Science.gov

Sample records for stage ii-iii esophageal

  1. Phase II Study of Chemoradiotherapy With 5-Fluorouracil and Cisplatin for Stage II-III Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: JCOG Trial (JCOG 9906)

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Ken; Muro, Kei; Minashi, Keiko; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Ishikura, Satoshi; Boku, Narikazu; Takiuchi, Hiroya; Komatsu, Yoshito; Miyata, Yoshinori; Fukuda, Haruhiko

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: In this Phase II study, we evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for Stage II-III esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Patients and Methods: Patients with clinical Stage II-III (T1N1M0 or T2-3N0-1M0) thoracic ESCC were enrolled between April 2000 and March 2002. Chemotherapy comprised two courses of protracted infusion of 5-FU (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on Days 1-5 and 8-12, and 2-h infusion of CDDP (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1 and 8; this regimen was repeated every 5 weeks. Concurrent radiotherapy involved 60-Gy irradiation (30 fractions) for 8 weeks with a 2-week break. Responders received two courses of 5-FU (800 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on Days 1-5 and CDDP (80 mg/m{sup 2}) on Day 1. Final analysis was conducted in March 2007. Survival and late toxicities were monitored for 5 years. Results: The characteristics of the 76 patients enrolled were as follows: median age, 61 years; male/female, 68/8; performance status 0/1, 59/17 patients; Stage IIA/IIB/III, 26/12/38 patients. Of the 74 eligible patients, 46 (62.2%) achieved complete response. Median survival time was 29 months, with 3- and 5-year survival rates of 44.7% and 36.8%, respectively. Acute toxicities included Grade 3/4 esophagitis (17%), nausea (17%), hyponatremia (16%), and infection without neutropenia (12%). Late toxicities comprised Grade 3/4 esophagitis (13%), pericardial (16%) and pleural (9%) effusion, and radiation pneumonitis (4%), causing 4 deaths. Conclusions: CRT is effective for Stage II-III ESCC with manageable acute toxicities and can provide a nonsurgical treatment option. However, further improvement is required for reduction in late toxicity.

  2. Phase I/II trial of chemoradiotherapy with concurrent S-1 and cisplatin for clinical stage II/III esophageal carcinoma (JCOG 0604).

    PubMed

    Tahara, Makoto; Fuse, Nozomu; Mizusawa, Junki; Sato, Akihiro; Nihei, Keiji; Kanato, Keisuke; Kato, Ken; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Muro, Kei; Takaishi, Hiromasa; Boku, Narikazu; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2015-10-01

    We carried out a phase I/II trial of chemoradiotherapy concurrent with S-1 and cisplatin to determine the maximum tolerated dose and recommended dose and to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this treatment in patients with esophageal carcinoma. Thoracic esophageal cancer patients with clinical stage II/III disease, excluding T4, were eligible. Chemotherapy consisted of S-1 at a dose of 60-80 mg/m(2) /day on days 1-14, and cisplatin at 75 mg/m(2) on day 1, repeated twice every 4 weeks. Single daily radiation of 50.4 Gy was given in 28 fractions concurrently starting on day 1. Patients achieving an objective response after chemoradiotherapy underwent two additional cycles of chemotherapy. Patient accrual was terminated early due to slow enrolment after 44 patients were accrued. In the phase I part, two of six patients experienced dose-limiting toxicities at each level of S-1 (S-1 60 or 80 mg/m(2) /day). Considering treatment compliance, the recommended dose was determined to be S-1 60 mg/m(2) /day. The complete response rate, the primary endpoint of phase II, was 59.5% (22/37; 90% confidence interval, 44.6-73.1%; weighted threshold, 57.2%; P = 0.46 by the exact binomial test) on central review. In the phase II part, 3-year progression-free survival was 48.4%, with a 3-year overall survival of 61.9%. Grade 3 or 4 toxicity in phase II included leukopenia (57.9%), neutropenia (50%), hyponatremia (28.9%), anorexia (21.1%), anemia (18.4%), thrombocytopenia (18.4%), and febrile neutropenia (2.6%). No treatment-related deaths were observed. Although this combination showed acceptable toxicity and favorable 3-year survival, the study did not meet its primary endpoint. This trial was registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN000000710. PMID:26250827

  3. Phase I/II trial of chemoradiotherapy with concurrent S-1 and cisplatin for clinical stage II/III esophageal carcinoma (JCOG 0604)

    PubMed Central

    Tahara, Makoto; Fuse, Nozomu; Mizusawa, Junki; Sato, Akihiro; Nihei, Keiji; Kanato, Keisuke; Kato, Ken; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Muro, Kei; Takaishi, Hiromasa; Boku, Narikazu; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    We carried out a phase I/II trial of chemoradiotherapy concurrent with S-1 and cisplatin to determine the maximum tolerated dose and recommended dose and to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this treatment in patients with esophageal carcinoma. Thoracic esophageal cancer patients with clinical stage II/III disease, excluding T4, were eligible. Chemotherapy consisted of S-1 at a dose of 60–80 mg/m2/day on days 1–14, and cisplatin at 75 mg/m2 on day 1, repeated twice every 4 weeks. Single daily radiation of 50.4 Gy was given in 28 fractions concurrently starting on day 1. Patients achieving an objective response after chemoradiotherapy underwent two additional cycles of chemotherapy. Patient accrual was terminated early due to slow enrolment after 44 patients were accrued. In the phase I part, two of six patients experienced dose-limiting toxicities at each level of S-1 (S-1 60 or 80 mg/m2/day). Considering treatment compliance, the recommended dose was determined to be S-1 60 mg/m2/day. The complete response rate, the primary endpoint of phase II, was 59.5% (22/37; 90% confidence interval, 44.6–73.1%; weighted threshold, 57.2%; P = 0.46 by the exact binomial test) on central review. In the phase II part, 3-year progression-free survival was 48.4%, with a 3-year overall survival of 61.9%. Grade 3 or 4 toxicity in phase II included leukopenia (57.9%), neutropenia (50%), hyponatremia (28.9%), anorexia (21.1%), anemia (18.4%), thrombocytopenia (18.4%), and febrile neutropenia (2.6%). No treatment-related deaths were observed. Although this combination showed acceptable toxicity and favorable 3-year survival, the study did not meet its primary endpoint. This trial was registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN000000710. PMID:26250827

  4. Molecular Phenotyping in Predicting Response in Patients With Stage IB-III Esophageal Cancer Receiving Combination Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-18

    Stage IB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIC Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

  5. Stages of Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cancer cells. The following stages are used for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus: Stage 0 (High-grade Dysplasia) ... is also called high-grade dysplasia . Stage I squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus Stage I is divided into ...

  6. Efficacy of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Early Stage of Esophageal Carcinoma;

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-09

    Esophageal Neoplasm; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T2; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T3; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Regional Lymph Nodes (N) N0; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Distal Metastasis (M) M0

  7. Endoscopic options for early stage esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pari M.

    2015-01-01

    Surgery has traditionally been the preferred treatment for early stage esophageal cancer. Recent advances in endoscopic treatments have been shown to be effective and safe. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) allow endoscopists to remove small, superficial lesions, providing tumor specimen that can be examined for accurate pathologic tumor staging and assessment of adequacy of resection. Endoscopic ablation procedures, including photodynamic therapy (PDT) and radio frequency ablation (RFA), have also been shown to safely and effectively treat esophageal dysplasia and early stage neoplasia, with excellent long-term disease control. Both approaches are becoming more widely available around the world, and provide an alternative, safe, low risk strategy for treating early stage disease, making combined endoscopic therapy the recommended treatment of choice for early stage esophageal cancers. PMID:25642334

  8. Serum miRNA expression profile as a prognostic biomarker of stage II/III colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jialu; Liu, Yang; Wang, Cheng; Deng, Ting; Liang, Hongwei; Wang, Yifei; Huang, Dingzhi; Fan, Qian; Wang, Xia; Ning, Tao; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zen, Ke; Chen, Xi; Ba, Yi

    2015-01-01

    We sought to identify a serum miRNA expression profile to improve disease surveillance and to predict post-operative disease recurrence for stage II/III colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Using the TaqMan Low-Density Array (TLDA), we performed an initial survey to analyze 749 miRNAs in the pooled serum of 20 paired pre- and post-operative CRC patients and 20 matched normal subjects. Using individual RT-qPCR verification in 175 stage II/III CRC patients, we identified that miR-145, miR-106a and miR-17-3p were significantly differentially expressed between pre- and post-operative CRC patients and between pre-operative CRC patients and normal controls (P?stage II/III CRC. PMID:26250939

  9. Immunodetection of collagen types I, II, III, and IV for differentiation of liver fibrosis stages in patients with chronic HCV.

    PubMed

    Attallah, Abdelfattah M; Mosa, Tamer E; Omran, Mohamed M; Abo-Zeid, Mostafa M; El-Dosoky, Ibrahim; Shaker, Yehia M

    2007-01-01

    The current study is aimed at evaluating serum collagens and other serum biochemical markers as useful, non-invasive markers of hepatic fibrosis associated with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV). Collagen types I, II, III, and IV were detected in serum using ELISA and Western blot techniques. The ELISA levels of collagen I, II, III, and IV increased significantly with the progression of fibrosis staging. Based on receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, the collagen type III (70 kDa) and type IV (200 kDa) were more useful than other serum bio-markers for differentiating severe fibrosis from mild fibrosis. Multivariate discriminant analysis (MDA) selected a fibrosis discriminant score (FDS) = [2.345 + Collagen III (microg/mL) x 1.923 + Collagen IV (microg/mL) x 1.544 + ALT (U/mL) x 0.005] - [albumin(g/L) x 0.046]. The FDS correctly classified 87% of the severe fibrosis patients at a cut-off score = 2.2 (i.e., more than 2.2 indicated severe fibrotic liver and less than 2.2 indicated mild fibrotic liver) with specificity of 97%. In a validation study, the FDS was applied to the second cohort of patients and the results were reproduced without significant difference. In conclusion, the developed four-parameter based FDS is useful for identifying severe liver fibrosis in patients with chronic HCV infection. PMID:17424834

  10. Role of Postmastectomy Radiation After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fowble, Barbara L.; Einck, John P.; Kim, Danny N.; McCloskey, Susan; Mayadev, Jyoti; Yashar, Catheryn; Chen, Steven L.; Hwang, E. Shelley

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To identify a cohort of women treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy for whom postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) may be omitted according to the projected risk of local-regional failure (LRF). Methods and Materials: Seven breast cancer physicians from University of California cancer centers created 14 hypothetical clinical case scenarios, identified, reviewed, and abstracted the available literature (MEDLINE and Cochrane databases), and formulated evidence tables with endpoints of LRF, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Using the American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria methodology, appropriateness ratings for postmastectomy radiation were assigned for each scenario. Finally, an overall summary risk assessment table was developed. Results: Of 24 sources identified, 23 were retrospective studies from single institutions. Consensus on the appropriateness rating, defined as 80% agreement in a category, was achieved for 86% of the cases. Distinct LRF risk categories emerged. Clinical stage II (T1-2N0-1) patients, aged >40 years, estrogen receptor-positive subtype, with pathologic complete response or 0-3 positive nodes without lymphovascular invasion or extracapsular extension, were identified as having {<=}10% risk of LRF without radiation. Limited data support stage IIIA patients with pathologic complete response as being low risk. Conclusions: In the absence of randomized trial results, existing data can be used to guide the use of PMRT in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy setting. Using available studies to inform appropriateness ratings for clinical scenarios, we found a high concordance of treatment recommendations for PMRT and were able to identify a cohort of women with a low risk of LRF without radiation. These low-risk patients will form the basis for future planned studies within University of California Athena Breast Health Network.

  11. Treatment Options by Stage (Esophageal Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cancer cells. The following stages are used for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus: Stage 0 (High-grade Dysplasia) ... is also called high-grade dysplasia . Stage I squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus Stage I is divided into ...

  12. Radiation Therapy, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Esophageal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-06

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer

  13. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, Leucovorin Calcium, and Oxaliplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-24

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  14. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-09

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  15. Thyroid Function in Women after Multimodal Treatment for Breast Cancer Stage II/III: Comparison With Controls From a Population Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Reinertsen, Kristin Valborg; Cvancarova, Milada; Wist, Erik; Bjoro, Trine; Dahl, Alv A.; Danielsen, Turi; Fossa, Sophie D.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: A possible association between thyroid diseases (TD) and breast cancer (BC) has been debated. We examined prevalence and development of TD in women after multimodal treatment for Stage II/III BC compared with women from a general population. Secondarily, we explored the impact of two different radiotherapy (RT) techniques (standardized field arrangements vs. computed tomography [CT]-based dose planning) on TD in BC patients examined 35-120 months after primary BC treatment. Methods and Materials: A total of 403 BC patients completed a questionnaire about TD and had blood samples taken for analyses of thyroid function. All had undergone postoperative RT with or without (2%) adjuvant systemic treatment. The results in the BC patients were compared with a cancer-free, age-matched control group from a general population (CGr). Results: There was higher prevalence of self-reported hypothyroidism in the BC patients as compared with the CGr (18% vs. 6%, p < 0.001). The raised prevalence was predominantly due to a substantial increase in the development of hypothyroidism after BC diagnosis, whereas the prevalence of hypothyroidism before BC diagnosis was similar to that observed in the CGr. Patients treated with CT-based RT showed a trend for increased post-BC development of hypothyroidism as compared with those treated with standardized field arrangements (p = 0.08). Conclusions: Hypothyroidism is significantly increased in women after multimodal treatment for Stage II/III BC. Radiation to the thyroid gland may be a contributing factor. BC patients should be routinely screened for hypothyroidism.

  16. Diet and Physical Activity Change or Usual Care in Improving Survival in Patients With Previously Treated Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase III trial studies diet and physical activity changes to see how well they work compared with usual care in improving progression-free survival in patients with previously treated stage II, III, or IV ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer. A healthy lifestyle and counseling after treatment may improve progression-free survival in patients with previously treated cancer.

  17. Vaccine Therapy and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Breast or Stage II-IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-12

    Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  18. Mastectomy With Immediate Expander-Implant Reconstruction, Adjuvant Chemotherapy, and Radiation for Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Treatment Intervals and Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jean L.; Cordeiro, Peter G.; Ben-Porat, Leah; Van Zee, Kimberly J.; Hudis, Clifford; Beal, Kathryn; McCormick, Beryl

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine intervals between surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation in patients treated with mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, and to evaluate locoregional and distant control and overall survival in these patients. Methods and Materials: Between May 1996 and March 2004, 104 patients with Stage II-III breast cancer were routinely treated at our institution under the following algorithm: (1) definitive mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection and immediate tissue expander placement, (2) tissue expansion during chemotherapy, (3) exchange of tissue expander for permanent implant, (4) radiation. Patient, disease, and treatment characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Median age was 45 years. Twenty-six percent of patients were Stage II and 74% Stage III. All received adjuvant chemotherapy. Estrogen receptor staining was positive in 77%, and 78% received hormone therapy. Radiation was delivered to the chest wall with daily 0.5-cm bolus and to the supraclavicular fossa. Median dose was 5040 cGy. Median interval from surgery to chemotherapy was 5 weeks, from completion of chemotherapy to exchange 4 weeks, and from exchange to radiation 4 weeks. Median interval from completion of chemotherapy to start of radiation was 8 weeks. Median follow-up was 64 months from date of mastectomy. The 5-year rate for locoregional disease control was 100%, for distant metastasis-free survival 90%, and for overall survival 96%. Conclusions: Mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation results in a median interval of 8 weeks from completion of chemotherapy to initiation of radiation and seems to be associated with acceptable 5-year locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival.

  19. Prognostic Impact of Erythropoietin Expression and Erythropoietin Receptor Expression on Locoregional Control and Survival of Patients Irradiated for Stage II/III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Setter, Cornelia; Dahl, Olav; Schild, Steven E.; Noack, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Prognostic factors can guide the physician in selecting the optimal treatment for an individual patient. This study investigates the prognostic value of erythropoietin (EPO) and EPO receptor (EPO-R) expression of tumor cells for locoregional control and survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: Fourteen factors were investigated in 62 patients irradiated for stage II/III NSCLC, as follows: age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), histology, grading, TNM/American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, surgery, chemotherapy, pack years (average number of packages of cigarettes smoked per day multiplied by the number of years smoked), smoking during radiotherapy, hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy, EPO expression, and EPO-R expression. Additionally, patients with tumors expressing both EPO and EPO-R were compared to those expressing either EPO or EPO-R and to those expressing neither EPO nor EPO-R. Results: On univariate analysis, improved locoregional control was associated with AJCC stage II cancer (p < 0.048), surgery (p < 0.042), no smoking during radiotherapy (p = 0.024), and no EPO expression (p = 0.001). A trend was observed for a KPS of >70 (p = 0.08), an N stage of 0 to 1 (p = 0.07), and no EPO-R expression (p = 0.10). On multivariate analysis, AJCC stage II and no EPO expression remained significant. No smoking during radiotherapy was almost significant. On univariate analysis, improved survival was associated with N stage 0 to 1 (p = 0.009), surgery (p = 0.039), hemoglobin levels of {>=}12 g/d (p = 0.016), and no EPO expression (p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, N stage 0 to 1 and no EPO expression maintained significance. Hemoglobin levels of {>=}12 g/d were almost significant. On subgroup analyses, patients with tumors expressing both EPO and EPO-R had worse outcomes than those expressing either EPO or EPO-R and those expressing neither EPO nor RPO-R. Conclusions: EPO expression of tumor cells was an independent prognostic factor for locoregional control and survival in patients irradiated for NSCLC. EPO-R expression showed a trend. Patients with tumors expressing both EPO and EPO-R have an unfavorable prognosis.

  20. Fibroblast Growth Factor 2-A Predictor of Outcome for Patients Irradiated for Stage II-III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Setter, Cornelia; Dahl, Olav; Schild, Steven E.; Noack, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The prognostic value of the tumor cell expression of the fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is unclear. The present study investigated the effect of tumor cell expression of FGF-2 on the outcome of 60 patients irradiated for Stage II-III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: The effect of FGF-2 expression and 13 additional factors on locoregional control (LRC), metastasis-free survival (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were retrospectively evaluated. These additional factors included age, gender, Karnofsky performance status, histologic type, histologic grade, T and N category, American Joint Committee on Cancer stage, surgery, chemotherapy, pack-years, smoking during radiotherapy, and hemoglobin during radiotherapy. Locoregional failure was identified by endoscopy or computed tomography. Univariate analyses were performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and the Wilcoxon test and multivariate analyses with the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: On univariate analysis, improved LRC was associated with surgery (p = .017), greater hemoglobin levels (p = .036), and FGF-2 negativity (p <.001). On multivariate analysis of LRC, surgery (relative risk [RR], 2.44; p = .037), and FGF-2 expression (RR, 5.06; p <.001) maintained significance. On univariate analysis, improved MFS was associated with squamous cell carcinoma (p = .020), greater hemoglobin levels (p = .007), and FGF-2 negativity (p = .001). On multivariate analysis of MFS, the hemoglobin levels (RR, 2.65; p = .019) and FGF-2 expression (RR, 3.05; p = .004) were significant. On univariate analysis, improved OS was associated with a lower N category (p = .048), greater hemoglobin levels (p <.001), and FGF-2 negativity (p <.001). On multivariate analysis of OS, greater hemoglobin levels (RR, 4.62; p = .002) and FGF-2 expression (RR, 3.25; p = .002) maintained significance. Conclusions: Tumor cell expression of FGF-2 appeared to be an independent negative predictor of LRC, MFS, and OS.

  1. Effects of atorvastatin on systemic and renal NO dependency in patients with non-diabetic stage II–III chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Mose, Frank Holden; Larsen, Thomas; Jensen, Janni Majgaard; Hansen, Annebirthe Bo; Bech, Jesper Nřrgaard; Pedersen, Erling Bjerregaard

    2014-01-01

    Aims Clinical trials suggest that statins have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system independent from their cholesterol lowering properties. In patients with chronic kidney disease stage II–III, we tested the hypothesis that atorvastatin increased systemic and renal nitric oxide (NO) availability using L-NG-monomethyl arginine (L-NMMA) as an inhibitor of NO production. Methods In a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study patients were treated with atorvastatin for 5 days with standardized diet and fluid intake. Glomerular filtration reate (GFR), fractional excretions of sodium (FENa), urinary excretion of aquaporin-2 (u-AQP2) and epithelial sodium channels (u-ENaC?), vasoactive hormones (renin, angiotensin II, aldosterone, arginine vasopressin, endothelin-1 and brain natriuretic peptide) and central blood pressure (BP) estimated by applanation tonometry were measured before and after systemic administration of the NO inhibitor L-NMMA. Results Atorvastatin caused a significant reduction in U-ENaC?, but sodium excretion, , FENa and u-AQP2 were not changed by atorvastatin. L-NMMA reduced renal effect variables, including GFR, FENa and u-ENaC? and increased brachial BP and central BP to a similar extent during both treatments. Vasoactive hormones were changed in the same way by L-NMMA during atorvastatin and placebo treatment. Conclusion During, atorvastatin and placebo treatment, inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis induced the same response in brachial and central blood pressure, GFR, renal tubular function and vasoactive hormones. Thus, the data do not support that atorvastatin changes nitric oxide availability in patients with mild nephropathy. The reduced u-ENaC may reflect changes in sodium absorption in the nephron induced by atorvastatin. PMID:24697877

  2. Ordering of mutations in preinvasive disease stages of esophageal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Forshew, Tim; Barbera, Mariagnese; Murtaza, Muhammed; Ong, Chin-Ann J.; Lao-Sirieix, Pierre; Dunning, Mark J; Smith, Laura; Smith, Mike L.; Anderson, Charlotte L.; Carvalho, Benilton; O’Donovan, Maria; Underwood, Timothy J.; May, Andrew P; Grehan, Nicola; Hardwick, Richard; Davies, Jim; Oloumi, Arusha; Aparicio, Sam; Caldas, Carlos; Eldridge, Matthew D.; Edwards, Paul A.W.; Rosenfeld, Nitzan; Tavaré, Simon; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2014-01-01

    Cancer genome sequencing studies have identified numerous driver genes but the relative timing of mutations in carcinogenesis remains unclear. The gradual progression from pre-malignant Barrett’s esophagus to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) provides an ideal model to study the ordering of somatic mutations. We identified recurrently-mutated genes and assessed clonal structure using whole-genome sequencing and amplicon-resequencing of 112 EACs. We next screened a cohort of 109 biopsies from two key transition points in the development of malignancy; benign metaplastic never-dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus (NDBE, n=66), and high-grade dysplasia (HGD, n=43). Unexpectedly, the majority of recurrently mutated genes in EAC were also mutated in NDBE. Only TP53 and SMAD4 were stage-specific, confined to HGD and EAC, respectively. Finally, we applied this knowledge to identify high-risk Barrett’s esophagus in a novel non-endoscopic test. In conclusion, mutations in EAC driver genes generally occur exceptionally early in disease development with profound implications for diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:24952744

  3. HLA-G 3’UTR Polymorphisms Impact the Prognosis of Stage II-III CRC Patients in Fluoropyrimidine-Based Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Garziera, Marica; Bidoli, Ettore; Cecchin, Erika; Mini, Enrico; Nobili, Stefania; Lonardi, Sara; Buonadonna, Angela; Errante, Domenico; Pella, Nicoletta; D’Andrea, Mario; De Marchi, Francesco; De Paoli, Antonino; Zanusso, Chiara; De Mattia, Elena; Tassi, Renato; Toffoli, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    An important hallmark of CRC is the evasion of immune surveillance. HLA-G is a negative regulator of host’s immune response. Overexpression of HLA-G protein in primary tumour CRC tissues has already been associated to worse prognosis; however a definition of the role of immunogenetic host background is still lacking. Germline polymorphisms in the 3’UTR region of HLA-G influence the magnitude of the protein by modulating HLA-G mRNA stability. Soluble HLA-G has been associated to 3’UTR +2960 Ins/Ins and +3035 C/T (lower levels) and +3187 G/G (high levels) genotypes. HLA-G 3’UTR SNPs have never been explored in CRC outcome. The purpose of this study was to investigate if common HLA-G 3’UTR polymorphisms have an impact on DFS and OS of 253 stage II-III CRC patients, after primary surgery and ADJ-CT based on FL. The 3’UTR was sequenced and SNPs were analyzed for their association with survival by Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox models; results underwent internal validation using a resampling method (bootstrap analysis). In a multivariate analysis, we estimated an association with improved DFS in Ins allele (Ins/Del +Ins/Ins) carriers (HR 0.60, 95% CI 0.38–0.93, P = 0.023) and in patients with +3035 C/T genotype (HR 0.51, 95% CI 0.26–0.99, P = 0.045). The +3187 G/G mutated carriers (G/G vs A/A+A/G) were associated to a worst prognosis in both DFS (HR 2.46, 95% CI 1.19–5.05, P = 0.015) and OS (HR 2.71, 95% CI 1.16–6.63, P = 0.022). Our study shows a prognostic and independent role of 3 HLA-G 3’UTR SNPs, +2960 14-bp INDEL, +3035 C>T, and +3187 A>G. PMID:26633805

  4. Esophageal cancer: A Review of epidemiology, pathogenesis, staging workup and treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Napier, Kyle J; Scheerer, Mary; Misra, Subhasis

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is a serious malignancy with regards to mortality and prognosis. It is a growing health concern that is expected to increase in incidence over the next 10 years. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common histological type of esophageal cancer worldwide, with a higher incidence in developing nations. With the increased prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease and obesity in developed nations, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has dramatically increased in the past 40 years. Esophageal cancer is staged according to the widely accepted TNM system. Staging plays an integral part in guiding stage specific treatment protocols and has a great impact on overall survival. Common imaging modalities used in staging include computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasound and positron emission tomography scans. Current treatment options include multimodality therapy mainstays of current treatment include surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Tumor markers of esophageal cancer are an advancing area of research that could potentially lead to earlier diagnosis as well as playing a part in assessing tumor response to therapy. PMID:24834141

  5. Esophagectomy Compared to Chemoradiation for Early Stage Esophageal Cancer in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Julian A.; Buono, Donna L.; Strauss, Joshua; McBride, Russell B.; Hershman, Dawn L.; Neugut, Alfred I.

    2009-01-01

    Background Esophagectomy has been the traditional treatment of choice for early stage esophageal cancer. However, esophagectomy is associated with high mortality and morbidity in the elderly, and these patients often receive chemoradiation instead. We compared outcomes of esophagectomy versus chemoradiation in a population-based sample of elderly patients with early stage esophageal cancer. Methods We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database to identify patients ?65 years diagnosed with stage 1 or 2 esophageal cancer from 1991–2002. We assessed associations of treatment with esophagectomy or chemoradiation with demographic and clinical variables. We performed survival analyses to compare outcomes with treatment modality, adjusted for potential confounders. Results We identified 730 patients with stage 1 or 2 esophageal cancer who underwent esophagectomy (n=341; 46.7%) or chemoradiation (n=389, 53.3%). Older age, squamous cell histology, and lower socioeconomic status were associated with increased odds of receipt of chemoradiation. In multivariable analyses, chemoradiation was associated with worse disease-specific (HR 2.08, 95%CI 1.64–2.64) and overall survival (HR 1.92, 95%CI 1.58–2.34). Receipt of chemoradiation was associated with worse survival for adenocarcinoma (HR 3.01, 95%CI 2.24–4.04), but there was no significant difference for squamous cell (HR 1.33, 95%CI 0.98–1.80). Conclusion Compared to chemoradiation, esophagectomy may be associated with improved survival for early stage esophageal cancer in the elderly. The results suggest that there may also be a subset of squamous cell patients for whom chemoradiation is adequate therapy. A randomized trial would be useful to determine optimal treatment for elderly patients with early stage esophageal cancer. PMID:19637343

  6. CT staging of esophageal carcinoma in patients treated by primary radiation therapy and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Unger, E C; Coia, L; Gatenby, R; Kessler, H; Hartz, W; Clair, M; Broder, G

    1992-01-01

    Primary radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy is under study as definitive and palliative therapy for patients with esophageal carcinoma. To evaluate the correlation between CT staging and outcome, we retrospectively reviewed the CT scans of 48 patients treated with primary radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy and correlated CT staging with disease-free survival, overall survival, and site of relapse. Excluding one patient who was understaged and six patients who died of problems unrelated to esophageal carcinoma, mean survival of CT stage I, II, and III patients was 14.7, 21.3, and 5.2 months, respectively. When the CT stage is modified by the presence of nodal involvement on CT, the mean survival of stage IIn and IIIn (nodes greater than 1.5 cm in diameter) and stage IV patients (distant metastases) was 16.4, 19.2, and 10.6 months, respectively. Despite thickening of the esophageal wall greater than 3.0 cm in five patients with stage IIn cancer, mean survival was still 19.2 months. Patients with pericardial effusion had the worst survival of only 4.3 months. Stage II patients had a significantly longer (p less than 0.05) disease-free period than all other groups and the difference between stage II and III patients was highly significant (p less than 0.01). Stage II patients were also more likely to be disease-free at the time of death or last follow-up (p less than 0.05). Computed tomographic staging of esophageal carcinoma is useful in radiation therapy treatment planning and predicting outcome of patients managed with a nonsurgical technique of concurrent radiation and chemotherapy. PMID:1545019

  7. Bevacizumab and Intravenous or Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  8. Akt Inhibitor MK-2206 and Anastrozole With or Without Goserelin Acetate in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-19

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  9. The Role of Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Clinical Stage II-III Breast Cancer Patients With pN0: A Multicenter, Retrospective Study (KROG 12-05)

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Su Jung; Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Choi, Doo Ho; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Nam Kwon; Suh, Chang-Ok; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Yong Bae; Ahn, Seung Do; Kim, Su Ssan; Ha, Sung W.; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Kyubo; Shin, Hyun Soo; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Hyung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in clinical stage II-III breast cancer patients with pN0. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 417 clinical stage II-III breast cancer patients who achieved an ypN0 at surgery after receiving NAC between 1998 and 2009. Of these, 151 patients underwent mastectomy after NAC. The effect of PMRT on disease-free survival (DFS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS), and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis including known prognostic factors using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log–rank test and Cox proportional regression analysis. Results: Of the 151 patients who underwent mastectomy, 105 (69.5%) received PMRT and 46 patients (30.5%) did not. At a median follow-up of 59 months, 5 patients (3.3%) developed LRR (8 sites of recurrence) and 14 patients (9.3%) developed distant metastasis. The 5-year DFS, LRRFS, and OS rates were 91.2, 98.1, and 93.3% with PMRT and 83.0%, 92.3%, and 89.9% without PMRT, respectively (all P values not significant). By univariate analysis, only age (?40 vs >40 years) was significantly associated with decreased DFS (P=.027). By multivariate analysis, age (?40 vs >40 years) and pathologic T stage (0-is vs 1 vs 2-4) were significant prognostic factors affecting DFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.353, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.135-0.928, P=.035; HR 2.223, 95% CI 1.074-4.604, P=.031, respectively). PMRT showed no correlation with a difference in DFS, LRRFS, or OS by multivariate analysis. Conclusions: PMRT might not be necessary for pN0 patients after NAC, regardless of clinical stage. Prospective randomized clinical trial data are needed to assess whether PMRT can be safely omitted in pN0 patients after NAC and mastectomy for clinical stage II-III breast cancer.

  10. Two-stage Surgery for an Aortoesophageal Fistula Caused by Tuberculous Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang Woo; Lim, Jae Woong; Her, Keun

    2015-01-01

    An aortoesophageal fistula (AEF) is an extremely rare, potentially fatal condition, and aortic surgery is usually performed together with extracorporeal circulation. However, this surgical method has a high rate of surgical complications and mortality. This report describes an AEF caused by tuberculous esophagitis that was treated successfully using a two-stage operation. A 52-yr-old man was admitted to the hospital with severe hematemesis and syncope. Based on the computed tomography and diagnostic endoscopic findings, he was diagnosed with an AEF and initially underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Esophageal reconstruction was performed after controlling the mediastinal inflammation. The patient suffered postoperative anastomotic leakage, which was treated by an endoscopic procedure, and the patient was discharged without any further problems. The patient received 9 months of anti-tuberculosis treatment after he was diagnosed with histologically confirmed tuberculous esophagitis; subsequently, he was followed as an outpatient and has had no recurrence of the tuberculosis or any further issues. PMID:26539019

  11. Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Carboplatin Followed by Surgery and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-10

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  12. Treatment results of chemoradiotherapy for clinical stage I (Taman) esophageal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Kazunari . E-mail: kyamada-rad@umin.ac.jp; Murakami, Masao; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Okuno, Yoshishige; Nakajima, Toshifumi; Kusumi, Fusako; Takakuwa, Hiroshi; Matsusue, Satoru

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: In 1991, we started a clinical prospective trial for operable esophageal carcinoma, foreseeing organ preservation, to assess the treatment results after definitive chemoradiotherapy (Crt) for clinical Stage I (Taman) esophageal cancer. Patients and Methods: Between 1992 and 2003, 63 patients were enrolled in this study. Tumor depth was mucosal cancer (T 1a) in 23 and submucosal cancer (T 1b) in 40. Crt consisted of 55-66 Gy/50-60 fractions (median, 59.4 Gy); from 1 to 3 cycles (median, 2) of concurrent chemotherapy (Cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil), followed by high-dose-rate intraluminal brachytherapy 10-12 Gy/2-3 fractions. Results: The 5-year overall and cause-specific and disease-free survival rates were 66.4%, 76.3%, and 63.7%, respectively. The 5-year cause-specific survival rates for T 1a and T 1b cancer patients were 85.2% and 70.0%, respectively (p = 0.06). The 5-year disease-free survival rates for T 1a and T 1b were 84.4% and 50.5%, respectively (p < 0.01). Esophageal fistula as a late toxicity occurred in 2 patients (G: 1; G: 1), and esophageal stricture requiring a liquid diet occurred in 2 patients. Pericardial effusion was observed in 3 patients. Conclusion: We confirmed that patients with Taman esophageal carcinoma had their esophagus preserved in 89.2% of cases after definitive Crt, and the survival rates were equivalent to those of previous reports of surgery.

  13. How well does pathologic stage predict survival for esophageal adenocarcinoma after neoadjuvant therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Rebecca A.; Kim, Joseph; Raz, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer staging systems are designed to predict survival and stratify patients. The 7th edition of the American Joint Commission on Cancer (AJCC7) staging system for esophageal cancer was modeled using survival data on patients who underwent esophagectomy without induction or adjuvant therapy. In the United States, the standard of care for patients with locally advanced tumors often includes neoadjuvant therapy. The prognostic value of the pathologic stage for these patients is unknown. Methods Data from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) were used to identify 1,243 patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus who underwent surgery after neoadjuvant therapy from 1988-2009. Included in the analysis were pathologically-staged, non-metastatic patients who had radiation as part of their neoadjuvant therapy. The AJCC7 staging system and an alternate system were modeled using Kaplan-Meier survival methods. The two systems were compared using log-rank chi-squared statistics, with large chi-squared values indicating accuracy in survival prediction. Results The AJCC staging system was able to predict survival for patients who had neoadjuvant therapy (P<0.001, chi-squared =81.8); however, there was little distinction between stage subgroups. Patients with neoadjuvant radiotherapy had improved survival for pathologic stage II and III disease. An alternative, simpler staging system was better able to stratify patients with neoadjuvant therapy (P<0.001, chi-squared =100.5). Conclusions The current AJCC staging system is able to predict survival in esophageal adenocarcinoma patients undergoing neoadjuvant therapy, however, there is less distinction among stage subgroups. An alternative, simpler stage grouping may better stratify patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy. PMID:25973240

  14. Dosimetric comparative study of 3 different postoperative radiotherapy techniques (3D-CRT, IMRT, and RapidArc) for II-III stage rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Liu, Bailong; Wang, Huidong; Ding, Lijuan; Shi, Yinghua; Ge, Chao; Su, Xu; Liu, Xiaodong; Dong, Lihua

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative radiotherapy is critical for reducing local relapse for advanced rectal carcinoma but has many side effects. Our study compared the dose distribution of target volumes, protection of normal organs at risk (OAR), and monitor unit (MU) for 3 radiotherapy techniques (3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy [3D-CRT], intensity-modulated radiation therapy [IMRT], and RapidArc (Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, CA, USA)). The results advocate for the clinical application of RapidArc technique in the future.Thirty postoperative patients with rectal cancer were enrolled. The 3 radiotherapy plans mentioned above were designed for each patient. The target volume coverage indicators included average dose, conformity index (CI), and homogeneity index (HI) of planning tumor volume (PTV). OAR included the bladder, small intestine, colon, and bilateral proximal femurs. The 30 patients were divided into 3 groups (10 cases in each group) for postoperative radiotherapy with the 3D-CRT, IMRT, or RapidArc technique, respectively.Both the IMRT and RapidArc plans have a significantly higher average PTV dose and better CI and HI (P?stage rectal cancer. PMID:25569661

  15. Dosimetric Comparative Study of 3 Different Postoperative Radiotherapy Techniques (3D-CRT, IMRT, and RapidArc) for II–III Stage Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Liu, Bailong; Wang, Huidong; Ding, Lijuan; Shi, Yinghua; Ge, Chao; Su, Xu; Liu, Xiaodong; Dong, Lihua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Postoperative radiotherapy is critical for reducing local relapse for advanced rectal carcinoma but has many side effects. Our study compared the dose distribution of target volumes, protection of normal organs at risk (OAR), and monitor unit (MU) for 3 radiotherapy techniques (3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy [3D-CRT], intensity-modulated radiation therapy [IMRT], and RapidArc (Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, CA, USA)). The results advocate for the clinical application of RapidArc technique in the future. Thirty postoperative patients with rectal cancer were enrolled. The 3 radiotherapy plans mentioned above were designed for each patient. The target volume coverage indicators included average dose, conformity index (CI), and homogeneity index (HI) of planning tumor volume (PTV). OAR included the bladder, small intestine, colon, and bilateral proximal femurs. The 30 patients were divided into 3 groups (10 cases in each group) for postoperative radiotherapy with the 3D-CRT, IMRT, or RapidArc technique, respectively. Both the IMRT and RapidArc plans have a significantly higher average PTV dose and better CI and HI (P?stage rectal cancer. PMID:25569661

  16. Long-term Survival Outcomes Following Internal Mammary Node Irradiation in Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Results of a Large Retrospective Study With 12-Year Follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jee Suk; Park, Won; Kim, Yong Bae; Lee, Ik Jae; Keum, Ki Chang; Lee, Chang Geol; Choi, Doo Ho; Suh, Chang-Ok; Huh, Seung Jae

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of internal mammary node irradiation (IMNI) on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in breast cancer patients treated with modified radical mastectomy and postoperative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2002, 396 patients with stage II-III breast cancer were treated with postmastectomy radiation therapy with (n=197) or without (n=199) IMNI. Patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy were excluded. IMNI was administered at the clinical discretion of the treating physician. Median RT dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 45.0-59.4 Gy) in 28 fractions, with inclusion of the supraclavicular fossa in 96% of patients. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 99.7% of the patients and endocrine therapy to 53%. Results: The median follow-up was 149 months (range, 124-202). IMNI patients had more advanced nodal stage and non-high grade tumors than those without IMNI (P<.001). Otherwise, disease and treatment characteristics were well balanced. The 10-year DFS with and without IMNI was 65% and 57%, respectively (P=.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that IMNI was an independent, positive predictor of DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; P=.02). Benefits of IMNI in DFS were seen most apparently in N2 patients (HR, 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.26-0.74) and inner/central tumors (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.34-0.90). The 10-year OS with and without IMNI was 72% and 66%, respectively (P=.62). The 10-year DFS and OS were 61%, and 69%, respectively. Conclusions: Internal mammary node irradiation significantly improved DFS in postmastectomy breast cancer patients. Pending long-term results from randomized trials, treatment of internal mammary nodes should be considered in postmastectomy radiation therapy.

  17. Endoscopic ultrasonography for staging of T1a and T1b esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    He, Long-Jun; Shan, Hong-Bo; Luo, Guang-Yu; Li, Yin; Zhang, Rong; Gao, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Guo-Bao; Lin, Shi-Yong; Xu, Guo-Liang; Li, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the accuracy of Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in staging and sub-staging T1a and T1b esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). METHODS: A retrospective analysis involving 72 patients with pathologically confirmed T1a or T1b ESCC, was undertaken between January 2005 and December 2011 in Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center. The accuracy and efficiency of EUS for detecting stages T1a and T1b ESCC were examined. RESULTS: The overall accuracy of EUS for detecting stage T1a or T1b ESCC was 70.8% (51/72), and the sensitivity was 74.3%. 77.8% (7/9) of lesions originated in the upper thoracic region, 73.1% (38/52) in the mid-thoracic region and 72.7% (8/11) in the lower thoracic region. Multivariate analysis revealed that the diagnostic accuracy of EUS was closely related to lesion length (F = 4.984, P = 0.029). CONCLUSION: EUS demonstrated median degree of accuracy for distinguishing between stages T1a and T1b ESCC. Therefore, it is necessary to improve EUS for staging early ESCC. PMID:24574809

  18. Multimodality therapy is recommended for limited-stage combined small cell esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan-Huan; Zaorsky, Nicholas G; Meng, Mao-Bin; Wu, Zhi-Qiang; Zeng, Xian-Liang; Jiang, Bo; Jiang, Chao; Zhao, Lu-Jun; Yuan, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim Limited-stage combined small cell esophageal carcinoma (LS-C-SCEC) is a rare, poorly understood, underdiagnosed disease, with components of both small cell esophageal cancer and non–small cell esophageal cancer. We investigated the optimal treatment strategy and prognostic factors in patients with LS-C-SCEC. Patients and methods LS-C-SCEC patients included in the analysis (from our hospital and the literature) were treated between January 1966 and December 2013. Patient treatment strategies included surgery (S), chemotherapy (CT), and radiation therapy (RT). The primary end point was overall survival (OS); the secondary end points included tumor complete response rates, patterns of failure, and toxicity. Kaplan–Meier curves were compared with the log-rank test. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine prognosticators for OS. Results A total of 72 patients were included in the analysis: 24 (33%) from our hospital and 48 (67%) from the literature. The median OS of all patients was 15.0 months. Patients who received CT had a significantly longer median OS than did those who did not (OS 22.8 months vs 10.0 months) (P=0.03). Patients treated with multimodality therapy (including RT+CT [18%], S+CT [40%], or S+RT+CT [17%]) vs monotherapy (typically, S [18%]) had significantly improved OS (15.5 months vs 9.3 months) (P=0.02) and complete response rates. On multivariate analysis, tumor location (upper third of the esophagus) and type of treatment (monotherapy) were the only factors predictive of poor OS. Conclusion Multimodality therapy (including RT+CT, S+CT, or S+RT+CT) improves OS for patients with LS-C-SCEC compared with monotherapy (typically, S). Additional studies are necessary to personalize multimodal treatment approaches to individual patients. PMID:25709477

  19. Pralatrexate and Oxaliplatin in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Esophageal, Stomach, or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-27

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Esophageal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Gastric Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIC Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Undifferentiated Gastric Carcinoma

  20. Molecular Subtypes in Stage II-III Colon Cancer Defined by Genomic Instability: Early Recurrence-Risk Associated with a High Copy-Number Variation and Loss of RUNX3 and CDKN2A

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Marianne; Nordgaard, Oddmund; Křrner, Hartwig; Oltedal, Satu; Smaaland, Rune; Sřreide, Jon Arne; Sřreide, Kjetil

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to investigate various molecular subtypes defined by genomic instability that may be related to early death and recurrence in colon cancer. Methods We sought to investigate various molecular subtypes defined by instability at microsatellites (MSI), changes in methylation patterns (CpG island methylator phenotype, CIMP) or copy number variation (CNV) in 8 genes. Stage II-III colon cancers (n = 64) were investigated by methylation-specific multiplex ligated probe amplification (MS-MLPA). Correlation of CNV, CIMP and MSI, with mutations in KRAS and BRAFV600E were assessed for overlap in molecular subtypes and early recurrence risk by uni- and multivariate regression. Results The CIMP phenotype occurred in 34% (22/64) and MSI in 27% (16/60) of the tumors, with noted CIMP/MSI overlap. Among the molecular subtypes, a high CNV phenotype had an associated odds ratio (OR) for recurrence of 3.2 (95% CI 1.1-9.3; P = 0.026). Losses of CACNA1G (OR of 2.9, 95% CI 1.4-6.0; P = 0.001), IGF2 (OR of 4.3, 95% CI 1.1-15.8; P = 0.007), CDKN2A (p16) (OR of 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.6; P = 0.024), and RUNX3 (OR of 3.4, 95% CI 1.3-8.7; P = 0.002) were associated with early recurrence, while MSI, CIMP, KRAS or BRAF V600E mutations were not. The CNV was significantly higher in deceased patients (CNV in 6 of 8) compared to survivors (CNV in 3 of 8). Only stage and loss of RUNX3 and CDKN2A were significant in the multivariable risk-model for early recurrence. Conclusions A high copy number variation phenotype is a strong predictor of early recurrence and death, and may indicate a dose-dependent relationship between genetic instability and outcome. Loss of tumor suppressors RUNX3 and CDKN2A were related to recurrence-risk and warrants further investigation. PMID:25879218

  1. Increased level of serum prostaglandin-2 in early stage of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Markocka-M?czka, Krystyna; Nienartowicz, Miros?aw; Lewandowski, Andrzej; Grabowski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Prostaglandin-2 (PGE-2), one of the products of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) induced catalysis, may play a critical role in the carcinogenesis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). We investigated the efficacy of using serum PGE-2 concentration as a biomarker for this cancer type. Material and methods Prostaglandin-2 levels were analyzed in the serum of 65 ESCC patients and in 47 healthy individuals. The concentrations of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were measured in tumor tissues and normal tissues obtained from 31 surgically treated ESCC patients. Results Serum PGE-2 concentration was significantly higher in ESCC patients than in control patients (p = 0.004), especially in the early stages (I + II) of cancer (p < 0.0001). We observed significant inverse relationships between serum PGE-2 levels and: tumor stage, primary tumor progression, lymph and distant metastasis. The COX-2 concentration was significantly elevated in tumors as compared to normal tissues (p = 0.008). A significant correlation between serum PGE-2 and tumor COX-2 was observed (rho = 0.46, p = 0.009). However, ROC analysis showed that serum PGE-2 may be a weak prognostic factor for ESCC. Conclusions Our results suggest that an elevated concentration of serum PGE-2 in the early stages of cancer may possibly be associated with tumor initiation and cancer development in ESCC. The exact role of these findings in early detection of this highly lethal cancer requires further research. PMID:25395947

  2. Lymph node ratio-based staging system for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shao-Bin; Weng, Hong-Rui; Wang, Geng; Zou, Xiao-Fang; Liu, Di-Tian; Chen, Yu-Ping; Zhang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze a modified staging system utilizing lymph node ratio (LNR) in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). METHODS: Clinical data of 2011 patients with ESCC who underwent surgical resection alone between January 1995 and June 2010 at the Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College were reviewed. The LNR, or node ratio (Nr) was defined as the ratio of metastatic LNs ompared to the total number of resected LNs. Overall survival between groups was compared with the log-rank test. The cutoff point of LNR was established by grouping patients with 10% increment in Nr, and then combining the neighborhood survival curves using the log-rank test. A new TNrM staging system, was constructed by replacing the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) N categories with the Nr categories in the new TNM staging system. The time-dependent receiver operating characteristic curves were used to evaluate the predictive performance of the seventh edition AJCC staging system and the TNrM staging system. RESULTS: The median number of resected LNs was 12 (range: 4-44), and 25% and 75% interquartile rangeswere8 and 16. Patients were classified into four Nr categories with distinctive survival differences (Nr0: LNR = 0; Nr1: 0% < LNR ? 10%; Nr2: 10% < LNR ? 20%; and Nr3: LNR > 20%). From N categories to Nr categories, 557 patients changed their LN stage. The median survival time (MST) for the four Nr categories (Nr0-Nr3) was 155.0 mo, 39.0 mo, 28.0 mo, and 19.0 mo, respectively, and the 5-year overall survival was 61.1%, 41.1%, 33.0%, and 22.9%, respectively (P < 0.001). Overall survival was significantly different for the AJCC N categories when patients were subgrouped into 15 or more vs fewer than 15 examined nodes, except for the N3 category (P = 0.292). However, overall survival was similar when the patients in all four Nr categories were subgrouped into 15 or more vs fewer than 15 nodes. Using the time-dependent receiver operating characteristic, we found that the Nr category and TNrM stage had higher accuracy in predicting survival than the AJCC N category and TNM stage. CONCLUSION: A staging system based on LNR may have better prognostic stratification of patients with ESCC than the current TNM system, especially for those undergoing limited lymphadenectomy. PMID:26139998

  3. Telomere and telomerase in the initial stage of immortalization of esophageal epithelial cell

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhong-Ying; Xu, Li-Yan; Li, En-Min; Cai, Wei-Jia; Chen, Min-Hua; Shen, Jian; Zeng, Yi

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To search for the biomarker of cellular immortalization, the telomere length, telomerase activity and its subunits in cultured epithelial cells of human fetal esophagus in the process of immortalization. METHODS: The transgenic cell line of human fetal esophageal epithelium (SHEE) was established with E6E7 genes of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 18 in our laboratory. Morphological phenotype of cultured SHEE cells from the 6th to 30th passages, was examined by phase contrast microscopy, the telomere length was assayed by Southern blot method, and the activity of telomerase was analyzed by telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP). Expressions of subunits of telomerase, hTR and hTERT, were assessed by RT-PCR. DNA content in cell cycle was detected by flow cytometry. The cell apoptosis was examined by electron microscopy (EM) and TUNEL label. RESULTS: SHEE cells from the 6th to 10th passages showed cellular proliferation with a good differentiation. From the 12th to the 16th passages, many senescent and apoptotic cells appeared, and the telomere length sharply shortened from 23 kb to 17 kb without expression of hTERT and telomerase activity. At the 20th passage, SHEE cells overcame the senescence and apoptosis and restored their proliferative activity with expression of telomerase and hTERT at low levels, but the telomere length shortened continuously to the lowest of 3 kb. After the 30th passage cells proliferation was restored by increment of cells at S and G2M phase in the cell cycle and telomerase activity expressed at high levels and with maintenance of telomere length. CONCLUSION: At the early stage of SHEE cells, telomeres are shortened without expression of telomerase and hTERT causing cellular senescence and cell death. From the 20th to the 30th passages, the activation of telomerase and maintenance of telomere length show a progressive process for immortalization of esophageal epithelial cells. The expression of telomerase may constitute a biomarker for detection of immortalization of cells. PMID:11925625

  4. Factors Associated With Severe Acute Esophagitis From Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Limited-Stage Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, John M.; Wahlquist, Amy E. M.S.; Shirai, Keisuke; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Aguero, Eric G.; Fortney, John A.; Sherman, Carol A.; Sharma, Anand K.

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To describe incidence and identify factors associated with development of severe acute esophagitis during hyperfractionated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy (BID-CRT) in patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Methods and Materials: Retrospective cohort analysis of patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related variables was performed to identify factors associated with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Grade 3 acute esophagitis. Twice-daily chemoradiotherapy (BID-CRT) involved 45 Gy at 1.5 Gy per fraction, treated twice daily with concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with esophagitis. Results: Between June 1999 and June 2007, 48 patients underwent curative intent BID-CRT for SCLC and were included in the analysis. Median radiotherapy dose was 45 Gy (range, 42-51 Gy) delivered with a median 4 cycles of chemotherapy (range, 2-6). RTOG Grade 3 acute esophagitis developed in 11 patients. No patient developed Grade 4 or 5 esophagitis. Simple logistic regression analyses demonstrated a highly significant association between Grade 3 acute esophagitis and mean esophageal dose (p = 0.002) as well as relative volume dosimetric area under curve (RV-AUC; p = 0.004). Using multiple regression analysis, RV-AUC was identified as the only factor associated with Grade 3 esophagitis (p = 0.004). The most strongly associated dosimetric volume was the V15 (Grade 3 esophagitis rates of 15% vs. 64% for V15 <60% versus {>=}60%, respectively). Conclusions: RV-AUC is the factor most associated with development of Grade 3 acute esophagitis in limited stage SCLC patients receiving BID-CRT.

  5. Results of chemoradiotherapy for stage I esophageal cancer in medically inoperable patients compared with results in operable patients.

    PubMed

    Jingu, K; Matsushita, H; Takeda, K; Narazaki, K; Ariga, H; Umezawa, R; Sugawara, T; Miyata, G; Onodera, K; Nemoto, K; Yamada, S

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate long-term results of chemoradiotherapy for clinical T1b-2N0M0 esophageal cancer and to compare outcomes for operable and inoperable patients. Patients with stage I esophageal cancer (Union for International Cancer Control [UICC] 2009), excluding patients with cT1a esophageal cancer, were studied. All patients had histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma. Operable patients received cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil with concurrent radiotherapy of 60 Gy including a 2-week break. Inoperable patients received nedaplatin and 5-fluorouracil with concurrent radiotherapy of 60-70 Gy without a pause. End-points were overall survival rate (OS), cause-specific survival rate (CSS), progression-free survival rate (PFS), and locoregional control rate (LC). Thirty-seven operable patients and 30 medically inoperable patients were enrolled. There was a significant difference in only age between the operable group and inoperable group (P = 0.04). The median observation period was 67.9 months. In all patients, 5-year OS, CSS, PFS, and LC were 77.9%, 91.5%, 66.9%, and 80.8%, respectively. Comparison of the operable group and inoperable group showed that there was a significant difference in OS (5-year, 85.5% vs. 68.7%, P = 0.04), but there was no difference in CSS, PFS, or LC. Grade 3 or more late toxicity according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v 3.0 was found in seven patients. Even in medically inoperable patients with stage I esophageal cancer, LC of more than 80% can be achieved with chemoradiotherapy. However, OS in medically inoperable patients is significantly worse than that in operable patients. PMID:22925398

  6. Diet and Physical Activity Change or Usual Care in Improving Progression-Free Survival in Patients With Previously Treated Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-13

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  7. SU-E-I-85: Exploring the 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET Characteristics in Staging of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C; Yin, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the characteristics derived from 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET image and assess its capacity in staging of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Methods: 26 patients with newly diagnosed ESCC who underwent 18F-FDG PET scan were included in this study. Different image-derived indices including the standardized uptake value (SUV), gross tumor length, texture features and shape feature were considered. Taken the histopathologic examination as the gold standard, the extracted capacities of indices in staging of ESCC were assessed by Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test. Specificity and sensitivity for each of the studied parameters were derived using receiver-operating characteristic curves. Results: 18F-FDG SUVmax and SUVmean showed statistically significant capability in AJCC and TNM stages. Texture features such as ENT and CORR were significant factors for N stages(p=0.040, p=0.029). Both FDG PET Longitudinal length and shape feature Eccentricity (EC) (p?0.010) provided powerful stratification in the primary ESCC AJCC and TNM stages than SUV and texture features. Receiver-operating-characteristic curve analysis showed that tumor textural analysis can capability M stages with higher sensitivity than SUV measurement but lower in T and N stages. Conclusion: The 18F-FDG image-derived characteristics of SUV, textural features and shape feature allow for good stratification AJCC and TNM stage in ESCC patients.

  8. Learning Curve and Interobserver Agreement of Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy for Detecting Precancerous or Early-Stage Esophageal Squamous Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Li, Ming; Li, Zhen; Zuo, Xiu-Li; Li, Chang-Qing; Dong, Yan-Yan; Zhou, Cheng-Jun; Li, Yan-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Background Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) can provide in vivo subcellular resolution images of esophageal lesions. However, the learning curve in interpreting CLE images of precancerous or early-stage esophageal squamous cancer is unknown. The goal of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and inter-observer agreement for differentiating esophageal lesions in CLE images among experienced and inexperienced observers and to assess the learning curve. Method After a short training, 8 experienced and 14 inexperienced endoscopists evaluated in sequence 4 sets of high-quality CLE images. Their diagnoses were corrected and discussed after each set. For each image, the diagnostic results, confidence in diagnosis, quality and time to evaluate were recorded. Results Overall, diagnostic accuracy was greater for the second, third, fourth set of images as compared with the initial set (odds ratio [OR] 2.01, 95% CI 1.22–3.31; 7.95, 3.74–16.87; and 6.45, 3.14–13.27), respectively, with no difference between the third and fourth sets in accuracy (p?=?0.67). Previous experience affected the diagnostic accuracy only in the first set of images (OR 3.70, 1.87–7.29, p<0.001). Inter-observer agreement was higher for experienced than inexperienced endoscopists (0.732 vs. 0.666, p<0.01) Conclusion CLE is a promising technology that can be quickly learned after a short training period; previous experience is associated with diagnostic accuracy only at the initial stage of learning. PMID:24897112

  9. Epoetin alfa improves survival after chemoradiation for Stage III esophageal cancer: Final results of a prospective observational study

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk . E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Tribius, Silke; Yekebas, Emre F.; Bahrehmand, Roia; Wildfang, Ingeborg; Kilic, Ergin; Muellerleile, Ulrich; Gross, Eberhard; Schild, Steven E.; Alberti, Winfried

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: This prospective, nonrandomized study evaluates the effectiveness of epoetin alfa to maintain the hemoglobin levels at 12 to14 g/dL (optimal range for tumor oxygenation) during chemoradiation for Stage III esophageal cancer and its impact on overall survival (OS), metastatic-free survival (MFS), and locoregional control (LC). Methods and Materials: Ninety-six patients were included. Forty-two patients received epoetin alfa (150 IU/kg, 3 times a week) during radiotherapy, which was started at hemoglobin less than 13 g/dL and stopped at 14 g/dL or higher. Hemoglobin levels were measured weekly during RT. Results: Both groups were balanced for age, sex, performance status, tumor length/location, histology, grading, T-stage/N-stage, chemotherapy, treatment schedule, and hemoglobin before RT. Median change of hemoglobin was +0.3 g/dL/wk with epoetin alfa and -0.5 g/dL/wk without epoetin alfa. At least 60% of hemoglobin levels were 12 to 14 g/dL in 64% and 17% of the patients, respectively (p < 0.001). Patients who received epoetin alfa had better OS (32% vs. 8% at 2 years, p = 0.009) and LC (67% vs. 15% at 2 years, p = 0.001). MFS was not significantly different (42% vs. 18% at 2 years, p = 0.09). Conclusions: The findings suggest that epoetin alfa when used to maintain the hemoglobin levels at 12 to 14 g/dL can improve OS and LC of Stage III esophageal cancer patients.

  10. Image-Guided Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-03

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  11. Prognostic Impact of the 6th and 7th American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM Staging Systems on Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Motoo; Shitara, Kohei; Kodaira, Takeshi; Hatooka, Shunzo; Mizota, Ayako; Kondoh, Chihiro; Yokota, Tomoya; Takahari, Daisuke; Ura, Takashi; Muro, Kei

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The new 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system is based on pathologic data from esophageal cancers treated by surgery alone. There is no information available on evaluation of the new staging system with regard to prognosis of patients treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT). The objective of this study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of the new staging system on esophageal cancer patients treated with CRT. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on 301 consecutive esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with CRT. Comparisons were made of the prognostic impacts of the 6th and 7th staging systems and the prognostic impacts of stage and prognostic groups, which were newly defined in the 7th edition. Results: There were significant differences between Stages I and III (p < 0.01) according to both editions. However, the 7th edition poorly distinguishes the prognoses of Stages III and IV (p = 0.36 by multivariate analysis) in comparison to the 6th edition (p = 0.08 by multivariate analysis), although these differences were not significant. For all patients, T, M, and gender were independent prognostic factors by multivariate analysis (p < 0.05). For the Stage I and II prognostic groups, survival curves showed a stepwise decrease with increase in stage, except for Stage IIA. However, there were no significant differences seen between each prognostic stage. Conclusions: Our study indicates there are several problems with the 7th TNM staging system regarding prognostic factors in patients undergoing CRT.

  12. Bevacizumab and Combination Chemotherapy Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Esophageal or Stomach Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-03

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage IA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer

  13. Risk of node metastasis of sentinel lymph nodes detected in level II/III of the axilla by single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    SHIMA, HIROAKI; KUTOMI, GORO; SATOMI, FUKINO; MAEDA, HIDEKI; TAKAMARU, TOMOKO; KAMESHIMA, HIDEKAZU; OMURA, TOSEI; MORI, MITSURU; HATAKENAKA, MASAMITSU; HASEGAWA, TADASHI; HIRATA, KOICHI

    2014-01-01

    In breast cancer, single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) shows the exact anatomical location of sentinel nodes (SN). SPECT/CT mainly exposes axilla and partly exposes atypical sites of extra-axillary lymphatic drainage. The mechanism of how the atypical hot nodes are involved in lymphatic metastasis was retrospectively investigated in the present study, particularly at the level II/III region. SPECT/CT was performed in 92 clinical stage 0-IIA breast cancer patients. Sentinel lymph nodes are depicted as hot nodes in SPECT/CT. Patients were divided into two groups: With or without hot node in level II/III on SPECT/CT. The existence of metastasis in level II/III was investigated and the risk factors were identified. A total of 12 patients were sentinel lymph node biopsy metastasis positive and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) was performed. These patients were divided into two groups: With and without SN in level II/III, and nodes in level II/III were pathologically proven. In 11 of the 92 patients, hot nodes were detected in level II/III. There was a significant difference in node metastasis depending on whether there were hot nodes in level II/III (P=0.0319). Multivariate analysis indicated that the hot nodes in level II/III and lymphatic invasion were independent factors associated with node metastasis. There were 12 SN-positive patients followed by ALND. In four of the 12 patients, hot nodes were observed in level II/III. Two of the four patients with hot nodes depicted by SPECT/CT and metastatic nodes were pathologically evident in the same lesion. Therefore, the present study indicated that the hot node in level II/III as depicted by SPECT/CT may be a risk of SN metastasis, including deeper nodes. PMID:25289038

  14. Esophageal cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    Cancer - esophagus ... Esophageal cancer is not common in the United States. It occurs most often in men over 50 years old. There are two main types of esophageal cancer: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. These two types ...

  15. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  16. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... More information Clinical Trials to Screen for Esophageal Cancer Statistics Esophageal cancer statistics based on data from large groups of patients to be used as a general guide. General Resources on Coping ... for both patients and caregivers. National ...

  17. Pilot Trial of CRLX101 in Treatment of Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Stomach, Gastroesophageal, or Esophageal Cancer That Cannot be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  18. Esophageal Stenosis Associated With Tumor Regression in Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer: Frequency and Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Atsumi, Kazushige; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Arimura, Hidetaka; Terashima, Kotaro; Matsuki, Takaomi; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Tsurumaru, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Asai, Kaori; Matsumoto, Keiji; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine clinical factors for predicting the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 109 patients with esophageal cancer of T1-4 and Stage I-III who were treated with definitive radiotherapy and achieved a complete response of their primary lesion at Kyushu University Hospital between January 1998 and December 2007. Esophageal stenosis was evaluated using esophagographic images within 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. We investigated the correlation between esophageal stenosis after radiotherapy and each of the clinical factors with regard to tumors and therapy. For validation of the correlative factors for esophageal stenosis, an artificial neural network was used to predict the esophageal stenotic ratio. Results: Esophageal stenosis tended to be more severe and more frequent in T3-4 cases than in T1-2 cases. Esophageal stenosis in cases with full circumference involvement tended to be more severe and more frequent than that in cases without full circumference involvement. Increases in wall thickness tended to be associated with increases in esophageal stenosis severity and frequency. In the multivariate analysis, T stage, extent of involved circumference, and wall thickness of the tumor region were significantly correlated to esophageal stenosis (p = 0.031, p < 0.0001, and p = 0.0011, respectively). The esophageal stenotic ratio predicted by the artificial neural network, which learned these three factors, was significantly correlated to the actual observed stenotic ratio, with a correlation coefficient of 0.864 (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Our study suggested that T stage, extent of involved circumference, and esophageal wall thickness of the tumor region were useful to predict the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer.

  19. Proton Beam Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Steven H.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing; Wei, Caimiao; Myles, Bevan; Guo Xiaomao; Palmer, Matthew; Mohan, Radhe; Swisher, Stephen G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Proton beam therapy (PBT) is a promising modality for the management of thoracic malignancies. We report our preliminary experience of treating esophageal cancer patients with concurrent chemotherapy (CChT) and PBT (CChT/PBT) at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: This is an analysis of 62 esophageal cancer patients enrolled on a prospective study evaluating normal tissue toxicity from CChT/PBT from 2006 to 2010. Patients were treated with passive scattering PBT with two- or three-field beam arrangement using 180 to 250 MV protons. We used the Kaplan-Meier method to assess time-to-event outcomes and compared the distributions between groups using the log-rank test. Results: The median follow-up time was 20.1 months for survivors. The median age was 68 years (range, 38-86). Most patients were males (82%) who had adenocarcinomas (76%) and Stage II-III disease (84%). The median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (RBE [relative biologic equivalence]) (range, 36-57.6). The most common grade 2 to 3 acute toxicities from CChT/PBT were esophagitis (46.8%), fatigue (43.6%), nausea (33.9%), anorexia (30.1%), and radiation dermatitis (16.1%). There were two cases of grade 2 and 3 radiation pneumonitis and two cases of grade 5 toxicities. A total of 29 patients (46.8%) received preoperative CChT/PBT, with one postoperative death. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate for the surgical cohort was 28%, and the pCR and near CR rates (0%-1% residual cells) were 50%. While there were significantly fewer local-regional recurrences in the preoperative group (3/29) than in the definitive CChT/PBT group (16/33) (log-rank test, p = 0.005), there were no differences in distant metastatic (DM)-free interval or overall survival (OS) between the two groups. Conclusions: This is the first report of patients treated with PBT/CChT for esophageal cancer. Our data suggest that this modality is associated with a few severe toxicities, but the pathologic response and clinical outcomes are encouraging. Prospective comparison with more traditional approach is warranted.

  20. A Phase I/II Study of Oblimersen Plus Cisplatin and Fluorouracil in Gastric & Esophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-10

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  1. Everolimus and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Stomach or Esophageal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-10

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  2. Prognostic factors in patients with thoracic esophageal carcinoma staged pT1-4aN0M0 undergone esophagectomy with three-field lymphadenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaohui; Zheng, Xiongwei; Chen, Yuanmei; Lin, Yu; Zheng, Qingfeng; Zhu, Kunshou; Pan, Jianji

    2015-01-01

    Background To analyze prognostic factors in patients with thoracic esophageal carcinoma staged pT1-4aN0M0 and undergone esophagectomy with 3-field lymphadenectomy and to evaluate the effect of postoperative radiotherapy. Methods From January 1993 to March 2007, 770 patients with stage pT1-4aN0M0 underwent 3-field lymphadenectomy at Fujian Province Cancer Hospital, China were enrolled for analysis. The study consisted of 770 patients with stage pT1-4aN0M0 who underwent 3-field lymphadenectomy at Fujian Province Cancer Hospital, China. A total of 687 had received surgery only, and 83 patients had undergone surgery followed by postoperative radiotherapy. Radiation dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Results The overall survival rates at 1, 3, 5, and 10 years were 92.9%, 80.8%, 71.7% and 57.4%, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that age and T staging were two independent factors on prognoses. Five-year survival in cases younger and older than 60 were 76.5% vs. 63.3% (P=0.001), while those of pT1, pT2, pT3 and pT4a were 83.8%, 78.8%, 67.8% and 54.1%, respectively (P=0.000). Five-year survival in group of simple surgery was 71.3%, compared with 74.5% in group of surgery plus postoperative radiotherapy (P=0.763), while stratified analysis indicated that postoperative radiotherapy was able to boost the survival of patients in pT4a which were 72.4% vs. 33.8% (P=0.036) and to lower relapse rate of tumor bed in patients with pT4a (P=0.005). Multivariate analysis showed that age and T staging were two independent factors on prognoses. Conclusions Patients with high T staging and at an age more than 60 turned out bad prognoses, neither could postoperative radiotherapy improve their survival. PMID:26697442

  3. Esophageal Microbiome in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J. Kirk; Fang, Rui; Wagner, Brandie D.; Choe, Ha Na; Kelly, Caleb J.; Schroeder, Shauna; Moore, Wendy; Stevens, Mark J.; Yeckes, Alyson; Amsden, Katie; Kagalwalla, Amir F.; Zalewski, Angelika; Hirano, Ikuo; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Henry, Lauren N.; Masterson, Joanne C.; Robertson, Charles E.; Leung, Donald Y.; Pace, Norman R.; Ackerman, Steven J.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Fillon, Sophie A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The microbiome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of allergic and inflammatory diseases. The mucosa affected by eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is composed of a stratified squamous epithelia and contains intraepithelial eosinophils. To date, no studies have identified the esophageal microbiome in patients with EoE or the impact of treatment on these organisms. The aim of this study was to identify the esophageal microbiome in EoE and determine whether treatments change this profile. We hypothesized that clinically relevant alterations in bacterial populations are present in different forms of esophagitis. Design In this prospective study, secretions from the esophageal mucosa were collected from children and adults with EoE, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) and normal mucosa using the Esophageal String Test (EST). Bacterial load was determined using quantitative PCR. Bacterial communities, determined by 16S rRNA gene amplification and 454 pyrosequencing, were compared between health and disease. Results Samples from a total of 70 children and adult subjects were examined. Bacterial load was increased in both EoE and GERD relative to normal subjects. In subjects with EoE, load was increased regardless of treatment status or degree of mucosal eosinophilia compared with normal. Haemophilus was significantly increased in untreated EoE subjects as compared with normal subjects. Streptococcus was decreased in GERD subjects on proton pump inhibition as compared with normal subjects. Conclusions Diseases associated with mucosal eosinophilia are characterized by a different microbiome from that found in the normal mucosa. Microbiota may contribute to esophageal inflammation in EoE and GERD. PMID:26020633

  4. Esophageal perforation during or after conformal radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hai-yan; Ma, Xiu-mei; Ye, Ming; Hou, Yan-li; Xie, Hua-Ying; Bai, Yong-rui

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the risk factors and prognosis for patients with esophageal perforation occurring during or after radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. We retrospectively analyzed 322 patients with esophageal carcinoma. These patients received radiotherapy for unresectable esophageal tumors, residual tumors after operation, or local recurrence. Of these, 12 had radiotherapy to the esophagus before being admitted, 68 patients had concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT), and 18 patients had esophageal perforation after RT (5.8%). Covered self-expandable metallic stents were placed in 11 patients. Two patients continued RT after stenting and control of infection; one of these suffered a new perforation, and the other had a massive hemorrhage. The median overall survival was 2 months (0–3 months) compared with 17 months in the non-perforation group. In univariate analysis, the Karnofsky performance status (KPS) being ?70, age younger than 60, T4 stage, a second course of radiotherapy to the esophagus, extracapsular lymph nodes (LN) involving the esophagus, a total dose >100 Gy (biologically effective dose?10), and CRT were risk factors for perforation. In multivariate analysis, age younger than 60, extracapsular LN involving the esophagus, T4 stage, and a second course of radiotherapy to the esophagus were risk factors. In conclusion, patients with T4 stage, extracapsular LN involving the esophagus, and those receiving a second course of RT should be given particular care to avoid perforation. The prognosis after perforation was poor. PMID:24914102

  5. Chemoprevention of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is rising rapidly in Western countries, and effective chemoprevention for this malignancy is lacking. Endoscopic surveillance of patients with Barrett's esophagus is currently employed to diagnose EAC at earlier stages, but this strategy has several limitations. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and proton pump inhibitors are the most promising agents for prevention of EAC, and a randomized controlled trial of aspirin and esomeprazole is ongoing. Other agents under investigation include green tea, berries, and antioxidants. Cost-effectiveness analyses have shown that chemopreventive agents need to be highly effective at preventing EAC in order to have benefit beyond endoscopic surveillance. PMID:21180511

  6. Dynamic esophageal scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Reilley, J.J.; Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S.; Applegate, G.; DeVegvar, M.L.

