Science.gov

Sample records for stage ii-iii esophageal

  1. Phase II Study of Chemoradiotherapy With 5-Fluorouracil and Cisplatin for Stage II-III Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: JCOG Trial (JCOG 9906)

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Ken; Muro, Kei; Minashi, Keiko; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Ishikura, Satoshi; Boku, Narikazu; Takiuchi, Hiroya; Komatsu, Yoshito; Miyata, Yoshinori; Fukuda, Haruhiko

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: In this Phase II study, we evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for Stage II-III esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Patients and Methods: Patients with clinical Stage II-III (T1N1M0 or T2-3N0-1M0) thoracic ESCC were enrolled between April 2000 and March 2002. Chemotherapy comprised two courses of protracted infusion of 5-FU (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on Days 1-5 and 8-12, and 2-h infusion of CDDP (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1 and 8; this regimen was repeated every 5 weeks. Concurrent radiotherapy involved 60-Gy irradiation (30 fractions) for 8 weeks with a 2-week break. Responders received two courses of 5-FU (800 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on Days 1-5 and CDDP (80 mg/m{sup 2}) on Day 1. Final analysis was conducted in March 2007. Survival and late toxicities were monitored for 5 years. Results: The characteristics of the 76 patients enrolled were as follows: median age, 61 years; male/female, 68/8; performance status 0/1, 59/17 patients; Stage IIA/IIB/III, 26/12/38 patients. Of the 74 eligible patients, 46 (62.2%) achieved complete response. Median survival time was 29 months, with 3- and 5-year survival rates of 44.7% and 36.8%, respectively. Acute toxicities included Grade 3/4 esophagitis (17%), nausea (17%), hyponatremia (16%), and infection without neutropenia (12%). Late toxicities comprised Grade 3/4 esophagitis (13%), pericardial (16%) and pleural (9%) effusion, and radiation pneumonitis (4%), causing 4 deaths. Conclusions: CRT is effective for Stage II-III ESCC with manageable acute toxicities and can provide a nonsurgical treatment option. However, further improvement is required for reduction in late toxicity.

  2. Molecular Phenotyping in Predicting Response in Patients With Stage IB-III Esophageal Cancer Receiving Combination Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-18

    Stage IB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIC Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

  3. Stages of Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cancer cells. The following stages are used for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus: Stage 0 (High-grade Dysplasia) ... is also called high-grade dysplasia . Stage I squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus Stage I is divided into ...

  4. Efficacy of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Early Stage of Esophageal Carcinoma;

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-09

    Esophageal Neoplasm; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T2; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T3; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Regional Lymph Nodes (N) N0; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Distal Metastasis (M) M0

  5. Endoscopic options for early stage esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pari M.

    2015-01-01

    Surgery has traditionally been the preferred treatment for early stage esophageal cancer. Recent advances in endoscopic treatments have been shown to be effective and safe. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) allow endoscopists to remove small, superficial lesions, providing tumor specimen that can be examined for accurate pathologic tumor staging and assessment of adequacy of resection. Endoscopic ablation procedures, including photodynamic therapy (PDT) and radio frequency ablation (RFA), have also been shown to safely and effectively treat esophageal dysplasia and early stage neoplasia, with excellent long-term disease control. Both approaches are becoming more widely available around the world, and provide an alternative, safe, low risk strategy for treating early stage disease, making combined endoscopic therapy the recommended treatment of choice for early stage esophageal cancers. PMID:25642334

  6. Tumour-infiltrating CD68+ and CD57+ cells predict patient outcome in stage IIIII colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chaput, N; Svrcek, M; Auprin, A; Locher, C; Drusch, F; Malka, D; Taeb, J; Gor, D; Ducreux, M; Boige, V

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of our study was to evaluate the prognostic role of immunological microenvironnement in stage IIIII CRC patients. Methods: We constructed a tissue microarray from 196 consecutive patients with stage IIIII CRC and compared CD3, CD4, CD8, CD57, CD68, CXCL9/MIG, CXCL13, and PPAR? immunoreactivity in tumour samples and their matched non-tumour tissue. We assessed their association with relapse-free survival (RFS; primary endpoint) and overall survival (OS) in multivariate Cox models. Results: Low densities of CD57+ and CD68+ tumour-infiltrating cells (TIC) independently predicted worse outcomes. A prognostic score combining CD57 (+, > vs ?, ?2 cells per spot) and CD68 (+, >0 vs ?, =0 cells per spot) TIC density discriminated CRC patients at low (CD68+/CD57+), intermediate (CD68+/CD57?), or high (CD68?/CD57?) risk, with hazard ratios for the intermediate-risk and high-risk groups of 2.7 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.35.8) and 9.0 (3.225.4) for RFS, and 2.5 (1.25.1) and 10.6 (3.829.2) for OS, respectively, as compared with the low-risk group. Corresponding 5-year survival rates (95% CI) in the low-, moderate- and high-risk groups were 84% (7191), 65% (5474), and 12% (247), respectively, for RFS, and 91% (8096), 76% (6684), and 25% (759), respectively, for OS. Conclusion: Tumour CD57+ and CD68+ TIC density assessment independently predicts survival in patients with stage IIIII CRC. If validated, our score based on a quick, inexpensive, and well-established method such as point counting on diagnostic tissue sections could be used routinely as a prognostic tool in CRC patients. PMID:23868006

  7. Adjuvant chemotherapy for stages II, III and IV of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Grvalos, Cristina; Garca-Escobar, Ignacio; Garca-Alfonso, Pilar; Cassinello, Javier; Maln, Diego; Carrato, Alfredo

    2009-08-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most frequent malignant neoplasm in Western countries. After complete resection, 5-year overall survival varies according to the initial stage. Adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) is indicated in patients with colon cancer at high-risk stage II, stage III and after complete resection of metastases. 5-Fluorouracil (5FU), alone or modulated with levamisol or leucovorin (LV), oral fluoropyrimidines, raltitrexed, irinotecan and oxaliplatin have been studied as adjuvant therapy for colon cancer. Nowadays, oxaliplatin-based regimens, FOLFOX or FLOX, are considered as the standard adjuvant CT. If there are contraindications for oxaliplatin, the best alternatives are capecitabine or continuous infusion of 5FU/LV. The role of monoclonal antibodies, cetuximab and bevacizumab, combined with oxaliplatin/fluoropyrimidine-based CT is under investigation in clinical trials. This article reviews the state of the art and the future perspectives of adjuvant therapy in colon cancer. Prognostic and predictive factors are also commented on. PMID:19661027

  8. Role of Postmastectomy Radiation After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fowble, Barbara L.; Einck, John P.; Kim, Danny N.; McCloskey, Susan; Mayadev, Jyoti; Yashar, Catheryn; Chen, Steven L.; Hwang, E. Shelley

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To identify a cohort of women treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy for whom postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) may be omitted according to the projected risk of local-regional failure (LRF). Methods and Materials: Seven breast cancer physicians from University of California cancer centers created 14 hypothetical clinical case scenarios, identified, reviewed, and abstracted the available literature (MEDLINE and Cochrane databases), and formulated evidence tables with endpoints of LRF, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Using the American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria methodology, appropriateness ratings for postmastectomy radiation were assigned for each scenario. Finally, an overall summary risk assessment table was developed. Results: Of 24 sources identified, 23 were retrospective studies from single institutions. Consensus on the appropriateness rating, defined as 80% agreement in a category, was achieved for 86% of the cases. Distinct LRF risk categories emerged. Clinical stage II (T1-2N0-1) patients, aged >40 years, estrogen receptor-positive subtype, with pathologic complete response or 0-3 positive nodes without lymphovascular invasion or extracapsular extension, were identified as having {<=}10% risk of LRF without radiation. Limited data support stage IIIA patients with pathologic complete response as being low risk. Conclusions: In the absence of randomized trial results, existing data can be used to guide the use of PMRT in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy setting. Using available studies to inform appropriateness ratings for clinical scenarios, we found a high concordance of treatment recommendations for PMRT and were able to identify a cohort of women with a low risk of LRF without radiation. These low-risk patients will form the basis for future planned studies within University of California Athena Breast Health Network.

