, Jeremy; Vader, Pieter; Pooga, Margus; Smith, Ci Edvard; Wood, Matthew Ja; Schiffelers, Raymond M; Hällbrink, Mattias; Andaloussi, Samir El

    2016-01-01

    The advantages of lipid-based transfection reagents have permitted their widespread use in molecular biology and gene therapy. This study outlines the effect of cryo-manipulation of a cationic lipid-based formulation, Lipofectamine 2000, which, after being frozen and thawed, showed orders of magnitude higher plasmid delivery efficiency throughout eight different cell lines, without compromising cell viability. Increased transfection efficiency with the freeze-thawed reagent was also seen with 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate oligonucleotide delivery and in a splice-correction assay. Most importantly, a log-scale improvement in gene delivery using the freeze-thawed reagent was seen in vivo. Using three different methods, we detected considerable differences in the polydispersity of the different nucleic acid complexes as well as observed a clear difference in their surface spreading and sedimentation, with the freeze-thawed ones displaying substantially higher rate of dispersion and deposition on the glass surface. This hitherto overlooked elevated potency of the freeze-thawed reagent facilitates the targeting of hard-to-transfect cells, accomplishes higher transfection rates, and decreases the overall amount of reagent needed for delivery. Additionally, as we also saw a slight increase in plasmid delivery using other freeze-thawed transfection reagents, we postulate that freeze-thawing might prove to be useful for an even wider variety of transfection reagents. PMID:27111416

  16. Thoughts on the diversity of convergent evolution of bioluminescence on earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldenmaier, Hans E.; Oliveira, Anderson G.; Stevani, Cassius V.

    2012-10-01

    The widespread independent evolution of analogous bioluminescent systems is one of the most impressive and diverse examples of convergent evolution on earth. There are roughly 30 extant bioluminescent systems that have evolved independently on Earth, with each system likely having unique enzymes responsible for catalysing the bioluminescent reaction. Bioluminescence is a chemical reaction involving a luciferin molecule and a luciferase or photoprotein that results in the emission of light. Some independent systems utilize the same luciferin, such as the use of tetrapyrrolic compounds by krill and dinoflagellates, and the wide use of coelenterazine by marine organisms, while the enzymes involved are unique. One common thread among all the different bioluminescent systems is the requirement of molecular oxygen. Bioluminescence is found in most forms of life, especially marine organisms. Bioluminescence in known to benefit the organism by: attraction, repulsion, communication, camouflage, and illumination. The marine ecosystem is significantly affected by bioluminescence, the only light found in the pelagic zone and below is from bioluminescent organisms. Transgenic bioluminescent organisms have revolutionized molecular research, medicine and the biotechnology industry. The use of bioluminescence in studying molecular pathways and disease allows for non-invasive and real-time analysis. Bioluminescence-based assays have been developed for several analytes by coupling luminescence to many enzyme-catalysed reactions.

  17. Novel bioluminescent coelenterazine derivatives with imidazopyrazinone C-6 extended substitution for Renilla luciferase.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tianyu; Yang, Xiaofeng; Yang, Xingye; Yuan, Mingliang; Zhang, Tianchao; Zhang, Huateng; Li, Minyong

    2016-06-21

    Two series of novel coelenterazine analogues (alkynes and triazoles) with imidazopyrazinone C-6 extended substitution have been designed and synthesized successfully for the extension of bioluminescent substrates. After extensive evaluation, some compounds display excellent bioluminescence properties compared with DeepBlueC in cellulo, thus becoming potential molecules for bioluminescence techniques. PMID:27197767

  18. Establishment of a novel immortalized human prostatic epithelial cell line stably expressing androgen receptor and its application for the functional screening of androgen receptor modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shan; Wang, Ming-Wei; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Chan, F.L.

    2009-05-15

    In this study, we developed a human prostatic epithelial cell line BPH-1-AR stably expressing AR by lentiviral transduction. Characterization by immunoblot and RT-PCR showed that AR was stably expressed in all representative BPH-1-AR clones. Androgen treatment induced a secretory differentiation phenotype in BPH-1-AR cells but suppressed their cell proliferation. Treatments with AR agonists induced transactivation of a transfected PSA-gene promoter reporter in BPH-1-AR cells, whereas this transactivation was suppressed by an AR antagonist flutamide, indicating that the transduced AR in BPH-1-AR cells was functional. Finally, we utilized BPH-1-AR cells to evaluate the androgenic activities and growth effects of five newly developed non-steroidal compounds. Results showed that these compounds showed androgenic activities and growth-inhibitory effects on BPH-1-AR cells. Our results showed that BPH-1-AR cell line would be a valuable in vitro model for the study of androgen-regulated processes in prostatic epithelial cells and identification of compounds with AR-modulating activities.

  19. Stably integrated luxCDABE for assessment of Salmonella invasion kinetics.

    PubMed

    Flentie, Kelly N; Qi, Min; Gammon, Seth T; Razia, Yasmin; Lui, Felix; Marpegan, Luciano; Manglik, Aashish; Piwnica-Worms, David; McKinney, Jeffrey S

    2008-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium is a common cause of gastroenteritis in humans and also localizes to neoplastic tumors in animals. Invasion of specific eukaryotic cells is a key mechanism of Salmonella interactions with host tissues. Early stages of gastrointestinal cell invasion are mediated by a Salmonella type III secretion system, powered by the adenosine triphosphatase invC. The aim of this work was to characterize the invC dependence of invasion kinetics into disparate eukaryotic cells traditionally used as models of gut epithelium or neoplasms. Thus, a nondestructive real-time assay was developed to report eukaryotic cell invasion kinetics using lux+ Salmonella that contain chromosomally integrated luxCDABE genes. Bioluminescence-based invasion assays using lux+ Salmonella exhibited inoculum dose-response correlation, distinguished invasion-competent from invasion-incompetent Salmonella, and discriminated relative Salmonella invasiveness in accordance with environmental conditions that induce invasion gene expression. In standard gentamicin protection assays, bioluminescence from lux+ Salmonella correlated with recovery of colony-forming units of internalized bacteria and could be visualized by bioluminescence microscopy. Furthermore, this assay distinguished invasion-competent from invasion-incompetent bacteria independent of gentamicin treatment in real time. Bioluminescence reported Salmonella invasion of disparate eukaryotic cell lines, including neoplastic melanoma, colon adenocarcinoma, and glioma cell lines used in animal models of malignancy. In each case, Salmonella invasion of eukaryotic cells was invC dependent. PMID:19123992

  20. Stably Integrated luxCDABE for Assessment of Salmonella Invasion Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Flentie, Kelly N.; Qi, Min; Gammon, Seth T.; Razia, Yasmin; Lui, Felix; Marpegan, Luciano; Manglik, Aashish; Piwnica-Worms, David; McKinney, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium is a common cause of gastroenteritis in humans and also localizes to neoplastic tumors in animals. Invasion of specific eukaryotic cells is a key mechanism of Salmonella interactions with host tissues. Early stages of gastrointestinal cell invasion are mediated by a Salmonella type III secretion system, powered by the adenosine triphosphatase invC. The aim of this work was to characterize the invC dependence of invasion kinetics into disparate eukaryotic cells traditionally used as models of gut epithelium or neoplasms. Thus, a nondestructive real-time assay was developed to report eukaryotic cell invasion kinetics using lux+ Salmonella that contain chromosomally integrated luxCDABE genes. Bioluminescence-based invasion assays using lux+ Salmonella exhibited inoculum dose-response correlation, distinguished invasion-competent from invasion-incompetent Salmonella, and discriminated relative Salmonella invasiveness in accordance with environmental conditions that induce invasion gene expression. In standard gentamicin protection assays, bioluminescence from lux+ Salmonella correlated with recovery of colony-forming units of internalized bacteria and could be visualized by bioluminescence microscopy. Furthermore, this assay distinguished invasion-competent from invasion-incompetent bacteria independent of gentamicin treatment in real time. Bioluminescence reported Salmonella invasion of disparate eukaryotic cell lines, including neoplastic melanoma, colon adenocarcinoma, and glioma cell lines used in animal models of malignancy. In each case, Salmonella invasion of eukaryotic cells was invC dependent. PMID:19123992

  1. Toward Contactless Biology: Acoustophoretic DNA Transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasileiou, Thomas; Foresti, Daniele; Bayram, Adem; Poulikakos, Dimos; Ferrari, Aldo

    2016-02-01

    Acoustophoresis revolutionized the field of container-less manipulation of liquids and solids by enabling mixing procedures which avoid contamination and loss of reagents due to the contact with the support. While its applications to chemistry and engineering are straightforward, additional developments are needed to obtain reliable biological protocols in a contactless environment. Here, we provide a first, fundamental step towards biological reactions in air by demonstrating the acoustophoretic DNA transfection of mammalian cells. We developed an original acoustophoretic design capable of levitating, moving and mixing biological suspensions of living mammalians cells and of DNA plasmids. The precise and sequential delivery of the mixed solutions into tissue culture plates is actuated by a novel mechanism based on the controlled actuation of the acoustophoretic force. The viability of the contactless procedure is tested using a cellular model sensitive to small perturbation of neuronal differentiation pathways. Additionally, the efficiency of the transfection procedure is compared to standard, container-based methods for both single and double DNA transfection and for different cell types including adherent growing HeLa cancer cells, and low adhesion neuron-like PC12 cells. In all, this work provides a proof of principle which paves the way to the development of high-throughput acoustophoretic biological reactors.

  2. Toward Contactless Biology: Acoustophoretic DNA Transfection

    PubMed Central

    Vasileiou, Thomas; Foresti, Daniele; Bayram, Adem; Poulikakos, Dimos; Ferrari, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Acoustophoresis revolutionized the field of container-less manipulation of liquids and solids by enabling mixing procedures which avoid contamination and loss of reagents due to the contact with the support. While its applications to chemistry and engineering are straightforward, additional developments are needed to obtain reliable biological protocols in a contactless environment. Here, we provide a first, fundamental step towards biological reactions in air by demonstrating the acoustophoretic DNA transfection of mammalian cells. We developed an original acoustophoretic design capable of levitating, moving and mixing biological suspensions of living mammalians cells and of DNA plasmids. The precise and sequential delivery of the mixed solutions into tissue culture plates is actuated by a novel mechanism based on the controlled actuation of the acoustophoretic force. The viability of the contactless procedure is tested using a cellular model sensitive to small perturbation of neuronal differentiation pathways. Additionally, the efficiency of the transfection procedure is compared to standard, container-based methods for both single and double DNA transfection and for different cell types including adherent growing HeLa cancer cells, and low adhesion neuron-like PC12 cells. In all, this work provides a proof of principle which paves the way to the development of high-throughput acoustophoretic biological reactors. PMID:26828312

  3. The Expanding Toolbox of In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan; Handagama, Winode; Marr, Enolia; Sayler, Gary; Ripp, Steven

    2016-01-01

    In vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) permits the visualization of engineered bioluminescence from living cells and tissues to provide a unique perspective toward the understanding of biological processes as they occur within the framework of an authentic in vivo environment. The toolbox of in vivo BLI includes an inventory of luciferase compounds capable of generating bioluminescent light signals along with sophisticated and powerful instrumentation designed to detect and quantify these light signals non-invasively as they emit from the living subject. The information acquired reveals the dynamics of a wide range of biological functions that play key roles in the physiological and pathological control of disease and its therapeutic management. This mini review provides an overview of the tools and applications central to the evolution of in vivo BLI as a core technology in the preclinical imaging disciplines. PMID:27446798

  4. Iso-luminance counterillumination drove bioluminescent shark radiation

    PubMed Central

    Claes, Julien M.; Nilsson, Dan-Eric; Straube, Nicolas; Collin, Shaun P.; Mallefet, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    Counterilluminating animals use ventral photogenic organs (photophores) to mimic the residual downwelling light and cloak their silhouette from upward-looking predators. To cope with variable conditions of pelagic light environments they typically adjust their luminescence intensity. Here, we found evidence that bioluminescent sharks instead emit a constant light output and move up and down in the water column to remain cryptic at iso-luminance depth. We observed, across 21 globally distributed shark species, a correlation between capture depth and the proportion of a ventral area occupied by photophores. This information further allowed us, using visual modelling, to provide an adaptive explanation for shark photophore pattern diversity: in species facing moderate predation risk from below, counterilluminating photophores were partially co-opted for bioluminescent signalling, leading to complex patterns. In addition to increase our understanding of pelagic ecosystems our study emphasizes the importance of bioluminescence as a speciation driver. PMID:24608897

  5. The Expanding Toolbox of In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan; Handagama, Winode; Marr, Enolia; Sayler, Gary; Ripp, Steven

    2016-01-01

    In vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) permits the visualization of engineered bioluminescence from living cells and tissues to provide a unique perspective toward the understanding of biological processes as they occur within the framework of an authentic in vivo environment. The toolbox of in vivo BLI includes an inventory of luciferase compounds capable of generating bioluminescent light signals along with sophisticated and powerful instrumentation designed to detect and quantify these light signals non-invasively as they emit from the living subject. The information acquired reveals the dynamics of a wide range of biological functions that play key roles in the physiological and pathological control of disease and its therapeutic management. This mini review provides an overview of the tools and applications central to the evolution of in vivo BLI as a core technology in the preclinical imaging disciplines. PMID:27446798

  6. Effect of antiangiogenic therapy on luciferase activity in a cytomegalovirus- or HSP70-promoter-transfected M21 tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hundt, Walter; Schink, Christian; Steinbach, Silke; O'Connell-Rodwell, Caitlin E.; Kiessling, Andreas; Librizzi, Damiano; Burbelko, Mykhaylo; Guccione, Samira

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the effect of targeted gene therapy on heat shock protein 70 expression (Hsp70) and protein production (HSP70) in a melanoma tumor model (M21; M21-L). M21 and M21-L cells transfected with a plasmid containing the Hsp70 (Hspa1b) or the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter and the luciferase reporter gene were injected into mice; the resulting tumors grew to a size of 650 mm3. Mice (five per group) were intravenously treated with an Arg-Gly-Asp peptide-nanoparticle/Raf-1 kinase inhibitor protein complex [RGD-NP/RAF(-)] or with a nanoparticle control. Bioluminescence imaging (IVIS®, Xenogen, USA) was performed at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after the treatment cycle. Western blot analysis of HSP70 protein was performed to monitor protein expression. The size of the treated M21 tumors remained fairly constant (647.8+/-103.4 mm2 at the beginning versus 704.8+/-94.4 mm3 at the end of the experiment). The size of the M21-L tumors increased, similar to the untreated control tumors. Bioluminescent imaging demonstrated that when transcription was controlled by the CMV promoter, luciferase activity decreased to 17.9%+/-4.3% of baseline values in the treated M21 tumors. When transcription was controlled by the Hsp70 promoter, the highest luciferase activity (4.5+/-0.7-fold increase over base-line values) was seen 24 h after injection in the M21 tumors; however, no luciferase activity was seen in the M21-L tumors. In accordance with bioluminescent imaging, western blot analysis showed a peak in HSP70 production at 24 h after the injection of the RGD-NP/RAF(-) complex in the M21 tumors; however, no HSP70 protein induction was seen in the M21-L tumors. Thus, targeted antiangiogenic therapy can induce Hsp70 expression and HSP70 protein in melanoma tumors.