    1982-06-01

    Esophageal scintigraphy was developed in order to quantitatively evaluate esophageal transit in patients with a variety of esophageal disorders. The study is performed with orally administered technetium-99m sulfur colloid in water, using a gamma camera on-line to a digital computer. Esophageal transit is expressed as the percent emptying for each of the first 15-sec intervals for 10 min after an initial swallow and at 15-sec intervals after serial swallows. Esophageal transit is significantly decreased in patients with motor disorders of the esophagus, compared to normal controls. In patients with reflux esophagitis, esophageal transit was abnormal when the reflux disease was accompanied by abnormal motor function. The technique we describe is the first quantitative test of esophageal function; it is a useful, sensitive, scintigraphic technique for evaluation of esophageal transit.

  7. Borderline Class II/III Ligand-Centered Mixed Valency in a Porphyrinic Molecular Rectangle

    E-print Network

    Dinolfo, Peter H.

    Borderline Class II/III Ligand-Centered Mixed Valency in a Porphyrinic Molecular Rectangle Peter H reduced rectangle is assigned as a borderline class II/class III mixed-valence species. Introduction Among

  8. ARSENIC INTERACTION WITH IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST: IMPLICATIONS FOR ARSENIC REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zerovalent iron is being used in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remediate groundwater arsenic contamination. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron under anaerobic conditions. The interaction between arsenic and this green...

  9. Esophageal dilation in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joel E

    2015-10-01

    Tissue remodeling with scaring is common in adult EoE patients with long standing disease. This is the major factor contributing to their complaints of solid food dysphagia and recurrent food impactions. The best tests to define the degree of remodeling are barium esophagram, high resolution manometry and endoscopy. Many physicians are fearful to dilate EoE patients because of concerns about mucosal tears and perforations. However, multiple recent case series attest to the safety of esophageal dilation and its efficacy with many patients having symptom relief for an average of two years. This chapter will review the sordid history of esophageal dilation in EoE patients and outline how to perform this procedure safely. The key is graduated dilation over one to several sessions to a diameter of 15-18 mm. Postprocedural pain is to be expected and mucosal tears are a sign of successful dilation, not complications. In some healthy adults, occasional dilation may be preferred to regular use of medications or restricted diets. This approach is now supported by recent EoE consensus statements and societal guidelines. PMID:26552780

  10. Understanding Esophageal Dilation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Education Videos Questions to Ask Your MD Endoscopy Unit Recognition Program Screen4coloncancer.org About Colonoscopy Facts About Common Colon Cancer Screening Tests PATIENTS Understanding Esophageal Dilation What is Esophageal Dilation? ...

  11. A Case of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Pancreatic Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Choulki; Kim, Youn Hwa; Hwang, Eun Jung; Na, Ki Yong; Kim, Kyung-Yup; Park, Jae Hyun; Chang, Young Woon

    2013-01-01

    Solitary pancreatic metastasis of esophageal cancer is extremely rare. We report the case of a 58-year-old male admitted with esophageal cancer. Additional asymptomatic solitary hepatic and pancreatic masses were observed in the staging work-up for esophageal cancer. The hepatic mass was confirmed as a primary hepatocellular carcinoma with an ultrasound-guided needle biopsy. An esophagectomy with a distal pancreatectomy and radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma were performed. Histologically, the pancreatic mass was confirmed to be a metastasis from the esophageal cancer. The patient has been followed up with chemotherapy. PMID:23614134

  12. Data-driven treatment selection for seamless phase II/III trials incorporating early-outcome data

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Cornelia Ursula; Friede, Tim; Parsons, Nick; Todd, Susan; Stallard, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Seamless phase II/III clinical trials are conducted in two stages with treatment selection at the first stage. In the first stage, patients are randomized to a control or one of k?>?1 experimental treatments. At the end of this stage, interim data are analysed, and a decision is made concerning which experimental treatment should continue to the second stage. If the primary endpoint is observable only after some period of follow-up, at the interim analysis data may be available on some early outcome on a larger number of patients than those for whom the primary endpoint is available. These early endpoint data can thus be used for treatment selection. For two previously proposed approaches, the power has been shown to be greater for one or other method depending on the true treatment effects and correlations. We propose a new approach that builds on the previously proposed approaches and uses data available at the interim analysis to estimate these parameters and then, on the basis of these estimates, chooses the treatment selection method with the highest probability of correctly selecting the most effective treatment. This method is shown to perform well compared with the two previously described methods for a wide range of true parameter values. In most cases, the performance of the new method is either similar to or, in some cases, better than either of the two previously proposed methods. © 2014 The Authors. Pharmaceutical Statistics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:24789367

  13. Esophageal pH monitoring

    MedlinePLUS

    pH monitoring - esophageal; Esophageal acidity test ... Esophageal pH monitoring is used to check how much stomach acid is entering the esophagus. It also checks how well the acid is cleared downward into the ...

  14. CISNET: Esophageal Cancer Modeling

    Cancer.gov

    The CISNET esophageal cancer group was formed in 2010 in the third round of CISNET funding with three distinct modeling teams focused on collaboratively modeling the incidence and mortality of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) in the US population. The group’s work will include performing collaborative modeling of the natural history models of esophageal adenocarcinoma which will include precursor states such as Barrett’s esophagus and dysplasia that are calibrated to US SEER data.

  15. Diet and esophageal disease

    PubMed Central

    Dawsey, Sanford M.; Fagundes, Renato B.; Jacobson, Brian C.; Kresty, Laura A.; Mallery, Susan R.; Paski, Shirley; van den Brandt, Piet A.

    2014-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on macronutrients, dietary patterns, and risk of adenocarcinoma in Barrett’s esophagus; micronutrients, trace elements, and risk of Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma; the role of mate consumption in the development of squamous cell carcinoma; the relationship between energy excess and development of esophageal adenocarcinoma; and the nutritional management of the esophageal cancer patient. PMID:25266021

  16. Diet and esophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Dawsey, Sanford M; Fagundes, Renato B; Jacobson, Brian C; Kresty, Laura A; Mallery, Susan R; Paski, Shirley; van den Brandt, Piet A

    2014-09-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on macronutrients, dietary patterns, and risk of adenocarcinoma in Barrett's esophagus; micronutrients, trace elements, and risk of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma; the role of mate consumption in the development of squamous cell carcinoma; the relationship between energy excess and development of esophageal adenocarcinoma; and the nutritional management of the esophageal cancer patient. PMID:25266021

  17. Esophageal lichen planus*

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Janine Pichler; Uribe, Natalia Caballero; Abulafia, Luna Azulay; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the skin, mucous membranes, nails and scalp. Esophageal lichen planus is a rarely reported manifestation of lichen planus, presenting itself commonly in middle-aged women, with symptoms such as dysphagia. We report a case of esophageal lichen planus in a 54-year-old woman associated with oral, cutaneous and ungual lichen planus. Although lichen planus is a disorder well known by dermatologists, reports of esophageal lichen planus are rare in dermatologic literature. The esophageal lichen planus is little known and underdiagnosed, with a significant delay between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis. PMID:26131872

  18. CHEMICAL INTERACTIONS OF ARSENATE, ARSENITE, PHOSPHATE, AND SILICATE WITH IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular zerovalent iron has been proposed to be used as a medium in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remove arsenic from contaminated groundwater. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust (carbonate green rust, or CGR) is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron under ...

  19. CHEMICAL INTERACTIONS OF ARSENATE, ARSENITE, PHOSPHATE, AND SILICATE WITH IRON (II,III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular zerovalent iron has been proposed to be used as a medium in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remove arsenic from contaminated groundwater. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust (carbonate green rust, or CGR) is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron under ...

  20. Distributed Sensor Networks, 2nd edition Vol. 2, Section II.I, Chapter #47

    E-print Network

    Gautam, Natarajan

    , food at restaurants, books at bookstores, etc.) are now paying a lot of attention to service (suchDistributed Sensor Networks, 2nd edition Vol. 2, Section II.I, Chapter #47 Quality of Service­0946935 1 #12;1 Service Systems The phrase "Quality of Service" (QoS) has been popular for over 20 years

  1. ARSENATE AND ARSENITE SORPTION AND ARSENITE OXIDATION BY IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron (II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron that is being used in permeable reactive barriers to remediate groundwater arsenic contamination. To optimize the design of iron barriers, it is important to evaluate the influence of geoch...

  2. Stomach-Esophageal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Stomach and esophageal cancers are close in anatomical location and have been combined into one project within TCGA. Although they are two separate cancer types, TCGA is collecting samples from various anatomic subsites along the esophageal and gastric tracts for analysis.

  3. Chemoprevention of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, Gary D. Wang Lishu; Chen Tong

    2007-11-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is responsible for approximately one-sixth of all cancer-related mortality worldwide. This malignancy has a multifactorial etiology involving several environmental, dietary and genetic factors. Since esophageal cancer has often metastasized at the time of diagnosis, current treatment modalities offer poor survival and cure rates. Chemoprevention offers a viable alternative that could well be effective against the disease. Clinical investigations have shown that primary chemoprevention of this disease is feasible if potent inhibitory agents are identified. The Fischer 344 (F-344) rat model of esophageal SCC has been used extensively to investigate the biology of the disease, and to identify chemopreventive agents that could be useful in human trials. Multiple compounds that inhibit tumor initiation by esophageal carcinogens have been identified using this model. These include several isothiocyanates, diallyl sulfide and polyphenolic compounds. These compounds influence the metabolic activation of esophageal carcinogens resulting in reduced genetic (DNA) damage. Recently, a few agents have been shown to inhibit the progression of preneoplastic lesions in the rat esophagus into tumors. These agents include inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and c-Jun [a component of activator protein-1 (AP-1)]. Using a food-based approach to cancer prevention, we have shown that freeze-dried berry preparations inhibit both the initiation and promotion/progression stages of esophageal SCC in F-344 rats. These observations have led to a clinical trial in China to evaluate the ability of freeze-dried strawberries to influence the progression of esophageal dysplasia to SCC.

  4. Valence-Delocalized Diiron(II,III) Cores Supported by Carboxylate-Only Bridging Ligands

    E-print Network

    Hendrich, Mike

    Valence-Delocalized Diiron(II,III) Cores Supported by Carboxylate-Only Bridging Ligands Dongwhan mixture formed in the reaction of a diiron(II) complex with dioxygen, preliminary Mo¨ssbauer studies(II) precursor compound [Fe2(µ-O2CArTol )4- (4-tBuC5H4N)2] (1)2 undergoes a reversible one-electron oxidation (E1

  5. Simultaneous Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Adenocarcinoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Iradj; Shekarriz, Ramin; Nosrati, Anahita; Orang, Elahe

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is a rather common cancer in northern Iran. Incidence of adenocarcinoma of esophagus has an increasing trend in Iran. Co-existence of both cancers in one patient is very rare. We report a middle age woman from northern Iran with a typical presentation of esophageal cancer, who was found to have a dual esophageal cancer. The disease was found in the advanced stage with pulmonary metastasis at the presentation. Palliative chemo-radiotherapy induced partial clinical response PMID:26609356

  6. Esophageal Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the type of cells that become malignant (cancerous): Squamous cell carcinoma : Cancer that begins in squamous cells , the thin, ... chance of developing esophageal cancer increases with age. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus is more common in blacks ...

  7. Understanding Esophageal Manometry

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Education Videos Questions to Ask Your MD Endoscopy Unit Recognition Program Screen4coloncancer.org About Colonoscopy Facts About Common Colon Cancer Screening Tests PATIENTS Understanding Esophageal Manometry The Esophagus The esophagus ...

  8. [Congenital Esophageal Atresia].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Makoto; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    In this report, we describe the esophageal atresia in terms of current surgical management on the basis of our experience and literatures. Traditionally, infants with esophageal atresia have presented shortly after birth because of an inability to pass an orogastric tube, respiratory distress, or an inability to tolerate feeding. And also, an isolated trachea-esophageal fistula (TEF) usually cases coughing, recurrent pneumonia, or choking during feedings. To ignore these symptoms is to risk a delayed diagnosis. The condition may be associated with other major congenital anomalies such as those seen in the vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheo-esophageal, renal/radial (VACTER) association, or it may be an isolated defect. Therapeutic strategies for esophageal atresia are a prevention of pulmonary complication by TEF closing and an early establishment of enteral alimentation. We promptly repair healthy infants without performing a gastrostomy and delay repair in infants with high-risk factors such as associated severe cardiac anomaly and respiratory insufficiency. Esophageal atresia has been classically approached through a thoracotomy. The disadvantages of such a thoracotomy have been recognized for a long time, for example winged scapula, elevation of fixation of shoulder, asymmetry of the chest wall, rib fusion, scoliosis, and breast and pectoral muscle maldevelopment. To avoid such disadvantages, thoracoscopic repair was recently reported. PMID:26197921

  9. Clinical Implications and Pathogenesis of Esophageal Remodeling in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Ikuo; Aceves, Seema S.

    2014-01-01

    In eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), remodeling changes are manifest histologically in both the epithelium as well as in the subepithelium where lamina propria (LP) fibrosis, expansion of the muscularis propria and increased vascularity occur. The major clinical symptoms and complications of EoE are largely consequences of esophageal remodeling. Important mediators of the process include IL-5, IL-13, TGF?1, mast cells, fibroblasts and eosinophils. Methods to detect remodeling effects include upper endoscopy, histopathology, barium esophagram, endoscopic ultrasonography, esophageal manometry, and functional luminal imaging. These modalities provide evidence of organ dysfunction that include focal and diffuse esophageal strictures, expansion of the mucosa and subepithelium, esophageal motor abnormalities and reduced esophageal distensibility. Complications of food impaction and perforations of the esophageal wall have been associated with reduction in esophageal caliber and increased esophageal mural stiffness. The therapeutic benefits of topical corticosteroids and elimination diet therapy in resolving mucosal eosinophilic inflammation of the esophagus are evident. Available therapies, however, have demonstrated variable ability to reverse existing remodeling changes of the esophagus. Systemic therapies that include novel, targeted biologic agents have the potential of addressing subepithelial remodeling. Esophageal dilation remains a useful, adjunctive therapeutic maneuver in symptomatic adults with esophageal stricture. As novel treatments emerge, it is essential that therapeutic endpoints account for the fundamental contributions of esophageal remodeling to overall disease activity. PMID:24813517

  10. Stage at Diagnosis | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    Cancers can be diagnosed at different stages in their development. Stage of cancer diagnosis may be expressed as numbers (for example, I, II, III, or IV) or by terms such as “localized,” “regional,” and “distant.” The lower the number or the more localized the cancer, the better a person’s chances of benefiting from treatment.

  11. Field Population-based blocking treatment of esophageal epithelia dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jun; Lin, Pei-Zhong; Chen, Zhi-Feng; Ding, Zhen-Wei; Li, Shao-Sheng; Men, Fan-Shu; Guo, Li-Ping; He, Yu-Tong; Qiao, Chui-Yun; Guo, Chui-Lan; Duan, Jian-Ping; Wen, Deng-Gui

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To confirm the value of blocking treatment by zenshengping (ZSP), a Chinese herb composite, and Riboflavin for esophageal epithelia dysplasia cases screened out in high risk area in northern china by exfoliative balloon cytology (EBC), so to reduce the incidence rate of esophageal cancer (EC). METHODS: Esophageal epithelium dysplasia cases including mind esophageal epithelium dysplasia (MEED), stage one severe esophageal epithelium dysplasia (SEED I), and stage two severe esophageal epithelium dysplasia (SEED II) were screened out from people aged 40 years and older in the high risk area of Chixian. These cases were randomly divided into a treatment and control group. Subjects in the treatment and control groups took ZSP, riboflavin, and placebo daily for three years. EC cases registered by cancer registry and identified by EBC re-screening in the treatment and control groups were used to calculate incidence and blocking rates to demonstrate the effects of blocking medication. RESULTS: It was found that 31.92% and 24.15% of people aged 40 years and older in Cixian could been diagnosed as MEED and SEED cases. The severity of dysplasia increased with age. ZSP had blocked EC occurrence by 47.79% after 3 year medication among the SEED cases. CONCLUSION: ZSP can block the development from SEED I and SEED II to EC by 47.79%. Efforts should be made to screen and treat dysplasia cases in people aged 40 years and older in high risk areas to reduce the mortality figures. PMID:12046061

  12. Endoscopic Management of Anastomotic Esophageal Strictures Secondary to Esophageal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The reported incidence of anastomotic stricture after esophageal atresia repair has varied in case series from as low as 9% to as high as 80%. The cornerstone of esophageal stricture treatment is dilation with either balloon or bougie. The goal of esophageal dilation is to increase the luminal diameter of the esophagus while also improving dysphagia symptoms. Once a stricture becomes refractory to esophageal dilation, there are several treatment therapies available as adjuncts to dilation therapy. These therapies include intralesional steroid injection, mitomycin C, esophageal stent placement, and endoscopic incisional therapy. PMID:26616905

  13. A randomized controlled Phase II/III study comparing endoscopic balloon dilation combined with steroid injection versus radial incision and cutting combined with steroid injection for refractory anastomotic stricture after esophagectomy: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG1207.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Kozo; Aoyama, Ikuo; Mizusawa, Junki; Eba, Junko; Minashi, Keiko; Yano, Tomonori; Tanaka, Masaki; Hanaoka, Noboru; Katayama, Hiroshi; Takizawa, Kohei; Fukuda, Haruhiko; Muto, Manabu

    2015-04-01

    A randomized Phase II/III trial commenced in May 2014. Endoscopic balloon dilation with steroid injection is the current standard treatment for patients with refractory anastomotic stricture after esophagectomy. The purpose of this study is to confirm the superiority of radial incision and cutting with steroid injection in terms of both restricture-free survival and number of dilations within 24 weeks compared with endoscopic balloon dilation with steroid injection for these patients. A total of 130 patients will be accrued from 30 Japanese institutions over 3 years. The primary endpoint in the Phase II part is proportion of Grade 3/4 intraoperative hemorrhages, post-operative esophageal perforations, esophageal hemorrhages, pneumothorax, lung or mediastinum infections or other unexpected adverse events. Co-primary endpoints in the Phase III part are restricture-free survival and number of dilations within 24 weeks after treatment. Secondary endpoints are proportion of patients with anastomotic diameter >10 mm at 8 weeks after treatment, proportion of adverse events, proportion of patients experiencing improvement of dysphagia score at 2, 4, 8 and 24 weeks after treatment and proportion of patients with dysphagia score ?1 at 24 weeks after treatment. This trial has been registered in the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN000014017 [http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index.htm]. PMID:25628348

  14. Recent Advances of Cobalt(II/III) Redox Couples for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Applications.

    PubMed

    Giribabu, Lingamallu; Bolligarla, Ramababu; Panigrahi, Mallika

    2015-08-01

    In recent years dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have emerged as one of the alternatives for the global energy crisis. DSSCs have achieved a certified efficiency of >11% by using the I(-) /I3 (-) redox couple. In order to commercialize the technology almost all components of the device have to be improved. Among the various components of DSSCs, the redox couple that regenerates the oxidized sensitizer plays a crucial role in achieving high efficiency and durability of the cell. However, the I(-) /I3 (-) redox couple has certain limitations such as the absorption of triiodide up to 430 nm and the volatile nature of iodine, which also corrodes the silver-based current collectors. These limitations are obstructing the commercialization of this technology. For this reason, one has to identify alternative redox couples. In this regard, the Co(II/III) redox couple is found to be the best alternative to the existing I(-) /I3 (-) redox couple. Recently, DSSC test cell efficiency has risen up to 13% by using the cobalt redox couple. This review emphasizes the recent development of Co(II/III) redox couples for DSSC applications. PMID:26081939

  15. Two cases of esophageal eosinophilia: eosinophilic esophagitis or gastro-esophageal reflux disease?

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ozlem; Karagol, Hacer Ilbilge Ertoy; Topal, Erdem; Unlusoy, Aysel Aksu; Egritas, Odul; Gonul, Ipek Isik; Bakirtas, Arzu

    2014-05-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and gastroesophageal reflux disease are among the major causes of isolated esophageal eosinophilia. Isolated esophageal eosinophilia meeting criteria for EoE may respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment. This entity is termed proton pumps inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE). Gastro-esophageal reflux is thought to comprise a subgroup of patients with PPI-REE. According to the latest guidelines, PPI responsiveness distinguishes people with PPI-REE from patients having EoE (non-responders). In this report, two unusual cases with findings belonging to both EoE and PPI-REE are discussed with known and unknown facts. PMID:24987510

  16. Two Cases of Esophageal Eosinophilia: Eosinophilic Esophagitis or Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Ozlem; Karagol, Hacer Ilbilge Ertoy; Topal, Erdem; Unlusoy, Aysel Aksu; Egritas, Odul; Gonul, Ipek Isik; Bakirtas, Arzu

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and gastroesophageal reflux disease are among the major causes of isolated esophageal eosinophilia. Isolated esophageal eosinophilia meeting criteria for EoE may respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment. This entity is termed proton pumps inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE). Gastro-esophageal reflux is thought to comprise a subgroup of patients with PPI-REE. According to the latest guidelines, PPI responsiveness distinguishes people with PPI-REE from patients having EoE (non-responders). In this report, two unusual cases with findings belonging to both EoE and PPI-REE are discussed with known and unknown facts. PMID:24987510

  17. Clinical experience of esophageal ulcers and esophagitis in AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, M T; Ko, F T; Cheng, N Y; Lin, K Y; Wang, C S; Siauw, C P; Shih, L S; Liao, S T

    1996-11-01

    In Taiwan, numbers of patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have been increasing in recent years. We present esophageal disease of different causes in 5(16%) heterosexual men among 31 AIDS patients over a 5-year period. Major symptoms included mild dysphagia in 4 (80%) patients and odynophagia in 3 (60%) patients. The duration of symptoms varied from 3 days to 6 months. The symptoms occurred before the diagnosis of AIDS in 3 patients. At esophagogastroduodenoscopy (endoscopy), all 5 patients had esophagitis and/or esophageal ulcers proved by histopathologic evaluation. Four had Candida esophagitis, 3 had cytomegalovirus esophagitis/ulcers and 2 had idiopathic esophageal ulcerations (IEU). Three patients had different esophagitis/ulcers at the same time or during follow-up. The median CD4 lymphocyte count at the time of diagnosis of esophageal disease was 12.2 cells/mm3 (range, 3 to 35 cells/mm3). The endoscopic pictures of the different causes of esophagitis/ ulcers lack uniformity in number, size and appearance. These observations make a conclusion that all AIDS patients with an esophageal disease should undergo endoscopy with biopsy to obtain a definitive diagnosis. PMID:8953856

  18. Spontaneous enterogastric reflux gastritis and esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Gowen, G F

    1985-02-01

    Enterogastric reflux gastritis and esophagitis is best known after gastric resections and pyloroplasty but it also occurs spontaneously in the nonoperated patient. Forty-two patients are presented who meet the criteria for the diagnosis: constant burning epigastric pain, worse after meals, unrelieved by antacids and diet; endoscopic demonstration of a gastric bile pool; endoscopic biopsy proof of gastritis and esophagitis; and hypochlorhydria. Patients with mild and moderate stages of the disease can benefit from metoclopramide therapy which improves the gastric emptying mechanism. Of the surgical patients with intractable symptoms, 90% were women, 90% had marked hypochlorhydria, 83% had biliary disease, current or remote, and 50% had anemia. With vagotomy, antrectomy, and Roux-Y anastomosis 45-60 cm downstream, the clinical response has been most encouraging. PMID:3970596

  19. Spontaneous enterogastric reflux gastritis and esophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Gowen, G F

    1985-01-01

    Enterogastric reflux gastritis and esophagitis is best known after gastric resections and pyloroplasty but it also occurs spontaneously in the nonoperated patient. Forty-two patients are presented who meet the criteria for the diagnosis: constant burning epigastric pain, worse after meals, unrelieved by antacids and diet; endoscopic demonstration of a gastric bile pool; endoscopic biopsy proof of gastritis and esophagitis; and hypochlorhydria. Patients with mild and moderate stages of the disease can benefit from metoclopramide therapy which improves the gastric emptying mechanism. Of the surgical patients with intractable symptoms, 90% were women, 90% had marked hypochlorhydria, 83% had biliary disease, current or remote, and 50% had anemia. With vagotomy, antrectomy, and Roux-Y anastomosis 45-60 cm downstream, the clinical response has been most encouraging. PMID:3970596

  20. 40 CFR 147.2650 - State-administered program-Class I, II, III, IV, and V wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CONTROL PROGRAMS Puerto Rico § 147.2650 State-administered program—Class I, II, III, IV, and V wells. The Underground Injection Control Program for all classes of wells in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, other than those on Indian lands, is the program administered by Puerto Rico's Environmental Quality Board...

  1. 40 CFR 147.2650 - State-administered program-Class I, II, III, IV, and V wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTROL PROGRAMS Puerto Rico § 147.2650 State-administered program—Class I, II, III, IV, and V wells. The Underground Injection Control Program for all classes of wells in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, other than those on Indian lands, is the program administered by Puerto Rico's Environmental Quality Board...

  2. 40 CFR 147.2650 - State-administered program-Class I, II, III, IV, and V wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL PROGRAMS Puerto Rico § 147.2650 State-administered program—Class I, II, III, IV, and V wells. The Underground Injection Control Program for all classes of wells in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, other than those on Indian lands, is the program administered by Puerto Rico's Environmental Quality Board...

  3. ROLE OF IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST IN ARSENIC REMEDIATION USING ZEROVALENT IRON IN COLUMN TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined corrosion products of zerovalent iron (Peerless iron) that was used in three column tests for removing arsenic under dynamic flow conditions with and without added phosphate and silicate. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate and magnetite were major iron corrosion products...

  4. Sequential Extraction Method for Determination of Fe(II/III) and U(IV/ VI) in Suspensions of Iron-Bearing Phyllosilicates and Uranium

    E-print Network

    Burgos, William

    at several DOE sites.8,9 Because phyllosilicates provide a large solid-phase reservoir of Fe(II/ III extractions have also been used for measuring solid-associated U concentrations in soils and sediments (TableSequential Extraction Method for Determination of Fe(II/III) and U(IV/ VI) in Suspensions of Iron

  5. FATE OF NICKEL ION IN (II-III) HYDROXYSULPHATE GREEN RUST SYNTHESIZED BY... 813 R. Bras. Ci. Solo, 31:813-818, 2007

    E-print Network

    Chorover, Jon

    FATE OF NICKEL ION IN (II-III) HYDROXYSULPHATE GREEN RUST SYNTHESIZED BY... 813 R. Bras. Ci. Solo, 31:813-818, 2007 FATE OF NICKEL ION IN (II-III) HYDROXYSULPHATE GREEN RUST SYNTHESIZED the environment by coprecipitation. Index terms: nickel incorporation, nickel adsorption, X-ray diffraction

  6. Esophageal Carcinoma in African Americans: A Five-Decade Experience

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Zahra; Nouraie, Mehdi; Razjouyan, Hadi; Lee, Edward E.; Dowlati, Ehsan; El-Seyed, El-Waleed; Laiyemo, Adeyinka; Brim, Hassan; Smoot, Duane T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Esophageal cancer accounts for a considerable proportion of carcinomas of the upper gastrointestinal tract in African Americans. Our aim was to describe the epidemiology of esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) among African Americans in the last five decades. Methods A total of 601 records of patients with documented esophageal cancer between 1959 and 2007 at Howard University Hospital were reviewed. Demographic characteristics, risk factors, clinical stage and histological findings were reviewed. The change in prevalence of the disease and the interaction between main risk factors with tumor stage of the patients were assessed over the years of this study. Result A total of 552 patients (91.8%) had ESCC while 49 patients (8.2%) had EA. The mean age at diagnosis was 60.1 and 60.6 years for ESCC and EA, respectively (P = 0.8). The peak incidence was in the 1980–1989 decade. Out of 136 ESCC patients with TNM staging information, 130 (95.6%) were diagnosed in stage 2 and above. The majority (73%) of the ESCC were in the mid- and upper third of the esophagus and associated with smoking and alcohol exposure. The majority (81%) of the EA were in the mid- and lower third. The most common presenting symptoms were dysphagia (77.7%), and weight loss (31.9%). Conclusion ESCC is the predominant esophageal cancer in African Americans and diagnosed in late stages, and its diagnosis in our institution has decreased since 1990. A combination of genetic factors, environmental influences (e.g., those related to diet), and the deleterious changes associated with smoking and alcohol consumption, and differences in tumor histology, are the obvious parameters that should be the focus of future studies, and early diagnosis at an earlier stage should be considered among blacks. PMID:21847566

  7. CISNET: Esophageal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has been rising at an alarming rate over the past four decades. Although the absolute number of EAC cases per year remains too low to screen the general population, targeted screening may be appropriate. Heartburn, the primary symptom of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), affects 40-60 million Americans and can lead to Barrett's esophagus (BE), a premalignant condition associated with the greatest risk of developing EAC.

  8. Radiochemotherapy of esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhongxing; Cox, James D; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2007-06-01

    Cancer of the esophagus continues to be a threat to public health. The common practice is esophagectomy for surgically resectable tumors and radiochemotherapy for locally advanced, unresectable tumors. However, local regional tumor control and overall survival of esophageal cancer patients after the standard therapies remain poor, approximately 30% of patients treated with surgery only will develop local recurrence, and 50% to 60% patients treated with radiochemotherapy only fail local regionally due to persistent disease or local recurrence. Esophagectomy after radiochemotherapy or preoperative radiochemotherapy has increased the complete surgical resection rate and local regional control without a significant survival benefit. Induction chemotherapy followed by preoperative radiochemotherapy has produced encouraging results. In addition to patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors, involvement of celiac axis nodes, number of positive lymph nodes after preoperative radiochemotherapy, incomplete pathologic response, high metabolic activity on positron emission tomography scan after radiochemotherapy, and incomplete surgical resection are factors associated with a poor outcome. Radiochemotherapy followed by surgery is associated with significant adverse effects, including treatment-related pneumonitis, postoperative pulmonary complications, esophagitis and pericarditis. The incidence and severity of the adverse effects are associated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy dosimetric factors. Innovative treatment strategies including physically and biologically molecular targeted therapy is needed to improve the treatment outcome of patients with esophageal cancer. PMID:17545853

  9. Hypnotherapy for Esophageal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Riehl, Megan E.; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    Hypnotherapy is an evidence based intervention for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome. While similar in pathophysiology, less is known about the utility of hypnotherapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal disorders, most of which are functional in nature, cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms that impact patient quality of life and are difficult to treat from a medical perspective. After a thorough medical workup and a failed trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy, options for treatment are significantly limited. While the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, two critical factors are believed to drive esophageal symptoms—visceral hypersensitivity and symptom hypervigilance. The goal of esophageal directed hypnotherapy is to promote a deep state of relaxation with focused attention allowing the patient to learn to modulate physiological sensations and symptoms that are not easily addressed with conventional medical intervention. Currently, the use of hypnosis is suitable for dysphagia, globus, functional chest pain/non-cardiac chest pain, dyspepsia, and functional heartburn. In this article the authors will provide a rationale for the use of hypnosis in these disorders, presenting the science whenever available, describing their approach with these patients, and sharing a case study representing a successful outcome. PMID:26046715

  10. Hypnotherapy for Esophageal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Megan E; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    Hypnotherapy is an evidence based intervention for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome. While similar in pathophysiology, less is known about the utility of hypnotherapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal disorders, most of which are functional in nature, cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms that impact patient quality of life and are difficult to treat from a medical perspective. After a thorough medical workup and a failed trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy, options for treatment are significantly limited. While the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, two critical factors are believed to drive esophageal symptoms-visceral hypersensitivity and symptom hypervigilance. The goal of esophageal directed hypnotherapy is to promote a deep state of relaxation with focused attention allowing the patient to learn to modulate physiological sensations and symptoms that are not easily addressed with conventional medical intervention. Currently, the use of hypnosis is suitable for dysphagia, globus, functional chest pain/non-cardiac chest pain, dyspepsia, and functional heartburn. In this article the authors will provide a rationale for the use of hypnosis in these disorders, presenting the science whenever available, describing their approach with these patients, and sharing a case study representing a successful outcome. PMID:26046715

  11. Esophageal metastasis from breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vergote, G; Ponette, E; Verschakelen, J; Baert, A L; Rutgeerts, P; Moerman, P

    1994-12-01

    A case of esophageal metastasis from a breast carcinoma is presented. Location was, as usual, midesophageal. The interval of time between breast carcinoma and the onset of esophageal symptoms was rather long. Barium swallow examination enabled correct diagnosis, whereas several series of superficial endoscopical biopsies were negative. Diagnosis was confirmed by deep endoscopical biopsy. PMID:7829460

  12. Aluminium substitution in iron(II-III)-layered double hydroxides: Formation and cationic order

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby, Christian Abdelmoula, Mustapha; Aissa, Rabha; Medjahdi, Ghouti; Brunelli, Michela; Francois, Michel

    2008-09-15

    The formation and the modifications of the structural properties of an aluminium-substituted iron(II-III)-layered double hydroxide (LDH) of formula Fe{sub 4}{sup II}Fe{sub (2-6y)}{sup III}Al{sub 6y}{sup III} (OH){sub 12} SO{sub 4}, 8H{sub 2}O are followed by pH titration curves, Moessbauer spectroscopy and high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction using synchrotron radiation. Rietveld refinements allow to build a structural model for hydroxysulphate green rust, GR(SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}), i.e. y=0, in which a bilayer of sulphate anions points to the Fe{sup 3+} species. A cationic order is proposed to occur in both GR(SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) and aluminium-substituted hydroxysulphate green rust when y<0.08. Variation of the cell parameters and a sharp decrease in average crystal size and anisotropy are detected for an aluminium content as low as y=0.01. The formation of Al-GR(SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) is preceded by the successive precipitation of Fe{sup III} and Al{sup III} (oxy)hydroxides. Adsorption of more soluble Al{sup III} species onto the initially formed ferric oxyhydroxide may be responsible for this slowdown of crystal growth. Therefore, the insertion of low aluminium amount (y{approx}0.01) could be an interesting way for increasing the surface reactivity of iron(II-III) LDH that maintains constant the quantity of the reactive Fe{sup II} species of the material. - Graphical abstract: (a) Crystallographical structure of sulphated green rust: SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} point to the Fe{sup 3+} cations (red) that form an ordered array with the Fe{sup 2+} cations (green). (b) Width and asymmetry of the synchrotron XRD peaks increase rapidly when some Al{sup 3+} species substitute the Fe{sup 3+} cations; z is molar ratio Al{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 3+}.

  13. Computed tomography of esophageal varices after sclerotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Halden, W.J.; Harnsberger, H.R.; Mancuso, A.A.

    1983-06-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of the normal esophagus and esophageal carcinoma have been reported. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) also has been used to define the presence of esophageal varices. The CT appearance is reported of therapeutically sclerosed esophageal varices which mimics esophageal carcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the first published case of this entity.

  14. ROTATION OF THE K3 II-III GIANT STAR {alpha} HYDRA

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, David F.

    2013-08-01

    Fundamental spectroscopic determination of projected rotation rates of slowly rotating stars is challenging because the rotational broadening of the spectral lines is often comparable to, or smaller than, the broadening from other sources, most notably macroturbulence. Fourier techniques have the advantage over direct profile matching when the observed profiles are complete, but when the profiles are severely blended, the Fourier analysis is compromised. A process of modeling partial profiles for determining the rotation rate for stars having blended spectral lines is investigated and applied to the evolved star {alpha} Hya (K3 II-III). Projected rotation higher than 5 km s{sup -1} can be definitively ruled out for this star. Not all lines are equally good, depending on the amount of blending and also depending on the strength of the line, as the balance between the thermal and non-thermal components changes. A modest ambiguity arises between macroturbulence and rotational broadening, but a careful look at the differences between the observations and the models allows one to measure the rotation with acceptable precision. The result for {alpha} Hya is v sin i = 2.6 {+-} 0.3 km s{sup -1}.

  15. Psychiatric illness delays diagnosis of esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, R W; Diggs, B S; Spight, D H; Robinson, J; Elder, K A; Andrus, J; Thomas, C R; Hunter, J G; Jobe, B A

    2008-01-01

    Evidence suggests that patients with psychiatric illnesses may be more likely to experience a delay in diagnosis of coexisting cancer. The association between psychiatric illness and timely diagnosis and survival in patients with esophageal cancer has not been studied. The specific aim of this retrospective cohort study was to determine the impact of coexisting psychiatric illness on time to diagnosis, disease stage and survival in patients with esophageal cancer. All patients with a diagnosis of esophageal cancer between 1989 and 2003 at the Portland Veteran's Administration hospital were identified by ICD-9 code. One hundred and sixty patients were identified: 52 patients had one or more DSM-IV diagnoses, and 108 patients had no DSM-IV diagnosis. Electronic charts were reviewed beginning from the first recorded encounter for all patients and clinical and demographic data were collected. The association between psychiatric illness and time to diagnosis of esophageal cancer and survival was studied using Cox proportional hazard models. Groups were similar in age, ethnicity, body mass index, and history of tobacco and alcohol use. Psychiatric illness was associated with delayed diagnosis (median time from alarm symptoms to diagnosis 90 days vs. 35 days in patients with and without psychiatric illness, respectively, P < 0.001) and the presence of advanced disease at the time of diagnosis (37% vs. 18% of patients with and without psychiatric illness, respectively, P= 0.009). In multivariate analysis, psychiatric illness and depression were independent predictors for delayed diagnosis (hazard ratios 0.605 and 0.622, respectively, hazard ratio < 1 indicating longer time to diagnosis). Dementia was an independent risk factor for worse survival (hazard ratio 2.984). Finally, psychiatric illness was associated with a decreased likelihood of receiving surgical therapy. Psychiatric illness is a risk factor for delayed diagnosis, a diagnosis of advanced cancer, and a lower likelihood of receiving surgical therapy in patients with esophageal cancer. Dementia is associated with worse survival in these patients. These findings emphasize the importance of prompt evaluation of foregut symptoms in patients with psychiatric illness. PMID:19125795

  16. Spectroscopic and quantum chemical study of the structure of a new paramagnetic dimeric palladium(II,III) complex with creatine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitewa, Mariana; Enchev, Venelin; Bakalova, Tatyana

    2002-05-01

    The structure and coordination mode of the newly synthesized dimeric paramagnetic Pd(II,III) complex are studied using magneto-chemical, EPR and IR spectroscopic methods. In order to perform reliable assignment of the IR bands, the structure and IR spectrum of the free creatine were calculated using ab initio method. For calculation of the configuration of its deprotonated and doubly deprotonated forms the semiempirical AM1 method was used.

  17. Clinical outcomes of synchronous head and neck and esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Won

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate clinical outcomes of synchronous head and neck and esophageal cancer (SHNEC). Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 27 SHNEC patients treated with curative intent at a single institution. The treatment modality for individual cases was usually determined on a case by case basis. Results The median follow-up duration for the surviving patients was 28.2 months. The most common site of head and neck cancer was hypopharyngeal carcinoma (n = 21, 77.7%). The lower esophagus was the most common location of esophageal carcinoma (n = 16, 59.3%). The 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 57.5% and 39.6%. Major pattern of failure was locoregional recurrence in the study patients. Esophageal cancer stage, the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status, and pretreatment weight loss were significant prognostic factors for OS in univariate analysis. Treatment-related death was observed in two patients, and one patient developed a grade 4 late treatment-related complication. Conclusion Although the survival outcome for SHNEC is poor, long-term survival might be achievable with aggressive treatment with stage I-II esophageal cancer and good performance. PMID:26484300

  18. Optimizing the data combination rule for seamless phase?II/III clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Hampson, Lisa V; Jennison, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    We consider seamless phase?II/III clinical trials that compare K treatments with a common control in phase?II then test the most promising treatment against control in phase?III. The final hypothesis test for the selected treatment can use data from both phases, subject to controlling the familywise type?I error rate. We show that the choice of method for conducting the final hypothesis test has a substantial impact on the power to demonstrate that an effective treatment is superior to control. To understand these differences in power, we derive decision rules maximizing power for particular configurations of treatment effects. A rule with such an optimal frequentist property is found as the solution to a multivariate Bayes decision problem. The optimal rules that we derive depend on the assumed configuration of treatment means. However, we are able to identify two decision rules with robust efficiency: a rule using a weighted average of the phase II and phase III data on the selected treatment and control, and a closed testing procedure using an inverse normal combination rule and a Dunnett test for intersection hypotheses. For the first of these rules, we find the optimal division of a given total sample size between phases II and III. We also assess the value of using phase?II data in the final analysis and find that for many plausible scenarios, between 50% and 70% of the phase?II numbers on the selected treatment and control would need to be added to the phase?III sample size in order to achieve the same increase in power. PMID:25315892

  19. Esophageal Cancer in Esophageal Diverticula Associated with Achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ah Ran; Chon, Nu Ri; Youn, Young Hoon; Paik, Hyo Chae; Kim, Yon Hee

    2015-01-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of achalasia and esophageal diverticula is rare. Here, we report the case of a 68-year-old man with multiple esophageal diverticula associated with achalasia who was later diagnosed with early esophageal cancer. He initially presented with dysphagia and dyspepsia, and injection of botulinum toxin to the lower esophageal sphincter relieved his symptoms. Five years later, however, the patient presented with worsening of symptoms, and esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was performed. The endoscopic findings showed multifocal lugol-voiding lesions identified as moderate dysplasia. We decided to use photodynamic therapy to treat the multifocal dysplastic lesions. At follow-up EGD 2 months after photodynamic therapy, more lugol-voiding lesions representing a squamous cell carcinoma in situ were found. The patient ultimately underwent surgery for the treatment of recurrent esophageal multifocal neoplasia. After a follow-up period of 3 years, the patient showed a good outcome without symptoms. To manage premalignant lesions such as achalasia with esophageal diverticula, clinicians should be cautious, but have an aggressive approach regarding endoscopic surveillance. PMID:25674530

  20. Progressive transformation of immortalized esophageal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhong-Ying; Xu, Li-Yan; Chen, Min-Hua; Shen, Jian; Cai, Wei-Jia; Zeng, Yi

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the progressive transformation of immortal cells of human fetal esophageal epithelium induced by human papillomavirus, and to examine biological criteria of sequential passage of cells, including cellular phenotype, proliferative rate, telomerase, chromosome and tumorigenicity. METHODS: The SHEE cell series consisted of immortalized embryonic esophageal epithelium which was in malignant transformation when cultivated over sixty passages without co-carcinogens. Cells of the 10th, 31st, 60th and 85th passages were present in progressive development after being transfected with HPV. Cells were cultivated in a culture flask and 24-hole cultural plates. Progressive changes of morphology, cell growth, contact-inhibition, and anchorage-dependent growth characteristics were examined by phase contrast microscopy. The cell proliferation rate was assayed by flow cytometry. The modal number of chromosomes was analyzed. HPV18E6E7 was detected by Western blot methods and activities of telomerase were analyzed by TRAP. Tumorigenicity of cells was detected with soft agar plates cultivated and with tumor formation in SCID mice. RESULTS: In morphological examination the 10th passage cells were in good differentiation, the 60th and 85th passages cells were in relatively poor differentiation, and the 31st passage cells had two distinct differentiations. The characteristics of the 85th and 60th passage cells were weakened at contact-inhibition and anchorage-dependent growth. Karyotypes of four stages of cells belonged to hyperdiploid or hypotriploid, and bimodal distribution of chromosomes appeared in the 31st and 60th passage cells. All of these characteristics combined with a increasing trend. The activities of telomerase were expressed in the latter three passages. Four fourths of SCID mice in the 85th passage cells and one fourth of SCID mice in the 60th passage cells developed tumors, but the cells in the 10th and 31st passage displayed no tumor formation. CONCLUSION: In continual cultivation of fetal esophageal epithelial cells with transduction of HPV18E6E7, cells from the 10th to the 85th passage were changed gradually from preimmortal, immortal, precancerous to malignantly transformed stages. All of these changes were in a dynamic progressive process. The establishment of a continuous line of esophageal epithelium may provide a in vitro model of carcinogenesis induced by HPV. PMID:12439909

  1. Environmental Causes of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kamangar, Farin; Chow, Wong-Ho; Abnet, Christian; Dawsey, Sanford

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis This articles reviews the environmental risk factors and predisposing conditions for the two main histological types of esophageal cancer, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). Tobacco smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, drinking maté, low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, achalasia, and low socioeconomic status increase the risk of ESCC. Results of investigations on several other potential risk factors, including opium consumption, intake of hot drinks, eating pickled vegetables, poor oral health, and exposure to human papillomavirus, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, N-nitroso compounds, acetaldehyde, and fumonisins are also discussed. Gastroesophageal reflux, obesity, tobacco smoking, hiatal hernia, achalasia, and probably absence of H. pylori in the stomach increase the risk of EA. Results of studies investigating other factors, including low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, consumption of carbonated soft drink, use of H2 blockers, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and drugs that relax the lower esophageal sphincter are also discussed. PMID:19327566

  2. [Esophageal involvement in Behçet's disease].

    PubMed

    Martínez Salmerón, J F; Gutiérrez-Rave Pecero, V; Uariachi, M; Ogea García, J L; Franco Cebrián, J; Castillo Higueras, P

    1992-09-01

    We report the case of a female patient that fulfills major criteria of Behcet's disease. Multiple esophageal aphthous ulcers seen by endoscopy responded to therapy with steroids and colchicine. PMID:1419316

  3. Oropharyngeal/Esophageal Candidiasis ("Thrush")

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page: About CDC.gov . Fungal Diseases Share Compartir Oropharyngeal / Esophageal Candidiasis ("Thrush") Candidiasis that develops in the mouth or throat is called "thrush" or oropharyngeal candidiasis. The most common symptom of oral thrush ...

  4. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  5. Photodynamic Therapy for Obstructive Esophageal Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    McCaughan, James S.

    1999-01-01

    Objectives Determine factors affecting survival rates, benefits and complications of patients with obstructive esophageal cancer treated with photodynamic therapy (PDT). Methods From 1982 to January 1998, we used PDT to treat 140 patients with obstructive adeno or squamous carcinoma and evaluated survival up to November 1998. All patients had failed, refused, or were ineligible for surgery, ionizing radiation or chemotherapy. The effect of different variables on survival was estimated using multivariate analysis. The Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS), weight, diet and complications were recorded and biopsies and brushings were taken at each endoscopy. At the beginning and end of each endoscopy the minimal diameter open of the esophagus, and the length, thickness and color of the tumor were recorded. Edema, exudate, bleeding, and mucositis were evaluated and recorded on an ordinal scale. Results The only significant variable affecting survival was the clinical stage. The median survival after PDT for all patients was 6.5 months (mean = 13.9). Kaplan–Meier survival after PDT curves were statistically significantly different when stratified by the clinical Stage at the time of PDT (p < 0.0001). Median survival (months) were for: Stage I = 56; Stage II = 12; Stage III = 6.5; Stage IV = 3.5. Analysis of each individual stage showed the KPS was the only confounding variable with a statistically significant effect on survival after PDT and this was only for Stages III and IV. The most significant effect occurred when the KPS was ? 70. For Stage III the median survival when the KPS was ? 70 was 7.7 months and for a KPS < 70 it was 5.0 months (p = 0.0001). For Stage IV the median survival when the KPS was ? 70 was 5.5 months and for a KPS < 70 it was 2.5 months (p = 0.0002). The mean minimum diameter open before PDT was 6.2 mm (median 6.0mm) and at the end of the PDT treatment endoscopy 11.1 mm (median 12.0 mm) for a mean increase in the minimum diameter open of 4.9 mm (median 5.0 mm) This was statistically significant using paired t-tests (p < 0.0001). Conclusions Photodynamic therapy for esophageal carcinoma caused minimal complications and procedure related mortality. Complete obstruction can be relieved by the end of the PDT endoscopy. The length of palliation for “non-curative” patients was equal to or better than that reported historically for most other treatment regimens. PMID:18493499

  6. Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Cianferoni, Antonella; Spergel, Jonathan M

    2015-09-01

    Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disease (EGID) can be classified as eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) when the eosinophilia is limited to the esophagus or as eosinophilic gastritis (EG) if it is limited to the gastric tract, eosinophilic colitis (EC) if it is limited to the colon, and eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) if the eosinophilia involves one or more parts of the gastrointestinal tract. EoE is by far the most common EGID. It is a well-defined chronic atopic disease due to a T helper type 2 (Th2) inflammation triggered often by food allergens. EoE diagnosis is done if an esophageal biopsy shows at least 15 eosinophils per high power field (eos/hpf). Globally accepted long-term therapies for EoE are the use of swallowed inhaled steroids or food antigen avoidance. The treatment of EoE is done not only to control symptoms but also to prevent complications such as esophageal stricture and food impaction. EGE cause non-specific gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and are diagnosed if esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD)/colonoscopy show eosinophilia in one or more parts of the GI tract. They are rare diseases with an unclear pathogenesis, and they are poorly defined in terms of diagnostic criteria and treatment. Before initiating treatment of any EGE, it is imperative to conduct a differential diagnosis to exclude other causes of hypereosinophilia with GI localization. EGE are often poorly responsive to therapy and there is no commonly accepted long-term treatment. EG has many characteristics similar to EoE, including the fact that it is often due to a food allergen-driven Th2 inflammation; transcriptome analysis however shows that it is more a systemic disease and has a different gene signature than EoE. EC is a benign form of delayed food allergy in infant and is instead a difficult-to-treat severe inflammatory condition in older children and adults. EC in the latter groups can be a manifestation of drug allergy or autoimmune disease. Overall EGE, EC, and EG are rare and are a diagnosis of exclusion until more common causes of eosinophilia have been excluded. PMID:26233430

  7. CT evaluation of thickened esophageal walls

    SciTech Connect

    Reinig, J.W.; Stanley, J.H.; Schabel, S.I.

    1983-05-01

    A study of 200 consecutive chest computed tomographic (CT) examinations revealed thickened esophageal walls (over 3 mm) in 35%. While this is the earliest finding of carcinoma of the esophagus on CT, only half of the cases of thickened walls were due to esophageal carcinoma. Other mediastinal malignancies as well as benign inflammatory, vascular, and fibrotic conditions such as reflux and monilial esophagitis, esophageal varices, and postirradiation scarring were found to cause thickened esophageal walls. Distension with air and intravenous enhancement aid in the optimal evaluation of the esophagus by CT. The thickened esophageal wall is always abnormal, but it is nonspecific, seen in both malignant and nonmalignant conditions.

  8. Interaction of the isolated domain II/III of Thermus thermophilus elongation factor Tu with the nucleotide exchange factor EF-Ts.

    PubMed Central

    Peter, M E; Reiser, C O; Schirmer, N K; Kiefhaber, T; Ott, G; Grillenbeck, N W; Sprinzl, M

    1990-01-01

    The middle and C-terminal domain (domain II/III) of elongation factor Tu from Thermus thermophilus lacking the GTP/GDP binding domain have been prepared by treating nucleotide-free protein with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease. The isolated domain II/III of EF-Tu has a compact structure and high resistance against tryptic treatment and thermal denaturation. As demonstrated by circular dichroism spectroscopy, the isolated domain II/III does not contain any alpha-helical structure. Nucleotide exchange factor, EF-Ts, was found to interact with domain II/III, whereas the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA, GDP and GTP to this EF-Tu fragment could not be detected. Images PMID:2263451

  9. Hyperfractionated Concomitant Boost Proton Beam Therapy for Esophageal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mizumoto, Masashi; Sugahara, Shinji; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Nakahara, Akira; Terashima, Hideo; Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of hyperfractionated concomitant boost proton beam therapy (PBT) for patients with esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study participants were 19 patients with esophageal cancer who were treated with hyperfractionated photon therapy and PBT between 1990 and 2007. The median total dose was 78 GyE (range, 70-83 GyE) over a median treatment period of 48 days (range, 38-53 days). Ten of the 19 patients were at clinical T Stage 3 or 4. Results: There were no cases in which treatment interruption was required because of radiation-induced esophagitis or hematologic toxicity. The overall 1- and 5-year actuarial survival rates for all 19 patients were 79.0% and 42.8%, respectively, and the median survival time was 31.5 months (95% limits: 16.7- 46.3 months). Of the 19 patients, 17 (89%) showed a complete response within 4 months after completing treatment and 2 (11%) showed a partial response, giving a response rate of 100% (19/19). The 1- and 5-year local control rates for all 19 patients were 93.8% and 84.4 %, respectively. Only 1 patient had late esophageal toxicity of Grade 3 at 6 months after hyperfractionated PBT. There were no other nonhematologic toxicities, including no cases of radiation pneumonia or cardiac failure of Grade 3 or higher. Conclusions: The results suggest that hyperfractionated PBT is safe and effective for patients with esophageal cancer. Further studies are needed to establish the appropriate role and treatment schedule for use of PBT for esophageal cancer.

  10. Upper esophageal and pharyngeal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Jonathan M.; Howell, Amy B.; Johnston, Nikki; Kresty, Laura A.; Lew, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on laryngopharyngeal reflux as a risk factor for laryngeal cancer; the role of pepsin in laryngopharyngeal neoplasia; natural fruit and vegetable compounds for the prevention and treatment of pharyngeal and esophageal cancers; and evaluation of cranberry constituents as inhibitors of esophageal adenocarcinoma utilizing in vitro assay and in vivo models. PMID:25266014

  11. Drug-induced esophageal strictures.

    PubMed Central

    Bonavina, L; DeMeester, T R; McChesney, L; Schwizer, W; Albertucci, M; Bailey, R T

    1987-01-01

    A retrospective study of 55 patients with a benign esophageal stricture showed that in 11 patients (20%) the cause was a drug-induced lesion due to potassium chloride (3), tetracyclines (3), aspirin (2), vitamin C (1), phenytoin (1), and quinidine (1). Five of the 11 patients would have been diagnosed as having a reflux etiology of their stricture if 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring was not performed. Six patients responded to dilatation and five patients required resection or bypass. A prospective study of 18 asymptomatic volunteers showed a high incidence of esophageal lodgment of a radiolabeled medicinal capsule, with subsequent dissolution and release of the isotope. This occurred most frequently in elderly subjects and was reduced by increasing the volume of water chaser. The sites of lodgment correspond to the location of the observed strictures in the patient population. An in vitro study showed that, when the causative drugs were mixed with saliva, dissolution occurred within 60 minutes and was associated with significant changes in pH. These investigations show that drug-induced esophageal strictures are more common than previously appreciated, and can be confused with a reflux etiology. Diagnosis is suggested by a history of drug ingestion, location of the stricture, and a normal esophageal acid exposure on 24-hour pH monitoring. The severity of the esophageal injury is variable and requires dilatation to resection for therapy. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3606243

  12. Black esophagus: Acute esophageal necrosis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gurvits, Grigoriy E

    2010-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), commonly referred to as “black esophagus”, is a rare clinical entity arising from a combination of ischemic insult seen in hemodynamic compromise and low-flow states, corrosive injury from gastric contents in the setting of esophago-gastroparesis and gastric outlet obstruction, and decreased function of mucosal barrier systems and reparative mechanisms present in malnourished and debilitated physical states. AEN may arise in the setting of multiorgan dysfunction, hypoperfusion, vasculopathy, sepsis, diabetic ketoacidosis, alcohol intoxication, gastric volvulus, traumatic transection of the thoracic aorta, thromboembolic phenomena, and malignancy. Clinical presentation is remarkable for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Notable symptoms may include epigastric/abdominal pain, vomiting, dysphagia, fever, nausea, and syncope. Associated laboratory findings may reflect anemia and leukocytosis. The hallmark of this syndrome is the development of diffuse circumferential black mucosal discoloration in the distal esophagus that may extend proximally to involve variable length of the organ. Classic “black esophagus” abruptly stops at the gastroesophageal junction. Biopsy is recommended but not required for the diagnosis. Histologically, necrotic debris, absence of viable squamous epithelium, and necrosis of esophageal mucosa, with possible involvement of submucosa and muscularis propria, are present. Classification of the disease spectrum is best described by a staging system. Treatment is directed at correcting coexisting clinical conditions, restoring hemodynamic stability, nil-per-os restriction, supportive red blood cell transfusion, and intravenous acid suppression with proton pump inhibitors. Complications include perforation with mediastinal infection/abscess, esophageal stricture and stenosis, superinfection, and death. A high mortality of 32% seen in the setting of AEN syndrome is usually related to the underlying medical co-morbidities and diseases. PMID:20614476

  13. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Adolescent Patients Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients Basics Overview Eosinophilic esophagitis also known as ( ... children may have vomiting and abdominal pain, and adolescents may complain of the feeling of food getting ...

  14. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  15. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  16. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  17. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  18. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  19. Computed tomographic features of esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlberg, J.L.; Sandler, M.A.; Madrazo, B.L.

    1983-04-01

    A patient wit esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD) was examined with computed tomography (CT). CT demonstrated marked thichening of the esophageal wall, diffuse irregularity of the esophageal lumen, and intramural gas collections-features typical of this entity. In the proper clinical setting, CT can confirm the diagnosis of EIPD, especially when other studies are equivocal. However, this case also demonstrates some of the limitations of CT in differentiating benign and malignant esophageal disorders.

  20. Recursive Partitioning Analysis for New Classification of Patients With Esophageal Cancer Treated by Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Motoo; Department of Clinical Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya; Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya ; Shitara, Kohei; Kodaira, Takeshi; Kondoh, Chihiro; Takahari, Daisuke; Ura, Takashi; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Kamata, Minoru; Muro, Kei; Sawada, Satoshi

    2012-11-01

    Background: The 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system does not include lymph node size in the guidelines for staging patients with esophageal cancer. The objectives of this study were to determine the prognostic impact of the maximum metastatic lymph node diameter (ND) on survival and to develop and validate a new staging system for patients with esophageal squamous cell cancer who were treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods: Information on 402 patients with esophageal cancer undergoing CRT at two institutions was reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses of data from one institution were used to assess the impact of clinical factors on survival, and recursive partitioning analysis was performed to develop the new staging classification. To assess its clinical utility, the new classification was validated using data from the second institution. Results: By multivariate analysis, gender, T, N, and ND stages were independently and significantly associated with survival (p < 0.05). The resulting new staging classification was based on the T and ND. The four new stages led to good separation of survival curves in both the developmental and validation datasets (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Our results showed that lymph node size is a strong independent prognostic factor and that the new staging system, which incorporated lymph node size, provided good prognostic power, and discriminated effectively for patients with esophageal cancer undergoing CRT.

  1. Using aptamers to elucidate esophageal cancer clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenxu; Lu, Yi; Pu, Ying; Liu, Jun; Liu, Bo; Yu, Bo; Chen, Ke; Fu, Ting; Yang, Chaoyong James; Liu, Huixia; Tan, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is closely correlated with the occurrence and development of various cancers of epithelial origin. This study tested, for the first time, the ability of EpCAM aptamer SYL3C to detect EpCAM expression in 170 cases of esophageal cancer (EC) and precancerous lesions, as well as 20 cases of EC series samples, using immunofluorescence imaging analysis. Corresponding antibodies were used as control. EpCAM overexpression was 98% in both esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EACA) and 100% in metastasis, but no EpCAM overexpression was detected in undifferentiated EC (UEC). Significant differences were noted among various stages of differentiation (p?esophageal lesions. In a competitive binding experiment, EpCAM aptamer generated a staining pattern similar to that of antibody, but the binding sites with EpCAM were different. Based on these results, it can be concluded that EpCAM is suitable for use as an EC biomarker, therapeutic target, and effective parameter for tumor transfer and prognosis evaluation by aptamer SYL3C staining. PMID:26687301

  2. Using aptamers to elucidate esophageal cancer clinical samples

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenxu; Lu, Yi; Pu, Ying; Liu, Jun; Liu, Bo; Yu, Bo; Chen, Ke; Fu, Ting; Yang, Chaoyong James; Liu, Huixia; Tan, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is closely correlated with the occurrence and development of various cancers of epithelial origin. This study tested, for the first time, the ability of EpCAM aptamer SYL3C to detect EpCAM expression in 170 cases of esophageal cancer (EC) and precancerous lesions, as well as 20 cases of EC series samples, using immunofluorescence imaging analysis. Corresponding antibodies were used as control. EpCAM overexpression was 98% in both esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EACA) and 100% in metastasis, but no EpCAM overexpression was detected in undifferentiated EC (UEC). Significant differences were noted among various stages of differentiation (p?esophageal lesions. In a competitive binding experiment, EpCAM aptamer generated a staining pattern similar to that of antibody, but the binding sites with EpCAM were different. Based on these results, it can be concluded that EpCAM is suitable for use as an EC biomarker, therapeutic target, and effective parameter for tumor transfer and prognosis evaluation by aptamer SYL3C staining. PMID:26687301

  3. CT diagnosis of an esophageal foreign body

    SciTech Connect

    Gambia, J.L.; Heaston, D.K.; Ling, D.; Korobkin, M.

    1983-02-01

    Although of proven value in the diagnosis and treatment of esophageal malignancy, computed tomography (CT) has had limited application in the evaluation of benign esophageal disease. The first case of a CT-detected esophageal foreign body is reported. The foreign body, a piece of bone present for possibly 3 years, had escaped prior detection by plain chest radiography, barium swallow, and esophagoscopy.

  4. Evidence of active tectonics on a Roman aqueduct system (II-III century A.D.) near Rome, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Fabrizio; Montone, Paola; Pirro, Mario; Boschi, Enzo

    2004-04-01

    In this paper we describe evidence of strong tectonic deformation affecting two aqueducts of Roman age (II-III century A.D.). The channels are located approximately 20 km northeast of Rome along the ancient Via Tiburtina. Brittle and ductile deformation affects these two structures, including extensional joint systems, NE-oriented faults, and horizontal distortion. This deformation is consistent with right-lateral movement on major N-striking faults, and represents the first evidence that tectonic deformation took place in historical times in the vicinity of Rome, with local strike-slip movement superimposed on a regional extensional fault system.

  5. Expression of Cofilin-1 and Transgelin in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Liao, Ruyi; Li, Hui; Liu, Ling; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Hongming

    2015-01-01

    Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has attracted much research attention around the world, and the number of ESCC cases has increased gradually in recent years. Identifying the specific biomarkers of ESCC is an effective approach for the early diagnosis of tumors. Material/Methods Immunohistochemical streptavidin-peroxidase method was used to determine the expressions of Cofilin-1 and transgelin in 68 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and 48 individuals with normal esophageal tissues. In addition to the relationships between the expression of Cofilin-1 and transgelin, the clinicopathologic features of ESCC were also discussed. The correlation between Cofilin-1 and transgelin protein expression in ESCC was analyzed. Results (1) The positive expression rates of Cofilin-1 and transgelin were 60.3% (41/68) and 54.4% (37/68) in esophageal carcinoma tissue, respectively. The positive expression rates of Cofilin-1 and transgelin in normal esophageal tissue were 27.1% (13/48) and 29.1% (14/48), respectively. The differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). (2) The positive expression rate of Cofilin-1 did not differ significantly (P>0.05) with sex, age, ethnicity, tumor size, or infiltration depth; but did have a statistically significant (P<0.05) difference with various degrees of tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, and clinical stages. (3) The positive expression rate of transgelin did not differ significantly (P>0.05) with sex, age, ethnicity, tumor size, infiltration depth, and clinical stage, but did significantly (P<0.05) differ with degree of tumor differentiation and lymph node metastasis. Conclusions Cofilin-1 and transgelin may play roles in the carcinogenesis and development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Cofilin-1 may be useful as an important biomarker for indicating the degree of malignancy of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and the detection of transgelin is valuable in early diagnosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26344167

  6. Surgical treatments for esophageal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Allum, William H.; Bonavina, Luigi; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Cuesta, Miguel A.; Dong, Zhao Ming; Felix, Valter Nilton; Figueredo, Edgar; Gatenby, Piers A.C.; Haverkamp, Leonie; Ibraev, Maksat A.; Krasna, Mark J.; Lambert, René; Langer, Rupert; Lewis, Michael P.N.; Nason, Katie S.; Parry, Kevin; Preston, Shaun R.; Ruurda, Jelle P.; Schaheen, Lara W.; Tatum, Roger P.; Turkin, Igor N.; van der Horst, Sylvia; van der Peet, Donald L.; van der Sluis, Peter C.; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Wormald, Justin C.R.; Wu, Peter C.; Zonderhuis, Barbara M.

    2015-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on the role of the nurse in preparation of esophageal resection (ER); the management of patients who develop high-grade dysplasia after having undergone Nissen fundoplication; the trajectory of care for the patient with esophageal cancer; the influence of the site of tumor in the choice of treatment; the best location for esophagogastrostomy; management of chylous leak after esophagectomy; the optimal approach to manage thoracic esophageal leak after esophagectomy; the choice for operational approach in surgery of cardioesophageal crossing; the advantages of robot esophagectomy; the place of open esophagectomy; the advantages of esophagectomy compared to definitive chemoradiotherapy; the pathologist report in the resected specimen; the best way to manage patients with unsuspected positive microscopic margin after ER; enhanced recovery after surgery for ER: expedited care protocols; and long-term quality of life in patients following esophagectomy. PMID:25266029

  7. Esophageal Cancer: Current Options for Therapeutic Management

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Zhang, Hongwei; Wu, Kaichun

    2014-01-01

    Background Esophageal cancer (EC) is the eighth most common cancer worldwide. A worldwide-established consensus on therapeutic pathways for EC is still missing. Debate exists on whether neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment regimens improve the prognosis and which surgical approach reaches objective benefits. Summary This article discusses the appropriate option of the current different curative treatments in patients with EC, including surgical treatment and adjuvant therapy. Key Message To maximize survival and quality of life and also decrease postoperative complications, the present recommended therapeutic management of EC should be individualized multidisciplinary team approaches according to patients' staging and physiologic reserve. Practical Implications The aim of this article is to provide a decision support and also a discussion based on clinical therapeutic strategy in order to characterize the beneficial approach which reaches an optimal balance between radical resection, postoperative outcome and long-term survival of EC. PMID:26674591

  8. Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius ST169 and novel ST354 SCCmec II-III isolates related to the worldwide ST71 clone.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, K; Koizumi, A; Saito, M; Muramatsu, Y; Tamura, Y

    2016-01-01

    The recent appearance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) is a concern for both veterinary and human healthcare. MRSP clonal lineages with sequence type (ST) 71-spa t02-staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) II-III and ST68-spa t06-SCCmec V have spread throughout Europe and North America, respectively. The current study compared the molecular characteristics of 43 MRSP isolates from dogs in Japan with those of MRSP from previous reports using multilocus sequence typing based on seven housekeeping genes, SCCmec typing, and detection of antimicrobial resistance genes. Three related clonal lineages, ST71, ST169, and the newly registered ST354, were observed in SCCmec II-III isolates from Japan, despite MRSP SCCmec II-III isolates being thought to belong to a single clonal lineage. The majority of SCCmec II-III isolates belonging to ST169 (9/11) and ST354 (3/3), but not ST71 (0/11), harboured tetM. Four STs were observed for the SCCmec V isolates; however, neither ST68 nor related STs were found in the Japanese MRSP isolates. In conclusion, MRSP SCCmec II-III isolates from Japan belonged to ST71 and related STs (ST169 and ST354). A variety of MRSP SCCmec V clones, including some novel clones, were identified. PMID:26138564

  9. Eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with esophageal atresia and chronic dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Kassabian, Sirvart; Baez-Socorro, Virginia; Sferra, Thomas; Garcia, Reinaldo

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is defined as a discontinuity of the lumen of the esophagus repaired soon after birth. Dysphagia is a common symptom in these patients, usually related to stricture, dysmotility or peptic esophagitis. We present 4 cases of patients with EA who complained of dysphagia and the diagnosis of Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was made, ages ranging from 9 to 16 years. Although our patients were on acid suppression years after their EA repair, they presented with acute worsening of dysphagia. Esophogastroduodenoscopy and/or barium swallow did not show stricture and biopsies revealed elevated eosinophil counts consistent with EoE. Two of 4 patients improved symptomatically with the topical steroids. It is important to note that all our patients have asthma and 3 out of 4 have tested positive for food allergies. One of our patients developed recurrent anastomotic strictures that improved with the treatment of the EoE. A previous case report linked the recurrence of esophageal strictures in patients with EA repair with EoE. Once the EoE was treated the strictures resolved. On the other hand, based on our observation, EoE could be present in patients without recurrent anastomotic strictures. There appears to be a spectrum in the disease process. We are suggesting that EoE is a frequent concomitant problem in patients with history of congenital esophageal deformities, and for this reason any of these patients with refractory reflux symptoms or dysphagia (with or without anastomotic stricture) may benefit from an endoscopic evaluation with biopsies to rule out EoE. PMID:25548504

  10. CISNET: Esophageal Cancer Model Profiles

    Cancer.gov

    Model profiles are standardized documents that facilitate the comparison of models and their results. The Joint Profile provided includes profiles for all esophageal cancer models. Individual profiles for each model are also provided and may be more current than the joint profile document.

  11. Esophageal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing esophageal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  12. Esophageal fistula complicating thyroid lobectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Nicholas D.; Lee, Cortney Y.; Lee, James T.; Sloan, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroidectomy is associated with low morbidity and mortality. Esophageal perforation following thyroidectomy has been reported only three times previously, with subsequent fistulization occurring in two of these cases. The authors present the first such case report in the English-speaking literature. PMID:25573663

  13. LYN, a Key Gene From Bioinformatics Analysis, Contributes to Development and Progression of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dabiao

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Esophageal adenocarcinoma is a lethal malignancy whose incidence is rapidly growing in recent years. Previous reports suggested that Barrett's esophagus (BE), which is represented by metaplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma transition, is regarded as the premalignant lesion of esophageal neoplasm. However, our knowledge about the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma is still very limited. MATERIAL AND METHODS In order to acquire better understanding about the pathological mechanisms in this field, we obtained gene profiling data on BE, esophageal adenocarcinoma patients, and normal controls from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. Bioinformatics analyses, including Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis, were conducted. RESULTS Our results revealed that several pathways, such as the wound healing, complement, and coagulation pathways, were closely correlated with cancer development and progression. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway was discovered to be responsible for the predisposition stage of cancer; while response to stress, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, nod-like receptor signaling pathway, and ECM-receptor interaction were chief contributors of cancer progression. More importantly, we discovered in this study that LYN was a critical gene. It was found to be the key nodule of several significant biological networks, which suggests its close correlation with cancer initiation and progression. CONCLUSIONS These results provided more information on the mechanisms of esophageal adenocarcinoma, which enlightened our way to the clinical discovery of novel therapeutic makers for conquering esophageal cancer. PMID:26708841

  14. Mechanics and hemodynamics of esophageal varices during peristaltic contraction

    E-print Network

    Brasseur, James G.

    Mechanics and hemodynamics of esophageal varices during peristaltic contraction Larry S. Miller,1 Ahmed, and James G. Brasseur. Mechanics and hemodynamics of esophageal varices dur- ing peristaltic hypothesis states that variceal pressure and wall tension increase dramatically during esophageal peristaltic

  15. Transtracheal Esophageal Stent Removal: A Case-Series

    PubMed Central

    Buiret, Guillaume; Guiraud, Michel; Pierron, Jerome; Schoeffler, Mathieu; Duperret, Serge; Baulieux, Jacques; Wander, Lionel; Poupart, Marc; Pignat, Jean-Christian

    2013-01-01

    Benign esophagorespiratory fistula is a rare but often lethal affection and difficult to cure. Possible treatments are surgery or esophageal stenting but may fail and cause respiratory failure. Two patients with spontaneous esophagorespiratory fistula after chemoradiotherapy for an esophageal malignancy were both treated by esophageal exclusion but esophageal stent were left in place. The esophageal stents were transtracheally removed through the fistula. The removals were successful, patients could leave Intensive Care Unit and returned home. Transtracheal esophageal stent removal is technically possible but very risky. Such situations must be avoided: esophageal stents must absolutely be removed before esophageal exclusion. PMID:23519091

  16. Proton Beam Therapy of Stage II and III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Satoh, Hiroaki; Sugahara, Shinji; Kurishima, Koichi; Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Ishikawa, Shigemi; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The present retrospective study assessed the role of proton beam therapy (PBT) in the treatment of patients with Stage II or III non-small-cell lung cancer who were inoperable or ineligible for chemotherapy because of co-existing disease or refusal. Patients and Methods: Between November 2001 and July 2008, PBT was given to 35 patients (5 patients with Stage II, 12 with Stage IIIA, and 18 with Stage IIIB) whose median age was 70.3 years (range, 47.4-85.4). The median proton dose given was 78.3 Gy (range, 67.1-91.3) (relative biologic effectiveness). Results: Local progression-free survival for Stage II-III patients was 93.3% at 1 year and 65.9% at 2 years during a median observation period of 16.9 months. Four patients (11.4%) developed local recurrence, 13 (37.1%) developed regional recurrence, and 7 (20.0%) developed distant metastases. The progression-free survival rate for Stage II-III patients was 59.6% at 1 year and 29.2% at 2 years. The overall survival rate of Stage II-III patients was 81.8% at 1 year and 58.9% at 2 years. Grade 3 or greater toxicity was not observed. A total of 15 patients (42.9%) developed Grade 1 and 6 (17.1%) Grade 2 toxicity. Conclusion: PBT for Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer without chemotherapy resulted in good local control and low toxicity. PBT has a definite role in the treatment of patients with Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer who are unsuitable for surgery or chemotherapy.