  9. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, Leucovorin Calcium, and Oxaliplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-24

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  10. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-09

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  11. Treatment Options by Stage (Esophageal Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cancer cells. The following stages are used for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus: Stage 0 (High-grade Dysplasia) ... is also called high-grade dysplasia . Stage I squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus Stage I is divided into ...

  12. Thyroid Function in Women after Multimodal Treatment for Breast Cancer Stage II/III: Comparison With Controls From a Population Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Reinertsen, Kristin Valborg; Cvancarova, Milada; Wist, Erik; Bjoro, Trine; Dahl, Alv A.; Danielsen, Turi; Fossa, Sophie D.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: A possible association between thyroid diseases (TD) and breast cancer (BC) has been debated. We examined prevalence and development of TD in women after multimodal treatment for Stage II/III BC compared with women from a general population. Secondarily, we explored the impact of two different radiotherapy (RT) techniques (standardized field arrangements vs. computed tomography [CT]-based dose planning) on TD in BC patients examined 35-120 months after primary BC treatment. Methods and Materials: A total of 403 BC patients completed a questionnaire about TD and had blood samples taken for analyses of thyroid function. All had undergone postoperative RT with or without (2%) adjuvant systemic treatment. The results in the BC patients were compared with a cancer-free, age-matched control group from a general population (CGr). Results: There was higher prevalence of self-reported hypothyroidism in the BC patients as compared with the CGr (18% vs. 6%, p < 0.001). The raised prevalence was predominantly due to a substantial increase in the development of hypothyroidism after BC diagnosis, whereas the prevalence of hypothyroidism before BC diagnosis was similar to that observed in the CGr. Patients treated with CT-based RT showed a trend for increased post-BC development of hypothyroidism as compared with those treated with standardized field arrangements (p = 0.08). Conclusions: Hypothyroidism is significantly increased in women after multimodal treatment for Stage II/III BC. Radiation to the thyroid gland may be a contributing factor. BC patients should be routinely screened for hypothyroidism.

  13. Predictors of timing of adjuvant chemotherapy in older women with hormone receptor-negative, stages II-III breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Stephanie B; Carpenter, William R; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Schenck, Anna P; Weinberger, Morris; Biddle, Andrea K

    2012-01-01

    Adherence to consensus guidelines for cancer care may vary widely across health care settings and contribute to differences in cancer outcomes. For some women with breast cancer, omission of adjuvant chemotherapy or delays in its initiation may contribute to differences in cancer recurrence and mortality. We studied adjuvant chemotherapy use among women with stage II or stage III, hormone receptor-negative breast cancer to understand health system and socio-demographic correlates of underuse and delayed adjuvant chemotherapy. We used Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked data to examine the patterns of care for 6,678 women aged 65 and older diagnosed with stage II or stage III hormone receptor-negative breast cancer in 1994-2002, with claims data through 2007. Age-stratified logistic regression was employed to examine the potential role of socio-demographic and structural/organizational health services characteristics in explaining differences in adjuvant chemotherapy initiation. Overall utilization of guideline-recommended adjuvant chemotherapy peaked at 43% in this population. Increasing age, higher co-morbidity burden, and low-income status were associated with lower odds of chemotherapy initiation within 4 months, whereas having positive lymph nodes, more advanced disease, and being married were associated with higher odds (P < 0.05). Health system-related structural/organizational characteristics and race/ethnicity offered little explanatory insight. Timely initiation of guideline-recommended adjuvant chemotherapy was low, with significant variation by age, income, and co-morbidity status. Based on these findings, future studies should seek to explore the more nuanced reasons why older women do not receive chemotherapy and why delays in care occur. PMID:21842244

  14. Diet and Physical Activity Change or Usual Care in Improving Survival in Patients With Previously Treated Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase III trial studies diet and physical activity changes to see how well they work compared with usual care in improving progression-free survival in patients with previously treated stage II, III, or IV ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer. A healthy lifestyle and counseling after treatment may improve progression-free survival in patients with previously treated cancer.

  15. Fluorouracil-based preoperative chemoradiotherapy with or without oxaliplatin for stage II/III rectal cancer: a 3-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Dexin; Zhang, Rui; Gong, Zhiqiang; Liu, Fang; Chen, Yue; Yu, Qinrui; Sun, Liping; Duan, Hongyan; Zhu, Shendong; Liu, Fei; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Background Fluorouracil-based preoperative chemoradiotherapy has become the standard treatment for stage II/III rectal cancer. In order to improve the overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS), we added oxaliplatin to the standard treatment, and compared the effectiveness of these two treatment patterns. Methods A total of 206 patients enrolled in the prospective study had histologically confirmed rectal cancer of clinical stage II/III during July 2007 to July 2010. They were randomized into the experimental group received oxaliplatin and capecitabine in combination with radiotherapy, and the control group received capecitabine in combination with radiotherapy. All patients received surgery in 6?10 weeks after chemoradiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6. The primary endpoints were DFS and OS, and the secondary endpoints included toxicity, compliance, and histopathological response. Results The 3-year OS in the experimental group and the control group was 90.29% vs. 86.41% (P>0.05), and the 3-year DFS was 80.58% vs. 69.90% (P>0.05). The pathological complete remission (pCR) rates were 23.30% and 19.42%, respectively (P=0.497). The 3-year local recurrence rates were 4.85% vs. 5.83% (P=0.694), and the 3-year distant metastasis rates were 16.50% and 28.16%, respectively (P=0.045). There were no significant differences in most grade 3?4 toxicities between two groups, however, grade 3?4 diarrhea occurred in 16.50% (17/103) of the experimental group, compared with 6.80% (7/103) of the control group (P=0.030). Also, the total grade 3?4 acute toxicity showed a significant difference (10.68% vs. 21.36%, P=0.037). Conclusions The experimental treatment did not lead significantly improved OS and DFS, and thus longer follow-up is warranted for our patient cohort. Adding oxaliplatin to capecitabine-based preoperative chemoradiotherapy can significantly reduce metastasis, but has only minimal impact on local recurrence. Although grade 3?4 toxicity rate increased (primarily gastrointestinal toxicity), patients can stand to be followed up with allopathic treatment. PMID:26752933

  16. Vaccine Therapy and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Breast or Stage II-IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  17. Radiation Therapy, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Esophageal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-31

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer

  18. Mastectomy With Immediate Expander-Implant Reconstruction, Adjuvant Chemotherapy, and Radiation for Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Treatment Intervals and Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jean L.; Cordeiro, Peter G.; Ben-Porat, Leah; Van Zee, Kimberly J.; Hudis, Clifford; Beal, Kathryn; McCormick, Beryl

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine intervals between surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation in patients treated with mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, and to evaluate locoregional and distant control and overall survival in these patients. Methods and Materials: Between May 1996 and March 2004, 104 patients with Stage II-III breast cancer were routinely treated at our institution under the following algorithm: (1) definitive mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection and immediate tissue expander placement, (2) tissue expansion during chemotherapy, (3) exchange of tissue expander for permanent implant, (4) radiation. Patient, disease, and treatment characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Median age was 45 years. Twenty-six percent of patients were Stage II and 74% Stage III. All received adjuvant chemotherapy. Estrogen receptor staining was positive in 77%, and 78% received hormone therapy. Radiation was delivered to the chest wall with daily 0.5-cm bolus and to the supraclavicular fossa. Median dose was 5040 cGy. Median interval from surgery to chemotherapy was 5 weeks, from completion of chemotherapy to exchange 4 weeks, and from exchange to radiation 4 weeks. Median interval from completion of chemotherapy to start of radiation was 8 weeks. Median follow-up was 64 months from date of mastectomy. The 5-year rate for locoregional disease control was 100%, for distant metastasis-free survival 90%, and for overall survival 96%. Conclusions: Mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation results in a median interval of 8 weeks from completion of chemotherapy to initiation of radiation and seems to be associated with acceptable 5-year locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival.