  7. Stable transfection and identification of a hair follicle-specific expression vector of IGFBP-5 in goat fetal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, X J; Su, H M; Liang, Y; Wang, Y F; Guo, X D; Wang, Z G; Liu, D J

    2014-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) is one of the 6 members of the IGFBP family and is involved in the regulation of cell growth, apoptosis, and other IGF-stimulated signaling pathways. To determine the significance of IGFBP-5 in the Inner Mongolia Cashmere goat (Capra hircus), a hair follicle-specific expression vector of IGFBP-5, pCDsRed2-K-IGFBP5 (6.7 kb), was constructed by cloning IGFBP-5 downstream of the keratin-association protein (KAP)6-1 promoter and inserting this fragment into pCDsRed2, which contains a red fluorescent protein (DsRed) expression unit. Inner Mongolia Cashmere goat fetal fibroblast (GFb) cells were transfected with the expression vector by using Lipofectamine(TM) 2000. Cell clones that stably expressed red fluorescence were obtained after selection with Geneticin (G418). The transgene in the cell clones was examined by polymerase chain reaction to verify that exogenous DNA (pKAP6-1 and IGFBP-5) had integrated stably into GFb cells. These data suggest that this method can be used for the construction of a hair follicle-specific expression vector for functional genetic analyses and for obtaining stable transfection donor cells for nuclear transfer. PMID:24668676

  8. Space application research of EMCCDs for bioluminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao

    The detection of bioluminescense is widely used on the ground, while the detection of bioluminescence in space is still at the stage of detecting bright bioluminescense. With the rapid development of research in Space Life Sciences, it will be necessary to develop a detection technology to detect weak bioluminescense. Compared to other low-light detection techniques for ground, there are more advantages of EMCCDs for space application. Build a space bioluminescence imaging detection system, analysis the feasibility and capability of its will be significant. Co-Author:Xie Zongbao,Zheng Weibo

  9. Infection, transfection, and co-transfection of baculoviruses by microprojectile bombardment of larvae.

    PubMed

    Obregón-Barboza, Verónica; Del Rincón-Castro, Ma Cristina; Cabrera-Ponce, José L; Ibarra, Jorge E

    2007-03-01

    The use of baculoviruses as expression vectors for heterologous proteins has been practically limited to the use of the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). In this work, infection, transfection and co-transfection events with the baculoviruses AcMNPV and Trichoplusia ni granulovirus (TnGV) were accomplished by bombardment of T. ni first-instar larvae with microprojectiles coated with virions, viral DNA, and viral DNA and a transfer vector, respectively. A series of shooting conditions were tested until positive results were obtained. The use of 1.6 microm gold particles at 900 psi shooting pressure, 400 Torr vacuum, 7 cm distance to target, on sets of 20 first-instar larvae held in a 16 mm diameter container, proved to be the best shooting conditions. Typical infection symptoms were shown by larvae when shot with viruses or viral DNA from AcMNPV or TnGV. Co-transfected recombinant AcMNPV and TnGV were identified by the formation of occlusion bodies and GFP, respectively, in bombarded larvae. This technique opens a wide range of possibilities, not only to use an extensive number of baculoviruses as expression vectors for heterologous proteins, but also be used to infect, transfect or co-transfect a wide variety of viruses into animal cells. PMID:17184851

  10. NF-kappa B activity in T cells stably expressing the Tax protein of human T cell lymphotropic virus type I

    SciTech Connect

    Lacoste, J.; Cohen, L.; Hiscott, J. )

    1991-10-01

    The effect of constitutive Tax expression on the interaction of NF-{kappa} B with its recognition sequence and on NF-{kappa} B-dependent gene expression was examined in T lymphoid Jurkat cell lines (19D and 9J) stably transformed with a Tax expression vector. Tax expressing T cell lines contained a constitutive level of NF-{kappa} B binding activity, detectable by mobility shift assay and uv cross-linking using a palindromic NF-{kappa} B probe homologous to the interferon beta PRDII site. In Jurkat and NC2.10 induction with phorbol esters resulted in the appearance of new DNA binding proteins of 85, 75, and 54 kDa, whereas in Tax expressing cells the 85-kDa protein and a 92-kDa DNA binding protein were constitutively induced. Expression of Tax protein in 19D and 9J resulted in transcription of the endogenous NF-kappa B-dependent granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor gene and increased basal level expression of transfected NF-kappa B-regulated promoters. Nonetheless transcription of both the endogenous and the transfected gene was inducible by PMA treatment. Tax expression in Jurkat T cells may alter the stoichiometry of NF-kappa B DNA binding proteins and thus change the expression of NF-kappa B-regulated promoters.

  11. Sodium Kinetics of Na,K-ATPase α Isoforms in Intact Transfected HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zahler, Raphael; Zhang, Zhong-Ting; Manor, Mira; Boron, Walter F.

    1997-01-01

    By participating in the regulation of ion and voltage gradients, the Na-K pump (i.e., Na,K-ATPase) influences many aspects of cellular physiology. Of the four α isoforms of the pump, α1 is ubiquitous, α2 is predominant in skeletal muscle, and α3 is found in neurons and the cardiac conduction system. To determine whether the isoforms have different intracellular Na+ affinities, we used the Na+-sensitive dye sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate (SBFI) to measure pump-mediated Na+ efflux as a function of [Na+]i in human HeLa cells stably transfected with rat Na-K pump isoforms. We Na+-loaded the cells, and then monitored the time course of the decrease in [Na+]i after removing external Na+. All transfected rat α subunits were highly ouabain resistant: the α1 isoform is naturally resistant, whereas the α2 and α3 isoforms had been mutagenized to render them resistant. Thus, the Na+ efflux mediated by endogenous and transfected pumps could be separated by studying the cells at low (1 μM) and high (4 mM) ouabain concentrations. We found that the apparent Km for Na+ efflux attributable to the native human α1 isoform was 12 mM, which was similar to the Km of rat α1. The α2 and α3 isoforms had apparent Km's of 22 and 33 mM, respectively. The cells expressing α3 had a high resting [Na+]i. The maximal activity of native α1 in the α3-transfected cells was only ∼56% of native α1 activity in untransfected HeLa cells, suggesting that transfection with α3 led to a compensatory decrease in endogenous α1 pumps. We conclude that the apparent Km(Na+) for rat Na-K pump isoforms increases in the sequence α1 < α2 < α3. The α3 isoform may be suited for handling large Na+ loads in electrically active cells. PMID:9236212

  12. A General RNA Motif for Cellular Transfection

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Maria LB; Byrom, Michelle; Yan, Amy; Kelly, Linsley; Li, Na; Furtado, Raquel; Palliser, Deborah; Ellington, Andrew D; Levy, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a selection scheme to generate nucleic acid sequences that recognize and directly internalize into mammalian cells without the aid of conventional delivery methods. To demonstrate the generality of the technology, two independent selections with different starting pools were performed against distinct target cells. Each selection yielded a single highly functional sequence, both of which folded into a common core structure. This internalization signal can be adapted for use as a general purpose reagent for transfection into a wide variety of cell types including primary cells. PMID:22233578

  13. Development of mRuby2-Transfected C3H10T1/2 Fibroblasts for Musculoskeletal Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunzhi Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mouse C3H10T1/2 fibroblasts are multipotent, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like progenitor cells that are widely used in musculoskeletal research. In this study, we have established a clonal population of C3H10T1/2 cells stably-transfected with mRuby2, an orange-red fluorescence reporter gene. Flow cytometry analysis and fluorescence imaging confirmed successful transfection of these cells. Cell counting studies showed that untransfected C3H10T1/2 cells and mRuby2-transfected C3H10T1/2 cells proliferated at similar rates. Adipogenic differentiation experiments demonstrated that untransfected C3H10T1/2 cells and mRuby2-transfected C3H10T1/2 cells stained positive for Oil Red O and showed increased expression of adipogenic genes including adiponectin and lipoprotein lipase. Chondrogenic differentiation experiments demonstrated that untransfected C3H10T1/2 cells and mRuby2-transfected C3H10T1/2 cells stained positive for Alcian Blue and showed increased expression of chondrogenic genes including aggrecan. Osteogenic differentiation experiments demonstrated that untransfected C3H10T1/2 cells and mRuby2-transfected C3H10T1/2 cells stained positive for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as well as Alizarin Red and showed increased expression of osteogenic genes including alp, ocn and osf-1. When seeded on calcium phosphate-based ceramic scaffolds, mRuby2-transfected C3H10T1/2 cells maintained even fluorescence labeling and osteogenic differentiation. In summary, mRuby2-transfected C3H10T1/2 cells exhibit mRuby2 fluorescence and showed little-to-no difference in terms of cell proliferation and differentiation as untransfected C3H10T1/2 cells. These cells will be available from American Type Culture Collection (ATCC; CRL-3268™) and may be a valuable tool for preclinical studies. PMID:26407291

  14. Development of mRuby2-Transfected C3H10T1/2 Fibroblasts for Musculoskeletal Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Ker, Dai Fei Elmer; Sharma, Rashmi; Wang, Evelyna Tsi Hsin; Yang, Yunzhi Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mouse C3H10T1/2 fibroblasts are multipotent, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like progenitor cells that are widely used in musculoskeletal research. In this study, we have established a clonal population of C3H10T1/2 cells stably-transfected with mRuby2, an orange-red fluorescence reporter gene. Flow cytometry analysis and fluorescence imaging confirmed successful transfection of these cells. Cell counting studies showed that untransfected C3H10T1/2 cells and mRuby2-transfected C3H10T1/2 cells proliferated at similar rates. Adipogenic differentiation experiments demonstrated that untransfected C3H10T1/2 cells and mRuby2-transfected C3H10T1/2 cells stained positive for Oil Red O and showed increased expression of adipogenic genes including adiponectin and lipoprotein lipase. Chondrogenic differentiation experiments demonstrated that untransfected C3H10T1/2 cells and mRuby2-transfected C3H10T1/2 cells stained positive for Alcian Blue and showed increased expression of chondrogenic genes including aggrecan. Osteogenic differentiation experiments demonstrated that untransfected C3H10T1/2 cells and mRuby2-transfected C3H10T1/2 cells stained positive for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as well as Alizarin Red and showed increased expression of osteogenic genes including alp, ocn and osf-1. When seeded on calcium phosphate-based ceramic scaffolds, mRuby2-transfected C3H10T1/2 cells maintained even fluorescence labeling and osteogenic differentiation. In summary, mRuby2-transfected C3H10T1/2 cells exhibit mRuby2 fluorescence and showed little-to-no difference in terms of cell proliferation and differentiation as untransfected C3H10T1/2 cells. These cells will be available from American Type Culture Collection (ATCC; CRL-3268™) and may be a valuable tool for preclinical studies. PMID:26407291

  15. Microtiter plate tests for segregation of bioluminescent bacteria.

    PubMed

    Šimkus, Remigijus; Meškienė, Rita; Ledas, Žilvinas; Baronas, Romas; Meškys, Rolandas

    2016-02-01

    It has been recently shown that bioluminescence imaging can be usefully applied to provide new insights into bacterial self-organization. In this work we employ bioluminescence imaging to record images of nutrient rich liquid cultures of the lux-gene reporter Escherichia coli in microtiter plate wells. The images show that patterns of inhomogenous bioluminescence form along the three-phase contact lines. The paper analyzes the dependencies of the average number of luminous aggregates (clouds) on various environmental factors. In particular, our results show that optimal (neutral) pH and high aeration rates determine the highest mean number of clouds, and that spatiotemporal patterns do not form in the pH buffered suspensions. In addition, a sigmoidal (switch-like) dependence of the number of aggregates on the rate of aeration was observed. The obtained bioluminescence imaging data was interpreted by employing the Keller-Segel-Fisher (KSF) model of chemotaxis and logistic growth, adapted to systems of metabolically flexible (two-state) bacteria. The modified KSF model successfully simulated the observed switch-like responses. The results of the microtiter plate tests and their simulations indicate that the segregation of bacteria with different activities proceeds in the three-phase contact line region. PMID:26039821

  16. Bioluminescent system for dynamic imaging of cell and animal behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Hara-Miyauchi, Chikako; Tsuji, Osahiko; Hanyu, Aki; Okada, Seiji; Yasuda, Akimasa; Fukano, Takashi; Akazawa, Chihiro; Nakamura, Masaya; Imamura, Takeshi; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Okano, Hirotaka James; and others

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We combined a yellow variant of GFP and firefly luciferase to make ffLuc-cp156. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 showed improved photon yield in cultured cells and transgenic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely-moving animals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled tracking real-time drug delivery in conscious animals. -- Abstract: The current utility of bioluminescence imaging is constrained by a low photon yield that limits temporal sensitivity. Here, we describe an imaging method that uses a chemiluminescent/fluorescent protein, ffLuc-cp156, which consists of a yellow variant of Aequorea GFP and firefly luciferase. We report an improvement in photon yield by over three orders of magnitude over current bioluminescent systems. We imaged cellular movement at high resolution including neuronal growth cones and microglial cell protrusions. Transgenic ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely moving animals, which may provide a reliable assay for drug distribution in behaving animals for pre-clinical studies.

  17. Bioluminescence: a fungal nightlight with an internal timer.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Etelvino J H

    2015-03-30

    A recent study shows that green light emission by Neonothopanus gardneri mushrooms, endemic to coconut forests of Northern Brazil, is controlled by a circadian clock. Furthermore, insects are attracted by the light, raising the possibility that bioluminescence functions in spore dispersal and fungal dissemination. PMID:25829013

  18. Semi-automated Image Processing for Preclinical Bioluminescent Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Slavine, Nikolai V; McColl, Roderick W

    2015-01-01

    Objective Bioluminescent imaging is a valuable noninvasive technique for investigating tumor dynamics and specific biological molecular events in living animals to better understand the effects of human disease in animal models. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a strategy behind automated methods for bioluminescence image processing from the data acquisition to obtaining 3D images. Methods In order to optimize this procedure a semi-automated image processing approach with multi-modality image handling environment was developed. To identify a bioluminescent source location and strength we used the light flux detected on the surface of the imaged object by CCD cameras. For phantom calibration tests and object surface reconstruction we used MLEM algorithm. For internal bioluminescent sources we used the diffusion approximation with balancing the internal and external intensities on the boundary of the media and then determined an initial order approximation for the photon fluence we subsequently applied a novel iterative deconvolution method to obtain the final reconstruction result. Results We find that the reconstruction techniques successfully used the depth-dependent light transport approach and semi-automated image processing to provide a realistic 3D model of the lung tumor. Our image processing software can optimize and decrease the time of the volumetric imaging and quantitative assessment. Conclusion The data obtained from light phantom and lung mouse tumor images demonstrate the utility of the image reconstruction algorithms and semi-automated approach for bioluminescent image processing procedure. We suggest that the developed image processing approach can be applied to preclinical imaging studies: characteristics of tumor growth, identify metastases, and potentially determine the effectiveness of cancer treatment. PMID:26618187

  19. Polydiacetylene Liposomal Aequorin Bioluminescent Device for Detection of Hydrophobic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Ryoko; Takegami, Shigehiko; Konishi, Atsuko; Horikawa, Hikari; Yonezawa, Sayumi; Kitade, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a polydiacetylene liposomal aequorin bioluminescent device (PLABD) that functioned through control of the membrane transport of Ca(2+) ions was developed for detecting hydrophobic compounds. In the PLABD, aequorin was encapsulated in an internal water phase and a calcium ionophore (CI) was contained in a hydrophobic region. Membrane transport of Ca(2+) ions across the CI was suppressed by polymerization between diacetylene molecules. On addition of an analyte, the membrane transport of Ca(2+) ions across the CI increased, and Ca(2+) ions from the external water phase could diffuse into the internal water phase via the CI, which resulted in bioluminescence of the aequorin. Lidocaine, procaine, and procainamide were used as model compounds to test the validity of the detection mechanism of the PLABD. When each analyte was added to a suspension of the PLABD, bioluminescence from the aequorin in the PLABD was observed, and the level of this bioluminescence increased with increasing analyte concentration. There was a linear relationship between the logarithm of the analyte concentration and the bioluminescence for all analytes as follows: R = 0.89 from 10 nmol L(-1) to 10 mmol L(-1) for lidocaine, R = 0.66 from 10 nmol L(-1) to 100 μmol L(-1) for procaine, and R = 0.74 from 100 nmol L(-1) to 100 μmol L(-1) for procainamide. Compared to the traditional colorimetric method using polydiacetylene liposome, the PLABD was superior for both the sensitivity and dynamic range. Thus, PLABD is a valid, simple, and sensitive signal generator for detection of hydrophobic compounds that interact with PLABD membranes. PMID:27146598

  20. Dual-Color Monitoring Overcomes the Limitations of Single Bioluminescent Reporters in Fast-Growing Microbes and Reveals Phase-Dependent Protein Productivity during the Metabolic Rhythms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Archana

    2015-01-01

    Luciferase is a useful, noninvasive reporter of gene regulation that can be continuously monitored over long periods of time; however, its use is problematic in fast-growing microbes like bacteria and yeast because rapidly changing cell numbers and metabolic states also influence bioluminescence, thereby confounding the reporter's signal. Here we show that these problems can be overcome in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by simultaneously monitoring bioluminescence from two different colors of beetle luciferase, where one color (green) reports activity of a gene of interest, while a second color (red) is stably expressed and used to continuously normalize green bioluminescence for fluctuations in signal intensity that are unrelated to gene regulation. We use this dual-luciferase strategy in conjunction with a light-inducible promoter system to test whether different phases of yeast respiratory oscillations are more suitable for heterologous protein production than others. By using pulses of light to activate production of a green luciferase while normalizing signal variation to a red luciferase, we show that the early reductive phase of the yeast metabolic cycle produces more luciferase than other phases. PMID:26162874

  1. Rational and random mutagenesis of firefly luciferase to identify an efficient emitter of red bioluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branchini, Bruce R.; Southworth, Tara L.; Khattak, Neelum F.; Murtiashaw, Martha H.; Fleet, Sarah E.