  17. Acute necrotizing esophagitis: a case report.

    PubMed Central

    Odelowo, Olajide O.; Hassan, Mohamed; Nidiry, Joseph J.; Marshalleck, Josephine J.

    2002-01-01

    Acute necrotizing esophagitis is rare. The exact etiology is unknown in most cases. The esophagus appears black, necrotic and ulcerated on the upper endoscopy, thus the term "black esophagus" is used. Histologically, there is necrosis of the esophageal mucosa and submucosa. Here, we present a patient with cholangiocarcinoma who had upper gastrointestinal bleeding and was found to have acute necrotizing esophagitis on the upper endoscopy. Images Fig. 1 PMID:12152932

  18. Corrosive Esophagitis Caused by Ingestion of Picosulfate

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jae Yong; Kang, Ho Suk; Kim, Seong Eun; Park, Ji Won; Moon, Sung Hoon; Kim, Jong Hyeok; Park, Choong Kee

    2015-01-01

    Corrosive esophagitis is characterized by caustic injury due to the ingestion of chemical agents, mainly alkaline substances such as detergents. Esophageal bleeding, perforation, or stricture can be worsened by high-degree corrosive esophagitis. Picosulfate is a commonly used laxative frequently administered for bowel preparation before colonoscopy or colon surgery. Picosulfate powder should be completely dissolved in water before ingestion because the powder itself may cause chemical burning of the esophagus and stomach. Here, we report a case of corrosive esophagitis due to the ingestion of picosulfate powder that was not completely dissolved in water. PMID:25674529

  19. Alkaline reflux gastritis and esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Nath, B J; Warshaw, A L

    1984-01-01

    Alkaline reflux (bile) gastritis and esophagitis result from mucosal injury by duodenal contents. Bile gastritis occurs after gastric surgery, cholecystectomy, ampullary sphincteroplasty, and, rarely, in nonoperated patients. Diagnostic features include chronic, continuous epigastric pain, exacerbated by eating, bilious vomiting, weight loss, iron deficiency anemia, achlorhydria, gastritis, and intragastric bile. The pathophysiology probably relates to excess enterogastric reflux and bile-induced mucosal damage. There is no perfect diagnostic test, but chemical and scintigraphic documentation of enterogastric reflux, as well as provocative testing with alkali solutions, are promising new techniques. Medical therapy with antacids, H2 antagonists, bile salt absorbants, and metoclopramide has been without significant benefit. Prostaglandins and sucralfate are now being evaluated. Surgical therapy that diverts duodenal contents away from the stomach is usually of benefit in appropriately selected patients. Alkaline reflux esophagitis shares many features with alkaline gastritis. PMID:6372664

  20. Pradaxa-induced esophageal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Wood, Michele; Shaw, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Pradaxa (dabigatran) is a direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. We describe a case of esophageal ulceration associated with Pradaxa administration in a 75-year-old man. The patient reported difficulty swallowing and a burning sensation after taking his first dose of Pradaxa. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed linear ulcerations in the mid-esophagus. Pradaxa was held beginning the day before the EGD. The patient reported that his pain and difficulty swallowing resolved on stopping Pradaxa. Pradaxa is formulated with a tartaric acid excipient to reduce variability in absorption. We hypothesise that the capsule lodged in the patient's esophagus and the tartaric acid may have caused local damage resulting in an esophageal ulcer. It is important to educate patients on proper administration of Pradaxa, to decrease the risk of this rare, but potentially serious adverse event. PMID:26452739

  1. True Intramural Esophageal Duplication Cyst.

    PubMed

    Al-Riyami, Salim; Al-Sawafi, Yaqoob

    2015-11-01

    Esophageal duplication is the second most common site of gastrointestinal duplication and most cases present with complications. These complications include bleeding, infection, dysphagia, and dyspnea. We report an incidental case of a true intramural esophageal duplication cyst in a new military recruit. The patient was diagnosed in Armed Forces Hospital, Oman. The patient came for a pre-recruitment routine check-up, he was found to have a suspicious soft tissue lesion on chest X-ray. He was referred to the thoracic surgeon for further investigations. The investigations included computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging chest scans, barium swallow, endoscopy and, finally, an endoscopic ultrasound. All workup pointed to a diagnosis of esophageal duplication cyst; therefore, the decision was made to excise the lesion after discussion with the patient about the possible diagnosis and nature of the treatment. The cyst was completely excised thoracoscopically with uneventful recovery. The patient was discharged a few days later and was doing well in subsequent visits to the outpatient department. The histopathological exam confirmed the diagnosis of a true congenital duplication cyst, which was lined by pseudostrati?ed ciliated columnar epithelium overlying double layers of thick bundles of smooth muscle ?bers. PMID:26674014

  2. True Intramural Esophageal Duplication Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Al-Riyami, Salim; Al-Sawafi, Yaqoob

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal duplication is the second most common site of gastrointestinal duplication and most cases present with complications. These complications include bleeding, infection, dysphagia, and dyspnea. We report an incidental case of a true intramural esophageal duplication cyst in a new military recruit. The patient was diagnosed in Armed Forces Hospital, Oman. The patient came for a pre-recruitment routine check-up, he was found to have a suspicious soft tissue lesion on chest X-ray. He was referred to the thoracic surgeon for further investigations. The investigations included computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging chest scans, barium swallow, endoscopy and, finally, an endoscopic ultrasound. All workup pointed to a diagnosis of esophageal duplication cyst; therefore, the decision was made to excise the lesion after discussion with the patient about the possible diagnosis and nature of the treatment. The cyst was completely excised thoracoscopically with uneventful recovery. The patient was discharged a few days later and was doing well in subsequent visits to the outpatient department. The histopathological exam confirmed the diagnosis of a true congenital duplication cyst, which was lined by pseudostrati?ed ciliated columnar epithelium overlying double layers of thick bundles of smooth muscle ?bers. PMID:26674014

  3. Radionuclide transit in esophageal varices

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, S.H.; Wang, S.J.; Wu, L.C.; Liu, R.S.; Tsai, Y.T.; Chiang, T.T.

    1985-05-01

    This study assessed esophageal motility in patients with esophageal varices by radionuclide transit studies. Data were acquired in list mode after an oral dose of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid in 10 ml of water in the supine position above a low-energy all-purpose collimator of a gamma camera. The condensed image (CI) superimposed with a centroid curve was also produced in each case. Twenty-five normal subjects (N) and 32 patients (pts) with esophageal varices by endoscopy (large varices in Grades IV and V in 8 and small varices in Grade III or less in 24) were studied. TMTT, RTT, RF, and RI were all significantly increased in pts as compared to N. Especially, the transit time for the middle third (6.7 +- 2.6 sec vs 3.5 +- 0.9 sec in N, rho < 0.005) had the optimal sensitivy and specificity of 88% each at the cutoff value of 4.2 sec as determined by ROC analysis. In summary, radionuclide transit disorders occur in the majority of pts with esopageal varices. The middle RTT and CI are both optimal in sensitivity and specificity for detecting the abnormalities.

  4. Pharmacologic influence on esophageal varices

    SciTech Connect

    Lunderquist, A.; Owman, T.; Alwmark, A.; Gullstrand, P.; Hall-Angeras, M.; Joelsson, B.; Tranberg, K.G.; Pettersson, K.I.

    1983-06-01

    Selective catherization of the left gastric vein was performed after percutaneous transhepatic portography (PTP) in patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices. Following the hypothesis that drugs increasing the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure may obstruct the variceal blood flow throught the lower esophagus, the effect of different drugs (i.e., intravenous injection of vasopressin, pentagastrin, domperidone and somatostatin and subcutaneous injection of metacholine) on the variceal blood flow was examined. Vasopressin did not change the variceal blood flow; pentagastrine, with its known effect of increasing the LES pressure produced a total interruption of the flow in four of eight patients; domperiodone, also known to increase the LES pressure obstructed the variceal blood flow in the only patient examined with this drug; somatostatin has no reported action on the LES but blocked the flow in one of two patients; and metacholine, reported to increase the LES pressure did not produce any change in the flow in the three patients examined. LES pressure was recorded before and during vasopressin infusion in seven patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices. No reaction on the pressure was found. The patient number in the study is small and the results are nonuniform but still they suggest that drugs increasing the LES tonus might be useful to control variceal blood flow.

  5. Orthometalation of dibenzo[1,2]quinoxaline with ruthenium(II/III), osmium(II/III/IV), and rhodium(III) ions and orthometalated [RuNO](6/7) derivatives.

    PubMed

    Maity, Suvendu; Kundu, Suman; Saha Roy, Amit; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Ghosh, Prasanta

    2015-02-16

    A new family of organometallics of ruthenium(II/III), osmium(II/III/IV), and rhodium(III) ions isolated from C-H activation reactions of dibenzo[1,2]quinoxaline (DBQ) using triphenylphosphine, carbonyl, and halides as coligands is reported. The CN-chelate complexes isolated are trans-[Ru(III)(DBQ)(PPh3)2Cl2] (1), trans-[Ru(II)(DBQ)(CO)(PPh3)2Cl] (2), trans-[Os(III)(DBQ)(PPh3)2Br2] (3), trans-[Os(II)(DBQ)(PPh3)2(CO)Br] (4), and trans-[Rh(III)(DBQ)(PPh3)2Cl2] (5). Reaction of 1 with NO affords trans-[Ru(DBQ)(NO)(PPh3)2Cl]Cl (6(+)Cl(-)), isoelectronic to 2, with a byproduct, [Ru(NO)(PPh3)2Cl3] (7). Complexes 1-5 and 6(+) were characterized by elemental analyses, mass, IR, NMR, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra including the single-crystal X-ray structure determinations of 1-3 and 5. The Ru(III)-C, Ru(II)-C, Os(III)-C, and Rh(III)-C lengths are 2.049(2), 2.074(3), 2.105(16), and 2.012(3) Ĺ in 1, 2, 3, and 5. In cyclic voltammetry, 2, 3, and 4 undergo oxidation at 0.59, 0.39, and 0.46 V, versus Fc(+)/Fc couple, to trans-[Ru(III)(DBQ)(CO)(PPh3)2Cl](+) (2(+)), trans-[Os(IV)(DBQ)(PPh3)2Br2](+) (3(+)), and trans-[Os(III)(DBQ)(CO)(PPh3)2Br](+) (4(+)) ions. Complex 3(+) incorporates an Os(IV)(d(4) ion)-C bond. The 6(+)/trans-[Ru(DBQ)(NO)(PPh3)2Cl] (6) reduction couple at -0.65 V is reversible. 2(+), 3(+), 4(+) and 6 were substantiated by spectroelectrochemical measurements, EPR spectra, and density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent (TD) DFT calculations. The frozen-glass EPR spectrum of the electrogenerated 6 exhibits hyperfine couplings due to (99,101)Ru and (14)N nuclei. DFT calculations on trans-[Os(III)(DBQ)(PMe3)2Br2] (3(Me)), St = 1/2 and trans-[Os(IV)(DBQ)(PMe3)2Br2](+) (3(Me+)), St = 0, trans-[Ru(DBQ)(NO)(PMe3)2Cl](+) (6(Me+)), St = 0 and trans-[Ru(DBQ)(NO)(PMe3)2Cl] (6(Me)), St = 1/2, authenticated a significant mixing between dOs and ?aromatic* orbitals, which stabilizes M(II/III/IV)-C bonds and the [RuNO](6) and [RuNO](7) states, respectively, in 6(+) and 6, which is defined as a hybrid state of trans-[Ru(II)(DBQ)(NO(•))(PPh3)2Cl] and trans-[Ru(I)(DBQ)(NO(+))(PPh3)2Cl] states. PMID:25602939

  6. Development of a Multicomponent Prediction Model for Acute Esophagitis in Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    De Ruyck, Kim; Sabbe, Nick; Oberije, Cary; Vandecasteele, Katrien; Thas, Olivier; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Lambin, Phillipe; Van Meerbeeck, Jan; De Neve, Wilfried; Thierens, Hubert

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To construct a model for the prediction of acute esophagitis in lung cancer patients receiving chemoradiotherapy by combining clinical data, treatment parameters, and genotyping profile. Patients and Methods: Data were available for 273 lung cancer patients treated with curative chemoradiotherapy. Clinical data included gender, age, World Health Organization performance score, nicotine use, diabetes, chronic disease, tumor type, tumor stage, lymph node stage, tumor location, and medical center. Treatment parameters included chemotherapy, surgery, radiotherapy technique, tumor dose, mean fractionation size, mean and maximal esophageal dose, and overall treatment time. A total of 332 genetic polymorphisms were considered in 112 candidate genes. The predicting model was achieved by lasso logistic regression for predictor selection, followed by classic logistic regression for unbiased estimation of the coefficients. Performance of the model was expressed as the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic and as the false-negative rate in the optimal point on the receiver operating characteristic curve. Results: A total of 110 patients (40%) developed acute esophagitis Grade {>=}2 (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0). The final model contained chemotherapy treatment, lymph node stage, mean esophageal dose, gender, overall treatment time, radiotherapy technique, rs2302535 (EGFR), rs16930129 (ENG), rs1131877 (TRAF3), and rs2230528 (ITGB2). The area under the curve was 0.87, and the false-negative rate was 16%. Conclusion: Prediction of acute esophagitis can be improved by combining clinical, treatment, and genetic factors. A multicomponent prediction model for acute esophagitis with a sensitivity of 84% was constructed with two clinical parameters, four treatment parameters, and four genetic polymorphisms.

  7. Clinical Application of Esophageal High-resolution Manometry in the Diagnosis of Esophageal Motility Disorders

    PubMed Central

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) is replacing conventional manometry in the clinical evaluation of patients with esophageal symptoms, especially dysphagia. The introduction of HRM gave rise to new objective metrics and recognizable patterns of esophageal motor function, requiring a new classification scheme: the Chicago classification. HRM measurements are more detailed and more easily performed compared to conventional manometry. The visual presentation of acquired data improved the analysis and interpretation of esophageal motor function. This led to a more sensitive, accurate, and objective analysis of esophageal motility. In this review we discuss how HRM changed the way we define and categorize esophageal motility disorders. Moreover, we discuss the clinical applications of HRM for each esophageal motility disorder separately. PMID:26631942

  8. High Resolution Microendoscopy for Quantitative Diagnosis of Esophageal Neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dongsuk

    Esophageal cancer is the eighth most common cancer in the world. Cancers of the esophagus account for 3.8% of all cases of cancers, with approximately 482,300 new cases reported in 2008 worldwide. In the United States alone, it is estimated that approximately 18,000 new cases will be diagnosed in 2013, and 15,210 deaths are expected. Despite advances in surgery and chemoradiation therapy, these advances have not led to a significant increase in survival rates, primarily because diagnosis often at an advanced and incurable stage when treatment is more difficult and less successful. Accurate, objective methods for early detection of esophageal neoplasia are needed. Here, quantitative classification algorithms for high resolution miscroendoscopic images were developed to distinguish between esophageal neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissue. A clinical study in 177 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) was performed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the classification algorithm in collaboration with the Mount Sinai Medical Center in the United States, the First Hospital of Jilin University in China, and the Cancer Institute and Hospital, the Chinese Academy of Medical Science in China. The study reported a sensitivity and specificity of 93% and 92%, respectively, in the training set, 87% and 97%, respectively, in the test set, and 84% and 95%, respectively, in an independent validation set. Another clinical study in 31 patients with Barrett's esophagus resulted in a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 85%. Finally, a compact, portable version of the high resolution microendoscopy (HRME) device using a consumer-grade camera was developed and a series of biomedical experimental studies were carried out to assess the capability of the device.

  9. General Information about Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cancer cells. The following stages are used for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus: Stage 0 (High-grade Dysplasia) ... is also called high-grade dysplasia . Stage I squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus Stage I is divided into ...

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Esophageal Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cancer cells. The following stages are used for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus: Stage 0 (High-grade Dysplasia) ... is also called high-grade dysplasia . Stage I squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus Stage I is divided into ...

  11. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  12. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  13. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  14. Acid Reflux Directly Causes Sleep Disturbances in Rat with Chronic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Kenichi; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Tsukahara, Takuya; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Shiba, Masatsugu; Tominaga, Kazunari; Watanabe, Toshio; Urade, Yoshihiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is strongly associated with sleep disturbances. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy improves subjective but not objective sleep parameters in patients with GERD. This study aimed to investigate the association between GERD and sleep, and the effect of PPI on sleep by using a rat model of chronic acid reflux esophagitis. Methods Acid reflux esophagitis was induced by ligating the transitional region between the forestomach and the glandular portion and then wrapping the duodenum near the pylorus. Rats underwent surgery for implantation of electrodes for electroencephalogram and electromyogram recordings, and they were transferred to a soundproof recording chamber. Polygraphic recordings were scored by using 10-s epochs for wake, rapid eye movement sleep, and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. To examine the role of acid reflux, rats were subcutaneously administered a PPI, omeprazole, at a dose of 20 mg/kg once daily. Results Rats with reflux esophagitis presented with several erosions, ulcers, and mucosal thickening with basal hyperplasia and marked inflammatory infiltration. The reflux esophagitis group showed a 34.0% increase in wake (232.2±11.4 min and 173.3±7.4 min in the reflux esophagitis and control groups, respectively; p<0.01) accompanied by a reduction in NREM sleep during light period, an increase in sleep fragmentation, and more frequent stage transitions. The use of omeprazole significantly improved sleep disturbances caused by reflux esophagitis, and this effect was not observed when the PPI was withdrawn. Conclusions Acid reflux directly causes sleep disturbances in rats with chronic esophagitis. PMID:25215524

  15. Radiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer in Japan: Results of the Patterns of Care Study 1999-2001

    SciTech Connect

    Kenjo, Masahiro Uno, Takashi; Murakami, Yuji; Nagata, Yasushi; Oguchi, Masahiko; Saito, Susumu; Numasaki, Hodaka; Teshima, Teruki; Mitsumori, Michihide

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To describe patient characteristics and the process of radiotherapy (RT) for patients with esophageal cancer treated between 1999 and 2001 in Japan. Methods and Materials: The Japanese Patterns of Care Study (PCS) Working Group conducted a third nationwide survey of 76 institutions. Detailed information was accumulated on 621 patients with thoracic esophageal cancer who received RT. Results: The median age of patients was 68 years. Eighty-eight percent were male, and 12% were female. Ninety-nine percent had squamous cell carcinoma histology. Fifty-five percent had the main lesion in the middle thoracic esophagus. Fourteen percent had clinical Stage 0-I disease, 32% had Stage IIA-IIB, 43% had Stage III, and 10% had Stage IV disease. Chemotherapy was given to 63% of patients; 39% received definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) without surgery and 24% pre- or postoperative CRT. Sixty-two percent of the patients aged {>=}75 years were treated with RT only. Median total dose of external RT was 60 Gy for definitive CRT patients, 60 Gy for RT alone, and 40 Gy for preoperative CRT. Conclusions: This PCS describes general aspects of RT for esophageal cancer in Japan. Squamous cell carcinoma accounted for the majority of patients. The standard total external RT dose for esophageal cancer was higher in Japan than in the United States. Chemoradiotherapy had become common for esophageal cancer treatment, but patients aged {>=}75 years were more likely to be treated by RT only.

  16. The efficacy and toxicities of combined lobaplatin with paclitaxel as a first-line chemotherapy for advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Qiu; Chen, Cheng; Lu, Hai-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Background To assess the efficacy and toxicities of combined lobaplatin with paclitaxel (LP) as a first line chemotherapy in esophageal cancer. Methods The clinical data of 45 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma treated initially with lobaplatin-paclitaxel chemotherapy were collected and reviewed retrospectively. The overall response, treatment toxicities and dysphagia relief were analyzed with SPSS software. Results The overall response rate was 42.2%, with 1 patient (2.2%) showing complete remission, 18 patients (40.0%) with partial remission, 19 (42.2%) with stable disease (SD), and 7 (15.6%) with progressive disease, respectively. The most common hematological toxicity was leucopenia with grade 0, I, II, III and IV in 16 (35.6%), 10 (22.2%), 11 (24.4%), 7 (15.6%), and 1 patient (2.2%), respectively. Thirty-seven patients (82.2%) experienced grade I-II nausea/vomiting without grade III-IV instances occurring. Four patients (8.9%) experienced grade I hepatotoxicity. No nephrotoxicity was observed. Five in thirteen patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) suffered severe radiation pneumonitis. The dysphagia resolved or improved in 32 patients (71%). Conclusions Lobaplatin-paclitaxel showed a significant antitumor effect to squamous esophageal cancer with manageable toxicities. Limitation of the surveillance time and the retrospective nature, the effect that based on these data formal prospective trials appear warranted and are needed prior to routine first line use of this regimen.

  17. Flap flexibility amongst plasmepsins I, II, III, IV, and V: Sequence, structural, and molecular dynamics analyses.

    PubMed

    McGillewie, Lara; Soliman, Mahmoud E

    2015-09-01

    Herein, for the first time, we comparatively report the opening and closing of apo plasmepsin I - V. Plasmepsins belong the aspartic protease family of enzymes, and are expressed during the various stages of the P. falciparum lifecycle, the species responsible for the most lethal and virulent malaria to infect humans. Plasmepsin I, II, IV and HAP degrade hemoglobin from infected red blood cells, whereas plasmepsin V transport proteins crucial to the survival of the malaria parasite across the endoplasmic reticulum. Flap-structures covering the active site of aspartic proteases (such as HIV protease) are crucial to the conformational flexibility and dynamics of the protein, and ultimately control the binding landscape. The flap-structure in plasmepsins is made up of a flip tip in the N-terminal lying perpendicular to the active site, adjacent to the flexible loop region in the C-terminal. Using molecular dynamics, we propose three parameters to better describe the opening and closing of the flap-structure in apo plasmepsins. Namely, the distance, d1, between the flap tip and the flexible region; the dihedral angle, ?, to account for the twisting motion; and the TriC? angle, ?1. Simulations have shown that as the flap-structure twists, the flap and flexible region move apart opening the active site, or move toward each other closing the active site. The data from our study indicate that of all the plasmepsins investigated in the present study, Plm IV and V display the highest conformational flexibility and are more dynamic structures versus Plm I, II, and HAP. PMID:26146842

  18. Phase-contrast X-ray CT Imaging of Esophagus and Esophageal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianfa; Tian, Dongping; Lin, Runhua; zhou, Guangzhao; Peng, Guanyun; Su, Min

    2014-01-01

    The electron density resolution is 1000 times higher for synchrotron-radiation phase-contrast CT imaging than conventional X-ray absorption imaging in light elements, with which high-resolution X-ray imaging of biological soft tissue can be achieved. In the present study, we used phase-contrast X-ray CT to investigate human resected esophagus and esophageal carcinoma specimens. This technology revealed the three-layer structure of the esophageal wall-- mucous, submucosa and muscular layers. The mucous and muscular layers were clearly separated by a loose submucosa layer with a honeycomb appearance. The surface of the mucous layer was smooth. In esophageal carcinoma, because of tumor tissue infiltration, the submucosa layer was absent, which indicated destruction of the submucosa. The boundary between normal tissue and tumor was comparatively fuzzy, the three-layer structure of the esophageal wall was indistinct. The surface of the mucous layer was rugose. The technology might be helpful in tumor staging of esophageal carcinoma. PMID:24939041

  19. Association of esophageal candidiasis and squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Delsing, C.E.; Bleeker-Rovers, C.P.; van de Veerdonk, F.L.; Tol, J.; van der Meer, J.W.M.; Kullberg, B.J.; Netea, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic esophageal candidiasis is an infection that is mostly seen in immunocompromised conditions, among which is chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC). Recently an association between CMC and esophageal carcinoma has been reported. Here we present two patients with chronic esophageal candidiasis who developed esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and we discuss the etiologic role of Candida-induced nitrosamine production, the loss of STAT1 function and impaired tumor surveillance and T-lymphocyte function in the development of esophageal carcinoma. PMID:24371724

  20. Meta-Analysis of Prognostic and Clinical Significance of CD44v6 in Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bangli; Luo, Wei; Hu, Rui-Ting; Zhou, You; Qin, Shan-Yu; Jiang, Hai-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract CD44v6 is a cell adhesion molecule that plays an important role in the development and progression of esophageal cancer. However, the prognostic value and clinical significance of CD44v6 in esophageal cancer remains controversial. In the present study, we aimed to clarify these relationships through a meta-analysis. We performed a comprehensive search of studies from PubMed, EMBASE, Ovid library database, Google scholar, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure databases that were published before June 2015. The odds ratio (OR) and pooled hazard ratio (HR) with the 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to estimate the effects. Twenty-one studies including 1504 patients with esophageal cancer were selected to assess the prognostic value and clinical significance of CD44v6 in these patients. The results showed that the expression of CD44v6 was higher in esophageal cancer tissue than in normal colorectal tissue (OR?=?9.19, 95% CI?=?6.30–13.42). Moreover, expression of CD44v6 was higher in patients with lymphoid nodal metastasis, compared to those without (OR?=?6.91, 95% CI?=?4.81–9.93). The pooled results showed that CD44v6 was associated with survival in patients with esophageal cancer (HR?=?2.47, 95% CI?=?1.56–3.92). No significant difference in CD44v6 expression was found in patients with different histological types and tumor stages (both P?>?0.05). Moreover, no publication bias was found among the studies (all P?>?0.05). This meta-analysis demonstrates that CD44v6 is associated with the metastasis of esophageal cancer and a poor prognosis, but is not associated with the histological types and tumor stages. PMID:26252284

  1. Flexible selection of a single treatment incorporating short-term endpoint information in a phase II/III clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Stallard, Nigel; Kunz, Cornelia Ursula; Todd, Susan; Parsons, Nicholas; Friede, Tim

    2015-10-15

    Seamless phase II/III clinical trials in which an experimental treatment is selected at an interim analysis have been the focus of much recent research interest. Many of the methods proposed are based on the group sequential approach. This paper considers designs of this type in which the treatment selection can be based on short-term endpoint information for more patients than have primary endpoint data available. We show that in such a case, the familywise type I error rate may be inflated if previously proposed group sequential methods are used and the treatment selection rule is not specified in advance. A method is proposed to avoid this inflation by considering the treatment selection that maximises the conditional error given the data available at the interim analysis. A simulation study is reported that illustrates the type I error rate inflation and compares the power of the new approach with two other methods: a combination testing approach and a group sequential method that does not use the short-term endpoint data, both of which also strongly control the type I error rate. The new method is also illustrated through application to a study in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26112909

  2. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy using paclitaxel plus cisplatin in the treatment of elderly patients with esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tao; Zhang, Xuebang; Fang, Min; Wu, Shixiu

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed at assessing the efficiency and safety of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) using paclitaxel (PTX) plus cisplatin (CDDP) in elderly (age ?70 years) esophageal cancer patients. Patients and methods Between July 2008 and June 2011, 82 esophageal cancer patients aged ?70 years were retrospectively analyzed. Chemotherapy consisted of CDDP for 3 days plus PTX given for 3 hours. The preplanned total dose of concurrent irradiation with 60 Gy/30 Fx was given at the 1st day of chemotherapy. Results The average age for the enrolled patients was 76.41 years (range: 70–87 years), and the clinical stages were stage I (two patients), stage II (23 patients), stage III (49 patients), and stage IV (eight patients). A total of 66 patients finished CCRT on schedule, including 55 (67.1%) patients in whom treatment regimen was not changed, and the clinical complete response was achieved in 29 patients. With a median follow-up time of 20.4 months, the median overall survival (OS) time and progression-free survival (PFS) time were 26.9 months and 18.2 months, respectively. The 2-year OS and PFS rates for stage I–II and III–IV were 76.0%, 64.0% and 38.6%, 21.2%, respectively. Grade ?3 leukopenia was observed in 25 patients, and the most common nonhematologic toxicity was esophagitis including five and two patients with grade 3 and 4, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that clinical stage was a strong factor for OS and PFS. Conclusion CCRT using PTX plus CDDP for selected elderly esophageal cancer patients resulted in encouraging survival outcomes and tolerable toxicities. Future prospective studies in large cohorts are highly warranted to confirm the findings in our report. PMID:26543377

  3. [Diffuse esophageal leiomyomatosis. Apropos of 3 cases].

    PubMed

    Heloury, Y; Borgne, J L; Babut, J M; David, A; Guyot, C; Fremont, B; Le Neel, J C

    1990-01-01

    Three cases of diffuse esophageal leiomyomatosis are discussed. Two of these are familial one, the mother being affected. These familial cases can occur in association with Alport's syndrome. The occurrence of a case of esophageal leiomyomatosis imply a familial survey and the search of a renal or ocular disease. The surgical treatment of this affection in sub total oesophagectomy with esophageal substitution (with the colon especially). The long term prognosis is unknown, with the risk of renal failure if Alport's syndrome is associated or of other leiomyomatous localisation. PMID:2386998

  4. Esophageal Melanocytosis in Oral Opium Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Geramizadeh, Bita; Asadian, Fatemeh; Taghavi, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal melanocytosis is a rare and benign condition, characterized by melanocytic proliferation of the esophageal squamous epithelium with heavy melanin deposition. The etiology and pathogenesis has not been exactly known but it seems to be a chronic stimulus such as gastroesophageal reflux. This condition is very rare and about 35 cases have been reported so far, most of which have been from India and Japan. Herein, we present a case of esophageal melanocytosis in a patient with long history of oral opium consumption. To the best of our knowledge, such a history has not been reported. PMID:24719715

  5. Photodynamic therapy of early esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Filonenko, Elena V; Sokolov, Victor V; Chissov, Valery I; Lukyanets, Evgeny A; Vorozhtsov, Georgy N

    2008-09-01

    In 1992-2006 at P.A. Hertsen Moscow Oncology Research Institute photodynamic therapy (PDT) was performed in 48 esophageal cancer patients (total 48 lesions). For PDT we used Russian photosensitizers (Photogem, Photosens, Radachlorin, Alasens), Russian diode lasers (Crystall) and endoscopic equipment. As a result of PDT complete regression was in 77% of esophageal cancer lesions, partial regression was in 23%. The follow-up period was 3-11 years. Median of survival was in 4.59 years of esophageal cancer patient. PMID:19356654

  6. Esophageal ESD: technique and prevention of complications.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Tsuneo

    2014-04-01

    The advantage of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is the ability to achieve high R0 resection, providing low local recurrence rate. Esophageal ESD is technically more difficult than gastric ESD due to the narrower space of the esophagus for endoscopic maneuvers. Also, the risk of perforation is higher because of the thin muscle layer of the esophageal wall. Blind dissection should be avoided to prevent perforation. A clip with line method is useful to keep a good endoscopic view with countertraction. Only an operator who has adequate skill should perform esophageal ESD. PMID:24679232

  7. High expression of the stem cell marker nestin is an adverse prognostic factor in WHO grade II-III astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Foong, Chan; Raisanen, Jack M.; Oliver, Dwight; Hiemenz, Matthew C.; Burns, Dennis K.; White, Charles L.; Whitworth, L. Anthony; Mickey, Bruce; Stegner, Martha; Habib, Amyn A.; Fink, Karen; Maher, Elizabeth A.; Bachoo, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Infiltrating astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas of low to anaplastic grade (WHO grades II and III), in spite of being associated with a wide range of clinical outcomes, can be difficult to subclassify and grade by the current histopathologic criteria. Unlike oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas that can be identified by the 1p/19q codeletion and the more malignant glioblastomas (WHO grade IV astrocytomas) that can be diagnosed solely based on objective features on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections, no such objective criteria exist for the subclassification of grade II-III astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas (A+OA II-III). In this study, we evaluated the prognostic and predictive value of the stem cell marker nestin in adult A+OA II-III (n=50) using immunohistochemistry and computer-assisted analysis on tissue microarrays. In addition, the correlation between nestin mRNA level and total survival was analyzed in the NCI Rembrandt database. The results showed that high nestin expression is a strong adverse prognostic factor for total survival (p=0.0004). The strength of the correlation was comparable to but independent of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 (IDH 1/2) mutation status. Histopathological grading and subclassification did not correlate significantly with outcome, although the interpretation of this finding is limited by the fact that grade III tumors were treated more aggressively than grade II tumors. These results suggest that nestin level and IDH 1/2 mutation status are strong prognostic features in A+OA II-III and possibly more helpful for treatment planning than routine histopathological variables such as oligodendroglial component (astrocytoma vs. oligoastrocytoma) and WHO grade (grade II vs. III). PMID:24519516

  8. Esophageal stenosis with sloughing esophagitis: A curious manifestation of graft-vs-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Trabulo, Daniel; Ferreira, Sara; Lage, Pedro; Rego, Rafaela Lima; Teixeira, Gilda; Pereira, A Dias

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 56-year-old woman with a history of allogenic bone marrow transplantation for two years, complaining with dysphagia and weight loss. Upper endoscopy revealed esophageal stenosis and extensive mucosa sloughing. Biopsies confirmed the diagnosis of graft-vs-host disease (GVHD). Balloon dilation, corticosteroids and cyclosporin resulted in marked clinical improvement. Gastrointestinal tract is involved in the majority of patients with chronic GVHD. Esophageal manifestations are rare and include vesiculobullous disease, ulceration, esophageal webs, casts or strictures. Sloughing esophagitis along with severe stenosis requiring endoscopic dilation has never been reported in this context. PMID:26290649

  9. Altered skeletal muscle insulin signaling and mitochondrial complex II-III linked activity in adult offspring of obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Shelley, Piran; Martin-Gronert, Malgorzata S.; Rowlerson, Anthea; Poston, Lucilla; Heales, S. J. R.; Hargreaves, Iain P.; McConnell, Josie M.; Ozanne, Susan E.; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S.

    2009-01-01

    We recently reported insulin resistance in adult offspring of obese C57BL/6J mice. We have now evaluated whether parameters of skeletal muscle structure and function may play a role in insulin resistance in this model of developmental programming. Obesity was induced in female mice by feeding a highly palatable sugar and fat-rich diet for 6 wk prior to pregnancy, and during pregnancy and lactation. Offspring of obese dams were weaned onto standard laboratory chow. At 3 mo of age, skeletal muscle insulin signaling protein expression, mitochondrial electron transport chain activity (ETC), muscle fiber type, fiber density, and fiber cross-sectional area were compared with that of offspring of control dams weaned onto the chow diet. Female offspring of obese dams demonstrated decreased skeletal muscle expression of p110?, the catalytic subunit of PI3K (P < 0.01), as well as reduced Akt phosphorylation at Serine residue 473 compared with control offspring. Male offspring of obese dams demonstrated increased skeletal muscle Akt2 and PKC? expression (P < 0.01; P < 0.001, respectively). A decrease in mitochondrial-linked complex II-III was observed in male offspring of obese dams (P < 0.01), which was unrelated to CoQ deficiency. This was not observed in females. There were no differences in muscle fiber density between offspring of obese dams and control offspring in either sex. Sex-related alterations in key insulin-signaling proteins and in mitochondrial ETC may contribute to a state of insulin resistance in offspring of obese mice. PMID:19535678

  10. Darier's Disease with Esophageal Involvement.

    PubMed

    Baba, Atsunori; Yonekura, Kentaro; Takeda, Koichiro; Kawai, Kazuhiro; Kanekura, Takuro

    2015-09-01

    We report the case of a Japanese man with Darier's disease (DD) that affected the esophagus as well as the skin. A 49-year-old man, who was diagnosed with DD 19 years earlier, visited us again in October 2008 because his skin lesions had exacerbated. Physical examination revealed reddish-brown crusted follicular papules mostly coalesced to produce irregularly-shaped warty plaques on his trunk, hip, upper and lower limbs, and scalp (Figure 1, a, b). Skin biopsy taken from the hip showed hyperkeratosis, papillomatosis, and suprabasal acantholysis with lacunae formation (Figure 1, c). The diagnosis of DD was confirmed and treatment with etretinate at 20 mg daily was started. The dose was increased to 50 mg 22 days later because his skin lesions failed to respond to the initial dose. When the dose was tapered to 20 mg after 2 months, painful erosions appeared on the hip. Tzanck smear testing showed balloon cells, and the serum level of Immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody against herpes simplex virus (HSV) was elevated. The erosion was successfully treated with intravenous acyclovir (750 mg/day for 5 consecutive days). The oral administration of valaciclovir (500 mg/day) was continued as prophylaxis against the recurrence of HSV infection. While the disease was well managed with 20 mg etretinate/day, the patient experienced aggravation in April 2010 and painful swallowing in September 2010. Gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed multiple hyperkeratotic lesions in the middle of the esophagus (Figure 2, a). A biopsy showed histology similar to lesions on the skin including acantholysis and lacunae formation (Figure 2, b). Immunostaining did not detect either HSV-1, HSV-2, or human papilloma virus (HPV) in the esophageal mucosa. The skin lesions improved but the esophageal lesions persisted unchanged 8 months after increasing the daily dose of etretinate to 40 mg. DD is a rare autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by abnormal keratinization that primarily affects the skin. A total of 8 cases of DD affecting the esophagus have been reported previously (1-6). Several important issues emerged from our experience and literature review. Firstly, DD predisposes to infections with HSV, varicella-zoster virus (VZV), HPV, and pox virus (7,8). HSV infection was diagnosed in 1 of 8 previously-reported cases of esophageal DD. In one case, a 20-year-old man had severe thoracic pain; his esophageal lesion was immunohistochemically positive for HSV type I, and acyclovir treatment produced an early clinical response (6). In our case, HSV was detected in the cutaneous lesions but not the esophagus; esophageal lesions developed and persisted during the administration of acyclovir or valacicrovir. Although a partial immune-deficiency has been proposed as causative in some reports, no specific immune function anomaly has been demonstrated (6,7). It is possible that suprabasal acantholysis, a characteristic histological feature of DD, may provide a favorable environment for viral infections and result in innate host defense system deficiencies (8). Secondly, there is a hypothetical association between DD and malignant neoplasms. Among patients with DD, one patient with the esophageal form developed squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (4). DD is attributed to a null-mutation in the ATP2A2 gene encoding the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase isoform 2 (SERCA2) (9). The functional association of the ATP2A2 gene mutation with the development of SCC has been demonstrated. Mice with a single functional Atp2a2 allele, a mouse homolog of ATP2A2, manifested reduced levels of SERCA2; subsequent perturbations in calcium homeostasis or signaling served as a primary initiating event in the development of SCC. Heterozygous mutant Atp2a2 (+/-) mice developed SCC in the skin, oral mucosa, and esophagus where SERCA2 protein levels were decreased (10). We reported a rare case of DD with esophageal involvement and encourage dermatologists to be alert to viral infections and the possible development of cancer in patients with DD. PMID:26476908

  11. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis. (a) Identification...plastic, metal, or polymeric material that is intended to be implanted to restore the structure and/or function of the...

  12. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  13. Management of refractory and complicated reflux esophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Hirschowitz, B. I.

    1996-01-01

    Simple intermittent heartburn with minor or no esophagitis can be treated with simple measures including lifestyle changes and antacids as needed, or H2 receptor antagonists (H2RA), and has a good outcome. Problematic reflux includes resistance to therapy, stricture, Barrett's esophagus and aspiration. Severe reflux esophagitis, often resistant to H2RA therapy, requires more potent treatment with potent acid suppression using proton pump inhibitors, often indefinitely. When complicated by stricture, dilatations with potent acid suppression are needed. Barrett's esophagus is subject to esophagitis, which is no more difficult to treat than other cases of esophagitis. Reflux in Barrett's esophagus should be treated on its own merits without regard to the presence of Barrett's epithelium. Dysplasia leading to adenocarcinoma is a different problem, apparently not influenced by reduced exposure to acid. Indications for antireflux surgery are quite limited and should be carefully analyzed as a cost/risk/benefit problem. PMID:9165696

  14. Tissue engineering: an option for esophageal replacement?

    PubMed

    Zani, Augusto; Pierro, Agostino; Elvassore, Nicola; De Coppi, Paolo

    2009-02-01

    Esophageal replacement is required in several pediatric surgical conditions, like long-gap esophageal atresia. Although several techniques have been described to bridge the gap, all of them could be followed by postoperative complications. Esophageal tissue engineering could represent a valid alternative thanks to the recent advances in biomaterial science and cellular biology. Numerous attempts to shape a new esophagus in vitro have been described in the last decade. Herein, we review the main studies on the experimental use of nonabsorbable and absorbable materials as well as the development of cellularized patches. Furthermore, we describe the future perspectives of esophageal tissue engineering characterized by the use of stem cells seeded on new biopolymers. This opens to the construction of a functional allograft that could allow an anatomical replacement that grows with the children and does not severely impair their anatomy. PMID:19103424

  15. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis... of a plastic, metal, or polymeric material that is intended to be implanted to restore the...

  16. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis... of a plastic, metal, or polymeric material that is intended to be implanted to restore the...

  17. Scintigraphic demonstration of tracheo-esophageal fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, E.K.; Man, A.C.; Lin, K.J.; Kaufman, H.D.; Solomon, N.A.

    1983-12-01

    A tracheo-esophageal fistula, developed following radiotherapy for an esophageal carcinoma, was vividly demonstrated by radionuclide imaging. The abnormality was later confirmed by a barium esophagram and endoscopic examinations. The scintigraphic procedure, making use of a Tc-99m sulfur colloid swallow, appears to be a simple alternative method use of a Tc-99m sulfur colloid swallow, appears to be a simple alternative method that may be clinically useful for the diagnosis of such a condition.

  18. Brain abscess following dilatation of esophageal stricture.

    PubMed

    Harp, D L; Schlitt, M; Williams, J P; Shamoun, J M

    1989-06-01

    A case of right parietal abscess following esophageal dilatation for peptic stricture secondary to hiatus hernia with reflux in an 18-month-old male child is reported. Prior cases of brain abscess following esophageal dilatation are reviewed. The combination of history, clinical findings, and computed tomography scan in the current case allowed confident preoperative diagnosis of brain abscess and allowed emergency treatment of the lesion by simple aspiration through a burr hole. PMID:2670145

  19. Magnetic lower esophageal sphincter augmentation device removal.

    PubMed

    Harnsberger, Cristina R; Broderick, Ryan C; Fuchs, Hans F; Berducci, Martin; Beck, Catherine; Gallo, Alberto; Jacobsen, Garth R; Sandler, Bryan J; Horgan, Santiago

    2015-04-01

    Implantation of a magnetic lower esophageal sphincter augmentation device is now an alternative to fundoplication in the surgical management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Although successful management of GERD has been reported following placement of the device, there are instances when device removal is needed. The details of the technique for laparoscopic magnetic lower esophageal sphincter device removal are presented to assist surgeons should device removal become necessary. PMID:25119542

  20. Analysis of the correlation between P53 and Cox-2 expression and prognosis in esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, JUN; WU, FANG; PEI, HONG-LEI; GU, WEN-DONG; NING, ZHONG-HUA; SHAO, YING-JIE; HUANG, JIN

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the importance of P53 and Cox-2 protein expression in esophageal cancer and assess their influence on prognosis. The expression of P53 and Cox-2 was assessed in esophageal cancer samples from 195 patients subjected to radical surgery at Changzhou First People's Hospital (Changzhou, China) between May 2010 and December 2011. Expression of P53 and Cox-2 proteins were detected in 60.5% (118/195) and 69.7% (136/195) of the samples, respectively, and were co-expressed in 43.1% (84/195) of the samples. A correlation was identified between P53 expression and overall survival (OS) (P=0.0351) as well as disease-free survival (DFS) (P=0.0307). In addition, the co-expression of P53 and Cox-2 also correlated with OS (P=0.0040) and DFS (P=0.0042). P53 expression (P=0.023), TNM staging (P<0.001) and P53/Cox-2 co-expression (P=0.009) were identified as independent factors affecting OS in patients with esophageal cancer via a Cox multivariate regression model analysis. A similar analysis also identified P53 expression (P=0.020), TNM staging (P<0.001) and P53/Cox-2 co-expression (P=0.008) as independent prognostic factors influencing DFS in these patients. Binary logistic regression analysis demonstrated a correlation between P53 expression (P=0.012), TNM staging (P<0.001), tumor differentiation level (P=0.023) and P53/Cox-2 co-expression (P=0.021), and local recurrence or distant esophageal cancer metastasis. The results of the present study indicate that P53 and Cox-2 proteins may act synergistically in the development of esophageal cancer, and the assessment of P53/Cox-2 co-expression status in esophageal cancer biopsies may become an important diagnostic criterion to evaluate the prognosis of patients with esophageal cancer.

  1. Phase II/III multicentre randomised controlled trial evaluating a strategy of primary surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy versus peri-operative chemotherapy for resectable gastric signet ring cell adenocarcinomas – PRODIGE 19 – FFCD1103 – ADCI002

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A dramatic increase in the incidence of the diffuse form of gastric adenocarcinomas and particularly signet ring cell carcinomas has been observed in Western countries. Evidence is accruing that signet ring cell carcinomas may have inherent chemo resistance leaving many clinicians unsure of the benefits of delaying surgery to pursue a neoadjuvant approach. Methods/design PRODIGE-19-FFCD1103-ADCI002 is a prospective multicentre controlled randomised phase II/III trial comparing current standard of care of perioperative chemotherapy (2x3 cycles of Epirubicin, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil) with a strategy of primary surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy (6 cycles of Epirubicin, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil) in patients with a stage IB-III gastric signet ring cell tumour. The principal objective of the phase II study (84 patients) is to determine if the experimental arm (primary surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy) has sufficient interest in terms of percentage of living patients at 24 months to be evaluated in a phase III trial. If 7 or less patients in the experimental arm are alive at 24 months, phase III will not be initiated. The primary objective of phase III (230 additional patients) is to demonstrate superiority of the experimental arm in terms of overall survival. Secondary endpoints include overall survival at 36 months, disease free survival at 24 and 36 months, R0 resection rates, treatment tolerance, postoperative mortality and morbidity evaluated by Clavien-Dindo severity index, the prognostic impact of positive peritoneal cytology and the assessment of quality of life. An ancillary study will assess the emotional and cognitive impact of surgery and perioperative chemotherapy for both the patient and their partner. Discussion As inherent chemo resistance of signet ring cell tumours and delay in definitive surgery may favour tumour progression we hypothesise that a policy of primary surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy will improve overall survival compared to a standard perioperative chemotherapeutic strategy. This randomised phase II/III trial is the first dedicated to this histological subtype. Whilst the development of new biomarkers and targeted therapies are awaited, the results of this trial should further help in devising individualised protocols of patient care in a tumour group whose diversity increasingly demands assessment of alternative strategies. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01717924 PMID:23758655

  2. Transabdominal approach assisted by thoracoscopic drainage for lower esophageal perforation

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Harufumi; Azuma, Masaki; Kanamaru, Hitoshi; Nishiyama, Motohiro; Okamoto, Kazuya; Shimamura, Takahiro; Kyo, Kennoki; Maema, Atsushi; Nakamura, Toshio; Shirakawa, Motoaki; Yokoyama, Hidetaro

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of use of thoracoscopy for esophageal perforation has not been fully evaluated. We herein report a case of esophageal perforation for which a transabdominal approach assisted by thoracoscopic drainage was performed. PMID:26628716

  3. STATISTICAL APPROACH TO VOICE QUALITY CONTROL IN ESOPHAGEAL SPEECH ENHANCEMENT

    E-print Network

    Duh, Kevin

    STATISTICAL APPROACH TO VOICE QUALITY CONTROL IN ESOPHAGEAL SPEECH ENHANCEMENT Kenzo Yamamoto This paper describes a voice quality control method in statistical esophageal speech enhancement. Esophageal-to-Speech using regression techniques to make it possible to manually control the converted voice quality

  4. Strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors on pyramidal neurons in layers II/III of the mouse prefrontal cortex are tonically activated

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Neil L.

    2014-01-01

    Processing of signals within the cerebral cortex requires integration of synaptic inputs and a coordination between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. In addition to the classic form of synaptic inhibition, another important mechanism that can regulate neuronal excitability is tonic inhibition via sustained activation of receptors by ambient levels of inhibitory neurotransmitter, usually GABA. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this occurs in layer II/III pyramidal neurons (PNs) in the prelimbic region of the mouse medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). We found that these neurons respond to exogenous GABA and to the ?4?-containing GABAA receptor (GABAAR)-selective agonist gaboxadol, consistent with the presence of extrasynaptic GABAAR populations. Spontaneous and miniature synaptic currents were blocked by the GABAAR antagonist gabazine and had fast decay kinetics, consistent with typical synaptic GABAARs. Very few layer II/III neurons showed a baseline current shift in response to gabazine, but almost all showed a current shift (15–25 pA) in response to picrotoxin. In addition to being a noncompetitive antagonist at GABAARs, picrotoxin also blocks homomeric glycine receptors (GlyRs). Application of the GlyR antagonist strychnine caused a modest but consistent shift (?15 pA) in membrane current, without affecting spontaneous synaptic events, consistent with the tonic activation of GlyRs. Further investigation showed that these neurons respond in a concentration-dependent manner to glycine and taurine. Inhibition of glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1) with sarcosine resulted in an inward current and an increase of the strychnine-sensitive current. Our data demonstrate the existence of functional GlyRs in layer II/III of the mPFC and a role for these receptors in tonic inhibition that can have an important influence on mPFC excitability and signal processing. PMID:24872538

  5. Voluntary exercise partially reverses neonatal alcohol-induced deficits in mPFC layer II/III dendritic morphology of male adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, G F; Criss, K J; Klintsova, A Y

    2015-08-01

    Developmental alcohol exposure in humans can produce a wide range of deficits collectively referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). FASD-related impairments in executive functioning later in life suggest long-term damage to the prefrontal cortex (PFC). In rodent neonates, moderate to high levels of alcohol exposure decreased frontal lobe brain size and altered medial PFC pyramidal neuron dendritic morphology. Previous research in our lab demonstrated that neonatal alcohol exposure decreased basilar dendritic complexity but did not affect spine density in Layer II/III pyramidal neurons in 26- to 30-day-old rats. The current study adds to the literature by evaluating the effect of neonatal alcohol exposure on mPFC Layer II/III basilar dendritic morphology in adolescent male rats. Additionally, it examines the potential for voluntary exercise to mitigate alcohol-induced deficits on mPFC dendritic complexity. An animal model of binge drinking during the third trimester of pregnancy was used. Rats were intubated with alcohol (alcohol-exposed, AE; 5.25 g kg(-1) day(-1)) on postnatal days (PD) 4-9; two control groups were included (suckle control and sham-intubated). Rats were anesthetized and perfused with heparinized saline solution on PD 42, and brains were processed for Golgi-Cox staining. Developmental alcohol exposure decreased spine density and dendritic complexity of basilar dendrites of Layer II/III neurons in the medial PFC (mPFC) compared to dendrites of control animals. Voluntary exercise increased spine density and dendritic length in AE animals resulting in elimination of the differences between AE and SH rats. Thus, voluntary exercise during early adolescence selectively rescued alcohol-induced morphological deficits in the mPFC. PMID:25967699

  6. The II-III loop of the skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptor is responsible for the Bi-directional coupling with the ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Grabner, M; Dirksen, R T; Suda, N; Beam, K G

    1999-07-30

    The dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR) in the skeletal muscle plasmalemma functions as both voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel and voltage sensor for excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. As voltage sensor, the DHPR regulates intracellular Ca(2+) release via the skeletal isoform of the ryanodine receptor (RyR-1). Interaction with RyR-1 also feeds back to increase the Ca(2+) current mediated by the DHPR. To identify regions of the DHPR important for receiving this signal from RyR-1, we expressed in dysgenic myotubes a chimera (SkLC) having skeletal (Sk) DHPR sequence except for a cardiac (C) II-III loop (L). Tagging with green fluorescent protein (GFP) enabled identification of expressing myotubes. Dysgenic myotubes expressing GFP-SkLC or SkLC lacked EC coupling and had very small Ca(2+) currents. Introducing a short skeletal segment (alpha(1S) residues 720-765) into the cardiac II-III loop (replacing alpha(1C) residues 851-896) of GFP-SkLC restored both EC coupling and Ca(2+) current densities like those of the wild type skeletal DHPR. This 46-amino acid stretch of skeletal sequence was recently shown to be capable of transferring strong, skeletal-type EC coupling to an otherwise cardiac DHPR (Nakai, J., Tanabe, T., Konno, T., Adams, B., and Beam, K.G. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 24983-24986). Thus, this segment of the skeletal II-III loop contains a motif required for both skeletal-type EC coupling and RyR-1-mediated enhancement of Ca(2+) current. PMID:10419512

  7. Esophageal Cancer: Insights From Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Tétreault, Marie-Pier

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the eighth leading cause of cancer and the sixth most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Despite recent advances in the development of surgical techniques in combination with the use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the prognosis for esophageal cancer remains poor. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that drive the pathogenesis of esophageal cancer are still poorly understood. Hence, understanding these mechanisms is crucial to improving outcomes for patients with esophageal cancer. Mouse models constitute valuable tools for modeling human cancers and for the preclinical testing of therapeutic strategies in a manner not possible in human subjects. Mice are excellent models for studying human cancers because they are similar to humans at the physiological and molecular levels and because they have a shorter gestation time and life cycle. Moreover, a wide range of well-developed technologies for introducing genetic modifications into mice are currently available. In this review, we describe how different mouse models are used to study esophageal cancer. PMID:26380556

  8. Incidence and specificity of antibodies to types I, II, III, IV, and V collagen in rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases as measured by 125I-radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, J.M.; Huffstutter, E.H.; Townes, A.S.; Kang, A.H.

    1983-07-01

    Antibodies to human native and denatured types I, II, III, IV, and V collagens were measured using 125I-radioimmunoassay. Mean levels of binding by sera from 30 rheumatoid arthritis patients were significantly higher than those from 20 normal subjects against all of the collagens tested. The relative antibody concentration was higher in synovial fluid than in simultaneously obtained serum. Many patients with gout or various other rheumatic diseases also had detectable anticollagen antibodies. With a few notable exceptions, the majority of the reactivity detected in all patient groups was directed against covalent structural determinants present on all of the denatured collagens, suggesting a secondary reaction to tissue injury.

  9. Expression and mechanism of PinX1 and telomerase activity in the carcinogenesis of esophageal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Jing; Wang, Da-Hu; Zhang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Liang; Liu, Feng-Ling; Liu, Wei

    2013-10-01

    Esophageal tissues were collected from an esophageal carcinoma high-risk area of China and were used to detect the telomere length and the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) by immuhistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization; esophageal carcinoma tissues, paired-adjacent mucosa and paired normal mucosa were obtained from resected surgical specimens of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in order to determine telomerase activity and expression of hTERT and Pin2/TRF1 interacting protein X1 (PinX1) by telomeric repeat amplification protocol-silver staining, RT-PCR and flow cytometry (FCM). The cell proliferation and apoptosis of Eca109 cells were analyzed by FCM and MTT assay. We found that the length of telomere DNA decreased and hTERT protein expression increased in the carcinogenesis of esophageal epithelial cells; telomerase activity was significantly upregulated followed by a decrease of PinX1 expression in esophageal carcinoma compared with dysplasia and normal patients, which notably correlated with grade and lymph node metastasis. Overexpression of PinX1 inhibited cell growth, arrested cells at the G0/G1 stage and induced cell apoptosis in Eca109 cells. In addition, PinX1 overexpression significantly inhibited telomerase activity. In conclusion, the length shortening of telomere was an important characteristic in the carcinogenesis of esophageal epithelial cells, followed by increase of telomerase activity and downregulation of PinX1. Overexpression of PinX1 blocked Eca109 cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis by downregulating telomerase activity. PMID:23912465

  10. Clinical observation of docetaxel or gemcitabine combined with cisplatin in the chemotherapy after surgery for stage II-III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiuqiang; Ji, Xuexian; Zhou, Xiao; Shi, Qilin; Yu, Huanming; Fu, Hengqin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to compare the efficacy and toxicity of docetaxel combined with cisplatin (DP) and gemcitabine combined with cisplatin (GP) in postoperative chemotherapy after surgery of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: A total of 92 patients diagnosed with NSCLC after surgery were enrolled, and they were treated with DP (DP group) and GP (GP group). The efficacy and toxicity of the medications were then compared. Results: Approximately 92.4% (85 out of 92) of the patients received chemotherapy for more than three weeks. In DP and GP groups, the incidence rates of grade III-IV thrombocytopenia were 24.4% and 6.38%, respectively, whereas the incidence rates of alopecia were 88.9% and 25.5%, respectively. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Disease-free survival rates in DP group in one and two years were 76.5% and 50.47%, respectively, whereas in GP group were 77.8% and 49.52%, respectively. No significant difference was observed between the two groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: These results showed similar disease-free survival rates of DP and GP therapies in one and two years after surgery for NSCLC. However, DP group exhibited higher incidence of grade III-IV thrombocytopenia and alopecia than GP group. Therefore, we should select a specific treatment for each patient according to individual differences. PMID:26648993

  11. Clinical observation of docetaxel or gemcitabine combined with cisplatin in the chemotherapy after surgery for stage II–III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xue-Xian; Zhou, Xiao; Shi, Qi-Lin; Yu, Huan-Ming; Fu, Heng-Qin; Ji, Guo-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study This study aimed to compare the efficacy and toxicity of docetaxel combined with cisplatin (DP) and gemcitabine combined with cisplatin (GP) in postoperative chemotherapy after surgery of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Material and methods A total of 92 patients diagnosed with NSCLC after surgery were enrolled, and they were treated with DP (DP group) and GP (GP group). The efficacy and toxicity of the medications were then compared. Results Approximately 92.4% (85 out of 92) of the patients received chemotherapy for more than three weeks. In the DP and GP groups, the incidence rates of grade III–IV thrombocytopenia were 24.4% and 6.38%, respectively, whereas the incidence rates of alopecia were 88.9% and 25.5%, respectively. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Disease-free survival rates in DP group in one and two years were 76.5% and 50.47%, respectively, whereas in the GP group they were 77.8% and 49.52%, respectively. No significant difference was observed between the two groups (p > 0.05). Conclusions These results showed similar disease-free survival rates of DP and GP therapies in one and two years after surgery for NSCLC. However, the DP group exhibited higher incidence rates of grade III–IV thrombocytopenia and alopecia than the GP group. Therefore, we should select a specific treatment for each patient according to individual differences. PMID:26557781

  12. Morphological and functional changes of mitochondria in apoptotic esophageal carcinoma cells induced by arsenic trioxide

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhong-Ying; Shen, Jian; Li, Qiao-Shan; Chen, Cai-Yun; Chen, Jiong-Yu; Zeng, Yi

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To demonstrate that mitochondrial morphological and functional changes are an important intermediate link in the course of apoptosis in esophageal carcinoma cells induced by As2O3. METHODS: The esophageal carcinoma cell line SHEEC1, established in our laboratory, was cultured in 199 growth medium, supplemented with 100 mL·L-1 calf serum and 3 ?mol·L-1 As2O3 ( the same below). After 2, 4, 6, 12, 24 h of drug adding, the SHEEC1 cells were collected for light-and electron-microscopic examination. The mitochondria were labeled by Rhodamine fluorescence probe and the fluorescence intensity of the mitochondria was measured by flow cytometer and cytofluorimetric analysis. Further, the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP, ?? m) change was also calculated. RESULTS: The mitochondrial morphological change after adding As2O3 could be divided into three stages. In the early-stage (2-6 h) after adding As2O3, an adaptive proliferation of mitochondria appeared; in the mid-stage (6-12 h) a degenerative change was observed; and in the late-stage (12-24 h) the mitochondria swelled with outer membrane broken down and then cells death with apoptotic changes of nucleus. The functional change of the mitochondria indicated by fluorescent intensity, which reflected the MTP status of mitochondria, was in accordance with morphological change of the mitochondria. The fluorescent intensity increased at early-stage, declined in mid-stage and decreased to the lowest in the late-stage. 24 h after As2O3 adding, the cell nucleus showed typical apoptotic changes. CONCLUSION: Under the inducement of As2O3, the early apoptotic changes of SHEEC1 cells were the apparent morphological and functional changes of mitochondria, afterwards the nucleus changes followed. It is considered that changes of mitochondria are an important intermediate link in the course of apoptosis of esophageal carcinoma cells induced by As2O3. PMID:11833066

  13. Congenital esophageal stenosis owing to tracheobronchial remnants

    PubMed Central

    Rebelo, Priscila Guyt; Ormonde, Joăo Victor C.; Ormonde, Joăo Baptista C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To emphasize the need of an accurate diagnosis of congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, since its treatment differs from other types of congenital narrowing. CASE DESCRIPTION Four cases of lower congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, whose definitive diagnosis was made by histopathology. Except for the last case, in which a concomitant anti-reflux surgery was not performed, all had a favorable outcome after resection and anastomosis of the esophagus. COMMENTS The congenital esophageal stenosis is an intrinsic narrowing of the organâ€(tm)s wall associated with its structural malformation. The condition can be caused by tracheobronchial remnants, fibromuscular stenosis or membranous diaphragm and the first symptom is dysphagia after the introduction of solid food in the diet. The first-choice treatment to tracheobronchial remnants cases is the surgical resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the esophagus. PMID:24142326

  14. Herpetic Esophagitis in Immunocompetent Medical Student

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, Andréia Vidica; Bonfim, Vinícius Mendes; de Alencar, Luciana Rodrigues; Pinto, Sebastiăo Alves; de Araújo Filho, Joăo Alves

    2014-01-01

    Esophagitis caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) is often documented during periods of immunosuppression in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); it is rare in immunocompetent diagnosed patients. Case reports of herpetic esophagitis in students of health sciences are extremely rare. The disease presents with a clinical picture characterized by acute odynophagia and retrosternal pain without obvious causes and ulcers, evidenced endoscopically in the middistal esophagus. Diagnosis depends on endoscopy, biopsies for pathology studies, and immunohistochemistry techniques. The disease course is often benign; however, treatment with acyclovir speeds the disappearance of symptoms and limits the severity of infection. In this report, we present a case of herpetic esophagitis in an immunocompetent medical student, with reference to its clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment. The disease may have manifested as a result of emotional stress experienced by the patient. PMID:24707416

  15. Systematic review: Eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian countries

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Ishimura, Norihisa; Oshima, Naoki; Ishihara, Shunji

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence and the clinical characteristics of Asian patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. METHODS: We conducted a systematic search of the PubMed and Web of Science databases for original studies, case series, and individual case reports of eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian countries published from January 1980 to January 2015. We found 66 and 80 articles in the PubMed and Web of Science databases, respectively; 24 duplicate articles were removed. After excluding animal studies, articles not written in English, and meeting abstracts, 25 articles containing 217 patients were selected for analysis. RESULTS: Sample size-weighted mean values were determined for all pooled prevalence data and clinical characteristics. The mean age of the adult patients with eosinophilic esophagitis was approximately 50 years, and 73% of these patients were male. They frequently presented with allergic diseases including bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy, and atopic dermatitis. Bronchial asthma was the most frequent comorbid allergic disease, occurring in 24% of patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. Dysphagia was the primary symptom reported; 44% of the patients complained of dysphagia. Although laboratory blood tests are not adequately sensitive for an accurate diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis, endoscopic examinations revealed abnormal findings typical of this disease, including longitudinal furrows and concentric rings, in 82% of the cases. One-third of the cases responded to proton pump inhibitor administration. CONCLUSION: The characteristics of eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian patients were similar to those reported in Western patients, indicating that this disease displays a similar pathogenesis between Western and Asian patients. PMID:26217096

  16. Simultaneous Esophageal and Gastric Metastases from Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Yong; Hong, Seung Wook; Lee, Joo Young; Kim, Ji Hye; Kang, Jin Woo; Lee, Hyun Woo; Im, Jong Pil

    2015-07-01

    We report of a patient with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and stomach from lung cancer. The patient was a 68-year-old man receiving radiotherapy and chemotherapy for stage IV lung cancer, without metastases to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract at the time of the initial diagnosis. During the treatment period, dysphagia and melena newly developed. Upper GI endoscopy revealed geographic erosion at the distal esophagus and multiple volcano-shaped ulcers on the stomach body. Endoscopic biopsy was performed for each lesion. To determine whether the lesions were primary esophageal and gastric cancer masses or metastases from the lung cancer, histopathological testing including immunohistochemical staining was performed, and metastasis from lung cancer was confirmed. The disease progressed despite chemotherapy, and the patient died 5 months after the diagnosis of lung cancer. This is a case report of metastatic adenocarcinoma in the esophagus and stomach, which are very rare sites of spread for lung cancer. PMID:26240809

  17. Esophageal recurrence of medullary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dworzynska, Agnieszka; Lorente-Poch, Leyre; Sancho, Juan Jose; Sitges-Serra, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) metastasizes to the regional lymph nodes and to the lungs, liver and bones. Only one case of recurrence of MTC involving the upper gastrointestinal tract has been reported so far. We describe the case of a 38-year-old woman with MTC, who developed an upper esophageal submucosal recurrence after two previous local recurrences treated surgically and one ethanol injection. After resection of the right lateral esophageal wall, calcitonin dropped by 60% and showed a doubling time >1 year. We cannot rule out the role of deep ethanol injection in the involvement of the cervical esophagus wall. PMID:26645011

  18. False esophageal hiatus hernia caused by a foreign body: a fatal event.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ya-Ping; Yao, Ming; Zhou, Xu-Yan; Huang, Bing; Qi, Wei-Bo; Chen, Zhi-Heng; Xu, Long-Sheng

    2014-10-21

    Foreign body ingestion is a common complaint in gastrointestinal clinics. It is usually not difficult to diagnose because most of the patients report a definitive history of accidental foreign body ingestion. However, in rare cases, patients do not have a clear history. Thus, the actual condition of the patient is difficult to diagnosis or is misdiagnosed; consequently, treatment is delayed or the wrong treatment is administered, respectively. This report describes a fatal case of esophageal perforation caused by an unknowingly ingested fishbone, which resulted in lower esophageal necrosis, chest cavity infection, posterior mediastinum fester, and significant upper gastrointestinal accumulation of blood. However, his clinical symptoms and imaging data are very similar with esophageal hiatal hernia. Unfortunately, because the patient was too late in consulting a physician, he finally died of chest infection and hemorrhage caused by thoracic aortic rupture. First, this case report underlines the importance of immediate consultation with a physician as soon as symptoms are experienced so as not to delay diagnosis and treatment, and thus avoid a fatal outcome. Second, diagnostic imaging should be performed in the early stage, without interference by clinical judgment. Third, when computed tomography reveals esophageal hiatus hernia with stomach incarceration, posterior mediastinal hematoma, and pneumatosis caused by esophageal, a foreign body should be suspected. Finally, medical professionals are responsible for making people aware of the danger of foreign body ingestion, especially among children, those who abuse alcohol, and those who wear dentures, particularly among the elderly, whose discriminability of foreign bodies is decreased, to avoid dire consequences. PMID:25339840

  19. Influence of Ionizing Radiation on Stromal-Epithelial Communication in Esophageal Carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Janice; Patel, Zarana; Grugan, Katharine; Rustgi, Anil; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    Esophageal cancer is the 6th leading cause of cancer death worldwide and is associated with a variety of risk factors including tobacco use, heavy alcohol consumption, human papilloma virus infection, and certain dietary factors such as trace mineral and vitamin deficiencies. A connection with ionizing radiation exposure is revealed by the high excess relative risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma observed in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. Esophageal carcinomas are also seen as secondary malignancies in patients who received radiotherapy for breast and thoracic cancers; additionally, patients with head/neck and oral squamous cell cancers are at increased risk for metachronous esophageal squamous cell cancers. This malignancy is rapidly fatal, mainly because it remains asymptomatic until late, advanced stages when the disease is rarely responsive to treatment. In normal epithelium, the stromal microenvironment is essential for the maintenance and modulation of cell growth and differentiation. Cross talk between the epithelial and stromal compartments can influence many aspects of malignant progression, including tumor cell proliferation, migration, invasion and recruitment of new blood vessels. To test the hypothesis that radiation exposure plays a role in esophageal carcinogenesis via non-targeted mechanisms involving stromal-epithelial cell communication, we are studying radiation effects on hTERT-immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells and genetic variants grown in co-culture with human esophageal stromal fibrob-lasts (Okawa et al., Genes Dev. 2007. 21: 2788-2803). We examined how irradiation of stromal fibroblasts affected epithelial migration and invasion, behaviors associated with cancer promotion and progression. These assays were conducted in modified Boyden chambers using conditioned media from irradiated fibroblasts. Our results using low LET gamma radiation showed a dose-dependent increase in migration of epithelial cells when exposed to conditioned media from irradiated vs. non-irradiated fibroblasts. We also observed enhanced invasion through a basement membrane matrix in similarly treated cells. Candidate factors that me-diate these effects were identified using antibody capture arrays, and their increased secretion in irradiated fibroblasts was confirmed using ELISAs. We are currently analyzing the effect of these individual factors on epithelial migration and invasion, as well as their influence on cell survival and DNA repair. Our current studies using high-LET radiation will elucidate radiation quality effects on these processes. These results should further our understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation impacts the tissue microenvironment and how it influences cancer development processes.

  20. IgG4-Related Esophageal Disease Presenting as Esophagitis Dissecans Superficialis With Chronic Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Dumas-Campagna, Myriam; Bouchard, Simon; Soucy, Genevieve; Bouin, Mickael

    2014-01-01

    IgG4-related disease is a recently recognized autoimmune systemic disorder that has been described in various organs. The disease is characterized histologically by a dense lymphoplasmocytic infiltrate of IgG4-positive cells, storiform fibrosis and can be associated with tumefactive lesions. IgG4-related disease involving the upper gastrointestinal tract is rare and only two previous case reports have reported IgG4-related esophageal disease. We report the case of a 63-year-old female patient with a long-standing history of severe dysphagia and odynophagia with an initial diagnosis of reflux esophagitis. Symptoms persisted despite anti-acid therapy and control esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed endoscopic images consistent with esophagitis dissecans superficialis (sloughing esophagitis). An underlying autoimmune process was suspected and immunosuppressant agents were tried to control her disease. The patient eventually developed disabling dysphagia secondary to multiple chronic esophageal strictures. A diagnosis of IgG4-related disease was eventually made after reviewing esophageal biopsies and performing an immunohistochemical study with an anti-IgG4 antibody. Treatment attempts with corticosteroids and rituximab was not associated with a significant improvement of the symptoms of dysphagia and odynophagia, possibly because of the chronic nature of the disease associated with a high fibrotic component. Our case report describes this unique case of IgG4-related esophageal disease presenting as chronic esophagitis dissecans with strictures. We also briefly review the main histopathological features and treatment options in IgG4-related disease. PMID:24883156

  1. Hereditary Factors in Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    van Nistelrooij, Anna M.J.; Dinjens, Winand N.M.; Wagner, Anja; Spaander, Manon C.W.; van Lanschot, J. Jan B.; Wijnhoven, Bas P.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The vast majority of Barrett's esophagus (BE) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) cases are sporadic and caused by somatic mutations. However, over the last decades several families have been identified with clustering of EAC. Here, we review data from the published literature in order to address the current knowledge on familial EAC. Summary Although familial EAC comprises a relatively small group of patients, it is a clinically relevant category due to the poor prognosis of this type of cancer. Efforts should be made to identify specific genetic risk factors for familial EAC to enable identification of relatives at risk, since endoscopic surveillance can diagnose preneoplastic or early neoplastic lesions leading to early treatment, with improved outcome. Key Message Although familial EAC comprises a relatively small group of patients, this is a clinically relevant category due to the poor prognosis. Efforts should be made to identify specific genetic risk factors for familial EAC in order to facilitate the identification of other family members with a predisposition for this type of cancer. Practical Implications Approximately 7% of BE and EAC cases are considered familial. Age at diagnosis is generally lower for patients with familial EAC as compared to sporadic cases, while other known risk factors for EAC, such as male gender and Caucasian ethnicity, do not differ between the two groups. In several described families with clustering of EAC the pattern of inheritance seems to be consistent with a rare autosomal dominant genetic trait. However, some association has been found with (attenuated) familial adenomatous polyposis, mismatch repair deficiency and recently with the genes MSR1, ASCC1 and CTHRC1. Nevertheless, no specific genetic predisposition has yet been identified.