  19. Radiographic and endosonographic staging in esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Krasna, Mark J

    2013-11-01

    Radiographic imaging using computed tomographic (CT) scan and positron emission tomography/CT are primarily helpful in identifying distant metastases. In general, if patients have evidence of lymph node involvement that is proved pathologically by endoscopic ultrasound/fine needle aspiration, this information is considered definitive, and the patient can be referred for the appropriate stage-specific therapy. Laparoscopy combined with laparoscopic ultrasound and peritoneal lavage has been shown to have sensitivity of 67% and specificity of 92% for lymph node disease. Thoracoscopy may help identify involved lymph node in the mediastinum before resection and help determine the field of radiation. PMID:24199695

  20. Prognostic Impact of Erythropoietin Expression and Erythropoietin Receptor Expression on Locoregional Control and Survival of Patients Irradiated for Stage II/III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Setter, Cornelia; Dahl, Olav; Schild, Steven E.; Noack, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Prognostic factors can guide the physician in selecting the optimal treatment for an individual patient. This study investigates the prognostic value of erythropoietin (EPO) and EPO receptor (EPO-R) expression of tumor cells for locoregional control and survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: Fourteen factors were investigated in 62 patients irradiated for stage II/III NSCLC, as follows: age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), histology, grading, TNM/American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, surgery, chemotherapy, pack years (average number of packages of cigarettes smoked per day multiplied by the number of years smoked), smoking during radiotherapy, hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy, EPO expression, and EPO-R expression. Additionally, patients with tumors expressing both EPO and EPO-R were compared to those expressing either EPO or EPO-R and to those expressing neither EPO nor EPO-R. Results: On univariate analysis, improved locoregional control was associated with AJCC stage II cancer (p < 0.048), surgery (p < 0.042), no smoking during radiotherapy (p = 0.024), and no EPO expression (p = 0.001). A trend was observed for a KPS of >70 (p = 0.08), an N stage of 0 to 1 (p = 0.07), and no EPO-R expression (p = 0.10). On multivariate analysis, AJCC stage II and no EPO expression remained significant. No smoking during radiotherapy was almost significant. On univariate analysis, improved survival was associated with N stage 0 to 1 (p = 0.009), surgery (p = 0.039), hemoglobin levels of {>=}12 g/d (p = 0.016), and no EPO expression (p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, N stage 0 to 1 and no EPO expression maintained significance. Hemoglobin levels of {>=}12 g/d were almost significant. On subgroup analyses, patients with tumors expressing both EPO and EPO-R had worse outcomes than those expressing either EPO or EPO-R and those expressing neither EPO nor RPO-R. Conclusions: EPO expression of tumor cells was an independent prognostic factor for locoregional control and survival in patients irradiated for NSCLC. EPO-R expression showed a trend. Patients with tumors expressing both EPO and EPO-R have an unfavorable prognosis.

  1. Fibroblast Growth Factor 2-A Predictor of Outcome for Patients Irradiated for Stage II-III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Setter, Cornelia; Dahl, Olav; Schild, Steven E.; Noack, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The prognostic value of the tumor cell expression of the fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is unclear. The present study investigated the effect of tumor cell expression of FGF-2 on the outcome of 60 patients irradiated for Stage II-III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: The effect of FGF-2 expression and 13 additional factors on locoregional control (LRC), metastasis-free survival (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were retrospectively evaluated. These additional factors included age, gender, Karnofsky performance status, histologic type, histologic grade, T and N category, American Joint Committee on Cancer stage, surgery, chemotherapy, pack-years, smoking during radiotherapy, and hemoglobin during radiotherapy. Locoregional failure was identified by endoscopy or computed tomography. Univariate analyses were performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and the Wilcoxon test and multivariate analyses with the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: On univariate analysis, improved LRC was associated with surgery (p = .017), greater hemoglobin levels (p = .036), and FGF-2 negativity (p <.001). On multivariate analysis of LRC, surgery (relative risk [RR], 2.44; p = .037), and FGF-2 expression (RR, 5.06; p <.001) maintained significance. On univariate analysis, improved MFS was associated with squamous cell carcinoma (p = .020), greater hemoglobin levels (p = .007), and FGF-2 negativity (p = .001). On multivariate analysis of MFS, the hemoglobin levels (RR, 2.65; p = .019) and FGF-2 expression (RR, 3.05; p = .004) were significant. On univariate analysis, improved OS was associated with a lower N category (p = .048), greater hemoglobin levels (p <.001), and FGF-2 negativity (p <.001). On multivariate analysis of OS, greater hemoglobin levels (RR, 4.62; p = .002) and FGF-2 expression (RR, 3.25; p = .002) maintained significance. Conclusions: Tumor cell expression of FGF-2 appeared to be an independent negative predictor of LRC, MFS, and OS.

  2. Impact of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage IIIII Triple Negative Breast Cancer on Eligibility for Breast-conserving Surgery and Breast Conservation Rates

    PubMed Central

    Golshan, Mehra; Cirrincione, Constance T.; Sikov, William M.; Berry, Donald A.; Jasinski, Sara; Weisberg, Tracey F.; Somlo, George; Hudis, Clifford; Winer, Eric; Ollila, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NST) at increasing the rate of successful breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in triple negative breast cancer. Background Inducing tumor regression to permit BCT is often cited to support administration of NST. To quantify this benefit, we conducted a surgical companion study to CALGB40603, a randomized phase II, 22 factorial trial of neoadjuvant paclitaxel carboplatin bevacizumab (B) followed by doxorubicin plus cyclophosphamide B in stage IIIII triple negative breast cancer. Methods Before and after NST, treating surgeons evaluated BCT candidacy by clinico-radiographic criteria; surgery performed was at surgeon and patient discretion. We measured (1) conversion rates from BCT-ineligible to BCT-eligible, (2) surgical choices in BCT candidates, and (3) rates of successful BCT with tumor-free margins. Results Four hundred four patients were assessable for surgical outcomes. Two hundred nineteen (54%) were BCT candidates before NST. One hundred ninety-seven (90%) remained BCT candidates after NST, of whom 138 (70%) chose BCT, which was successful in 130 (94%). Of 185 (46%) who were not BCT candidates before NST, 78 (42%) converted to candidates with NST. Of these, 53 (68%) chose BCT with a 91% (48/53) success rate. The overall BCT-eligibility rate rose from 54% to 68% (275/404) with NST. Addition of carboplatin, B, or both increased conversion rates. Conclusions This is the first study to document prospectively a 42% conversion rate from BCT-ineligible to BCT-eligible, resulting in a 14% absolute increase in BCT eligibility. BCT was successful in 93% of patients who opted for it, but 31% of BCT-eligible patients still chose mastectomy. PMID:26222764

  3. Long-term prognostic and predictive factors in 107 stage II/III breast cancer patients treated with anthracycline-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Brain, E.; Garrino, C.; Misset, J. L.; Carbonero, I. G.; Itzhaki, M.; Cvitkovic, E.; Goldschmidt, E.; Burki, F.; Regensberg, C.; Pappo, E.; Hagipantelli, R.; Musset, M.