    2004-06-01

    Firefly luciferase, which emits yellow-green (557 nm) light, and the corresponding cDNA have been used successfully as a bioluminescence reporter of gene expression. One particularly exciting application is in the area of in vivo bioluminescence imaging. Our interest is in developing improved reagents by identifying Photinus pyralis luciferase mutants that efficiently emit red bioluminescence. In this way, the proven advantages of the P. pyralis protein can be combined with the potential advantages of a red-shifted emitter. Using site-directed mutagenesis techniques, we have identified many mutants emitting red bioluminescence. Unfortunately, these enzymes generally have significantly decreased bioluminescence activity. Interestingly, we discovered a mutation, Ile351Ala, that produced a moderate 16 nm red-shift, while maintaining excellent bioluminescence activity. We then undertook a random mutagenesis approach to identify luciferase mutants that emit further red-shifted bioluminescence with minimal loss of activity. Libraries of mutants were created using an error-prone PCR method and the Ile351Ala luciferase mutant as the template DNA. The libraries were screened by in vivo bacterial assays and the promising mutants were purified to enable accurate determination of bioluminescence emission spectra and total bioluminescence activity. We will report the characterization results, including the identification of the randomly altered amino acids, of several mutants that catalyze bioluminescence with emission maxima of approximately 600 nm.

  2. Validation of constitutively expressed bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a rapid microbiological quantification tool.

    PubMed

    Shah, N; Naseby, D C

    2015-06-15

    Whole cell biosensors have been extensively used for monitoring toxicity and contamination of various compounds and xenobiotics in environmental biology and microbial ecology; their application in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries has been limited. According to several pharmacopoeias, pharmaceutical products must be tested for microbial activity using traditional viable count techniques; the use of whole cell microbial biosensors potentially provides an alternative, fast, and efficient method. However there is a lack of a validated bioluminescence method. Prototype whole cell microbial biosensors have already been developed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027. Validation of the bioluminescent strains was performed in accordance with the pharmacopoeia, Parenteral Drug Association and International Organisation of Standardisation. These strains demonstrated that the bioluminescent method was accurate, precise and equivalent, as compared with plate counting at a range of 10(3)-10(7) CFU/mL. Percentage recoveries using the bioluminescent method were between 70% and 130% for all bioluminescent strains and therefore the bioluminescent method was accurate according to the criteria set in PDA technical report 33. The method was also more precise (relative standard deviation less than 15%) than the traditional plate counting method or the ATP bioluminescent method. The lower limit of detection was 10(3) CFU/mL. Two-way ANOVA showed no significant difference between the traditional plate counting and the novel bioluminescent method for all bioluminescent strains. The bioluminescent constructs passed/exceeded pharmacopoeia-specified criteria for range, limit of detection, accuracy, precision and equivalence. PMID:25618377

  3. Gene transfection by echo contrast agent microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, Katsuro

    2002-11-01

    In vitro and in vivo experiments have demonstrated that various echo contrast agent microbubbles can be intentionally ruptured by diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound. Violent microstreaming are produced during microbubble collapse. Researchers have hypothesized that these microjets or microstreaming could be applied to promote diffusion of drugs into various tissues and lesions. The most exciting application of this method is probably delivery of genes into cells. As various genes are currently under investigation for the purpose of treating diseases, ultrasound and microbubbles may be used as a modality to promote better outcome for gene therapy. Recent studies have shown that different gases contained within the bubbles greatly influence the degree of gene transfection. Also, the outer layer of the microbubbles can be custom-made for binding to target tissue. Recent advance on this topic will be discussed.

  4. Single cell transfection using plasmid decorated AFM probes

    SciTech Connect

    Cuerrier, Charles M.; Lebel, Rejean; Grandbois, Michel . E-mail: michel.grandbois@usherbrooke.ca

    2007-04-13

    Eukaryotic cells were individually transfected using commercially available atomic force microscope tips decorated with plasmidic DNA encoding for the fluorescent protein EGFP. In a typical transfection attempt, the tip is forcibly incorporated into the cell thus allowing for the transfer of the genetic material through the cell membrane. A sharp discontinuity, corresponding to the passage of the tip through the cell membrane can be easily detected when monitoring the cellular deformation as a function of the applied force. In order for the transfection to be successful, the tip must reversibly penetrates the membrane without causing disturbance or damage to the cell. Transfection success rate (30%), cell survival, and growth are confirmed by epifluorescence microscopy. This technique provides an alternative tool to the transfection toolbox, allowing the transfection of specific individual cells with minimal disturbance.

  5. Specific growth stimulation by linoleic acid in hepatoma cell lines transfected with the target protein of a liver carcinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Keler, T; Barker, C S; Sorof, S

    1992-01-01

    The hepatic carcinogen N-2-fluorenylacetamide (2-acetylaminofluorene) was shown previously to interact specifically with its target protein, liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), early during hepatocarcinogenesis in rats. In search of the significance of the interaction, rat L-FABP cDNA in the sense and antisense orientations was transfected into a subline of the rat hepatoma HTC cell line that did not express L-FABP. After the transfections, the basal doubling times of the cells were not significantly different. However, at 10(-5)-10(-7) M, linoleic acid, which is an essential fatty acid, a ligand of L-FABP, and the precursor of many eicosanoids and related lipids, stimulated the incorporation of [3H]thymidine in three randomly isolated and stably transfected cell clones that expressed L-FABP, but virtually did not stimulate the incorporation of [3H]thymidine in three L-FABP-nonexpressing clones transfected with the antisense DNA. Linoleic acid at 10(-6) M increased cell number almost 3-fold (38% vs. 14%; P less than 0.0001) and thymidine incorporation nearly 5-fold (23.2% vs. 4.9%; P less than 0.001) in the L-FABP-expressing cells compared to that in the transfected nonexpressing cells. L-FABP acted specifically and cooperatively with linoleic acid, inasmuch as all the proteins other than L-FABP in the transfected L-FABP nonexpressing cells and four other fatty acids (gamma-linolenic acid, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid, and palmitoleic acid) were unable to effect a significant elevation or difference in the level of DNA synthesis that was attributable to the transfection. Metabolism of the linoleic acid to oxygenated derivatives was apparently necessary, since the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin partly inhibited and the antioxidant lipoxygenase inhibitors nordihydroguariaretic acid and alpha-tocopherol completely abolished the growth stimulation. The evidence supports the idea that L-FABP, the target protein of the liver carcinogen

  6. Modelling dinoflagellates as an approach to the seasonal forecasting of bioluminescence in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcinko, Charlotte L. J.; Martin, Adrian P.; Allen, John T.

    2014-11-01

    Bioluminescence within ocean surface waters is of significant interest because it can enhance the study of subsurface movement and organisms. Little is known about how bioluminescence potential (BPOT) varies spatially and temporally in the open ocean. However, light emitted from dinoflagellates often dominates the stimulated bioluminescence field. As a first step towards forecasting surface ocean bioluminescence in the open ocean, a simple ecological model is developed which simulates seasonal changes in dinoflagellate abundance. How forecasting seasonal changes in BPOT may be achieved through combining such a model with relationships derived from observations is discussed and an example is given. The study illustrates a potential new approach to forecasting BPOT through explicitly modelling the population dynamics of a prolific bioluminescent phylum. The model developed here offers a promising platform for the future operational forecasting of the broad temporal changes in bioluminescence within the North Atlantic. Such forecasting of seasonal patterns could provide valuable information for the targeting of scientific field campaigns.

  7. Bioluminescent Ligand-Receptor Binding Assays for Protein or Peptide Hormones.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence has been widely used in biomedical research due to its high sensitivity, low background, and broad linear range. In recent studies, we applied bioluminescence to ligand-receptor binding assays for some protein or peptide hormones based on a newly developed small monomeric Nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) reporter that has the so far brightest bioluminescence. The conventional ligand-receptor binding assays rely on radioligands that have drawbacks, such as radioactive hazards and short shelf lives. In contrast, the novel bioluminescent binding assays use the NanoLuc-based protein or peptide tracers that are safe, stable, and ultrasensitive. Thus, the novel bioluminescent ligand-receptor binding assay would be applied to more and more protein or peptide hormones for ligand-receptor interaction studies in future. In the present article, we provided detailed protocols for setting up the novel bioluminescent ligand-receptor binding assays using two representative protein hormones as examples. PMID:27424896

  8. EXPERIMENTS ON STABLY AND NEUTRALLY STRATIFIED FLOW OVER A MODEL THREE-DIMENSIONAL HILL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The flow structure over a bell shaped hill (reciprocal of a fourth order polynomial in cross section and height h) was studied in large and small stably stratified towing tanks (with uniform density gradients) and in an unstratified wind tunnel. Observations were made at Froude n...

  9. Mammalian cell transfection: the present and the future

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Kyung

    2010-01-01

    Transfection is a powerful analytical tool enabling study of the function of genes and gene products in cells. The transfection methods are broadly classified into three groups; biological, chemical, and physical. These methods have advanced to make it possible to deliver nucleic acids to specific subcellular regions of cells by use of a precisely controlled laser-microcope system. The combination of point-directed transfection and mRNA transfection is a new way of studying the function of genes and gene products. However, each method has its own advantages and disadvantages so the optimum method depends on experimental design and objective. PMID:20549496

  10. Optimization of Transfection Conditions for siRNA Screening.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Justin J; Azorsa, David O

    2016-01-01

    RNAi screening of mammalian cells is often performed using siRNAs and cationic lipids as transfection reagents. Efficiency of transfection depends on growth characteristics of the cells and the cationic lipid used. With a large selection of cationic lipids available, it can often be difficult to select the optimal lipid and lipid:siRNA (vol:wt) ratio. Here, we describe the process of optimizing siRNA transfection conditions for efficient reverse transfection of mammalian cells using specific positive and negative siRNA controls. PMID:27581281

  11. Multiplexing Bioluminescent and Fluorescent Reporters to Monitor Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haugwitz, Michael; Nourzaie, Omar; Garachtchenko, Tatiana; Hu, Lanrong; Gandlur, Suvarna; Olsen, Cathy; Farmer, Andrew; Chaga, Grigoriy; Sagawa, Hiroaki

    2008-01-01

    Reporter proteins are valuable tools to monitor promoter activities and characterize signal transduction pathways. Many of the currently available promoter reporters have drawbacks that compromise their performance. Enzyme-based reporter systems using cytosolic luciferases are highly sensitive, but require a cell lysis step that prevents their use in long-term monitoring. By contrast, secreted bioluminescent reporters like Metridia luciferase and Secreted Alkaline Phosphatase can be assayed repeatedly, using supernatant from the same live cell population to produce many sets of data over time. This is crucial for studies with limited amounts of cells, as in the case of stem cells. The use of secreted bioluminescent reporters also enables broader applications to provide more detailed information using live cells; for example, multiplexing with fluorescent proteins. Here, data is presented describing the characteristics of secreted Metridia luciferase and its use in multiplexing applications with either Secreted Alkaline Phosphatase or a fluorescent protein. PMID:20161823

  12. Multiplexing bioluminescent and fluorescent reporters to monitor live cells.

    PubMed

    Haugwitz, Michael; Nourzaie, Omar; Garachtchenko, Tatiana; Hu, Lanrong; Gandlur, Suvarna; Olsen, Cathy; Farmer, Andrew; Chaga, Grigoriy; Sagawa, Hiroaki

    2008-01-01

    Reporter proteins are valuable tools to monitor promoter activities and characterize signal transduction pathways. Many of the currently available promoter reporters have drawbacks that compromise their performance. Enzyme-based reporter systems using cytosolic luciferases are highly sensitive, but require a cell lysis step that prevents their use in long-term monitoring. By contrast, secreted bioluminescent reporters like Metridia luciferase and Secreted Alkaline Phosphatase can be assayed repeatedly, using supernatant from the same live cell population to produce many sets of data over time. This is crucial for studies with limited amounts of cells, as in the case of stem cells. The use of secreted bioluminescent reporters also enables broader applications to provide more detailed information using live cells; for example, multiplexing with fluorescent proteins. Here, data is presented describing the characteristics of secreted Metridia luciferase and its use in multiplexing applications with either Secreted Alkaline Phosphatase or a fluorescent protein. PMID:20161823

  13. Modeling and image reconstruction in spectrally resolved bioluminescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, Hamid; Pogue, Brian W.; Davis, Scott C.; Patterson, Michael S.

    2007-02-01

    Recent interest in modeling and reconstruction algorithms for Bioluminescence Tomography (BLT) has increased and led to the general consensus that non-spectrally resolved intensity-based BLT results in a non-unique problem. However, the light emitted from, for example firefly Luciferase, is widely distributed over the band of wavelengths from 500 nm to 650 nm and above, with the dominant fraction emitted from tissue being above 550 nm. This paper demonstrates the development of an algorithm used for multi-wavelength 3D spectrally resolved BLT image reconstruction in a mouse model. It is shown that using a single view data, bioluminescence sources of up to 15 mm deep can be successfully recovered given correct information about the underlying tissue absorption and scatter.

  14. Rapid, sensitive bioluminescent reporter technology for napthalene exposure and biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.M.H.; DiGrazia, P.M.; Applegate, B.; Burlage, R.; Sanseverino, J.; Dunbar, P.; Sayler, G.S. ); Larimer, F. )

    1990-08-17

    A bioluminescent reporter plasmid for naphthalene catabolism (pUTK21) was developed by transposon (Tn4431) insertion of the lux gene cassette from Vibrio fischeri into a naphthalene catabolic plasmid in Pseudomonas fluorescens. The insertion site of the lux transposon was the nahG gene encoding for salicylate hydroxylase. Luciferase-mediated light production from P. fluorescens strains harboring this plasmid was induced on exposure to naphthalene or the regulatory inducer metabolite, salicylate. In continuous culture, light induction was rapid and was highly responsive to dynamic changes in naphthalene exposure. Strains harboring pUTK21 were responsive to aromatic hydrocarbon contamination in Manufactured Gas Plant soils and produced sufficient light to serve as biosensors of naphthalene exposure and reporters of napthalene biodegradative activity. The robust and sensitive nature of the bioluminescent reporter technology suggests that new sensing methods can be developed for on-line process monitoring and control in complex environmental matrices.

  15. Monitoring Neural Activity with Bioluminescence during Natural Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, Eva A.; Kampff, Adam R.; Prober, David A.; Schier, Alexander F.; Engert, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Existing techniques for monitoring neural activity in awake, freely behaving vertebrates are invasive and difficult to target to genetically identified neurons. Here we describe the use of bioluminescence to non-invasively monitor the activity of genetically specified neurons in freely behaving zebrafish. Transgenic fish expressing the Ca2+-sensitive photoprotein GFP-apoAequorin (GA) in most neurons generated large and fast bioluminescent signals related to neural activity, neuroluminescence, that could be recorded continuously for many days. To test the limits of this technique, GA was specifically targeted to the hypocretin-positive neurons of the hypothalamus. We found that neuroluminescence generated by this group of ~20 neurons was associated with periods of increased locomotor activity and identified two classes of neural activity corresponding to distinct swim latencies. Thus, our neuroluminescence assay can report, with high temporal resolution and sensitivity, the activity of small subsets of neurons during unrestrained behavior. PMID:20305645

  16. A bright future for bioluminescent imaging in viral research

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Stewart M; McGregor, Alistair

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) has emerged as a powerful tool in the study of animal models of viral disease. BLI enables real-time in vivo study of viral infection, host immune response and the efficacy of intervention strategies. Substrate dependent light emitting luciferase enzyme when incorporated into a virus as a reporter gene enables detection of bioluminescence from infected cells using sensitive charge-coupled device (CCD) camera systems. Advantages of BLI include low background, real-time tracking of infection in the same animal and reduction in the requirement for larger animal numbers. Transgenic luciferase-tagged mice enable the use of pre-existing nontagged viruses in BLI studies. Continued development in luciferase reporter genes, substrates, transgenic animals and imaging systems will greatly enhance future BLI strategies in viral research. PMID:26413138

  17. Hyperspectral and multispectral bioluminescence optical tomography for small animal imaging.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Abhijit J; Darvas, Felix; Bading, James R; Moats, Rex A; Conti, Peter S; Smith, Desmond J; Cherry, Simon R; Leahy, Richard M