  2. Family history of esophageal cancer increases the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tiantian; Cheng, Hongwei; Chen, Xingdong; Yuan, Ziyu; Yang, Xiaorong; Zhuang, Maoqiang; Lu, Ming; Jin, Li; Ye, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    A population-based case-control was performed to explore familial aggregation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Family history of cancer was assessed by a structured questionnaire, and from which 2 cohorts of relatives of cases and controls were reconstructed. Unconditional logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression were applied for case-control design and reconstructed cohort design, respectively. We observed a close to doubled risk of ESCC associated with a positive family history of esophageal cancer among first degree relatives (odds ratio [OR]?=?1.85, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.42-2.41), after adjusting age, sex, family size and other confounders. The excess risks of ESCC increased with the increasing of first-degree relatives affected by esophageal cancer (p?esophageal cancer had an 8-fold excess risk of ESCC (95%?CI: 1.74-36.32). The reconstructed cohort analysis showed that the cumulative risk of esophageal cancer to age 75 was 12.2% in the first-degree relatives of cases and 7.0% in those of controls (hazard ratio?=?1.91, 95%?CI: 1.54-2.37). Our results suggest family history of esophageal cancer significantly increases the risk for ESCC. Future studies are needed to understand how the shared genetic susceptibility and/or environmental exposures contribute to the observed excess risk. PMID:26526791

  3. Family history of esophageal cancer increases the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tiantian; Cheng, Hongwei; Chen, Xingdong; Yuan, Ziyu; Yang, Xiaorong; Zhuang, Maoqiang; Lu, Ming; Jin, Li; Ye, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    A population-based case-control was performed to explore familial aggregation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Family history of cancer was assessed by a structured questionnaire, and from which 2 cohorts of relatives of cases and controls were reconstructed. Unconditional logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression were applied for case-control design and reconstructed cohort design, respectively. We observed a close to doubled risk of ESCC associated with a positive family history of esophageal cancer among first degree relatives (odds ratio [OR]?=?1.85, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.42–2.41), after adjusting age, sex, family size and other confounders. The excess risks of ESCC increased with the increasing of first-degree relatives affected by esophageal cancer (p?esophageal cancer had an 8-fold excess risk of ESCC (95%?CI: 1.74–36.32). The reconstructed cohort analysis showed that the cumulative risk of esophageal cancer to age 75 was 12.2% in the first-degree relatives of cases and 7.0% in those of controls (hazard ratio?=?1.91, 95%?CI: 1.54–2.37). Our results suggest family history of esophageal cancer significantly increases the risk for ESCC. Future studies are needed to understand how the shared genetic susceptibility and/or environmental exposures contribute to the observed excess risk. PMID:26526791

  4. Current Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis 2015.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joel E

    2016-02-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory condition characterized by esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilic infiltrate (?15/hpf) in the esophageal epithelium and the absence of other potential causes of eosinophilia. The prevalence is increasing and is the most common cause of solid food dysphagia in children and young adults. This article will review the diagnosis and management of EoE based on consensus conferences, systematic reviews, and meta-analysis and highlights seminal studies in our evolving treatment of this disease. However, all answers are not available and I will remark about the lessons learned in my clinical practice seeing EoE patients over the last 25 years. The complicated etiology of the complaint of dysphagia in EoE patients will be reviewed. The importance of utilizing endoscopy, biopsies, and barium esophagram to help define the 2 phenotypes (inflammatory, fibrostenosis) of EoE will be highlighted. The controversy about PPI-responsive esophageal eosinophilia will be discussed and contrasted with idiopathic EoE. Finally, the 3 treatment options for EoE (drugs, diet, dilation) will be reviewed in detail and a useful clinical management algorithm presented. PMID:26485101

  5. A safe treatment option for esophageal bezoars

    PubMed Central

    Yaqub, Sheraz; Shafique, Muhammad; Kjćstad, Erik; Thorsen, Yngve; Lie, Erik S.; Dahl, Vegard; Bakka, Njĺl; Rřkke, Ola

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Bezoar in the esophagus is a rare condition and associated with structural or functional abnormalities of the esophagus. Endoscopy is the main tool for diagnosis and treatment for bezoar in the esophagus. PRESENTATION OF CASE Here we present a case where an endoscopic evacuation of an esophageal bezoar was unsuccessful. We treated the bezoar through a nasogastric tube using a cocktail composed of pancreatic enzymes dissolved in Coca-Cola. DISCUSSION Endoscopy is regarded as the mainstay for the diagnosis and treatment of esophageal bezoars. However, when this approach fails, other treatment options include dissolution therapy, and surgical exploration and removal of the bezoar. Surgical removal of an esophageal bezoar is associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality. We advocate that dissolving therapy should be the first choice of treatment when endoscopic evacuation is not possible. CONCLUSION This is the first report describing a successful treatment of an esophageal bezoar with a cocktail of Coca-Cola and pancreatic enzymes. It is an effective, inexpensive, and worldwide available treatment and should be considered when endoscopic evacuation fails. PMID:22609703

  6. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...or expandable tubular device made of a plastic, metal, or polymeric material that is intended to be implanted to restore the...metal esophageal prosthesis may be uncovered or covered with a polymeric material. This device may also include a device...

  7. Barrett’s and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    An international consortium with epidemiologic studies of Barrett's Esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Analyses so far have included alcohol consumption, anthropometry, cigarette smoking, excess risk models, gastroesophageal reflux disease, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, reproductive factors, and genome-wide studies to identify susceptibility loci associated with Barrett’s esophagus and/or adenocarcinomas of the esophagus.

  8. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enable the user to listen to heart and breath sounds. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls)....

  9. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enable the user to listen to heart and breath sounds. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls)....

  10. Histomorphological and Immunophenotypic Features of Pill-Induced Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Hwan; Kim, Won; Lee, Kook Lae; Byeon, Sun-ju; Choi, Euno; Chang, Mee Soo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate histomorphological and immunophenotypic features in pill-induced esophagitis. We comparatively evaluated the histomorphological, immunophenotypic features of pill-induced esophagitis vs. reflux esophagitis, as well as clinical information and endoscopic findings. Fifty-two tissue pieces from 22 cases of pill-induced esophagitis, 46 pieces from 20 reflux esophagitis, and 16 pieces from 14 control samples were subjected to immunohistochemistry for inflammatory infiltrates (CD3 for T lymphocyte, CD20 for B lymphocyte, CD56 for NK cell, CD68 for macrophage, CD117 for mast cell) and eosinophil chemotaxis-associated proteins (Erk, leptin, leptin receptor, pSTAT3, phospho-mTOR). As a result, Histomorphology showed that a diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis, while reactive atypia and subepithelial papillary elongation were more often found in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). Interestingly, intraepithelial eosinophilic microabscess, intraepithelial pustule and diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces were observed in 14% (3 cases), 9% (2 cases) and 32% (7 cases) of pill-induced esophagitis, respectively, but in no cases of reflux esophagitis. Regarding intraepithelial inflammatory infiltrates in pill-induced esophagitis, T lymphocytes were the most common cells, followed by eosinophil; 11 and 7 in one x400 power field, respectively. Intraepithelial pSTAT3-positive pattern was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis than in reflux esophagitis, at 45% (10 cases) versus 10% (2 cases), respectively (P < 0.05). Considering the distal esophageal lesion only, intraepithelial pustule, diffuse dilated intercellular spaces and stromal macrophages were more frequently found in distal pill-induced esophagitis, whereas reactive atypia and intraepithelial mast cells in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). In conclusion, diffuse dilated intercellular spaces, intraepithelial eosinophil microabscess, pustule, T lymphocytes, eosinophils, and pSTAT3 positivity can be added to histopathological features of pill-induced esophagitis, other than non-specific ulcer. Besides, distal pill-induced esophagitis may be histopathologically differentiated from reflux esophagitis. PMID:26047496

  11. Expression patterns of esophageal cancer deregulated genes in C57BL/6J mouse embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Gao, Fu-Lu; Zhi, Hui-Ying; Luo, Ai-Ping; Ding, Fang; Wu, Min; Liu, Zhi-Hua

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression patterns of esophageal squamous cell cancer deregulated genes in mid to late stages of C57BL/6J mouse embryogenesis, and the correlation between these genes in embryonic development and tumorigenesis of esophageal squamous cell cancer. METHODS: Reverse northern screening was performed to examine the expression patterns of esophageal cancer deregulated genes in C57BL/6J mouse embryogenesis. To confirm the gene expression patterns, semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was carried out for 3 of the randomly picked differentially expressed genes. RESULTS: Within these esophageal cancer deregulated genes, 4 patterns of expression were observed at 3 stages embryonic d 11.5 (E11.5), embryonic d 13.5 (E13.5) and postnatal d1 (P1). (1) Up-regulation during the E11.5 period, down- regulation during the E13.5 and P1 period (up-down-down), the 10 up-regulated genes during the E11.5 period could be classified into 6 known genes and 4 unknown genes. The known genes included differentiation related genes (S100A8), immunity related gene (IGL), translation and transcription regulation genes (RPL15, EEF1A1), cytoskeletal protein (TUBA1), cysteine protease inhibitor (cystatin B). (2) Up-regulation during the E13.5 and P1 period (down-up-up), such as the SPRR2A which was down-regulated at E11.5. (3) Down-regulation during the E11.5 and E13.5 period (down-down-up), such as RHCG and keratin 4. (4) Fluctuating expression, down initially, up at E13.5, and then down again (down-up-down). EMP1 belonged to such a gene, which was highly expressed at E13.5. CONCLUSION: The results will be helpful for understanding the function of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) deregulated genes in embryonic development and tumorigenesis. S100A8 and S100A9 may play different roles in early embryonic development. IGL may be an oncofetal protein, and EMP1 relates with neurogenesis at E13.5. The genes identified pertinent to embryonic development may serve as candidate susceptibility genes for inherited esophageal cancer disorders as well as for various heritable disorders of embryonic development. PMID:15069704

  12. Restenosis following balloon dilation of benign esophageal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ying-Sheng; Li, Ming-Hua; Yang, Ren-Jie; Zhang, Hui-Zhen; Ding, Zai-Xian; Zhuang, Qi-Xin; Jiang, Zhi-Ming; Shang, Ke-Zhong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the mechanism of restenosis following balloon dilation of benign esophageal stenosis. METHODS: A total of 49 rats with esophageal stenosis were induced in 70 rats using 5 mL of 50% sodium hydroxide solution and the double-balloon method, and an esophageal restenosis (RS) model was developed by esophageal stenosis using dilation of a percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) balloon catheter. These 49 rats were divided into two groups: rats with benign esophageal stricture caused by chemical burn only (control group, n = 21) and rats with their esophageal stricture treated with balloon catheter dilation (experimental group, n = 28). Imaging analysis and immunohistochemistry were used for both quantitative and qualitative analyses of esophageal stenosis and RS formation in the rats, respectively. RESULTS: Cross-sectional areas and perimeters of the esophageal mucosa layer, muscle layer, and the entire esophageal layers increased significantly in the experimental group compared with the control group. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was expressed on the 5th day after dilation, and was still present at 1 mo. Fibronectin (FN) was expressed on the 1st day after dilation, and was still present at 1 month. CONCLUSION: Expression of PCNA and FN plays an important role in RS after balloon dilation of benign esophageal stenosis. PMID:14606107

  13. Viruses, Other Pathogenic Microorganisms and Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenjia; Liu, Zhongshun; Bao, Qunchao; Qian, Zhikang

    2015-01-01

    Background Esophageal cancer (EC) is the eighth most prevalent malignant tumor and the sixth leading cause of cancer mortality throughout the world. Despite the technical developments in diagnosis and treatment, the 5-year survival rate is still low. The etiology of EC remains poorly understood; multiple risk factors may be involved and account for the great variation in EC incidence in different geographic regions. Summary Infection with carcinogenetic pathogens has been proposed as a risk factor for EC. This review explores the recent studies on the association of human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Helicobacter pylori and esophageal bacterial biota with EC. Key Message Among the above-mentioned pathogens, HPV most likely contributes to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in high-risk populations. New techniques are being applied to studies on the role of infection in EC, which will inevitably bring novel ideas to the field in the near future. Practical Implications Multiple meta-analyses support the finding of a higher HPV detection rate in regions associated with high risk for ESCC compared to low-risk areas. A potential role of HPV in the rise of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) was proposed recently. However, further studies are required before a firm conclusion can be drawn. Less work has been done in studying the association between EBV and ESCC, and the results are quite controversial. H. pylori infection is found to be inversely related to EC, which is probably due to the reduced incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Analysis of the esophageal bacterial biota revealed distinct clusters of bacteria in normal and diseased esophagi. A type II microbiome rich in Gram-negative bacteria potentially contributes to EAC by inducing chronic inflammation. Novel findings from such studies as these may benefit public health by justifying anti-infection measures to prevent EC. PMID:26674173

  14. Esophagitis of likely traumatic origin in newborns.

    PubMed

    Deneyer, M; Goossens, A; Pipeleers-Marichal, M; Hauser, B; Blecker, U; Sacre, L; Vandenplas, Y

    1992-07-01

    We describe 17 full-term newborns presenting with vague symptoms related to the upper gastrointestinal tract (anorexia, poor feeding, retching, regurgitation, and incessant crying) during their stay in the maternity unit. After an esophagogastroduodenoscopy performed between days 2 and 5 of life, the babies could clearly be divided into two groups. Twelve babies (group 1) had an extremely severe esophagitis (circular ulcerations), without gastroduodenitis. In the remaining five babies (group 2), the upper gastrointestinal tract was unaffected. Allergic, infectious, metabolic, and toxic etiologies were excluded. Esophageal pH monitoring data were within normal ranges in all. All babies of group 1 were treated as follows: prone anti-Trendelenburg position, cisapride, and cimetidine syrup. Symptoms and lesions disappeared within 48-72 h. Reendoscopy after 72 h showed an almost normal esophagus with greatly improved histology. These observations highlight four points of interest: (a) the existence of an extremely severe ulcerative esophagitis in apparently healthy newborns, (b) the very rapid clinical and histological recovery, (c) the difficulties in predicting esophagitis on clinical grounds, and (d) the mysterious origin despite thorough assessment. The distribution of the lesions (more severe in the upper esophagus), the early onset (almost at birth), the very rapid healing, and the absence of gastric and duodenal lesions are in favor of a possible "traumatic" origin (pharyngeal, esophageal, and gastric suction at birth). Finally, because the condition described is transient, questions arise regarding the necessity of treatment, and we currently do not recommend overtreating newborns presenting with similar symptoms and/or endoscopic findings. PMID:1403453

  15. Esophageal desalination is mediated by Na+ exchanger-2 in the gulf

    E-print Network

    Grosell, Martin

    Esophageal desalination is mediated by Na+ , H+ exchanger-2 in the gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta Intestinal water transport Osmoregulation Chloride Esophageal desalination is a crucial step (-subunit), suggesting that esophageal desalination is less flexible in response to osmotic stress than

  16. Hydraulically controlled magnetic bougienage for correction of long-gap esophageal atresia

    E-print Network

    Noh, Minkyun

    2014-01-01

    About one in 4000 babies in the United States is born with their esophageal disconnected and separated by a gap, which is called esophageal atresia. Esophageal atresia with a relatively short gap can be directly corrected ...

  17. Esophageal perforation post pneumatic dilatation for achalasia managed by esophageal stenting

    PubMed Central

    Elhanafi, Sherif; Othman, Mohamed; Sunny, Joseph; Said, Sarmad; Cooper, Chad J.; Alkhateeb, Haider; Quansah, Raphael; McCallum, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 82 Final Diagnosis: Achalasia Symptoms: Nocturnal regurgtation • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Esophageal stenting Specialty: Gastroenterology • Hepatology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Pneumatic dilatation is one of the most effective methods for treating achalasia. Esophageal perforation is the most serious complication after pneumatic dilatation and has been reported to occur in the range of 1 to 4.3%. The appropriate management of esophageal perforation can range from conservative medical treatment to surgical intervention. Case Report: We report a case of an 82-year-old male who had an 8 month history of dysphagia for solid and liquids, a 10 lb weight loss and nocturnal regurgitation. The diagnosis of achalasia was established by endoscopic; barium and manometric criteria. He underwent a pneumatic dilation with a 30 mm Rigiflex balloon. A confined or limited esophageal perforation projecting into the mediastinum and located 1–2 cm above the diaphragm was confirmed by a gastrografin swallow study performed immediately after the procedure. There was some accompanying epigastric abdominal pain. Patient was treated later that day by placing a fully covered metallic esophageal stent in addition to antibiotics, proton pump inhibitor, and fasting. Patient was discharged home 3 days later able to eat liquid-soft foods. Follow up endoscopy 2 weeks later and a gastrografin swallow showed a completely healed perforation and the stent was removed. Symptomatically he has done well, with no dysphagia or heartburn at six and twelve months follow up. Conclusions: Early esophageal stenting for esophageal perforation after pneumatic dilation for achalasia is a treatment option which accelerates healing shortens recovery period, as well as decreasing hospital stay and costs. PMID:24349606

  18. Esophageal leiomyoma: experience from a single institution.

    PubMed

    Jiang, W; Rice, T W; Goldblum, J R

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal leiomyomas are rare. We report the clinicopathologic features of one of the largest series of esophageal leiomyomas from a single institution. We retrospectively reviewed the Cleveland Clinic pathology database (1985-2010) for patients with a diagnosis of esophageal leiomyoma(s). Clinicopathologic features of 30 cases from 28 patients were analyzed. The group included 15 females and 13 males with a mean age at diagnosis of 56 years. These include 9 excisions, 9 esophagectomies, and 12 endoscopic biopsies. Only one partial esophagectomy was performed solely for a symptomatic 14-cm leiomyoma; the remainder of the resections (n= 8) were for other indications, including esophageal cancer (Barrett's esophagus-related adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma) and emergent esophageal perforation, with leiomyoma being an incidental finding. One patient (2.5%) had two synchronous leiomyomas (14 cm and 0.3 cm). Tumor size ranged from 0.1 to 14 cm (mean = 2.0 cm). Mean tumor size among symptomatic patients was 5.2 cm, as compared with 0.4 cm in asymptomatic patients. Dysphagia was the most common complaint in symptomatic patients (71.4%). Sixty-nine percent of the tumors were located in the distal and middle thirds of the esophagus, with most (69.6%) arising from muscularis propria. Histologically, these tumors were composed of bland spindle cells with low cellularity, no nuclear atypia, or mitotic activity. Only one case (14 cm) showed focal moderate cellularity and nuclear atypia, with low mitotic activity (<1/10 high power field). Immunohistochemical studies showed tumor cells were positive for smooth muscle actin, and negative for CD34 and CD117. Follow-up information was available for 22 patients (78.6%), and none had adverse events related to leiomyoma. In summary, esophageal leiomyoma is a rare benign tumor of the esophagus. Patients with larger tumors were more likely to have symptoms. The majority of the tumors were in the lower and mid-esophagus, and arose from muscularis propria. These tumors behave in a clinically benign fashion. PMID:22458777

  19. Endoscopic palliation of advanced esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mocanu, A; Bârla, R; Hoara, P; Constantinoiu, S

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer represents one of the most aggressive digestive tumors, with a survival rate at 5 years of only 10%. Globally, during the last three decades, there has been an increasing incidence of the esophageal cancer, approx. 400,000 new esophageal cancers being currently diagnosed annually. This represents the eighth leading cause of cancer incidence and the sixth leading cause of cancer death overall. Taking into account the population’s global aging and thus, the increase in the number of patients who will not bear surgery, PCT and radiation, or the fact that they do not want it especially because of deficiencies and associated pathology, the endoscopic ablative techniques with palliation purposes represent the alternative. If we refer to the Western Europe countries and North America, we notice an increase of esophageal adenocarcinoma rate versus squamous cancer. As for the Asian region, referring in particular to China and Japan, 9 out of 10 esophageal cancers are squamous cell carcinomas. For at least half of the patients with EC (esophageal cancer) there is no hope of healing because of the advanced regional malignant invasion (T3-4, N+, M+) with no chemo and radiotherapy response, poor preoperative patients’ conditions or systemic metastasis. The low life expectancy does not justify the risky medical procedures, the goal of the therapy consisting in the improvement of the quality of life by eliminating dysphagia (reestablishing oral feeding) which represents the most common complication of EC, the respiratory tract complication caused by eso-tracheal fistulas or by eliminating chest pain. To treat dysphagia, which is the main target of palliation, combined methods like endoscopic, chemo and radio-therapy, can be used, each one with indications, benefits and risks. Abbreviations: SEPS = self expanding plastic stent, SREMS = self expanding metal stent, EBRT = Endoscopic brachy radiotherapy, EUS = Ultra sound endoscopy, CT = Computer tomograph, UGE = Upper gastro endoscopy, PET-CT = Positron Emission Tomography, APC = argon plasma coagulation, PDT = photo dynamic therapy, PCT = Poli-chemotherapy, RT = Radio-therapy PMID:25866578

  20. Eosinophilic esophagitis as paraneoplastic syndrome in a patient with ganglioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Prader, S; Spalinger, J; Caduff, J; Hürlimann, S; Rischewski, J

    2015-05-01

    A 16-month-old boy presented with failure to thrive despite sufficient caloric intake, hypersalivation, abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea and blepharitis. An eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was diagnosed by esophageal biopsy. Dietary restrictions and topical steroid treatment lead to no improvement. Further diagnostic work-up revealed an intrathoracal, paraspinal ganglioneuroblastoma. After operative extirpation of the tumour, all initial symptoms resolved. An esophageal control biopsy 4 weeks after tumour resection was normal. This is the first report of eosinophilic esophagitis as part of a paraneoplastic syndrome in a patient with a malignant disease other than a carcinoma. PMID:25985452

  1. Peroral endoscopic myotomy for esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Haruhiro; Ikeda, Haruo; Sato, Hiroki; Sato, Chiaki; Hokierti, Chananya

    2014-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is one of the alternative treatment for achalasia. Due to concept of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), it becomes popular and widely accepted. With the endoluminal technique, submucosal tunnel was created followed by endoscopic myotomy. POEM is not only indicated in classical achalasia but also other abnormal esophageal motility disorders. Moreover, failures of endoscopic treatment or surgical attempted cases are not contraindicated for POEM. The second attempted POEM is also safe and technically feasible. Even though the legend of success of POEM is fruitful, the possible complications are very frightened. Good training and delicate practice will reduce rate of complications. This review provides a summary of current state-of-the-art of POEM, including indication equipments, technique and complications. This perfect procedure may become the treatment of choice of achalasia and some esophageal motility disorders in the near future. PMID:25333007

  2. Recent Advances From Basic and Clinical Studies of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Shinya; Miyamoto, Shin'ichi; Kikuchi, Osamu; Goto, Tomoyuki; Amanuma, Yusuke; Muto, Manabu

    2015-12-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the most aggressive squamous cell carcinomas and is highly prevalent in Asia. Alcohol and its metabolite, acetaldehyde, are considered definite carcinogens for the esophagus. Polymorphisms in the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 gene, which encodes an enzyme that eliminates acetaldehyde, have been associated with esophageal carcinogenesis. Studies of the mutagenic and carcinogenic effects of acetaldehyde support this observation. Several recent large-scale comprehensive analyses of the genomic alterations in ESCC have shown a high frequency of mutations in genes such as TP53 and others that regulate the cell cycle or cell differentiation. Moreover, whole genome and whole exome sequencing studies have frequently detected somatic mutations, such as G:C?A:T transitions or G:C?C:G transversions, in ESCC tissues. Genomic instability, caused by abnormalities in the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway, is also considered a pathogenic mechanism of ESCC. Advances in diagnostic techniques such as magnifying endoscopy with narrow band imaging or positron emission tomography have increased the accuracy of diagnosis of ESCC. Updated guidelines from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network standardize the practice for the diagnosis and treatment of esophageal cancer. Patients with ESCC are treated endoscopically or with surgery, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy, based on tumor stage. Minimally invasive treatments help improve the quality of life of patients who undergo such treatments. We review recent developments in the diagnosis and treatment of ESCC and advances gained from basic and clinical research. PMID:26376349

  3. Esophageal cancer: Risk factors, screening and endoscopic treatment in Western and Eastern countries

    PubMed Central

    Domper Arnal, María José; Ferrández Arenas, Ángel; Lanas Arbeloa, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the most unknown and deadliest cancers worldwide, mainly because of its extremely aggressive nature and poor survival rate. Esophageal cancer is the 6th leading cause of death from cancer and the 8th most common cancer in the world. The 5-year survival is around 15%-25%. There are clear differences between the risk factors of both histological types that affect their incidence and distribution worldwide. There are areas of high incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (some areas in China) that meet the requirements for cost-effectiveness of endoscopy for early diagnosis in the general population of those areas. In Europe and United States the predominant histologic subtype is adenocarcinoma. The role of early diagnosis of adenocarcinoma in Barrett’s esophagus remains controversial. The differences in the therapeutic management of early esophageal carcinoma (high-grade dysplasia, T1a, T1b, N0) between different parts of the world may be explained by the number of cancers diagnosed at an early stage. In areas where the incidence is high (China and Japan among others) early diagnoses is more frequent and has led to the development of endoscopic techniques for definitive treatment that achieve very effective results with a minimum number of complications and preserving the functionality of the esophagus. PMID:26185366

  4. Proteomic identification of malignant transformation-related proteins in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yi-Jun; He, Qing-Yu; Ma, Yuan-Fang; Du, Yao-Wu; Liu, Guang-Chao; Li, Yan-Jie; Tsao, George S W; Ngai, Sai Ming; Chiu, Jen-Fu

    2008-08-01

    Esophageal cancer (EC) persists to be a leading cancer-related death in northern China. Clinical outcome of EC is the most dismal among many types of digestive tumors because EC at early stage is asymptomatic. The current study used 2-DE-based proteomics to identify differentially expressed proteins between esophageal cancer cell lines and immortal cell line. Fifteen proteins were identified with differences of more than five folds, comprising the down-regulation of annexin A2, histone deacetylase 10 isoform beta and protein disulfide-isomerase ER-60 precursor, and the up-regulation of heat shock 70 kDa protein 9B precursor, solute carrier family 44 Member 3, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L (hnRNP L), eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4A isoform 2, triosephosphate isomerase1 (TPI), peroxiredoxin1 (PRX1), forminotransferase cyclodeaminase form (FTCD), fibrinogen gamma-A chain precursor, kinesin-like DNA binding protein, lamin A/C, cyclophilin A (CypA), and transcription factor MTSG1. Expression pattern of annexin A2 was verified by Western blotting, immunocytochemistry and immunohistochemistry analysis. The implication of these protein alterations correlated to the esophageal malignant transformation is discussed. PMID:18320592

  5. Efficacy of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for resected thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wencheng; Liu, Xiao; Xiao, Zefen; Wang, Lvhua; Zhang, Hongxing; Chen, Dongfu; Zhou, Zongmei; Feng, Qinfu; Hui, Zhouguang; Liang, Jun; Yin, Weibo; He, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the clinical use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) of esophageal cancer; therefore, we retrospectively investigated the clinical value of postoperative IMRT among resected thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (TESCC) patients. Methods We enrolled a total of 228 patients with resected TESCC who underwent IMRT between January 2004 and June 2009 in the study. PORT was applied via IMRT with a median total dose of 60?Gy. The Kaplan–Meier method was used to calculate survival rates, and a log-rank test was used for univariate analysis. The Cox proportional model was used for multivariate analysis. Results The one, three, and five-year overall survival rates of all patients were 89.9%, 56.7%, and 45.1%, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that significant prognostic factors included Union for International Cancer Control 2002 stage, lymphatic metastasis, number of metastatic lymph nodes, the degree of metastatic lymph nodes, the degree of differentiation, and vascular tumor thrombus (P < 0.05). Treatment failure occurred in 98 (45.2%) patients because of recurrence or metastases. Early reactions were observed at rates of 18.0% for radiation esophagitis and 5.7% for radiation pneumonitis more than grade 2. Late side effects included anastomotic stenosis (1.3%) and gastrointestinal bleeding (3.1%). Conclusions The postoperative prophylactic IMRT of TESCC provided a favorable local control rate and acceptable toxicity. PMID:26445608

  6. The neural regulation of the mammalian esophageal motility and its implication for esophageal diseases.

    PubMed

    Shiina, Takahiko; Shima, Takeshi; Wörl, Jürgen; Neuhuber, Winfried L; Shimizu, Yasutake

    2010-04-01

    In contrast to the tunica muscularis of the stomach, small intestine and large intestine, the external muscle layer of the mammalian esophagus contains not only smooth muscle but also striated muscle fibers. Although the swallowing pattern generator initiates the peristaltic movement via vagal preganglionic neurons that project to the myenteric ganglia in the smooth muscle esophagus, the progressing front of contraction is organized by a local reflex circuit composed by intrinsic neurons similarly to other gastrointestinal tracts. On the other hand, the peristalsis of the striated muscle esophagus is both initiated and organized by the swallowing pattern generator via vagal motor neurons that directly innervate the muscle fibers. The presence of a distinct ganglionated myenteric plexus in the striated muscle portion of the esophagus had been enigmatic and neglected in terms of peristaltic control for a long time. Recently, the regulatory roles of intrinsic neurons in the esophageal striated muscle have been clarified. It was reported that esophageal striated muscle receives dual innervation from both vagal motor fibers originating in the brainstem and varicose intrinsic nerve fibers originating in the myenteric plexus, which is called 'enteric co-innervation' of esophageal motor endplates. Moreover, a putative local neural reflex pathway that can control the motility of the striated muscle was identified in the rodent esophagus. This reflex circuit consists of primary afferent neurons and myenteric neurons, which can modulate the release of neurotransmitters from vagal motor neurons in the striated muscle esophagus. The pathogenesis of some esophageal disorders such as achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease might be involved in dysfunction of the neural networks including alterations of the myenteric neurons. These evidences indicate the physiological and pathological significance of intrinsic nervous system in the regulation of the esophageal motility. In addition, it is assumed that the components of intrinsic neurons might be therapeutic targets for several esophageal diseases. PMID:19497713

  7. Esophageal carcinoid tumor treated by endoscopic resection.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Makoto; Abe, Yasuhiko; Sasaki, Yu; Nomura, Eiki; Sato, Takeshi; Iwano, Daisuke; Yoshizawa, Kazuya; Sakuta, Kazuhiro; Kanno, Nana; Nishise, Syouichi; Ueno, Yoshiyuki

    2015-05-01

    The present report describes a rare case of esophageal carcinoid tumor that was treated by endoscopic resection. A 43-year-old woman underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy at her family clinic for screening of the upper digestive tract and a small lesion resembling a submucosal tumor was detected in the lower esophagus. A biopsy sample from the lesion was diagnosed as esophageal carcinoid tumor and the patient visited our hospital for detailed examination. The tumor was approximately 3?mm in diameter and its surface appeared to be covered with normal squamous epithelium. The tumor had a shiny reddish surface without ulceration or erosion. Magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging showed structures resembling reticular vessels under the epithelium. Endoscopic ultrasonography depicted the tumor as a low-echoic mass within the lamina propria. Computed tomography did not detect the tumor and no metastatic lesions were evident in other organs. With the patient's informed consent, the tumor was resected using endoscopic submucosal dissection, with a sufficient free margin in both the vertical and horizontal directions. Magnifying endoscopic examination showed the resected tumor to have abundant reticular vessels. Finally, the tumor was diagnosed immunopathologically as an esophageal carcinoid tumor (neuroendocrine cell tumor, grade 1), without lymphatic or vascular invasion. PMID:25283957

  8. Endoscopic resection of gastric and esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balmadrid, Bryan; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) techniques have reduced the need for surgery in early esophageal and gastric cancers and thus has lessened morbidity and mortality in these diseases. ESD is a relatively new technique in western countries and requires rigorous training to reproduce the proficiency of Asian countries, such as Korea and Japan, which have very high complete (en bloc) resection rates and low complication rates. EMR plays a valuable role in early esophageal cancers. ESD has shown better en bloc resection rates but it is easier to master and maintain proficiency in EMR; it also requires less procedural time. For early esophageal adenocarcinoma arising from Barrett’s, ESD and EMR techniques are usually combined with other ablative modalities, the most common being radiofrequency ablation because it has the largest dataset to prove its success. The EMR techniques have been used with some success in early gastric cancers but ESD is currently preferred for most of these lesions. ESD has the added advantage of resecting into the submucosa and thus allowing for endoscopic resection of more aggressive (deeper) early gastric cancer. PMID:26510452

  9. Eosinophilic esophagitis: From pathophysiology to treatment

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Esposito, Dario; Pesce, Marcella; Cuomo, Rosario; De Palma, Giovanni Domenico; Sarnelli, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune disease, characterized by a dense eosinophilic infiltrate in the esophagus, leading to bolus impaction and reflux-like symptoms. Traditionally considered a pediatric disease, the number of adult patients with EoE is continuously increasing, with a relatively higher incidence in western countries. Dysphagia and food impaction represent the main symptoms complained by patients, but gastroesophageal reflux-like symptoms may also be present. Esophageal biopsies are mandatory for the diagnosis of EoE, though clinical manifestations and proton pump inhibitors responsiveness must be taken into consideration. The higher prevalence of EoE in patients suffering from atopic diseases suggests a common background with allergy, however both the etiology and pathophysiology are not completely understood. Elimination diets are considered the first-line therapy in children, but this approach appears less effective in adults patients, who often require steroids; despite medical treatments, EoE is complicated in some cases by esophageal stricture and stenosis, that require additional endoscopic treatments. This review summarizes the evidence on EoE pathophysiology and illustrates the safety and efficacy of the most recent medical and endoscopic treatments. PMID:26600973

  10. Use of Germline Polymorphisms in Predicting Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Response in Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pei-Chun; Chen, Yen-Ching; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Chen, Shin-Kuang; Yang, Pei-Wen; Lee, Yung-Chie; Hsiao, Chuhsing K.; Lee, Jang-Ming; Chuang, Eric Y.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To identify germline polymorphisms to predict concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) response in esophageal cancer patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 139 esophageal cancer patients treated with CCRT (cisplatin-based chemotherapy combined with 40 Gy of irradiation) and subsequent esophagectomy were recruited at the National Taiwan University Hospital between 1997 and 2008. After excluding confounding factors (i.e., females and patients aged {>=}70 years), 116 patients were enrolled to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with specific CCRT responses. Genotyping arrays and mass spectrometry were used sequentially to determine germline polymorphisms from blood samples. These polymorphisms remain stable throughout disease progression, unlike somatic mutations from tumor tissues. Two-stage design and additive genetic models were adopted in this study. Results: From the 26 SNPs identified in the first stage, 2 SNPs were found to be significantly associated with CCRT response in the second stage. Single nucleotide polymorphism rs16863886, located between SGPP2 and FARSB on chromosome 2q36.1, was significantly associated with a 3.93-fold increase in pathologic complete response to CCRT (95% confidence interval 1.62-10.30) under additive models. Single nucleotide polymorphism rs4954256, located in ZRANB3 on chromosome 2q21.3, was associated with a 3.93-fold increase in pathologic complete response to CCRT (95% confidence interval 1.57-10.87). The predictive accuracy for CCRT response was 71.59% with these two SNPs combined. Conclusions: This is the first study to identify germline polymorphisms with a high accuracy for predicting CCRT response in the treatment of esophageal cancer.

  11. A Statistical Reappraisal of the Findings of an Esophageal Cancer

    E-print Network

    Statnikov, Alexander

    (SNP, family history of esophageal cancer, and alcohol consump- tion). Because family history with alcohol consumption and family history. Although there are SNPs that are significant according and alcohol consumption are strong risk factors for esophageal cancer, this P value will be biased toward zero

  12. Prevention of esophageal strictures after endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shinichiro; Kanai, Nobuo; Ohki, Takeshi; Takagi, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Isomoto, Hajime; Kasai, Yoshiyuki; Hosoi, Takahiro; Nakao, Kazuhiko; Eguchi, Susumu; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) have recently been accepted as less invasive methods for treating patients with early esophageal cancers such as squamous cell carcinoma and dysplasia of Barrett’s esophagus. However, the large defects in the esophageal mucosa often cause severe esophageal strictures, which dramatically reduce the patient’s quality of life. Although preventive endoscopic balloon dilatation can reduce dysphagia and the frequency of dilatation, other approaches are necessary to prevent esophageal strictures after ESD. This review describes several strategies for preventing esophageal strictures after ESD, with a particular focus on anti-inflammatory and tissue engineering approaches. The local injection of triamcinolone acetonide and other systemic steroid therapies are frequently used to prevent esophageal strictures after ESD. Tissue engineering approaches for preventing esophageal strictures have recently been applied in basic research studies. Scaffolds with temporary stents have been applied in five cases, and this technique has been shown to be safe and is anticipated to prevent esophageal strictures. Fabricated autologous oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets to cover the defective mucosa similarly to how commercially available skin products fabricated from epidermal cells are used for skin defects or in cases of intractable ulcers. Fabricated autologous oral-mucosal-epithelial cell sheets have already been shown to be safe. PMID:25386058

  13. 21 CFR 868.1920 - Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors... stethoscope with electrical conductors. (a) Identification. An esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors is a device that is inserted into the esophagus to listen to a patient's heart and breath...

  14. 21 CFR 868.1920 - Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors... stethoscope with electrical conductors. (a) Identification. An esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors is a device that is inserted into the esophagus to listen to a patient's heart and breath...

  15. 21 CFR 868.1920 - Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors... stethoscope with electrical conductors. (a) Identification. An esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors is a device that is inserted into the esophagus to listen to a patient's heart and breath...

  16. [Is alkaline gastroesophageal reflux an etiology for esophagitis?].

    PubMed

    Herzog, D

    1997-12-01

    Alkaline gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a controversial concept for the pathogenesis of non-infectious esophagitis in the absence of measurable acid GER. Excessive duodenogastric reflux, as it can be seen in antroduodenal motility disorders, seems to be prerequisite. Yet, bile acids, a marker for duodenal secretions, are more frequently found during acid than during alkaline GER. Moreover, it has not been possible to show mucosal toxicity by bile acids or trypsin when tested at concentrations similar to those measured in esophageal refluxate. It remains therefore questionable as to whether alkaline pH measured in the esophagus results from reflux of duodenal contents or if it is a sign of increased salivary or esophageal secretions, and if the analogy of gastritis and esophagitis secondary to biliary reflux is allowed. Alkaline GER more probably is an erroneous pathogenic concept for esophagitis which requires intensified antacid therapy. PMID:9487642

  17. Stromal cells participate in the murine esophageal mucosal injury response

    PubMed Central

    Binkley, Jana; Darwech, Isra; Swietlicki, Elzbieta; McDonald, Keely; Newberry, Rodney; Rubin, Deborah C.

    2013-01-01

    We identified ?-smooth muscle actin (?-SMA)- and vimentin-expressing spindle-shaped esophageal mesenchymal cells in the adult and neonate murine esophageal lamina propria. We hypothesized that these esophageal mesenchymal cells express and secrete signaling and inflammatory mediators in response to injury. We established primary cultures of esophageal mesenchymal cells using mechanical and enzymatic digestion. We demonstrate that these primary cultures are nonhematopoietic, nonendothelial, stromal cells with myofibroblast-like features. These cells increase secretion of IL-6 in response to treatment with acidified media and IL-1?. They also increase bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp)-4 secretion in response to sonic hedgehog. The location of these cells and their biological functions demonstrate their potential role in regulating esophageal epithelial responses to injury and repair. PMID:23370675

  18. Stent placement provides safe esophageal closure in thoracic NOTES™ procedures

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Brian G.; Cizginer, Sevdenur; Kim, Min-Chan; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Ducharme, Richard W.; Surti, Vihar C.; Sylla, Patricia; Brugge, William R.; Rattner, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Safe esophageal closure remains a challenge in transesophageal Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES). Previously described methods, such as suturing devices, clips, or submucosal tunneling, all have weaknesses. In this survival animal series, we demonstrate safe esophageal closure with a prototype retrievable, antimigration stent. Methods Nine Yorkshire swine underwent thoracic NOTES procedures. A double-channel gastroscope equipped with a mucosectomy device was used to create an esophageal mucosal defect. A 5-cm submucosal tunnel was created and the muscular esophageal wall was incised with a needle-knife. Mediastinoscopy and thoracoscopy were performed in all swine; lymphadenectomy was performed in seven swine. A prototype small intestinal submucosal (SurgiSIS) covered stent was deployed over the mucosectomy site and tunnel. Three versions of the prototype stent were developed. Prenecropsy endoscopy confirmed stent location and permitted stent retrieval. Explanted esophagi were sent to pathology. Results Esophageal stenting was successful in all animals. Stent placement took 15.8 ± 4.8 minuted and no stent migration occurred. Prenecropsy endoscopy revealed proximal ingrowth of esophageal mucosa and erosion with Stent A. Mucosal inflammation and erosion was observed proximally with Stent B. No esophageal erosion or pressure damage from proximal radial forces was seen with Stent C. On necropsy, swine 5 had a 0.5-cm periesophageal abscess. Histology revealed a localized inflammatory lesion at the esophageal exit site in swine 1, 3, and 9. The mucosectomy site was partially healed in three swine and poorly healed in six. All swine thrived clinically, except for a brief period of mild lethargy in swine 9 who improved with short-term antibiotic therapy. The submucosal tunnels were completely healed and no esophageal bleeding or stricture formation was observed. All swine survived 13.8 ± 0.4 days and gained weight in the postoperative period. Conclusions Esophageal stenting provides safe closure for NOTES thoracic procedures but may impede healing of the mucosectomy site. PMID:20820811

  19. Application of Endobronchial Ultrasonography for the Preoperative Detecting Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Lymph Node Metastasis of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Rong; Li, Yin; Gao, Xiao-Yan; Lin, Shi-Yong; Luo, Guang-Yu; Li, Jian-Jun; Xu, Guo-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background The preoperative detection of recurrent laryngeal nerve lymph node (RLN LN) metastasis provides important information for the treatment of esophageal cancer. We investigated the possibility of applying endobronchial ultrasonography (EBUS) with conventional preoperative endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and computerized tomography (CT) examination to evaluate RLN LN metastasis in patients with esophageal cancer. Methods A total of 115 patients with advanced thoracic esophageal cancer underwent EBUS examinations. Patients also underwent EUS and CT imaging as reference diagnostic methods. Positron emission tomography /computed tomography (PET/CT) was also introduced in partial patients as reference method. The preoperative evaluation of RLN LN metastasis was compared with the surgical and pathological staging in 94 patients who underwent radical surgery. Results The sensitivities of the preoperative evaluations of RLN LN metastasis by EBUS, EUS and CT were 67.6%, 32.4% and 29.4%, respectively. The sensitivity of EBUS was significantly different from that of EUS or CT, especially in the detection of right RLN LNs. In addition, according to the extra data from reference method, PET/CT was not superior to EBUS or EUS in detecting RLN LN metastasis. Among all 115 patients, 21 patients who were diagnosed with tracheal invasions by EUS or EBUS avoided radical surgery. Another 94 patients who were diagnosed as negative for tracheobronchial tree invasion by EUS and EBUS had no positive findings in radical surgery. Conclusions EBUS can enhance the preoperative sensitivity of the detection of RLN LN metastasis in cases of thoracic esophageal cancer and is a useful complementary examination to conventional preoperative EUS and CT, which can alert thoracic surgeons to the possibility of a greater range of preoperative lymph node dissection. EBUS may also indicate tracheal invasion in cases of esophageal stricture. PMID:26372339

  20. Multidisciplinary Modalities Achieve Encouraging Long-Term Survival in Resectable Limited-Disease Esophageal Small Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing-Xun; Wang, Xin; Fu, Jian-Hua; Lin, Peng; Yang, Hao-Xian

    2013-01-01

    Background The management of limited-disease esophageal small cell carcinoma is not well defined, and the role of surgery is still controversial. We aim to determine the optimal treatment strategy in limited-disease of esophageal small cell carcinoma. Methods and Findings We conducted a retrospective review of 141 patients with limited-disease esophageal small cell carcinoma from 3 institutions in China who underwent treatment between July 1994 and September 2008, July 1994 and July 2011, and June 2004 and December 2010, respectively. The survival rate was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and the log-rank test was used to assess the survival differences between the groups. Cox proportional hazards model were used to further determine the independent factors impacting overall survival. The median survival time was 16.1 months for the entire cohort of patients, with a 5-year survival rate of 6.7%. The median survival times for surgery alone, surgery combined with chemotherapy, surgery combined with radiotherapy, surgery combined with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, chemotherapy plus radiotherapy, and chemotherapy alone were 18.0 months, 15.0 months, 23.0 months, 25.0 months, 17.1 months, and 6.1 months, respectively; the corresponding 5-year survival rates were 0%, 15.4%, 0%, 38.9%, 0%, and 0%, respectively. For the 105 patients who underwent R0 resection, the median disease-free survival time was 12.0 months, with a 95% confidence interval of 9.5 months to 14.5 months. The multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that advanced pathological staging (p?=?0.003), and pure esophageal small cell carcinoma (p?=?0.035) were independent factors decreasing overall survival. Conclusions Our data suggested that multidisciplinary modalities achieved encouraging long-term survival in patients with resectable limited-disease of esophageal small cell carcinoma. PMID:23874925

  1. Exome sequencing identifies NFS1 deficiency in a novel Fe-S cluster disease, infantile mitochondrial complex II/III deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Farhan, Sali M K; Wang, Jian; Robinson, John F; Lahiry, Piya; Siu, Victoria M; Prasad, Chitra; Kronick, Jonathan B; Ramsay, David A; Rupar, C Anthony; Hegele, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are a class of highly conserved and ubiquitous prosthetic groups with unique chemical properties that allow the proteins that contain them, Fe-S proteins, to assist in various key biochemical pathways. Mutations in Fe-S proteins often disrupt Fe-S cluster assembly leading to a spectrum of severe disorders such as Friedreich's ataxia or iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme (ISCU) myopathy. Herein, we describe infantile mitochondrial complex II/III deficiency, a novel autosomal recessive mitochondrial disease characterized by lactic acidemia, hypotonia, respiratory chain complex II and III deficiency, multisystem organ failure and abnormal mitochondria. Through autozygosity mapping, exome sequencing, in silico analyses, population studies and functional tests, we identified c.215G>A, p.Arg72Gln in NFS1 as the likely causative mutation. We describe the first disease in man likely caused by deficiency in NFS1, a cysteine desulfurase that is implicated in respiratory chain function and iron maintenance by initiating Fe-S cluster biosynthesis. Our results further demonstrate the importance of sufficient NFS1 expression in human physiology. PMID:24498631

  2. Influence of chloride in mortar made of Portland cement types II, III, and V on the near-field microwave reflection properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Cairong; Benally, Aaron D.; Case, Tobias; Zoughi, Reza; Kurtis, Kimberly

    2000-07-01

    Corrosion of steel rebar in reinforced concrete structures, can be induced by the presence of chloride in the structure. Corrosion of steel rebar is a problematic issue in the construction industry as it compromises the strength and integrity of the structure. Although techniques exist for chloride detection and its migration into a structure, they are destructive, time consuming and cannot be used for the interrogation of large surfaces. In this investigation three different portland cement types; namely, ASTM types II, III and V were used, and six cubic (8' X 8' X 8') mortar specimens were produced all with water-to-cement (w/c) ratio of 0.6 and sand-to-cement (s/c) ratio of 1.5. Tap water was used when producing three of these specimens (one of each cement type). For the other three specimens calcium chloride was added to the mixing tap water resulting in a salinity of 2.5%. These specimens were placed in a hydration room for one day and thereafter left it the room temperature with low humidity. The reflection properties of these specimens, using an open-ended rectangular waveguide probe, were monitored daily at 3 GHz (S-band) and 10 GHz (X-band). The results show the influence of cement type on the reflection coefficient as well as the influence of chloride on the curing process and setting time.

  3. A Giant Purely Polypoid Esophageal Leiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Brichon, Pierre-Yves; Laverriere, Marie-Hélčne; Guigard, Sebastien; Chaffanjon, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    We present a case of a giant (13-cm length) purely polypoid esophageal leiomyoma without any intramural development. This form of leiomyoma is rare and develops due to proliferation originating from the muscularis mucosae, although the intramural type originates in the muscularis propria. This should not be confused with giant fibrovascular polyps, which are postulated to arise at the pharyngoesophageal junction when a flap of mobile, redundant submucosa prolapses distally and may cause asphyxia when protruding into the mouth. Our case was successfully removed by a right thoracotomy. PMID:26140772

  4. Treatment of esophageal spirocercosis with milbemycin oxime.

    PubMed

    Kelly, P J; Fisher, M; Lucas, H; Krecek, R C

    2008-10-01

    Six medium sized mixed breed dogs treated with milbemycin oxime (11.5mg on days 0, 7 and 28 and then monthly) stopped shedding Spirocerca lupi ova after 3-44 days. There was no evidence of subsequent shedding in repeated tests (about 5/dog) carried out from 31 to 133 days after initiation of treatment. Esophageal nodules disappeared in all dogs within 95-186 days and radiographic signs resolved within 85-127 days in the five dogs that were studied. This preliminary data shows milbemycin oxime deserves further evaluation for the treatment of spirocercosis. PMID:18644677

  5. Influence of Ionizing Radiation on Stromal-Epithelial Intercellular Communication in Esophageal Carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Kalabis, Jiri; Rustgi, Anil K.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Huff, Janice L.

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the 6th leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Its development is associated with a variety of risk factors including tobacco use, heavy alcohol consumption, human papilloma virus infection, and certain dietary factors such as trace mineral and vitamin deficiencies. An association with ionizing radiation exposure is revealed by the high excess relative risk for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus observed in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. It is also seen as a secondary malignancy in patients who received radiotherapy for breast and thoracic cancers; additionally, patients with head/neck and oral squamous cell cancers are at increased risk for metachronous esophageal squamous cell cancers. This malignancy is rapidly fatal, mainly because it remains asymptomatic until late, advanced stages when the disease is rarely curable. The stromal microenvironment plays an essential role in the maintenance and modulation of normal epithelial cell growth and differentiation and cross talk between the epithelial and stromal compartments can influence many aspects of malignant progression, including tumor cell proliferation, migration, invasion and recruitment of new blood vessels. To test the hypothesis that radiation exposure plays a role in esophageal carcinogenesis via non-targeted mechanisms involving stromal-epithelial cell communication, we are studying radiation effects on hTERT-immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells and genetic variants grown in co-culture with human esophageal stromal fibroblasts (Okawa et al., Genes & Dev. 2007. 21: 2788-2803). We examined how radiation treatment of stromal fibroblasts affected epithelial migration and invasion, behaviors associated with cancer promotion and progression. Chemotactic and haptotactic migration of epithelial cells stimulated by conditioned media from irradiated fibroblasts was measured using assays conducted in Transwell cell culture chambers. Our results using low LET radiation showed a dose-dependent increase in migration of epithelial cells when exposed to conditioned media from irradiated vs. non-irradiated fibroblasts. We also observed enhanced invasion through a basement membrane simulant. To identify chemotactic proteins secreted by irradiated stromal fibroblasts, we used antibody capture cytokine arrays and have identified several proteins as candidates. Increased secretion of these factors by irradiated fibroblasts was confirmed using ELISA. We are currently analyzing the contribution of these individual factors on epithelial migration and invasion, as well as their influence on cell survival and DNA repair. Studies using high-LET radiation will help determine radiation quality effects on these processes. These results should further our understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation impacts the tissue microenvironment and how it influences cancer development processes.

  6. Massive Endoscopic Screening for Esophageal and Gastric Cancers in a High-Risk Area of China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kun; Lü, Lingshuang; Peng, Xianzhen; Wang, Min; Xu, Guisheng; Hua, Zhaolai; Wang, Jianping; Xue, Hengchuan; Wang, Jianming; Lu, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aims to describe the findings from a massive endoscopic screening program in a high-risk area of China and to evaluate the prognosis of patients diagnosed through endoscopic screening compared with those diagnosed at usual hospital visits because of illness. Methods In 2006, an early detection and treatment program was initiated in Yangzhong county, China. Local residents aged 40–69 years were eligible for free endoscopic screening. Endoscopic examination was performed with Lugol’s iodine staining, followed by biopsies. Patients diagnosed with esophageal or gastric cancer were referred for treatment and followed to assess their long-term survival status. Results From 2006 through 2012, we screened 12453 participants, including 5334 (42.8%) men and 7119 (57.2%) women. The average age was 52.8±8.0 years. We detected 166 patients with upper digestive tract cancers, including 106 cancers in the esophagus (detection rate: 0.85%) and 60 cancers in the stomach (detection rate: 0.48%). Of these patients, 98.11% with esophageal cancer and 100% with gastric cancer were defined as at the early stage. In the process of follow-up, 17 patients died from cancer-related causes, and the median survival time was greater than 85 months. The overall survival rates for 1, 3 and 5 years were 98.0%, 90.0% and 89.0%, respectively. A significant positive effect was observed for the long-term survival of patients diagnosed through massive endoscopic screening. Conclusions In a high-risk population, massive endoscopic screening can identify early stage carcinoma of esophageal and gastric cancers and improve patients’ prognosis through early detection and treatment. PMID:26699332

  7. Gastroesophageal reflux in cirrhotic patients without esophageal varices

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Cui, Pei-Lin; Lv, Dong; Yao, Shi-Wei; Xu, You-Qing; Yang, Zhao-Xu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the esophageal motility and abnormal acid and bile reflux incidence in cirrhotic patients without esophageal varices (EV). METHODS: Seventy-eight patients with liver cirrhosis without EV confirmed by upper gastroesophageal endoscopy and 30 healthy control volunteers were prospectively enrolled in this study. All the patients were evaluated using a modified protocol including Child-Pugh score, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, esophageal manometry, simultaneous ambulatory 24-h esophageal pH and bilirubin monitoring. All the patients and volunteers accepted the manometric study. RESULTS: In the liver cirrhosis group, lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP, 15.32 ± 2.91 mmHg), peristaltic amplitude (PA, 61.41 ± 10.52 mmHg), peristaltic duration (PD, 5.32 ± 1.22 s), and peristaltic velocity (PV, 5.22 ± 1.11 cm/s) were all significantly abnormal in comparison with those in the control group (P < 0.05), and LESP was negatively correlated with Child-Pugh score. The incidence of reflux esophagitis (RE) and pathologic reflux was 37.18% and 55.13%, respectively (vs control, P < 0.05). And the incidence of isolated abnormal acid reflux, bile reflux and mixed reflux was 12.82%, 14.10% and 28.21% in patients with liver cirrhosis without EV. CONCLUSION: Cirrhotic patients without EV presented esophageal motor disorders and mixed acid and bile reflux was the main pattern; the cirrhosis itself was an important causative factor. PMID:21483637

  8. Overexpression of Ku80 correlates with aggressive clinicopathological features and adverse prognosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    WANG, SHUAI; WANG, ZHOU; YANG, YU; SHI, MO; SUN, ZHENGUO

    2015-01-01

    Ku80, a subunit of the heterodymeric Ku protein, is clearly implicated in nonhomologous end joining DNA repair, chemoresistance and radioresistance in malignant tumors. In the present study, the clinicopathological significance of Ku80 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) was investigated. The expression levels of Ku80 were determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry in ESCC specimens and normal esophageal mucosa. The mRNA and protein levels of Ku80 were significantly higher in ESCC tissues than in normal esophageal mucosa, and were significantly associated with tumor differentiation, local invasion, lymph node metastasis and tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage. However, overexpression of Ku80 mRNA and protein levels were not significantly correlated with age, gender, tumor site or tumor size. Cox proportional hazards regression model demonstrated that tumor local invasion, lymph node metastasis, TNM stage and Ku80 mRNA and protein levels were independent risk factors indicating the overall survival of patients with ESCC. The present study demonstrated that aberrant Ku80 overexpression is observed in ESCC. In addition, high expression levels of Ku80 are associated with adverse clinicopathological features and unfavorable prognosis in ESCC patients. PMID:26722230

  9. Normal variation of radionuclide esophageal transit

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, H.A.; Wald, A.

    1985-05-01

    The authors have extended their investigation of normal esophageal transit of aqueous Tc-99m sulfur colloid to determine range and reproducibility using previously described methods. They studied 5 males and 11 females, ages 21 to 67 (mean 35), with no symptoms of esophageal disease. Eight had repeat studies after a 48 day mean interval. The rapid component mean transit time through the esophagus in the 1st swallow (MTT), residual fraction after the 1st and 4th swallows (RF(1), RF(4)), and retrograde index quantifying retrograde motion in the 1st swallow (RI) are presented for the 16 initial studies. CV/sub i/ = intersubject coefficient of variation. CV/sub r/=mean intrasubject coefficient of variation of the 8 repeat pairs. Marked skewness of the distribution to the right, as well as high inter- and intrasubject variation, are noted for RF(1) and RI. Condensed images having a spatial and a temporal dimension show related variable qualitative features. In contrast, MTT distribution is somewhat symmetrical with lower variation, and RF(4) is intermediate. The authors conclude that the normal 1st swallow is subject to sporadic variation. Though all the measured indices may have diagnostic utility, certain of those having a lesser degree of normal variation, notably the residual fractions of swallows beyond the 1st, may discriminate better between normal and abnormal than do RF(1) and RI.

  10. Electrodes for long-term esophageal electrocardiography.

    PubMed

    Niederhauser, Thomas; Haeberlin, Andreas; Marisa, Thanks; Jungo, Michael; Goette, Josef; Jacomet, Marcel; Abacherli, Roger; Vogel, Rolf

    2013-09-01

    The emerging application of long-term and high-quality ECG recording requires alternative electrodes to improve the signal quality and recording capability of surface skin electrodes. The esophageal ECG has the potential to overcome these limitations but necessitates novel recorder and lead designs. The electrode material is of particular interest, since the material has to ensure conflicting requirements like excellent biopotential recording properties and inertness. To this end, novel electrode materials like PEDOT and silver-PDMS as well as established electrode materials such as stainless steel, platinum, gold, iridium oxide, titanium nitride, and glassy carbon were investigated by long-term electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and model-based signal analysis using the derived in vitro interfacial properties in conjunction with a dedicated ECG amplifier. The results of this novel approach show that titanium nitride and iridium oxide featuring microstructured surfaces did not degrade when exposed to artificial acidic saliva. These materials provide low electrode potential drifts and insignificant signal distortion superior to surface skin electrodes making them compatible with accepted standards for ambulatory ECG. They are superior to the noble and polarizable metals such as platinum, silver, and gold that induced more signal distortions and are superior to esophageal stainless steel electrodes that corrode in artificial saliva. The study provides rigorous criteria for the selection of electrode materials for prolonged ECG recording by combining long-term in vitro electrode material properties with ECG signal quality assessment. PMID:23649132

  11. Esophageal Involvement in Multiple System Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroshige; Nakayama, Hideaki; Hori, Kazuhiro; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Inoue, Makoto; Shimohata, Takayoshi

    2015-12-01

    The prevalence of esophageal involvement and its impact on clinical manifestations in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) remains unknown. We recruited 16 consecutive patients with dysphagia associated with MSA (MSA group) and 16 consecutive patients with dysphagia associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS group). We assessed the presence or absence of food stagnation within the esophagus using videofluorography. Food stagnation within the esophagus was observed in 16 patients (100 %; 7 severe, 9 mild) in the MSA group and in 4 patients (25 %; 4 mild) in the ALS group (P < 0.001). Follow-up videofluorography revealed that food stagnation in patients with MSA could exacerbate during the disease course. Patients with MSA and severe food stagnation showed a wide range of intraesophageal stasis by videofluorography. Among the 16 patients in the MSA group, 4 developed aspiration pneumonia and 1 died of suffocation associated with food regurgitation during continuous positive airway pressure therapy. In conclusion, food stagnation within the esophagus occurs more frequently in MSA patients with dysphagia than in ALS patients with dysphagia. Because food stagnation can cause serious complications such as aspiration pneumonia and suffocation, patients with MSA should be evaluated by videofluorography, especially those with stagnation in the esophageal phase. PMID:26205436

  12. Defining esophageal landmarks, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    DeVault, Kenneth; McMahon, Barry P; Celebi, Altay; Costamagna, Guido; Marchese, Michele; Clarke, John O; Hejazi, Reza A; McCallum, Richard W; Savarino, Vincenzo; Zentilin, Patrizia; Savarino, Edoardo; Thomson, Mike; Souza, Rhonda F; Donohoe, Claire L; O'Farrell, Naoimh J; Reynolds, John V

    2013-10-01

    The following paper on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and Barrett's esophagus (BE) includes commentaries on defining esophageal landmarks; new techniques for evaluating upper esophageal sphincter (UES) tone; differential diagnosis of GERD, BE, and hiatal hernia (HH); the use of high-resolution manometry for evaluation of reflux; the role of fundic relaxation in reflux; the use of 24-h esophageal pH-impedance testing in differentiating acid from nonacid reflux and its potential inclusion in future Rome criteria; classification of endoscopic findings in GERD; the search for the cell origin that generates BE; and the relationship between BE, Barrett's carcinoma, and obesity. PMID:24117649

  13. Chimeric Anterolateral Thigh Flap for Total Thoracic Esophageal Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Moya, Alejandro; Segura-Sampedro, Juan J; Sicilia-Castro, Domingo; Carvajo-Pérez, Francisco; Gómez-Cía, Tomás; Vázquez-Medina, Antonio; Ibáńez-Delgado, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Gastric pull-up is generally the first choice for a total thoracic esophageal reconstruction. Malfunction of this gastric conduit is uncommon, but devastating when it occurs: it causes marked comorbidity to the patient, preventing oral intake and worsening quality of life. Secondary salvage thoracic esophageal reconstruction surgery is usually performed with free or pedicled jejunum flaps or colon interposition. We present a case of a total thoracic esophageal reconstruction with an externally monitored chimeric anterolateral thigh flap, extending from the cervical esophagus to the retrosternal gastroplasty remnant. Intestinal reconstructive techniques were not an available option for this patient. PMID:26694271

  14. Quality Management and Key Performance Indicators in Oncologic Esophageal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gockel, Ines; Ahlbrand, Constantin Johannes; Arras, Michael; Schreiber, Elke Maria; Lang, Hauke

    2015-12-01

    Ranking systems and comparisons of quality and performance indicators will be of increasing relevance for complex "high-risk" procedures such as esophageal cancer surgery. The identification of evidence-based standards relevant for key performance indicators in esophageal surgery is essential for establishing monitoring systems and furthermore a requirement to enhance treatment quality. In the course of this review, we analyze the key performance indicators case volume, radicality of resection, and postoperative morbidity and mortality, leading to continuous quality improvement. Ranking systems established on this basis will gain increased relevance in highly complex procedures within the national and international comparison and furthermore improve the treatment of patients with esophageal carcinoma. PMID:26177703

  15. Enhanced Expression of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 IIIc Promotes Human Esophageal Carcinoma Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Nobuhiro; Shimizu, Akio; Kanai, Michiyuki; Iwaya, Yugo; Ueda, Shugo; Nakayama, Jun; Seo, Misuzu Kurokawa

    2016-01-01

    Deregulated expression of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) and their ligands plays critical roles in tumorigenesis. The gene expression of an alternatively spliced isoforms of FGFR3, FGFR3IIIc, was analyzed by RT-PCR in samples from patients with esophageal carcinoma (EC), including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and adenocarcinoma (EAC). The incidence of FGFR3IIIc was higher in EC [12/16 (75%); p=0.073] than in non-cancerous mucosa (NCM) [6/16 (38%)]. Indeed, an immunohistochemical analysis of early-stage ESCC showed that carcinoma cells expressing FGFR3IIIc stained positively with SCC-112, a tumor marker, and Ki67, a cell proliferation marker, suggesting that the expression of FGFR3IIIc promotes cell proliferation. We used EC-GI-10 cells endogenously expressing FGFR3IIIc as a model of ESCC to provide mechanistic insight into the role of FGFR3IIIc in ESCC. The knockdown of endogenous FGFR3 using siRNA treatment significantly abrogated cell proliferation and the overexpression of FGFR3IIIc in cells with enhanced cell proliferation. EC-GI-10 cells and ESCC from patients with EC showed endogenous expression of FGF2, a specific ligand for FGFR3IIIc, suggesting that the upregulated expression of FGFR3IIIc may create autocrine FGF signaling in ESCC. Taken together, FGFR3IIIc may have the potential to be an early-stage tumor marker and a molecular target for ESCC therapy. PMID:26487184

  16. Multiple Rapid Swallow Responses During Esophageal High-Resolution Manometry Reflect Esophageal Body Peristaltic Reserve

    PubMed Central

    Shaker, Anisa; Stoikes, Nathaniel; Drapekin, Jesse; Kushnir, Vladimir; Brunt, L. Michael; Gyawali, C. Prakash

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Dysphagia may develop following antireflux surgery as a consequence of poor esophageal peristaltic reserve. We hypothesized that suboptimal contraction response following multiple rapid swallows (MRS) could be associated with chronic transit symptoms following antireflux surgery. METHODS Wet swallow and MRS responses on esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) were characterized collectively in the esophageal body (distal contractile integral (DCI)), and individually in each smooth muscle contraction segment (S2 and S3 amplitudes) in 63 patients undergoing antireflux surgery and in 18 healthy controls. Dysphagia was assessed using symptom questionnaires. The MRS/wet swallow ratios were calculated for S2 and S3 peak amplitudes and DCI. MRS responses were compared in patients with and without late postoperative dysphagia following antireflux surgery. RESULTS Augmentation of smooth muscle contraction (MRS/wet swallow ratios > 1.0) as measured collectively by DCI was seen in only 11.1% with late postoperative dysphagia, compared with 63.6% in those with no dysphagia and 78.1% in controls (P?0.02 for each comparison). Similar results were seen with S3 but not S2 peak amplitude ratios. Receiver operating characteristics identified a DCI MRS/wet swallow ratio threshold of 0.85 in segregating patients with late postoperative dysphagia from those with no postoperative dysphagia with a sensitivity of 0.67 and specificity of 0.64. CONCLUSIONS Lack of augmentation of smooth muscle contraction following MRS is associated with late postoperative dysphagia following antireflux surgery, suggesting that MRS responses could assess esophageal smooth muscle peristaltic reserve. Further research is warranted to determine if antireflux surgery needs to be tailored to the MRS response. PMID:24019081

  17. Manganese(II,III) Oxyborate, Mn 2OBO 3: A Distorted Homometallic Warwickite—Synthesis, Crystal Structure, Band Calculations, and Magnetic Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrestam, R.; Kritikos, M.; Sjödin, A.

    1995-02-01

    The manganese(II,III) oxyborate with the composition Mn2OBO3 has been synthesized by high-temperature techniques. X-ray studies show that crystals of the specimen, grown with borax as flux, are monoclinic, with space group P21/n, = 9.2866(7), b = 9.5333(10), c = 3.2438(3) Ĺ, and ? = 90.757(7)°. A model of the crystal structure has been refined with the 2064 most significant (l ? 5 · ?1) X-ray reflections with sin(?)/? ? 1.08 Ĺ-1 to R = 0.40. The structure of Mn2OBO3 can be considered to be a distorted modification of the orthorhombic warwickite structure. The distortions, apparently caused by Jahn-Teller effects induced by the Mn3+ ions, remove the mirror symmetry of the parent undistorted warwickite. As a consequence, the space group symmetry is lowered from Pnam to one of its subgroups, P21/n. The structural results as well as the measured magnetic susceptibilities indicate high-spin manganese ions. The magnetic susceptibilities in the temperature region 110-300 K follow the Curie-Weiss law. The Weiss constant of -132(1) K indicates an antiferromagnetic ordering at low temperature. The bond distances and calculated bond valence sums indicate that the trivalent manganese ions are located in the two inner columns of the four-octahedra-wide walls. This metal charge distribution is supported by extended Hückel band calculations on some homometallic warwickites. The difference in metal coordination around one of the borate oxygen atoms is reflected by a significant deviation of the borate group geometry from the ideal trigonal symmetry.