    1997-01-01

    The heterogeneity of therapeutic modalities and eligibility criteria and the lack of long-term follow-up in most reports of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer preclude us from drawing conclusions about its value in clinically relevant patient subgroups. The present study aims to identify predictive and prognostic factors in 107 non-inflammatory stage II/III breast cancer patients treated between November 1980 and October 1991 with an anthracycline-based induction regimen before locoregional surgery. Preoperative chemotherapy comprised 3-6 cycles of doxorubicin (pirarubicin after 1986), vindesine, cyclophosphamide and 5-fluorouracil. Type of subsequent surgery and adjuvant treatment were decided individually. In analysis of outcome, univariate comparisons of end points were made using the log-rank test, and significant (P < or = 0.05) pre- and post-therapeutic factors were incorporated in a Cox multivariate analysis. With a median follow-up of 81 months (range 32-164+ months), the median disease-free survival (DFS) is 90.5 months while median overall survival has not yet been reached. Cytoprognostic grade and histopathological response in both the primary and lymph nodes were independent covariates associated with locoregional relapse with or without DFS and overall survival. Eleven patients with pathological complete response remain free of disease with a 68-month median follow-up, while the 18 with residual microscopic disease on the specimen showed a 60% cumulative incidence of locoregional recurrence. Despite encouraging response rates based on clinical or radiological evaluation (87% or 70%), neither method showed any significant correlation with pathological response and failed to contribute prognostic information on patients' outcome. Pathological evaluation of antitumoral activity of primary chemotherapy remains a major source of prognostic information and might be used to select patients in need of additional adjuvant treatment. PMID:9155059

  4. Does internal mammary node irradiation affect treatment outcome in clinical stage II-III breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuv ant chemotherapy?

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Noh, Jae Myoung; Kim, Yong Bae; Chang, Jee Suk; Keum, Ki Chang; Huh, Seung Jae; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Won; Suh, Chang-Ok

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the value of internal mammary node irradiation (IMNI) in patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) using modern systemic therapy. Between 2001 and 2009, 521 consecutive patients with clinical stage II-III breast cancer received NAC and postoperative radiotherapy. With a consistent policy, the treating radiation oncologist either included (N = 284) or excluded (N = 237) the internal mammary node in the treatment volume. Anthracycline- and taxane-based chemotherapy was provided to 482 (92.5 %) patients. To account for the unbalanced characteristics between the two groups, we performed propensity score matching and covariate adjustment using the propensity score. The median follow-up duration was 71 months (range 31-153 months). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) with and without IMNI was 81.8 and 72.7 %, respectively (p = 0.019). The benefit of IMNI varied according to patient characteristics such that it was more apparent in patients with N1-2 disease, inner/central location, and triple-negative subtype. After adjusting for all potential confounding variables, IMNI was independently associated with improved DFS (p = 0.049). The significant effect of IMNI on DFS was sustained after propensity score matching (p = 0.040) and covariate adjustment using the propensity score (p = 0.048). Symptomatic radiation pneumonitis developed in 9 (3.2 %) patients receiving IMNI. Our results indicated that IMNI was associated with a significant improvement in DFS with low toxicity rate for breast cancer patients receiving NAC. Further prospective studies are warranted to confirm the effect of IMNI in the NAC setting. PMID:26202053

  5. Feasibility of radiotherapy after high-dose dense chemotherapy with epirubicin, preceded by dexrazoxane, and paclitaxel for patients with high-risk Stage II-III breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    De Giorgi, Ugo . E-mail: ugo_degiorgi@yahoo.com; Giannini, Massimo; Frassineti, Luca; Kopf, Barbara; Palazzi, Silvia; Giovannini, Noemi; Zumaglini, Federica; Rosti, Giovanni; Emiliani, Ermanno; Marangolo, Maurizio

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To verify the feasibility of, and quantify the risk of, pneumonitis from locoregional radiotherapy (RT) after high-dose dense chemotherapy with epirubicin and paclitaxel with peripheral blood progenitor cell support in patients with high-risk Stage II-III breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Treatment consisted of a mobilizing course of epirubicin 150 mg/m{sup 2}, preceded by dexrazoxane (Day 1), paclitaxel 175 mg/m{sup 2} (Day 2), and filgrastim; followed by three courses of epirubicin 150 mg/m{sup 2}, preceded by dexrazoxane (Day 1), paclitaxel 400 mg/m{sup 2} (Day 2), and peripheral blood progenitor cell support and filgrastim, every 16-19 days. After chemotherapy, patients were treated with locoregional RT, which included the whole breast or the chest wall, axilla, and supraclavicular area. Results: Overall, 64 of 69 patients were evaluable. The interval between the end of chemotherapy and the initiation of RT was at least 1.5-2 months (mean 2). No treatment-related death was reported. After a median follow-up of 27 months from RT (range 5-77 months), neither clinically relevant radiation pneumonitis nor congestive heart failure had been reported. Minor and transitory lung and cardiac toxicities were observed. Conclusion: Sequential high doses of epirubicin, preceded by dexrazoxane, and paclitaxel did not adversely affect the tolerability of locoregional RT in breast cancer patients. The risk of pneumonitis was not affected by the use of sequential paclitaxel with an interval of at least 1.5-2 months between the end of chemotherapy and the initiation of RT. Long-term follow-up is needed to define the risk of cardiotoxicity in these patients.

  6. Effects of atorvastatin on systemic and renal NO dependency in patients with non-diabetic stage IIIII chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Mose, Frank Holden; Larsen, Thomas; Jensen, Janni Majgaard; Hansen, Annebirthe Bo; Bech, Jesper Nrgaard; Pedersen, Erling Bjerregaard

    2014-01-01

    Aims Clinical trials suggest that statins have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system independent from their cholesterol lowering properties. In patients with chronic kidney disease stage IIIII, we tested the hypothesis that atorvastatin increased systemic and renal nitric oxide (NO) availability using L-NG-monomethyl arginine (L-NMMA) as an inhibitor of NO production. Methods In a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study patients were treated with atorvastatin for 5 days with standardized diet and fluid intake. Glomerular filtration reate (GFR), fractional excretions of sodium (FENa), urinary excretion of aquaporin-2 (u-AQP2) and epithelial sodium channels (u-ENaC?), vasoactive hormones (renin, angiotensin II, aldosterone, arginine vasopressin, endothelin-1 and brain natriuretic peptide) and central blood pressure (BP) estimated by applanation tonometry were measured before and after systemic administration of the NO inhibitor L-NMMA. Results Atorvastatin caused a significant reduction in U-ENaC?, but sodium excretion, , FENa and u-AQP2 were not changed by atorvastatin. L-NMMA reduced renal effect variables, including GFR, FENa and u-ENaC? and increased brachial BP and central BP to a similar extent during both treatments. Vasoactive hormones were changed in the same way by L-NMMA during atorvastatin and placebo treatment. Conclusion During, atorvastatin and placebo treatment, inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis induced the same response in brachial and central blood pressure, GFR, renal tubular function and vasoactive hormones. Thus, the data do not support that atorvastatin changes nitric oxide availability in patients with mild nephropathy. The reduced u-ENaC may reflect changes in sodium absorption in the nephron induced by atorvastatin. PMID:24697877

  7. HLA-G 3UTR Polymorphisms Impact the Prognosis of Stage II-III CRC Patients in Fluoropyrimidine-Based Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Garziera, Marica; Bidoli, Ettore; Cecchin, Erika; Mini, Enrico; Nobili, Stefania; Lonardi, Sara; Buonadonna, Angela; Errante, Domenico; Pella, Nicoletta; DAndrea, Mario; De Marchi, Francesco; De Paoli, Antonino; Zanusso, Chiara; De Mattia, Elena; Tassi, Renato; Toffoli, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    An important hallmark of CRC is the evasion of immune surveillance. HLA-G is a negative regulator of hosts immune response. Overexpression of HLA-G protein in primary tumour CRC tissues has already been associated to worse prognosis; however a definition of the role of immunogenetic host background is still lacking. Germline polymorphisms in the 3UTR region of HLA-G influence the magnitude of the protein by modulating HLA-G mRNA stability. Soluble HLA-G has been associated to 3UTR +2960 Ins/Ins and +3035 C/T (lower levels) and +3187 G/G (high levels) genotypes. HLA-G 3UTR SNPs have never been explored in CRC outcome. The purpose of this study was to investigate if common HLA-G 3UTR polymorphisms have an impact on DFS and OS of 253 stage II-III CRC patients, after primary surgery and ADJ-CT based on FL. The 3UTR was sequenced and SNPs were analyzed for their association with survival by Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox models; results underwent internal validation using a resampling method (bootstrap analysis). In a multivariate analysis, we estimated an association with improved DFS in Ins allele (Ins/Del +Ins/Ins) carriers (HR 0.60, 95% CI 0.380.93, P = 0.023) and in patients with +3035 C/T genotype (HR 0.51, 95% CI 0.260.99, P = 0.045). The +3187 G/G mutated carriers (G/G vs A/A+A/G) were associated to a worst prognosis in both DFS (HR 2.46, 95% CI 1.195.05, P = 0.015) and OS (HR 2.71, 95% CI 1.166.63, P = 0.022). Our study shows a prognostic and independent role of 3 HLA-G 3UTR SNPs, +2960 14-bp INDEL, +3035 C>T, and +3187 A>G. PMID:26633805