    2005-12-01

    For bioluminescence imaging studies in small animals, it is important to be able to accurately localize the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of the underlying bioluminescent source. The spectrum of light produced by the source that escapes the subject varies with the depth of the emission source because of the wavelength-dependence of the optical properties of tissue. Consequently, multispectral or hyperspectral data acquisition should help in the 3D localization of deep sources. In this paper, we describe a framework for fully 3D bioluminescence tomographic image acquisition and reconstruction that exploits spectral information. We describe regularized tomographic reconstruction techniques that use semi-infinite slab or FEM-based diffusion approximations of photon transport through turbid media. Singular value decomposition analysis was used for data dimensionality reduction and to illustrate the advantage of using hyperspectral rather than achromatic data. Simulation studies in an atlas-mouse geometry indicated that sub-millimeter resolution may be attainable given accurate knowledge of the optical properties of the animal. A fixed arrangement of mirrors and a single CCD camera were used for simultaneous acquisition of multispectral imaging data over most of the surface of the animal. Phantom studies conducted using this system demonstrated our ability to accurately localize deep point-like sources and show that a resolution of 1.5 to 2.2 mm for depths up to 6 mm can be achieved. We also include an in vivo study of a mouse with a brain tumour expressing firefly luciferase. Co-registration of the reconstructed 3D bioluminescent image with magnetic resonance images indicated good anatomical localization of the tumour. PMID:16306643

  18. Bioluminescence imaging of estrogen receptor activity during breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Vantaggiato, Cristina; Dell’Omo, Giulia; Ramachandran, Balaji; Manni, Isabella; Radaelli, Enrico; Scanziani, Eugenio; Piaggio, Giulia; Maggi, Adriana; Ciana, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ER) are known to play an important regulatory role in mammary gland development as well as in its neoplastic transformation. Although several studies highlighted the contribution of ER signaling in the breast transformation, little is known about the dynamics of ER state of activity during carcinogenesis due to the lack of appropriate models for measuring the extent of receptor signaling in time, in the same animal. To this aim, we have developed a reporter mouse model for the non-invasive in vivo imaging of ER activity: the ERE-Luc reporter mouse. ERE-Luc is a transgenic mouse generated with a firefly luciferase (Luc) reporter gene driven by a minimal promoter containing an estrogen responsive element (ERE). This model allows to measure receptor signaling in longitudinal studies by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Here, we have induced sporadic mammary cancers by treating systemically ERE-Luc reporter mice with DMBA (9,10-dimethyl 1,2-benzanthracene) and measured receptor signaling by in vivo imaging in individual animals from early stage until a clinically palpable tumor appeared in the mouse breast. We showed that DMBA administration induces an increase of bioluminescence in the whole abdominal area 6 h after treatment, the signal rapidly disappears. Several weeks later, strong bioluminescence is observed in the area corresponding to the mammary glands. In vivo and ex vivo imaging analysis demonstrated that this bioluminescent signal is localized in the breast area undergoing neoplastic transformation. We conclude that this non-invasive assay is a novel relevant tool to identify the activation of the ER signaling prior the morphological detection of the neoplastic transformation. PMID:27069764

  19. Hyperspectral and multispectral bioluminescence optical tomography for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Darvas, Felix; Bading, James R.; Moats, Rex A.; Conti, Peter S.; Smith, Desmond J.; Cherry, Simon R.; Leahy, Richard M.

    2005-12-01

    For bioluminescence imaging studies in small animals, it is important to be able to accurately localize the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of the underlying bioluminescent source. The spectrum of light produced by the source that escapes the subject varies with the depth of the emission source because of the wavelength-dependence of the optical properties of tissue. Consequently, multispectral or hyperspectral data acquisition should help in the 3D localization of deep sources. In this paper, we describe a framework for fully 3D bioluminescence tomographic image acquisition and reconstruction that exploits spectral information. We describe regularized tomographic reconstruction techniques that use semi-infinite slab or FEM-based diffusion approximations of photon transport through turbid media. Singular value decomposition analysis was used for data dimensionality reduction and to illustrate the advantage of using hyperspectral rather than achromatic data. Simulation studies in an atlas-mouse geometry indicated that sub-millimeter resolution may be attainable given accurate knowledge of the optical properties of the animal. A fixed arrangement of mirrors and a single CCD camera were used for simultaneous acquisition of multispectral imaging data over most of the surface of the animal. Phantom studies conducted using this system demonstrated our ability to accurately localize deep point-like sources and show that a resolution of 1.5 to 2.2 mm for depths up to 6 mm can be achieved. We also include an in vivo study of a mouse with a brain tumour expressing firefly luciferase. Co-registration of the reconstructed 3D bioluminescent image with magnetic resonance images indicated good anatomical localization of the tumour.

  20. Bioluminescence imaging of estrogen receptor activity during breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Vantaggiato, Cristina; Dell'Omo, Giulia; Ramachandran, Balaji; Manni, Isabella; Radaelli, Enrico; Scanziani, Eugenio; Piaggio, Giulia; Maggi, Adriana; Ciana, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ER) are known to play an important regulatory role in mammary gland development as well as in its neoplastic transformation. Although several studies highlighted the contribution of ER signaling in the breast transformation, little is known about the dynamics of ER state of activity during carcinogenesis due to the lack of appropriate models for measuring the extent of receptor signaling in time, in the same animal. To this aim, we have developed a reporter mouse model for the non-invasive in vivo imaging of ER activity: the ERE-Luc reporter mouse. ERE-Luc is a transgenic mouse generated with a firefly luciferase (Luc) reporter gene driven by a minimal promoter containing an estrogen responsive element (ERE). This model allows to measure receptor signaling in longitudinal studies by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Here, we have induced sporadic mammary cancers by treating systemically ERE-Luc reporter mice with DMBA (9,10-dimethyl 1,2-benzanthracene) and measured receptor signaling by in vivo imaging in individual animals from early stage until a clinically palpable tumor appeared in the mouse breast. We showed that DMBA administration induces an increase of bioluminescence in the whole abdominal area 6 h after treatment, the signal rapidly disappears. Several weeks later, strong bioluminescence is observed in the area corresponding to the mammary glands. In vivo and ex vivo imaging analysis demonstrated that this bioluminescent signal is localized in the breast area undergoing neoplastic transformation. We conclude that this non-invasive assay is a novel relevant tool to identify the activation of the ER signaling prior the morphological detection of the neoplastic transformation. PMID:27069764

  1. Bacterial bioluminescence and Gumbel statistics: From quorum sensing to correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delle Side, Domenico; Velardi, Luciano; Nassisi, Vincenzo; Pennetta, Cecilia; Alifano, Pietro; Talà, Adelfia; Salvatore Tredici, Maurizio

    2013-12-01

    We show that, in particular experimental conditions, the time course of the radiant fluxes, measured from a bioluminescent emission of a Vibrio harveyi related strain, collapse after suitable rescaling onto the Gumbel distribution of extreme value theory. We argue that the activation times of the strain luminous emission follow the universal behavior described by this statistical law, in spite of the fact that no extremal process is known to occur.

  2. Measurement of Bacterial Bioluminescence Intensity and Spectrum: Current Physical Techniques and Principles.

    PubMed

    Jia, Kun; Ionescu, Rodica Elena

    2016-01-01

    : Bioluminescence is light production by living organisms, which can be observed in numerous marine creatures and some terrestrial invertebrates. More specifically, bacterial bioluminescence is the "cold light" produced and emitted by bacterial cells, including both wild-type luminescent and genetically engineered bacteria. Because of the lively interplay of synthetic biology, microbiology, toxicology, and biophysics, different configurations of whole-cell biosensors based on bacterial bioluminescence have been designed and are widely used in different fields, such as ecotoxicology, food toxicity, and environmental pollution. This chapter first discusses the background of the bioluminescence phenomenon in terms of optical spectrum. Platforms for bacterial bioluminescence detection using various techniques are then introduced, such as a photomultiplier tube, charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) based integrated circuit. Furthermore, some typical biochemical methods to optimize the analytical performances of bacterial bioluminescent biosensors/assays are reviewed, followed by a presentation of author's recent work concerning the improved sensitivity of a bioluminescent assay for pesticides. Finally, bacterial bioluminescence as implemented in eukaryotic cells, bioluminescent imaging, and cancer cell therapies is discussed. PMID:25981856

  3. Bioluminescence in the Ocean: Origins of Biological, Chemical, and Ecological Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widder, E. A.

    2010-05-01

    From bacteria to fish, a remarkable variety of marine life depends on bioluminescence (the chemical generation of light) for finding food, attracting mates, and evading predators. Disparate biochemical systems and diverse phylogenetic distribution patterns of light-emitting organisms highlight the ecological benefits of bioluminescence, with biochemical and genetic analyses providing new insights into the mechanisms of its evolution. The origins and functions of some bioluminescent systems, however, remain obscure. Here, I review recent advances in understanding bioluminescence in the ocean and highlight future research efforts that will unite molecular details with ecological and evolutionary relationships.

  4. Detection of Organic Compounds with Whole-Cell Bioluminescent Bioassays

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan; Smartt, Abby; Ripp, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Natural and manmade organic chemicals are widely deposited across a diverse range of ecosystems including air, surface water, groundwater, wastewater, soil, sediment, and marine environments. Some organic compounds, despite their industrial values, are toxic to living organisms and pose significant health risks to humans and wildlife. Detection and monitoring of these organic pollutants in environmental matrices therefore is of great interest and need for remediation and health risk assessment. Although these detections have traditionally been performed using analytical chemical approaches that offer highly sensitive and specific identification of target compounds, these methods require specialized equipment and trained operators, and fail to describe potential bioavailable effects on living organisms. Alternatively, the integration of bioluminescent systems into whole-cell bioreporters presents a new capacity for organic compound detection. These bioreporters are constructed by incorporating reporter genes into catabolic or signaling pathways that are present within living cells and emit a bioluminescent signal that can be detected upon exposure to target chemicals. Although relatively less specific compared to analytical methods, bioluminescent bioassays are more cost-effective, more rapid, can be scaled to higher throughput, and can be designed to report not only the presence but also the bioavailability of target substances. This chapter reviews available bacterial and eukaryotic whole-cell bioreporters for sensing organic pollutants and their applications in a variety of sample matrices. PMID:25084996

  5. Robust image modeling technique with a bioluminescence image segmentation application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jianghong; Wang, Ruiping; Tian, Jie

    2009-02-01

    A robust pattern classifier algorithm for the variable symmetric plane model, where the driving noise is a mixture of a Gaussian and an outlier process, is developed. The veracity and high-speed performance of the pattern recognition algorithm is proved. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has recently gained wide acceptance in the field of in vivo small animal molecular imaging. So that it is very important for BLT to how to acquire the highprecision region of interest in a bioluminescence image (BLI) in order to decrease loss of the customers because of inaccuracy in quantitative analysis. An algorithm in the mode is developed to improve operation speed, which estimates parameters and original image intensity simultaneously from the noise corrupted image derived from the BLT optical hardware system. The focus pixel value is obtained from the symmetric plane according to a more realistic assumption for the noise sequence in the restored image. The size of neighborhood is adaptive and small. What's more, the classifier function is base on the statistic features. If the qualifications for the classifier are satisfied, the focus pixel intensity is setup as the largest value in the neighborhood.Otherwise, it will be zeros.Finally,pseudo-color is added up to the result of the bioluminescence segmented image. The whole process has been implemented in our 2D BLT optical system platform and the model is proved.

  6. Species-specific bioluminescence facilitates speciation in the deep sea.

    PubMed

    Davis, Matthew P; Holcroft, Nancy I; Wiley, Edward O; Sparks, John S; Leo Smith, W

    2014-01-01

    The vast darkness of the deep sea is an environment with few obvious genetic isolating barriers, and little is known regarding the macroevolutionary processes that have shaped present-day biodiversity in this habitat. Bioluminescence, the production and emission of light from a living organism through a chemical reaction, is thought to occur in approximately 80 % of the eukaryotic life that inhabits the deep sea (water depth greater than 200 m). In this study, we show, for the first time, that deep-sea fishes that possess species-specific bioluminescent structures (e.g., lanternfishes, dragonfishes) are diversifying into new species at a more rapid rate than deep-sea fishes that utilize bioluminescence in ways that would not promote isolation of populations (e.g., camouflage, predation). This work adds to our understanding of how life thrives and evolution shaped present-day biodiversity in the deep sea, the largest and arguably least explored habitat on earth. PMID:24771948

  7. Catabolic gene expression is monitored by bioluminescence in bioreactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Burlage, R.S.; Kuo, D.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1993-03-01

    In order to study the expression of specific catabolic genes under defined conditions, and to determine whether certain conditions tend to increase or decrease metal catabolic activities, a bioreporter gene can be introduced into the microorganism. Activity from such bioreporter gene would indicate successful bioremediation. Our laboratory has produced several bioreporter strains using the bioluminescent lux genes of Vibrio fischeri. A bioreporter producing visible light when genetic expression is induced. The bioluminescent system include sensitivity of detection, analysis of response in real- time, and on-line capability. We constructed a bioreporter strain aimed at following the degradation of toluene and related compounds in order to study expression of the catabolic genes with various substrates and under optimized bioreactor conditions. We have been able to detect the induction of a specific operon in response to the addition of oxylene, as a gratuitous inducer of the catabolic genes. A strong bioluminescent signal in these studies. We have varied the medium of an induced bioreactor culture of RB1401, and our data suggest that conditions for optimal expression of the catabolic operon might not be identical with optimal growth conditions.

  8. Catabolic gene expression is monitored by bioluminescence in bioreactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Burlage, R.S.; Kuo, D.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    In order to study the expression of specific catabolic genes under defined conditions, and to determine whether certain conditions tend to increase or decrease metal catabolic activities, a bioreporter gene can be introduced into the microorganism. Activity from such bioreporter gene would indicate successful bioremediation. Our laboratory has produced several bioreporter strains using the bioluminescent lux genes of Vibrio fischeri. A bioreporter producing visible light when genetic expression is induced. The bioluminescent system include sensitivity of detection, analysis of response in real- time, and on-line capability. We constructed a bioreporter strain aimed at following the degradation of toluene and related compounds in order to study expression of the catabolic genes with various substrates and under optimized bioreactor conditions. We have been able to detect the induction of a specific operon in response to the addition of oxylene, as a gratuitous inducer of the catabolic genes. A strong bioluminescent signal in these studies. We have varied the medium of an induced bioreactor culture of RB1401, and our data suggest that conditions for optimal expression of the catabolic operon might not be identical with optimal growth conditions.

  9. Completion of Kunjin virus RNA sequence and recovery of an infectious RNA transcribed from stably cloned full-length cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Khromykh, A A; Westaway, E G

    1994-01-01

    Completion of the Kunjin virus (KUN) RNA sequence showed that it is the longest flavivirus sequence reported (11,022 bases), commencing with a 5' noncoding region of 96 bases. The 3' noncoding sequence of 624 nucleotides included a unique insertion sequence of 46 bases adjacent to the stop codon, but otherwise it had properties similar to those of RNAs of closely related flaviviruses. A full-length KUN cDNA clone which could be stably propagated in Escherichia coli DH5 alpha was constructed; SP6 polymerase RNA transcripts from amplified cDNA were infectious when transfected into BHK-21 cells. A mutational change abolishing the BamHI restriction site at position 4049, leading to a conservative amino acid change of Arg-175 to Lys in the NS2A protein, was introduced into the cDNA during construction and was retained in the recovered virus. Extra terminal nucleotides introduced during cloning of the cDNA were shown to be present in the in vitro RNA transcripts but absent in the RNA of recovered virus. Although recovered virus differed from the parental KUN by a smaller plaque phenotype and delayed growth rate in BHK-21 cells and mice, it was very similar as assessed by several other criteria, such as peak titer during growth in cells, infectivity titer in cells and in mice, rate of adsorption and penetration in cells, replication at 39 degrees C, and neurovirulence after intraperitoneal injection in mice. The KUN stably cloned cDNA will provide a useful basis for future studies in defining and characterizing functional roles of all the gene products. Images PMID:8207832

  10. Markedly Enhanced Skeletal Muscle Transfection Achieved by the Ultrasound-Targeted Delivery of Non-Viral Gene Nanocarriers with Microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Caitlin W.; Suk, Jung Soo; Kim, Anthony J.; Hsiang, Yu-Han J.; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Hanes, Justin; Price, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to enhance ultrasound (US)-targeted skeletal muscle transfection through the use of poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG)/polyethylenimine (PEI) nanocomplex gene carriers and adjustments to US and microbubble (MB) parameters. C57BL/6 mice received an intravenous infusion of MBs and either “naked” luciferase plasmid or luciferase plasmid condensed in PEG/PEI nanocomplexes. Pulsed ultrasound (1MHz; 0.6 MPa or 0.8 MPa) was applied to the right hindlimb for 12 mins. Luciferase activity in both hindlimbs was assessed at 3, 5, 7, and 10 days post-treatment by bioluminescent imaging. When targeted to hindlimb using unsorted MBs and 0.6 MPa US, 7 days after treatment, we observed a >60-fold increase in luciferase activity in PEG/PEI nanocomplex treated muscles over muscles treated with “naked” plasmid DNA. Luciferase activity was consistently greater after treatment with PEG/PEI nanocomplexes at 0.6 MPa as compared to 0.8 MPa. The combination of small diameter MBs and 0.6 MPa US also resulted in significantly greater gene expression when compared to concentration matched intramuscular injections, a control condition in which considerably more PEG/PEI nanocomplexes were present in tissue. This result suggests that, in addition to facilitating PEG/PEI nanocomplex delivery from the bloodstream to tissue, US enhances transfection via one or more secondary mechanisms, including increased cellular uptake and/or trafficking to the nucleus of PEG/PEI nanocomplexes. We conclude that PEG/PEI nanocomplexes may be used to markedly enhance the amplitude of US-MB-targeted skeletal muscle transfection and that activating “small” MBs with a moderate level (0.6 MPa) of acoustic pressure can further enhance these effects. PMID:22800583