  18. Systemic, postsymptomatic antisense oligonucleotide rescues motor unit maturation delay in a new mouse model for type II/III spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Bogdanik, Laurent P; Osborne, Melissa A; Davis, Crystal; Martin, Whitney P; Austin, Andrew; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C Frank; Lutz, Cathleen M

    2015-10-27

    Clinical presentation of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) ranges from a neonatal-onset, very severe disease to an adult-onset, milder form. SMA is caused by the mutation of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, and prognosis inversely correlates with the number of copies of the SMN2 gene, a human-specific homolog of SMN1. Despite progress in identifying potential therapies for the treatment of SMA, many questions remain including how late after onset treatments can still be effective and what the target tissues should be. These questions can be addressed in part with preclinical animal models; however, modeling the array of SMA severities in the mouse, which lacks SMN2, has proven challenging. We created a new mouse model for the intermediate forms of SMA presenting with a delay in neuromuscular junction maturation and a decrease in the number of functional motor units, all relevant to the clinical presentation of the disease. Using this new model, in combination with clinical electrophysiology methods, we found that administering systemically SMN-restoring antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) at the age of onset can extend survival and rescue the neurological phenotypes. Furthermore, these effects were also achieved by administration of the ASOs late after onset, independent of the restoration of SMN in the spinal cord. Thus, by adding to the limited repertoire of existing mouse models for type II/III SMA, we demonstrate that ASO therapy can be effective even when administered after onset of the neurological symptoms, in young adult mice, and without being delivered into the central nervous system. PMID:26460027

  19. Systemic, postsymptomatic antisense oligonucleotide rescues motor unit maturation delay in a new mouse model for type II/III spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanik, Laurent P.; Osborne, Melissa A.; Davis, Crystal; Martin, Whitney P.; Austin, Andrew; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C. Frank; Lutz, Cathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical presentation of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) ranges from a neonatal-onset, very severe disease to an adult-onset, milder form. SMA is caused by the mutation of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, and prognosis inversely correlates with the number of copies of the SMN2 gene, a human-specific homolog of SMN1. Despite progress in identifying potential therapies for the treatment of SMA, many questions remain including how late after onset treatments can still be effective and what the target tissues should be. These questions can be addressed in part with preclinical animal models; however, modeling the array of SMA severities in the mouse, which lacks SMN2, has proven challenging. We created a new mouse model for the intermediate forms of SMA presenting with a delay in neuromuscular junction maturation and a decrease in the number of functional motor units, all relevant to the clinical presentation of the disease. Using this new model, in combination with clinical electrophysiology methods, we found that administering systemically SMN-restoring antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) at the age of onset can extend survival and rescue the neurological phenotypes. Furthermore, these effects were also achieved by administration of the ASOs late after onset, independent of the restoration of SMN in the spinal cord. Thus, by adding to the limited repertoire of existing mouse models for type II/III SMA, we demonstrate that ASO therapy can be effective even when administered after onset of the neurological symptoms, in young adult mice, and without being delivered into the central nervous system. PMID:26460027

  20. Japanese POEMS syndrome with Thalidomide (J-POST) Trial: study protocol for a phase II/III multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Kanako; Misawa, Sonoko; Sato, Yasunori; Sobue, Gen; Yabe, Ichiro; Watanabe, Osamu; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Kusunoki, Susumu; Kikuchi, Seiji; Nakashima, Ichiro; Ikeda, Shu-ichi; Kohara, Nobuo; Kanda, Takashi; Kira, Jun-ichi; Hanaoka, Hideki; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein and skin changes (POEMS) syndrome is a fatal systemic disorder associated with plasma cell dyscrasia and the overproduction of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Recently, the prognosis of POEMS was substantially improved by introduction of therapeutic intervention for myeloma. However, no randomised clinical trial has been performed because of the rarity and severity of the disease. Methods and analysis The Japanese POEMS syndrome with Thalidomide (J-POST) Trial is a phase II/III multicentre, double-blinded, randomised, controlled trial that aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a 24-week treatment with thalidomide in POEMS syndrome, with an additional 48-week open-label safety study. Adults with POEMS syndrome who have no indication for transplantation are assessed for eligibility at 12 tertiary neurology centres in Japan. Patients who satisfy the eligibility criteria are randomised (1:1) to receive thalidomide (100–300?mg daily) plus dexamethasone (12?mg/m2 on days 1–4 of a 28-day cycle) or placebo plus dexamethasone. Both treatments were administered for 24?weeks (six cycles; randomised comparative study period). Patients who complete the randomised study period or show subacute deterioration during the randomised period participate in the subsequent 48-week open-label safety study (long-term safety period). The primary end point of the study is the reduction rate of serum VEGF levels at 24?weeks. Ethics and dissemination The protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board of each hospital. The trial was notified and registered at the Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency, Japan (No. 22-1716). The J-POST Trial is currently ongoing and is due to finish in August 2015. The findings of this trial will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations and will also be disseminated to participants. Trial registration number UMIN000004179 and JMA-IIA00046. PMID:25573527

  1. Slow magnetic relaxation and electron delocalization in an S = 9/2 iron(II/III) complex with two crystallographically inequivalent iron sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Susanta; Sasmal, Sujit; Fleck, Michel; Grandjean, Fernande; Sougrati, Moulay T.; Ghosh, Meenakshi; Harris, T. David; Bonville, Pierre; Long, Gary J.; Mohanta, Sasankasekhar

    2011-05-01

    The magnetic, electronic, and Mössbauer spectral properties of [Fe2L(?-OAc)2]ClO4, 1, where L is the dianion of the tetraimino-diphenolate macrocyclic ligand, H2L, indicate that 1 is a class III mixed valence iron(II/III) complex with an electron that is fully delocalized between two crystallographically inequivalent iron sites to yield a [Fe2]V cationic configuration with a St = 9/2 ground state. Fits of the dc magnetic susceptibility between 2 and 300 K and of the isofield variable-temperature magnetization of 1 yield an isotropic magnetic exchange parameter, J, of -32(2) cm-1 for an electron transfer parameter, B, of 950 cm-1, a zero-field uniaxial D9/2 parameter of -0.9(1) cm-1, and g = 1.95(5). In agreement with the presence of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy, ac susceptibility measurements reveal that 1 is a single-molecule magnet at low temperature with a single molecule magnetic effective relaxation barrier, Ueff, of 9.8 cm-1. At 5.25 K the Mössbauer spectra of 1 exhibit two spectral components, assigned to the two crystallographically inequivalent iron sites with a static effective hyperfine field; as the temperature increases from 7 to 310 K, the spectra exhibit increasingly rapid relaxation of the hyperfine field on the iron-57 Larmor precession time of 5 × 10-8 s. A fit of the temperature dependence of the average effective hyperfine field yields |D9/2| = 0.9 cm-1. An Arrhenius plot of the logarithm of the relaxation frequency between 5 and 85 K yields a relaxation barrier of 17 cm-1.

  2. Insect lipoprotein biogenesis depends on an amphipathic beta cluster in apolipophorin II/I and is stimulated by microsomal triglyceride transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Smolenaars, Marcel M W; de Morrée, Antoine; Kerver, Jana; Van der Horst, Dick J; Rodenburg, Kees W

    2007-09-01

    Lipoproteins transport lipids in the circulation of an evolutionally wide diversity of animals. The pathway for lipoprotein biogenesis has been revealed to a large extent in mammals only, in which apolipoprotein B (apoB) acquires lipids via the assistance of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) and binds them by means of amphipathic protein structures. To investigate whether this is a common mechanism for lipoprotein biogenesis in animals, we studied the structural elements involved in the assembly of the insect lipoprotein, lipophorin. LOCATE sequence analysis predicted that the insect lipoprotein precursor, apolipophorin II/I (apoLp-II/I), contains clusters of amphipathic alpha-helices and beta-strands, organized along the protein as N-alpha(1)-beta-alpha(2)-C, reminiscent of a truncated form of apoB. Recombinant expression of a series of C-terminal truncation variants of Locusta migratoria apoLp-II/I in an insect cell (Sf9) expression system revealed that the formation of a buoyant high density lipoprotein requires the amphipathic beta cluster. Coexpression of apoLp-II/I with the MTP homolog of Drosophila melanogaster affected insect lipoprotein biogenesis quantitatively as well as qualitatively, as the secretion of apoLp-II/I proteins was increased several-fold and the buoyant density of the secreted lipoprotein decreased concomitantly, indicative of augmented lipidation. Based on these findings, we propose that, despite specific modifications, the assembly of lipoproteins involves MTP as well as amphipathic structures in the apolipoprotein carrier, both in mammals and insects. Thus, lipoprotein biogenesis in animals appears to rely on structural elements that are of early metazoan origin. PMID:17568063

  3. The trifunctional antibody catumaxomab for the treatment of malignant ascites due to epithelial cancer: Results of a prospective randomized phase II/III trial.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Markus M; Murawa, Pawel; Koralewski, Piotr; Kutarska, Elzbieta; Kolesnik, Olena O; Ivanchenko, Vladimir V; Dudnichenko, Alexander S; Aleknaviciene, Birute; Razbadauskas, Arturas; Gore, Martin; Ganea-Motan, Elena; Ciuleanu, Tudor; Wimberger, Pauline; Schmittel, Alexander; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Burges, Alexander; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Lindhofer, Horst; Lahr, Angelika; Parsons, Simon L

    2010-11-01

    Malignant ascites is a common manifestation of advanced cancers, and treatment options are limited. The trifunctional antibody catumaxomab (anti-epithelial cell-adhesion molecule x anti-CD3) represents a targeted immunotherapy for the intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment of malignant ascites secondary to epithelial cancers. In this phase II/III trial (EudraCT 2004-000723-15; NCT00836654), cancer patients (n = 258) with recurrent symptomatic malignant ascites resistant to conventional chemotherapy were randomized to paracentesis plus catumaxomab (catumaxomab) or paracentesis alone (control) and stratified by cancer type (129 ovarian and 129 nonovarian). Catumaxomab was administered as an i.p. infusion on Days 0, 3, 7 and 10 at doses of 10, 20, 50 and 150 mug, respectively. The primary efficacy endpoint was puncture-free survival. Secondary efficacy parameters included time to next paracentesis, ascites signs and symptoms and overall survival (OS). Puncture-free survival was significantly longer in the catumaxomab group (median 46 days) than the control group (median 11 days) (hazard ratio = 0.254: p < 0.0001) as was median time to next paracentesis (77 versus 13 days; p < 0.0001). In addition, catumaxomab patients had fewer signs and symptoms of ascites than control patients. OS showed a positive trend for the catumaxomab group and, in a prospectively planned analysis, was significantly prolonged in patients with gastric cancer (n = 66; 71 versus 44 days; p = 0.0313). Although adverse events associated with catumaxomab were frequent, they were manageable, generally reversible and mainly related to its immunologic mode of action. Catumaxomab showed a clear clinical benefit in patients with malignant ascites secondary to epithelial cancers, especially gastric cancer, with an acceptable safety profile. PMID:20473913

  4. The trifunctional antibody catumaxomab for the treatment of malignant ascites due to epithelial cancer: Results of a prospective randomized phase II/III trial

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, Markus M; Murawa, Pawel; Koralewski, Piotr; Kutarska, Elzbieta; Kolesnik, Olena O; Ivanchenko, Vladimir V; Dudnichenko, Alexander S; Aleknaviciene, Birute; Razbadauskas, Arturas; Gore, Martin; Ganea-Motan, Elena; Ciuleanu, Tudor; Wimberger, Pauline; Schmittel, Alexander; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Burges, Alexander; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Lindhofer, Horst; Lahr, Angelika; Parsons, Simon L

    2010-01-01

    Malignant ascites is a common manifestation of advanced cancers, and treatment options are limited. The trifunctional antibody catumaxomab (anti-epithelial cell-adhesion molecule x anti-CD3) represents a targeted immunotherapy for the intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment of malignant ascites secondary to epithelial cancers. In this phase II/III trial (EudraCT 2004-000723-15; NCT00836654), cancer patients (n = 258) with recurrent symptomatic malignant ascites resistant to conventional chemotherapy were randomized to paracentesis plus catumaxomab (catumaxomab) or paracentesis alone (control) and stratified by cancer type (129 ovarian and 129 nonovarian). Catumaxomab was administered as an i.p. infusion on Days 0, 3, 7 and 10 at doses of 10, 20, 50 and 150 ?g, respectively. The primary efficacy endpoint was puncture-free survival. Secondary efficacy parameters included time to next paracentesis, ascites signs and symptoms and overall survival (OS). Puncture-free survival was significantly longer in the catumaxomab group (median 46 days) than the control group (median 11 days) (hazard ratio = 0.254: p < 0.0001) as was median time to next paracentesis (77 versus 13 days; p < 0.0001). In addition, catumaxomab patients had fewer signs and symptoms of ascites than control patients. OS showed a positive trend for the catumaxomab group and, in a prospectively planned analysis, was significantly prolonged in patients with gastric cancer (n = 66; 71 versus 44 days; p = 0.0313). Although adverse events associated with catumaxomab were frequent, they were manageable, generally reversible and mainly related to its immunologic mode of action. Catumaxomab showed a clear clinical benefit in patients with malignant ascites secondary to epithelial cancers, especially gastric cancer, with an acceptable safety profile. PMID:20473913

  5. Iris metastasis from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LV, DONGLAI; HU, ZONGTAO; WANG, CHONG; GAO, SHILE; XU, JUN

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoma metastatic to the eye is a rare condition, typically associated with a poor prognosis. Breast and lung cancers are the most common sources of intraocular metastases, and the majority of metastatic lesions involve the posterior uvea, with <8% of reported cases arising in the iris. Intraocular metastasis as the presenting form of esophageal carcinoma is highly uncommon. In the present report, a rare case of metastatic iris tumor resulting from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is discussed. A 64-year-old patient presented with a progressively distending pain in the right eye, with associated blurred vision. Local and systemic evaluation was performed, followed by treatment. Multiple examinations identified a neoplasm in the right iris and postoperative pathology revealed that the iris lesion was a metastasis of esophageal squamous cell cancer origin. The patient was treated with adjuvant radiation. To the best of our knowledge, this was only the second reported case of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma metastasizing to the iris.

  6. Fatal aorto-esophageal fistula in child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pehlivan, Sultan; Kara, Dogus Ozdemir; Turkkan, Dilhan; Akçan, Ramazan; Gokmen, Asude; Akduman, Baris; Karapirli, Mustafa

    2014-02-01

    Esophageal foreign body ingestion is especially frequent in childhood and may cause fatal complications in case of late diagnosis and delayed treatment. We present a case of 2-year old girl who was admitted to emergency department with massive bleeding. However, she died due to an unrecognized foreign body resulted an aorto-esophageal fistula. At autopsy an aorto-esophageal fistula was detected by gross examination. Tissue samples were obtained from the organs and fistula region. In histopathological examination, a calcified body with multinucleated giant cell and surrounding granulation tissue was detected at the bleeding site. An ulcerated fistula tract ran from the intima to the adventitia, passing through layers of esophageal wall was also noticed. The mortality rate for foreign body ingestion is less than 1%, except in cases of perforation. Therefore the presented case is among rare examples of fatal foreign body ingestions. PMID:24485434

  7. Preoperative Chemotherapy, Radiation Improve Survival in Esophageal Cancer (Updated)

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with esophageal cancer who received chemotherapy and radiation before surgery survived, on average, nearly twice as long as patients treated with surgery alone, according to results of a randomized clinical trial published May 31, 2012, in NEJM.

  8. Adding Targeted Therapy to Treatment for Esophageal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this phase III clinical trial, people with confirmed HER2-positive locally advanced esophageal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive preoperative radiation therapy and chemotherapy, with or without trastuzumab.

  9. Buspirone, a new drug for the management of patients with ineffective esophageal motility?

    PubMed Central

    Scheerens, Charlotte; Tack, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) is the most frequently encountered esophageal motility disorder. Patients may present with a variety of symptoms, such as dysphagia, heartburn, odynophagia, and regurgitation. Over the past years, the landscape of esophageal motility testing has been revolutionized; however, our current treatment options for IEM still remain limited. Previous studies have suggested that buspirone, a serotonin receptor agonist, enhances esophageal peristalsis and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) function. Recent work provides the first evidence that buspirone may influence LES resting pressure in patients with systemic sclerosis. Future research should evaluate whether the beneficial effects of buspirone also apply to the broad clinical entity of esophageal dysphagia patients with IEM. PMID:26137300

  10. Role of Endoscopy in Diagnosis and Management of Pediatric Eosinophilic Esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Muir, Amanda B; Merves, Jamie; Liacouras, Chris A

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic allergic (immune-mediated) disease that leads to esophageal dysfunction and feeding disorders in children. Foods, and possibly environmental triggers, cause an inflammatory response in the esophagus, leading to esophageal inflammation, eosinophilic infiltration, and esophageal dysmotility, which may progress to dysphagia, food impaction, and esophageal stricture. Endoscopy with biopsy and histologic evaluation is currently the only method to diagnose EoE. Once diagnosed with EoE, children undergo follow-up endoscopy after therapy initiation and adjustments to ensure remission. Furthermore, children with food impactions or strictures may require endoscopic intervention such as foreign body removal and/or esophageal dilation. PMID:26616904

  11. Androgens and esophageal cancer: What do we know?

    PubMed Central

    Sukocheva, Olga A; Li, Bin; Due, Steven L; Hussey, Damian J; Watson, David I

    2015-01-01

    Significant disparities exist between genders for the development and progression of several gastro-intestinal (GI) diseases including cancer. Differences in incidence between men vs women for colon, gastric and hepatocellular cancers suggest a role for steroid sex hormones in regulation of GI carcinogenesis. Involvement of intrinsic gender-linked mechanisms is also possible for esophageal adenocarcinoma as its incidence is disproportionally high among men. However, the cause of the observed gender differences and the potential role of androgens in esophageal carcinogenesis remains unclear, even though the cancer-promoting role of androgen receptors (AR) shown in other cancers such as prostate and bladder suggests this aspect warrants exploration. Several studies have demonstrated expression of ARs in esophageal cancer. However, only one study has suggested a potential link between AR signaling and outcome - poorer prognosis. Two groups have analyzed data from cohorts with prostate cancer and one of these found a decreased incidence of esophageal squamous and adenocarcinoma after androgen deprivation therapy. However, very limited information is available about the effects of androgen and AR-initiated signaling on esophageal cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Possible mechanisms for androgens/AR involvement in the regulation of esophageal cancer growth are considered, and the potential use of AR as a prognostic factor and clinical target is highlighted, although insufficient evidence is available to support clinical trials of novel therapies. As esophageal adenocarcinoma is a gender linked cancer with a large male predominance further studies are warranted to clarify the role of androgens and ARs in shaping intracellular signaling and genomic responses in esophageal cancer. PMID:26034350

  12. Multidisciplinary management of early and locally advanced esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaifi, Jussuf T; Gusani, Niraj J; Jiang, Yixing; Mackley, Heath B; Dye, Charles E; Mathew, Abraham; Kimchi, Eric T; Reed, Michael F; Staveley-O'Carroll, Kevin F

    2011-01-01

    Clinical management of esophageal cancer is a multidisciplinary challenge. Diagnosis is associated with a high mortality and approximately 40% of patients have locally advanced disease at clinical presentation. Surgery remains one of the fundamental parts of treatment, but multimodal approaches including chemotherapy and radiation are associated with improved outcomes. This comprehensive review addresses the multidisciplinary management of early and locally advanced esophageal cancer. PMID:21301357

  13. [Congenital esophagotracheal fistulas without esophageal atresia in children].

    PubMed

    Bourdiničre, J; Lavalou, J F; Le Clech, G; Babut, J M; Camuzet, J P; Leprince, B; Le Gall, G

    1985-01-01

    Ten cases are reported of children presenting isolated, congenital esophagotracheal fistulae without esophageal atresia, or "H-type-fistula" of Anglo-Saxon authors. The malformation is rare, of difficult diagnosis and often associated with other malformations. Respiratory symptomatology is sometimes dramatic, but diagnosis is based on data from radiologic imaging of the esophagus and from esophageal and tracheobronchial endoscopy. Treatment is surgical by a cervicotomy approach due to the almost constant high localization of the lesion. PMID:4037619

  14. Analysis of esophageal cancer time trends in China, 1989- 2008.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; He, Yu-Tong; Zheng, Rong-Shou; Zhang, Si-Wei; Chen, Wan-Qing

    2012-01-01

    National cancer incidence data were utilized to analyze trends in esophageal cancer incidence in China in order to provide basic information for making cancer control strategy. We retrieved and re-sorted valid esophageal cancer incidence data from National Central Cancer Registry Database over 20 years period from 1989 to 2008. Crude incidence and age-standardized incidence rates were calculated for analysis, with annual percent change estimated by Joinpoint software for long term trend analysis. The crude incidence rate of esophageal cancer was found to have remained relatively stable in both urban and rural areas over the 20 year period. Age standardized incidence rate (ASR) in cancer registration areas decreased from 39.5/100,000 in 1989 to 23.0/100,000 in 2008 in all areas (AAPC=-3.3%, 95% CI:-2.8~-3.7). The trend was no change in urban areas and 2.1% average annual decrease observed in rural aras. Before the year of 2000, esophageal cancer incidence rates significant decreased with 2.8% annually and then the rates kept stable. Over 20 years from 1989 to 2008, esophageal cancer age standardized incidence rate in cancer registration areas decreased with time. However, esophageal cancer is still a big issue and efforts for control should be continuously enhanced. Cancer registration is playing an important role in cancer control with the number of registries increasing and data quality improving in China. PMID:23167389

  15. Effect of bolus composition on esophageal transit: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.S.; Malmud, L.S.; Appelgate, G.; Rock, E.; Lorber, S.H.

    1982-10-01

    The technique of esophageal scintigraphy was developed as a sensitive, quantitative, noninvasive test of esophageal transit. Esophageal scintigraphy was performed in 40 asymptomatic normal volunteers in order to determine the effect on esophageal transit of the following: body posture (sitting vs. supine), liquid vs. solid, the solid being either a standard gelatin capsule of the size used for antibiotic capsules, or a cube of solid food such as cooked chicken liver. The results showed that liquids emptied completely from the esophagus after one swallow whether supine or sitting. Capsules or liver cubes, when ingested without water, frequently remained in the esophagus for up to two hours without the subject's having any sensation that the solid had not left the esophagus. Both capsules and liver cubes cleared the esophagus better in the upright than in the supine position. When gelatin capsules were swallowed with as little as 15 ml of water, but after a preliminary sip of water, there was complete transit in each case. The study suggests that the practice of assisting patients into a sitting position and instructing them to take a sip of water before attempting to swallow a capsule will assure better transit of the capsule even when swallowed with as little as 15 ml of water. This may reduce the incidence of esophagitis following oral antibiotics, and of esophageal erosions from aspirin-containing medications.

  16. Effect of bolus composition on esophageal transit: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.S.; Malmud, L.S.; Applegate, G.; Rock, E.; Lorber, S.H.

    1982-10-01

    The technique of esophageal scintigraphy was developed as a sensitive, quantitative, noninvasive test of esophageal transit. Esophageal scintigraphy was performed in 40 asymptomatic normal volunteers in order to determine the effect on esophageal transit of the following: body posture (sitting vs. supine), liquid vs. solid, the solid being either a standard number4 gelatin capsule of the size used for antibiotic capsules, or a cube of solid food such as cooked chicken liver. The results showed that liquids emptied completely from the esophagus after one swallow, whether supine or sitting. Capsules or liver cubes, when ingested without water, frequently remained in the esophagus for up to two hours without the subject's having any sensation that the solid had not left the esophagus. Both capsules and liver cubes cleared the esophagus better in the upright than in the supine position. When gelatin capsules were swallowed with as little as 15 ml of water, but after a preliminary sip of water, there was complete transit in each case. The study suggests that the practice of assisting patients into a sitting position and instructing them to take a sip of water before attempting to swallow a capsule will assure better transit of the capsule even when swallowed with as little as 15 ml of water. This may reduce the incidence of esophagitis following oral antibiotics, and of esophageal erosions from aspirin-containing medications.

  17. Reconstruction techniques for hypopharyngeal and cervical esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ming; He, Xiaotian; Wu, Duoguang; Han, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the incidence of perioperative complications in patients with hypopharyngeal and cervical esophageal carcinoma who underwent three types of esophageal defect reconstruction procedures. Methods Clinical data from 105 patients with hypopharyngeal and cervical esophageal carcinoma who were treated at SUN YAT-SEN Memorial Hospital from January 2003 to February 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Among these patients, 45 underwent a pectoral major muscle skin flap reconstruction following carcinoma resection (group A); 32 patients were treated with stomach replacement of the esophagus (group B), and 28 patients were treated with tube stomach replacement of the esophagus (group C). The incidences of perioperative complications were compared among these three groups. Results The incidences of anastomotic leakage, neck swelling, and incision infection were significantly lower in group C than in group A (P<0.05). The incidences of anastomotic leakage, reflux esophagitis, and thoracic stomach syndrome were significantly lower in group C than in group B (P<0.05). Conclusions Tube stomach replacement of the esophagus in the setting of hypopharyngeal and cervical esophageal carcinoma reduced the incidence of complications; therefore, it is a reasonable procedure for the management of esophageal defects. PMID:25922724

  18. Data analyses and perspectives on laparoscopic surgery for esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Kazuto; Omura, Nobuo; Yano, Fumiaki; Hoshino, Masato; Yamamoto, Se-Ryung; Akimoto, Shunsuke; Masuda, Takahiro; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    In general, the treatment methods for esophageal achalasia are largely classified into four groups, including drug therapy using nitrite or a calcium channel blocker, botulinum toxin injection, endoscopic therapy such as endoscopic balloon dilation, and surgery. Various studies have suggested that the most effective treatment of esophageal achalasia is surgical therapy. The basic concept of this surgical therapy has not changed since Heller proposed esophageal myotomy for the purpose of resolution of lower esophageal obstruction for the first time in 1913, but the most common approach has changed from open-chest surgery to laparoscopic surgery. Currently, the laparoscopic surgery has been the procedure of choice for the treatment of esophageal achalasia. During the process of the transition from open-chest surgery to laparotomy, to thoracoscopic surgery, and to laparoscopic surgery, the necessity of combining antireflux surgery has been recognized. There is some debate as to which type of antireflux surgery should be selected. The Toupet fundoplication may be the most effective in prevention of postoperative antireflux, but many medical institutions have selected the Dor fundoplication which covers the mucosal surface exposed by myotomy. Recently, a new endoscopic approach, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM), has received attention. Future studies should examine the long-term outcomes and whether POEM becomes the gold standard for the treatment of esophageal achalasia. PMID:26478674

  19. Data analyses and perspectives on laparoscopic surgery for esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Kazuto; Omura, Nobuo; Yano, Fumiaki; Hoshino, Masato; Yamamoto, Se-Ryung; Akimoto, Shunsuke; Masuda, Takahiro; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2015-10-14

    In general, the treatment methods for esophageal achalasia are largely classified into four groups, including drug therapy using nitrite or a calcium channel blocker, botulinum toxin injection, endoscopic therapy such as endoscopic balloon dilation, and surgery. Various studies have suggested that the most effective treatment of esophageal achalasia is surgical therapy. The basic concept of this surgical therapy has not changed since Heller proposed esophageal myotomy for the purpose of resolution of lower esophageal obstruction for the first time in 1913, but the most common approach has changed from open-chest surgery to laparoscopic surgery. Currently, the laparoscopic surgery has been the procedure of choice for the treatment of esophageal achalasia. During the process of the transition from open-chest surgery to laparotomy, to thoracoscopic surgery, and to laparoscopic surgery, the necessity of combining antireflux surgery has been recognized. There is some debate as to which type of antireflux surgery should be selected. The Toupet fundoplication may be the most effective in prevention of postoperative antireflux, but many medical institutions have selected the Dor fundoplication which covers the mucosal surface exposed by myotomy. Recently, a new endoscopic approach, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM), has received attention. Future studies should examine the long-term outcomes and whether POEM becomes the gold standard for the treatment of esophageal achalasia. PMID:26478674

  20. Research advances in esophageal diseases: bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    di Pietro, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    Over the last year, significant steps have been made toward understanding the pathogenesis of esophageal diseases and translating this knowledge to clinical practice. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common outpatient diagnosis in gastroenterology and has a high prevalence in the general population. As many as 40% of patients with GERD have incomplete response to medical therapy, and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying lack of response are now better understood. Novel medical and minimally invasive interventions are available to optimize management of GERD. Esophageal cancer, regardless of the histological subtype, has among the worst survival statistics among all malignancies. Taking advantage of technological advances in genome sequencing, the mutational spectra in esophageal cancer are now emerging, offering novel avenues for targeted therapies. Early diagnosis is another strand for improving survival. While genome-wide association studies are providing insights into genetic susceptibility, novel approaches to early detection of cancer are being devised through the use of biomarkers applied to esophageal samples and as part of imaging technologies. Dysmotility and eosinophilic esophagitis are the differential diagnoses in patients with dysphagia. New pathophysiological classifications have improved the management of motility disorders. Meanwhile, exciting progress has been made in the endoscopic management of these conditions. Eosinophilic esophagitis is still a relatively new entity, and the pathogenesis remains poorly understood. However, it is now clear that an allergic reaction to food plays an important role, and dietary interventions as well as biologic agents to block the inflammatory cascade are novel, promising fields of clinical research. PMID:24167725

  1. A Zebrafish Model for Studies on Esophageal Epithelial Biology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Beasley, Andrea; Hu, Yuhui; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian esophagus exhibits a remarkable change in epithelial structure during the transition from embryo to adult. However, the molecular mechanisms of esophageal epithelial development are not well understood. Zebrafish (Danio rerio), a common model organism for vertebrate development and gene function, has not previously been characterized as a model system for esophageal epithelial development. In this study, we characterized a piece of non-keratinized stratified squamous epithelium similar to human esophageal epithelium in the upper digestive tract of developing zebrafish. Under the microscope, this piece was detectable at 5dpf and became stratified at 7dpf. Expression of esophageal epithelial marker genes (Krt5, P63, Sox2 and Pax9) was detected by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Knockdown of P63, a gene known to be critical for esophageal epithelium, disrupted the development of this epithelium. With this model system, we found that Pax9 knockdown resulted in loss or disorganization of the squamous epithelium, as well as down-regulation of the differentiation markers Krt4 and Krt5. In summary, we characterized a region of stratified squamous epithelium in the zebrafish upper digestive tract which can be used for functional studies of candidate genes involved in esophageal epithelial biology. PMID:26630178

  2. Ultrastructural Changes of the Smooth Muscle in Esophageal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Al-Shraim, Mubarak M; Eid, Refaat A; Musalam, Adel Osman; Radad, Khaled; Ibrahim, Ashraf H M; Malki, Talal A

    2015-12-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) with or without tracheo-esophageal fistula (TEF) is a relatively rare congenital anomaly. Despite the advances in the management techniques and neonatal intensive care, esophageal dysmotility remains a very common problem following EA/TEF repair. Our current study aimed to describe the most significant ultrastructural changes of the smooth muscle cells (SMCs) trying to highlight some of the underlying mechanisms of esophageal dysmotility following EA/TEF repair. Twenty-three biopsies were obtained from the tip of the lower esophageal pouch (LEP) of 23 patients during primary repair of EA/TEF. Light microscopic examination was performed with hematoxylin and eosin (HE), and Van Gieson's stains. Ultrastructural examination was done using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Histopathological examination showed distortion of smooth muscle layer and deposition of an abundant amount of fibrous tissue in-between smooth muscles. Using TEM, SMCs exhibited loss of the cell-to-cell adhesion, mitochondrial vacuolation, formation of myelin figures, and apoptotic fragmentation. There were also plasmalemmal projections and formation of ghost bodies. Interestingly, SMCs were found extending pseudopodia-like projections around adjacent collagen fibers. Engulfed collagen fibers by SMCs underwent degradation within autophagic vacuoles. Degeneration of SMCs and deposition of abundant extracellular collagen fibers are prominent pathological changes in LEP of EA/TEF. These changes might contribute to the pathogenesis of esophageal dysmotility in patients who have survived EA/TEF. PMID:26548437

  3. Primary extramedullary esophageal plasmacytoma - a case report.

    PubMed

    Debnath, C R; Debnath, M R; Shahjahan, S M; Rana, M S; Islam, M S; Rashid, M; Tarafder, A J

    2015-04-01

    Extramedullary plasmacytomas are very uncommon tumors, may occur commonly in the upper respiratory passages. These are rarely seen in the middle and lower gastrointestinal system and exceptional to originate in the esophagus. We present a novel case of a 65-year old man who presented with dysphagia and weight loss. After taking detailed clinical history and physical examination endoscopy was performed that showed an ulcero-proliferative lesion involving the lower third of esophagus. Histopathological examination revealed sheets of malignant plasma cells, some with prominent nucleoli. Immuno-histochemistry could not be done due to unavailability. A bone marrow biopsy was performed which was negative for involvement. This is a rare case of esophageal plasmacytoma diagnosed on endoscopy in a patient presenting with dysphagia. PMID:26007272

  4. Obesity and Risk of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma and Barrett’s Esophagus: A Mendelian Randomization Study

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Gammon, Marilie D.; Bernstein, Leslie; Reid, Brian J.; Onstad, Lynn; Risch, Harvey A.; Liu, Geoffrey; Bird, Nigel C.; Wu, Anna H.; Corley, Douglas A.; Romero, Yvonne; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chow, Wong-Ho; Casson, Alan G.; Levine, David M.; Zhang, Rui; Ek, Weronica E.; MacGregor, Stuart; Ye, Weimin; Hardie, Laura J.; Vaughan, Thomas L.; Whiteman, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Data from observational studies suggest that body mass index (BMI) is causally related to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and its precursor, Barrett’s esophagus (BE). However, the relationships may be affected by bias and confounding. Methods We used data from the Barrett’s and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Genetic Susceptibility Study: 999 patients with EAC, 2061 patients with BE, and 2169 population controls. We applied the two-stage control function instrumental variable method of the Mendelian randomization approach to estimate the unbiased, unconfounded effect of BMI on risk of EAC and BE. This was performed using a genetic risk score, derived from 29 genetic variants shown to be associated with BMI, as an instrument for lifetime BMI. A higher score indicates propensity to obesity. All tests were two-sided. Results The genetic risk score was not associated with potential confounders, including gastroesophageal reflux symptoms and smoking. In the instrumental variable analyses (IV), EAC risk increased by 16% (IV-odds ratio [OR] = 1.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01 to 1.33) and BE risk increased by 12% (IV-OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.00 to 1.25) per 1kg/m2 increase in BMI. BMI was statistically significantly associated with EAC and BE in conventional epidemiologic analyses. Conclusions People with a high genetic propensity to obesity have higher risks of esophageal metaplasia and neoplasia than people with low genetic propensity. These analyses provide the strongest evidence to date that obesity is independently associated with BE and EAC, and is not due to confounding or bias inherent in conventional epidemiologic analyses. PMID:25269698

  5. Prediction of outcome with FDG-PET in definitive chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Atsumi, Kazushige; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Abe, Koichiro; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Sasaki, Tomonari; Baba, Shingo; Isoda, Takuro; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Shinoto, Makoto; Asai, Kaori; Honda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose uptake positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for the prediction of outcome in definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for esophageal cancer. We enrolled 56 patients with esophageal cancer treated with definitive CRT and examined by FDG-PET before treatment. We examined the correlation of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) in FDG-PET of the primary tumor with overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local control (LC) and response of the primary tumor. After definitive CRT, 30 patients had a clinical complete response (CR), making the CR rate 54%. For all 56 patients, the 2-year OS rate, PFS rate and LC rates were 64%, 38% and 51%, respectively. We divided the patients into two groups according to SUVmax: SUVmax < 10 (low-SUV) and ?10 (high-SUV). The 2-year OS rates in the low- and high-SUV groups were 100% and 41%, the PFS rates were 73% and 19%, the LC rates were 71% and 39%, and the CR rates were 100% and 32%, respectively. A univariate analysis revealed significant differences between the low- and high-SUV group in OS, PFS, LC and response (P = 0.0005, 0.0002, 0.048, and <0.0001, respectively). SUVmax and T stage were significantly associated with OS, PFS, LC and response. A multivariate analysis showed significant differences between the SUVmax <10 and ?10 groups in overall survival and response (P < 0.05). Our result suggests that the SUVmax in FDG-PET of the primary tumor before treatment may have prognostic value for esophageal cancer. PMID:23520267

  6. Survival Effect of Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy Before Esophagectomy for Patients With Esophageal Cancer: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schwer, Amanda L. Ballonoff, Ari; McCammon, Robert; Rusthoven, Kyle; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Schefter, Tracey E.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: The role of neoadjuvant radiotherapy (NeoRT) before definitive surgery for esophageal cancer remains controversial. This study used a large population-based database to assess the effect of NeoRT on survival for patients treated with definitive surgery. Methods and Materials: The overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival for patients with Stage T2-T4, any N, M0 (cT2-T4M0) esophageal cancer who had undergone definitive surgery between 1998 and 2004 were analyzed by querying the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results database. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated and univariate comparisons were made using the log-rank test. Cox proportional hazards survival regression multivariate analysis was performed with NeoRT, T stage (T2 vs. T3-T4), pathologic nodal status (pN0 vs. pN1), number of nodes dissected (>10 vs. {<=}10), histologic type (adenocarcinoma vs. squamous cell carcinoma), age (<65 vs. {>=}65 years), and gender as covariates. Results: A total of 1,033 patients were identified. Of these, 441 patients received NeoRT and 592 underwent esophagectomy alone; 77% were men, 67% had adenocarcinoma, and 72% had Stage T3-T4 disease. The median OS and cause-specific survival were both significantly greater for patients who received NeoRT compared with esophagectomy alone (27 vs. 18 months and 35 vs. 21 months, respectively, p <0.0001). The 3-year OS rate was also significantly greater in the NeoRT group (43% vs. 30%). On multivariate analysis, NeoRT, age <65 years, adenocarcinoma histologic type, female gender, pN0 status, >10 nodes dissected, and Stage T2 disease were all independently correlated with increased OS. Conclusion: These results support the use of NeoRT for patients with esophageal cancer. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these results.

  7. The association between reflux esophagitis and airway hyper-reactivity in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux

    PubMed Central

    Karbasi, Ashraf; Ardestani, Mohammad Emami; Ghanei, Mostafa; Harandi, Ali Amini

    2013-01-01

    Background: The association of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) with a wide variety of pulmonary disorders was recognized. We aimed to evaluate the effect of GER-induced esophagitis on airway hyper-reactivity (AHR) in patients and the response to treatment. Materials and Methods: In this cohort study, 30 patients attending the gastrointestinal clinic of a university hospital with acid reflux symptoms were included. All patients were evaluated endoscopically and divided into case group with esophagitis and control group without any evidence of esophagitis. Spirometry and methacholine test were done in all patients before and after treatment of GER with pantoprazole 40 mg daily for six months. Results: There was a significant difference in the rate of positive methacholine test between the cases (40%) and the controls (6.7%) prior to anti-acid therapy (P < 0.0001). After six months of treatment, the frequency of positive methacholine test diminished from 40 to 13.3% in the case group (P < 0.05) but did not change in the controls (P = 0.15). Conclusion: The presence of esophagitis due to GER would increase the AHR and treatment with pantoperazole would decrease AHR in patients with proved esophagitis and no previous history of asthma after six months. PMID:24250694

  8. Impact of alcohol consumption on survival in patients with esophageal carcinoma: A large cohort with long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qingyuan; Luo, Kongjia; Yang, Hong; Wen, Jing; Zhang, Shuishen; Li, Jinhui; Ela Bella, Amos; Liu, Qianwen; Yang, Fu; Zheng, Yuzhen; Hu, Ronggui; Chen, Junying; Fu, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is a well-established cause of esophageal carcinoma, but its effect on survival is little known and contradictory. To clarify whether drinking is an independent predictor of survival in esophageal carcinoma, 2151 Chinese patients, receiving surgical resection from January 1997 to December 2008, were followed until March 2014. Cox proportional hazards analysis was applied to evaluate the prognostic effect of alcohol consumption. The median follow-up was 64 months. The median overall survival (OS; 42 months) and disease-free survival (DFS; 33 months) for never-drinkers were significantly higher than ever-drinkers (27 and 22 months, respectively). In the multivariate Cox model that was adjusted for age, weight loss, stage according to criteria set by the American Joint Committee on Cancer, radicality of surgery, adjuvant treatment, smoking status, and gender, the hazard ratios of ever-drinking were 1.22 (1.06–1.41, P = 0.005) on OS, and 1.16 (1.01–1.34, P = 0.037) on DFS. The hazardous effect on OS and DFS of drinking grew statistically significantly in a dose-dependent manner with increasing amount of alcohol consumption per day (both P-value for trend < 0.05). The predictive effect of drinking on OS (P = 0.596) or DFS (P = 0.207) was not significant in the subgroup with esophageal adenocarcinoma (n = 195). The current study revealed that the survival is shortened, of those patients who consume alcohol before diagnosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, which are not attributable to differences in stage, smoking status, and gender. Alcohol control should be emphasized to reduce mortality of esophageal carcinoma, and further outcome studies should include alcohol as a potential prognosticator. PMID:25287715

  9. Flavonoid consumption and esophageal cancer among Black and White men in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavonoids and proanthocyanidins are bioactive polyphenolic components of fruits and vegetables that may account for part of the protective effect of raw fruit and vegetable consumption in esophageal cancer. We studied the relationship between esophageal cancer and dietary proanthocyanidins, flavon...

  10. Structure-function correlations of calcium binding and calcium channel activities based on 3-dimensional models of human annexins I, II, III, V and VII.

    PubMed

    Chen, J M; Sheldon, A; Pincus, M R

    1993-06-01

    The annexins are a family of calcium-dependent phospholipid-binding proteins which share a high degree of primary sequence similarity. Using a model of the crystal structure of annexin V as a template, 3-dimensional models of human annexins I, II, III and VII were constructed by homology modeling (J. Greer, J. Mol. Biol. 153, 1027-1042, 1981; J.M. Chen, G. Lee, R.B. Murphy, R.P. Carty, P.W. Brant-Rauf, E. Friedman and M.R. Pincus, J. Biomolec. Str. Dyn. 6, 859-87, 1989) for the 316 amino acid portions corresponding to the annexin V structure published by Huber et al. (J. Mol. Biol. 223, 683-704, 1992). These methods were used to study structure-function correlations for calcium ion binding and calcium channel activity. Published experimental data are specifically shown to be consistent with the annexin models. Possible intramolecular disulfide bridges were identified in annexin I (between Cys297 and Cys316) and in annexins II and VII (between Cys115 and Cys243). Each of the annexin models have 3 postulated calcium binding sites, usually via a Gly-Xxx-Gly-Thr loop with an acidic Glu or Asp residue 42 positions C-terminal to the first Gly. Despite a nonconserved binding site sequence, annexins I and II are able to coordinate calcium in domain 3 since the residue in the second loop position is directed toward the solvent away from the binding pocket. This finding also suggests a mechanism for a conformational change upon binding calcium. Highly conserved Arg and acidic sidechains stabilize the channel pore structure; annexin channels probably exist in a closed state normally. Arg271 may be involved in channel opening upon activation: basic residue 254 can stabilize Glu112, which allows Arg271 to interact with residue 95 instead of Glu112. Residue 267, found on the convex surface at the pore opening, may also be important in modifying channel activity. PMID:8395183

  11. SU-E-J-88: Margin Reduction of Level II/III Planning Target Volume for Image-Guided Simultaneous Integrated Boost Head-And-Neck Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Can, S; Neylon, J; Qi, S; Santhanam, A; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of improved normal tissue sparing for head-and-neck (H'N) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) by employing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for target level II/III though a GPU-based deformable image registration and dose accumulation framework. Methods: Ten H'N simultaneous integrated boost cases treated on TomoTherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Weekly kVCT scans in addition to daily MVCT scans were acquired for each patient. Reduced margin plans were generated with 0- mm margin for level II and III PTV (while 3-5 mm margin for PTV1) and compared with the standard margin plan using 3-5mm margin to all CTV1-3 (reference plan). An in-house developed GPU-based 3D image deformation tool was used to register and deform the weekly KVCTs with the planning CT and determine the delivered mean/minimum/maximum dose, dose volume histograms (DVHs), etc. Results: Compared with the reference plans, the averaged cord maximum, the right and left parotid doses reduced by 22.7 %, 16.5 %, and 9 % respectively in the reduced margin plans. The V95 for PTV2 and PTV3 were found within 2 and 5% between the reference and tighter margin plans. For the reduced margin plans, the averaged cumulative mean doses were consistent with the planned dose for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 within 1.5%, 1.7% and 1.4%. Similar dose variations of the delivered dose were seen for the reference and tighter margin plans. The delivered maximum and mean doses for the cord were 3.55 % and 2.37% higher than the planned doses; a 5 % higher cumulative mean dose for the parotids was also observed for the delivered dose than the planned doses in both plans. Conclusion: By imposing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for level II and III targets for H'N irradiation, acceptable cumulative doses were achievable when coupled with weekly kVCT guidance while improving normal structure sparing.

  12. Case-matched analysis of combined thoracoscopic-laparoscopic versus open esophagectomy for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xianglai; Yang, Juesheng; Peng, Jinhua; Jiang, Han

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate surgical results and long-term survival of combined thoracoscopic-laparoscopic esophagectomy (TLE) performed for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Data of 59 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, undergoing TLE from January 2007 to January 2015, were compared to a control group of 59 patients who underwent open esophagectomy (OE) during the same period. The two groups were matched in terms of age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) score and clinical TNM stage. Laparoscopic approach resulted in longer operating time (P=0.003) and lower blood loss (P=0.000). There was no difference in perioperative morbidity and mortality rate; TLE approach was associated with a shorter hospital stay (P=0.000). After a mean follow up of 38 months, 5-year disease free survival and 5-year overall survival were 38% and 50% for TLE group, and 36% and 45% for OE group (P>0.05). TLE for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is feasible and safe in selected patients and can result in good surgical results, with similar outcomes in terms of long-term outcomes. PMID:26550289

  13. Late Toxicity After Definitive Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Thoracic Esophageal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Morota, Madoka Gomi, Kotaro; Kozuka, Takuyo; Chin, Keisho; Matsuura, Masaaki; Oguchi, Masahiko; Ito, Hisao; Yamashita, Takashi

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate late cardiopulmonary toxicities after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for esophageal carcinomas. Methods and Materials: From February 2002 through April 2005, 74 patients with clinical Stage I-IVB carcinoma of the esophagus were treated with CCRT. Sixty-nine patients with thoracic squamous cell carcinoma were the core of this analysis. Patients received 60 Gy of radiation therapy in 30 fractions over 8 weeks, including a 2-week break, and received 2 cycles of fluorouracil/cisplatin chemotherapy concomitantly. Initial radiation fields included primary tumors, metastatic lymph nodes, and supraclavicular, mediastinal, and celiac nodes areas. Late toxicities were assessed with the late radiation morbidity scoring scheme of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organiation for Research and Treatment of Cancer. Results: The median age was 67 years (range, 45-83 years). The median follow-up time was 26.1 months for all patients and 51.4 months for patients still alive at the time of analysis. Five cardiopulmonary toxic events of Grade 3 or greater were observed in 4 patients, Grade 5 heart failure and Grade 3 pericarditis in 1 patient, and Grade 3 myocardial infarction, Grade 3 radiation pneumonitis, and Grade 3 pleural effusion. The 2-year cumulative incidence of late cardiopulmonary toxicities of Grade 3 or greater for patients 75 years or older was 29% compared with 3% for younger patients (p = 0.005). Conclusion: The CCRT used in this study with an extensive radiation field is acceptable for younger patients but is not tolerated by patients older than 75 years.

  14. The complex relationship between eosinophilic esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Katzka, David A

    2014-01-01

    That gastroesophageal reflux and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) may both lead to esophageal eosinophilia is well known. What is not known is how, if at all, these entities interact to contribute to this pathologic entity in specific patients and how often they occur in patients as synergistic contributors to the disease as opposed to distinct processes. There are several hypotheses by which gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and EoE might interact to cause esophageal eosinophilia. These include (1) reflux of food from the stomach with increased antigenic exposure to esophageal epithelium; (2) reflux-induced dilation of intercellular spaces in the epithelium facilitating dendritic cell and antigen movement through the mucosa, and (3) a common inflammatory pathway activated by both GERD and EoE. Although these hypotheses appear plausible, supporting clinical data is not readily available. For example, it is unclear if the beneficial effect of proton pump inhibitors on esophageal eosinophilia is mediated through control of acid exposure to esophageal mucosa or independent anti-inflammatory effects. There is also a lack of definitive evidence to support an increased incidence of GERD in the pediatric population in the absence of evident risk factors such as obesity. One would think if GERD were an important cofactor in this disease, the incidence of GERD would rise similarly to EoE. It is speculated that GERD and EoE coexist and in some patients interact to facilitate esophageal eosinophilia and its sequelae. However, the presence and degree of this interaction likely varies remarkably. Their presence could be influenced by other factors such as age of the patient and genetic predisposition to EoE. PMID:24603388

  15. Contractile profile of esophageal and gastric fundus strips in experimental doxorubicin-induced esophageal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Capeto, F.A.; Lima, F.J.B.; Okoba, W.; Ramos, F.L.; Messias, T.F.A.; Rigonatto, G.A.; Sbragia, L.; Magalhăes, P.J.C.; Melo-Filho, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is characterized by esophageal and gastric motility changes secondary to developmental and postsurgical damage. This study evaluated the in vitro contractile profile of the distal esophagus and gastric fundus in an experimental model of EA induced by doxorubicin (DOXO). Wistar pregnant rats received DOXO 2.2 mg/kg on the 8th and 9th gestational days. On day 21.5, fetuses were collected, sacrificed, and divided into groups: control, DOXO without EA (DOXO-EA), and DOXO with EA (DOXO+EA). Strips from the distal esophagus and gastric fundus were mounted on a wire myograph and isolated organ-bath system, respectively, and subjected to increasing concentrations of carbamylcholine chloride (carbachol, CCh). The isolated esophagus was also stimulated with increasing concentrations of KCl. In esophagus, the concentration-effect curves were reduced in response to CCh in the DOXO+EA and DOXO-EA groups compared to the control group (P<0.05). The maximum effect values (Emax) for DOXO+EA and DOXO-EA were significantly lower than control (P<0.05), but the half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) values were not significantly different when the three groups were compared (P>0.05). In response to KCl, the distal esophagus samples in the three groups were not statistically different with regard to Emax or EC50 values (P>0.05). No significant difference was noted for EC50 or Emax values in fundic strips stimulated with CCh (P>0.05). In conclusion, exposure of dams to DOXO during gestation inhibited the contractile behavior of esophageal strips from offspring in response to CCh but not KCl, regardless of EA induction. The gastric fundus of DOXO-exposed offspring did not have altered contractile responsiveness to cholinergic stimulation. PMID:25760030

  16. Esophageal reflexes modulate frontoparietal response in neonates: Novel application of concurrent NIRS and provocative esophageal manometry

    PubMed Central

    Pakiraih, Joanna F.; Hasenstab, Kathryn A.; Dar, Irfaan; Gao, Xiaoyu; Bates, D. Gregory; Kashou, Nasser H.

    2014-01-01

    Central and peripheral neural regulation of swallowing and aerodigestive reflexes is unclear in human neonates. Functional near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a noninvasive method to measure changes in oxyhemoglobin (HbO) and deoxyhemoglobin (HbD). Pharyngoesophageal manometry permits evaluation of aerodigestive reflexes. Modalities were combined to investigate feasibility and to test neonatal frontoparietal cortical changes during pharyngoesophageal (visceral) stimulation and/or swallowing. Ten neonates (45.6 ± 3.0 wk postmenstrual age, 4.1 ± 0.5 kg) underwent novel pharyngoesophageal manometry concurrent with NIRS. To examine esophagus-brain interactions, we analyzed cortical hemodynamic response (HDR) latency and durations during aerodigestive provocation and esophageal reflexes. Data are presented as means ± SE or percent. HDR rates were 8.84 times more likely with basal spontaneous deglutition compared with sham stimuli (P = 0.004). Of 182 visceral stimuli, 95% were analyzable for esophageal responses, 38% for HDR, and 36% for both. Of analyzable HDR (n = 70): 1) HbO concentration (?mol/l) baseline 1.5 ± 0.7 vs. 3.7 ± 0.7 poststimulus was significant (P = 0.02), 2) HbD concentration (?mol/l) between baseline 0.1 ± 0.4 vs. poststimulus ?0.5 ± 0.4 was not significant (P = 0.73), and 3) hemispheric lateralization was 21% left only, 29% right only, and 50% bilateral. During concurrent esophageal and NIRS responses (n = 66): 1) peristaltic reflexes were present in 74% and HDR in 61% and 2) HDR was 4.75 times more likely with deglutition reflex vs. secondary peristaltic reflex (P = 0.016). Concurrent NIRS with visceral stimulation is feasible in neonates, and frontoparietal cortical activation is recognized. Deglutition contrasting with secondary peristalsis is related to cortical activation, thus implicating higher hierarchical aerodigestive protective functional neural networks. PMID:24789204

  17. Occult esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with metastases to the spine and central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Roballo, Carla Adriane; de Campos, Pompeu Tomé Ribeiro; Teixeira, Carlos Osvaldo; Teixeira, Maria Aparecida Barone

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal malignancy encompasses a group of diseases that are mostly represented by the squamous cell carcinoma and the adenocarcinoma. Quite frequently, these neoplasms present aggressive behavior; therefore, the diagnosis is often made when the condition is in advanced stages. Dysphagia is the typical clinical complaint, although it is present only when most of the lumen is obstructed. Therefore, quite often, the metastatic disease is first diagnosed, which contributes to the patient's poor survival expectancy. The authors report the case of a 58-year-old man who looked for medical care complaining of a long-term history of scapular pain. The diagnostic work-up disclosed a cervical spine lytic lesion surrounded by a tumoral mass shown by computed tomography. The cervical tumor was sampled by fine needle aspiration, revealing an undifferentiated carcinoma. The outcome was unfavorable and the patient died. The autopsy findings revealed metastatic disease to the spine and central nervous system, and the primary tumor was found to be an esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, which had progressed without typical dysphagia. PMID:26484322

  18. The expression of ?-catenin in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and its correlations with prognosis of patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun-Yi; Bai, Chun-Ying; Bai, Yu-Qin; Zhang, Jing-Yi; Wu, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Shao-Hong; Xu, Xiu-E; Wu, Jian-Yi; Zhu, Ying; Rui, Yun; Li, En-Min; Xu, Li-Yan

    2014-10-01

    As a member of the catenin family, expression of ?-catenin and its clinical implication in numerous tumors remain unclear. In the present study, expression of ?-catenin in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and its correlations with patient prognosis were explored. We detected the expression of ?-catenin, by immunohistochemistry, in ESCC tissues from 299 cases and analyzed the correlation between ?-catenin expression and patient clinicopathological features. Compared with a lack of expression in adjacent normal esophageal epithelium (0%, 0/47), the frequency of ?-catenin protein was increased in ESCC tissues to 41.5% (124/299, P < .001) and expression correlated with TNM stage and lymph node metastasis (P = .025 and .019, respectively). Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that patients with high ?-catenin expression had shorter survival than patients with low expression (P = .010), and multivariate Cox analysis revealed that high ?-catenin expression was also an independent prognostic factor (P = .001). In transwell assays, migration of ESCC cells was enhanced by ?-catenin overexpression, whereas proliferation of ESCC cells was unchanged. Together, our results suggest that ?-catenin acts as an oncoprotein when overexpressed in ESCC, and its expression is associated with poor prognosis and malignant cell behavior. PMID:25090917

  19. High expression of TACC3 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma correlates with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yi-Ren; Cao, Xun; Zhu, Lin-Chun; Zeng, Mu-Sheng; Zhong, Qian; Wen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the expression of the transforming acidic coiled-coil protein 3 (TACC3) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) samples, and to identify whether TACC3 can serve as a biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of ESCC, qPCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry staining (IHC) were utilized to detect the expression of TACC3. Furthermore, cell growth, colony formation, migration ability and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers of ESCC cells in which TACC3 were knocked-down were measured. The mRNA and protein levels of TACC3 were higher in ESCC specimens compared to non-tumorous esophageal epithelial tissues. IHC results revealed TACC3 expression was significantly correlated to differentiation (p = 0.017) and lymphoid nodal status (p = 0.028). The patients with high-expression of TACC3 had a significantly poor prognosis compared to those of low-expression (p = 0.017), especially in the patients at stages I–II (p = 0.028). Multivariate analysis indicated that TACC3 expression was an independent prognostic factor for ESCC patients (p = 0.025). Knockdown of TACC3 inhibited the ability of cell proliferation, colony formation and migration. This study first identifies TACC3 not only as a useful biomarker for diagnose and prognosis of ESCC, but also as a potential therapeutic target for patients with ESCC. PMID:25760075

  20. Useful strategies to prevent severe stricture after endoscopic submucosal dissection for superficial esophageal neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Kaname; Iijima, Katsunori; Koike, Tomoyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    The minimal invasiveness of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) prompted us to apply this technique to large-size early esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and Barrett’s adenocarcinoma, despite the limitations in the study population and surveillance duration. A post-ESD ulceration of greater than three-fourths of esophageal circumference was advocated as an important risk factor for refractory strictures that require several sessions of dilation therapy. Most of the preoperative conditions are asymptomatic, but dilatation treatment for dysphagia associated with the stricture has potential risks of severe complications and a worsening of quality of life. Possible mechanisms of dysphasia were demonstrated based on dysmotility and pathological abnormalities at the site: (1) delayed mucosal healing; (2) severe inflammation and disorganized fibrosis with abundant extracellular matrices in the submucosa; and (3) atrophy in the muscularis proper. However, reports on the administration of anti-scarring agents, preventive dilation therapies, and regenerative medicine demonstrated limited success in stricture prevention, and there were discrepancies in the study designs and protocols of these reports. The development and consequent long-term assessments of new prophylactic technologies on the promotion of wound healing and control of the inflammatory/tumor microenvironment will require collaboration among various research fields because of the limited accuracy of preoperative staging and high-risk of local recurrence. PMID:26109798

  1. Overexpression of Cystatin SN positively affects survival of patients with surgically resected esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cystatin SN is a secreted protein and a cysteine proteinase inhibitor. It has been considered to be a tumor marker for gastrointestinal tract cancer in several functional researches. However, the clinicopathological and prognostic significance of Cystatin SN expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has not been elucidated. Methods In our study, the expression of Cystatin SN was detected in 209 surgically resected ESCC tissues and 170 peritumoral normal esophageal mucosae by immunohistochemistry. The prognostic significance of Cystatin SN expression was analysed with Kaplan-Meier plots and the Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results The results showed that the immunostaining of Cystatin SN in ESCC tissues was less intense than that in the normal control tissue (P?stage II subgroup (P?

  2. Factors Predictive of Tumor Recurrence and Survival After Initial Complete Response of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Definitive Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Ryu; Yamamoto, Sachiko; Iishi, Hiroyasu; Takeuchi, Yoji; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Higashino, Koji; Uedo, Noriya; Tatsuta, Masaharu; Yano, Masahiko; Imai, Atsushi; Nishiyama, Kinji

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To assess factors predictive of recurrent disease and survival after achieving initial complete response (CR) to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients who had clinical Stage I-IVA esophageal cancer and received definitive CRT between 2001 and 2007 were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Of 269 patients with esophageal cancer, 110 who achieved CR after definitive CRT were included in the analyses. Chemoradiotherapy mainly consisted of 2 cycles of cisplatin and fluorouracil with concurrent radiotherapy of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. We identified 28 recurrences and 28 deaths during follow-up. The cumulative 1- and 3-year recurrence rates were 18% and 32%, respectively. By univariate and multivariate analyses, tumor category (hazard ratio [HR] 6.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-30.2; p = 0.015) was an independent risk factor for local recurrence, whereas age (HR 3.9; 95% CI 1.1-14.0; p = 0.034) and primary tumor location (HR 4.5; 95% CI 1.6-12.4; p = 0.004) were independent risk factors for regional lymph node or distant recurrences. The cumulative overall 1- and 3-year survival rates were 91% and 66%, respectively. As expected, recurrence was associated with poor survival (p = 0.019). By univariate and multivariate analyses, primary tumor location (HR 3.8; 95% CI 1.2-12.0; p = 0.024) and interval to recurrence (HR 4.3; 95% CI 1.3-14.4; p = 0.018) were independent factors predictive of survival after recurrence. Conclusion: Risk of recurrence after definitive CRT for esophageal cancer was associated with tumor category, age, and primary tumor location; this information may help in improved prognostication for these patients.

  3. Prognostic nomogram integrated systemic inflammation score for patients with esophageal squamouscell carcinoma undergoing radical esophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yingjie; Ning, Zhonghua; Chen, Jun; Geng, Yiting; Gu, Wendong; Huang, Jin; Pei, Honglei; Shen, Yueping; Jiang, Jingting

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that nomogram combined with the biomarkers of systemic inflammation response could provide more accurate prediction than conventional staging systems in tumors. This study aimed to establish an effective prognostic nomogram for resectable thoracic esophageal squamouscell carcinoma (ESCC) based on the clinicopathological parameters and inflammation-based prognostic scores. We retrospectively investigated 916 ESCC patients who underwent radical esophagectomy. The predictive accuracy and discriminative ability of the nomogram were determined by concordance index (C-index) and calibration curve, and compared with the 6(th) and 7(th) AJCC TNM classifications. The neutrophil lymphocyte ratio (NLR), C-reactive protein albumin (CRP/Alb) ratio, histological grade, T stage and modified N stage were integrated in the nomogram. The C-index of the nomogram for predicting the survival was 0.72, which showed better predictive ability of OS than the 6(th) or 7(th) TNM stages in the primary cohort (P?staging system. Moreover, our findings were supported by the validation cohort. The proposed nomogram showed more accurate prognostic prediction for patients with ESCC after radical esophagectomy. PMID:26689680

  4. Prognostic nomogram integrated systemic inflammation score for patients with esophageal squamouscell carcinoma undergoing radical esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yingjie; Ning, Zhonghua; Chen, Jun; Geng, Yiting; Gu, Wendong; Huang, Jin; Pei, Honglei; Shen, Yueping; Jiang, Jingting

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that nomogram combined with the biomarkers of systemic inflammation response could provide more accurate prediction than conventional staging systems in tumors. This study aimed to establish an effective prognostic nomogram for resectable thoracic esophageal squamouscell carcinoma (ESCC) based on the clinicopathological parameters and inflammation-based prognostic scores. We retrospectively investigated 916 ESCC patients who underwent radical esophagectomy. The predictive accuracy and discriminative ability of the nomogram were determined by concordance index (C-index) and calibration curve, and compared with the 6th and 7th AJCC TNM classifications. The neutrophil lymphocyte ratio (NLR), C-reactive protein albumin (CRP/Alb) ratio, histological grade, T stage and modified N stage were integrated in the nomogram. The C-index of the nomogram for predicting the survival was 0.72, which showed better predictive ability of OS than the 6th or 7th TNM stages in the primary cohort (P?staging system. Moreover, our findings were supported by the validation cohort. The proposed nomogram showed more accurate prognostic prediction for patients with ESCC after radical esophagectomy. PMID:26689680

  5. Inactivation of GSK3? and activation of NF-?B pathway via Axl represents an important mediator of tumorigenesis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Paccez, Juliano D.; Duncan, Kristal; Vava, Akhona; Correa, Ricardo G.; Libermann, Towia A.; Parker, M. Iqbal; Zerbini, Luiz F.

    2015-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase Axl has been described as an oncogene, and its deregulation has been implicated in the progression of several human cancers. While the role of Axl in esophageal adenocarcinoma has been addressed, there is no information about its role in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In the current report, we identified, for the first time, deregulation of Axl expression in OSCC. Axl is consistently overexpressed in OSCC cell lines and human tumor samples, mainly in advanced stages of the disease. Blockage of Axl gene expression by small interfering RNA inhibits cell survival, proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro and esophageal tumor growth in vivo. Additionally, repression of Axl expression results in Akt-dependent inhibition of pivotal genes involved in the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-?B) pathway and in the induction of glycogen synthase kinase 3? (GSK3?) activity, resulting in loss of mesenchymal markers and induction of epithelial markers. Furthermore, treatment of esophageal cancer cells with the Akt inhibitor wortmannin inhibits NF-?B signaling, induces GSK3? activity, and blocks OSCC cell proliferation in an Axl-dependent manner. Taken together, our results establish a clear role for Axl in OSCC tumorigenesis with potential therapeutic implications. PMID:25568334

  6. Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vivekanandan, Nagarajan; Sriram, Padmanaban; Syam Kumar, S.A.; Bhuvaneswari, Narayanan; Saranya, Kamalakannan

    2012-04-01

    A treatment planning study was performed to evaluate the performance of volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc (RA) against 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques for esophageal cancer. Computed tomgraphy scans of 10 patients were included in the study. 3D-CRT, 4-field IMRT, and single-arc and double-arc RA plans were generated with the aim to spare organs at risk (OAR) and healthy tissue while enforcing highly conformal target coverage. The planning objective was to deliver 54 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) in 30 fractions. Plans were evaluated based on target conformity and dose-volume histograms of organs at risk (lung, spinal cord, and heart). The monitor unit (MU) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated to measure the treatment efficiency. The IMRT plan improves target conformity and spares OAR when compared with 3D-CRT. Target conformity improved with RA plans compared with IMRT. The mean lung dose was similar in all techniques. However, RA plans showed a reduction in the volume of the lung irradiated at V{sub 20Gy} and V{sub 30Gy} dose levels (range, 4.62-17.98%) compared with IMRT plans. The mean dose and D{sub 35%} of heart for the RA plans were better than the IMRT by 0.5-5.8%. Mean V{sub 10Gy} and integral dose to healthy tissue were almost similar in all techniques. But RA plans resulted in a reduced low-level dose bath (15-20 Gy) in the range of 14-16% compared with IMRT plans. The average MU needed to deliver the prescribed dose by RA technique was reduced by 20-25% compared with IMRT technique. The preliminary study on RA for esophageal cancers showed improvements in sparing OAR and healthy tissue with reduced beam-on time, whereas only double-arc RA offered improved target coverage compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT plans.

  7. Epidemiology of Esophageal Cancer in Japan and China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yingsong; Totsuka, Yukari; He, Yutong; Kikuchi, Shogo; Qiao, Youlin; Ueda, Junko; Wei, Wenqiang; Inoue, Manami; Tanaka, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    In preparation for a collaborative multidisciplinary study of the pathogenesis of esophageal cancer, the authors reviewed the published literature to identify similarities and differences between Japan and China in esophageal cancer epidemiology. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the predominant histologic type, while the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma remains extremely low in both countries. Numerous epidemiologic studies in both countries show that alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking are contributing risk factors for ESCC. There are differences, however, in many aspects of esophageal cancer between Japan and China, including cancer burden, patterns of incidence and mortality, sex ratio of mortality, risk factor profiles, and genetic variants. Overall incidence and mortality rates are higher in China than in Japan, and variation in mortality and incidence patterns is greater in China than in Japan. During the study period (1987–2000), the decline in age-adjusted mortality rates was more apparent in China than in Japan. Risk factor profiles differed between high- and low-incidence areas within China, but not in Japan. The association of smoking and drinking with ESCC risk appears to be weaker in China than in Japan. Genome-wide association studies in China showed that variants in several chromosome regions conferred increased risk, but only genetic variants in alcohol-metabolizing genes were significantly associated with ESCC risk in Japan. A well-designed multidisciplinary epidemiologic study is needed to examine the role of diet and eating habits in ESCC risk. PMID:23629646

  8. Silane surface modification for improved bioadhesion of esophageal stents

    PubMed Central

    Karakoy, Mert; Gultepe, Evin; Pandey, Shivendra; Khashab, Mouen A.; Gracias, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Stent migration occurs in 10-40% of patients who undergo placement of esophageal stents, with higher migration rates seen in those treated for benign esophageal disorders. This remains a major drawback of esophageal stent therapy. In this paper, we propose a new surface modification method to increase the adhesion between self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) and tissue while preserving their removability. Taking advantage of the well-known affinity between epoxide and amine terminated silane coupling agents with amine and carboxyl groups that are abundant in proteins and related molecules in the human body; we modified the surfaces of silicone coated esophageal SEMS with these adhesive self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). We utilized vapor phase silanization to modify the surfaces of different substrates including PDMS strips and SEMS, and measured the force required to slide these substrates on a tissue piece. Our results suggest that surface modification of esophageal SEMS via covalent attachment of protein-binding coupling agents improves adhesion to tissue and could offer a solution to reduce SEMS migration while preserving their removability. PMID:25663731

  9. Citrus Fruit Intake Substantially Reduces the Risk of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Anqiang; Zhu, Chengpei; Fu, Lilan; Wan, Xueshuai; Yang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Haohai; Miao, Ruoyu; He, Lian; Sang, Xinting; Zhao, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Many epidemiologic studies indicate a potential association between fruit and vegetable intake and various cancers. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to investigate the association between citrus fruit intake and esophageal cancer risk. The authors conducted a comprehensive search on PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library from inception until July 2014. Studies presenting information about citrus intake and esophageal cancer were analyzed. The authors extracted the categories of citrus intake, study-specific odds ratio or relative risk, and the P value and associated 95% confidence intervals for the highest versus lowest dietary intake of citrus fruit level. The association was quantified using meta-analysis of standard errors with a random-effects model. Thirteen case–control studies and 6 cohort studies were eligible for inclusion. Citrus intake may significantly reduce risk of esophageal cancer (summary odds ratio?=?0.63; 95% confidence interval?=?0.52–0.75; P?=?0), without notable publication bias (intercept?=??0.79, P?=?0.288) and with significant heterogeneity across studies (I2?=?52%). The results from epidemiologic studies suggest an inverse association between citrus fruit intake and esophageal cancer risk. The significant effect is consistent between case–control and cohort studies. Larger prospective studies with rigorous methodology should be considered to validate the association between citrus fruits and esophageal cancer. PMID:26426606

  10. Herpes Simplex Esophagitis in Immunocompetent Host: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Geraci, G.; Pisello, F.; Modica, G.; Li Volsi, F.; Cajozzo, M.; Sciumč, C.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction. Herpes simplex esophagitis is well recognized in immunosuppressed subjects, but it is infrequent in immunocompetent patients. We present a case of HSE in a 53-year-old healthy man. Materials and Methods. The patient was admitted with dysphagia, odynophagia, and retrosternal chest pain. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed minute erosive area in distal esophagus and biopsies confirmed esophagitis and findings characteristic of Herpes Simplex Virus infection. Results. The patients was treated with high dose of protonpump inhibitor, sucralfate, and acyclovir, orally, with rapid resolution of symptoms. Discussion. HSV type I is the second most common cause of infectious esophagitis. The majority of symptomatic immunocompetent patients with HSE will present with an acute onset of esophagitis. Endoscopic biopsies from the ulcer edges should be obtained for both histopathology and viral culture. In immunocompetent host, HSE is generally a self-limited condition. Conclusions. HSE should be suspected in case of esophagitis without evident cause, even if the patient is immunocompetent. When the diagnosis of HSE is confirmed, careful history and assessment for an immune disorder such as HIV infection is crucial, to look for underlying immune deficiency. PMID:19750238

  11. Esophageal Dysmotility, Gastro-esophageal Reflux Disease, and Lung Transplantation: What Is the Evidence?

    PubMed

    Wood, Richard K

    2015-12-01

    Lung transplantation is an effective and life-prolonging therapy for patients with advanced lung disease (ALD). However, long-term patient survival following lung transplantation is primarily limited by development of an inflammatory and fibrotic process involving the lung allograft known as bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). Although the precise cause of BOS remains uncertain and is likely multifactorial, chronic aspiration of gastro-duodenal contents is one possible contributing factor. Multiple small, cross-sectional studies performed over the past two decades have reported a high prevalence of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) and esophageal dysmotility in the ALD population and several investigations suggest the prevalence may increase following lung transplantation. More recent studies evaluating the direct effect of gastro-duodenal contents on airways have demonstrated a possible biologic link between GERD and BOS. Despite the recent advances in our understanding of BOS, further investigations are needed to establish GERD as a causative factor in its development. This review will discuss the existing literature that has identified an association of GERD with ALD and post-transplant populations, with a focus on recent advances in the field. PMID:26454656

  12. Esophageal Dysfunction in Friesian Horses: Morphological Features.

    PubMed

    Ploeg, M; Gröne, A; Saey, V; de Bruijn, C M; Back, W; van Weeren, P R; Scheideman, W; Picavet, T; Ducro, B J; Wijnberg, I; Delesalle, C

    2015-11-01

    Megaesophagus appears to be more common in Friesian horses than in other breeds. A prevalence of approximately 2% was observed among Friesian horses presented to the Wolvega Equine Clinic and the Utrecht University Equine Clinic. In this study, morphologic changes in the esophagi of Friesian horses with megaesophagus were compared with those of 6 control horses. Of 18 horses with clinically observed megaesophagus, only 12 animals had esophageal dilation at necropsy, usually involving the thoracic portion. Muscular hypertrophy of the distal esophagus was present in only one-third of the affected horses, indicating that this change is not the most relevant cause of megaesophagus in Friesians. Increased deposition of clumped and disorganized collagen was present in these clinically affected horses mainly in the non-dilated portion of the esophagus. At necropsy, a decrease in neural elements and elastin was present principally in horses with megaesophagus. Mild degeneration and necrosis of the tunica muscularis along the entire length of the esophagus were present in clinically affected horses and encountered only rarely in control animals. There were no significant differences among affected and control horses with respect to inflammation, mineralization, or the number of cells of Cajal. The increased occurrence of megaesophagus in the Friesian breed compared with other horse breeds, together with the presence of abnormal collagen in very young foals, supports the hypothesis that megaesophagus is hereditary in Friesians. PMID:25367366

  13. Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes for Patients with Thymic Carcinoma: Evaluation of Masaoka Staging

    PubMed Central

    Litvak, Anya M.; Woo, Kaitlin; Hayes, Sara; Huang, James; Rimner, Andreas; Sima, Camelia S.; Moreira, Andre L.; Tsukazan, Maria; Riely, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Thymic carcinomas are rare cancers with limited data regarding outcomes, particularly for those patients with advanced disease. Methods We identified patients with thymic carcinomas diagnosed between 1993 and 2012. Patient characteristics, recurrence free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results One hundred twenty-one patients with thymic carcinomas were identified. Higher Masaoka stage was associated with worse OS and RFS (5-yr OS of 100%, 81%, 51%, 24%, and 17% for stage I, II, III, IVa and IVb respectively, p<0.001 and 5-yr RFS of 80%, 28%, and 7% for stage I/II, III, and IV respectively, p<0.001). Patients with stage IVb lymph node (LN) only disease had a better 5-year OS as compared to patients with distant metastasis (24% vs. 7%, p=0.025). Of the 61 patients with stage IVb disease, 22/29 patients (76%) with LN-only disease underwent curative intent resection vs. 3/32 patients (9%) with distant metastasis. Twenty-two patients with LN involvement were treated with multi-modality therapy. Three (14%) remain free of disease with long-term follow-up (range: 3.4+ years to 6.8+ years). Conclusions We describe the clinical features of a large series of patients with thymic carcinoma in North America. The Masaoka staging system effectively prognosticated OS and RFS. Patients with stage IVb LN-only disease had significantly better OS as compared to patients with distant metastasis with a subset of patients sustaining long term RFS with multi-modality therapy. If validated, these data would support a revised staging system with sub-classification of stage IVb disease into two groups. PMID:25393794

  14. Endoscopic vacuum therapy for esophageal perforations and leakages

    PubMed Central

    Möschler, Oliver; Nies, Christoph; Mueller, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Injuries to the esophageal wall, such as perforations and anastomotic leaks, are serious complications of surgical and endoscopic interventions. Since 2006, a new treatment has been introduced, in the form of endoscopically placed vacuum sponge therapy. Patients and methods: Between April 2012 and October 2014, 10 patients (5 men and 5 women) aged 57 to 94 years were treated at our institution using endoscopic vacuum therapy (EVT) in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Results: The defect in the esophageal wall was successfully closed in seven of the 10 patients (70?%). No severe complications occurred. Conclusions: EVT is a valuable tool for management of defects in the esophageal wall and should be considered as a treatment option for patients with this condition. PMID:26716111

  15. Conservative Management of an Iatrogenic Esophageal Tear in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Waweru, Peter; Mwaniki, David

    2015-01-01

    Since its description over 250 years ago, diagnosis of esophageal perforation remains challenging, its management controversial, and its mortality high. This rare, devastating, mostly iatrogenic, condition can quickly lead to severe complications and death due to an overwhelming inflammatory response to gastric contents in the mediastinum. Diagnosis is made with the help of esophagograms and although such tears have traditionally been managed via aggressive surgical approach, recent reports emphasize a shift in favor of nonoperative care which unfortunately remains controversial. We here present a case of an iatrogenic esophageal tear resulting from a routine esophagoscopy in a 50-year-old lady presenting with dysphagia. The esophageal tear, almost missed, was eventually successfully managed conservatively, thanks to a relatively early diagnosis. PMID:26257974

  16. A rare cause of chronic dysphagia: eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Destek, Sebahattin; Gul, Vahit Onur; Ahioglu, Serkan; Tatar, Zeynep; Erbil, Yesim

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is attributable to environmental factors, allergens and several immunological causes. The most typical symptoms include dysphagia and sensation of food impingement in the retrosternal area. Although its clinical features resemble those of gastroesophageal reflux, proton pump inhibitors are not effective for its treatment. The diagnosis of EE is dependent on the pathological detection of eosinophilic infiltration in esophageal mucosa. In this study, we evaluated a patient who applied to our clinic with complaints of long-term difficulty in swallowing, sensation of food sticking while eating and weight loss; the patient was diagnosed with EE, following biochemical, radiological, endoscopic and pathological assessments and was treated with steroids. The results show that EE should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with dysphagia and food impingement in the retrosternal area, and the diagnosis should be confirmed through multiple esophageal biopsies. PMID:25249002

  17. Diagnosis and management of eosinophilic esophagitis in children

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Timothy; Chan, Edmond S.; Avinashi, Vishal; Ko, Hin Hin; Goldman, Ran D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Question After a few years of difficulty swallowing solids and feeling like food was getting stuck, a 13-year-old boy in my practice with peanut allergy and asthma was recently diagnosed with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). What is EoE and how is it diagnosed and managed? Answer Eosinophilic esophagitis is an immune-mediated disease resulting in inflammation of the esophagus. It is increasing in prevalence and incidence in countries like Canada, and frequently occurs in children with other allergic conditions. Unexplained feeding difficulties, vomiting, and solid-food dysphagia, especially in boys with atopy, supports the possibility of having EoE. A formal diagnosis is obtained by reviewing esophageal biopsies obtained through upper endoscopy performed while the patient is taking a proton pump inhibitor. Once EoE has been established, management should involve working collaboratively with gastroenterology and allergy specialists. Medical or dietary treatments are acceptable therapeutic approaches. PMID:26505065

  18. Coexistence of esophageal blue nevus, hair follicles and basaloid squamous carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong-Guan; Li, Xin-Gong; Gao, Hong; Sun, Xi-Yin; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2008-01-01

    We present the case of a 57-year-old man who underwent esophagectomy for esophageal carcinoma found at barium meal and gastroscopic examination. He was diagnosed as esophageal basaloid squamous carcinoma (BSC) and gastric stromal tumor, which were associated with focal proliferation of melanocytes/pigmentophages and hair follicles in esophageal mucosa. Melanocytic hyperplasia (melanocytosis) has previously been recognized as an occasional reactive lesion, which can accompany esophageal inflammation and invasive squamous carcinoma. The present case is unusual because of its hyperplasia of not only melanocytes but also hair follicles. To our knowledge, this is the first report of esophageal blue nevus and hair follicle coexisting with BSC. PMID:18636677

  19. Unprecedented structural variations in trinuclear mixed valence Co(II/III) complexes: theoretical studies, pnicogen bonding interactions and catecholase-like activities.