  8. MTHFR-1298 A>C (rs1801131) is a predictor of survival in two cohorts of stage II/III colorectal cancer patients treated with adjuvant fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Cecchin, E; Perrone, G; Nobili, S; Polesel, J; De Mattia, E; Zanusso, C; Petreni, P; Lonardi, S; Pella, N; D'Andrea, M; Errante, D; Rizzolio, F; Mazzei, T; Landini, I; Mini, E; Toffoli, G

    2015-06-01

    Adjuvant treatment based on fluoropyrimidines (FL) improves the prognosis of stage II/III colorectal cancer (CRC). Validated predictive/prognostic biomarkers would spare therapy-related morbidity in patients with a good prognosis. We compared the impact of a set of 22 FL-related polymorphisms with the prognosis of two cohorts of CRC patients treated with adjuvant FL with or without OXA, including a total of 262 cases. 5,10-Methylentetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) MTHFR-1298 A>C (rs1801131) polymorphism had a concordant effect: MTHFR-rs1801131-1298CC genotype carriers had a worse disease free survival (DFS) in both the cohorts. In the pooled population MTHFR-rs1801131-1298CC carriers had also a worse overall survival. We computed a clinical score related to DFS including MTHFR-rs1801131, tumor stage, sex and tumor location, where rs1801131 is the most detrimental factor (hazard ratio=5.3, 95% confidence interval=2.2-12.9; P-value=0.0006). MTHFR-rs1801131 is a prognostic factor that could be used as an additional criteria for the choice of the proper adjuvant regimen in stage II/III colorectal cancer patients. PMID:25331073

  9. Ordering of mutations in preinvasive disease stages of esophageal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Forshew, Tim; Barbera, Mariagnese; Murtaza, Muhammed; Ong, Chin-Ann J.; Lao-Sirieix, Pierre; Dunning, Mark J; Smith, Laura; Smith, Mike L.; Anderson, Charlotte L.; Carvalho, Benilton; ODonovan, Maria; Underwood, Timothy J.; May, Andrew P; Grehan, Nicola; Hardwick, Richard; Davies, Jim; Oloumi, Arusha; Aparicio, Sam; Caldas, Carlos; Eldridge, Matthew D.; Edwards, Paul A.W.; Rosenfeld, Nitzan; Tavar, Simon; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2014-01-01

    Cancer genome sequencing studies have identified numerous driver genes but the relative timing of mutations in carcinogenesis remains unclear. The gradual progression from pre-malignant Barretts esophagus to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) provides an ideal model to study the ordering of somatic mutations. We identified recurrently-mutated genes and assessed clonal structure using whole-genome sequencing and amplicon-resequencing of 112 EACs. We next screened a cohort of 109 biopsies from two key transition points in the development of malignancy; benign metaplastic never-dysplastic Barretts esophagus (NDBE, n=66), and high-grade dysplasia (HGD, n=43). Unexpectedly, the majority of recurrently mutated genes in EAC were also mutated in NDBE. Only TP53 and SMAD4 were stage-specific, confined to HGD and EAC, respectively. Finally, we applied this knowledge to identify high-risk Barretts esophagus in a novel non-endoscopic test. In conclusion, mutations in EAC driver genes generally occur exceptionally early in disease development with profound implications for diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:24952744

  10. Bevacizumab and Intravenous or Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-25

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  11. Akt Inhibitor MK-2206 and Anastrozole With or Without Goserelin Acetate in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-19

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  12. The Role of Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Clinical Stage II-III Breast Cancer Patients With pN0: A Multicenter, Retrospective Study (KROG 12-05)

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Su Jung; Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Choi, Doo Ho; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Nam Kwon; Suh, Chang-Ok; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Yong Bae; Ahn, Seung Do; Kim, Su Ssan; Ha, Sung W.; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Kyubo; Shin, Hyun Soo; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Hyung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in clinical stage II-III breast cancer patients with pN0. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 417 clinical stage II-III breast cancer patients who achieved an ypN0 at surgery after receiving NAC between 1998 and 2009. Of these, 151 patients underwent mastectomy after NAC. The effect of PMRT on disease-free survival (DFS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS), and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis including known prognostic factors using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log–rank test and Cox proportional regression analysis. Results: Of the 151 patients who underwent mastectomy, 105 (69.5%) received PMRT and 46 patients (30.5%) did not. At a median follow-up of 59 months, 5 patients (3.3%) developed LRR (8 sites of recurrence) and 14 patients (9.3%) developed distant metastasis. The 5-year DFS, LRRFS, and OS rates were 91.2, 98.1, and 93.3% with PMRT and 83.0%, 92.3%, and 89.9% without PMRT, respectively (all P values not significant). By univariate analysis, only age (≤40 vs >40 years) was significantly associated with decreased DFS (P=.027). By multivariate analysis, age (≤40 vs >40 years) and pathologic T stage (0-is vs 1 vs 2-4) were significant prognostic factors affecting DFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.353, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.135-0.928, P=.035; HR 2.223, 95% CI 1.074-4.604, P=.031, respectively). PMRT showed no correlation with a difference in DFS, LRRFS, or OS by multivariate analysis. Conclusions: PMRT might not be necessary for pN0 patients after NAC, regardless of clinical stage. Prospective randomized clinical trial data are needed to assess whether PMRT can be safely omitted in pN0 patients after NAC and mastectomy for clinical stage II-III breast cancer.

  13. Esophagitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... increase your risk of esophagitis: Alcohol use Cigarette smoking Surgery or radiation to the chest (for example, treatment for lung cancer) Taking certain medicines without drinking plenty of water. ...

  14. Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Carboplatin Followed by Surgery and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-10

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  15. Gene expression profiles at different stages of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jin; Zhao, Li-Qun; Xiong, Mo-Miao; Wang, Xiu-Qin; Yang, Guan-Rui; Qiu, Zong-Liang; Wu, Min; Liu, Zhi-Hua

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the gene expression profiles in different stages of carcinogenesis of esophageal epithelium. METHODS: A microarray containing 588 cancer related genes was employed to study the gene expression profile at different stages of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma including basal cell hyperplasia, high-grade dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, early and late cancer. Principle component analysis was performed to search the genes which were important in carcinogenesis. RESULTS: More than 100 genes were up or down regulated in esophageal epithelial cells during the stages of basal cell hyperplasia, high-grade dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, early and late cancer. Principle component analysis identified a set of genes which may play important roles in the tumor development. Comparison of expression profiles between these stages showed that some genes, such as P160ROCK, JNK2, were activated and may play an important role in early stages of carcinogenesis. CONCLUSION: These findings provided an esophageal cancer-specific and stage-specific expression profiles, showing that complex alterations of gene expression underlie the development of malignant phenotype of esophageal cancer cells. PMID:12508342