  11. Use of bacterial and firefly luciferases as reporter genes in DEAE-dextran-mediated transfection of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Pazzagli, M; Devine, J H; Peterson, D O; Baldwin, T O

    1992-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare three different luciferase genes by placing them in a single reporter vector and expressing them in the same mammalian cell type. The luciferase genes investigated were the luc genes from the fireflies Photinus pyralis (PP) and Luciola mingrelica (LM) and the lux AB5 gene, a translational fusion of the two subunits of the bacterial luciferase from Vibrio harveyi (VH). The chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene was also included in this study for comparison. The performances of the assay methods of the corresponding enzymes were evaluated using reference materials and the results of the expressed enzymes following transfection were calculated using calibration curves. All of the bioluminescent assays possess high reproducibility both within and between the batches (less than 15%). The comparison of the assay methods shows that firefly luciferases have the highest detection sensitivity (0.05 and 0.08 amol for PP and LM, respectively) whereas the VH bacterial luciferase has 5 amol and CAT 100 amol. On the other hand, the transfection of the various plasmids shows that the content of the expressed enzyme within the cells is much higher for CAT than for the other luciferase genes. VH luciferase is expressed at very low levels in mammalian cells due to the relatively high temperature of growing of the mammalian cells that seems to impair the correct folding of the active enzyme. PP and LM luciferases are both expressed at picomolar level but usually 10 to 70 times less in content with respect to CAT within the transfected cells. On the basis of these results the overall improvement in sensitivity related to the use of firefly luciferases as reporter genes in mammalian cells is about 30 to 50 times with respect to that of CAT. PMID:1443530

  12. Stable transfection of protein kinase C alpha cDNA in hormone-dependent breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Tonetti, D A; Chisamore, M J; Grdina, W; Schurz, H; Jordan, V C

    2000-01-01

    An inverse relationship between protein kinase C (PKC) activity and oestrogen receptor (ER) expression in human breast cell lines and tumours has been firmly established over the past 10 years. To determine whether specific alterations in PKC expression accompany hormone-independence, we examined the expression of PKC isozymes in the hormone-independent human breast cancer cell clones MCF-7 5C and T47D:C42 compared with their hormone-dependent counterparts, MCF-7 A4, MCF-7 WS8 and T47D:A18 respectively. Both hormone-independent cell clones exhibit elevated PKCα expression and increased basal AP-1 activity compared with the hormone-dependent cell clones. To determine whether PKCα overexpression is sufficient to mediate the hormone-independent phenotype, we stably transfected an expression plasmid containing PKCα cDNA to the T47D:A18 and MCF-7 A4 cell lines. This is the first report of PKCα transfection in T47D cells. In contrast to MCF-7 cells, T47D has the propensity to lose the ER and more readily forms tamoxifen-stimulated tumours in athymic mice. We find that in T47D:A18/PKCα clones, there is concomitant up-regulation of PKC βI and δ, whereas in the MCF-7 A4/PKCα transfectants PKC ɛ is up-regulated. In T47D:A18, but not in MCF-7 A4, PKCα stable transfection is accompanied by down-regulation of ER function whilst basal AP-1 activity is elevated. Our results suggest PKCα overexpression may play a role in growth signalling during the shift from hormone dependent to hormone-independent breast cancers. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10952784

  13. In vivo bioluminescence and reflectance imaging of multiple organs in bioluminescence reporter mice by bundled-fiber-coupled microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ando, Yoriko; Sakurai, Takashi; Koida, Kowa; Tei, Hajime; Hida, Akiko; Nakao, Kazuki; Natsume, Mistuo; Numano, Rika

    2016-03-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is used in biomedical research to monitor biological processes within living organisms. Recently, fiber bundles with high transmittance and density have been developed to detect low light with high resolution. Therefore, we have developed a bundled-fiber-coupled microscope with a highly sensitive cooled-CCD camera that enables the BLI of organs within the mouse body. This is the first report of in vivo BLI of the brain and multiple organs in luciferase-reporter mice using bundled-fiber optics. With reflectance imaging, the structures of blood vessels and organs can be seen clearly with light illumination, and it allowed identification of the structural details of bioluminescence images. This technique can also be applied to clinical diagnostics in a low invasive manner. PMID:27231601

  14. In vivo bioluminescence and reflectance imaging of multiple organs in bioluminescence reporter mice by bundled-fiber-coupled microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Yoriko; Sakurai, Takashi; Koida, Kowa; Tei, Hajime; Hida, Akiko; Nakao, Kazuki; Natsume, Mistuo; Numano, Rika

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is used in biomedical research to monitor biological processes within living organisms. Recently, fiber bundles with high transmittance and density have been developed to detect low light with high resolution. Therefore, we have developed a bundled-fiber-coupled microscope with a highly sensitive cooled-CCD camera that enables the BLI of organs within the mouse body. This is the first report of in vivo BLI of the brain and multiple organs in luciferase-reporter mice using bundled-fiber optics. With reflectance imaging, the structures of blood vessels and organs can be seen clearly with light illumination, and it allowed identification of the structural details of bioluminescence images. This technique can also be applied to clinical diagnostics in a low invasive manner. PMID:27231601

  15. Radiofrequency transmission line for bioluminescent Vibrio sp. irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassisi, V.; Alifano, P.; Talà, A.; Velardi, L.

    2012-07-01

    We present the study and the analyses of a transmission line for radiofrequency (RF) irradiation of bacteria belonging to Vibrio harveyi-related strain PS1, a bioluminescent bacterium living in symbiosis with many marine organisms. The bioluminescence represents a new biologic indicator which is useful for studying the behaviour of living samples in the presence of RF waves due to the modern communication systems. A suitable transmission line, used as an irradiating cell and tested up to the maximum frequency used by the global system for mobile communications and universal mobile telecommunications system transmissions, was characterized. In this experiment, the RF voltage applied to the transmission line was 1 V. Due to short dimensions of the line and the applied high frequencies, standing waves were produced in addition to progressing waves and the electric field strength varies particularly along the longitudinal direction. The magnetic field map was not strongly linked to the electric one due to the presence of standing waves and of the outgoing irradiation. RF fields were measured by two homemade suitable probes able to diagnostic fields of high frequency. The field measurements were performed without any specimens inside the line. Being our sample made of living matter, the real field was modified and its value was estimated by a simulation code. The bioluminescence experiments were performed only at 900 MHz for two different measured electric fields, 53 and 140 V/m. The light emission was measured right from the beginning and after 7 and 25 h. Under RF irradiation, we found that the bioluminescence activity decreased. Compared with the control sample, the diminution was 6.8% and 44% after 7 and 25 h of irradiation, respectively, both with the low or high field. No changes of the survival factor for all the samples were observed. Besides, to understand the emission processes, we operated the deconvolution of the spectra by two Gaussian curves. The Gaussian

  16. An adaptive regularization parameter choice strategy for multispectral bioluminescence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Jinchao; Qin Chenghu; Jia Kebin; Han Dong; Liu Kai; Zhu Shouping; Yang Xin; Tian Jie

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) provides an effective tool for monitoring physiological and pathological activities in vivo. However, the measured data in bioluminescence imaging are corrupted by noise. Therefore, regularization methods are commonly used to find a regularized solution. Nevertheless, for the quality of the reconstructed bioluminescent source obtained by regularization methods, the choice of the regularization parameters is crucial. To date, the selection of regularization parameters remains challenging. With regards to the above problems, the authors proposed a BLT reconstruction algorithm with an adaptive parameter choice rule. Methods: The proposed reconstruction algorithm uses a diffusion equation for modeling the bioluminescent photon transport. The diffusion equation is solved with a finite element method. Computed tomography (CT) images provide anatomical information regarding the geometry of the small animal and its internal organs. To reduce the ill-posedness of BLT, spectral information and the optimal permissible source region are employed. Then, the relationship between the unknown source distribution and multiview and multispectral boundary measurements is established based on the finite element method and the optimal permissible source region. Since the measured data are noisy, the BLT reconstruction is formulated as l{sub 2} data fidelity and a general regularization term. When choosing the regularization parameters for BLT, an efficient model function approach is proposed, which does not require knowledge of the noise level. This approach only requests the computation of the residual and regularized solution norm. With this knowledge, we construct the model function to approximate the objective function, and the regularization parameter is updated iteratively. Results: First, the micro-CT based mouse phantom was used for simulation verification. Simulation experiments were used to illustrate why multispectral data were used

  17. Correlation between cationic lipid-based transfection and cell division.

    PubMed

    Kirchenbuechler, Inka; Kirchenbuechler, David; Elbaum, Michael

    2016-07-01

    We evaluate the temporal relation between protein expression by cationic lipid-mediated transfection and cell division using time lapse fluorescence microscopy. Detailed image analysis provides new insights on the single cell level while simultaneously achieving appropriate statistics. Earlier evidence by less direct methods such as flow cytometry indicates a primary route for transfection involving nuclear envelope breakdown, but also suggests the existence of a pathway independent of mitosis. We confirm and quantify both mechanisms. We found the timing for successful transfection to be unexpectedly flexible, contrary to assertions of a narrow time window. Specifically, cells dividing more than 24h after exposure to the transfection medium express the probed protein at a comparable level to cells in a mitotic state during or shortly after transfection. This finding can have a profound impact on the guidance and development of non-viral gene delivery materials. PMID:25556666

  18. Unexpected transcellular protein crossover occurs during canonical DNA transfection.

    PubMed

    Arsenault, Jason; Cuijpers, Sabine A G; Niranjan, Dhevahi; Davletov, Bazbek

    2014-12-01

    Transfection of DNA has been invaluable for biological sciences, yet the effects upon membrane homeostasis are far from negligible. Here, we demonstrate that Neuro2A cells transfected using Lipofectamine LTX with the fluorescently coupled Botulinum serotype A holoenzyme (EGFP-LcA) cDNA express this SNAP25 protease that can, once translated, escape the transfected host cytosol and become endocytosed into untransfected cells, without its innate binding and translocation domains. Fluorescent readouts revealed moderate transfection rates (30-50%) while immunoblotting revealed a surprisingly total enzymatic cleavage of SNAP25; the transgenic protein acted beyond the confines of its host cell. Using intracellular dyes, no important cytotoxic effects were observed from reagent treatment alone, which excluded the possibility of membrane ruptures, though noticeably, intracellular acidic organelles were redistributed towards the plasma membrane. This drastic, yet frequently unobserved, change in protein permeability and endosomal trafficking following reagent treatment highlights important concerns for all studies using transient transfection. PMID:25043607

  19. Synchronization of circadian bioluminescence as a group-foraging strategy in cave glowworms.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Andrew J; Merritt, David J

    2013-07-01

    Flies of the genus Arachnocampa are sit-and-lure predators that use bioluminescence to attract flying prey to their silk webs. Some species are most common in rainforest habitat and others inhabit both caves and rainforest. We have studied the circadian regulation of bioluminescence in two species: one found in subtropical rainforest with no known cave populations and the other found in temperate rainforest with large populations in limestone caves. The rainforest species is typical of most nocturnal animals in that individuals are entrained by the light:dark (LD) cycle to be active at night; in this case, their propensity to bioluminesce is greatest at night. The dual-habitat species shows an opposite phase response to the same entrainment; its bioluminescence propensity rhythm is entrained by LD exposure to peak during the day. Nevertheless, in LD environments, individuals do not bioluminesce during the day because ambient light inhibits their bioluminescence (negative masking), pushing bioluminescence into the dark period. This unusual and unexpected phenomenon could be related to their association with caves and has been suggested to be an adaptation of the circadian system that promotes synchronization of a colony's output of bioluminescence. Here, we use controlled laboratory experiments to show that individuals do synchronize their bioluminescence rhythms when in visual contact with each other. Entrainment of the bioluminescence rhythm to the biological photophase causes colony-wide synchronization, creating a daily sinusoidal rhythm of the intensity of bioluminescence in the many thousands of individuals making up a colony. This synchronization could provide a group-foraging advantage, allowing the colony to glow most brightly when the prey are most likely to be active. PMID:23575257

  20. Highly efficient transfection of human THP-1 macrophages by nucleofection.

    PubMed

    Maeß, Marten B; Wittig, Berith; Lorkowski, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages, as key players of the innate immune response, are at the focus of research dealing with tissue homeostasis or various pathologies. Transfection with siRNA and plasmid DNA is an efficient tool for studying their function, but transfection of macrophages is not a trivial matter. Although many different approaches for transfection of eukaryotic cells are available, only few allow reliable and efficient transfection of macrophages, but reduced cell vitality and severely altered cell behavior like diminished capability for differentiation or polarization are frequently observed. Therefore a transfection protocol is required that is capable of transferring siRNA and plasmid DNA into macrophages without causing serious side-effects thus allowing the investigation of the effect of the siRNA or plasmid in the context of normal cell behavior. The protocol presented here provides a method for reliably and efficiently transfecting human THP-1 macrophages and monocytes with high cell vitality, high transfection efficiency, and minimal effects on cell behavior. This approach is based on Nucleofection and the protocol has been optimized to maintain maximum capability for cell activation after transfection. The protocol is adequate for adherent cells after detachment as well as cells in suspension, and can be used for small to medium sample numbers. Thus, the method presented is useful for investigating gene regulatory effects during macrophage differentiation and polarization. Apart from presenting results characterizing macrophages transfected according to this protocol in comparison to an alternative chemical method, the impact of cell culture medium selection after transfection on cell behavior is also discussed. The presented data indicate the importance of validating the selection for different experimental settings. PMID:25226503

  1. Highly Efficient Transfection of Human THP-1 Macrophages by Nucleofection

    PubMed Central

    Maeß, Marten B.; Wittig, Berith; Lorkowski, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages, as key players of the innate immune response, are at the focus of research dealing with tissue homeostasis or various pathologies. Transfection with siRNA and plasmid DNA is an efficient tool for studying their function, but transfection of macrophages is not a trivial matter. Although many different approaches for transfection of eukaryotic cells are available, only few allow reliable and efficient transfection of macrophages, but reduced cell vitality and severely altered cell behavior like diminished capability for differentiation or polarization are frequently observed. Therefore a transfection protocol is required that is capable of transferring siRNA and plasmid DNA into macrophages without causing serious side-effects thus allowing the investigation of the effect of the siRNA or plasmid in the context of normal cell behavior. The protocol presented here provides a method for reliably and efficiently transfecting human THP-1 macrophages and monocytes with high cell vitality, high transfection efficiency, and minimal effects on cell behavior. This approach is based on Nucleofection and the protocol has been optimized to maintain maximum capability for cell activation after transfection. The protocol is adequate for adherent cells after detachment as well as cells in suspension, and can be used for small to medium sample numbers. Thus, the method presented is useful for investigating gene regulatory effects during macrophage differentiation and polarization. Apart from presenting results characterizing macrophages transfected according to this protocol in comparison to an alternative chemical method, the impact of cell culture medium selection after transfection on cell behavior is also discussed. The presented data indicate the importance of validating the selection for different experimental settings. PMID:25226503

  2. Bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit devices and methods for detecting ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Paulus, Michael J [Knoxville, TN; Sayler, Gary S [Blaine, TN; Applegate, Bruce M [West Lafayette, IN; Ripp, Steven A [Knoxville, TN

    2007-04-24

    Monolithic bioelectronic devices for the detection of ammonia includes a microorganism that metabolizes ammonia and which harbors a lux gene fused with a heterologous promoter gene stably incorporated into the chromosome of the microorganism and an Optical Application Specific Integrated Circuit (OASIC). The microorganism is generally a bacterium.

  3. Transfection of isolated rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, granulosa cells through chemical transfection and electroporation at 12°C.