    PubMed

    Hazari, Alokesh; Kanta Das, Lakshmi; Kadam, Ramakant M; Bauzá, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio; Ghosh, Ashutosh

    2015-02-28

    Three new mixed valence trinuclear Co(II/III) compounds cis-[Co3L2(MeOH)2(N3)2(?1,1-N3)2] (1), trans-[Co3L2(H2O)2(N3)2(?1,1-N3)2]·(H2O)2 (2) and [Co3L(R)2(N3)3(?1,3-N3)] (3) have been synthesized by reacting a di-Schiff base ligand (H2L) or its reduced form [H2LR] (where H2L= N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-1,3-propanediamine and H2LR= N,N'-bis(2-hydroxybenzyl)-1,3-propanediamine) with cobalt perchlorate hexahydrate and sodium azide. All three products have been characterized by IR, UV-Vis and EPR spectroscopies, ESI-MS, elemental, powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Complex 2 is an angular trinuclear species in which two terminal octahedral Co(III)N2O4 centers coordinate to the central octahedral cobalt(II) ion through ?2-phenoxido oxygen and ?1,1-azido nitrogen atoms along with two mutually cis-oxygen atoms of methanol molecules. On the other hand, in linear trinuclear complex , in addition to the ?2-phenoxido and ?1,1-azido bridges with terminal octahedral Co(III) centres, the central Co(II) is bonded with two mutually trans-oxygen atoms of water molecules. Thus the cis-trans configuration of the central Co(II) is solvent dependent. In complex 3, the two terminal octahedral Co(III)N2O4 centers coordinate to the central penta-coordinated Co(II) ion through double phenoxido bridges along with the nitrogen atom of a terminal azido ligand. In addition, the two terminal Co(III) are connected through a ?1,3-azido bridge that participates in pnicogen bonding interactions (intermolecular N-N interaction) as an acceptor. Both the cis and trans isomeric forms of 1 and 2 have been optimized using density functional theory (DFT) calculations and it is found that the cis configuration is energetically more favorable than the trans one. However, the trans configuration of 2 is stabilized by the hydrogen bonding network involving a water dimer. The pnicogen bonding interactions have been demonstrated using MEP surfaces and CSD search which support the counter intuitive electron acceptor ability of the ?1,3-azido ligand. Complexes 1-3 exhibit catecholase-like activities in the aerial oxidation of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol to the corresponding o-quinone. Kinetic data analyses of this oxidation reaction in acetonitrile reveal that the catecholase-like activity follows the order: 1 (kcat = 142 h(-1)) > 3 (kcat = 99 h(-1)) > 2 (kcat = 85 h(-1)). Mechanistic investigations of the catalytic behaviors by X-band EPR spectroscopy and estimation of hydrogen peroxide formation indicate that the oxidation reaction proceeds through the reduction of Co(III) to Co(II). PMID:25611163

  20. Use of Preclinical Data for Selection of a Phase II/III Dose for Evernimicin and Identification of a Preclinical MIC Breakpoint

    PubMed Central

    Drusano, G. L.; Preston, S. L.; Hardalo, C.; Hare, R.; Banfield, C.; Andes, D.; Vesga, O.; Craig, W. A.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues in the design of phase II/III clinical trials of antimicrobial agents is dose selection. The choice is often based on preclinical data from pharmacokinetic (PK) studies with animals and healthy volunteers but is rarely linked directly to the target organisms except by the MIC, an in vitro measure of antimicrobial activity with many limitations. It is the thesis of this paper that rational dose-selection decisions can be made on the basis of the pharmacodynamics (PDs) of the test agent predicted by a mathematical model which uses four data sets: (i) the distribution of MICs for clinical isolates, (ii) the distribution of the values of the PK parameters for the test drug in the population, (iii) the PD target(s) developed from animal models of infection, and (iv) the protein binding characteristics of the test drug. In performing this study with the new anti-infective agent evernimicin, we collected a large number (n = 4,543) of recent clinical isolates of gram-positive pathogens (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, and Staphylococcus aureus) and determined the MICs using E-test methods (AB Biodisk, Stockholm, Sweden) for susceptibility to evernimicin. Population PK data were collected from healthy volunteers (n = 40) and patients with hypoalbuminemia (n = 12), and the data were analyzed by using NPEM III. PD targets were developed with a neutropenic murine thigh infection model with three target pathogens: S. pneumoniae (n = 5), E. faecalis (n = 2), and S. aureus (n = 4). Drug exposure or the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve/MIC (AUC/MIC) was found to be the best predictor of microbiological efficacy. There were three possible microbiological results: stasis of the initial inoculum at 24 h (107 CFU), log killing (pathogen dependent, ranging from 1 to 3 log10), or 90% maximal killing effect (90% Emax). The levels of protein binding in humans and mice were similar. The PK and PD of 6 and 9 mg of evernimicin per kg of body weight were compared; the population values for the model parameters and population covariance matrix were used to generate five Monte Carlo simulations with 200 subjects each. The fractional probability of attaining the three PD targets was calculated for each dose and for each of the three pathogens. All differences in the fractional probability of attaining the target AUC/MIC in this PD model were significant. For S. pneumoniae, the probability of attaining all three PD targets was high for both doses. For S. aureus and enterococci, there were increasing differences between the 6- and 9-mg/kg evernimicin doses for reaching the 2 log killing (S. aureus), 1 log killing (enterococci), or 90% Emax AUC/MIC targets. This same approach may also be used to set preliminary in vitro MIC breakpoints. PMID:11120938

  1. Management of an aorto-esophageal fistula, complicating a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm endovascularly repaired.

    PubMed

    Georvasili, Vaia K; Bali, Christina; Peroulis, Michalis; Kouvelos, George; Avgos, Stavros; Godevenos, Dimitris; Liakakos, Theodoros; Matsagkas, Miltiadis

    2014-05-18

    Aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF) is a rare but devastating complication of thoracic aorta endovascular repair (TEVAR). We report a case of a 64-year-old male who presented with chest pain and high CRP levels 10 months after TEVAR for a 9 cm diameter descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. The diagnosis of an AEF was confirmed and the patient was treated conservatively with broad spectrum antibiotics and total parental alimentation. After control of sepsis was achieved, esophagectomy with gastric tube reconstruction was performed and an omental pedicle was used to cover the aortic wall. No intervention to the aorta was made at that time due to the potentially infected mediastinum. The patient's recovery was uneventful and 2 years postoperatively he is in good condition and lives a normal life. Esophagectomy seems to be a mandatory stage of treatment in the setting of AEF. In cases where signs of graft infection are persistent, aortic surgery might be also necessary. PMID:24838140

  2. Molecular Pathways: Pathogenesis and clinical implications of microbiome alteration in esophagitis and Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liying; Francois, Fritz; Pei, Zhiheng

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma is preceded by the development of reflux-related intestinal metaplasia or Barrett’s esophagus which is a response to inflammation of the esophageal squamous mucosa, reflux esophagitis. Gastroesophageal reflux impairs the mucosal barrier in the distal esophagus, allowing chronic exposure of the squamous epithelium to the diverse microbial ecosystem or microbiome, and inducing chronic inflammation. The esophageal microbiome is altered in both esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus, characterized by a significant decrease in Gram-positive bacteria and an increase in Gram-negative bacteria in esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), a major structure of the outer membrane in Gram-negative bacteria, can up-regulate gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines via activation of the TLR4 and NF-kB pathway. The potential impact of LPS on reflux esophagitis may be through relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter via iNOS and by delaying gastric emptying via COX-2. Chronic inflammation may be play a critical role in the progression from benign to malignant esophageal disease. Therefore analysis of the pathways leading to chronic inflammation in the esophagus may help to identify biomarkers in Barrett's esophagus patients for neoplastic progression and provide insight into molecular events suitable for therapeutic intervention in prevention of esophageal adenocarcinoma development in patients with reflux esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus. PMID:22344232

  3. Paraneoplastic cutaneous lupus secondary to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tworek, Joseph; Schapiro, Brian; Zolotarevsky, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) in an elderly man does not fit a typical demographic for the disease process. Using the McLean’s criteria we were able to establish a temporal relationship between the patient’s diagnosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and his dermatosis, both of which responded to cytotoxic chemotherapy. The clinical presentation and progression of the clinical illness is supportive of a very unusual and not previously reported paraneoplastic SCLE secondary to esophageal SCC. PMID:26029469

  4. [An epidemiological analysis on the geographic factors of esophageal cancer].

    PubMed

    Song, J

    1992-12-01

    The author collects the data of esophageal cancer mortality (1971-1973) of 78 counties in Hubei Province and the data of topography, climate, soil, rock formation and geochemical elements, including 40 suspected factors. The method of linear correlation and multiple stepwise regression are used for the comprehensive analysis of relation between the geographical factors and esophageal cancer. The result is that four factors metamorphic rock, zinc, copper, chromium are suspected factors. It suggests that the four factors will need future study. PMID:1303310

  5. Acute respiratory failure secondary to esophageal dilation from undiagnosed achalasia.

    PubMed

    Layton, James; Ward, Paul W; Miller, David W; Roan, Ronald M

    2014-09-01

    Achalasia is an idiopathic motility disorder causing progressive dysphagia and dilation of the esophagus. Rarely this esophageal dilation can cause acute respiratory insufficiency and/or failure. We describe a 63-year-old woman presenting for total knee arthroplasty in whom induction of anesthesia was complicated by pulmonary aspiration requiring postoperative ventilation, hypotension requiring vasopressor therapy, and postextubation, recurrent, acute respiratory failure. Computed tomography of the chest performed for suspected pneumothorax revealed severe esophageal dilation with a mass effect. As this case describes, achalasia may present with the life-threatening complication of respiratory failure and requires a high index of suspicion for timely diagnosis and appropriate interventions. PMID:25611356

  6. Inhibitory effect of coffee on lower esophageal sphincter pressure.

    PubMed

    Thomas, F B; Steinbaugh, J T; Fromkes, J J; Mekhjian, H S; Caldwell, J H

    1980-12-01

    We examined the effect of 150 ml of caffeinated instant coffee at two pHs, 4.5 and 7.0, on lower esophageal sphincter pressure in 20 normal volunteers and 16 patients with reflux esophagitis. When ingested alone coffee at pH 4.5 and 7.0 caused a decrease in basal sphincter pressure in normal volunteers from 19.4 +/- 1.5 to 13.7 +/- 1.0 mmHg (P ż 0.01) and from 18.7 +/- 1.5 to 16.0 +/- 0.8 mmHg (P < 0.05) respectively. When coffee at pH 4.5 was drunk with a mixed nutrient test meal, the resting sphincter pressure in normal subjects fell after 30-60 min with the nadir, 11.2 +/- 1.0 mmHg, being recorded at 60 min (P < 0.01). Coffee at pH 7.0 with the test meal resulted in a fall in pressure to 14.3 +/- 1.5 mmHg (P < 0.02) at 60 min. In patients with reflux esophagitis, coffee at pH 4.5 lowered lower esophageal sphincter pressure from 9.1 +/- 1.0 to 5.5 +/- 0.6 mmHg (P < 0.005); coffee at pH 7.0 decreased lower esophageal sphincter pressure from 8.5 +/- 1.1 to 6.9 +/- 0.7 mmHg (P < 0.05). In these patients, mean basal pressure, 9.2 +/- 0.8 mmHg, decreased to 5.2 +/- 0.7 mmHg (P < 0.001) 45 min after drinking coffee at pH 4.5 with the test meal. Coffee at the neutral pH caused a fall in pressure from 8.8 +/- 1.1 to 6.5 +/- 0.7 mmHg at 60 min after the test meal. Thus, coffee at either pH 4.5 or 7.0 caused a decrease in fasting and postcibal lower esophageal sphincter pressure in normal volunteers and patients with reflux esophagitis. The magnitude and the duration of the effect were greater after coffee at the lower pH. These data support the clinical belief that coffee may cause or aggravate heartburn by decreasing lower esophageal sphincter pressure. PMID:7002705

  7. Prevention strategies for esophageal cancer: Perspectives of the East vs. West.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chen-Shuan; Lee, Yi-Chia; Wu, Ming-Shiang

    2015-12-01

    Esophageal cancer is the eighth most common cancer worldwide. Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) are the two major phenotypes in Western and Eastern countries, respectively. Because of different pathways in carcinogenesis, the risk factors and effective steps for prevention of esophageal cancer are different between EAC and ESCC. The carcinogenesis of EAC is initiated by the acid exposure of the esophageal mucosa from stomach while that of the ESCC are related to the chronic irritation of carcinogens mainly by the alcohol, cigarette, betel quid, and hot beverage. To eliminate the burden of esophageal cancer on the global health, the effective strategy should be composed of the primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention. In this article, we perform a systematic review of the preventive strategies for esophageal cancer with special emphasis on the differences from the perspectives of Western and Eastern countries. PMID:26651249

  8. A Phase II Study of a Paclitaxel-Based Chemoradiation Regimen With Selective Surgical Salvage for Resectable Locoregionally Advanced Esophageal Cancer: Initial Reporting of RTOG 0246

    SciTech Connect

    Swisher, Stephen G.; Winter, Kathryn A.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Wu, Tsung T.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Konski, Andre A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The strategy of definitive chemoradiation with selective surgical salvage in locoregionally advanced esophageal cancer was evaluated in a Phase II trial in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-affiliated sites. Methods and Materials: The study was designed to detect an improvement in 1-year survival from 60% to 77.5% ({alpha} = 0.05; power = 80%). Definitive chemoradiation involved induction chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (650 mg/mg{sup 2}/day), cisplatin (15 mg/mg{sup 2}/day), and paclitaxel (200 mg/mg{sup 2}/day) for two cycles, followed by concurrent chemoradiation with 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) and daily 5-FU (300 mg/mg{sup 2}/day) with cisplatin (15 mg/mg{sup 2}/day) over the first 5 days. Salvage surgical resection was considered for patients with residual or recurrent esophageal cancer who did not have systemic disease. Results: Forty-three patients with nonmetastatic resectable esophageal cancer were entered from Sept 2003 to March 2006. Forty-one patients were eligible for analysis. Clinical stage was {>=}T3 in 31 patients (76%) and N1 in 29 patients (71%), with adenocarcinoma histology in 30 patients (73%). Thirty-seven patients (90%) completed induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiation. Twenty-eight patients (68%) experienced Grade 3+ nonhematologic toxicity. Four treatment-related deaths were noted. Twenty-one patients underwent surgery following definitive chemoradiation because of residual (17 patients) or recurrent (3 patients) esophageal cancer,and 1 patient because of choice. Median follow-up of live patients was 22 months, with an estimated 1-year survival of 71%. Conclusions: In this Phase II trial (RTOG 0246) evaluating selective surgical salvage after definitive chemoradiation in locoregionally advanced esophageal cancer, the hypothesized 1-year RTOG survival rate (77.5%) was not achieved (1 year, 71%; 95% confidence interval< 54%-82%).

  9. Comparison of clinicopathologic features and survival between eastern and western population with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yizhou; Wu, Chunxiao; Cai, Shuang; Wang, Rui; Zhen, Ying; Chen, Sufeng; Zhao, Kuaile; Huang, Yangle; Luketich, James

    2015-01-01

    Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the major histologic subtype of esophageal cancer, characterized by a high mortality rate and geographic differences in incidences. It is unknown whether there is difference between “eastern” ESCC and “western” ESCC. This study is attempted to demonstrate the hypothesis by comparing ESCC between Chinese residents and Caucasians living in the US. Methods The data sources of this study are from United States SEER limited-use database and Shanghai Cancer Registries by Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control (SMCDC). Consecutive, non-selected patients with pathologically diagnosed ESCC, between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2006, were included in this analysis. 1-year, 3-year and 5-year survival estimates were computed and compared between two populations. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine factors affecting survival differences. Results A total of 1,718 Chinese, 1,624 Caucasians ESCC patients with individual American Joint Commission on Cancer (AJCC) staging information were included in this study. The Caucasian group had a significantly higher proportion of female patients than Chinese (38.24% vs. 18.68% P<0.01). ESCC was diagnosed in Chinese patients at an earlier age and stage than Caucasians. Generally, Chinese patients had similar overall survival rate with Caucasian by both univariate and multivariate analysis. Overall survival was significantly worse only in male Caucasians compared to Chinese patients (median survival time, 12.4 vs. 14.5 months, P<0.01, respectively). Conclusions ESCC from eastern and western countries might have some different features. These differences need to be taken into account for the management of ESCC patients in different ethnic groups. PMID:26623101

  10. Prognosis of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma after esophagectomy using the log odds of positive lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Wu, San-Gang; Sun, Jia-Yuan; Yang, Li-Chao; Zhou, Juan; Li, Feng-Yan; Li, Qun; Lin, Huan-Xin; Lin, Qin; He, Zhen-Yu

    2015-11-01

    To compare the log odds of positive lymph nodes (LODDS) with the number of positive lymph nodes (pN), lymph node ratio (LNR), removed lymph node (RLN) count, and negative lymph node (NLN) count in determining the prognosis of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) after esophagectomy. The records of patients with ESCC who received esophagectomy were retrospectively reviewed. The log-rank test was used to compare curves for overall survival (OS), and Cox regression analysis was performed to identify prognostic factors. The prognostic performance of the different lymph node staging systems were compared using the linear trend chi-square test, likelihood ratio chi-square test, and Akaike information criterion. A total of 589 patients were enrolled. Univariate Cox analysis showed that pN stage, LNR, RLN count, NLN count, and the LODDS were significantly associated with OS (p < 0.05 for all). Multivariate Cox analysis adjusted for significant factors indicated that LODDS was independent risk factor on overall survival (OS), and a higher LODDS was associated with worse OS (hazard ratio = 3.297, 95% confidence interval: 2.684-4.050, p < 0.001). The modified Tumor-LODDS-Metastasis staging system had better discriminatory ability, monotonicity, and homogeneity, and better optimistic prognostic stratification than the Tumor-Node-Metastasis staging system in determining the prognosis of patients with ESCC. The LODDS staging system was superior to other lymph node classifications in determining the prognosis of patients with ESCC after esophagectomy. LODDS may be incorporated into esophageal staging system if these results are eventually confirmed by other studies. PMID:26426993

  11. On the Possible Correlations Between the Evolution of the Melting Behavior, the Change in Birefringence and Crystal Structure with Crystallization Temperature and the Existence of the II - III Regime Transition for Isotactic Polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiannong; Srinivas, Srivatsan; Subramaniam, Chitra; Marand, Herve

    1998-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the spherulitic growth rate, G(Tx), for isotactic polypropylene has been analyzed by a number of authors in the context of the Lauritzen-Hoffman secondary nucleation theory. In all cases, the existence of a regime II to regime III transition has been reported. We carried out similar studies using a number of metallocene based isotactic polypropylene fractions and failed to see any such transition when plotting ln G vs. Tx. On the other hand, plots of lnG vs 1/Tx(Tm-Tx), where Tm is the equilibrium melting temperature, do exhibit a change in slope at temperatures in the vicinity of the reported II-III regime transition. Studies of the melting behavior and birefringence of it-PP fractions crystallized isothermally in a temperature range encompassing this so called transition revealed a change in the slope of observed melting temperature vs crystallization temperature and a change in the sign of spherulite birefringence in the near vicinity of the II-III regime transition temperature. Current X-ray diffraction studies are probing the possibility that this transition temperature is associated with a gradual evolution in the structure of the crystal phase resulting from isothermal crystallization (alpha one vs alpha two)..

  12. Exercise-triggered transient R-wave enhancement and ST-segment elevation in II, III, and aVF ECG leads: a testament to the "plasticity" of the QRS complex during ischemia.

    PubMed

    Madias, John E; Attari, Mehran

    2004-04-01

    We describe a patient with coronary artery disease who showed transiently augmented R-waves in his electrocardiogram (ECG) during the course of an exercise treadmill test (ETT), an ECG pattern occasionally associated with the hyperacute phase of myocardial infarction and variant angina. This change in the R-waves was noted in II, III, and aVF ECG leads and was associated with ST-segment elevation; both changed gradually and were normalized during the recovery period. Cardiac enzymes after ETT were negative, and arteriography revealed 3-vessel coronary artery disease, with a completely occluded right coronary artery. The ventriculogram showed very mild hypokinesis of the inferior left ventricular wall, while the global ejection fraction was 75%. These ECG changes, noted previously during ETT in precordial ECG leads, are herein reported to occur also in II, III, and aVF ECG leads. The generation of these ECG changes, which hinges upon a late unopposed depolarization occurring in the course and at the site of severe ischemic injury, constitutes a transient focal ventricular conduction abnormality. PMID:15127379

  13. Comparison of Efficacy of Regional and Extensive Clinical Target Volumes in Postoperative Radiotherapy for Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao Xueying; Wang Wei; Zhou Zhiguo; Gao Xianshu; Chang, Joe Y.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To compare and analyze the effect of different clinical target volumes (CTVs) on survival rate after postoperative radiotherapy (RT) for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and Materials: We studied 102 patients who underwent postoperative RT after radical resection for esophageal SCC (T3/4 or N1). The radiation dose was {>=}50 Gy. In the extensive portal group (E group, 43 patients), the CTV encompassed the bilateral supraclavicular region, all mediastinal lymph nodes, the anastomosis site, and the left gastric and pericardial lymphatic. In the regional portal group (R group, 59 patients), the CTV was confined to tumor bed and the lymph nodes in the immediate region of the primary lesion. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were compared between the groups, and multivariate/univariate analysis for factors predicting survival was studied. Results: For the entire group, the 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates were 76.3%, 50.5%, and 42.9%, respectively (median survival, 30 months). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 76.5%, 52.1%, and 41.3%, respectively, in the E group and 76.2%, 49.2%, and 44.6%, respectively, in the R group (not significant). According to the multivariate analysis, N stage, number of lymph nodes with metastatic disease, and tumor length were the independent prognostic factors for survival. Conclusions: Using a regional portal in postoperative RT for esophageal SCC is not associated with compromised survival compared with extensive portal RT and therefore should be considered. N stage, number of affected lymph nodes, and tumor length predict poor survival.

  14. Oncological and surgical outcomes of minimally invasive versus open esophagectomy for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: a matched-pair comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenli; Zhou, Yongxin; Feng, Jing; Mei, Yunqing

    2015-01-01

    Only a few series have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of minimally invasive esophagectomy (MIE) for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and the benefits of this approach. This report describes the results of a pair-matched comparative study between minimally invasive and open esophagectomy (OE) for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Patients were retrospectively matched in pairs for the following criteria: age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) score, clinical TNM stage, tumor location, and type of resection. A total of 97 patients undergoing MIE were compared with patients undergoing OE during the same period. Operative, postoperative, and oncologic outcomes were compared. Significantly less bleeding was observed in the MIE group (P = 0.001). Transfusion was required for three patients in the MIE group and ten patients in the OE group (P = 0.044). Overall morbidity was similar in the two groups. The hospital stay was significantly shorter for the patients undergoing MIE (P = 0.027). The surgical margin and tumor stage were not affected by MIE. The overall survival rates in the MIE group were 54% at 5 years and 46% in the OE group (P = 0.631). The disease-free survival rates in the MIE group were 45% at 5 years, 41% in the OE group (P = 0.704). In summary, MIE for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma for selected patients gave a better postoperative outcome without oncologic consequences.

  15. Upper Gastrointestinal Symptoms Predictive of Candida Esophagitis and Erosive Esophagitis in HIV and Non-HIV Patients: An Endoscopy-Based Cross-Sectional Study of 6011 Patients.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yuta; Nagata, Naoyoshi; Shimbo, Takuro; Nishijima, Takeshi; Watanabe, Koji; Aoki, Tomonori; Sekine, Katsunori; Okubo, Hidetaka; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Sakurai, Toshiyuki; Yokoi, Chizu; Mimori, Akio; Oka, Shinichi; Uemura, Naomi; Akiyama, Junichi

    2015-11-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are common in both HIV and non-HIV-infected patients, but the difference of GI symptom severity between 2 groups remains unknown. Candida esophagitis and erosive esophagitis, 2 major types of esophagitis, are seen in both HIV and non-HIV-infected patients, but differences in GI symptoms that are predictive of esophagitis between 2 groups remain unknown. We aimed to determine whether GI symptoms differ between HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected patients, and identify specific symptoms of candida esophagitis and erosive esophagitis between 2 groups.We prospectively enrolled 6011 patients (HIV, 430; non-HIV, 5581) who underwent endoscopy and completed questionnaires. Nine upper GI symptoms (epigastric pain, heartburn, acid regurgitation, hunger cramps, nausea, early satiety, belching, dysphagia, and odynophagia) were evaluated using a 7-point Likert scale. Associations between esophagitis and symptoms were analyzed by the multivariate logistic regression model adjusted for age, sex, and proton pump inhibitors.Endoscopy revealed GI-organic diseases in 33.4% (2010/6.011) of patients. The prevalence of candida esophagitis and erosive esophagitis was 11.2% and 12.1% in HIV-infected patients, respectively, whereas it was 2.9% and 10.7 % in non-HIV-infected patients, respectively. After excluding GI-organic diseases, HIV-infected patients had significantly (P?esophagitis in HIV-infected patients, whereas dysphagia and odynophagia were independently (P?esophagitis in non-HIV-infected patients. However, heartburn and acid regurgitation were independently (P?esophagitis in both patient groups. The internal consistency test using Cronbach's ? revealed that the 9 symptom scores were reliable in both HIV (?, 0.86) and non-HIV-infected patients (?, 0.85).This large-scale endoscopy-based study showed that HIV-infected patients have greater GI symptom scores compared with non-HIV-infected patients even after excluding GI-organic diseases. None of the upper GI symptoms predict candida esophagitis in HIV-infected patients, but dysphagia and odynophagia predict candida esophagitis in non-HIV-infected patients. Heartburn and acid regurgitation predict erosive esophagitis in both patient groups. PMID:26632738

  16. Preparation and Characterization of a Biologic Scaffold from Esophageal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Timothy J.; Londono, Ricardo; Carey, Ryan M.; Carruthers, Christopher A.; Reing, Janet E.; Dearth, Christopher L.; D’Amore, Antonio; Medberry, Christopher J.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2013-01-01

    Biologic scaffolds composed of extracellular matrix (ECM) are commonly used to facilitate a constructive remodeling response in several types of tissue, including the esophagus. Surgical manipulation of the esophagus is often complicated by stricture, but preclinical and clinical studies have shown that the use of an ECM scaffold can mitigate stricture and promote a constructive outcome after resection of full circumference esophageal mucosa. Recognizing the potential benefits of ECM derived from homologous tissue (i.e., site-specific ECM), the objective of the present study was to prepare, characterize, and assess the in-vivo remodeling properties of ECM from porcine esophageal mucosa. The developed protocol for esophageal ECM preparation is compliant with previously established criteria of decellularization and results in a scaffold that maintains important biologic components and an ultrastructure consistent with a basement membrane complex. Perivascular stem cells remained viable when seeded upon the esophageal ECM scaffold in vitro, and the in-vivo host response showed a pattern of constructive remodeling when implanted in soft tissue. PMID:23777917

  17. Influence of Postvocalic Consonants on Vowel Duration in Esophageal Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandour, Jack; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Data on the durations of vowels preceding voiced and voiceless stops in three normal speakers and three esophageal speakers (who had had laryngectomies) suggested that the vowel length variations that were observed were language-specific, governed by phonological rules of English, and were not language universals. (Author/RL)

  18. Lower Esophageal Thickening Due to a Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Band

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Jitin; Conklin, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB) is a surgical device to treat obesity that is widely used and generally considered to be safe. We report an adverse event related to the physiological and mechanical changes that occur after LAGB placement, namely chronic obstruction resulting in marked lower esophageal thickening. PMID:26504870

  19. Keratinization of the esophageal epithelium of domesticated mammals.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Wilfried; Schoennagel, Britta; Kacza, Johannes; Busche, Roger; Hornickel, Isabelle Nina; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Schnapper, Anke

    2014-01-01

    We studied the esophageal epithelium for keratinization characteristics from samples of domesticated mammals of three nutrition groups (herbivores: horse, cattle, sheep; omnivores: pig, dog, rat; carnivores: cat) using histochemistry (keratins, disulfides), sulfur measurements, and cryo-SEM. Keratins were found in all esophageal layers of all species, except for the equine Stratum corneum. The positive reaction staining of Pan-keratin was remarkable, but decreased in intensity toward the outer layers, whereas in the pig and cat, staining was confined to the corneal layer. The herbivores revealed positive staining reactions in the upper Stratum spinosum, particularly in the sheep. Regarding single keratins, CK6 immunostating was found in most esophageal layers, but only weakly or negatively in the porcine and equine Stratum corneum. CK13 staining was restricted to the sheep and here was found in all layers. CK14 could be detected in the equine and feline Stratum basale, and upper vital layers of the dog and rat. CK17 appeared only in the Stratum spinosum and Stratum granulosum, but in all layers of the dog and cat. Disulfides reacted strongest in the Stratum corneum of the herbivores, as corroborated by the sulfur concentrations in the esophagus. Our study emphasized that keratins are very important for the mechanical stability of the epithelial cells and cell layers of the mammalian esophagus. The role of these keratins in the esophageal epithelia is of specific interest owing to the varying feed qualities and mechanical loads of different nutrition groups, which have to be countered. PMID:23948668

  20. Health Centers: Heartburn & GERD Print Wireless System Tracks Esophageal

    E-print Network

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    Health Centers: Heartburn & GERD Print Wireless System Tracks Esophageal Reflux More 'comfortable reflux disease (GERD), says the American College of Gastroenterology. GERD occurs when a muscle into esophagus and irritate it. More information The American College of Gastroenterology has more about GERD

  1. Massive gas insufflation without effect on esophageal reflectometry profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raphael, David T.; Arnaudov, Dimiter; Benbassat, Maxim

    2003-10-01

    Time-domain acoustic reflectometry generates a ``one-dimensional'' image of the interior of a cavity in the form of an area-distance profile. After patient intubation with a breathing tube, the characteristic reflectometry profile consists of a constant-area segment corresponding to the length of the tube, followed either by a rapid increase in the area beyond the carina (lung) or by a sudden decrease in the area to zero (esophagus). In the cardiac arrest setting, during mistaken placement of the breathing tube into the esophagus, followed by aggressive manual ventilation, is it possible to markedly distend the esophagus, such that the esophageal profile looks like a tracheal profile? With approval of the USC IUCAC Committee, an animal study was conducted with anesthetized, tracheally intubated, and mechanically ventilated dogs. With a separate breathing tube in the esophagus, aggressive esophageal ventilation (comparable to that seen in the cardiopulmonary resuscitation setting) was accomplished with a manual resuscitation bag. A Benson Hood Labs two-microphone reflectometer was used to obtain esophageal profiles with and without the above ventilation. In this pilot study, there was no significant esophageal distention as a result of the above ventilation. [Research supported by the Alfred E. Mann Institute.

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Roshandel, Gholamreza; Semnani, Shahryar; Malekzadeh, Reza; Dawsey, Sanford M

    2012-11-01

    Esophageal cancer (EC) is the 8th most common cancer and the 6th most frequent cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the most common type of EC. Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been suggested as a risk factor for developing ESCC. In this paper we will review different aspects of the relationship between PAH exposure and ESCC. PAHs are a group of compounds that are formed by incomplete combustion of organic matter. Studies in humans have shown an association between PAH exposure and development of ESCC in many populations. The results of a recent case-control study in a high risk population in northeastern Iran showed a dramatic dose-response relationship between PAH content in non-tumor esophageal tissue (the target tissue for esophageal carcinogenesis) and ESCC case status, consistent with a causal role for PAH exposure in the pathogenesis of ESCC.  Identifying the main sources of exposure to PAHs may be the first and most important step in designing appropriate PAH-reduction interventions for controlling ESCC, especially in high risk areas. Coal smoke and drinking mate have been suggested as important modifiable sources of PAH exposure in China and Brazil, respectively. But the primary source of exposure to PAHs in other high risk areas for ESCC, such as northeastern Iran, has not yet been identified. Thus, environmental studies to determining important sources of PAH exposure should be considered as a high priority in future research projects in these areas. PMID:23102250

  3. New index to predict esophageal variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Dan; Dai, Jian-Jun; Qian, Jian-Qing; Pin, Xun; Wang, Wei-Jun

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To develop a safe, simple, noninvasive and affordable system to predict esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB) in decompensated cirrhosis patients. METHODS: Four hundred and eighty-six patients with decompensated cirrhosis (238 males and 248 females), with a mean age of 63.1 ± 11.2 years, were admitted to Changshu Affiliated Hospital of Suzhou University between May 2008 and March 2011. Patients enrolled in this study underwent ultrasound-Doppler (US-Doppler) to assess left gastric vein (LGV) blood flow velocity (LGVV) and blood flow direction (LGVBFD), and were evaluated by the Model For End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) scoring system. All patients received follow-up evaluations every three months. The resulting data were entered into a database after each time point collection. RESULTS: Four hundred and sixteen patients completed follow-up evaluations for an average of 31.6 mo (range: 12 to 47 mo). Fifty-one (12.3%) patients experienced EVB. The change in the MELD score over three months (?MELD), LGVV and LGVBFD were independently associated with EVB occurrence. MELD-US-Doppler Index (MUI), a new index, was developed and calculated using the following logistic regression equation: MUI = Logit (P) = 1.667 (?MELD) + 2.096 (LGVV) - 3.245 (LGVBFD) - 1.697. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for prediction of EVB occurrence was significantly higher for the MUI [0.858 (95%CI: 0.774-0.920)] than for ?MELD [0.734 (95%CI: 0.636-0.817); P < 0.05], LGVV [0.679 (95%CI: 0.578-0.769); P < 0.05] or LGVBFD [0.726 (95%CI: 0.627-0.810); P < 0.05] alone. When the MUI was set at 46, the index had high diagnostic accuracy (85.8%), with high specificity (80%) and sensitivity (87.27%). CONCLUSION: The MUI, a noninvasive and affordable index, can predict EVB occurrence in decompensated cirrhotic patients and serve as an alternative when conventional endoscopic screening is declined. PMID:24944493

  4. The genetic events of HPV-immortalized esophageal epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Z Y; Xu, L Y; Chen, X H; Cai, W J; Shen, J; Chen, J Y; Huang, T H; Zeng, Y

    2001-11-01

    We studied cytogenesis, telomere and telomerase, and c-myc, ras, bcl-2, and p53 genes of cells in the progressive process of immortal epithelial cells from embryonic esophagus induced by human papillomavirus (HPV). The SHEE cell line, established by us, consist of immortalized epithelial cells from the embryonic esophagus induced by genes E6E7 of HPV type 18. It was in initial malignant transformation when cultivated over 60 passages without co-carcinogens. Cells of the 10th, 31st, and 60th passages were represented in the progressive process within the immortal period. In these three stages of the cell line, the modal number of chromosome and karyotypes were analyzed. The telomere length was assayed by Southern blot methods, and the telomerase activity was analyzed by hTR and hTERT assay. C-myc, p53, bcl-2, ras genes were assayed by the multi-PCR method. The morphology of the 10th passage cells exhibited good differentiation, the 60th passage cells were relatively poorly differentiated, and the 31st passage cells differentiated in two distinct ways. The growth characteristics of the 31st and 60th passage cells were weakened at contact-inhibition and anchorage-dependent growth. Karyotypes of three cell passages belonged to hyperdiploid and hypotriploid with abnormal chromosomes +1, +3, +7, +9, +17, +18; del(1)(p32); der(4), t(4;?)(q31;?); der(5),t(5;?)(q31;?); der(13),t(13;13)(p11;q11) and others. Bimodal distribution of chromosomes with more aberrant chromosomes appeared in the 31st and 60th passage cells. Telomere length sharply shortened from normal fetal esophagus to the 10th and 31st passage step by step, but was stable from the 31st to the 60th passage and the telomerase activities measured were expressed at late two passages. p53 mutant was positive in three passages, c-myc was positive in the 31st and the 60th passage K-ras only in the last. The results reveal that changes of chromosomes, telomere length, telomerase activity and certain gene expressions are important events of HPV-immortalized esophageal epithelium cells. All of these changes occurred in dynamic progressive process. This cell line may be useful for the elucidation of the genetic mechanism of cellular immortalization. PMID:11605024

  5. Long esophageal stricture in Crohn's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gheorghe, C; Aposteanu, G; Popescu, C; Gheorghe, L; Oproiu, A; Popescu, I

    1998-01-01

    Crohn's disease of the esophagus is rare, and it is very unusual for it to be located only in the esophagus. We report a case of Crohn's disease confined to the esophagus in a 26-year-old female. The patient was admitted because of progressive dysphagia, odynophagia and weight loss. A barium-swallow examination showed an irregular narrowing of the esophagus below the level of the aortic arch which was 15 cm long, with marginal ulcers and a pseudopolypoid appearance of the mucosa; a computed tomographic scan of the thorax revealed a thickened esophageal wall. Esophagoscopy revealed an esophageal stricture 25 cm distal to the incisor teeth, 2 mm in diameter, with "punched out" ulcers and pseudopolypoid mucosa. Endobiopsy specimens showed chronic lymphocytic infiltration into the corion in the absence of neutrophils, basal-cell hyperplasia and elongation of the stromal papillae. The patient underwent an esophagectomy through a combined cervico-abdominal approach followed by a cervical esogastrostomy. The specimen was 18 cm long, the thickness of the wall was 1.7 cm with fibrosis involving all layers of the esophageal wall and a cobblestone appearance of the mucosa. A heavy lymphoplasmocytic infiltrate extended from the mucosa deep into the muscularis, fibrosis and granulomas were found transmurally. Crohn's disease of the esophagus is a rare and specific entity which can present in various ways; strictures resembling those from reflux esophagitis or a tumor are common. Diagnosis may be suggested by the presence of a chronic lymphocytic infiltrate with or without non-caseating granulomas, and no histologic evidence of chronic reflux esophagitis. PMID:9684125

  6. Efficacy of short period, low dose oral prednisolone for the prevention of stricture after circumferential endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Mikinori; Anzai, Sho; Shirasaki, Tomoaki; Ikemiyagi, Hidekazu; Fujii, Takashi; Mabuchi, Kazuhisa; Suzuki, Shinji; Yoshida, Masashi; Kawai, Takashi; Kitajima, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was developed in Japan and has been performed on many patients with early stage esophageal cancer; however quality of life in patients with postoperative stricture is drastically decreased and repeat, periodic endoscopic balloon dilatation (EBD) is usually required over long periods. In this study, we evaluate the efficacy of short period, low dose oral prednisolone in controlling post-procedural esophageal stricture. Patients and methods: In total, 33 patients who underwent semicircular or complete circular ESD for esophageal superficial squamous cell carcinoma were included in this study. They were divided into two groups: those who underwent large-circumference ESD with no preventative treatment for stricture (ESD alone group) and those who received systemic steroid treatment for stricture (oral prednisolone group). We compared the two groups in terms of stricture rate and total number of EBD sessions. The ESD alone group underwent no preventative treatment. The oral prednisolone group started with 30?mg/day prednisolone on the second day post-ESD, and continued with a gradually tapering prednisolone dose, finally discontinuing systemic steroid administration 3 weeks later. Results: The stricture rate after ESD was significantly lower in the oral prednisolone group (3 of 17 patients; 17.6?%) than in the ESD alone group (11 of 16 patients; 68.7?%) (P?stage esophageal cancers. PMID:26135649

  7. Expression of Wnt11 and Rock2 protein with clinical characteristics of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in Kazakh and Han patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Zhou, Keming; Li, Qiaoxin; Deng, Feiyan; Ma, Yuqing

    2015-01-01

    Background: Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the most malignancies with a very poor outcome in China. Wnt11 and Rock2, new identified proteins highly associated with metastasis of many cancers, which were never reported in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Here we measured the expression levels of Wnt11 and Rock2 in tissues from 265 patients with ESCC. Immunohistochemical staining was employed to detect the correlation of Wnt11 and Rock2 expression with clinicopathological features. Methods: The expression of Wnt11 and Rock2 was detected by immunohistochemistry in esophageal squamous cell carcinomas and normal esophageal tissues. A chi-square test was used to assess the statistical significance of the correlations between Wnt11, Rock2 expression and different clinicopathological parameters, respectively. Results: The high-expression of Wnt11 and Rock2 was observed in ESCCs. Seventy-five cases of ESCC (51.7%) showed a positive expression of Wnt11, which indicated a significant association with the AJCC stage (P=0.007). Ninety-eight cases of ESCC (65.5%) showed a positive expression of Rock2, which indicated a significant association with ethnic background. There were no close correlations between Rock2 expression and gender, tumor location, AJCC stage, lymph node metastasis. Specifically, the expression of Rock2 was significantly different between Hans and Kazaks ethnicities (P=0.000). In Kaplan-Meier curve analysis, no significant correlation was observed between the expression of Wnt11, Rock-2 and the poor prognosis of ESCCs. Conclusion: Our finding suggests that the over-expression of Rock2 may play an important role in the carcinogenesis and progression, and may become a new underlying molecular marker in the diagnosis and treatment in ESCC. PMID:26261605

  8. Presence of serum tripartite motif-containing 21 antibodies in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kuboshima, Mari; Shimada, Hideaki; Liu, Tian-Ling; Nomura, Fumio; Takiguchi, Masaki; Hiwasa, Takaki; Ochiai, Takenori

    2006-05-01

    SEREX has been applied to esophageal SCC, and the TRIM21 gene was identified as a novel SEREX antigen of esophageal SCC. The presence of s-TRIM21-Abs was confirmed by Western blotting using bacterially expressed TRIM21 gene product and was evaluated for clinicopathological significance in patients with esophageal SCC. s-TRIM21-Abs were detected in 18 (20%) of 91 patients with esophageal SCC but not in 42 healthy donors. The presence of s-TRIM21-Abs was partly associated with tumor size (P = 0.063) and poor survival (P = 0.067). To measure serum antibody levels, ELISA using purified recombinant TRIM21 protein was developed. The levels of s-TRIM21-Abs were significantly higher in patients with esophageal SCC than in healthy donors (P = 0.013). s-TRIM21-Abs may be a useful tumor marker to diagnose and predict disease progression in patients with esophageal SCC. PMID:16630135

  9. Esophageal blood flow in the cat. Normal distribution and effects of acid perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hollwarth, M.E.; Smith, M.; Kvietys, P.R.; Granger, D.N.

    1986-03-01

    The radioactive microsphere technique was used to estimate blood flow to different regions of the esophagus and to adjacent regions of the stomach before and after perfusion of the esophagus with hydrochloric acid (pH 1.5) for 5 min. Under resting conditions total blood flow, as well as blood flow to the mucosal-submucosal layer and the muscular layer, to both sphincters was significantly higher than to the esophageal body. Blood flow to the adjacent regions of the stomach was significantly higher than esophageal blood flow. Acid perfusion resulted in a large increase in total blood flow in both sphincters and the lower esophageal body. Gastric blood flow was not altered by acid perfusion. The esophageal hyperemia resulted primarily from an increase in blood flow to the muscular layer; mucosal-submucosal blood flow was increased only in the lower esophageal sphincter. The present study indicates that short periods (5 min) of gastroesophageal reflux may increase esophageal blood flow.

  10. A comparative study of nitrite reduction by synthetic and biogenic Fe(II-III) hydroxysalts green rusts: Evidence for hydroxyl-nitrite green rust formation as an intermediate reaction product.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ona-Nguema, G.; Guerbois, D.; Morin, G.; Zhang, Y.; Noel, V.; Brest, J.

    2013-12-01

    The occurrence of high nitrite concentrations as a result of anthropogenic activities is an important water quality concern as it is highly toxic to human and fauna, and it is used as a nitrogen source for the assimilation process. The toxicity of nitrite is related to its transformation into carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds, which are suspected to be responsible for some gastric cancers, and to its ability to convert the hemoglobin to methaemoglobin what is then unable to fix oxygen and to transport it to the tissues, involving hypoxia and the blue-baby syndrome [1]. To reduce the adverse effect of nitrite on human health and on macroalgal blooms, any process enhancing the transformation of nitrite ions to nitrogen gas is of interest for the remediation of natural environments. To achieve this purpose the use of processes involving Fe(II)-containing minerals could be considered as one of the best options. Green-rusts are mixed Fe(II-III) layered double hydroxides commonly found in anoxic zones of natural environments such as sediments and hydromorphic soils. In such anoxic environments, green rust minerals play an important role in the biogeochemical redox cycling of iron and nitrogen, and can affect the speciation and mobility of many organic and inorganic contaminants. The present study investigates the reduction of nitrite by two synthetic and two biogenic green rusts. On the one hand, Fe(II-III) hydroxychloride and Fe(II-III) hydroxycarbonate green rusts were used as synthetic interlayer forms of GR, which are referred to as ';syn-GR(CO3)' and ';syn-GR(Cl)', respectively. On the other hand, the study was performed with biogenic Fe(II-III) hydroxycarbonate green rusts obtained from the bioreduction of two ferric precursors, either Fe(III)-oxyhydroxycarbonate or lepidocrocite; these biogenic green rusts are referred to as ';bio-GR(CO3)F' and ';bio-GR(CO3)L', respectively. For synthetic green rusts, results showed that the oxidation of both syn-GR(CO3) and syn-GR(Cl) led to the reduction of nitrite ions to ammonium, and that the production of ammonium depended on their Fe(II) content. XRD patterns indicated that both synthetic green rusts were fully oxidized into magnetite during the reaction with nitrite. For biogenic green rusts, the study revealed that both bio-GR(CO3)F and bio-GR(CO3)L were capable of reducing nitrite ions without ammonium production, suggesting the conversion of nitrite ions to nitrogen gas. Moreover, we provided evidence for the first time that the interactions of bio-GR(CO3)F with nitrite led to the formation of an hydroxy-nitrite green rust as a result of the incorporation of nitrite in the interlayer region of bio-GR(CO3)F; such an intercalation of nitrite ions was not observed in experiments with bio-GR(CO3)L. XRD analysis indicated that GR(NO2) was formed as an intermediate reaction product prior to the fully oxidation of GR to ferric oxyhydroxides. [1] Philips S., Laanbroek H. J. and Verstraete W. (2002). Rev. Environ. Sci. Biotechnol. 1, 115-141.

  11. High DEPTOR expression correlates with poor prognosis in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nan-bo; Zhang, Jun-hua; Liu, Yu-fan; Li, Jun; Zhang, Zhen-zhong; Li, Ji-wei; Liu, Wen-yue; Huang, Chen; Shen, Tao; Gu, Cheng-wei; Gao, Dong-yun; Wu, Xia; Wu, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Objective The disheveled, Egl-10, and pleckstrin (DEP) domain containing mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-interacting protein (DEPTOR) is a binding protein containing mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), and an endogenous mTOR inhibitor. DEPTOR shows abnormal expressions in numerous types of solid tumors. However, how DEP-TOR is expressed in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remains elusive. Methods The expression of DEPTOR in 220 cases of ESCC and non-cancerous adjacent tissues was detected by immunohistochemistry. DEPTOR levels in ESCC and paired normal tissue were quantified using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis to verify the immunohistochemical results. The relationship between DEPTOR expression and the clinicopathological features of ESCC was analyzed based on the results of immunohistochemistry. Finally, we analyzed the relationship between DEPTOR expression and the prognosis of patients with ESCC. Results Immunohistochemical staining showed that the expression rate of DEPTOR in ESCC tissues was significantly increased. DEPTOR mRNA and protein expression was significantly higher in ESCC tissues than in normal adjacent esophageal squamous tissues. High DEPTOR expression was significantly correlated with regional lymph node status in the TNM stage of patients with ESCC. Kaplan–Meier survival curves showed that the rate of overall survival was significantly lower in patients with high DEPTOR expression than in those with low DEPTOR expression. Additionally, high DEPTOR expression was an independent prognostic predictor for ESCC patients. Conclusion High DEPTOR expression is an independent prognostic biomarker indicating a worse prognosis for patients with ESCC. PMID:26640385

  12. Carbon abundances of early B-type stars in the solar vicinity. Non-LTE line-formation for C II/III/IV and self-consistent atmospheric parameters

    E-print Network

    M. F. Nieva; N. Przybilla

    2007-11-23

    Precise determinations of the chemical composition in early B-type stars consitute fundamental observational constraints on stellar and galactochemical evolution. Carbon is one of the most abundant metals in the Universe but analyses in early-type stars show inconclusive results, like large discrepancies between analyses of different lines in C II, a failure to establish the C II/III ionization balance and the derivation of systematically lower abundances than from other objects. We present a comprehensive and robust C II/III/IV model for non-LTE line-formation calculations based on carefully selected atomic data. The model is calibrated with high-S/N spectra of six apparently slow-rotating early B-type dwarfs and giants, which cover a wide parameter range and are randomly distributed in the solar neighbourhood. A self-consistent quantitative spectrum analysis is performed using an extensive iteration scheme to determine stellar atmospheric parameters and to select the appropriate atomic data used for the derivation of chemical abundances. We establish the carbon ionization balance for all sample stars based on a unique set of input atomic data, achieving consistency for all modelled lines. Highly accurate atmospheric parameters and a homogeneous carbon abundance with reduced systematic errors are derived. This results in a present-day stellar carbon abundance in the solar neighbourhood, which is in good agreement with recent determinations of the solar value and with the gas-phase abundance of the Orion H II region. The homogeneous present-day carbon abundance also conforms with predictions of chemical-evolution models for the Galaxy. The present approach allows us to constrain the effects of systematic errors on fundamental parameters and abundances. (abridged)

  13. Temporary Retrograde Occlusion of High-Flow Tracheo-Esophageal Fistula.

    PubMed

    Gause, Colin D; Glenn, Ian; Liu, Michael; Seifarth, Federico G

    2015-10-01

    This report describes a temporary retrograde occlusion technique for control of a high-flow tracheo-esophageal fistula in a critically ill, premature infant born at 29 weeks' gestational age, with a diagnosis of type C (Gross) esophageal atresia and tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). This procedure is a useful bridging maneuver before definitive surgical correction for extremely low birth weight, unstable neonates with tracheo-esophageal fistula who are suffering from associated malformations. PMID:26391942

  14. Relevance of N-nitrosamines to esophageal cancer in China

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.H.; Montesano, R.; Zhang, M.S.; Feng, L.; Luo, F.J.; Chui, S.X.; Umbenhauer, D.; Saffhill, R.; Rajewsky, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    Studies on the relevance of the N-nitrosamines to esophageal cancer in China are reviewed. Although a causal association between nitrosamines exposure and esophageal cancer in China has not yet been rigorously established, exposure of Lin-Xian subjects to nitrosamines either directly or as a result of their in vivo formation has been detected in our study. Several N-nitrosamines (NDMA, NDEA, NMBzA, NPyr, NPip, and NSAR) in gastric juice collected from Lin-Xian inhabitants have been detected. A correlation was found between the lesions of esophageal epithelium and the amount of nitrosamines present. In addition, the amounts of N-nitrosamino acids excreted in 24-hr urine of subjects in Lin-Xian were significantly higher than those in Fan-Xian, indicating a higher exposure to N-nitroso compound and their precursors of the inhabitants in the high-risk area. The effect of nitrosamines on human esophagus has been investigated at the cellular levels. The amounts of O/sup 6/-MedG in DNA of esophageal or stomach mucosa of patients from Lin-Xian were higher than that from Europe. The presence of O/sup 6/-MedG in the human fetal esophagus cultured with NMBzA was also detected. These findings indicate that the elevated levels of O/sup 6/-MedG in esophageal DNA could be the result of a recent exposure to N-nitroso compounds or a genetically determined reduced cellular capacity for repair of O/sup 6/-MedG from DNA. The hyperplasia was induced in the esophagus of human fetus that cultured with NMBzA for 2 weeks to 2 months. The intervention studies of esophageal cancer in Lin-Xian have been pursued. Intake of moderate doses of ascorbic acids by Lin-Xian subjects effectively reduced the urinary levels of N-nitrosamino acids to those found in undosed subjects in the low-risk area.

  15. Efficacy and safety analysis of trastuzumab and paclitaxel based regimen plus carboplatin or epirubicin as neoadjuvant therapy for clinical stage II-III, HER2-positive breast cancer patients: a phase 2, open-label, multicenter, randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liang; Chen, Sheng; Yang, Wentao; Xu, Binghe; Huang, Tao; Yang, Hongjian; Zheng, Hong; Wang, Yongsheng; Song, Erwei; Zhang, Jin; Cui, Shude; Pang, Da; Tang, Lili; Lei, Yutao; Geng, Cuizhi; Shao, Zhiming

    2015-07-30

    This trial was designed to compare the efficacy and safety between epirubicin (E) and carboplatin (C) in combination with paclitaxel (P) and trastuzumab (H) in neoadjuvant setting. In 13 Chinese cancer centers, 100 patients with HER2-positive, locally advanced breast cancer were 1:1 randomized to receive medication as follows: trastuzumab and paclitaxel weekly combined with carboplatin weekly for PCH group, or epirubicin every 3 weeks for PEH group. Patients were given 4 to 6 cycles of chemotherapy. The primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) rate, which was no significant difference in PCH and PEH regimen (39.1% vs. 48.8%; p=0.365). However, PEH regimen achieved higher pCR in luminal-B (HER2-poitive) subgroup (55.0% vs. 24.0%; p = 0.033), but not in ERBB2+ subgroup (42.9% vs. 57.1%; p = 0.355). PEH regimen showed a favorable efficacy in PIK3CA mutated subgroup (69.2% vs.23.5%, p=0.012). No significant difference was observed in the subgroup analysis of TP53 mutation status, PTEN expression, FCGR2A SNP and FCGR3A SNP. Both regimens as neoadjuvant chemotherapy achieve similar efficacy and safety. PEH might improve pCR rate, especially in the luminal-B subtype and PIK3CA mutation subtype. PEH is feasible and less likely to increase the incidence of acute cardiac events compared to PCH. PMID:26084292

  16. Efficacy and safety analysis of trastuzumab and paclitaxel based regimen plus carboplatin or epirubicin as neoadjuvant therapy for clinical stage II-III, HER2-positive breast cancer patients: a phase 2, open-label, multicenter, randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wentao; Xu, Binghe; Huang, Tao; Yang, Hongjian; Zheng, Hong; Wang, Yongsheng; Song, Erwei; Zhang, Jin; Cui, Shude; Pang, Da; Tang, Lili; Lei, Yutao; Geng, Cuizhi; Shao, Zhiming

    2015-01-01

    This trial was designed to compare the efficacy and safety between epirubicin (E) and carboplatin (C) in combination with paclitaxel (P) and trastuzumab (H) in neoadjuvant setting. In 13 Chinese cancer centers, 100 patients with HER2-positive, locally advanced breast cancer were 1:1 randomized to receive medication as follows: trastuzumab and paclitaxel weekly combined with carboplatin weekly for PCH group, or epirubicin every 3 weeks for PEH group. Patients were given 4 to 6 cycles of chemotherapy. The primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) rate, which was no significant difference in PCH and PEH regimen (39.1% vs. 48.8%; p=0.365). However, PEH regimen achieved higher pCR in luminal-B (HER2-poitive) subgroup (55.0% vs. 24.0%; p = 0.033), but not in ERBB2+ subgroup (42.9% vs. 57.1%; p = 0.355). PEH regimen showed a favorable efficacy in PIK3CA mutated subgroup (69.2% vs.23.5%, p=0.012). No significant difference was observed in the subgroup analysis of TP53 mutation status, PTEN expression, FCGR2A SNP and FCGR3A SNP. Both regimens as neoadjuvant chemotherapy achieve similar efficacy and safety. PEH might improve pCR rate, especially in the luminal-B subtype and PIK3CA mutation subtype. PEH is feasible and less likely to increase the incidence of acute cardiac events compared to PCH. PMID:26084292

  17. In stage II/III lymph node-positive breast cancer patients less than 55 years of age, keratin 8 expression in lymph node metastases but not in the primary tumour is an indicator of better survival.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Serena; Pracella, Danae; Barbazza, Renzo; Sulfaro, Sandro; Stanta, Giorgio

    2015-05-01

    Axillary lymph node status is one of the most important prognostic variables for breast cancer (BC). To investigate and understand the clinical, histopathological and biological factors that affect prognosis in node-positive young breast cancer patients, we compared the phenotype of 100 primary tumours with their corresponding loco-regional lymph node (LN) metastases using conventional immunohistochemistry (IHC) markers currently in use for molecular classification of breast cancer. By comparing the expression of ER, PR, HER-2, Ki67, K8, K5/6 and vimentin, we found that expression of HER-2, Ki67, K8 and vimentin is frequently lost in lymph node metastases. Between the primary tumour and corresponding lymph node metastases, expression of keratins K8 and K5/6 significantly changed. Expression of K8 in lymph node metastases, but not in primary tumours, segregates patients in two sub-groups with different outcomes. Survival of patients with K8-positive LN metastases at 5 years in comparison with patients with K8-negative LN metastases was 75 vs 48 %, at 10 years 62 vs 22 % and at 20 years 53 vs 14 % (p?

  18. Safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin injection therapy for esophageal achalasia in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Tsuruoka, Nanae; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Shimoda, Ryo; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Iwakiri, Ryuichi

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin injection is an accepted treatment modality for esophageal achalasia in western countries. This pilot study aimed to clarify the effectiveness of botulinum toxin injection for esophageal achalasia in Japanese patients. We enrolled 10 patients diagnosed with esophageal achalasia between 2008 and 2014. A total of 100 U botulinum toxin A was divided into eight aliquots and injected around the esophagogastric junction. We compared the lower esophageal sphincter pressure before and 1 week after treatment. Scores of subjective symptoms for esophageal achalasia were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) before and after 1 week of follow-up of treatment. Barium passage was improved in barium esophagography and passage of contrast agent was also improved. Mean Eckardt score was reduced from 5.5 to 1.6 after treatment (p<0.001). By esophageal manometric study, mean lower esophageal sphincter pressure was reduced from 46.9 to 29.1 mmHg after treatment (p = 0.002). One week after treatment, mean VAS score was reduced from 10 to 3.9 (p<0.001). There were no side effects in any cases. Botulinum toxin injection for esophageal achalasia was safe and effective with few complications. Therefore, botulinum toxin could be used as minimally invasive therapy for esophageal achalasia in Japan. PMID:26566311

  19. Safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin injection therapy for esophageal achalasia in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Tsuruoka, Nanae; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Shimoda, Ryo; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Iwakiri, Ryuichi

    2015-11-01

    Botulinum toxin injection is an accepted treatment modality for esophageal achalasia in western countries. This pilot study aimed to clarify the effectiveness of botulinum toxin injection for esophageal achalasia in Japanese patients. We enrolled 10 patients diagnosed with esophageal achalasia between 2008 and 2014. A total of 100 U botulinum toxin A was divided into eight aliquots and injected around the esophagogastric junction. We compared the lower esophageal sphincter pressure before and 1 week after treatment. Scores of subjective symptoms for esophageal achalasia were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) before and after 1 week of follow-up of treatment. Barium passage was improved in barium esophagography and passage of contrast agent was also improved. Mean Eckardt score was reduced from 5.5 to 1.6 after treatment (p<0.001). By esophageal manometric study, mean lower esophageal sphincter pressure was reduced from 46.9 to 29.1 mmHg after treatment (p = 0.002). One week after treatment, mean VAS score was reduced from 10 to 3.9 (p<0.001). There were no side effects in any cases. Botulinum toxin injection for esophageal achalasia was safe and effective with few complications. Therefore, botulinum toxin could be used as minimally invasive therapy for esophageal achalasia in Japan. PMID:26566311

  20. [Diffuse esophageal leiomyomatosis. Apropos of 5 cases with 2 familial cases].

    PubMed

    Leborgne, J; Le Neel, J C; Heloury, Y; Audoin, A F; David, A; Babut, J M; Lenne, Y

    1989-01-01

    Diffuse esophageal leiomyomatosis is characterized by diffuse muscular hypertrophy chiefly marked in the lower end of the esophagus looks at a large tumor. It involves the entire length of the esophagus and down to the upper part of the stomach (esogastric leiomyomatosis). Diffuse leiomyomatosis is a extremely rare pathology encountered in children (13 previous report cases) and young adults. Il may be isolated or found in association with other intrathoracic and genital localisations or Alport syndrome (nephropathy, sensorineural deafness, ocular lesions). Extensive leiomyomatosis, engulfing the trachea and stem bronchi, may involve acute respiratory insufficiency. Genital localisations, exclusively in women (clitoral hypertrophy, vulvar leiomyomatosis), in association with esophageal leiomyomatosis, realize the esophago vulvar syndrome. Recently, familial diffuse leiomyomatosis cases were described with, in association, esophageal and extra-esophageal leiomyomatosis and Alport syndrome. The majority of the patients developed esophageal or respiratory symptoms. The radiological appearance is that of a mediastinal tumor or achalasia. CT Scans findings can give evidence diffuse muscular thickening of esophageal wall. Prognosis depends on the associated lesions. In that reports, two young adults (27 and 39 years old) died of inhabitual carcinomas (esophageal and gallbladder carcinoma). The only surgical treatment for symptomatic esogastric leiomyomatosis is subtotal esophagectomy with proximal gastrectomy and esocoloplasty. Myotomy is ineffective (2 cases). Five cases of esophageal leiomyomatosis are described (3 children, 2 young adults). Among these, two are familial leiomyomatosis cases. An esophageal resection was performed in four patients. PMID:2612274

  1. Curative ESD for intraepithelial esophageal carcinoma with leiomyoma mimicking submucosal invasive carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, Keiko; Kodashima, Shinya; Ono, Satoshi; Goto, Osamu; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro

    2009-01-01

    This case report presents a 65-year-old man who developed early esophageal cancer with leiomyoma treated by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). There have been several reports of co-existing superficial esophageal cancer and leiomyoma treated by endoscopic mucosal resection. However, there is no previous report describing the co-existing lesion treated by ESD. In order to determine treatment strategies for esophageal cancer, accurate endoscopic evaluation of the cancerous depth is essential. In the present case, the combination of endoscopic ultrasonography and narrow-band imaging system with magnifying endoscopy was extremely useful to evaluate the superficial esophageal cancer with leiomyoma, which lead to the appropriate treatment, ESD. PMID:21160655

  2. Serum miRNA expression in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    HUI, BEINA; CHEN, XIN; HUI, LINGYUN; XI, RUXING; ZHANG, XIAOZHI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the feasibility and value of serum microRNAs (miRNAs/miRs) as biological markers for the prediction of the behavior and prognosis of esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC). The differential expression of serum miRNA was detected by an miRNA microarray of 9 patients with ESCC and 9 healthy volunteers. The result of the miRNA microarray was validated in serum samples of 69 patients with ESCC and 14 healthy volunteers by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). The association between serum miRNA expression and tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage was analyzed. A total of 10 serum-specific miRNAs were identified from the patients with ESCC. Through PCR verification, the expression levels of miR-129, miR-451 and miR-365 were consistent with the microarray results validated by RT-qPCR, and the difference was statistically significant compared with the healthy volunteers (P=0.007, P=0.007 and P<0.001, respectively). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that miR-365 could serve as potential diagnostic marker for ESCC; the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.831, with a sensitivity of 80.56% and a specificity of 86.7%, but its expression did not differ significantly among the different TNM stages (stage I–II vs. III, P=0.052; stage III vs. IV, P=0.069). The expression level of miRNA-129 differed significantly among the different stages (stage I–II vs. III, P=0.002; stage III vs. IV, P=0.042), while the expression level of miR-451 did not differ significantly between stage III and IV (P=0.308). In conclusion, serum microRNAs are novel biomarkers for ESCC, and miRNA-365 and miRNA-129 can be used for the early prediction of cancer and the prediction of clinical stage, respectively. PMID:26722280

  3. BMP-driven NRF2 activation in esophageal basal cell differentiation and eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ming; Ku, Wei-Yao; Zhou, Zhongren; Dellon, Evan S; Falk, Gary W; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Wang, Mei-Lun; Liu, Kuancan; Wang, Jun; Katzka, David A; Peters, Jeffrey H; Lan, Xiaopeng; Que, Jianwen

    2015-04-01

    Tissue homeostasis requires balanced self-renewal and differentiation of stem/progenitor cells, especially in tissues that are constantly replenished like the esophagus. Disruption of this balance is associated with pathological conditions, including eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), in which basal progenitor cells become hyperplastic upon proinflammatory stimulation. However, how basal cells respond to the inflammatory environment at the molecular level remains undetermined. We previously reported that the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway is critical for epithelial morphogenesis in the embryonic esophagus. Here, we address how this pathway regulates tissue homeostasis and EoE development in the adult esophagus. BMP signaling was specifically activated in differentiated squamous epithelium, but not in basal progenitor cells, which express the BMP antagonist follistatin. Previous reports indicate that increased BMP activity promotes Barrett's intestinal differentiation; however, in mice, basal progenitor cell-specific expression of constitutively active BMP promoted squamous differentiation. Moreover, BMP activation increased intracellular ROS levels, initiating an NRF2-mediated oxidative response during basal progenitor cell differentiation. In both a mouse EoE model and human biopsies, reduced squamous differentiation was associated with high levels of follistatin and disrupted BMP/NRF2 pathways. We therefore propose a model in which normal squamous differentiation of basal progenitor cells is mediated by BMP-driven NRF2 activation and basal cell hyperplasia is promoted by disruption of BMP signaling in EoE. PMID:25774506

  4. BMP-driven NRF2 activation in esophageal basal cell differentiation and eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ming; Ku, Wei-Yao; Zhou, Zhongren; Dellon, Evan S.; Falk, Gary W.; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Wang, Mei-Lun; Liu, Kuancan; Wang, Jun; Katzka, David A.; Peters, Jeffrey H.; Lan, Xiaopeng; Que, Jianwen

    2015-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis requires balanced self-renewal and differentiation of stem/progenitor cells, especially in tissues that are constantly replenished like the esophagus. Disruption of this balance is associated with pathological conditions, including eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), in which basal progenitor cells become hyperplastic upon proinflammatory stimulation. However, how basal cells respond to the inflammatory environment at the molecular level remains undetermined. We previously reported that the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway is critical for epithelial morphogenesis in the embryonic esophagus. Here, we address how this pathway regulates tissue homeostasis and EoE development in the adult esophagus. BMP signaling was specifically activated in differentiated squamous epithelium, but not in basal progenitor cells, which express the BMP antagonist follistatin. Previous reports indicate that increased BMP activity promotes Barrett’s intestinal differentiation; however, in mice, basal progenitor cell–specific expression of constitutively active BMP promoted squamous differentiation. Moreover, BMP activation increased intracellular ROS levels, initiating an NRF2-mediated oxidative response during basal progenitor cell differentiation. In both a mouse EoE model and human biopsies, reduced squamous differentiation was associated with high levels of follistatin and disrupted BMP/NRF2 pathways. We therefore propose a model in which normal squamous differentiation of basal progenitor cells is mediated by BMP-driven NRF2 activation and basal cell hyperplasia is promoted by disruption of BMP signaling in EoE. PMID:25774506

  5. Personalized targeted therapy for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xiaozheng; Chen, Keneng; Li, Yicheng; Li, Jianying; D'Amico, Thomas A; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma continues to heavily burden clinicians worldwide. Researchers have discovered the genomic landscape of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, which holds promise for an era of personalized oncology care. One of the most pressing problems facing this issue is to improve the understanding of the newly available genomic data, and identify the driver-gene mutations, pathways, and networks. The emergence of a legion of novel targeted agents has generated much hope and hype regarding more potent treatment regimens, but the accuracy of drug selection is still arguable. Other problems, such as cancer heterogeneity, drug resistance, exceptional responders, and side effects, have to be surmounted. Evolving topics in personalized oncology, such as interpretation of genomics data, issues in targeted therapy, research approaches for targeted therapy, and future perspectives, will be discussed in this editorial. PMID:26167067

  6. A rare cause of dysphagia: herpes simplex esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bee; Caddy, Grant

    2007-05-21

    Herpes simplex esophagitis (HSE) is well documented in immunosuppressed patients. However, it is rare in the immunocompetent host. We present a case of HSE in a 21 year-old healthy lady who was admitted to our unit with dysphagia, odynophagia and chest pain. Clinical examination revealed mild epigastric tenderness and admission bloods including full blood picture, electrolytes and inflammatory markers were normal. She underwent an esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) which revealed severe exudative, well-circumscribed ulcerations in her distal esophagus. Biopsies confirmed severe esophagitis with acute ulceration and subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1. Subsequent assessment failed to identify an immune disorder. HSE should be suspected when faced with characteristic endoscopic findings, even if the patient is immunocompetent. When the diagnosis of HSE is confirmed, an immune deficiency should be sought. PMID:17569149

  7. Esophageal diverticulum exposed during endoscopic submucosal dissection of superficial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shinwa; Toyonaga, Takashi; Ohara, Yoshiko; Yoshizaki, Tetsuya; Kawara, Fumiaki; Ishida, Tsukasa; Hoshi, Namiko; Morita, Yoshinori; Azuma, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is now widely accepted as a strategy to treat superficial esophageal neoplasms. The rate of adverse events, such as perforation, has been decreasing with the improvement of devices and techniques. In this paper, we report a case of esophageal cancer that had a diverticulum under cancerous epithelium. The diverticulum was not detected during preoperative examination, and led to perforation during the ESD procedure. Our case shows that, although rare, some diverticula can exist underneath the mucosal surface without obvious depression. If there is any sign of hidden diverticula during ESD, surgeons should proceed with caution or, depending on the case, the procedure should be discontinued to avoid adverse events. PMID:25780314

  8. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Another Atopy-Related Alopecia Areata Trigger?