  16. Through-the-Scope Balloon Dilation for EUS Staging of Stenosing Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Brian C.; Shami, Vanessa M.; Faigel, Douglas O.; Larghi, Alberto; Kahaleh, Michel; Dye, Charles; Pedrosa, Marcos; Waxman, Irving

    2010-01-01

    Background Dilation of malignant esophageal strictures is often required to complete staging by EUS. The aim of this study is to determine the successful dilation rate (ability to complete staging) and complication rate of TTS balloon dilation for malignant esophageal strictures during EUS. Methods We retrospectively reviewed EUS reports for all cases of primary esophageal cancer staged at five centers between 1/2002 and 10/2004. All dilations were performed with TTS balloons (Boston Scientific, Natick, MA). Results Among 272 EUSs, dilation was required in 77 (28%) and was successful in 73 cases (95%). There was one esophageal perforation following dilation (1.3%; 95%CI 0.2-7.0) and one esophageal perforation following EUS without dilation (0.5%; 95%CI 0.1-2.8; p=0.48 by 2-sided Fisher's Exact test). There were no other major complications. Conclusions TTS balloon dilation is highly successful in permitting complete staging of obstructing tumors. The rate of complications following dilation with a TTS balloon dilator is low and similar to the baseline rate of EUS in this setting. PMID:17253140

  17. Esophagectomy Compared to Chemoradiation for Early Stage Esophageal Cancer in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Julian A.; Buono, Donna L.; Strauss, Joshua; McBride, Russell B.; Hershman, Dawn L.; Neugut, Alfred I.

    2009-01-01

    Background Esophagectomy has been the traditional treatment of choice for early stage esophageal cancer. However, esophagectomy is associated with high mortality and morbidity in the elderly, and these patients often receive chemoradiation instead. We compared outcomes of esophagectomy versus chemoradiation in a population-based sample of elderly patients with early stage esophageal cancer. Methods We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database to identify patients ?65 years diagnosed with stage 1 or 2 esophageal cancer from 19912002. We assessed associations of treatment with esophagectomy or chemoradiation with demographic and clinical variables. We performed survival analyses to compare outcomes with treatment modality, adjusted for potential confounders. Results We identified 730 patients with stage 1 or 2 esophageal cancer who underwent esophagectomy (n=341; 46.7%) or chemoradiation (n=389, 53.3%). Older age, squamous cell histology, and lower socioeconomic status were associated with increased odds of receipt of chemoradiation. In multivariable analyses, chemoradiation was associated with worse disease-specific (HR 2.08, 95%CI 1.642.64) and overall survival (HR 1.92, 95%CI 1.582.34). Receipt of chemoradiation was associated with worse survival for adenocarcinoma (HR 3.01, 95%CI 2.244.04), but there was no significant difference for squamous cell (HR 1.33, 95%CI 0.981.80). Conclusion Compared to chemoradiation, esophagectomy may be associated with improved survival for early stage esophageal cancer in the elderly. The results suggest that there may also be a subset of squamous cell patients for whom chemoradiation is adequate therapy. A randomized trial would be useful to determine optimal treatment for elderly patients with early stage esophageal cancer. PMID:19637343

  18. Computed tomography in the staging of esophageal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Picus, D.; Balfe, D.M.; Koehler, R.E.; Roper, C.L.; Owen, J.W.

    1983-02-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) findings in 52 patients with histologically proved esophageal carcinoma were reviewed. In 30 of these patients, the CT findings were correlated with findings at surgery or autopsy. CT was found to be highly accurate in predicting tumor size and assessing invasion of the tracheobronchial tree and spread to the liver, adrenals, and celiac and left gastric nodes. By quantifying the contact between the tumor and aorta, it was found that the CT appearance correctly predicted the presence or absence or aortic invasion in 24 of 25 cases (five cases were indeterminate). CT was insensitive in detecting metastatic spread to local periesophageal nodes; in these cases the tumor tended to involve the nodes without enlarging them. CT is an accurate method for assessing the spread of esophageal carcinoma. Its use can prevent unnecessary surgery in patients with inoperable tumors.

  19. Two-stage Surgery for an Aortoesophageal Fistula Caused by Tuberculous Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang Woo; Lim, Jae Woong; Her, Keun

    2015-01-01

    An aortoesophageal fistula (AEF) is an extremely rare, potentially fatal condition, and aortic surgery is usually performed together with extracorporeal circulation. However, this surgical method has a high rate of surgical complications and mortality. This report describes an AEF caused by tuberculous esophagitis that was treated successfully using a two-stage operation. A 52-yr-old man was admitted to the hospital with severe hematemesis and syncope. Based on the computed tomography and diagnostic endoscopic findings, he was diagnosed with an AEF and initially underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Esophageal reconstruction was performed after controlling the mediastinal inflammation. The patient suffered postoperative anastomotic leakage, which was treated by an endoscopic procedure, and the patient was discharged without any further problems. The patient received 9 months of anti-tuberculosis treatment after he was diagnosed with histologically confirmed tuberculous esophagitis; subsequently, he was followed as an outpatient and has had no recurrence of the tuberculosis or any further issues. PMID:26539019

  20. Genetic variants within obesity-related genes are associated with tumor recurrence in patients with stages II/III colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sebio, Ana; Gerger, Armin; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Yang, Dongyun; Zhang, Wu; Stremitzer, Stefan; Stintizing, Sebastian; Sunakawa, Yu; Yamauchi, Shinichi; Ning, Yan; Fujimoto, Yoshiya; Ueno, Masashi; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2014-01-01

    Objective Obesity is an established risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and it is also linked to CRC recurrence and survival. Polymorphisms located in obesity-related genes are associated with increased risk of developing several cancer types including colorectal cancer. We evaluated whether SNPs in obesity-related genes may predict tumor recurrence in colon cancer patients. Methods Genotypes were obtained from germline DNA from 207 patients with stage II or III colon cancer at the Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center. Nine polymorphisms in eight obesity-related genes (PPAR, LEP, NFKB, CD36, DRG1, NGAL, REGIA and DSCR1) were evaluated. The primary endpoint of the study was 3-year recurrence rate. Positive associations were also tested in an independent Japanese cohort of 350 stage III CRC patients. Results In univariate analysis, for PPAR rs1801282, patients with a CC genotype had significantly lower recurrence probability (29± 4% standard error, SE) compared to patients with a CG genotype (48% ± 8% SE), HR: 1.77; 95%CI, 1.01-3.10; p=0.040. For DSCR1 rs6517239, patients with an AA genotype had higher recurrence probability than patients carrying at least one allele G (37% ± 4% SE vs 15% ± 6% SE), HR: 0.51, 95% CI, 0.27-0.94; p=0.027. This association was stronger in the patients bearing a left-sided tumor (HR: 0.34; 95%CI, 0.13-0.88; p=0.018). In the Japanese cohort no associations were found. Conclusion This hypothesis generating study suggests a potential influence of polymorphisms within obesity-related genes in the recurrence probability of colon cancer. These interesting results should be further evaluated. PMID:25379721

  1. Clinical Study of Time Optimizing of Endoscopic Photodynamic Therapy on Esophageal and/or Gastric Cardiac Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-10