    PubMed

    Marivin, E; Mourot, B; Loyer, P; Rime, H; Bobe, J; Fostier, A

    2015-09-15

    Over-expression or inhibition of gene expression can be efficiently used to analyse the functions and/or regulation of target genes. Modulation of gene expression can be achieved through transfection of exogenous nucleic acids into target cells. Such techniques require the development of specific protocols to transfect cell cultures with nucleic acids. The aim of this study was to develop a method of transfection suitable for rainbow trout granulosa cells in primary culture. After the isolation of rainbow trout granulosa cells, chemical transfection of cells with a fluorescent morpholino oligonucleotide (MO) was tested using FuGENE HD at 12 °C. Electroporation was also employed to transfect these cells with either a plasmid or MO. Transfection was more efficient using electroporation (with the following settings: 1200 V/40 ms/1p) than chemical transfection, but electroporation by itself was deleterious, resulting in a decrease of the steroidogenic capacity of the cells, measured via estradiol production from its androgenic substrate. The disturbance of cell biology induced by the transfection method per se should be taken into account in data interpretation when investigating the effects of under- or over-expression of candidate genes. PMID:25957917

  4. Numerical model of the urban heat island in a calm and stably stratified environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurbatskiy, A.; Kurbatskaya, L.

    2015-11-01

    The RANS high close approach for the turbulent fluxes of momentum, heat and mass for simulating of the circulation structure and dispersion pollutant over the urban heat island in a stably stratified environment under nearly calm conditions is formulated. The turbulent fluxes of momentum - uiuj , heat -uiθ and mass -uic in this approach determined from the gradient diffusion type models with the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), its spectral consumption (or dissipation), the temperature variance and the covariance for cθ as parameters which are obtained from transport equations. Such the RANS approach minimizes difficulties in the turbulent transport modeling in a stably stratified environment and reduces efforts needed for the numerical implementation of the numerical model. The simulation results demonstrates that the three-four equations RANS approach is able to predict the structure of turbulent circulation flow induced by the heat island that is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  5. Similarity states of homogeneous stably-stratified turbulence at infinite Froude number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chasnov, Jeffrey R.

    1993-01-01

    We present evidence of similarity states which may develop inhomogeneous stably-stratified flows if a dimensionless group in addition to the Reynolds number, the so-called Froude number, is sufficiently large. Here, we define the Froude number as the ratio of the internal wave time-scale to the turbulence time-scale. We examine three different similarity states which may develop depending on the initial conditions of the velocity and density fields. Theoretical arguments and results of large-eddy simulations will be presented. We will conclude this report with some speculative thoughts on similarity states which may develop in stably-stratified turbulence at arbitrary Froude number as well as our future research plans in this area.

  6. Electroporation for Transfection and Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rabie, Bakr M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Target gene delivery is needed to induce cellular differentiation or a specific therapeutic effect. Electroporation is a relatively safe and simple technique to deliver nucleic acids to the cell that acts by rendering cells transiently permeable using short periods of high voltage. In stem cell research, human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCS) are highly accessible, and they exhibit broad differentiation potential. Until now, no studies have attempted to optimize electroporation parameters for DPSCs with respect to transfection efficiency and viability. In this study, we aimed to optimize transfection of DPSCs through varying different electroporation parameters, including voltage, mode of pulsation, and the number of pulses. As positive control, we used commonly utilized the chemical transfection reagents Lipofectamine 2000 and FuGene 6. In addition, we used our newly optimized transfection conditions to transfect hDPSCs with a functional chondrogenic transgene. We obtained higher transfection efficiency and cell viability with these electroporation conditions compared to controls. The highest transfection efficiency (63.81±4.72%) was achieved with 100 V, 20 msec, one-pulse square-wave condition. Among chemical transfection groups, FuGene 6 showed the highest cell viability at all tested transfection ratios, while Lipofectamine 2000 showed the highest transfection efficiency (19.23±3.19%) using 1:1 DNA (μg):Lipofectamine (μL). Transfected DPSCs functionally expressed the transforming growth factor β-3 chondrogenic transgene on the mRNA level as detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction and on the protein level as detected by Western blot analysis. An increase in various chondrogenic markers was also found when studying mRNA expression in transfected cells. In conclusion, the results of our study demonstrate optimal electroporation and chemical transfection reagent conditions for hDPSCs, and, subsequently, we provide proof of concept for

  7. Acoustic Liquid Handling for Rapid siRNA Transfection Optimization.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Andrew S; Lightcap, Eric S; Bouck, David C

    2015-09-01

    Gene knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) has been used extensively to investigate the function of genes in targeted and genome-wide studies. One of the primary challenges of siRNA studies of any scale is to achieve sufficient gene knockdown to produce the biological changes that lead to measurable phenotypes. Reverse, lipid-based transfection efficiency minimally requires the optimization of the following parameters: cell number, knockdown duration, siRNA oligonucleotide concentration, type/brand of transfection lipid, and transfection lipid concentration. In this study, we describe a methodology to utilize the flexibility and low-volume range of the Echo acoustic liquid handler to rapidly screen a matrix of transfection conditions. The matrix includes six different transfection lipids from three separate vendors across a broad range of concentrations. Our results validate acoustic liquid transfer for the delivery of siRNAs and transfection reagents. Finally, this methodology is applied to rapidly optimize transfection conditions across many tissue culture cell lines derived from various originating tissues. PMID:25924619

  8. Lipid-based transfection reagents can interfere with cholesterol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Danielli, Mauro; Marinelli, Raúl A

    2016-02-15

    Lipid-based transfection reagents are widely used for delivery of small interfering RNA into cells. We examined whether the commonly used commercial transfection reagents DharmaFECT-4 and Lipofectamine 2000 can interfere with lipid metabolism by studying cholesterogenesis. Cholesterol de novo synthesis from [(14)C]acetate was assessed in human hepatocyte-derived Huh-7 cells. The results revealed that DharmaFECT, but not Lipofectamine, markedly inhibited cholesterol biosynthesis by approximately 70%. Cell viability was not significantly altered. These findings suggest that caution is required in the choice of certain lipid-based transfection reagents for gene silencing experiments, particularly when assessing cholesterol metabolism. PMID:26656923

  9. Bioluminescence monitor and method for enzymatic determinations. [Patents

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, W.D.; Denton, M.S.; Dinsmore, S.R.

    1981-04-28

    An on-line, nonreferenced apparatus for measuring the concentration of a biomarker species in authentic biological samples in solution comprises conduit means for conducting said sample solution from a source of said solution, stream diversion means disposed within the conduit for diverting a predetermined amount of said sample for analysis, means for introducing and independently regulating the flow of one or more reactants disposed in fluid communication with said diverted stream, incubating means within the diverted stream for reacting said reactants and biomarkers to produce a bioluminescence emission, and means disposed within the diverted stream for monitoring said emission intensity which is correlatable to said biomarker concentration.

  10. Luciferase-dependent oxygen consumption by bioluminescent vibrios

    SciTech Connect

    Makemson, J.C.

    1986-02-01

    Oxygen uptake due to luciferase in two luminous Vibrio species was estimated in vivo by utilizing inhibitors having specificities for luciferase (decanol) and cytochromes (cyanide). Cyanide titration of respiration revealed a component of oxygen uptake less sensitive to cyanide which was completely inhibitable by low concentrations of decanol. From this it was estimated that in vivo luciferase is responsible for less than 12% (Vibrio harveyi) or 20% (Vibrio fischeri) of the total respiration. From these data in vivo bioluminescent quantum yields are estimated to be not lower than 1.7 and 2.6%, respectively.

  11. GENERATION OF RECOMBINANT BACULOVIRUS VIA LIPOSOME MEDIATED TRANSFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baculovirus expression vectors have become a popular method of producing recombinant proteins. Production of recombinant virus requires the transfection of both the native viral DNA and a transfer plasmid into insect cells where recombination takes place. While several methods of...

  12. Transfecting RNA quadruplexes results in few transcriptome perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Phil G.T.; Cotterell, James; Sharpe, James; Isalan, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Guanine-rich nucleic acid sequences can form four-stranded structures called G-quadruplexes. Previous studies showed that transfecting G-quadruplex DNA oligonucleotides inhibits proliferation in many cancer cell lines and can induce apoptosis. However, little is known about the effects of transfecting RNA quadruplexes. In this study, we transfected a G-quadruplex RNA oligonucleotide (GqRNA) into HEK293T cells and observed that it did not alter cell viability. Subsequent transcriptome expression profiling revealed that only two genes, EGR1 and FOS, were significantly altered in the presence of GqRNA (upregulated 2- to 4-fold). Sequence analysis showed that both genes contained putative quadruplex sequences (PQS) in their 3′-UTRs, immediately adjacent to the stop codons. Transfection of the EGR1 PQS as an RNA oligonucleotide also caused an increase in EGR1 expression. Similar motifs are found in a variety of genomes, but are relatively rare and have been missed by previous annotations. A bioinformatic analysis revealed stop codon-proximal enrichment of such motifs compared with the rest of the 3′-UTR, although these genes were not affected by RNA quadruplex transfection, and their function remains unknown. Overall, transfecting RNA quadruplexes results in relatively few alterations in gene expression. PMID:23235467

  13. Bioluminescent detection probe for tick-borne encephalitis virus immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Burakova, Ludmila P; Kudryavtsev, Alexander N; Stepanyuk, Galina A; Baykov, Ivan K; Morozova, Vera V; Tikunova, Nina V; Dubova, Maria A; Lyapustin, Victor N; Yakimenko, Valeri V; Frank, Ludmila A

    2015-07-01

    To facilitate the detection of the tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), the causative agent of one of the most severe human neuroinfections, we have developed an immunoassay based on bioluminescent hybrid protein 14D5a-Rm7 as a detection probe. The protein containing Renilla luciferase as a reporter and a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) of murine immunoglobulin to TBEV as a recognition element was constructed, produced by bacterial expression, purified, and tested. Both domains were shown to reveal their specific biological properties-affinity to the target antigen and bioluminescent activity. Hybrid protein was applied as a label for solid-phase immunoassay of the antigens, associated with the tick-borne encephalitis virus (native glycoprotein E or extracts of the infected strain of lab ticks). The assay demonstrates high sensitivity (0.056 ng of glycoprotein E; 10(4)-10(5) virus particles or 0.1 pg virions) and simplicity and is competitive with conventional methods for detection of TBEV. PMID:25925861

  14. Bioluminescence-based imaging technique for pressure measurement in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yasunori; Tanaka, Yasufumi

    2011-07-01

    The dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula emits light in response to water motion. We developed a new imaging technique for measuring pressure using plankton that emits light in response to mechanical stimulation. The bioluminescence emitted by P. lunula was used to measure impact water pressure produced using weight-drop tests. The maximum mean luminescence intensity correlated with the maximum impact pressure that the cells receive when the circadian and diurnal biological rhythms are appropriately controlled. Thus, with appropriate calibration of experimentally determined parameters, the dynamic impact pressure can be estimated by measuring the cell-flash distribution. Statistical features of the evolution of flash intensity and the probability distribution during the impacting event, which are described by both biological and mechanical response parameters, are also discussed in this paper. The practical applicability of this bioluminescence imaging technique is examined through a water drop test. The maximum dynamic pressure, occurring at the impact of a water jet against a wall, was estimated from the flash intensity of the dinoflagellate.

  15. Bioluminescence Imaging of an Immunocompetent Animal Model for Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Aaron J.; Fakurnejad, Shayan; Ma, Quanhong; Hashizume, Rintaro

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to commonly reported human glioma xenograft animal models, GL261 murine glioma xenografts recapitulate nearly all relevant clinical and histopathologic features of the human disease. When GL261 cells are implanted intracranially in syngeneic C57BL/6 mice, the model has the added advantage of maintaining an intact immune microenvironment. Stable expression of luciferase in GL261 cells allows non-invasive cost effective bioluminescence monitoring of intracranial tumor growth. We have recently demonstrated that luciferase expression in GL261 cells does not affect the tumor growth properties, tumor cell immunomodulatory cytokine expression, infiltration of immune cells into the tumor, or overall survival of animals bearing the intracranial tumor. Therefore, it appears that the GL261 luciferase glioma model can be useful in the study of novel chemotherapeutic and immunotherapeutic modalities. Here we report the technique for generating stable luciferase expression in GL261 cells and how to study the in vitro and in vivo growth of the tumor cells by bioluminescence imaging. PMID:26863490

  16. Aequorin fusion proteins as bioluminescent tracers for competitive immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirasoli, Mara; Michelini, Elisa; Deo, Sapna K.; Dikici, Emre; Roda, Aldo; Daunert, Sylvia

    2004-06-01

    The use of bio- and chemiluminescence for the development of quantitative binding assays offers undoubted advantages over other detection systems, such as spectrophotometry, fluorescence, or radioactivity. Indeed, bio- and chemiluminescence detection provides similar, or even better, sensitivity and detectability than radioisotopes, while avoiding the problems of health hazards, waste disposal, and instability associated with the use of radioisotopes. Among bioluminescent labels, the calcium-activated photoprotein aequorin, originally isolated from Aequorea victoria and today available as a recombinant product, is characterized by very high detectability, down to attomole levels. It has been used as a bioluminescent label for developing a variety of highly sensitive immunoassays, using various analyte-aequorin conjugation strategies. When the analyte is a protein or a peptide, genetic engineering techniques can be used to produce protein fusions where the analyte is in-frame fused with aequorin, thus producing homogeneous one-to-one conjugation products, available in virtually unlimited amount. Various assays were developed using this strategy: a short review of the most interesting applications is presented, as well as the cloning, purification and initial characterization of an endothelin-1-aequorin conjugate suitable for developing a competitive immunoassay for endothelin-1, a potent vasoconstrictor peptide, involved in hypertension.

  17. Metabolic imaging in tumours by means of bioluminescence.

    PubMed Central

    Tamulevicius, P.; Streffer, C.

    1995-01-01

    A bioluminescence technique involving single photon imaging was used to quantify the spatial distribution of the metabolites ATP, glucose and lactate in cryosections of various solid tumours and normal tissue. Each section was covered with an enzyme cocktail linking the metabolite in question to luciferase with light emission proportional to the metabolite concentration. The photons emitted are imaged directly through a microscope and an imaging photon counting system. In some cases, good agreement was observed between the distribution of relatively high concentrations of ATP and glucose in viable cell regions of the periphery, while the reverse was seen in more necrotic tumour centres with comparatively high lactate levels. In general, lactate was distributed more diffusely over the sections while ATP was more highly localised and glucose assumed an intermediate pattern. In contrast to the large degree of heterogeneity seen in tumours, distribution patterns of metabolites were much more homogeneous in normal tissue, such as heart muscle. Mean values for metabolite levels in cryosections using bioluminescence are in good agreement with those obtained from the same tumour by conventional methods. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7577454

  18. Multiplexed amino acid array utilizing bioluminescent Escherichia coli auxotrophs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon Il; Yu, Byung Jo; Woo, Min-Ah; Cho, Daeyeon; Dordick, Jonathan S; Cho, June Hyoung; Choi, Byung-Ok; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2010-05-15

    We describe a novel multiplex "amino acid array" for simultaneously quantifying different amino acids based on the rapid growth of amino acid auxotrophic E. coli. First, we constructed genetically engineered amino acid auxotrophs of E. coli containing a bioluminescence reporter gene, yielding concomitant luminescence as a response to cell growth, and then immobilized the reporter cells within individual agarose of respective wells in a 96-well plate serving as a mimic of a biochip. Using the amino acid array, we were able to determine quantitatively the concentrations of 16 amino acids in biological fluid by simply measuring bioluminescent signals from the immobilized cells within 4 h without pre- and post-treatment. The clinical utility of this method was verified by quantifying different amino acids in dried blood spot specimens from clinical samples for the diagnosis of metabolic diseases of newborn babies. This method serves as a convenient route to the rapid and simultaneous analysis of multiple amino acids from complex biological fluids and represents a new analytical paradigm that can replace conventional, yet laborious methods currently in use. PMID:20405822

  19. Bioluminescence imaging: a shining future for cardiac regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Roura, Santiago; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Advances in bioanalytical techniques have become crucial for both basic research and medical practice. One example, bioluminescence imaging (BLI), is based on the application of natural reactants with light-emitting capabilities (photoproteins and luciferases) isolated from a widespread group of organisms. The main challenges in cardiac regeneration remain unresolved, but a vast number of studies have harnessed BLI with the discovery of aequorin and green fluorescent proteins. First described in the luminous hydromedusan Aequorea victoria in the early 1960s, bioluminescent proteins have greatly contributed to the design and initiation of ongoing cell-based clinical trials on cardiovascular diseases. In conjunction with advances in reporter gene technology, BLI provides valuable information about the location and functional status of regenerative cells implanted into numerous animal models of disease. The purpose of this review was to present the great potential of BLI, among other existing imaging modalities, to refine effectiveness and underlying mechanisms of cardiac cell therapy. We recount the first discovery of natural primary compounds with light-emitting capabilities, and follow their applications to bioanalysis. We also illustrate insights and perspectives on BLI to illuminate current efforts in cardiac regeneration, where the future is bright. PMID:23402217