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Omer; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Piliang, Melissa

    2015-11-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is associated with atopy in 10-22% of patients, twice the prevalence in the general population. Patients can present with concomitant atopic dermatitis, hay fever, asthma, and even allergies to dust mites. In many cases, severity and flares of these atopic diatheses correlate with severity of AA. Herein we present a patient with AA affected by contemporaneous eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). EoE is a recently recognized allergic disorder, mediated by eosiniphils and histamine. It is characterized by esophageal dysfunction and intraepithelial microabscesses. We propose that EoE be considered as a condition falling within the realm of atopic diseases, and a potential trigger of AA in affected patients. PMID:26551950

  9. Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy for Treating Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Young Hoon; Minami, Hitomi; Chiu, Philip Wai Yan; Park, Hyojin

    2016-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is the application of esophageal myotomy to the concept of natural orifice transluminal surgery (NOTES) by utilizing a submucosal tunneling method. Since the first case of POEM was performed for treating achalasia in Japan in 2008, this procedure is being more widely used by many skillful endosopists all over the world. Currently, POEM is a spotlighted, emerging treatment option for achalasia, and the indications for POEM are expanding to include long-standing, sigmoid shaped esophagus in achalasia, even previously failed endoscopic treatment or surgical myotomy, and other spastic esophageal motility disorders. Accumulating data about POEM demonstrate excellent short-term outcomes with minimal risk of major adverse events, and some existing long-term data show the efficacy of POEM to be long lasting. In this review article, we review the technical details and clinical outcomes of POEM, and discuss some considerations of POEM in special situations. PMID:26717928

  10. Investigation of cholecystokinin receptors in the human lower esophageal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Xin-Bo; Drew, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To compare the binding of cholecystokinin (CCK)-8 to CCK receptors in sling and clasp fibers of the human lower esophageal sphincter. METHODS: Esophageal sling and clasp fibers were isolated from eight esophagectomy specimens, resected for squamous cell carcinoma in the upper two thirds of the esophagus, which had been maintained in oxygenated Kreb’s solution. Western blot was used to measure CCK-A and CCK-B receptor subtypes in the two muscles. A radioligand binding assay was used to determine the binding parameters of 3H-CCK-8S to the CCK receptor subtypes. The specificity of binding was determined by the addition of proglumide, which blocks the binding of CCK to both receptor subtypes. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between the sling and clasp fibers of the human lower esophageal sphincter in the amount of CCK-A [integrated optical density (IOD) value: 22.65 ± 0.642 vs 22.328 ± 1.042, P = 0.806] or CCK-B receptor protein (IOD value: 13.20 ± 0.423 vs 12.45 ± 0.294, P = 0.224) as measured by Western blot. The maximum binding of radio-labeled CCK-8S was higher in the sling fibers than in the clasp fibers (595.75 ± 3.231 cpm vs 500.000 ± 10.087 cpm, P < 0.001) and dissociation constant was lower (Kd: 1.437 ± 0.024 nmol/L vs 1.671 ± 0.024 nmol/L, P < 0.001). The IC50 of the receptor specific antagonists were lower for the CCK-A receptors than for the CCK-B (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: CCK binding modulates the contractile function of the lower esophageal sphincter through differential binding to the CCK-A receptor on the sling and clasp fibers. PMID:24914377

  11. Radionuclide esophageal transit of a liquid bolus: A reappraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, R.H.; Lange, R.C.; Magyar, L.; Greene, R.; McCallum, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Measurement of radionuclide esophageal transit (RT) using a liquid bolus has been suggested as a screening test for esophageal motor disorders (EMD). The authors prospectively evaluated RT in 49 patients referred for esophageal manometry. Ten subjects with normal manometry served as controls. RT was performed using two 10 ml boluses of water labeled with 250 ..mu..Ci /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid. Patients were studied supine and the swallow sequences framed in 1 second intervals. Transit time was measured from the time of entry to the time of exit from the esophagus. Mean transit time in normal subjects was 9.1 +- 2.1 (SD) sec. The test was abnormal if the transit time was prolonged (> 15 sec) in at least 1 of 2 swallows. RT agreed with manometry in 36/49 patients (75%), including 9/9 achalasics, 3/3 diffuse esophageal spasm, 3/7 'nutcracker esophagus' and 7/8 non-specific motor disorders (NSMD). 4/18 patients with normal manometry had abnormal RT. 9/31 patients with abnormal manometry had normal RT, including 4/7 nutcracker esophagus, 3/3 hypertrensive LES, 1/1 scleroderma and 1/8 NSMD. Sensitivity of RT was 70% and specificity 77%. The false positive rate was 15% and the false negative rate 39%. The authors conclude the following: 1) RT identifies patients with absent or impaired peristalsis; 2) There is substantial incidence of false negatives among patients with manometric disorders but normal peristalsis; and 3) Abnormal RT did occur in some patients with normal menometry. RT using a liquid bolus may not be sensitive enough as a screening test for EMD, but it may be an important adjunct to manometry.

  12. Minimally invasive esophagectomy for esophageal cancer – results of surgical therapy

    PubMed Central

    Vrba, Radek; Vomá?ková, Katherine; Bohanes, Tomáš; Stašek, Martin; Neoral, ?estmír

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The indication for minimally invasive esophagectomy (MIE) in esophageal cancer has an increasing tendency. Aim To present our cohort of patients operated on between 2006 and 2012. Material and methods: A single centre study of 106 consecutive esophagectomies performed for esophageal cancer by a minimally invasive approach in 79 patients was performed. Transhiatal laparoscopic esophagectomy (THLE) was performed in 66 patients, transthoracic esophagectomy (TTE) in 13 patients, with histological findings of squamous cell carcinoma in 28 and adenocarcinoma in 51 patients. Results The MIE was completed in 76 (96.2%) patients. In cases of TTE, the operation was converted to an open procedure in 3 cases. Operation time ranged from 225 to 370 min (average 256 min). The number of lymph nodes removed was 7–16 (11 on average). The postoperative course was without any complications in 54 (68.3%) patients. Respiratory complications were observed in 14 (17.7%) patients (9 following THLE, 5 following TTE). Other serious complications included acute myocardial infarction (1 patient) and necrosis of the gastroplasty (1 patient). Anastomotic dehiscence was observed in 8 patients, left recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis in 8 patients, intra-abdominal abscesses in 2 patients, and pleural empyema in 1 case. The overall morbidity of patients operated on by MIE was 31.6%. Thirty-day mortality was 10.1%. Conclusions The MIE belongs to the therapeutic portfolio of surgical procedures performed for esophageal cancer. Successful performance requires erudition of the surgical team in both minimally invasive procedures as well as in classical surgical treatment of esophageal cancer; therefore centralization of patients is imperative. PMID:26240618

  13. Esophageal cyst in the duodenum of a foal.

    PubMed

    Loynachan, Alan T

    2014-03-01

    A 21-day-old Thoroughbred colt was euthanized following a history of recurrent colic. A 4.5 cm in diameter, occlusive, submucosal cyst was identified in the duodenum at necropsy. Histologically, the cyst was surrounded by a smooth muscle wall and was lined by both squamous and attenuated cuboidal to columnar epithelium. A diagnosis of an esophageal cyst was made based on the gross and histologic findings. PMID:24595302

  14. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in esophageal carcinoma in Tangshan, China

    PubMed Central

    Mehryar, Mohammadreza Mohammadzad; Li, Shu-Ying; Liu, Hong-Wei; Li, Fan; Zhang, Fang; Zhou, Yu-Bai; Zeng, Yi; Li, Jin-Tao

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in esophageal carcinoma in Tangshan, China, a high-incidence area. METHODS: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from 198 patients who were pathologically diagnosed with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma from 2011 to 2013 were obtained from a pathology department in Tangshan. DNA was extracted from all 198 specimens to detect HPV by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). ?-globin PCR was performed to check the quality of the DNA extraction procedure. PCR was performed to detect a wide range of HPV types, and type-specific PCR was performed to detect HPV types 16 and 18. Negative and positive controls were used for HPV 16 and 18 detection. RESULTS: The DNA extraction method in this study appeared to be more effective than other previously reported methods. After DNA extraction, more than 98% of the tissue specimens had an acceptable result in the DNA qualification test (?-globin PCR). The overall prevalence of HPV in tumor tissues by GP6+/GP5+ PCR was 79.79%, and the prevalence of HPV types 16 and 18 was 40.40% and 47.47%, respectively. PCR demonstrated the presence of HPV, and direct sequencing confirmed the HPV genotypes. All HPV-positive PCR products were checked by DNA sequence analysis using DNAman and compared with the known HPV sequences listed in the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool database to evaluate the HPV types. This analysis confirmed the presence of HPV types 16 and 18. CONCLUSION: DNA of high-risk HPV types 16 and 18 is present in esophageal tumors, implicating HPV as a possible etiologic factor for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:25780287

  15. Case report: esophageal metastasis from breast carcinoma presenting as achalasia.

    PubMed

    Herrera, J L

    1992-05-01

    Metastatic breast carcinoma to the esophagus most often presents with a mid-esophageal stricture. Involvement of the gastroesophageal junction by breast carcinoma is distinctly unusual. The authors report the case of a 78-year-old woman who presented with clinical and radiologic features of achalasia secondary to breast carcinoma, metastatic to the gastroesophageal junction. Metastatic breast cancer to the gastroesophageal junction should be added to the list of conditions mimicking achalasia. PMID:1580322

  16. Esophageal cancer management controversies: Radiation oncology point of view

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Patricia; Yu, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal cancer treatment has evolved from single modality to trimodality therapy. There are some controversies of the role, target volumes and dose of radiotherapy (RT) in the literature over decades. The present review focuses primarily on RT as part of the treatment modalities, and highlight on the RT volume and its dose in the management of esophageal cancer. The randomized adjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) trial, intergroup trial (INT 0116) enrolled 559 patients with resected adenocarcinoma of the stomach or gastroesophageal junction. They were randomly assigned to surgery plus postoperative CRT or surgery alone. Analyses show robust treatment benefit of adjuvant CRT in most subsets for postoperative CRT. The Chemoradiotherapy for Oesophageal Cancer Followed by Surgery Study (CROSS) used a lower RT dose of 41.4 Gray in 23 fractions with newer chemotherapeutic agents carboplatin and paclitaxel to achieve an excellent result. Target volume of external beam radiation therapy and its coverage have been in debate for years among radiation oncologists. Pre-operative and post-operative target volumes are designed to optimize for disease control. Esophageal brachytherapy is effective in the palliation of dysphagia, but should not be given concomitantly with chemotherapy or external beam RT. The role of brachytherapy in multimodality management requires further investigation. On-going studies of multidisciplinary treatment in locally advanced cancer include: ZTOG1201 trial (a phase II trial of neoadjuvant and adjuvant CRT) and QUINTETT (a phase III trial of neoadjuvant vs adjuvant therapy with quality of life analysis). These trials hopefully will shed more light on the future management of esophageal cancer. PMID:25132924

  17. Evaluating the effect of four extracts of avocado fruit on esophageal squamous carcinoma and colon adenocarcinoma cell lines in comparison with peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Vahedi Larijani, Laleh; Ghasemi, Maryam; AbedianKenari, Saeid; Naghshvar, Farshad

    2014-01-01

    Most patients with gastrointestinal cancers refer to the health centers at advanced stages of the disease and conventional treatments are not significantly effective for these patients. Therefore, using modern therapeutic approaches with lower toxicity bring higher chance for successful treatment and reduced adverse effects in such patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of avocado fruit extracts on inhibition of the growth of cancer cells in comparison with normal cells. In an experimental study, ethanol, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and petroleum extracts of avocado (Persea americana) fruit were prepared. Then, the effects if the extracts on the growth of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and colon adenocarcinoma cell lines were evaluated in comparison with the control group using the MTT test in the cell culture medium. Effects of the four extracts of avocado fruit on three cells lines of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and colon adenocarcinoma were tested. The results showed that avocado fruit extract is effective in inhibition of cancer cell growth in comparison with normal cells (P<0.05). Avocado fruit is rich in phytochemicals, which play an important role in inhibition of growth of cancer cells. The current study for the first time demonstrates the anti-cancer effect of avocado fruit extracts on two cancers common in Iran. Therefore, it is suggested that the fruit extracts can be considered as appropriate complementary treatments in treatment of esophageal and colon cancers. PMID:24901722

  18. Immunohistochemical Analysis of P53 and PRB in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Vandana; Khonglah, Yookarin; Lynrah, Kyrshanlang Giri

    2014-01-01

    Background: Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the fatal cancers with a high incidence rate in Asia. Many genes including p53 and pRb play an important role in its carcinogenesis. Expressions of p53 and pRb proteins have been associated with prognosis of ESCC. Objective: The study was undertaken to analyze the expressions of p53 and pRb with the various clinicopathological characteristics including stage and grade of ESCC. Materials and Methods: We examined 30 biopsy samples of ESCC for p53 and pRb protein expressions using immunohistochemistry. Immunointensity was classified as no immunostaining (-), weakly immunostaining (+), weak immunostaining (++) and strongly positive immunostaining (+++). Results: Significant association was seen between positive p53 expression and tumor size (p=0.042), invasion to adventitia (p=0.009) and lymph node metastasis (p=0.014), and negative pRb expression was associated with invasion to the adventitia (p=0.015) and lymph node metastasis (p=0.003) There was significant association of p53+/ pRb- (n=11) with tumor invasion to adventitia (p=0.001), lymph node metastasis (p=0.0007) and TNM staging (p=0.042). Conclusion: The study shows that p53 and pRb proteins, individually as well as synergistically, may serve as putative prognostic markers in ESCC. PMID:24995187

  19. Endemic chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in Sri Lanka: Correlation of pathology with clinical stages

    PubMed Central

    Wijetunge, S.; Ratnatunga, N. V. I.; Abeysekera, T. D. J.; Wazil, A. W. M.; Selvarajah, M.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDU) is endemic among the rural farming communities in several localities in and around the North Central region of Sri Lanka. This is an interstitial type renal disease and typically has an insidious onset and slow progression. This study was conducted to identify the pathological features in the different clinical stages of CKDU. This is a retrospective study of 251 renal biopsies identified to have a primary interstitial disease from regions endemic for CKDU. Pathological features were assessed and graded in relation to the clinical stage. The mean age of those affected by endemic CKDU was 37.3 ± 12.5 years and the male to female ratio was 3.3:1. The predominant feature of stage I disease was mild and moderate interstitial fibrosis; most did not have interstitial inflammation. The typical stage II disease had moderate interstitial fibrosis with or without mild interstitial inflammation. Stage III disease had moderate and severe interstitial fibrosis, moderate interstitial inflammation, tubular atrophy and some glomerulosclerosis. Stage IV disease typically had severe interstitial fibrosis and inflammation, tubular atrophy and glomerulosclerosis. The mean age of patients with stage I disease (27 ± 10.8 years) was significantly lower than those of the other stages. About 79.2%, 55%, 49.1% and 50% in stage I, II, III and IV disease respectively were asymptomatic at the time of biopsy.

  20. Recent advances in understanding/managing eosinophilic esophagitis in adults

    PubMed Central

    Katzka, David A.

    2015-01-01

    It is an exciting time for research in eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). As a new and increasingly prevalent disease, it is receiving considerable attention in the medical world, resulting in a flood of new insights. Clearly, a genetic predisposition seems likely with the identification of abnormalities in thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), calpain14, and eotaxin-3 genes. There are also well-defined abnormalities described in esophageal epithelial barrier function in these patients. The relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and EoE remains unclear, but emerging data suggest that the concept of proton pump inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPIREE) may retain less importance, as this subset of patients becomes a likely subset of EoE in general. Finally, we approach the looming issue of long-term maintenance therapy. Although we lack adequate specific data on how to provide long-term pharmacologic treatment, studies clearly show that for most patients, this is a progressive disease that warrants such consideration. PMID:26339483

  1. Prognostic significance of phosphorylated RON in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hui, Marco K C; Lai, Kenneth K Y; Chan, Kwok Wah; Luk, John M; Lee, Nikki P; Chung, Yvonne; Cheung, Leo C; Srivastava, Gopesh; Tsao, Sai Wah; Tang, Johnny C; Law, Simon

    2012-09-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the most common type of esophageal cancer. RON is a transmembrane receptor overexpressed in various cancers; however, the clinical significance of its phosphorylated form (pRON) is not fully deciphered. This report is the first to investigate the expression and clinical significance of pRON in human ESCC. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed an up-regulation of RON mRNA in 70% (7/10) of ESCC tissues when compared to the adjacent nontumor tissues. An overexpression of pRON protein was found in most of the ESCC cell lines studied (4/5) when compared to two non-neoplastic esophageal epithelial cells using immunoblot. In 64 ESCC tissues, pRON was localized at the cell membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus in 15 (23.4%), 63 (98.4%) and 61 (95.3%) cases using immunohistochemistry. Patients having high expression of cytoplasmic pRON significantly associated with shorter median survival when compared to those with low expression (25.41 months vs. 14.43 months), suggesting cytoplasmic pRON as a potential marker for poor prognosis in ESCC patients. PMID:22086736

  2. Engineering Stent Based Delivery System for Esophageal Cancer Using Docetaxel.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Mohsin; Choudhury, Namita Roy; Knott, Robert; Garg, Sanjay

    2015-07-01

    Esophageal cancer patients are often diagnosed as "advanced" cases. These patients are subjected to palliative stenting using self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) to maintain oral alimentation. Unfortunately, SEMS get reoccluded due to tumor growth, in and over the stent struts. To investigate potential solutions to this problem, docetaxel (DTX) delivery films were prepared using PurSil AL 20 (PUS), which can be used as a covering material for the SEMS. Drug-polymer miscibility and interactions were studied. Bilayer films were prepared by adhering the blank film to the DTX loaded film in order to maintain the unidirectional delivery to the esophagus. In vitro release and the local DTX delivery were studied using in vitro permeation experiments. It was found that DTX and PUS were physically and chemically compatible. The bilayer films exhibited sustained release (>30 days) and minimal DTX permeation through esophageal tissues in vitro. The rate-determining step for the DTX delivery was calculated. It was found that >0.9 fraction of rate control lies with the esophageal tissues, suggesting that DTX delivery can be sustained for longer periods compared to the in vitro release observed. Thus, the bilayer films can be developed as a localized sustained delivery system in combination with the stent. PMID:25936529

  3. Esophageal epithelium of women with AIDS: thickness and local immunity.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Laura; Silva, Renata; Olegário, Janaínna; Corręa, Rosana; Teixeira, Vicente; Cavellani, Camila

    2010-04-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphological characteristics of the esophageal epithelium (EE) and its local immunity. Esophageal fragments of autopsied women were collected from 1980 to 2008, and two groups were analyzed: with AIDS (n=17) and without AIDS (n=12). The measurement of the esophageal epithelium was carried out through the image analysis software ImageJ, and the immunostaining of Langerhans cells (LCs) was carried out using anti-S100 antibody. Women with AIDS, when compared with women without AIDS, had significantly thinner EE (220.6 versus 243.5 microm), a less number of LCs (6.2 versus 18.8 LCs/mm(2)), and a higher percentage of immature or morphologically altered LCs (66.6 versus 40.0%). The malnourished women, when compared with normonourished women, regardless of AIDS, had significantly thinner EE (227.1 versus 238.0 microm) and a less number of LCs (6.2 versus 12.5 LCs/mm(2)). The percentage of immature or morphologically altered LCs was the same in both groups. Additionally, the women with AIDS (7.0 versus 2.8%) and the malnourished women (5.8 versus 3.1%) presented a significantly higher percentage of fibrosis. We concluded that AIDS and malnutrition contribute to the decrease in esophagus local immunity and, therefore, to a possible increase in local opportunistic infections. PMID:20097482

  4. Giant esophageal gastrointestinal stromal tumor: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Akira; Akutsu, Yasunori; Shuto, Kiyohiko; Uesato, Masaya; Kono, Tsuguaki; Hoshino, Isamu; Akanuma, Naoki; Maruyama, Tetsuro; Isozaki, Yuka; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2015-02-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) rarely arise in the esophagus, where carcinoma is the most common malignant neoplasm and leiomyoma is the most common benign tumor. Because of their rarity, the clinical course and treatment of esophageal GISTs are poorly understood. These lesions are generally thought to carry a poor prognosis, making the differential diagnosis of other common mesenchymal neoplasms essential, for both prognostic and therapeutic reasons. We report a case of successfully resected giant esophageal GIST, thought to be the largest resected GIST reported in Japan. The patient was a 65-year-old woman, in whom upper gastrointestinal endoscopy found a 180-mm submucosal tumor in the lower thoracic esophagus, extending just below the aortic arch. We diagnosed esophageal GIST, and the patient underwent middle and lower esophagectomy via left thoracotomy, followed by gastric tube reconstruction. The tumor was resected completely. Histopathological and immunohistochemical staining confirmed that the tumor was a high-risk lesion, and treatment with imatinib was initiated. Computed tomography showed liver metastasis 5 months later, but the patient is doing well 24 months after surgery. PMID:24890800

  5. Immunotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Cianferoni, Antonella; Spergel, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a clinical pathologic disease characterized by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilia of the esophagus. When the diagnosis is confirmed, it is important to treat the eosinophilic inflammation not only to control the presenting symptoms, but also to prevent acute and chronic complications. The pathogenesis of EoE is most likely a mixed IgE and non-IgE food-mediated reaction, where Th2 cytokines drive esophageal eosinophilia as in other atopic diseases. Hence, it is not surprising that therapy is based on inflammation control, with steroids (oral or topical) and/or food antigen avoidance. However, these treatment options are not specific, reduce the quality of life of patients and have significant side effects, therefore, there is an ongoing effort to design more specific immunotherapies. In this review, we review standard and immunotherapeutic options for EoE treatment, such as anti-IL-5, anti-TNF?, anti-IgE, anti-CRTH, oral allergy desensitization and environmental immunotherapy. PMID:24762076

  6. Biodegradable stents for caustic esophageal strictures: a new therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Karakan, T; Utku, O G; Dorukoz, O; Sen, I; Colak, B; Erdal, H; Karatay, E; Tahtaci, M; Cengiz, M

    2013-04-01

    The treatment of caustic esophageal strictures is a challenging topic. Although traditional therapies have limited efficacy, most of these patients eventually require surgery. Biodegradable (BD) stents are newly designed stents for benign conditions. This is a retrospective case series of seven patients with caustic esophageal stricture. BD esophageal stents were inserted for palliation of dysphagia. The position of the stent was checked at 1, 4, 8, 12 16, 20, and 24 weeks and at the end of follow-up period. The follow-up period was 60 ± 23 (36-102) weeks. Complete dissolution of the stent occurred at 16 ± 4 (12-20) weeks. Three patients had partial/complete relief of dysphagia. The remaining four patients experienced tissue hyperplasia at the edges of the stent and required serial dilations. At the end of follow-up, all patients had partial or complete relief of dysphagia. Although BD stents have some efficiency, tissue hyperplasia is the main limiting factor. Further randomized trials are needed to determine efficiency of BD stents for caustic damage. PMID:22974043

  7. Esophageal cancer in Uruguay: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Vassallo, A; Correa, P; De Stéfani, E; Cendán, M; Zavala, D; Chen, V; Carzoglio, J; Deneo-Pellegrini, H

    1985-12-01

    Esophageal cancer has constituted a major public health problem in Uruguay, with age-adjusted death rates of 14.5 X 10(5) for males and of 3.8 X 10(5) for females. A case-control study was undertaken to ascertain the possible association of the local custom of drinking infusions of Ilex paraguariensis ("maté") with cancer of the esophagus, after controlling for well-known risk factors, such as alcohol and tobacco consumption. Two hundred twenty-six patients with esophageal cancer and 469 controls (control:case = 2.1) were interviewed at the time of admission or consultation at the Oncology Institute of Montevideo from 1979 through 1984. Males showed elevated risks of esophageal cancer associated with heavy tobacco [relative risk (RR) = 10.8] and alcohol (RR = 10.3) exposures. Among females, the independent effects of tobacco and alcohol were nonsignificant. Maté consumption had an independent effect in both males and females, with odds ratios of 6.5 and 34.6, respectively, for heavy users. Moreover, a well-defined dose response was evident in both sexes. PMID:3865007

  8. The Role of Endosonography in the Staging of Gastrointestinal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jin Woong

    2015-07-01

    Endosonography (EUS) enables the acquisition of clear images of the gastrointestinal tract wall and the surrounding structures. EUS enables much greater accuracy for staging decisions compared to computed tomography. Surgery for esophageal cancer has a high rate of morbidity and mortality, and it is important to decide on an appropriate treatment method through pre-surgical evaluation. Minimal invasive surgery is widely used for the treatment of gastrointestinal cancer, and endoscopic submucosal dissection is a safe treatment method for early cancer of the gastrointestinal tract that does not result in lymph node metastasis. EUS is essential for pre-surgical evaluation for all esophageal cancers. The use of EUS can effectively reduce unnecessary surgeries and thereby allow for appropriate treatment planning for patients. A number of different diagnostic modalities are available, but EUS is still the mainstay for pre-surgical evaluation of esophageal cancer. The role of EUS for early stomach cancer treatment as a tool for determining the need for endoscopic resection and for pre-surgical assessment is increasing. PMID:26240802

  9. Down-regulation of gut-enriched Krüppel-like factor expression in esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nan; Liu, Zhi-Hua; Ding, Fang; Wang, Xiu-Qin; Zhou, Chuan-Nong; Wu, Min

    2002-01-01

    AIM: Esophageal carcinoma is one of the most common malignant tumors in China. But the molecular mechanisms of esophageal carcinoma remains unclear. Gut-enriched Krüppel-like factor (GKLF) is a newly identified transcription factor which is expressed abandantly in the epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract and deregulation of GKLF was linked to several types of cancer. It is of interest to study the expression and role of GKLF in esophageal carcinoma. METHODS: Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to compare GKLF expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma to normal mucosa of the same patients. The serum deprivation inducibility of GKLF was observed in an esophageal squamous cancer cell line by comparison to the primary culture of human fibroblast. The effect of antisense GKLF transfection on the proliferation and adhesion of esophageal squamous cancer cell line was also observed. RESULTS: The level of GKLF transcript is lower in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma compared to paired normal-appearing mucosa in 14 of 17 of the tumors analyzed. The serum deprivation inducibility of GKLF was greatly decreased in an esophageal squamous cancer cell line compared to the primary culture of human fibroblast. Decreased expression of GKLF in the esophageal cancer cell by antisense GKLF transfection increased its proliferation rate compared with that of vector transfected cell control (P < 0.05). Transfection of antisense GKLF decreased its adhesion ability (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The findings of this study demonstrate the down-regulation of GKLF in esophageal squamous cancer, and suggest that deregulation of GKLF may play a role in initiation and/or progression as well as the metastasis of esophageal squamous cancer. PMID:12439907

  10. Concurrent radiotherapy with gefitinib in elderly patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: Preliminary results of a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yaping; Zheng, Yuanda; Sun, Xiaojiang; Yu, Xinmin; Gu, Jialei; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Gu; Hu, Jinlin; Sun, Wenyong; Mao, Weimin

    2015-11-10

    The survival rate associated with esophageal cancer is very poor due to diagnosis at advanced stages of disease and insensitivity to chemotherapy. This study investigated the efficacy of gefitinib combination with radiation in 20 elderly patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) who were not eligible for platinum-based chemotherapy. Immunohistochemistry was performed to analyze epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression, and the amplified refractory mutation system was used to detect EGFR mutations. Treatment response was assessed by endoscopy and computed tomography. Treatment toxicity was evaluated using the National Cancer Institute's Common Toxicity Criteria. The data showed that among these 20 patients, 5 experienced a complete response (CR), 13 a partial response (PR), and 2 had stable disease. The overall response rate (CR + PR) was 90%, the median overall survival (OS) was 14.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.0-17.9 months), and the median progression-free survival was 7.0 months (95% CI: 0-17.2 months). Patients with good Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, never smoking, and EGFR mutated tumors had the best OS (14.0, 14.0, and 17.0 months, respectively). Treatment-related grade 3/4 toxicity occurred in five patients. No case of grade 3/4 impaired liver function or hematological toxicity was observed. Concurrent radiotherapy with gefitinib is effective and tolerable in elderly ESCC patients. PMID:26392415

  11. Molecular Marker Expression Is Highly Heterogeneous in Esophageal Adenocarcinoma and Does Not Predict a Response to Neoadjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bronson, Nathan W; Diggs, Brian S; Bakis, Gene; Gatter, Kenneth M; Sheppard, Brett C; Hunter, John G; Dolan, James P

    2015-12-01

    A reliable method to identify pathologic complete responders (pCR) or non-responders (NR) to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (NAT) would dramatically improve therapy for esophageal cancer. The purpose of this study is to investigate if a distinct profile of prognostic molecular markers can predict pCR after neoadjuvant therapy. Expression of p53, Her-2/neu, Cox-2, Beta-catenin, E-cadherin, MMP-1, NFkB, and TGF-B was measured by immunohistochemistry in pre-treatment biopsy tissue and graded by an experienced pathologist. A pCR was defined as no evidence of malignancy on final pathology. Molecular profiles comparing responders to non-responders were analyzed using classification and regression tree analysis to investigate response to NAT and overall survival. Nineteen patients were pCRs and 34 were NRs. pCRs were more likely to be alive at follow-up than NRs (p?stage (p?=?0.39) when evaluated either as individual markers or in combination with other expression patterns. NAT dramatically impacts survival through a mechanism independent of known molecular markers of esophageal cancer, which are expressed in a highly heterogeneous fashion and do not predict response to NAT or survival. PMID:26394876

  12. Elevated IL-33 expression is associated with pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis, and exogenous IL-33 promotes eosinophilic esophagitis development in mice.

    PubMed

    Judd, L M; Heine, R G; Menheniott, T R; Buzzelli, J; O'Brien-Simpson, N; Pavlic, D; O'Connor, L; Al Gazali, K; Hamilton, O; Scurr, M; Collison, A M; Mattes, J; Allen, K J; Giraud, A S

    2016-01-01

    We tested whether the T helper (Th) type 2 (Th2) cell agonist and allergenic ligand IL-33 was associated with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) development in a pediatric cohort and whether IL-33 protein could induce disease symptoms in mice. Biopsies from EoE patients or controls were used to measure IL-33 mRNA and protein expression. Increased expression of IL-33 mRNA was found in the esophageal mucosa in EoE. IL-33 protein was detected in cells negative for CD45, mast cells, and epithelial cell markers near blood vessels. Circulating levels of IL-33 were not increased. The time course for IL-33 gene expression was quantified in an established Aspergillus fumigatus allergen mouse model of EoE. Because IL-33 induction was transient in this model and chronicity of IL-33 expression has been demonstrated in humans, naive mice were treated with recombinant IL-33 for 1 wk and esophageal pathology was evaluated. IL-33 application produced changes consistent with phenotypically early EoE, including transmural eosinophilia, mucosal hyperproliferation, and upregulation of eosinophilic genes and chemokines. Th2 cytokines, including IL-13, along with innate lymphoid cell group 2, Th1/17, and M2 macrophage marker genes, were increased after IL-33 application. IL-33-induced eosinophilia was ablated in IL-13 null mice. In addition, IL-33 induced a profound inhibition of the regulatory T cell gene signature. We conclude that IL-33 gene expression is associated with pediatric EoE development and that application of recombinant protein in mice phenocopies the early clinical phase of the human disease in an IL-13-dependent manner. IL-33 inhibition of esophageal regulatory T cell function may induce loss of antigenic tolerance, thereby providing a mechanistic rationale for EoE development. PMID:26514775

  13. Evaluation of tumor metastasis-associated markers for molecular classification in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jun-Xing; Yao, Juan; Lin, Mao-Song; Lin, Mei; Xiao, Wei; Yu, Hong; Chen, Ping; Qian, Rong-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to ascertain the relationship of tumor metastasis-associated markers cyclin D1, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) with the clinicopathologic features and prognosis of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), and to investigate their value in ESCC molecular classification. The expression of cyclin D1, CTGF and VEGF in 100 specimens from patients and 20 from normal esophageal mucosa were detected by immunohistochemistry. The relationship of their expression with prognosis of the patients with ESCC was evaluated by Cox regression model and Kaplan-Meier survival curve analysis. High levels of expression of cyclin D1, CTGF, and VEGF were observed in 61 (61%), 53 (53%), 49 (49%) cases, respectively. Univariate survival analysis indicated that the levels of expression of cyclin D1, CTGF and VEGF were associated with survival (all P-value < 0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated that cyclin D1 and VEGF were independent prognostic factors affecting the three-year survival rate of patients (P = 0.001, 0.017, respectively). Furthermore, high level expression of cyclin D1, CTGF and VEGF in stage I patients was found associated with poor three-year survival rate (all P-value < 0.05). The prognosis probably was favorable for patients with low expression of cyclin D1 even in stage III, or VEGF even in stage IV. Tumor metastasis-associated markers such as cyclin D1 and VEGF may be independent prognostic factors affecting survival rate of postoperative ESCC patients. It is possible to judge prognosis better and tailor treatments to each individual patient when these markers were applied to ESCC molecular classification.

  14. Esophageal and transpulmonary pressures in acute respiratory failure*

    PubMed Central

    Talmor, Daniel; Sarge, Todd; O’Donnell, Carl R.; Ritz, Ray; Malhotra, Atul; Lisbon, Alan; Loring, Stephen H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Pressure inflating the lung during mechanical ventilation is the difference between pressure applied at the airway opening (Pao) and pleural pressure (Ppl). Depending on the chest wall’s contribution to respiratory mechanics, a given positive end-expiratory and/or end-inspiratory plateau pressure may be appropriate for one patient but inadequate or potentially injurious for another. Thus, failure to account for chest wall mechanics may affect results in clinical trials of mechanical ventilation strategies in acute respiratory distress syndrome. By measuring esophageal pressure (Pes), we sought to characterize influence of the chest wall on Ppl and transpulmonary pressure (PL) in patients with acute respiratory failure. Design Prospective observational study. Setting Medical and surgical intensive care units at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Patients Seventy patients with acute respiratory failure. Interventions: Placement of esophageal balloon-catheters. Measurements and Main Results Airway, esophageal, and gastric pressures recorded at end-exhalation and end-inflation Pes averaged 17.5 ± 5.7 cm H2O at end-expiration and 21.2 ± 7.7 cm H2O at end-inflation and were not significantly correlated with body mass index or chest wall elastance. Estimated PL was 1.5 ± 6.3 cm H2O at end-expiration, 21.4 ± 9.3 cm H2O at end-inflation, and 18.4 ± 10.2 cm H2O (n = 40) during an end-inspiratory hold (plateau). Although PL at end-expiration was significantly correlated with positive end-expiratory pressure (p < .0001), only 24% of the variance in PL was explained by Pao (R2 = .243), and 52% was due to variation in Pes. Conclusions In patients in acute respiratory failure, elevated esophageal pressures suggest that chest wall mechanical properties often contribute substantially and unpredictably to total respiratory impedance, and therefore Pao may not adequately predict PL or lung distention. Systematic use of esophageal manometry has the potential to improve ventilator management in acute respiratory failure by providing more direct assessment of lung distending pressure. PMID:16540960

  15. Space-time pressure structure of pharyngo-esophageal segment during swallowing

    E-print Network

    Brasseur, James G.

    Space-time pressure structure of pharyngo-esophageal segment during swallowing ROHAN B. WILLIAMS,1-time pressure structure of pha- ryngo-esophageal segment during swallowing. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver interpolation and simultaneous videofluoroscopy to normal pharyngeal swallows to correlate specific features

  16. Intrathoracic esophageal rupture distal to the carina after blunt chest trauma: Case-report

    PubMed Central

    Cedeńo, Alex; Echeverría, Karla; Vázquez, Jan; Delgado, Aura; Rodríguez-Ortiz, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal rupture caused by blunt chest trauma is a very rare entity, with an incidence of 0.001%. Eighty two percent of the esophageal perforation secondary to blunt chest trauma occur above the level of the carina, with the lowest reported incidence in the intrathoracic region distal to the carina. Presentation of case We report on the case of a 48-year-old Hispanic male with intrathoracic esophageal rupture. Exploration revealed a right lateral, mid esophageal, longitudinal 1.5 cm perforation. The defect was repaired using a double-layered primary closure reinforced with an intercostal muscle flap. The patient tolerated the procedure and the recovery was complicated by a pneumonic process which was treated accordingly. No leakage was found. Discussion A five-year retrospective review (2009–2013) at our institution identified 5586 trauma cases with only one case with esophageal rupture. This represents a 0.0002% of incidence of blunt esophageal rupture. This estimate is consistent with what has been previously reported in the medical literature. Our case represents a uniquely rare presentation of traumatic esophageal rupture due to the underline mechanism of injury and its anatomical location. A high index of suspicion and early intervention are critical in assuring a favorable outcome. Conclusion Diagnosis and surgical intervention with primary repair completed in the first twenty-four hours after presentation is fundamental to achieve a good outcome after esophageal rupture. PMID:26492358

  17. Endoscopic removal of esophageal and ruminal foreign bodies in 5 Holstein calves

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Diego E.; Cribb, Nicola C.; Arroyo, Luis G.; Desrochers, André; Fecteau, Gilles; Nichols, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic removal of esophageal and ruminal foreign bodies was successfully performed in 5 Holstein-Friesian calves under sedation or general anesthesia by using an electrocautery snare or a wire-guided Dormi basket. This report describes the endoscopic manipulations, treatment, and outcomes of esophageal foreign body removal in these calves. PMID:25320385

  18. MITOMYCIN C IN THE MANAGEMENT OF PEDIATRIC CAUSTIC ESOPHAGEAL STRICTURES. A CASE REPORT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the incidence of caustic ingestion is declining, the management of caustic esophageal strictures remains a challenge. Mitomycin C (MMC) inhibits fibroblast proliferation and is effective in reducing scar in animal experiments. We report the case of a child with a distal esophageal stricture...

  19. Effects of Metoclopramide on Esophageal Motor Activity and Esophagogastric Junction Compliance in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Mikami, Hironobu; Ishimura, Norihisa; Fukazawa, Kousuke; Okada, Mayumi; Izumi, Daisuke; Shimura, Shino; Okimoto, Eiko; Aimi, Masahito; Ishihara, Shunji; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Prokinetic drugs such as metoclopramide are frequently used as second-line therapy for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, their beneficial effects remain unclear. Esophageal motor activities and compliance of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) are important for prevention of gastroesophageal reflux. Although metoclopramide has been reported to increase lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, its effects on EGJ compliance have not been evaluated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of metoclopramide on esophageal motor activities and EGJ compliance. Methods Nine healthy male volunteers without abdominal symptoms were enrolled. Peristaltic esophageal contractions and LES pressure were examined using high-resolution esophageal manometry, while EGJ compliance was evaluated with an endoluminal functional lumen-imaging probe. After obtaining baseline values for esophageal motor activities and EGJ compliance, metoclopramide (10 mg) was intravenously administered, then all measurements were repeated at 15 minutes after administration in each subject. Results Following administration of metoclopramide, mean resting LES pressure was significantly increased as compared with the baseline (13.7 ± 9.2 vs 26.7 ± 8.8 mmHg, P < 0.05). In addition, metoclopramide significantly augmented peristaltic contractions, especially in the distal esophageal segment (P < 0.05). On the other hand, distensibility index did not change after administration (4.5 ± 0.5 vs 4.1 ± 0.5 mm2/mmHg), suggesting no significant effect of metoclopramide on EGJ compliance. Conclusions Metoclopramide augmented esophageal contractions without changing EGJ compliance in healthy adults. PMID:26507875

  20. Treatment of a malignant esophageal fistula with a Gore-Tex-covered flexible nitinol stent

    SciTech Connect

    Kishi, Kazushi; Takeuchi, Taizo; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Kimura, Masashi; Kita, Keisuke; Sato, Morio; Terada, Masaki

    1997-01-15

    In order to treat fistulated esophageal cancer using a flexible stent, a covered flexible stent was constructed by wrapping a nitinol stent with a thin sheet of Gore-Tex, preserving the stents original advantages of flexibility and a low-profile introducer system. This stent was used to perform standard radiotherapy in a case of fistulated esophageal cancer.

  1. Laparoscopic first step approach in the two stage hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Levi Sandri, Giovanni Battista; Colace, Lidia; Vennarecci, Giovanni; Santoro, Roberto; Lepiane, Pasquale; Colasanti, Marco; Burocchi, Mirco

    2015-01-01

    Resection is the gold standard therapeutic option for patients with colorectal liver metastases. However, only 20-30% of patients are resectable. In patients with a concomitant future liver remnant (FLR) less than 25-30%, a single stage resection is not feasible. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and the rates of morbidity and mortality of the laparoscopic approach in the first-step of two stage hepatectomy. From 2004 to March 2014, 73 patients underwent a two stage hepatectomy: of these, four underwent a totally laparoscopic first step [wedge left liver resection and right portal vein ligation (PVL)]. All the patients were male. Median age was 55 years. One patient underwent an atypical wedge resection of segment II-III and a laparoscopic PVL (LPVL), one patient had a first wedge resection of segment II and LPVL, and two patients underwent a wedge resection of segment III and LPVL. First step surgical mean time was 189 (range, 160-244) min, mean blood loss was 22 (range, 0-50) cc. No transfusion was required in this series. The results of our study demonstrate that the first step of hepatic resection and PVL is feasible with a laparoscopic approach in patients with bilobar liver metastases. PMID:26605282

  2. Laparoscopic first step approach in the two stage hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Levi Sandri, Giovanni Battista; Colace, Lidia; Vennarecci, Giovanni; Santoro, Roberto; Lepiane, Pasquale; Colasanti, Marco; Burocchi, Mirco; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria

    2015-10-01

    Resection is the gold standard therapeutic option for patients with colorectal liver metastases. However, only 20-30% of patients are resectable. In patients with a concomitant future liver remnant (FLR) less than 25-30%, a single stage resection is not feasible. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and the rates of morbidity and mortality of the laparoscopic approach in the first-step of two stage hepatectomy. From 2004 to March 2014, 73 patients underwent a two stage hepatectomy: of these, four underwent a totally laparoscopic first step [wedge left liver resection and right portal vein ligation (PVL)]. All the patients were male. Median age was 55 years. One patient underwent an atypical wedge resection of segment II-III and a laparoscopic PVL (LPVL), one patient had a first wedge resection of segment II and LPVL, and two patients underwent a wedge resection of segment III and LPVL. First step surgical mean time was 189 (range, 160-244) min, mean blood loss was 22 (range, 0-50) cc. No transfusion was required in this series. The results of our study demonstrate that the first step of hepatic resection and PVL is feasible with a laparoscopic approach in patients with bilobar liver metastases. PMID:26605282

  3. MicroRNA-506 inhibits esophageal cancer cell proliferation via targeting CREB1

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Wen-Jian; Wang, Yong-Lian; Lu, Jian-Guo; Guo, Ling; Qi, Bo; Chen, Zhi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act as key regulators of multiple cancers. MicroRNA-506 (miR-506) functions as a tumor suppressor in various types of cancers. However, its role in esophageal cancer remains unclear. In our study, we found that miR-506 was significantly down-regulated in esophageal cancer tissues and cell lines. In vitro assay, our results showed that ectopic over-expression of miR-506 inhibited esophageal cancer cells proliferation, meanwhile, cells proliferation was promoted by miR-506 inhibition. In exploring mechanisms underlying the inhibitive role, we found that miR-506 significantly decreased the expression and transcription activity of cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1). CREB1, tumor oncogene, exhibited significantly promote effect on esophageal cancer cell proliferation. Taken together, our data identify a new role of miR-506 in esophageal cancer involving CREB1 suppression. PMID:26617801

  4. Rare complication after thyroidectomy-cervical esophageal stenosis: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hanwei; Wang, Steven J; Li, Weixiong

    2014-01-01

    The most common complications after thyroidectomy are injuries associated with the recurrent laryngeal nerve and parathyroid gland. Cervical esophagus perforation is an exceptionally rare complication after thyroidectomy; it can usually be resolved by conservative care. Cervical esophageal stenosis secondary to intraoperative esophageal injury during thyroidectomy is much rarer and has not been reported in the literature to date. We report a case of esophageal stenosis following thyroidectomy performed at a peripheral hospital. The patient initially underwent a thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid carcinoma involving the cervical esophagus; esophageal perforation was noted intraoperatively, and closed using three number 4 silk sutures. Cervical esophageal stenosis subsequently developed after conservative care. The patient was successfully treated with cervical esophagectomy and reconstruction using a tubed forearm free flap after a failed attempt at endoscopic recanalization. This case is discussed in conjunction with a review of the literature. PMID:25305782

  5. Radiation esophagitis in the opossum: radioprotection with indomethacin. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Northway, M.G.; Libshitz, H.I.; Osborne, B.M.; Feldman, M.S.; Mamel, J.J.; West, J.H.; Szwarc, I.A.

    1980-05-01

    Twenty-five opossums were evaluated before irradiation by fiberoptic endoscopy and air-contrast barium esophagram examination. All animals received 2250 rad /sup 60/Co-irradiated in a single exposure to the entire esophagus and lower exophageal sphincter. Animals received treatment with indomethacin. Acute esophagitis occurred 7 to 10 days postirradiation in control animals and was characterized by erythema, ulceration, and sloughing of esophageal mucosa as determined by air-contrast barium esophagram, endoscopy, and histology. Prostaglandin-treated animals showed more severe evidence of esophagitis than control animals. Indomethacin-treated animals showed no signs or only mild esophagitis posttreatment. It is concluded that indomethacin treatment may significantly reduce the severity of radiation esophagitis perhaps by blockade of prostaglandin synthesis.

  6. Stages and Behaviors

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Stage Caregiving Middle-Stage Caregiving Late-Stage Caregiving Behaviors Aggression & Anger Anxiety & Agitation Depression Hallucinations Memory Loss & ... Legal Documents alz.org » Caregiver Center » Stages and Behaviors Text size: A A A Stages / Behaviors As ...

  7. Effects of tenoxicam in experimental corrosive esophagitis model.

    PubMed

    Erba?, M; Kiraz, H A; Küçük, A; Topalo?lu, N; Erdem, H; ?ahin, H; Toman, H; Ozkan, M Turgut Alper

    2015-04-01

    Esophageal stricture, one of the important complications of corrosive esophagus, develops following edema and granulation tissue that forms during and after the inflammatory reactions. Tenoxicam, a non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug with a long half-life, prevents various leukocyte functions including phagocyte and histamine secretion by inhibiting prostaglandin synthesis and removes various oxygen radicals in the region of inflammation. We designed this as a histopathological study using tenoxicam in rats for which we created a corrosive esophagus model. After necessary authorizations were obtained, the study was performed in Çanakkale 18 Mart University experimental animal laboratory. Twenty-four Wistar albino rats, weighing 220-240?g, were used for the experiment. Experimental animals were randomized into three groups: tenoxicam group (group T, n:8), control group (group C, n:8), and sham group (group S, n:8). Tenoxicam 0.5?mg/kg/day was administered to animals in group T, where esophageal burn was developed experimentally, 5?mg/kg 0.9% NaCL was administered i.p. to rats in group C for 15 days, once in 24 hours. No procedure was applied to rats in group S. After 15 days, all animals were sacrificed under general anesthesia and their esophagi were extracted. As a result of histopathological evaluation, inflammation and fibroblast proliferation was not observed in rats in the sham group (group S). Intense inflammation was observed in six rats (6+/2-) in the control group, and fibroblast proliferation was observed as 5+/3-. And in treatment groups, inflammation was evaluated as 3+/5-, and fibroblast proliferation as 3+/5-. In our study, histopathologic damage score was higher in the control group (P < 0.005). We deduce that tenoxicam can be useful in the treatment of caustic esophageal injuries in the acute phase, but think that these drugs require further researches and clinical studies before routine clinical use. PMID:24602009

  8. Esophageal Cancer Dose Escalation Using a Simultaneous Integrated Boost Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James; Palmer, Matthew B.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Liao Zhongxing; Swisher, Steven G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Allen, Pamela K.; Settle, Steven H.; Gomez, Daniel; Likhacheva, Anna; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We previously showed that 75% of radiation therapy (RT) failures in patients with unresectable esophageal cancer are in the gross tumor volume (GTV). We performed a planning study to evaluate if a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique could selectively deliver a boost dose of radiation to the GTV in patients with esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were generated using four different approaches (two-dimensional conformal radiotherapy [2D-CRT] to 50.4 Gy, 2D-CRT to 64.8 Gy, intensity-modulated RT [IMRT] to 50.4 Gy, and SIB-IMRT to 64.8 Gy) and optimized for 10 patients with distal esophageal cancer. All plans were constructed to deliver the target dose in 28 fractions using heterogeneity corrections. Isodose distributions were evaluated for target coverage and normal tissue exposure. Results: The 50.4 Gy IMRT plan was associated with significant reductions in mean cardiac, pulmonary, and hepatic doses relative to the 50.4 Gy 2D-CRT plan. The 64.8 Gy SIB-IMRT plan produced a 28% increase in GTV dose and comparable normal tissue doses as the 50.4 Gy IMRT plan; compared with the 50.4 Gy 2D-CRT plan, the 64.8 Gy SIB-IMRT produced significant dose reductions to all critical structures (heart, lung, liver, and spinal cord). Conclusions: The use of SIB-IMRT allowed us to selectively increase the dose to the GTV, the area at highest risk of failure, while simultaneously reducing the dose to the normal heart, lung, and liver. Clinical implications warrant systematic evaluation.

  9. CD38-Expressing Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Promote Tumor Growth in a Murine Model of Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Karakasheva, Tatiana A; Waldron, Todd J; Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Kim, Sang-Bae; Lee, Ju-Seog; O'Brien, Shaun; Hicks, Philip D; Basu, Devraj; Singhal, Sunil; Malavasi, Fabio; Rustgi, Anil K

    2015-10-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are an immunosuppressive population of immature myeloid cells found in advanced-stage cancer patients and mouse tumor models. Production of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and arginase, as well as other suppressive mechanisms, allows MDSCs to suppress T-cell-mediated tumor clearance and foster tumor progression. Using an unbiased global gene expression approach in conditional p120-catenin knockout mice (L2-cre;p120ctn(f/f)), a model of oral-esophageal cancer, we have identified CD38 as playing a vital role in MDSC biology, previously unknown. CD38 belongs to the ADP-ribosyl cyclase family and possesses both ectoenzyme and receptor functions. It has been described to function in lymphoid and early myeloid cell differentiation, cell activation, and neutrophil chemotaxis. We find that CD38 expression in MDSCs is evident in other mouse tumor models of esophageal carcinogenesis, and CD38(high) MDSCs are more immature than MDSCs lacking CD38 expression, suggesting a potential role for CD38 in the maturation halt found in MDSC populations. CD38(high) MDSCs also possess a greater capacity to suppress activated T cells, and promote tumor growth to a greater degree than CD38(low) MDSCs, likely as a result of increased iNOS production. In addition, we have identified novel tumor-derived factors, specifically IL6, IGFBP3, and CXCL16, which induce CD38 expression by MDSCs ex vivo. Finally, we have detected an expansion of CD38(+) MDSCs in peripheral blood of advanced-stage cancer patients and validated targeting CD38 in vivo as a novel approach to cancer therapy. PMID:26294209

  10. Acute Esophageal Necrosis Presenting With Henoch-Schönlein Purpura.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Natalya; Bernstein, Gregory R; Malik, Zubair; Schey, Ron

    2015-10-01

    A 63-year-old woman with abdominal pain and melena developed a palpable, purpuric rash and acute kidney injury. Skin and kidney biopsy confirmed Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Upper endoscopy revealed diffuse, circumferential, black-appearing mucosa of the esophagus consistent with acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), also known as black esophagus. AEN is a very rare cause of gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a high mortality risk. To our knowledge, there have been no prior reports of AEN associated with Henoch-Schonlein purpura or other vasculitis. PMID:26504868

  11. Acute Esophageal Necrosis Presenting With Henoch-Schönlein Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Gregory R.; Malik, Zubair; Schey, Ron

    2015-01-01

    A 63-year-old woman with abdominal pain and melena developed a palpable, purpuric rash and acute kidney injury. Skin and kidney biopsy confirmed Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Upper endoscopy revealed diffuse, circumferential, black-appearing mucosa of the esophagus consistent with acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), also known as black esophagus. AEN is a very rare cause of gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a high mortality risk. To our knowledge, there have been no prior reports of AEN associated with Henoch-Schonlein purpura or other vasculitis. PMID:26504868

  12. Implication of lncRNAs in pathogenesis of esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wei-Wei; Wu, Qingquan; Li, Su-Qing; Tong, Yu-Suo; Liu, Zi-Hao; Yang, Tong-Xin; Xu, Yong; Cao, Xiu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), transcripts as longer than 200 nt in length with a great number of varieties in human genomics, play important roles in the regulation of genetics and epigenetics including gene transcription and post-transcription. Increasing evidence have demonstrated the upregulation of lncRNAs in tumorigenesis and metastasis of esophageal cancer (EC), a type of malignant tumors particularly in Asia. In this review, we briefly discuss the profiles and functions of lncRNAs involved in the progression of EC, which may provide a new approach to improve EC diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26609239

  13. Characterization of Tumor Suppressive Function of cornulin in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Li, Yan; Dai, Yongdong; Li, Jiangchao; Qin, Yanru; Zhu, Yinghui; Zeng, Tingting; Ban, Xiaojiao; Fu, Li; Guan, Xin-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    By using cDNA microarray analysis, we identified cornulin (CRNN) gene was frequently downregulated in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). In the present study, we investigated the role of CRNN in ESCC development. The results showed that CRNN was frequently downregulated in primary ESCCs in both mRNA level (26/56, 46.4%) and protein level (137/249, 55%), which was significantly associated with lymph node metastases (P=0.027), advanced clinical stage (P=0.039), and overall survival rate (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis indicated that the CRNN downregulation was an independent prognostic factor for ESCC. Functional studies with both in vitro and in vivo assays demonstrated that CRNN had strong tumor suppressive ability in ESCC cells. The tumor-suppressive mechanism of CRNN was associated with its role in cell cycle arrest at G1/S checkpoint by upregulating expressions of P21WAF1/CIP1 and Rb. Silencing CRNN expression by RNA interference could effectively inhibit its tumor suppressive effect. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that CRNN is a tumor suppressor gene that plays a critical tumor suppressive role in ESCC. PMID:23894350

  14. [The expression and significance of hnRNPD in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells].

    PubMed

    Geng, Yangyang; Zhang, Lulu; Xu, Miaomiao; Sheng, Wenjiong; Dong, Aijing; Cao, Jinming; Cao, Jianping

    2015-12-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D (hnRNPD) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues and the relationship between hnRNPD expression and the clinicopathological features of ESCC, and to study the effect of down-regulated hnRNPD on the proliferation of ESCC cells and explore its potential mechanism. Methods The expression of hnRNPD protein in ESCC tissues and the normal paracancerous tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry. The siRNA-hnRNPD was transfected into ESCC cells and the silence effect was verified by Western blotting. MTT assay and clone formation assay were used to evaluate the proliferation of ESCC cells after down-regulation of hnRNPD genes. Cell apoptosis was examined by annexin V-phycoerythrin/7-aminoactinomycin D (annexin V-PE/7-AAD) staining and flow cytometry. Results The expression of hnRNPD protein in ESCC tissues was significantly higher than that of the normal paracancerous tissues, and the expression was closely related with neoplasm staging. Down-regulation of hnRNPD inhibited the proliferation and clonality of ESCC cells. Compared with the control group, siRNA targeting hnRNPD significantly promoted cell apoptosis. Conclusion Down-regulation of hnRNPD inhibits the proliferation of ESCC cells by promoting cell apoptosis. PMID:26648300

  15. MicroRNA-1290 promotes esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell proliferation and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; He, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Zhi-Mei; Li, Shuo; Ren, Li-Hua; Cao, Ri-Sheng; Feng, Ya-Dong; Ji, Yin-Lin; Zhao, Ye; Shi, Rui-Hua

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the biological role of miR-1290 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) progression and invasion and the underlying mechanism. METHODS: Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was performed to evaluate miR-1290 expression in ESCC tissue samples. The roles of miR-1290 in cell proliferation, migration and invasion were identified using miR-1290 mimic-transfected cells. In addition, the regulatory effect of miR-1290 on suppressor of cancer cell invasion (SCAI) was evaluated using qRT-PCR, Western blot analysis and a dual luciferase reporter assay. RESULTS: miR-1290 was significantly upregulated in ESCC tissue samples compared with normal adjacent tissues (9.213 ± 1.150 vs 1.000 ± 0.0), (P < 0.01). Upregulation of miR-1290 was associated with tumor differentiation (P = 0.021), N classification (P = 0.006) and tumor-node-metastasis stage (P = 0.021) in ESCC patients. Moreover, ectopic miR-1290 expression potently promoted ESCC cell growth (P < 0.01), migration (P < 0.01) and invasion (P < 0.01) in vitro. miR-1290 overexpression in ESCC cell lines decreased SCAI expression at the translational level and reduced SCAI-driven luciferase-reporter activity (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Our findings suggested that miR-1290 may play an oncogenic role in cellular processes of ESCC. PMID:25805931

  16. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase expression is correlated with poor clinical prognosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Li, XiaoJuan; Zhang, XiaQing; Fan, RuiTai; Gu, Hao; Shi, YongGang; Liu, HongTao

    2015-10-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated that glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), a key metabolic enzyme, participating in pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), is tightly associated with development and progression of a variety of tumors. Here, we reported expression of G6PD and its association with the prognosis of the patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The results revealed significantly elevated G6PD mRNA and protein expressions in ESCC tissues compared with normal tissues (P < 0.05). Furthermore, high G6PD expression was tightly associated with histological grade, TNM staging and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.05), but not related to the patients' age and gender (P > 0.05). Importantly, the survival time of G6PD-positive patients was markedly lower than that of G6PD-negative patients (P < 0.05). Most notably, Cox multivariate assay demonstrated that G6PD was an independent prognostic factor for the patients with ESCC. In conclusion, G6PD may be a novel predictor for the prognosis of the patients with ESCC. PMID:26329784

  17. Association between clusterin polymorphisms and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma risk in Han Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kun; Wang, Jian; Ma, Zhen-Bin; Guo, Guang-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility plays an essential role in an individual’s risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The aim of this study is to investigate the associations between clusterin (CLU) gene polymorphisms and ESCC risk. We undertook a case-control study to analyze three CLU polymorphisms (gene rs9331888 C>G, rs17466684 A>G and rs1532278 T>C) in an Han Chinese population, by extraction of genomic DNA from the peripheral blood of 642 patients with ESCC and 658 control participants, and performed CLU genotyping using DNA sequencing. The obtained results indicated that overall, no statistically significant association was observed in rs17466684 and rs1532278. However, gene rs9331888 C>G genotype was at increased risk of ESCCs (P=0.037; odds ratio (OR)=1.089, 95% CI: 1.006-1.175). Moreover, rs9331888 G/G genotype ESCCs were more significantly common in patients with tumor size of >5 cm than T allele ESCC and in cases of poor differentiation and lower advanced pathological stage. In conclusion, polymorphism in rs9331888 C>G was observed to be associated with susceptibility of ESCC. Nevertheless, further investigation with a larger sample size is needed to support our results. PMID:26550359

  18. Osteopontin (OPN/SPP1) isoforms collectively enhance tumor cell invasion and dissemination in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jules; Myers, Amy L.; Wang, Zhuwen; Nancarrow, Derek J.; Ferrer-Torres, Daysha; Handlogten, Amy; Leverenz, Kimmy; Bao, Julia; Thomas, Dafydd G.; Wang, Thomas D.; Orringer, Mark B.; Reddy, Rishindra M.; Chang, Andrew C.; Beer, David G.; Lin, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is often diagnosed at an advanced stage, thus understanding the molecular basis for EAC invasion and metastasis is critical. Here we report that SPP1/OPN was highly overexpressed in primary EACs and intracellularly localized to tumor cells. We further demonstrate that all known OPN isoforms (OPNa, b, c, 4 and 5) were frequently co-overexpressed in primary EACs. Distinct pro-invasion and dissemination phenotypes of isoform-specific OPNb and OPNc stable transfectants were observed. Expression of OPNb significantly enhanced cell migration and adhesion to laminin. In contrast, OPNc cells showed significantly decreased cell migration yet increased cell detachment. Enhanced invasion, both in vitro and in vivo, was observed for OPNb- but not OPNc-expressing cells. Inhibition of RGD integrins, one family of OPN receptors, attenuated OPNb cell migration, abrogated OPNb cell adhesion and significantly reduced OPNb cell clonogenic survival but did not affect OPNc phenotypes, indicating that OPNb but not OPNc acts through integrin-dependent signaling. Differential expression of vimentin, E-cadherin and ?-catenin in OPN stable cells may account for the variation in cell adhesion and detachment between these isoforms. We conclude that while all OPN isoforms are frequently co-overexpressed in primary EACs, isoforms OPNb and OPNc enhance invasion and dissemination through collective yet distinct mechanisms. PMID:26068949

  19. Aberrant methylation of the TERT promoter in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jiaying; Zhou, Daizhan; Zhang, Junhua; Chen, Yun; Wang, Chunyu; Liu, Yun; Zhao, Kuaile

    2015-12-01

    A recent study indicated that upstream of the transcription start site (UTSS) hypermethylation of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene was associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis in pediatric brain tumors. The potential for methylation-mediated regulation of the UTSS region of the TERT gene in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has not yet been investigated. Here, TERT methylation was investigated in tumor and paired adjacent non-cancerous tissues (ANT) from 185 ESCC patients, and the expression of TERT was investigated in 26 tumors paired with ANTs selected from the same cohort. The methylation level of TERT was analyzed in three different regions: region 1, region 2, and the UTSS region. Comparison and correlation of methylation level and clinical features were analyzed in the abovementioned regions. The results showed that the methylation level of TERT was significantly elevated in the tumor relative to the ANT in ESCC. TERT RNA expression was significantly reduced in primary tumors. Tumor stage was the major determinant of survival. The UTSS region may not be an accessible biomarker for ESCC. PMID:26669682

  20. Factors Affecting the Risk of Brain Metastasis in Small Cell Lung Cancer With Surgery: Is Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Necessary for Stage I-III Disease?

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Linlin; Wang, Q.I.; Zhao Lujun; Yuan Zhiyong; Li Ruijian; Wang Ping

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with surgical resection has not been fully identified. This study undertook to assess the factors affecting the risk of brain metastases in patients with stage I-III SCLC after surgical resection. The implications of PCI treatment for these patients are discussed. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-six patients treated with surgical resection for stage I-III SCLC from January 1998-December 2009 were retrospectively analyzed to elucidate the risk factors of brain metastases. Log-rank test and Cox regression model were used to determine the risk factors of brain metastases. Results: The median survival time for this patient population was 34 months, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 34.9%. For the whole group, 23.0% (29/126) of the patients had evidence of metastases to brain. Pathologic stage not only correlated with overall survival but also significantly affected the risk of brain metastases. The 5-year survival rates for patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 54.8%, 35.6%, and 14.1%, respectively (P=.001). The frequency of brain metastases in patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 6.25% (2/32), 28.2% (11/39), and 29.1% (16/55) (P=.026), respectively. A significant difference in brain metastases between patients with complete resection and incomplete resection was also observed (20.5% vs 42.9%, P=.028). The frequency of brain metastases was not found to be correlated with age, sex, pathologic type, induction chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, or adjuvant radiation therapy. Conclusions: Stage I SCLC patients with complete resection had a low incidence of brain metastases and a favorable survival rate. Stage II-III disease had a higher incidence of brain metastases. Thus, PCI might have a role for stage II-III disease but not for stage I disease.

  1. Esophageal Adenocarcinoma: The Influence of Medications Used to Treat Comorbidities on Cancer Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Thrift, Aaron P

    2015-12-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma has undergone a continuous rise in incidence since the early 1970s and is the fastest rising cancer among white men in the United States. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that medications commonly used to treat multiple chronic conditions (for example, aspirin, non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and statins) as well as powerful acid suppressants such as proton pump inhibitors are associated with a reduced risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma. The chemopreventive potential of these classes of medications appears to be especially applicable to persons with Barrett's esophagus, the only known premalignant condition for esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, it is not known whether these medications also influence cancer recurrence and cancer-specific mortality in persons diagnosed with esophageal adenocarcinoma. This is an important question because most patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma have 1 or more comorbid conditions at the time of their cancer diagnosis and are receiving medication to treat these conditions. This article summarizes the evidence on the associations between 4 commonly used classes of medications and (1) risk of developing esophageal adenocarcinoma and Barrett's esophagus and (2) risk of cancer recurrence and cancer-specific mortality in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:25835331

  2. Esophageal tuberculosis presenting with an appearance similar to that of carcinoma of the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yushi; Osugi, Harushi; Takada, Nobuyasu; Takemura, Masashi; Lee, Shigeru; Ueno, Masakatsu; Fukuhara, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Nishizawa, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Hiroaki

    2003-01-01

    A case of esophageal tuberculosis presenting with an appearance similar to that of esophageal cancer is reported. The patient was an 82-year-old man with progressive dysphagia. Barium swallow and esophagoscopy revealed an elevated lesion with deep ulceration in the middle thoracic esophagus. Esophageal carcinoma, in particular, an undermining type of undifferentiated carcinoma, was suspected fluoroscopically and endoscopically. Histological examination of biopsy specimens revealed no malignancy, but there were epithelioid granulomas and a few Langhans' type multinucleated giant cells. Endoscopic ultrasonography clearly demonstrated an extramural lesion with calcification and direct infiltration of enlarged subcarinal lymph nodes into the esophageal wall. Ultrasonographic and histological findings indicated the possibility of esophageal tuberculosis. Although no bacteriological evidence was obtained, a therapeutic trial for tuberculosis, using antituberculous drugs, was started. After 2 weeks, the enlarged subcarinal lymph nodes were markedly reduced in size. The patient's symptoms improved gradually and had disappeared 8 weeks after he started treatment, when tubercle bacilli were isolated from sputum. A connection between the esophageal wall and its adjacent structures was clearly demonstrated by endoscopic ultrasonography. For patients with findings indicative of esophageal tuberculosis on endoscopic ultrasonography, a therapeutic trial for tuberculosis should be considered, even if polymerase chain reaction assay or culture is negative. PMID:12768391

  3. Thoracoscopic repair of esophageal atresia with a distal fistula – lessons from the first 10 operations

    PubMed Central

    Zaborowska, Kamila; Rogowski, B?a?ej; Kali?ska, Anita; Nosek, Marzena; Golonka, Anna; Lesiuk, Witold; Obel, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Thoracoscopic esophageal atresia (EA) repair was first performed in 1999, but still the technique is treated as one of the most complex pediatric surgical procedures. Aim The study presents a single-center experience and learning curve of thoracoscopic repair of esophageal atresia and tracheo-esophageal (distal) fistula. Material and methods From 2012 to 2014, 10 consecutive patients with esophageal atresia and tracheo-esophageal fistula were treated thoracoscopically in our center. There were 8 girls and 2 boys. Mean gestational age was 36.5 weeks and mean weight was 2230 g. Four children had associated anomalies. The surgery was performed after stabilization of the patient between the first and fourth day after birth. Five patients required intubation before surgery for respiratory distress. Bronchoscopy was not performed before the operation. Results In 8 patients, the endoscopic approach was successfully used thoracoscopically, while in 2 patients conversion to an open thoracotomy was necessary. In all patients except 1, the anastomosis was patent, with no evidence of leak. One patient demonstrated a leak, which did not resolve spontaneously, necessitating surgical repair. In long-term follow-up, 1 patient required esophageal dilatation of the anastomosis. All patients are on full oral feeding. Conclusions The endoscopic approach is the method of choice for the treatment of esophageal atresia in our center because of excellent visualization and precise atraumatic preparation even in neonates below a weight of 2000 g. PMID:25960794

  4. Clinicopathological findings of primary esophageal malignant melanoma: report of six cases and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jinfeng; Mo, Haiying; Ma, Shufang; Wang, Zhenzheng

    2014-01-01

    We studied images and histopathological features of primary esophageal malignant melanoma to explore the clinical pathological features, diagnosis, differential diagnoses, and treatment. Immunolabelling was conducted on six cases of esophageal malignant melanoma using histological and immunohistochemical techniques. Combined with the related literature, the clinical manifestations, imaging, histopathological and immunohistochemical features, treatment, and prognosis of primary esophageal malignant melanoma were observed and analyzed. The six patients with primary esophageal malignant melanoma were all male with an average age of 63.4 years. Poor food intake was observed in all patients, and the symptoms showed progressive aggravation. Endoscopic feed tube revealed dark brown and black nodular and polypoid lesions, 1/4-1/2 loop cavity. Tumor histopathology revealed the following characteristics: tumor cells arranged in nests, sheets and cords, round or polygonal, abundant and red-stained cytoplasm, melanin granules in the cytoplasm, heterogeneous nucleus sizes, centered or deviated nuclei, clearly identifiable nucleoli, and apparent pathological mitosis. The immune phenotype was as follows: tumor cells had diffuse expression of HMB45, Melan A, and S100. The cells were CK negative, and the Ki67-positive cell number was 40%-45%. Primary esophageal malignant melanoma is rare with high malignancy and poor prognosis. Immunohistochemical staining is helpful for diagnosing this tumor. The differential diagnosis includes low differentiated carcinoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor, esophageal sarcomatoid carcinoma, esophageal lymphoma, and other tumors. PMID:25400820

  5. Oral Bisphosphonate and Risk of Esophageal Cancer: A Nationwide Claim Study

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Gi Hyeon

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidemiology studies suggest that oral bisphosphonate may increase the risk of esophageal cancer. The present study aimed to investigate the association between exposure of oral bisphosphonate and risk of esophageal cancer. Methods Using the nationwide medical claim database in South Korea, 2,167,955 subjects, who initiated osteoporosis treatment (oral bisphosphonate, intravenous bisphosphonate or raloxifene) or performed dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) between 2008 and 2012, were analyzed. Diagnosis of esophageal cancer was estimated from medical claim database. Standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was estimated by comparing with incidence in the general population. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to investigate age-adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of esophageal cancer. Results The present study included oral bisphosphonate group (N=1,435,846), comparator group 1 (intravenous bisphosphonate or raloxifene, N=78,363) and comparator group 2 (DXA, N=653,746). Mean age was 65.6±8.8 years and mean observation duration was 30.9±17.7 months. During 5,503,688 patient-years, 205 esophageal cancer incidences were observed. The annual incidence of esophageal cancer was 3.88, 4.21, and 3.30 for oral bisphosphonate group, comparator group 1 and comparator group 2, respectively. SIR of esophageal cancer was 1.24, 1.38, and 1.40 for oral bisphosphonate group, comparator group 1 and comparator group 2, respectively. Esophageal cancer risk of oral bisphosphonate group was not significantly different from comparator group 1 and comparator group 2 (aHR 0.87; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.39-1.98 and aHR 0.94; 95% CI 0.68-1.30, respectively). Conclusions The use of oral bisphosphonate was not associated with increased risk of esophageal cancer in real clinical practice using large scale nationwide database. PMID:26082917

  6. Postchemoradiotherapy Positron Emission Tomography Predicts Pathologic Response and Survival in Patients With Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jayachandran, Priya; Pai, Reetesh K.; Quon, Andrew; Graves, Edward; Krakow, Trevor E.; La, Trang; Loo, Billy W.; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To correlate the prechemoradiotherapy (CRT) and post-CRT metabolic tumor volume (MTV) on positron emission tomography (PET) scanning with the pathologic response and survival in patients receiving preoperative CRT for esophageal cancer. Materials and Methods: The medical records of 37 patients with histologically confirmed Stage I-IVA esophageal cancer treated with CRT with or without surgical resection were reviewed. Of the 37 patients, 21 received preoperative CRT (57%) and 16 received definitive CRT (43%). All patients had a pre-CRT and 32 had a post-CRT PET scan. The MTV was measured on the pre-CRT PET and post-CRT PET scan, respectively, using a minimum standardized uptake value (SUV) threshold x, where x = 2, 2.5, 3, or the SUV maximum Multiplication-Sign 50%. The total glycolytic activity (TGA{sub x}) was defined as the mean SUV Multiplication-Sign MTV{sub x}. The MTV ratio was defined as the pre-CRT PET MTV/post-CRT MTV. The SUV ratio was defined similarly. A single pathologist scored the pathologic response using a tumor regression grade (TRG) scale. Results: The median follow-up was 1.5 years (range, 0.4-4.9). No significant correlation was found between any parameters on the pre-CRT PET scan and the TRG or overall survival (OS). Multiple post-CRT MTV values and post-TGA values correlated with the TRG and OS; however, the MTV{sub 2.5Post} and TGA{sub 2.5Post} had the greatest correlation. The MTV{sub 2} ratio correlated with OS. The maximum SUV on either the pre-CRT and post-CRT PET scans or the maximum SUV ratio did not correlate with the TRG or OS. Patients treated preoperatively had survival similar compared with those treated definitively with a good PET response (p = 0.97) and significantly better than that of patients treated definitively with a poor PET response (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The maximum SUV was not a predictive or prognostic parameter. The MTV{sub 2.5} and TGA{sub 2.5} were useful markers for predicting the response and survival on the post-CRT PET scan. The MTV{sub 2} ratio also correlated with survival. Post-CRT PET can potentially guide therapy after CRT.