    Stage I Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage I Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  2. Preoperative TN staging of esophageal cancer: Comparison of miniprobe ultrasonography, spiral CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ling-Fei; Wang, Bing-Zhou; Feng, Jia-Lin; Cheng, Wei-Rong; Liu, Guo-Re; Xu, Xiao-Hua; Zheng, Zhi-Chao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the value of miniprobe sonography (MPS), spiral CT and MR imaging (MRI) in the tumor and regional lymph node staging of esophageal cancer. METHODS: Eight-six patients (56 men and 30 women; age range of 39-73 years, mean 62 years) with esophageal carcinoma were staged preoperatively with imaging modalities. Of them, 81 (94%) had squamous cell carcinoma, 4 (5%) adenocarcinoma, and 1 (1%) adenoacanthoma. Eleven patients (12%) had malignancy of the upper one third, 41 (48%) of the mid-esophagus and 34 (40%) of the distal one third. Forty-one were examined by spiral CT in whom 13 were co-examined by MPS, and forty-five by MRI in whom 18 were also co-examined by MPS. These imaging results were compared with the findings of the histopathologic examination for resected specimens. RESULTS: In staging the depth of tumor growth, MPS was significantly more accurate (84%) than spiral CT and MRI (68% and 60%, respectively, P < 0.05). The specificity and sensitivity were 82% and 85% for MPS; 60% and 69% for spiral CT; and 40% and 63% for MRI, respectively. In staging regional lymph nodes, spiral CT was more accurate (78%) than MPS and MRI (71% and 64%, respectively), but the difference was not statistically significant. The specificity and sensitivity were 79% and 77% for spiral CT; 75% and 68% for MPS; and 68% and 62% for MRI, respectively. CONCLUSION: MPS is superior to spiral CT or MRI for T staging, especially in early esophageal cancer. However, the three modalities have the similar accuracy in N staging. Spiral CT or MRI is helpful for the detection of far-distance metastasis in esophageal cancer. PMID:12532435

  3. Long-term Survival Outcomes Following Internal Mammary Node Irradiation in Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Results of a Large Retrospective Study With 12-Year Follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jee Suk; Park, Won; Kim, Yong Bae; Lee, Ik Jae; Keum, Ki Chang; Lee, Chang Geol; Choi, Doo Ho; Suh, Chang-Ok; Huh, Seung Jae

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of internal mammary node irradiation (IMNI) on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in breast cancer patients treated with modified radical mastectomy and postoperative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2002, 396 patients with stage II-III breast cancer were treated with postmastectomy radiation therapy with (n=197) or without (n=199) IMNI. Patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy were excluded. IMNI was administered at the clinical discretion of the treating physician. Median RT dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 45.0-59.4 Gy) in 28 fractions, with inclusion of the supraclavicular fossa in 96% of patients. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 99.7% of the patients and endocrine therapy to 53%. Results: The median follow-up was 149 months (range, 124-202). IMNI patients had more advanced nodal stage and non-high grade tumors than those without IMNI (P<.001). Otherwise, disease and treatment characteristics were well balanced. The 10-year DFS with and without IMNI was 65% and 57%, respectively (P=.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that IMNI was an independent, positive predictor of DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; P=.02). Benefits of IMNI in DFS were seen most apparently in N2 patients (HR, 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.26-0.74) and inner/central tumors (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.34-0.90). The 10-year OS with and without IMNI was 72% and 66%, respectively (P=.62). The 10-year DFS and OS were 61%, and 69%, respectively. Conclusions: Internal mammary node irradiation significantly improved DFS in postmastectomy breast cancer patients. Pending long-term results from randomized trials, treatment of internal mammary nodes should be considered in postmastectomy radiation therapy.

  4. Measurement of the human esophageal cancer in an early stage with Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yasuhiro; Ishigaki, Mika; Taketani, Akinori; Andriana, Bibin B.; Ishihara, Ryu; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2014-02-01

    The esophageal cancer has a tendency to transfer to another part of the body and the surgical operation itself sometimes gives high risk in vital function because many delicate organs exist near the esophagus. So the esophageal cancer is a disease with a high mortality. So, in order to lead a higher survival rate five years after the cancer's treatment, the investigation of the diagnosis methods or techniques of the cancer in an early stage and support the therapy are required. In this study, we performed the ex vivo experiments to obtain the Raman spectra from normal and early-stage tumor (stage-0) human esophageal sample by using Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra are collected by the homemade Raman spectrometer with the wavelength of 785 nm and Raman probe with 600-um-diameter. The principal component analysis (PCA) is performed after collection of spectra to recognize which materials changed in normal part and cancerous pert. After that, the linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is performed to predict the tissue type. The result of PCA indicates that the tumor tissue is associated with a decrease in tryptophan concentration. Furthermore, we can predict the tissue type with 80% accuracy by LDA which model is made by tryptophan bands.

  5. Treatment results of chemoradiotherapy for clinical stage I (Taman) esophageal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Kazunari . E-mail: kyamada-rad@umin.ac.jp; Murakami, Masao; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Okuno, Yoshishige; Nakajima, Toshifumi; Kusumi, Fusako; Takakuwa, Hiroshi; Matsusue, Satoru

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: In 1991, we started a clinical prospective trial for operable esophageal carcinoma, foreseeing organ preservation, to assess the treatment results after definitive chemoradiotherapy (Crt) for clinical Stage I (Taman) esophageal cancer. Patients and Methods: Between 1992 and 2003, 63 patients were enrolled in this study. Tumor depth was mucosal cancer (T 1a) in 23 and submucosal cancer (T 1b) in 40. Crt consisted of 55-66 Gy/50-60 fractions (median, 59.4 Gy); from 1 to 3 cycles (median, 2) of concurrent chemotherapy (Cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil), followed by high-dose-rate intraluminal brachytherapy 10-12 Gy/2-3 fractions. Results: The 5-year overall and cause-specific and disease-free survival rates were 66.4%, 76.3%, and 63.7%, respectively. The 5-year cause-specific survival rates for T 1a and T 1b cancer patients were 85.2% and 70.0%, respectively (p = 0.06). The 5-year disease-free survival rates for T 1a and T 1b were 84.4% and 50.5%, respectively (p < 0.01). Esophageal fistula as a late toxicity occurred in 2 patients (G: 1; G: 1), and esophageal stricture requiring a liquid diet occurred in 2 patients. Pericardial effusion was observed in 3 patients. Conclusion: We confirmed that patients with Taman esophageal carcinoma had their esophagus preserved in 89.2% of cases after definitive Crt, and the survival rates were equivalent to those of previous reports of surgery.

  6. Prognosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients with preoperative radiotherapy: Comparison of different cancer staging systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qifeng; Zhang, Wencheng; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Xun; He, Jie; Feng, Qinfu; Zhou, Zongmei; Wang, Lvhua; Yin, Weibo; Xiao, Zefen

    2014-01-01

    Background The 7th edition American Joint Committee on Cancer tumor-node-metastasis (AJCC TNM) staging system was published in 2010. Here we evaluate its predictive ability and compare the 6th and 7th editions of the AJCC TNM staging systems in esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC) with preoperative radiotherapy. Methods A total of 296 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients receiving preoperative radiotherapy between 1980 and 2007 were included. Patients were staged using the 6th and 7th edition staging systems. Survival analyses were performed using Cox regression models. The homogeneity, discriminatory ability, and monotonicity of gradients of the two staging systems were compared using linear trend ?2, likelihood ratio statistics, and Akaike information criterion calculation. Results The overall five-year survival rate for the entire cohort was 27.1%. Female gender, length, T, and N, classifications according to the 7th edition staging system were the prognostic factors in univariate analyses. However, tumor histological grade and cancer location did not significantly influence patient survival. The 7th edition staging system has the highest linear trend ?2and likelihood ratio ?2scores. Compared to the 6th edition, the 7th edition staging system also has a smaller Akaike information criterion value, which represents the optimum prognostic stratification. Conclusions The strength of the 7th edition AJCC TNM staging system lies in the new descriptors for T and N classifications. However, we did not find cancer location to be a significant prognostic factor in our cohort. Overall, the 7th edition AJCC TNM staging system performed better than the previous edition.