  20. A Novel Bioluminescence Orthotopic Mouse Model for Advanced Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Torossian, Artour; Li, Wenyan; Schleicher, Stephen; Niu, Kathy; Giacalone, Nicholas J.; Kim, Sung June; Chen, Heidi; Gonzalez, Adriana; Moretti, Luigi; Lu, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States despite recent advances in our understanding of this challenging disease. An animal model for high-throughput screening of therapeutic agents for advanced lung cancer could help promote the development of more successful treatment interventions. To develop our orthotopic lung cancer model, luciferase-expressing A549 cancer cells were injected into the mediastinum of athymic nude mice. To determine whether the model would allow easy monitoring of response to therapeutic interventions, tumors were treated with 30 mg/kg Paclitaxel or were irradiated with 5 fractions of 2 Gy, and tumor burden was monitored using bioluminescence imaging. Evidence of radiation-induced lung injury was assessed using immunohistochemical staining for phospho-Smad2/3 and cleaved caspase-3. We found that tumor implantation recapitulated advanced human lung cancer as evidenced by tumor establishment and proliferation within the mediastinum. The tumor responded to Paclitaxel or radiation as shown by decreased tumor bioluminescence and improved overall survival. Immunohistochemistry revealed increased phospho-Smad2/3 and cleaved caspase-3 in irradiated lungs, consistent with radiation-induced lung injury. This orthotopic lung cancer model may help provide a method to assess therapeutic interventions in a preclinical setting that recapitulates locally advanced lung cancer. PMID:21663394

  1. Bioluminescence regenerative cycle (BRC) system for nucleic acid quantification assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassibi, Arjang; Lee, Thomas H.; Davis, Ronald W.; Pourmand, Nader

    2003-07-01

    A new label-free methodology for nucleic acid quantification has been developed where the number of pyrophosphate molecules (PPi) released during polymerization of the target nucleic acid is counted and correlated to DNA copy number. The technique uses the enzymatic complex of ATP-sulfurylase and firefly luciferase to generate photons from PPi. An enzymatic unity gain positive feedback is also implemented to regenerate the photon generation process and compensate any decay in light intensity by self regulation. Due to this positive feedback, the total number of photons generated by the bioluminescence regenerative cycle (BRC) can potentially be orders of magnitude higher than typical chemiluminescent processes. A system level kinetic model that incorporates the effects of contaminations and detector noise was used to show that the photon generation process is in fact steady and also proportional to the nucleic acid quantity. Here we show that BRC is capable of detecting quantities of DNA as low as 1 amol (10-18 mole) in 40μlit aqueous solutions, and this enzymatic assay has a controllable dynamic range of 5 orders of magnitude. The sensitivity of this technology, due to the excess number of photons generated by the regenerative cycle, is not constrained by detector performance, but rather by possible PPi or ATP (adenosine triphosphate) contamination, or background bioluminescence of the enzymatic complex.

  2. How synthetic biology will reconsider natural bioluminescence and its applications.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Benjamin; Sanderson, Theo; Ellis, Tom; Freemont, Paul

    2014-01-01

    As our understanding of natural biological systems grows, so too does our ability to alter and rebuild them. Synthetic biology is the application of engineering principles to biology in order to design and construct novel biological systems for specific applications. Bioluminescent organisms offer a treasure trove of light-emitting enzymes that may have applications in many areas of bioengineering, from biosensors to lighting. A few select bioluminescent organisms have been well researched and the molecular and genetic basis of their luminescent abilities elucidated, with work underway to understand the basis of luminescence in many others. Synthetic biology will aim to package these light-emitting systems as self-contained biological modules, characterize their properties, and then optimize them for use in other chassis organisms. As this catalog of biological parts grows, synthetic biologists will be able to engineer complex biological systems with the ability to emit light. These may use luminescence for an array of disparate functions, from providing illumination to conveying information or allowing communication between organisms. PMID:25216951

  3. A genetically encoded bioluminescent indicator for illuminating proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Bae; Ozawa, Takeaki; Umezawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a method to evaluate the activities of cytokines based on the nuclear transport of NF-κB. A pair of bioluminescent indicators was made for conferring cytokine sensitivity to cervical carcinoma-derived HeLa cells. The principle is based on reconstitution of split fragments of Renilla reniformis luciferase (RLuc) by protein splicing with a DnaE intein from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. The bioluminescence intensity of thus reconstituted RLuc in the HeLa cells was used as a measure of the activities for cytokines. With the present method, we evaluated the activities of various cytokines based on the nuclear transport of NF-κB in human cervical carcinoma-derived HeLa cells carrying the indicators. The present approach to evaluating the activities of cytokines may provide a potential clinical value in monitoring drug activity and directing treatment for various diseases related with NF-κB. The method highlights the experimental procedure from our original publications, Anal. Biochem. 2006, 359, 147-149 and Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 2004, 101, 11542. The summary of the method is: •Cytokine activities are determined within 2 h after stimulation.•Temporarily inactivated split-luciferase fragments are reconstituted by protein splicing.•Nucleartrafficking of NF-κB was illuminated for gauging the ligand-driven activity. PMID:27489781

  4. Enhanced Landweber algorithm via Bregman iterations for bioluminescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yi; Zhang, Meng

    2014-09-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is an important optical molecular imaging modality aimed at visualizing physiological and pathological processes at cellular and molecular levels. While the forward process of light propagation is described by the diffusion approximation to radiative transfer equation, BLT is the inverse problem to reconstruct the 3D localization and quantification of internal bioluminescent sources distribution. Due to the inherent ill-posedness of the BLT problem, regularization is generally indispensable to obtain more favorable reconstruction. In particular, total variation (TV) regularization is known to be effective for piecewise-constant source distribution which can permit sharp discontinuities and preserve edges. However, total variation regularization generally suffers from the unsatisfactory staircasing effect. In this work, we introduce the Bregman iterative regularization to alleviate this degeneration and enhance the numerical reconstruction of BLT. Based on the existing Landweber method (LM), we put forward the Bregman-LM-TV algorithm for BLT. Numerical experiments are carried out and preliminary simulation results are reported to evaluate the proposed algorithms. It is found that Bregman-LM-TV can significantly outperform the individual Landweber method for BLT when the source distribution is piecewise-constant.

  5. Stability boundaries and sufficient stability conditions for stably stratified, monotonic shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Makoto; Morrison, Philip J.

    2016-05-01

    Linear stability of inviscid, parallel, and stably stratified shear flow is studied under the assumption of smooth strictly monotonic profiles of shear flow and density, so that the local Richardson number is positive everywhere. The marginally unstable modes are systematically found by solving a one-parameter family of regular Sturm-Liouville problems, which can determine the stability boundaries more efficiently than solving the Taylor-Goldstein equation directly. By arguing for the non-existence of a marginally unstable mode, we derive new sufficient conditions for stability, which generalize the Rayleigh-Fjørtoft criterion for unstratified shear flows.

  6. A centre manifold approach to solitary waves in a sheared, stably stratified fluid layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, W. B.; Velarde, M. G.

    The centre manifold approach is used to derive an approximate equation for nonlinear waves propagating in a sheared, stably stratified fluid layer. The evolution equation matches limiting forms derived by other methods, including the inviscid, long wave approximation leading to the Korteweg- deVries equation. The model given here allows large modulations of the height of the waveguide. This permits the crude modelling of shear layer instabilities at the upper material surface of the waveguide which excite solitary internal waves in the waveguide. An energy argument is used to support the existence of these waves.

  7. Evaluation of an improved bioluminescence assay for the detection of bacteria in soy milk.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki, Yohei; Sato, Jun; Igarashi, Toshinori; Suzuki, Shigeya; Nishimoto, Kazunori; Harada, Yasuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Because soy milk is nutrient rich and nearly neutral in pH, it favors the growth of microbial contaminants. To ensure that soy milk meets food-safety standards, it must be pasteurized and have its sterility confirmed. ATP bioluminescence assay has become a widely accepted means of detecting food microorganisms. However, the high background bioluminescence intensity of soy milk has rendered it unsuitable for ATP analysis. Here, we tested the efficacy of an improved pre-treated bioluminescence assay on soy milk. By comparing background bioluminescence intensities obtained by the conventional and improved methods, we demonstrated that our method significantly reduces soy milk background bioluminescence. The dose-response curve of the assay was tested with serial dilutions of Bacillus sp. culture. An extremely strong log-linear relation between the bioluminescence intensity relative light units and colony formation units CFU/ml emerged for the tested strain. The detection limit of the assay was estimated as 5.2×10(3) CFU/ml from the dose-response curve and an imposed signal limit was three times the background level. The results showed that contaminated samples could be easily detected within 24 h using our improved bioluminescence assay. PMID:23538846

  8. Foraging in the Darkness of the Southern Ocean: Influence of Bioluminescence on a Deep Diving Predator

    PubMed Central

    Vacquié-Garcia, Jade; Royer, François; Dragon, Anne-Cécile; Viviant, Morgane; Bailleul, Frédéric; Guinet, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    How non-echolocating deep diving marine predators locate their prey while foraging remains mostly unknown. Female southern elephant seals (SES) (Mirounga leonina) have vision adapted to low intensity light with a peak sensitivity at 485 nm. This matches the wavelength of bioluminescence produced by a large range of marine organisms including myctophid fish, SES’s main prey. In this study, we investigated whether bioluminescence provides an accurate estimate of prey occurrence for SES. To do so, four SES were satellite-tracked during their post-breeding foraging trip and were equipped with Time-Depth-Recorders that also recorded light levels every two seconds. A total of 3386 dives were processed through a light-treatment model that detected light events higher than ambient level, i.e. bioluminescence events. The number of bioluminescence events was related to an index of foraging intensity for SES dives deep enough to avoid the influence of natural ambient light. The occurrence of bioluminescence was found to be negatively related to depth both at night and day. Foraging intensity was also positively related to bioluminescence both during day and night. This result suggests that bioluminescence likely provides SES with valuable indications of prey occurrence and might be a key element in predator-prey interactions in deep-dark marine environments. PMID:22952706

  9. Foraging in the darkness of the Southern Ocean: influence of bioluminescence on a deep diving predator.

    PubMed

    Vacquié-Garcia, Jade; Royer, François; Dragon, Anne-Cécile; Viviant, Morgane; Bailleul, Frédéric; Guinet, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    How non-echolocating deep diving marine predators locate their prey while foraging remains mostly unknown. Female southern elephant seals (SES) (Mirounga leonina) have vision adapted to low intensity light with a peak sensitivity at 485 nm. This matches the wavelength of bioluminescence produced by a large range of marine organisms including myctophid fish, SES's main prey. In this study, we investigated whether bioluminescence provides an accurate estimate of prey occurrence for SES. To do so, four SES were satellite-tracked during their post-breeding foraging trip and were equipped with Time-Depth-Recorders that also recorded light levels every two seconds. A total of 3386 dives were processed through a light-treatment model that detected light events higher than ambient level, i.e. bioluminescence events. The number of bioluminescence events was related to an index of foraging intensity for SES dives deep enough to avoid the influence of natural ambient light. The occurrence of bioluminescence was found to be negatively related to depth both at night and day. Foraging intensity was also positively related to bioluminescence both during day and night. This result suggests that bioluminescence likely provides SES with valuable indications of prey occurrence and might be a key element in predator-prey interactions in deep-dark marine environments. PMID:22952706

  10. Quorum Sensing Influences Vibrio harveyi Growth Rates in a Manner Not Fully Accounted For by the Marker Effect of Bioluminescence

    PubMed Central

    Nackerdien, Zeena E.; Keynan, Alexander; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Lederberg, Joshua; Thaler, David S.

    2008-01-01

    Background The light-emitting Vibrios provide excellent material for studying the interaction of cellular communication with growth rate because bioluminescence is a convenient marker for quorum sensing. However, the use of bioluminescence as a marker is complicated because bioluminescence itself may affect growth rate, e.g. by diverting energy. Methodology/Principal Findings The marker effect was explored via growth rate studies in isogenic Vibrio harveyi (Vh) strains altered in quorum sensing on the one hand, and bioluminescence on the other. By hypothesis, growth rate is energy limited: mutants deficient in quorum sensing grow faster because wild type quorum sensing unleashes bioluminescence and bioluminescence diverts energy. Findings reported here confirm a role for bioluminescence in limiting Vh growth rate, at least under the conditions tested. However, the results argue that the bioluminescence is insufficient to explain the relationship of growth rate and quorum sensing in Vh. A Vh mutant null for all genes encoding the bioluminescence pathway grew faster than wild type but not as fast as null mutants in quorum sensing. Vh quorum sensing mutants showed altered growth rates that do not always rank with their relative increase or decrease in bioluminescence. In addition, the cell-free culture fluids of a rapidly growing Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) strain increased the growth rate of wild type Vh without significantly altering Vh's bioluminescence. The same cell-free culture fluid increased the bioluminescence of Vh quorum mutants. Conclusions/Significance The effect of quorum sensing on Vh growth rate can be either positive or negative and includes both bioluminescence-dependent and independent components. Bioluminescence tends to slow growth rate but not enough to account for the effects of quorum sensing on growth rate. PMID:18301749

  11. In vitro transfection of the hepatitis B virus PreS2 gene into the human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2 induces upregulation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hua; Luan Fang; Ju Ying; Shen Hongyu; Gao Lifen; Wang Xiaoyan; Liu Suxia; Zhang Lining; Sun Wensheng; Ma Chunhong . E-mail: machunhong@sdu.edu.cn

    2007-04-06

    The preS2 domain is the minimal functional unit of transcription activators that is encoded by the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface (S) gene. It is present in more than one-third of the HBV-integrates in HBV induced hepatocarcinoma (HCC). To further understand the functional role of PreS2 in hepatocytes, a PreS2 expression plasmid, pcS2, was constructed and stably transfected into HepG2 cells. We conducted growth curve and colony-forming assays to study the impact of PreS2 expression on cell proliferation. Cells transfected with PreS2 proliferated more rapidly and formed colonies in soft agar. PreS2 expressing cells also induced upregulation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and telomerase activation by RT-PCR and the modified TRAP assay. Blocking expression of hTERT with antisense oligonuleotide reversed the growth rate in cells stably transfected with PreS2. Our data suggest that PreS2 may increase the malignant transformation of human HCC cell line HepG2 by upregulating hTERT and inducing telomerase activation.

  12. Influence of culture conditions on mycelial growth and bioluminescence of Gerronema viridilucens.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Luiz F; Bastos, Erick L; Desjardin, Dennis E; Stevani, Cassius V

    2008-05-01

    Herein we describe a procedure for measuring the total light emission of the naturally bioluminescent tropical fungus Gerronema viridilucens and the optimization of culture conditions using multivariate factorial anova. Cultures growing on an agar surface in 35 mm Petri dishes at 90% humidity show optimal bioluminescence emission at 25 degrees C in the presence of 1.0% sugar cane molasses, 0.10% yeast extract and pH 6.0 (nonbuffered). Temperature and pH are the most important factors for both mycelial growth and bioluminescence. PMID:18355288

  13. A novel reconstruction algorithm for bioluminescent tomography based on Bayesian compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaqi; Feng, Jinchao; Jia, Kebin; Sun, Zhonghua; Wei, Huijun

    2016-03-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is becoming a promising tool because it can resolve the biodistribution of bioluminescent reporters associated with cellular and subcellular function through several millimeters with to centimeters of tissues in vivo. However, BLT reconstruction is an ill-posed problem. By incorporating sparse a priori information about bioluminescent source, enhanced image quality is obtained for sparsity based reconstruction algorithm. Therefore, sparsity based BLT reconstruction algorithm has a great potential. Here, we proposed a novel reconstruction method based on Bayesian compressive sensing and investigated its feasibility and effectiveness with a heterogeneous phantom. The results demonstrate the potential and merits of the proposed algorithm.

  14. High resolution in vitro bioluminescence imaging using a multimodal optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altabella, L.; Gigliotti, C. R.; Perani, L.; Crippa, M. P.; Boschi, F.; Spinelli, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence in vitro studies are usually performed with dedicated microscopes. In this work, we developed a novel image recovery algorithm and a multimodal system prototype to perform bioluminescence microscopy. We performed a feasibility study using GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of bioluminescent cells acquired at low SNR frames and processed using a Super Resolution Regularization Algorithm (SRRA). The method was also tested using in vitro cell acquisition. The results obtained with MC simulations showed an improvement in the spatial resolution from 90 μ m to 10 μ m and from 110 μ m to 13 μ m for in vitro imaging of mesothelioma cells.