  7. Quality Improvement Guidelines for Placement of Esophageal Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Sabharwal, Tarun Morales, Jose P.; Irani, Farah G.; Adam, Andreas

    2005-04-15

    Esophageal cancer is now the sixth leading cause of death from cancer worldwide. During the past three decades, important changes have occurred in the epidemiologic patterns associated with this disease. Due to the distensible characteristics of the esophagus, patients may not recognize any symptoms until 50% of the luminal diameter is compromised, explaining why cancer of the esophagus is generally associated with late presentation and poor prognosis. Esophageal cancer has a poor outcome, with an overall 5 year survival rate of less than 10%, and fewer than 50% of patients are suitable for resection at presentation. As a result palliation is the best option in this group of patients]. The aims of palliation are maintenance of oral intake, minimizing hospital stay, relief of pain, elimination of reflux and regurgitation, and prevention of aspiration. For palliative care, current treatment options include thermal ablation, photodynamic therapy, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, chemical injection therapy, argon beam or bipolar electrocoagulation therapy, enteral feeding (nasogastric tube/percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy), and intubation (self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) or semi-rigid prosthetic tubes) with different success and complications rates.

  8. [Effect of preoperative adjuvant therapy of esophageal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Shiozaki, H; Ogawa, Y; Ogawa, M; Fujimoto, J; Kido, Y; Miyamoto, T; Tane, H; Kokunai, I; Ueno, K; Kobayashi, K

    1984-10-01

    Between January 1970 and December 1983, 148 patients of esophageal carcinoma were treated surgically in the 2nd Department of Surgery, Osaka University Medical School. Among these patients, 70 (48.6%) with suspected invasion to neighboring structures were treated with preoperative chemotherapy, radiotherapy or a combination of both. The chemotherapeutic agents used were tegafur (FT-207)-suppository, bleomycin (BLM) or peplomycin (PEP). Radiotherapy (3000-4000 cGy) for selected cases was begun at the same time as the chemotherapy. Three to four weeks after the chemotherapy and radiotherapy were completed, esophagectomy was performed. The effects of the preoperative adjuvant therapies were investigated in these patients, and the following results were obtained: A marked histological effect, according to the Guide Lines in Clinical and Pathologic Studies for Carcinoma of the Esophagus (Japanese Society for Esophageal Diseases, 1976) was found in 47.4% of the radiotherapy plus FT-207 group, 39.1% of the group receiving radiotherapy alone and 28.6% of the group receiving radiotherapy plus PEP or BLM. Radiotherapy plus FT-207 showed excellent effects (77.8% of this group showed marked histological effects) on well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, as shown histologically by biopsy specimens. Tumors exhibiting sharp edged margins radiographically and endoscopically, showed a very good histological effect after preoperative radiotherapy. Metastatic lymph nodes present in the irradiation field, whose primary lesion showed a marked histological effect, also gave excellent results. Postoperative radiotherapy is also expected to be equally effective on these cases. PMID:6207778

  9. Gastric necrosis after fundoplication: a novel approach for esophageal preservation.

    PubMed

    Bass, K D; Meagher, D P; Haase, G M

    1998-11-01

    An 11-year-old boy presented moribund, with massive abdominal distension. A Nissen fundoplication and gastrostomy tube had been established at age 2 years. After attempts to pass a nasogastric tube were unsuccessful, the old gastrostomy site was used to gain percutaneous access to the stomach resulting in release of gastric contents and stabilization of blood pressure and perfusion. During operation, massive gastric distention with gastric necrosis was found. Subtotal gastrectomy was performed with stapled closure of the distal intraabdominal esophagus and prepyloric region. Sump suction was placed in the proximal esophagus and the abdomen was drained widely. A distal esophageal perforation was apparent on postoperative day 19 confirmed by imaging and endoscopy. A nasoesophageal tube was passed into the abdomen, tied to a Jackson-Pratt drain, and the composite tube repositioned in the midesophagus allowing controlled proximal and distal drainage. Six months later, a Hunt-Laurence esophagojejunal pouch was created. At age 13, the child is clinically well, and enjoys 50% of his nutritional needs orally, with the remainder delivered overnight via tube feedings. This case describes gastric necrosis after gas bloat syndrome as a late complication of Nissen fundoplication. A novel approach to the management of distal esophageal perforation allowed preservation of a functional, intact native esophagus. PMID:9856904

  10. Esophageal Cancer in Kashmir (India): An Enigma for Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Mir, M. Muzaffar; Dar, Nazir Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    About 90% of esophageal cancers worldwide are Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC), mostly occurring in defined high-incidence areas of low and middle-resource countries. Historically, the highest incidences are reported in regions of Central Asia. One such region is Kashmir Valley in Northern India. In this review, we summarize a large body of epidemiological, toxicological and observational information on occurrence, dietary patterns and lifestyles to discuss factors that may be involved in the etiology of SCC in Kashmir Valley. To date, no single factor can be identified as the main cause of the excess incidence of SCC as compared to other regions of India. Three main components emerge as important factors: a societal component with poor, rural lifestyle and general deprivation, status in particular in vitamins and oligoelements; a lifestyle component with the use of copper utensil in cooking, the consumption of spicy, deep fried foodstuffs, and the drinking of hot salty tea; and an environmental component with exposure to high levels of dietary nitrosamines from diverse sources. Overall, these three components are similar to the general pattern of factors that have been involved in causing SCC in other high-incidence area in the so-called “esophageal cancer belt”, namely in central China (Cixian, Lixian) and in Northern Iran (Golestan). Further comparative studies between these regions are needed to identify the contributions of these various components. PMID:21475514

  11. [Treatment of esophagopericardial fistula following esophagogastroplasty for esophageal caustic stenosis].

    PubMed

    Michieletto, Silvia; Ruol, Alberto; Cagol, Matteo; Alfieri, Rita; Castoro, Carlo; Marano, Salvatore; Tosolini, Chiara; Ancona, Ermanno

    2007-01-01

    Esophagopericardial fistula is a rare and severe complication, involving several benign, malignant and traumatic pathologies of the esophagus. Only few cases of esophagopericardial fistula have been published so far, as compared to more frequently reported cases of gastropericardial fistula. We report on a 25-year-old female with an esophagopericardial fistula following retrosternal esophagogastroplasty for esophageal caustic stenosis. One month before admission to our hospital, the patient had fever and nonradiating substernal chest pain which was relieved by aspirin, unfortunately without adequate antacid therapy. After 3 weeks, for abdominal pain and worsening chest pain with shock, she was admitted to another hospital and underwent laparotomy: an haemoperitoneum was found, due to a rupture of an ovarian cyst which was removed. For persistent shock, the patient had an echocardiogram which revealed a cardiac tamponade, treated with placement of a pericardic drainage (300 cc of purulent liquid). She was then transferred to our unit: an esophageal swallow with a small amount of methilene blue revealed a fistula between the stomach of the esophagogatroplasty and the pericardium. She eventually underwent surgery. A pericardial window was created, the gastric tube was taken down because of the impossibility to suture the gastric ulcer, and an esophagocoloplasty was used for the reconstruction of the alimentary transit. The postoperative course was unevenqf&l. She is alive and well at 15 months after surgery. Esophagopericardial fistula is a rare complication, with a high mortality rate. A timely decision is mandatory and an aggressive treatment often necessary. PMID:17722501

  12. Technical Feasibility of TachoSil Application on Esophageal Anastomoses.

    PubMed

    Haverkamp, Leonie; Ruurda, Jelle P; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Sealing esophageal anastomoses with a sealant patch (TachoSil) containing human fibrinogen and thrombin may improve mechanical strength. The aim was to evaluate the technical feasibility of the application of a sealant patch in upper gastrointestinal surgery. Methods. In total 15 patients, 18-80 years old, undergoing thoracolaparoscopic esophagectomy with esophagogastrostomy or laparoscopic total gastrectomy with esophagojejunostomy was included. Different techniques of anastomotic TachoSil patch application were tested and recorded on video. Results. TachoSil was successfully applied to the esophagogastrostomy (n = 11) and to the esophagojejunostomy (n = 4). A median of 2 (1-6) attempts was necessary to reach successful application. The median duration was 7 (3-26) minutes before successful application was accomplished. The best technique in esophagectomy was the application of TachoSil with the use of 2 cellophane sheets. For total gastrectomy, the patch was folded into a harmonica shape and wrapped around the esophagojejunostomy. Although not significant, the number of attempts and time to success showed a decreasing trend along with the increased experience. Conclusion. Application of TachoSil as a sealant of esophageal anastomoses was technically feasible. Future studies may investigate the value of TachoSil application on the prevention of anastomotic leakage. PMID:26101523

  13. Technical Feasibility of TachoSil Application on Esophageal Anastomoses

    PubMed Central

    Haverkamp, Leonie; Ruurda, Jelle P.; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Sealing esophageal anastomoses with a sealant patch (TachoSil) containing human fibrinogen and thrombin may improve mechanical strength. The aim was to evaluate the technical feasibility of the application of a sealant patch in upper gastrointestinal surgery. Methods. In total 15 patients, 18–80 years old, undergoing thoracolaparoscopic esophagectomy with esophagogastrostomy or laparoscopic total gastrectomy with esophagojejunostomy was included. Different techniques of anastomotic TachoSil patch application were tested and recorded on video. Results. TachoSil was successfully applied to the esophagogastrostomy (n = 11) and to the esophagojejunostomy (n = 4). A median of 2 (1–6) attempts was necessary to reach successful application. The median duration was 7 (3–26) minutes before successful application was accomplished. The best technique in esophagectomy was the application of TachoSil with the use of 2 cellophane sheets. For total gastrectomy, the patch was folded into a harmonica shape and wrapped around the esophagojejunostomy. Although not significant, the number of attempts and time to success showed a decreasing trend along with the increased experience. Conclusion. Application of TachoSil as a sealant of esophageal anastomoses was technically feasible. Future studies may investigate the value of TachoSil application on the prevention of anastomotic leakage. PMID:26101523

  14. Elimination diets in the management of eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Wechsler, Joshua B; Schwartz, Sally; Amsden, Katie; Kagalwalla, Amir F

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis, an increasingly recognized chronic inflammatory disorder isolated to the esophagus, is triggered by an abnormal allergic response to dietary antigens. Current treatment includes swallowed topical steroids and dietary modification, which aim to resolve symptoms and prevent long-term complications such as formation of strictures. The dietary approach has become more widely accepted because long-term steroid therapy is associated with potential risks. Dietary treatment includes elemental and elimination diets. An exclusive elemental diet, which requires replacement of all intact protein with amino acid-based formula, offers the best response of all available therapies, with remission in up to 96% of subjects proving it to be superior to all other available therapies including topical steroids. However, compliance with this approach is challenging because of poor taste and monotony. The high cost of formula and the associated psychosocial problems are additional drawbacks of this approach. Empiric and allergy test-directed elimination diets have gained popularity given that elimination of a limited number of foods is much easier and as such is more readily acceptable. There is a growing body of literature supporting this type of therapy in both children and adults. This paper reviews the evidence for all types of dietary therapy in eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:24920928

  15. Excitatory and inhibitory enteric innervation of horse lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Chiocchetti, R; Giancola, F; Mazzoni, M; Sorteni, C; Romagnoli, N; Pietra, M

    2015-06-01

    The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is a specialized, thickened muscle region with a high resting tone mediated by myogenic and neurogenic mechanisms. During swallowing or belching, the LES undergoes strong inhibitory innervation. In the horse, the LES seems to be organized as a "one-way" structure, enabling only the oral-anal progression of food. We characterized the esophageal and gastric pericardial inhibitory and excitatory intramural neurons immunoreactive (IR) for the enzymes neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and choline acetyltransferase. Large percentages of myenteric plexus (MP) and submucosal (SMP) plexus nNOS-IR neurons were observed in the esophagus (72 ± 9 and 69 ± 8 %, respectively) and stomach (57 ± 17 and 45 ± 3 %, respectively). In the esophagus, cholinergic MP and SMP neurons were 29 ± 14 and 65 ± 24 vs. 36 ± 8 and 38 ± 20 % in the stomach, respectively. The high percentage of nitrergic inhibitory motor neurons observed in the caudal esophagus reinforces the role of the enteric nervous system in the horse LES relaxation. These findings might allow an evaluation of whether selective groups of enteric neurons are involved in horse neurological disorders such as megaesophagus, equine dysautonomia, and white lethal foal syndrome. PMID:25578519

  16. Laparoscopic Partial Fundoplication in Case of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Patient with Absent Esophageal Motility

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kyung Won; Yoon, Ki Young; Park, Seun Ja; Kim, Sung Eun

    2015-01-01

    The surgical indications for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients with esophageal motility disorders have been debated. We report a case of antireflux surgery performed in a patient with absent esophageal motility as categorized by the Chicago classification (2011). A 54-year-old man underwent laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication due to apparent GERD and desire to discontinue all medications. After surgery, his subjective symptoms improved. Furthermore, objective findings including manometry and 24-hour pH-metry also improved. In our experience, antireflux surgery can improve GERD symptoms patients, even with absent esophageal motility. PMID:26161286

  17. Delayed Esophageal Hemorrhage Caused by a Metal Stent: Treatment with Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Kos, Xavier; Trotteur, Genevieve; Dondelinger, Robert F.

    1998-09-15

    We report a case of life-threatening esophageal hemorrhage after metal stent implantation successfully treated by arterial embolization. An 85-year-old woman was admitted in shock secondary to massive hematemesis and melena. Recent medical history revealed esophageal cancer treated 8 weeks previously by endoesophageal radiotherapy (40 Gy) and endoscopic placement of a covered Wallstent prosthesis. Selective arteriography of the fifth posterior right intercostal artery showed massive contrast extravasation in the esophagus. Embolization was performed with 150-250-{mu}m polyvinyl alcohol particles. Follow-up at 5 months was uneventful. Arteriography and embolization are advised when severe hemorrhage occurs after esophageal implantation of metal stents.

  18. Acute Cardiac Impairment Associated With Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer: Magnetic Resonance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hatakenaka, Masamitsu; Yonezawa, Masato; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nagao, Michinobu; Matsuo, Yoshio; Kamitani, Takeshi; Higo, Taiki; Nishikawa, Kei; Setoguchi, Taro; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate acute cardiac effects of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. The left ventricular function (LVF) of 31 patients with esophageal cancer who received cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil-based CCRT was evaluated using cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging. The patients were classified into two groups according to mean LV dose. The parameters related to LVF were compared between before and during (40 Gy) or between before and after CCRT using a Wilcoxon matched-pairs single rank test, and parameter ratios (during/before CCRT, after/before CCRT) were also compared between the groups with a t test. Data were expressed as mean {+-} SE. Results: In the low LV-dose group (n = 10; mean LV dose <0.6 Gy), LV ejection fraction decreased significantly (before vs. during vs. after CCRT; 62.7% {+-} 2.98% vs. 59.8% {+-} 2.56% vs. 60.6% {+-} 3.89%; p < 0.05). In the high LV-dose group (n = 21; mean LV dose of 3.6-41.2 Gy), LV end-diastolic volume index (before vs. after CCRT; 69.1 {+-} 2.93 vs. 57.0 {+-} 3.23 mL/m{sup 2}), LV stroke volume index (38.6 {+-} 1.56 vs. 29.9 {+-} 1.60 mL/m{sup 2}), and LV ejection fraction (56.9% {+-} 1.79% vs. 52.8% {+-} 1.15%) decreased significantly (p < 0.05) after CCRT. Heart rate increased significantly (before vs. during vs. after CCRT; 66.8 {+-} 3.05 vs. 72.4 {+-} 4.04 vs. 85.4 {+-} 3.75 beats per minute, p < 0.01). Left ventricle wall motion decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in segments 8 (before vs. during vs. after CCRT; 6.64 {+-} 0.54 vs. 4.78 {+-} 0.43 vs. 4.79 {+-} 0.50 mm), 9 (6.88 {+-} 0.45 vs. 5.04 {+-} 0.38 vs. 5.27 {+-} 0.47 mm), and 10 (9.22 {+-} 0.48 vs. 8.08 {+-} 0.34 vs. 8.19 {+-} 0.56 mm). The parameter ratios of LV end-diastolic volume index, stroke volume index, wall motion in segment 9, and heart rate showed significant difference (p < 0.05) after CCRT between the groups. Conclusions: Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer impairs LVF from an early treatment stage. This impairment is prominent in patients with high LV dose.

  19. Core Temperature Measurement During Submaximal Exercise: Esophageal, Rectal, and Intestinal Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Williams, W. Jon; Schneider, Suzanne M.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if intestinal temperature (Tin) might be in acceptable alternative to esophageal (Tes) and rectal temperature (Trec) to assess thermoregulation during supine exercise. We hypothesized that Tin would have values similar to Tes and a response time similar to Trec, but the rate of temperature change across time would not be different between measurement sites. Seven subjects completed a continuous supine protocol of 20 min of rest, 20 min of cycle exercise at 40% peak oxygen consumption (VO2pk), 20 min of cycle exercise at 65% V02pk, and 20 min of recovery. Tes, Trec, and Tin were recorded each min throughout the test. Temperatures were not different after 20 min of rest, but Trec was less than the Tes and Tin at the end of the 40% and 65% VO2pk stages. After 20 min of recovery, Tes was less than either Trec or Tin, which were not different from each other. Time to threshold for increased temperature from rest was greater for Trec than Tes but not different from Tin. Time to reach peak temperature was greater for Tin and Trec than Tes. Similarly, time to a decrease in temperature after exercise was greater for Trec than Tes, but not different from Tin. The rate of temperature change from threshold to the end of the 40% VO2pk stage was not different between measurement sites. However, the rate of change during recovery was more negative for Tes than Tin and Trec, which were different from each other. Measurement of Tin may he an acceptable alternative to Tes and Trec with an understanding of its limitations.

  20. Treatment of esophageal-gastric double primary cancer by pedunculated remnant gastric interposition, esophageal-gastric anastomosis and gastrojejunal Billroth II anastomosis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIAO TIAN; WANG, WEI; ZHU, QIANG; CAO, MING; JIANG, ZHONG MIN; ZANG, QI

    2015-01-01

    With the continuous advancement of clinical diagnostic techniques, including imaging technology, the incidence of confirmed multiple primary cancers or double primary carcinoma increases yearly. However, studies reporting synchronization surgery performed for primary dual esophageal gastric cancer are rare. The present study reports the case of a patient with double primary esophageal-gastric cancer, located in the thoracic cavity segment of the esophagus and gastric antrum of the stomach, respectively. The gastric cancer was diagnosed by endoscopy biopsy with concomitant esophageal cancer. The patient underwent gastric cancer resection, and pedunculated remnant gastric interposition esophagogastric side anastomosis was performed with gastrojejunostomy Billroth II anastomosis behind the colon. Abdominal cavity lymph node dissection was also performed. The esophageal-gastric double primary cancer was simultaneously excised and the gastric regions were used in the construction of the upper gastrointestinal tract: The surgery was successful. However, two weeks after surgery, upper gastrointestinal imaging revealed esophagogastric anastomotic leakage. Subsequently, an esophageal stent was inserted and antibiotics and additional treatment was administered. Follow-up one year after surgery revealed that the patient was well and remained in a stable condition. PMID:26622590

  1. Oral liarozole in the treatment of patients with moderate/severe lamellar ichthyosis: results of a randomized, double-blind, multinational, placebo-controlled phase II/III trial

    PubMed Central

    Vahlquist, A; Blockhuys, S; Steijlen, P; van Rossem, K; Didona, B; Blanco, D; Traupe, H

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Oral liarozole, a retinoic acid metabolism-blocking agent, may be an alternative to systemic retinoid therapy in patients with lamellar ichthyosis. Objective To demonstrate the efficacy and safety of once-daily oral liarozole in the treatment of moderate/severe lamellar ichthyosis. Methods This was a double-blind, multinational, parallel phase II/III trial (NCT00282724). Patients aged ? 14 years with moderate/severe lamellar ichthyosis [Investigator's Global Assessment (IGA) score ? 3] were randomized 3 : 3 : 1 to receive oral liarozole (75 or 150 mg) or placebo once daily for 12 weeks. Assessments included: IGA; a five-point scale for erythema, scaling and pruritus severity; Short Form-36 health survey; Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI); and safety parameters. The primary efficacy variable was response rate at week 12 (responder: ? 2-point decrease in IGA from baseline). Results Sixty-four patients were enrolled. At week 12, 11/27 (41%; liarozole 75 mg), 14/28 (50%; liarozole 150 mg) and one out of nine (11%; placebo) patients were responders; the difference between groups (liarozole 150 mg vs. placebo) was not significant (P = 0·056). Mean IGA and scaling scores decreased from baseline in both liarozole groups at weeks 8 and 12 vs. placebo; erythema and pruritus scores were similar between treatment groups. Improvement in DLQI score was observed in both liarozole groups. Treatment with liarozole for 12 weeks was well tolerated. Conclusions The primary efficacy variable did not reach statistical significance, possibly owing to the small sample size following premature termination. However, once-daily oral liarozole, 75 and 150 mg, improved scaling and DLQI and was well tolerated in patients with moderate/severe lamellar ichthyosis. PMID:24102348

  2. Phase II Results of RTOG 0537: A Phase II/III Study Comparing Acupuncture-like Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Versus Pilocarpine in Treating Early Radiation-Induced Xerostomia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Raimond K. W.; James, Jennifer L.; Sagar, Stephen; Wyatt, Gwen; Nguyen-Tân, Phuc Felix; Singh, Anurag K.; Lukaszczyk, Barbara; Cardinale, Francis; Yeh, Alexander M.; Berk, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This phase II component of a multi-institutional phase II/III randomized trial assessed the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of acupuncture-like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (ALTENS) in reducing radiation-induced xerostomia. Methods Head and neck cancer patients who were 3–24 months from completing radiotherapy ± chemotherapy (RT±C) and experiencing xerostomia symptoms with basal whole saliva production ?0.1 ml/min and without recurrence were eligible. Patients received twice weekly ALTENS sessions (24 over 12 weeks) using a Codetron™ unit. The primary objective assessed the feasibility of ALTENS treatment. A patient was considered compliant if 19/24 ALTENS were delivered, with a targeted 85% compliance rate. Secondary objectives measured treatment-related toxicities and ALTENS effect on overall radiation-induced xerostomia burden using the University of Michigan Xerostomia-Related Quality of Life Scale (XeQOLS). Results Of 48 accrued patients, 47 were evaluable. Median age was 60 years; 84% were male, 70% completed RT±C for > 12 months and 21% had received prior pilocarpine. All ALTENS sessions were completed in 34 patients, but 9 and 1 completed 20–23 and 19 sessions respectively, representing a 94% total compliance rate. 6-month XeQOLS scores were available for 35 patients; 30 (86%) achieved a positive treatment response with a mean reduction of 35.9% (SD 36.1). Five patients developed grade 1–2 gastrointestinal toxicity and one had grade 1 pain event. Conclusions ALTENS treatment for radiation-induced xerostomia can be uniformly delivered in a cooperative multicenter setting and has possible beneficial treatment response. Given these results, the phase III component of this study was initiated. PMID:22252927

  3. Rivaroxaban in antiphospholipid syndrome (RAPS) protocol: a prospective, randomized controlled phase II/III clinical trial of rivaroxaban versus warfarin in patients with thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome, with or without SLE

    PubMed Central

    Doré, C J; Clawson, S; Hunt, B J; Isenberg, D; Khamashta, M; Muirhead, N

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The current mainstay of the treatment of thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is long-term anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) such as warfarin. Non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs), which include rivaroxaban, have been shown to be effective and safe compared with warfarin for the treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in major phase III prospective, randomized controlled trials (RCTs), but the results may not be directly generalizable to patients with APS. Aims The primary aim is to demonstrate, in patients with APS and previous VTE, with or without systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), that the intensity of anticoagulation achieved with rivaroxaban is not inferior to that of warfarin. Secondary aims are to compare rates of recurrent thrombosis, bleeding and the quality of life in patients on rivaroxaban with those on warfarin. Methods Rivaroxaban in antiphospholipid syndrome (RAPS) is a phase II/III prospective non-inferiority RCT in which eligible patients with APS, with or without SLE, who are on warfarin, target international normalized ratio (INR) 2.5 for previous VTE, will be randomized either to continue warfarin (standard of care) or to switch to rivaroxaban. Intensity of anticoagulation will be assessed using thrombin generation (TG) testing, with the primary outcome the percentage change in endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) from randomization to day 42. Other TG parameters, markers of in vivo coagulation activation, prothrombin fragment 1.2, thrombin antithrombin complex and D-dimer, will also be assessed. Discussion If RAPS demonstrates i) that the anticoagulant effect of rivaroxaban is not inferior to that of warfarin and ii) the absence of any adverse effects that cause concern with regard to the use of rivaroxaban, this would provide sufficient supporting evidence to make rivaroxaban a standard of care for the treatment of APS patients with previous VTE, requiring a target INR of 2.5. PMID:25940537

  4. [The road to modern esophageal surgery - from maximally invasive to minimally invasive].

    PubMed

    von Holzen, Urs

    2014-08-01

    520 new cases of esophageal carcinoma are diagnosed in Switzerland per year. 80% of these patients eventually die from their disease despite recent advances in surgical technique and systemic treatment. The first successful thoracic esophageal resection for carcinoma was performed in 1913, but only the introduction of modern anesthesia with oral intubation and positive pressure ventilation made thoracic operations routinely feasible. Esophageal resection can be performed open or minimally invasive. The minimally invasive esophageal resection has been proven to be safe with comparable mortality to open resection. Also, there is no difference in terms of radicality of the operation. Overall survival seems to be equal in published series, but results of prospective trials are still pending. PMID:25097164

  5. Saccharomyces Fungemia Associated with Esophageal Disease Identified by D1/D2 Ribosomal RNA Gene Sequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disseminated Saccharomyces infection has been reported in immunosuppressed patients treated with probiotics, but disseminated Saccharomyces cerevisiae infection associated with underlying esophageal disease is not previously described. Saccharomyces cerevisiae (which occasionally colonizes the gast...

  6. Exome and whole-genome sequencing of esophageal adenocarcinoma identifies recurrent driver events and mutational complexity

    E-print Network

    Lander, Eric S.

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has risen 600% over the last 30 years. With a 5-year survival rate of ~15%, the identification of new therapeutic targets for EAC is greatly important. We analyze the mutation ...

  7. Cripto-1 Promotes the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun; Chen, Wangsheng; Wang, Xiaowen; Zhao, Jinqiu; Li, Qian; Fu, Zhongxue

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma is a major public health problem worldwide and one of the most aggressively malignant neoplasms. Although considerable diagnostic and therapeutic progress has been made in recent years, the prognosis of EC patients still remains dismal due to high rates of recurrence/metastasis and invasion. Previous studies have demonstrated that Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) is proposed as a critical mechanism for the acquisition of malignant phenotypes by epithelial cells. Several lines of evidence have shown that Cripto-1 plays an important oncogenic role during tumorigenesis by promoting EMT. The aim of our study was to evaluate the significance of Cripto-1 which plays a role in EMT and its metastasis in esophageal carcinoma. Data of this study suggest that Cripto-1 overexpression is connected with the tumorigenesis and progression of esophageal carcinoma; shRNA might be feasible for the inhibition of the invasion and metastasis of esophageal carcinoma. PMID:26472984

  8. Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Recurrent or Residual Superficial Esophageal Cancer after Chemoradiotherapy: Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Changhyeok; Youn, Young Hoon; Choi, Sung-eun; Jung, Young Hak; Park, Hae Yeul; Park, Jae Jun; Kim, Jie Hyun; Park, Hyojin

    2015-01-01

    We report two cases of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for recurrent or residual esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) lesions after chemoradiotherapy for advanced esophageal cancer. Case 1 involved a 64-year-old man who had previously undergone chemoradiotherapy for advanced ESCC and achieved a complete response (CR) for 22 months, until metachronous recurrent superficial ESCC was detected on follow-up esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). We performed ESD and found no evidence of recurrence for 24 months. Case 2 involved a 59-year-old man who had previously undergone chemoradiotherapy for advanced ESCC. He responded favorably to treatment, and most of the tumor had disappeared on follow-up EGD 4 months later. However, there were two residual superficial esophageal lugol-voiding lesions. We performed ESD, and he had a CR for 32 months thereafter. ESD can be considered a viable treatment option for recurrent or residual superficial ESCC after chemoradiotherapy for advanced esophageal cancer. PMID:26668804

  9. Analysis of Mucosal Stress Response in Acid-Induced Esophagitis in Opossum

    E-print Network

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Analysis of Mucosal Stress Response in Acid-Induced Esophagitis in Opossum ROBERT J. WHITE, Ph, and proximal samples were excised from anesthetized opossums 24 hr after three consecutive days of 45-min

  10. Esophageal Mast Cell Infiltration in a 32-Year-Old Woman with Noncardiac Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keol; Kwon, Hee Jin; Kim, In Young; Yoo, Kwai Han; Lee, Seulkee; Min, Yang Won; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2016-01-23

    Noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) is one of the most common esophageal symptoms and lacks a clearly defined mechanism. The most common cause of NCCP is gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). One of the accepted mechanisms of NCCP in a patient without GERD has been altered visceral sensitivity. Mast cells may play a role in visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome. In this case, a patient with NCCP and dysphagia who was unresponsive to proton pump inhibitor treatment had an increased esophageal mast cell infiltration and responded to 14 days of antihistamine and antileukotriene treatment. We suggest that there may be a relationship between esophageal symptoms such as NCCP and esophageal mast cell infiltration. PMID:26087786

  11. Dysphagia among adult patients who underwent surgery for esophageal atresia at birth

    PubMed Central

    Huynh-Trudeau, Valérie; Maynard, Stéphanie; Terzic, Tatjana; Soucy, Genevičve; Bouin, Mickael

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical experiences of adults who underwent surgery for esophageal atresia at birth is limited. There is some evidence that suggests considerable long-term morbidity, partly because of dysphagia, which has been reported in up to 85% of adult patients who undergo surgery for esophageal atresia. The authors hypothesized that dysphagia in this population is caused by dysmotility and/or anatomical anomalies. OBJECTIVE: To determine the motor and anatomical causes of dysphagia. METHODS: A total of 41 adults, followed at the Esophageal Atresia Clinic at Hôpital Saint-Luc (Montreal, Quebec), were approached to particpate in the present prospective study. Evaluation was completed using upper endoscopy, manometry and barium swallow for the participants who consented. The medical charts of respondents were systematically reviewed from the neonatal period to 18 years of age to assess medical and surgical history. RESULTS: All 41 patients followed at the clinic consented and were included in the study. Dysphagia was present in 73% of patients. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed in 32 patients: hiatal hernia was present in 62% (n=20); esophageal diverticulum in 13% (n=4); macroscopic Barrett esophagus in 31% (n=10); and esophagitis in 19% (n=6). Histological esophagitis was present in 20% and intestinal metaplasia in 10%. There were no cases of dysplagia or adenocarcinoma. Esophageal manometry was performed on 56% of the patients (n=23). Manometry revealed hypomotility in 100% of patients and included an insufficient number of peristaltic waves in 96%, non-propagating peristalsis in 78% and low-wave amplitude in 95%. Complete aperistalsis was present in 78%. The lower esophageal sphincter was abnormal in 12 (52%) patients, with incomplete relaxation the most common anomaly. Of the 41 patients, 29 (71%) consented to a barium swallow, which was abnormal in 13 (45%). The anomalies found were short esophageal dilation in 28%, delay in esophageal emptying in 14%, diverticula in 14% and stenosis in 7% of patients. There was more than one anomaly in 14% of patients. CONCLUSION: Dysphagia was a highly prevalent symptom in adults who underwent surgery for esophageal atresia. The present study is the first to demonstrate that motor and anatomical abnormalities may be implicated in causes of dysphagia in this population. Furthermore, these anomalies may be demonstrated with simple investigations such as endoscopy, manometry and barium swallow. PMID:25803019

  12. Quantification of esophageal wall thickness in CT using atlas-based segmentation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiahui; Kang, Min Kyu; Kligerman, Seth; Lu, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Esophageal wall thickness is an important predictor of esophageal cancer response to therapy. In this study, we developed a computerized pipeline for quantification of esophageal wall thickness using computerized tomography (CT). We first segmented the esophagus using a multi-atlas-based segmentation scheme. The esophagus in each atlas CT was manually segmented to create a label map. Using image registration, all of the atlases were aligned to the imaging space of the target CT. The deformation field from the registration was applied to the label maps to warp them to the target space. A weighted majority-voting label fusion was employed to create the segmentation of esophagus. Finally, we excluded the lumen from the esophagus using a threshold of -600 HU and measured the esophageal wall thickness. The developed method was tested on a dataset of 30 CT scans, including 15 esophageal cancer patients and 15 normal controls. The mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and mean absolute distance (MAD) between the segmented esophagus and the reference standard were employed to evaluate the segmentation results. Our method achieved a mean Dice coefficient of 65.55 ± 10.48% and mean MAD of 1.40 ± 1.31 mm for all the cases. The mean esophageal wall thickness of cancer patients and normal controls was 6.35 ± 1.19 mm and 6.03 ± 0.51 mm, respectively. We conclude that the proposed method can perform quantitative analysis of esophageal wall thickness and would be useful for tumor detection and tumor response evaluation of esophageal cancer.

  13. Involvement of CXCR4 Chemokine Receptor in Metastastic HER2-Positive Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gros, Stephanie J.; Kurschat, Nina; Drenckhan, Astrid; Dohrmann, Thorsten; Forberich, Evelyn; Effenberger, Katharina; Reichelt, Uta; Hoffman, Robert M.; Pantel, Klaus; Kaifi, Jussuf T.; Izbicki, Jakob R.

    2012-01-01

    A functional linkage of the structurally unrelated receptors HER2 and CXCR4 has been suggested for breast cancer but has not been evaluated for esophageal carcinoma. The inhibition of HER2 leads to a reduction of primary tumor growth and metastases in an orthotopic model of esophageal carcinoma. The chemokine receptor CXCR4 has been implicated in metastatic dissemination of various tumors and correlates with poor survival in esophageal carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate a correlation between the expression levels of HER2 and CXCR4 and to evaluate the involvemnent of CXCR4-expression in HER2-positive esophageal carcinoma. The effects of HER2-inhibition with trastuzumab and of CXCR4-inhibition with AMD3100 on primary tumor growth, metastatic homing, and receptor expression were evaluated in vitro and in an orthotopic model of metastatic esophageal carcinoma using MRI for imaging. The clinical relevance of HER2- and CXCR4-expression was examined in esophageal carcinoma patients. A significant correlation of HER2- and CXCR4-expression in primary tumor and metastases exists in the orthotopic model. Trastuzumab and AMD3100 treatment led to a significant reduction of primary tumor growth, metastases and micrometastases. HER2-expression was significantly elevated under AMD3100 treatment in the primary tumor and particularly in the metastases. The positive correlation between HER2- and CXCR4-expression was validated in esophageal cancer patients. The correlation of CXCR4- and HER2-expression and the elevation of HER2-expression and reduction of metastases through CXCR4-inhibition suggest a possible functional linkage and a role in tumor dissemination in HER2-positive esophageal carcinoma. PMID:23082154

  14. Involvement of CXCR4 chemokine receptor in metastastic HER2-positive esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gros, Stephanie J; Kurschat, Nina; Drenckhan, Astrid; Dohrmann, Thorsten; Forberich, Evelyn; Effenberger, Katharina; Reichelt, Uta; Hoffman, Robert M; Pantel, Klaus; Kaifi, Jussuf T; Izbicki, Jakob R

    2012-01-01

    A functional linkage of the structurally unrelated receptors HER2 and CXCR4 has been suggested for breast cancer but has not been evaluated for esophageal carcinoma. The inhibition of HER2 leads to a reduction of primary tumor growth and metastases in an orthotopic model of esophageal carcinoma. The chemokine receptor CXCR4 has been implicated in metastatic dissemination of various tumors and correlates with poor survival in esophageal carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate a correlation between the expression levels of HER2 and CXCR4 and to evaluate the involvement of CXCR4-expression in HER2-positive esophageal carcinoma. The effects of HER2-inhibition with trastuzumab and of CXCR4-inhibition with AMD3100 on primary tumor growth, metastatic homing, and receptor expression were evaluated in vitro and in an orthotopic model of metastatic esophageal carcinoma using MRI for imaging. The clinical relevance of HER2- and CXCR4-expression was examined in esophageal carcinoma patients. A significant correlation of HER2- and CXCR4-expression in primary tumor and metastases exists in the orthotopic model. Trastuzumab and AMD3100 treatment led to a significant reduction of primary tumor growth, metastases and micrometastases. HER2-expression was significantly elevated under AMD3100 treatment in the primary tumor and particularly in the metastases. The positive correlation between HER2- and CXCR4-expression was validated in esophageal cancer patients. The correlation of CXCR4- and HER2-expression and the elevation of HER2-expression and reduction of metastases through CXCR4-inhibition suggest a possible functional linkage and a role in tumor dissemination in HER2-positive esophageal carcinoma. PMID:23082154

  15. Biology of telomeres: importance in etiology of esophageal cancer and as therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Pal, Jagannath; Gold, Jason S; Munshi, Nikhil C; Shammas, Masood A

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the importance of telomeres, the mechanisms implicated in their maintenance, and their role in the etiology as well as the treatment of human esophageal cancer. We will also discuss the role of telomeres in the maintenance and preservation of genomic integrity, the consequences of telomere dysfunction, and the various factors that may affect telomere health in esophageal tissue predisposing it to oncogenesis. There has been growing evidence that telomeres, which can be affected by various intrinsic and extrinsic factors, contribute to genomic instability, oncogenesis, as well as proliferation of cancer cells. Telomeres are the protective DNA-protein complexes at chromosome ends. Telomeric DNA undergoes progressive shortening with age leading to cellular senescence and/or apoptosis. If senescence/apoptosis is prevented as a consequence of specific genomic changes, continued proliferation leads to very short (ie, dysfunctional) telomeres that can potentially cause genomic instability, thus, increasing the risk for activation of telomere maintenance mechanisms and oncogenesis. Like many other cancers, esophageal cancer cells have short telomeres and elevated telomerase, the enzyme that maintains telomeres in most cancer cells. Homologous recombination, which is implicated in the alternate pathway of telomere elongation, is also elevated in Barrett's-associated esophageal adenocarcinoma. Evidence from our laboratory indicates that both telomerase and homologous recombination contribute to telomere maintenance, DNA repair, and the ongoing survival of esophageal cancer cells. This indicates that telomere maintenance mechanisms may potentially be targeted to make esophageal cancer cells static. The rate at which telomeres in healthy cells shorten is determined by a number of intrinsic and extrinsic factors, including those associated with lifestyle. Avoidance of factors that may directly or indirectly injure esophageal tissue including its telomeric and other genomic DNA can not only reduce the risk of development of esophageal cancer but may also have positive impact on overall health and lifespan. PMID:24090770

  16. Biology of Telomeres: Importance in Etiology of Esophageal Cancer And As Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Jagannath; Gold, Jason S.; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Shammas, Masood A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this review is to highlight the importance of telomeres, the mechanisms implicated in their maintenance, and their role in the etiology as well as the treatment of human esophageal cancer. We will also discuss the role of telomeres in the maintenance/preservation of genomic integrity, the consequences of telomere dysfunction, and the various factors that may affect telomere health in esophageal tissue predisposing it to oncogenesis. Recent findings There has been growing evidence that telomeres, which can be affected by various intrinsic and extrinsic factors, contribute to genomic instability, oncogenesis, as well as proliferation of cancer cells. Summary Telomeres are the protective DNA-protein complexes at chromosome ends. Telomeric DNA undergoes progressive shortening with age leading to cellular senescence and/or apoptosis. If senescence/apoptosis is prevented as a consequence of specific genomic changes, continued proliferation leads to very short (i.e. dysfunctional) telomeres that can potentially cause genomic instability thus increasing the risk for activation of telomere maintenance mechanisms and oncogenesis. Like many other cancers, esophageal cancer cells have short telomeres and elevated telomerase, the enzyme that maintains telomeres in most cancer cells. Homologous recombination, which is implicated in the alternate pathway of telomere elongation, is also elevated in Barrett’s-associated esophageal adenocarcinoma. Evidence from our laboratory indicates that both telomerase and homologous recombination contribute to telomere maintenance, DNA repair, and the ongoing survival of esophageal cancer cells. This indicates that telomere maintenance mechanisms may potentially be targeted to make esophageal cancer cells static. The rate at which telomeres in healthy cells shorten is determined by a number of intrinsic and extrinsic factors, including those associated with lifestyle. Avoidance of factors that may directly or indirectly injure esophageal tissue including its telomeric and other genomic DNA can not only reduce the risk of development of esophageal cancer but may also have positive impact on overall health and lifespan. PMID:24090770

  17. NFkB and Nrf2 in esophageal epithelial barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Fang, Yu; Li, Wenbo; Orlando, Roy C; Shaheen, Nicholas; Chen, Xiaoxin Luke

    2013-01-01

    The stratified squamous epithelium of the esophagus forms a tight protective barrier. Defects of the barrier function contribute to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), which is manifested as damage to the esophageal epithelium due to exposure to the gastrointestinal refluxate. In this review, we discuss the involvement of NFkB and Nrf2 in esophageal epithelial barrier function. Understanding these molecular pathways in the esophagus may help us develop therapeutic strategies to improve clinical outcomes in patients with GERD. PMID:24790804

  18. Esophageal investigations in connective tissue disease: which tests are most appropriate?

    PubMed

    Ling, T C; Johnston, B T

    2001-01-01

    Our aim was to review the use of esophageal investigations in patients with suspected connective tissue disease (CTD). Forty-seven patients (39 women and 8 men) with suspected CTD were referred for esophageal manometry at the gastrointestinal physiology unit in the Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, U.K., over a 10-year period (1987-1997). The mean age was 51.7 years (range = 21-79 years). Chart review was conducted 1 to 10 years after manometry to confirm the final diagnoses: scleroderma was found in 11; CREST (calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, telangiectasia), 8; mixed connective tissue disease, 14; Raynaud's alone, 5; and other CTDs, 9. All 47 successfully underwent esophageal manometry. In addition to manometry, 24 underwent gastroscopy; 27, barium meal; and 3, esophageal pH studies. Clinically significant esophageal abnormalities were noted in 8 (33%) on gastroscopy, in 15 (56%) on barium meal, and in 31 (66%) on manometry. Gastroscopy had a significantly lower positivity rate than the others (p < 0.05). Only three patients had pH testing, yet all three pH tests were abnormal. During manometry, abnormal findings were significantly more common in scleroderma-CREST when compared with other diagnoses (89% vs. 50%; p < 0.02). Thirty-three patients reported dysphagia. Abnormal manometry was more likely in these cases (82% vs. 33%; p < 0.02). A high percentage of patients with CTD have significant esophageal motility disorders. Investigations were more likely to be positive with scleroderma-CREST than other CTDs, even if dysphagia was present. Barium meal and manometry are more useful than OGD. pH studies were under-used. There is need for a standardized approach to esophageal investigations in patients with CTDs. PMID:11154166

  19. Jonathan Barrera Three types: I, II, III

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    recessive Mutation of the ERCC 8 gene (25%) or the ERCC 6 gene (75%) Located at 5q12.1 and 10q11 testing Confirmatory genetic testing Carrier testing Complementation tests to determine which gene://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bookshelf/br.fcgi?book= http://mcb.asm.org/cgi/content/full/29/5/1276 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?db=gene& http

  20. Circular and longitudinal muscles shortening indicates sliding patterns during peristalsis and transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nirali; Jiang, Yanfen; Mittal, Ravinder K; Kim, Tae Ho; Ledgerwood, Melissa; Bhargava, Valmik

    2015-09-01

    Esophageal axial shortening is caused by longitudinal muscle (LM) contraction, but circular muscle (CM) may also contribute to axial shortening because of its spiral morphology. The goal of our study was to show patterns of contraction of CM and LM layers during peristalsis and transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation (TLESR). In rats, esophageal and LES morphology was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry, and function with the use of piezo-electric crystals and manometry. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve was used to induce esophageal contractions. In 18 healthy subjects, manometry and high frequency intraluminal ultrasound imaging during swallow-induced esophageal contractions and TLESR were evaluated. CM and LM thicknesses were measured (40 swallows and 30 TLESRs) as markers of axial shortening, before and at peak contraction, as well as during TLESRs. Animal studies revealed muscular connections between the LM and CM layers of the LES but not in the esophagus. During vagal stimulated esophageal contraction there was relative movement between the LM and CM. Human studies show that LM-to-CM (LM/CM) thickness ratio at baseline was 1. At the peak of swallow-induced contraction LM/CM ratio decreased significantly (<1), whereas the reverse was the case during TLESR (>2). The pattern of contraction of CM and LM suggests sliding of the two muscles. Furthermore, the sliding patterns are in the opposite direction during peristalsis and TLESR. PMID:26045610

  1. A clinical trial of neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by resection for esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Anvari, Kazem; Aledavood, Seyed Amir; Toussi, Mehdi Seilanian; Forghani, Mohammad Naser; Mohtashami, Samira; Rajabi, Mohammad Taghi; Shandiz, Fatemeh Homaee; Nosrati, Fatemeh; Nowferesti, Gholamhossein; Salek, Roham

    2015-01-01

    Background: Esophageal carcinoma is a common malignancy in the North East of Iran. Combined modality treatments have been adopted to improve survival in patients with esophageal carcinoma. In this trial, we evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of a preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy protocol in the patients with locally advanced esophageal carcinoma. Materials and Methods: Between 2006 and 2011, eligible patients with locally advanced esophageal carcinoma underwent concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy and 3-4 weeks later, esophagectomy. Pathologic response, overall survival rate, toxicity, and feasibility were evaluated. Results: One hundred ninety-seven patients with a median age of 59 (range: 27-70) entered the protocol. One hundred ninety-four cases (98.5%) had esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Grades 3-4 of toxicity in patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemoradotherapy were as follows: Neutropenia in 21% and esophagitis in 2.5% of cases. There were 11 (5.6%) early death probably due to the treatment-related toxicities. One hundred twenty-seven patients underwent surgery with postsurgical mortality of 11%. In these cases, the complete pathological response was shown in 38 cases (29.9%) with a 5-year overall survival rates of 48.2% and median overall survival of 44 months (95% confidence interval, 24.46-63.54). Conclusion: The pathological response rate and the overall survival rate are promising in patients who completed the protocol as receiving at least one cycle of chemotherapy. However, the treatment toxicities were relatively high.

  2. Response characteristics of esophageal balloon catheters handmade using latex and nonlatex materials

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Troy J; Lalande, Sophie; Hyatt, Robert E; Johnson, Bruce D

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of esophageal pressure allows for the calculation of several important and clinically useful parameters of respiratory mechanics. Esophageal pressure is often measured with balloon-tipped catheters. These catheters may be handmade from natural latex condoms and polyethylene tubing. Given the potential of natural latex to cause allergic reaction, it is important to determine whether esophageal catheter balloons can be fabricated, by hand, using nonlatex condoms as construction materials. To determine the static and dynamic response characteristics of esophageal balloon catheters handmade from latex and nonlatex materials, six esophageal catheter balloons were constructed from each of the following condom materials: natural latex, synthetic polyisoprene, and polyurethane (18 total). Static compliance and working volume range of each balloon catheter was obtained from their pressure-volume characteristics in water. The dynamic response of balloon catheters were measured via a pressure “step” test, from which a third-order underdamped transfer function was modeled. The dynamic ranges of balloon catheters were characterized by the frequencies corresponding to ±5% amplitude- and phase-distortion (fA5% and f?5%). Balloon catheters handmade from polyurethane condoms displayed the smallest working volume range and lowest static balloon compliance. Despite this lower compliance, fA5% and f?5% were remarkably similar between all balloon materials. Our findings suggest that polyisoprene condoms are an ideal nonlatex construction material to use when fabricating esophageal catheter balloons by hand. PMID:26077619

  3. Pathogenetic factors affecting gastroesophageal reflux in patients with esophagitis and concomitant duodenal ulcer: a multivariate analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hui-Ming; Huang, Xun; Deng, Chuang-Zheng; Porro, G. Pianchi; Pace, F.; Sangaletti, O.

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To assess the relationship between gastric acid output (GAO) and both pattern of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and esophageal lesions, and to evaluate the role of GAO and other potential pathogenetic factors in the development of esophagitis. METHODS: Gastric acid secretory testing and 24-h intraesophageal pH monitoring were performed in 31 patients with esophagitis and concomitant duodenal ulcer (E + DU) and compared with those of 72 patients with esophagitis (E) alone. RESULTS: The GAO in patients with E + DU was significantly higher than in patients with E (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between the two groups of patients as to endoscopicl findings and parameters of GER (P > 0.05). A multiple regression analysis with stepwise deletion showed that the presence of hiatal hernia (HH), GER in upright position and age appeared to correlate significantly with the presence of esophagitis. CONCLUSIONS: No parallel relationship between GAO and severity of GER or esophageal lesions exists in patients with E + DU, and that GAO is not a major pathogenetic factor in GER disease. PMID:11819262

  4. Telomerase antagonist imetelstat inhibits esophageal cancer cell growth and increases radiation-induced DNA breaks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuping; Smavadati, Shirin; Nordfjäll, Katarina; Karlsson, Krister; Qvarnström, Fredrik; Simonsson, Martin; Bergqvist, Michael; Gryaznov, Sergei; Ekman, Simon; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva

    2012-12-01

    Telomerase is mainly active in human tumor cells, which provides an opportunity for a therapeutic window on telomerase targeting. We sought to evaluate the potential of the thio-phosphoramidate oligonucleotide inhibitor of telomerase, imetelstat, as a drug candidate for treatment of esophageal cancer. Our results showed that imetelstat inhibited telomerase activity in a dose-dependent manner in esophageal cancer cells. After only 1 week of imetelstat treatment, a reduction of colony formation ability of esophageal cancer cells was observed. Furthermore, long-term treatment with imetelstat decreased cell growth of esophageal cancer cells with different kinetics regarding telomere lengths. Short-term imetelstat treatment also increased ?-H2AX and 53BP1 foci staining in the esophageal cancer cell lines indicating a possible induction of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). We also found that pre-treatment with imetelstat led to increased number and size of 53BP1 foci after ionizing radiation. The increase of 53BP1 foci number was especially pronounced during the first 1h of repair whereas the increase of foci size was prominent later on. This study supports the potential of imetelstat as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of esophageal cancer. PMID:22906540

  5. Response characteristics of esophageal balloon catheters handmade using latex and nonlatex materials.

    PubMed

    Cross, Troy J; Lalande, Sophie; Hyatt, Robert E; Johnson, Bruce D

    2015-06-01

    The measurement of esophageal pressure allows for the calculation of several important and clinically useful parameters of respiratory mechanics. Esophageal pressure is often measured with balloon-tipped catheters. These catheters may be handmade from natural latex condoms and polyethylene tubing. Given the potential of natural latex to cause allergic reaction, it is important to determine whether esophageal catheter balloons can be fabricated, by hand, using nonlatex condoms as construction materials. To determine the static and dynamic response characteristics of esophageal balloon catheters handmade from latex and nonlatex materials, six esophageal catheter balloons were constructed from each of the following condom materials: natural latex, synthetic polyisoprene, and polyurethane (18 total). Static compliance and working volume range of each balloon catheter was obtained from their pressure-volume characteristics in water. The dynamic response of balloon catheters were measured via a pressure "step" test, from which a third-order underdamped transfer function was modeled. The dynamic ranges of balloon catheters were characterized by the frequencies corresponding to ±5% amplitude- and phase-distortion (fA5% and f?5%). Balloon catheters handmade from polyurethane condoms displayed the smallest working volume range and lowest static balloon compliance. Despite this lower compliance, fA 5% and f?5% were remarkably similar between all balloon materials. Our findings suggest that polyisoprene condoms are an ideal nonlatex construction material to use when fabricating esophageal catheter balloons by hand. PMID:26077619

  6. Endoscopic dilation of esophageal stricture without fluoroscopy is safe and effective

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Guang; Tio, Thian-Lok; Soehendra, Nib

    2002-01-01

    AIM: Endoscopic dilation of esophageal strictures is a commonly performed procedure in the management of dysphagia. The procedure is usually done with fluoroscopic guidance. The aim of this study was to assess the use of Tracer guide wire in conjunction with Savary-Gilliard dilators in the dilation of tight esophageal strictures without fluoroscopy. METHODS: Fifty-five patients with significant dysphagia from strictures due to a variety of causes were dilated endoscopically. The procedure consisted of two parts. First, a guidewire was passed using endoscopic guidance, and then, dilation was performed without fluoroscopy. A modified Tracer wire was employed and was particularly effective in negotiating very tight esophageal strictures, in which the lumen is less than 6 mm. In general, the "Rule of Three" and "2-3 sessions in 10 d, maximum dilation up to 42 French" rules were followed. 401 dilations in a total of 55 patients (malignant strictures 30, benign 25) in 177 sessions were carried out. RESULTS: The guide wire placement and Savary-Gilliard dilation were successfully performed without fluoroscopy, and improvement of dysphagia was achieved in all patients. Esophageal plastic stent (out diameter 40 French) was placed in five patients with malignant stricture-three of them with tracheo-esophageal fistula. CONCLUSION: Dilation using Tracer guide wire without fluoroscopy is safe and effective in treatment of even very tight esophageal strictures. PMID:12174394

  7. Esophageal ulcer due to ingestion of melted copper.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, S; Takase, Y; Sharma, N

    1992-11-01

    We report a patient with esophageal stricture as a result of the accidental swallowing of melted copper by a 49-year-old male. As a result, esophagogastric ulcers developed and left a cicatrical stricture. The patient could only manage to swallow liquid food. Radiology of the upper gastrointestinal tract showed marked stricture of the esophagus from the middle thoracic portion to the esophagogastric junction and shortening of the lesser curvature of the stomach. The patient underwent a single-session total gastrectomy, and excision of the thoracic esophagus and construction of anterior thoracic esophagocolic and duodenocolic anastomoses were performed by right thoracotomy and laparotomy, respectively. Macroscopic findings of the surgical specimens showed extensive circular ulcers at the esophagus, and microscopic findings showed deep ulcers extending to the muscle layer with marked fibrosis. The postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:1425082

  8. Precancerous esophageal epithelia are associated with significantly increased scattering coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jing-Wei; Lin, Yang-Hsien; Chiang, Chun-Ping; Lee, Jang-Ming; Hsieh, Chao-Mao; Hsieh, Min-Shu; Yang, Pei-Wen; Wang, Chen-Ping; Tseng, Ping-Huei; Lee, Yi-Chia; Sung, Kung-Bin

    2015-01-01

    The progression of epithelial precancers into cancer is accompanied by changes of tissue and cellular structures in the epithelium. Correlations between the structural changes and scattering coefficients of esophageal epithelia were investigated using quantitative phase images and the scattering-phase theorem. An ex vivo study of 14 patients demonstrated that the average scattering coefficient of precancerous epithelia was 37.8% higher than that of normal epithelia from the same patient. The scattering coefficients were highly correlated with morphological features including the cell density and the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio. A high interpatient variability in scattering coefficients was observed and suggests identifying precancerous lesions based on the relative change in scattering coefficients. PMID:26504630

  9. An allergist's perspective to the evaluation of Eosinophilic Esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Spergel, Jonathan M

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) is a classic atopic disease as it shares features with other atopic disease on all levels including pathogenesis, genetics, epidemiology, and treatment options. EoE has elements of Th2 pathogenesis with increase levels of Th2 cytokines (IL4, 5, and 13). In addition, it shares atopic genetic risk factors including thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) loci as a risk factor in genome wide association studies. EoE patients have a higher rate of other atopic disease (asthma, allergic rhinitis and food allergy) compared to the general population indicating their atopic phenotype. Like asthma, atopic dermatitis or food allergy, EoE has increased in the last 20 years. Treatment options include the basic principle of other atopic diseases include using topical steroids or avoidance of the triggers (food or pollen). An allergist provides a critical role as they are experts in the treatment of atopic disease including avoidance strategies. PMID:26552776

  10. Human papillomavirus tumor infection in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ludmir, Ethan B.; Stephens, Sarah J.; Palta, Manisha; Willett, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    The association between human papillomavirus (HPV) and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has been recognized for over three decades. Recently, multiple meta-analyses have drawn upon existing literature to assess the strength of the HPV-ESCC linkage. Here, we review these analyses and attempt to provide a clinically-relevant overview of HPV infection in ESCC. HPV-ESCC detection rates are highly variable across studies. Geographic location likely accounts for a majority of the variation in HPV prevalence, with high-incidence regions including Asia reporting significantly higher HPV-ESCC infection rates compared with low-incidence regions such as Europe, North America, and Oceania. Based on our examination of existing data, the current literature does not support the notion that HPV is a prominent carcinogen in ESCC. We conclude that there is no basis to change the current clinical approach to ESCC patients with respect to tumor HPV status. PMID:26029456

  11. A Pilot Study of Omalizumab in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Loizou, Denise; Enav, Benjamin; Komlodi-Pasztor, Edina; Hider, Pamela; Kim-Chang, Julie; Noonan, Laura; Taber, Tabitha; Kaushal, Suhasini; Limgala, Renuka; Brown, Margaret; Gupta, Raavi; Balba, Nader; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Khojah, Amer; Alpan, Oral

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic disorders of the gastrointestinal tract are an emerging subset of immune pathologies within the spectrum of allergic inflammation. Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE), once considered a rare disease, is increasing in incidence, with a rate of over 1 in 10,000 in the US, for unknown reasons. The clinical management of EoE is challenging, thus there is an urgent need for understanding the etiology and pathophysiology of this eosinophilic disease to develop better therapeutic approaches. In this open label, single arm, unblinded study, we evaluated the effects of an anti-IgE treatment, omalizumab, on local inflammation in the esophagus and clinical correlates in patients with EoE. Omalizumab was administered for 12 weeks to 15 subjects with long standing EoE. There were no serious side effects from the treatment. Esophageal tissue inflammation was assessed both before and after therapy. After 3 months on omalizumab, although tissue Immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels were significantly reduced in all but two of the subjects, we found that full remission of EoE, which is defined as histologic and clinical improvement only in 33% of the patients. The decrease in tryptase-positive cells and eosinophils correlated significantly with the clinical outcome as measured by improvement in endoscopy and symptom scores, respectively. Omalizumab-induced remission of EoE was limited to subjects with low peripheral blood absolute eosinophil counts. These findings demonstrate that in a subset of EoE patients, IgE plays a role in the pathophysiology of the disease and that anti-IgE therapy with omalizumab may result in disease remission. Since this study is open label there is the potential for bias, hence the need for a larger double blind placebo controlled study. The data presented in this pilot study provides a foundation for proper patient selection to maximize clinical efficacy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01040598 PMID:25789989

  12. Hospitalization for esophageal achalasia in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Molena, Daniela; Mungo, Benedetto; Stem, Miloslawa; Lidor, Anne O

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the outcome of different treatments in patients admitted for esophageal achalasia in the United States. METHODS: This is a retrospective analysis using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample over an 8-year period (2003-2010). Patients admitted with a primary diagnosis of achalasia were divided into 3 groups based on their treatment: (1) Group 1: patients who underwent Heller myotomy during their hospital stay; (2) Group 2: patients who underwent esophagectomy; and (3) Group 3: patients not undergoing surgical treatment. Primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes included length of stay (LOS), discharge destination and total hospital charges. RESULTS: Among 27141 patients admitted with achalasia, nearly half (48.5%) underwent Heller myotomy, 2.5% underwent esophagectomy and 49.0% had endoscopic or other treatment. Patients in group 1 were younger, healthier, and had the lowest mortality when compared with the other two groups. Group 2 had the highest LOS and hospital charges among all groups. Group 3 had the highest mortality (1.2%, P < 0.001) and the lowest home discharge rate (78.8%) when compared to the other groups. The most frequently performed procedures among group 3 were esophageal dilatation (25.9%) and injection (13.3%). Among patients who died in this group the most common associated morbidities included acute respiratory failure, sepsis and aspiration pneumonia. CONCLUSION: Surgery for achalasia carries exceedingly low mortality in the modern era; however, in complicated patients, even less invasive treatments are burdened by significant mortality and morbidity. PMID:26421106

  13. Stage migration vs immunology: The lymph node count story in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Märkl, Bruno

    2015-11-21

    Lymph node staging is of crucial importance for the therapy stratification and prognosis estimation in colon cancer. Beside the detection of metastases, the number of harvested lymph nodes itself has prognostic relevance in stage II/III cancers. A stage migration effect caused by missed lymph node metastases has been postulated as most likely explanation for that. In order to avoid false negative node staging reporting of at least 12 lymph nodes is recommended. However, this threshold is met only in a minority of cases in daily practice. Due to quality initiatives the situation has improved in the past. This, however, had no influence on staging in several studies. While the numbers of evaluated lymph nodes increased continuously during the last decades the rate of node positive cases remained relatively constant. This fact together with other indications raised doubts that understaging is indeed the correct explanation for the prognostic impact of lymph node harvest. Several authors assume that immune response could play a major role in this context influencing both the lymph node detectability and the tumor's behavior. Further studies addressing this issue are need. Based on the findings the recommendations concerning minimal lymph node numbers and adjuvant chemotherapy should be reconsidered. PMID:26604632

  14. Stage migration vs immunology: The lymph node count story in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Märkl, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Lymph node staging is of crucial importance for the therapy stratification and prognosis estimation in colon cancer. Beside the detection of metastases, the number of harvested lymph nodes itself has prognostic relevance in stage II/III cancers. A stage migration effect caused by missed lymph node metastases has been postulated as most likely explanation for that. In order to avoid false negative node staging reporting of at least 12 lymph nodes is recommended. However, this threshold is met only in a minority of cases in daily practice. Due to quality initiatives the situation has improved in the past. This, however, had no influence on staging in several studies. While the numbers of evaluated lymph nodes increased continuously during the last decades the rate of node positive cases remained relatively constant. This fact together with other indications raised doubts that understaging is indeed the correct explanation for the prognostic impact of lymph node harvest. Several authors assume that immune response could play a major role in this context influencing both the lymph node detectability and the tumor’s behavior. Further studies addressing this issue are need. Based on the findings the recommendations concerning minimal lymph node numbers and adjuvant chemotherapy should be reconsidered. PMID:26604632

  15. LgR5 expression and cancer stem cell hypothesis: clue to define the true origin of esophageal adenocarcinomas with and without Barrett's Esophagus?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Investigation of the expression of an intestinal stem cell marker in esophageal adenocarcinomas (EAC) with and without Barrett's Esophagus (BE), with respect to a cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis. Materials and methods Expression of a putative intestinal stem cell marker LgR5 was analyzed in esophageal cancer specimen (n = 70: 41 EAC with BE, 19 EAC without BE, and n = 10 esophageal squamous-cell carcinomas, ESCC) and in the adenocarcinoma cell line OE-33. Ki-67 and Cdx-2 were co-labelled with LgR5 in double staining experiments. Immunhistochemical expression results were confirmed by RT-PCR and correlated with tumor stage and five-year survival rates. Results LgR5was found expressed in 35 of 41 (85%) EAC with BE and in 16 of 19 (81%) EAC without BE. By contrast, LgR5 was not found to be expressed in ESCC. Quantification of immunolabeling showed 15% LgR5+ cells in EAC with BE, 32% LgR5+ cells in adjacent BE and 13% in EAC without BE. Immunofluorescence double staining experiments with LgR5 and Ki-67 revealed a subpopulation (~5%) of proliferating LgR+/Ki-67+ cells. On mRNA-level, expression of LgR5 was higher in BE in comparison to EAC (p = 0.0159). High levels of LgR5 expression in BE associated EAC were associated with poorer survival in univariate analysis. Conclusion The stem cell marker LgR5 is expressed in EAC, irrespective of association with BE, and appears to have negative impact on survival. The subset of proliferating LgR5+ cells (<5%) might resemble rapidly cycling CSCs, which needs to be substantiated in further investigations. PMID:21345220

  16. Genetic Analysis-Guided Irinotecan Hydrochloride Dosing of mFOLFIRINOX in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Gastroesophageal or Stomach Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-20

    Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer

  17. Search for the azygos: a lesson learnt from a case with left superior vena cava, esophageal atresia and tracheo-esophageal fistula.

    PubMed

    Arbell, Dan; Golender, Julius; Khalaileh, Abed; Gross, Eitan

    2009-01-01

    The azygos vein is of superior importance during the operation for esophageal atresia with tracheo-esophageal fistula (EA; TEF). Its location helps the surgeon to locate the fistula. Newborns with persistent left superior vena cava (LSVC) may have alterations in the location of the azygos, and since LSVC is not uncommon in EAs with fistulae, it is important to locate the azygos during a pre-operative echocardiogram. Foreknowledge of a possible absent azygos may avoid morbidity while trying to locate the fistula. We present a case of a newborn with EA, TEF, and LSVC in which the azygos vein was absent. PMID:19052754

  18. Opening mechanisms of the human upper esophageal sphincter IAN J. COOK, WYLIE J. DODDS, ROBERTO 0. DANTAS, BENSON MASSEY,

    E-print Network

    Brasseur, James G.

    relaxation, anterior laryngeal traction, and intrabolus pressure, 2) volume-dependent adaptive changes in UES centers. pharyngoesophageal sphincter; laryngeal motion; hyoid motion THE UPPER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER (UES

  19. Esophageal large fish bone (sea bream jawbone) impaction successfully managed with endoscopy and safely excreted through the intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Hirasaki, Shoji; Inoue, Atsushi; Kubo, Motoharu; Oshiro, Hisako

    2010-01-01

    A 68-year-old man consulted our hospital because of back pain. A chest computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a high-density foreign body in the esophageal wall. There was no evidence of pneumomediastinum. Endoscopic examination demonstrated a large fish bone that was stuck in the esophageal wall. It was dislodged and moved into the stomach. The bone was excreted through the intestinal tract on the seventh hospital day. Unintentional ingestion of large fish bones must be considered potentially dangerous. Complications such as esophageal perforation or mediastinitis should be confirmed by CT; and then, the esophageal foreign body should be removed as soon as possible. PMID:20519815

  20. The TGF?1 Promoter SNP C-509T and Food Sensitization Promote Esophageal Remodeling in Pediatric Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Newbury, Robert O.; Bafna, Vineet; Aquino, Melissa; Palmquist, Jacob; Hoffman, Hal M.; Mueller, James L.; Dohil, Ranjan; . Broide, David H; Aceves, Seema S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic antigen mediated disease associated with substantial esophageal remodeling and fibrosis. The functional TGF?1 promoter SNP C-509 associates with renal fibrosis and asthma. The effect of TGF?1 genotype and EoE severity or potential gene-environment interactions have not been previously reported in EoE. Methods Genotype at TGF?1 C-509T and remodeling was analyzed in 144 subjects with EoE. The severity of remodeling and inflammation was analyzed in the context of IgE sensitization to food antigens and C-509T genotype. Results The TGF?1 promoter C-509 genotypes CC, CT, and TT were 35%, 52%, and 13%, respectively. Sixty-six percent of subjects were sensitized to foods by positive skin prick test (SPT) or serum specific IgE. TT genotype subjects had significantly more TGF?1 (CC subjects = 1300 per mm2; TT = 2250 per mm2) (p<0.05) and tryptase (CC subjects = 145 per mm2: TT = 307 per mm2) (p<0.05) positive cells and higher epithelial remodeling scores (2.4 vs 3.7, p<0.001) than CC subjects. The differences in TGF?1 and tryptase positive cells as well as fibrosis were significantly increased when there was concurrent food sensitization. Food sensitization alone did not associate with any parameters of inflammation or remodeling. Conclusions Our data support a gene-environment interaction between food and genotype at C-509 that modulates disease severity in EoE. Since EoE subjects often continue to consume foods to which they are sensitized, these findings may have clinical relevance for disease management. PMID:26656423