  15. Study of firefly luciferin oxidation and isomerism as possible inhibition pathways for firefly bioluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto da Silva, Luís; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C. G.

    2014-01-01

    Firefly bioluminescence presents a light emitting profile with a form of a flash, due to the firefly luciferase-catalyzed formation of inhibitory products. These impair the binding of the substrate luciferin to the active site of the enzyme. However, this luciferase catalyzed pathways may not be the only ones responsible for the flash profile. The oxidation and isomerisation of the substrate luciferin lead to the formation of compounds that are also known inhibitors of firefly bioluminescence. So, the objective of this Letter was to analyze if these reactions could be capable of interfering with the bioluminescence reaction.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A DUAL MODALITY TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGING SYSTEM FOR BIOLUMINESCENCE AND PET

    SciTech Connect

    CHATZIIOANNOU, ARION

    2011-12-21

    The goal of this proposal was to develop a new hybrid imaging modality capable to simultaneously image optical bioluminescence signals, as well as radionuclide emissions from the annihilation of positrons originating from molecular imaging probes in preclinical mouse models. This new technology enables the simultaneous in-vivo measurements of both emissions that could be produced from a single or a combination of two different biomarkers. It also facilitates establishing the physical limitations of bioluminescence imaging, its tomographic and spectral image reconstruction potential and the quantification of bioluminescence signals.

  17. A Numerical Model for Magnetohydrodynamic Waves in a Stably-Stratified Layer in Earth's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezek, N. R.; Buffett, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    A numerical model for magnetohydrodynamic waves in a thin shell is developed and applied to study the effect of a stably-stratified layer in Earth's core on geomagnetic secular variation. The model employs a spherical coordinate system with finite differences in r and θ and Fourier decomposition in Φ. The model is linearized assuming a background azimuthal velocity field UΦ(r,θ) and an arbitrary background magnetic field Br,θ,Φ(r,θ). The Boussinesq approximation is employed and the buoyancy forces are prescribed in terms of a spatially variable Brunt-Vaisala frequency N(r,θ). The equations are cast into a sparse generalized eigenvalue problem by assuming solutions of the form uj,bj,p=CjeimΦ+λt and eigenmodes are found. Good agreement is obtained with previous approximate analytical solutions for zonal (m=0) magnetic-Archimedes-Coriolis (MAC) waves (e.g. Braginsky, 1993), global magnetic-Rossby (m>0) waves (e.g. Braginsky, 1998), and equatorially-trapped magnetic-Rossby waves (e.g. Bergman, 1993). This model is employed to study the origins of the fast equatorial waves observed by Chulliat et al. (2015) in recent high-resolution magnetic field models to constrain plausible properties of the stably-stratified layer and core-surface magnetic field.

  18. SNOHATS: Subgrid-scale fluxes in stably stratified atmospheric flow over snow surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bou-Zeid, Elie; Parlange, Marc B.; Huwald, Hendrik; Chamecki, Marcelo; Meneveau, Charles

    2006-11-01

    Stably stratified turbulence presents particular challenges both from an experimental and a modeling perspective. Many of the characteristics of stable flows complicate the formulation of effective models for unresolved, subgrid scale (SGS), turbulence in Large Eddy Simulation (LES). To address these concerns, a field study (SNOHATS) was held at the extensive ``Plaine-Morte'' glacier in the Swiss Alps (3000 m) from February to April 2006. Two horizontal arrays of vertically separated 3D sonic anemometers were deployed; this setup was specifically designed to measure subgrid scale fluxes (upwind uninterrupted fetch of 2 km) and then to assess the success of various models in reproducing these fluxes. We first study the influence of stratification on the spectra and co-spectra of velocity and temperature. Subsequently, the eddy-viscosity subgid scale model is assessed for LES of stably stratified wall-bounded flows. Specifically, we measure the Smagorinsky coefficient and the SGS turbulent Prandtl number by matching measured and modeled dissipation rates. Finally we present the dependence of these coefficients on stability, height above the ground, filter size, and strain rates.

  19. A Sweeping based Kinematic Simulation for the Stably Stratified Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghate, Aditya; Lele, Sanjiva

    2014-11-01

    A Kinematic Simulation (KS) for a statistically stationary and stably stratified surface layer is proposed. The Fourier coefficients are obtained by numerically solving the linearized NS equations with Boussinesq approximation in spectral space, under the assumption of ``rapid'' deformation (RDT) due to combined shear and stratification. The linearization of RDT, which is unrealistic for the surface layer, is rectified using Mann's (JFM, 1994) idea of wavenumber dependent eddy lifetime. The input parameters required by the KS are estimated using either Monin-Obukhov theory, or an appropriate Second Moment Closure. In order to overcome the frozen turbulence hypothesis made in the Mann model, we incorporate inter-scale ``sweeping'' of eddies following the ideas of Fung et al. (JFM, 1992), along with temporal decorrelation associated with the natural eddy time scale. The solenoidal velocity field generated by the KS allows inclusion of a wide range of scales with correct space-time correlations, making it ideal to investigate particle dispersion in a stably stratified environment, and can also serve as inflow for the study of Wind Farm-PBL interactions. The effect of varying Obukhov length will be discussed by analyzing the frozen Eulerian spectra and Lagrangian particle dispersion.

  20. Bioanalytical Applications of Real-Time ATP Imaging Via Bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Jason Alan Gruenhagen

    2003-12-12

    The research discussed within involves the development of novel applications of real-time imaging of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). ATP was detected via bioluminescence and the firefly luciferase-catalyzed reaction of ATP and luciferin. The use of a microscope and an imaging detector allowed for spatially resolved quantitation of ATP release. Employing this method, applications in both biological and chemical systems were developed. First, the mechanism by which the compound 48/80 induces release of ATP from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was investigated. Numerous enzyme activators and inhibitors were utilized to probe the second messenger systems involved in release. Compound 48/80 activated a G{sub q}-type protein to initiate ATP release from HUVECs. Ca{sup 2+} imaging along with ATP imaging revealed that activation of phospholipase C and induction of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} signaling were necessary for release of ATP. Furthermore, activation of protein kinase C inhibited the activity of phospholipase C and thus decreased the magnitude of ATP release. This novel release mechanism was compared to the existing theories of extracellular release of ATP. Bioluminescence imaging was also employed to examine the role of ATP in the field of neuroscience. The central nervous system (CNS) was dissected from the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that the neurons of the Lymnaea were not damaged by any of the components of the imaging solution. ATP was continuously released by the ganglia of the CNS for over eight hours and varied from ganglion to ganglion and within individual ganglia. Addition of the neurotransmitters K{sup +} and serotonin increased release of ATP in certain regions of the Lymnaea CNS. Finally, the ATP imaging technique was investigated for the study of drug release systems. MCM-41-type mesoporous nanospheres were loaded with ATP and end-capped with mercaptoethanol functionalized Cd

  1. In vitro gene transfection using dendritic poly(L-lysine).

    PubMed

    Ohsaki, Mio; Okuda, Tatsuya; Wada, Akihiro; Hirayama, Toshiya; Niidome, Takuro; Aoyagi, Haruhiko

    2002-01-01

    Monodispersed dendritic poly(L-lysine)s (DPKs) of several generations were synthesized, and their characteristics as a gene transfection reagent were then investigated. The agarose gel shift and ethidium bromide titration assay proved that the DPKs of the third generation and higher could form a complex with a plasmid DNA, and the degree of compaction of the DNA was increased by the increasing number of the generation. The DPKs of the fifth and sixth generation, which have 64 and 128 amine groups on the surface of the molecule, respectively, showed efficient gene transfection ability into several cultivated cell lines without significant cytotoxity. In addition, the transfection efficiency of the DPK of the sixth generation was not seriously reduced even if serum was added at 50% of the final concentration into the transfection medium. Because we can strictly synthesize various DPK derivatives, which have several types of branch units, terminal cationic groups, and so on, they are expected to be a good object of study regarding the basic information on the detailed mechanism of gene transfection into cells. We also expect to be able to easily construct DPK-based functional gene carriers, e.g., DPKs modified by ligands such as a sugar chain, which can enable advanced gene delivery in vivo. PMID:12009940

  2. Femtosecond cellular transfection using a non-diffracting beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsampoula, X.; Garcés-Chávez, V.; Comrie, M.; Stevenson, D. J.; Agate, B.; Brown, C. T. A.; Gunn-Moore, F.; Dholakia, K.

    2008-02-01

    Efficient DNA delivery into single living cells would be a very powerful capability for cell biologists for elucidating basic cellular functions but also in other fields such as applied drug discovery and gene therapy. The ability to gently permeate the cell membrane and introduce foreign DNA with the assistance of lasers is a powerful methodology but requires exact focusing due to the required two-photon power density. Here, we demonstrate a laser-mediated delivery method of the red fluorescent protein DS-RED into Chinese hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. We used an elongated beam of light created by a Bessel beam (BB) which obviates the need to locate precisely the cell membrane, permitting two-photon excitation along a line leading to cell transfection. Assuming a threshold for transfection of 20%, the BB gives us transfection over twenty times the axial distance compared to the Gaussian beam of equivalent core diameter. In addition, by exploiting the BB property of reconstruction, we demonstrate successful transfection of CHO cells which involves the BB passing through an obstructive layer and re forming itself prior to reaching the cell membrane. In the light of this exciting result, one can envisage the possibility of achieving transfection through multiple cell monolayer planes and tissues using this novel light field, eliminating this way the stringent requirements for tight focusing.

  3. The construction and proliferative effects of a lentiviral vector capable of stably overexpressing SPINK1 gene in human pancreatic cancer AsPC-1 cell line.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Dongmei; Hu, Na; Wang, Qian; Yu, Shanice; Wang, Jun

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to design and generate recombinant lentiviral vector containing the complete coding sequence (CDS) region of human serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 gene (SPINK1) and establish a human pancreatic cancer cell line (AsPC-1) stably overexpressing SPINK1. Then, to assess the proliferative and oncogenic effects of upregulated SPINK1 gene on pancreatic cancer AsPC-1 cells using different methods. Initially, the target coding sequence (CDS) of SPINK1 was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the synthesized product was subsequently subcloned into the lentiviral vector. The construction of recombinant SPINK1 gene was verified by the restriction digestion and sequencing analysis. The lentiviral particles carrying SPINK1 gene were produced by co-transfection of the recombination lentiviral vector and the packaging mix plasmids into 293 T cells and filtered and concentrated before AsPC-1 cells were infected by the virus particles. The cells transduced were differentially selected with puromycin, and the clones that highly expressed SPINK1 were chosen by real-time PCR and confirmed by Western blot after 7 weeks. The stably transduced AsPC-1 cell line showed significantly increased metabolic and proliferative capability using CCK-8 and Trypan Blue assays (P < 0.001). Cell cycle and DNA content analysis by flow cytometry showed that upregulated SPINK1 elicited significant increase in the percentage of AsPC-1 cells in the S and G2/M phase (P < 0.001). Clone formation assay demonstrated that the number of the colonies formed in the experimental group was greater than that in the control parental cells (P < 0.001). It was concluded that a stable AsPC-1 cell line capable of overexpressing SPINK1 had been successfully created, and that the proliferative capacity of AsPC-1 pancreatic cancer cells was significantly raised by SPINK1 upregulation as well as the ability of a single AsPC-1 cell to grow into a colony. PMID:26586397

  4. Sparse Reconstruction for Bioluminescence Tomography Based on the Semigreedy Method

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Jia, Kebin; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Xueyan; Feng, Jinchao; Qin, Chenghu; Ma, Xibo; Yang, Xin; Tian, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is a molecular imaging modality which can three-dimensionally resolve the molecular processes in small animals in vivo. The ill-posedness nature of BLT problem makes its reconstruction bears nonunique solution and is sensitive to noise. In this paper, we proposed a sparse BLT reconstruction algorithm based on semigreedy method. To reduce the ill-posedness and computational cost, the optimal permissible source region was automatically chosen by using an iterative search tree. The proposed method obtained fast and stable source reconstruction from the whole body and imposed constraint without using a regularization penalty term. Numerical simulations on a mouse atlas, and in vivo mouse experiments were conducted to validate the effectiveness and potential of the method. PMID:22927887

  5. Endotoxin assay by bioluminescence using mutant firefly luciferase.

    PubMed

    Noda, Kenichi; Goto, Hitoshi; Murakami, Yuji; Ahmed, Abo Bakr F; Kuroda, Akio

    2010-02-15

    The Limulus reaction is an application of the defense mechanism of horseshoe crab for endotoxin detection. Endotoxin is a component of the cell wall in the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, and causes fever or shock when it enters the human blood stream. For endotoxin detection, gel formation or turbidity of the coagulation factor chromogen or fluorescence-modified peptide is used. However, these conventional methods have problems with regard to their measurement time or sensitivity. We recently obtained a mutant firefly luciferase that has a luminescence intensity over 10-fold higher than that of the wild type. Therefore, we developed a new endotoxin detection method that combines the Limulus reaction and bioluminescence using mutant luciferase. The new method detects 0.0005EU/ml of endotoxin within 15min. PMID:19850001

  6. Bioluminescence microscopy: application to ATP measurements in single living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brau, Frederic; Helle, Pierre; Bernengo, Jean C.

    1997-12-01

    Bioluminescence microscopy can be used to measure intracellular cofactors and ionic concentrations (Ca2+, K+, ATP, NADH), as an alternative to micro- spectrophotometry and micro-fluorimetry, due to the development of sensitive detectors (cooled photomultipliers tubes and CCD). The main limitation comes from the very small and brief intensity of the emitted light. Our instrumentation based on an inverted microscope, equipped with high aperture immersion lenses is presented. Light intensity measurements are carried out through a photomultiplier sorted for low dark current and cooled at -5 degree(s)C to reduce thermal noise. Our first aim is to quantify ATP on single living cells using the firefly luciferin-luciferase couple. Experimental and kinetic aspects are presented to emphasize the potentialities of the technique.

  7. Real-Time Bioluminescent Tracking of Cellular Population Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Close, Dan; Sayler, Gary Steven; Xu, Tingting; Ripp, Steven Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Cellular population dynamics are routinely monitored across many diverse fields for a variety of purposes. In general, these dynamics are assayed either through the direct counting of cellular aliquots followed by extrapolation to the total population size, or through the monitoring of signal intensity from any number of externally stimulated reporter proteins. While both viable methods, here we describe a novel technique that allows for the automated, non-destructive tracking of cellular population dynamics in real-time. This method, which relies on the detection of a continuous bioluminescent signal produced through expression of the bacterial luciferase gene cassette, provides a low cost, low time-intensive means for generating additional data compared to alternative methods.

  8. A Novel Bioluminescent Protease Assay Using Engineered Firefly Luciferase

    PubMed Central

    Wigdal, Susan S; Anderson, Jessica L; Vidugiris, Gediminas J; Shultz, John; Wood, Keith V; Fan, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Proteases play important roles in a variety of disease processes. Understanding their biological functions underpins the efforts of drug discovery. We have developed a bioluminescent protease assay using a circularly permuted form of firefly luciferase, wherein the native enzyme termini were joined by a peptide containing a protease site of interest. Protease cleavage of these mutant luciferases greatly activates the enzyme, typically over 100 fold. The mutant luciferase substrates are easily generated by molecular cloning and cell-free translation reactions and thus the protease substrates do not need to be chemically synthesized or purchased. The assay has broad applicability using a variety of proteases and their cognate sites and can sensitively detect protease activity. In this report we further demonstrate its utility for the evaluation of protease recognition sequence specificity and subsequent establishment of an optimized assay for the identification and characterization of protease inhibitors using high throughput screening. PMID:20161840

  9. Two-phase flow cell for chemiluminescence and bioluminescence measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, J.L.; Seitz, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    A new approach to two-phase CL (chemiluminescence) measurements is reported. A magnetically stirred reagent phase is separated from the analyte phase by a dialysis membrane so that only smaller molecules can go from one phase to the other. The system is designed so that the analyte phase flows through a spiral groove on an aluminum block that is flush against the dialysis membrane. As solution flows through the spiral grove, analyte diffuses into the reagent phase where it reacts to produce light. A simple model is developed to predict how this system will behave. Experimentally, the system is evaluated by using the luminol reaction catalyzed by peroxidase, the firefly reaction, and the bacterial bioluminescence reaction. 10 references, 4 tables, 6 figures.

  10. Bioluminescent luciferase-modified magnetic nanoparticles as potential imaging agents for mammalian spermatozoa detection and tracking

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Nanoparticles have emerged as key materials for developing applications in nanomedicine, nanobiotechnology, bioimaging and theranostics. Existing bioimaging technologies include bioluminescent resonance energy transfer-conjugated quantum dots (BRET-QDs). Despite the current use of BRET-Q...