  7. Preliminary treatment results of proton beam therapy with chemoradiotherapy for stage I-III esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Takada, Akinori; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Takayama, Kanako; Makita, Chiyoko; Suzuki, Motohisa; Azami, Yusuke; Kato, Takahiro; Tsukiyama, Iwao; Hareyama, Masato; Kikuchi, Yasuhiro; Daimon, Takashi; Toyomasu, Yutaka; Ii, Noriko; Nomoto, Yoshihito; Sakuma, Hajime; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2016-03-01

    The effect of proton beam therapy (PBT) on various cancers is controversial. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of PBT with alternating chemoradiotherapy (ACRT) for patients with stage I-III esophageal cancer. Two cycles of systemic chemotherapy with a continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on days 1-5 and a 5h infusion of nedaplatin (NDP) on day 6 were accompanied by thoracic irradiation using X-ray therapy and PBT. During the first half of the treatment, X-rays were delivered to the prophylactic area. During the second half of the treatment, proton beams were used to irradiate the involved field. To reduce the dose of cardiac irradiation, proton beams were delivered with posterior and posterior oblique angles. Between January 2009 and December 2012, 47 patients were enrolled in this study. The median follow-up duration was 29 months for all patients and 40 months for survivors. The 3 year overall survival rate, progression-free survival rate, and local control rate were 59.2%, 56.3%, and 69.8%, respectively. With respect to grade 3-4 late toxicities, there were no pleural or pericardial effusions, but two patients (4.3%) had esophageal stenosis, one patient (2.1%) had fistula, and two patients (4.3%) developed radiation pneumonitis. PBT with ACRT might have the potential to reduce the risk of cardiac damage and might become one of the primary methods of esophageal cancer treatment. PMID:26806272

  8. The role of gastrostomy in the staged operation of esophageal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Vahid; Davani, Sam Zeraatian Nejad; Sabet, Babak; Forutan, Hamid Reza; Sharifian, Maryam

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to recommend criteria for selection of patients who benefited from the use of gastrostomy rather than emergency fistula closure during the staged operation of esophageal atresia (EA). Materials and Methods: Between August 2004 and July 2006, 75 cases of EA, were consecutively operated. Nineteen out of 75 (25%) underwent routine gastrostomy because they required a type of staged operation: Group I: Five cases with pure atresia had gastrostomy and esophagostomy; Group II: Six with severe pneumonia and congenital heart disease (Waterson class C) had gastrostomy and conservative management; Group III: Eight with long gap EA (2-4 vertebras); four out of 8 cases underwent primary anastomosis with tension and the other four had delayed primary anastomosis plus primary gastrostomy. Results: GI: Only three cases survived after esophageal substitution; GII: Three out of six cases with severe pneumonia (fistula size: f > 2.5 mm) underwent emergency fistula closure with only one survival, but all (f < 2.5 mm) recovered without complication, GIII: Four patients with long gap and primary anastomosis with tension developed anastomotic leakage; they required gastrostomy following the leakage, except for those with delayed primary anastomosis, and all of them recovered without early complications. Conclusion: All the cases with long gap, although two esophageal ends can be reached with tension, should undergo delayed primary closure with primary gastrostomy. Those were brought with Waterson class C and the fistula size greater than 2.5 mm should undergo emergency fistula closure; however, if fistula size was less than 2.5 mm, it is better to be delayed by primary gastrostomy for stabilization. In this study, we had a better outcome with gastric tube for substitution than colon interposition in infants. PMID:20177478

  9. Diagnosis of early-stage esophageal cancer by Raman spectroscopy and chemometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Ishigaki, Mika; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Taketani, Akinori; Andriana, Bibin B; Ishihara, Ryu; Wongravee, Kanet; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2016-02-01

    Esophageal cancer is a disease with high mortality. In order to improve the 5 year survival rate after cancer treatment, it is important to develop a method for early detection of the cancer and for therapy support. There is increasing evidence that Raman spectroscopy, in combination with chemometric analysis, is a powerful technique for discriminating pre-cancerous and cancerous biochemical changes. In the present study, we used Raman spectroscopy to examine early-stage (stages 0 and I) esophageal cancer samples ex vivo. Comparison between the Raman spectra of cancerous and normal samples using a t-test showed decreased concentrations of glycogen, collagen, and tryptophan in cancerous tissue. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) analysis and self-organization maps (SOMs) discriminated the datasets of cancerous and normal samples into two groups, but there was a relatively large overlap between them. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) based on Raman bands found in the t-test was able to predict the tissue types with 81.0% sensitivity and 94.0% specificity. PMID:26694647

  10. Endoscopic ultrasonography for staging of T1a and T1b esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    He, Long-Jun; Shan, Hong-Bo; Luo, Guang-Yu; Li, Yin; Zhang, Rong; Gao, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Guo-Bao; Lin, Shi-Yong; Xu, Guo-Liang; Li, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the accuracy of Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in staging and sub-staging T1a and T1b esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). METHODS: A retrospective analysis involving 72 patients with pathologically confirmed T1a or T1b ESCC, was undertaken between January 2005 and December 2011 in Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center. The accuracy and efficiency of EUS for detecting stages T1a and T1b ESCC were examined. RESULTS: The overall accuracy of EUS for detecting stage T1a or T1b ESCC was 70.8% (51/72), and the sensitivity was 74.3%. 77.8% (7/9) of lesions originated in the upper thoracic region, 73.1% (38/52) in the mid-thoracic region and 72.7% (8/11) in the lower thoracic region. Multivariate analysis revealed that the diagnostic accuracy of EUS was closely related to lesion length (F = 4.984, P = 0.029). CONCLUSION: EUS demonstrated median degree of accuracy for distinguishing between stages T1a and T1b ESCC. Therefore, it is necessary to improve EUS for staging early ESCC. PMID:24574809

  11. Pralatrexate and Oxaliplatin in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Esophageal, Stomach, or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-11

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Esophageal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Gastric Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIC Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Undifferentiated Gastric Carcinoma

  12. Early-Stage Induction of SWI/SNF Mutations during Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nakazato, Hidetsugu; Takeshima, Hideyuki; Kishino, Takayoshi; Kubo, Emi; Hattori, Naoko; Nakajima, Takeshi; Yamashita, Satoshi; Igaki, Hiroyasu; Tachimori, Yuji; Kuniyoshi, Yukio; Ushijima, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex is frequently inactivated by somatic mutations of its various components in various types of cancers, and also by aberrant DNA methylation. However, its somatic mutations and aberrant methylation in esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs) have not been fully analyzed. In this study, we aimed to clarify in ESCC, what components of the SWI/SNF complex have somatic mutations and aberrant methylation, and when somatic mutations of the SWI/SNF complex occur. Deep sequencing of components of the SWI/SNF complex using a bench-top next generation sequencer revealed that eight of 92 ESCCs (8.7%) had 11 somatic mutations of 7 genes, ARID1A, ARID2, ATRX, PBRM1, SMARCA4, SMARCAL1, and SMARCC1. The SMARCA4 mutations were located in the Forkhead (85Ser>Leu) and SNF2 family N-terminal (882Glu>Lys) domains. The PBRM1 mutations were located in a bromodomain (80Asn>Ser) and an HMG-box domain (1,377Glu>Lys). For most mutations, their mutant allele frequency was 31-77% (mean 61%) of the fraction of cancer cells in the same samples, indicating that most of the cancer cells in individual ESCC samples had the SWI/SNF mutations on one allele, when present. In addition, a BeadChip array analysis revealed that a component of the SWI/SNF complex, ACTL6B, had aberrant methylation at its promoter CpG island in 18 of 52 ESCCs (34.6%). These results showed that genetic and epigenetic alterations of the SWI/SNF complex are present in ESCCs, and suggested that genetic alterations are induced at an early stage of esophageal squamous cell carcinogenesis. PMID:26812616

  13. Early-Stage Induction of SWI/SNF Mutations during Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nakazato, Hidetsugu; Takeshima, Hideyuki; Kishino, Takayoshi; Kubo, Emi; Hattori, Naoko; Nakajima, Takeshi; Yamashita, Satoshi; Igaki, Hiroyasu; Tachimori, Yuji; Kuniyoshi, Yukio; Ushijima, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex is frequently inactivated by somatic mutations of its various components in various types of cancers, and also by aberrant DNA methylation. However, its somatic mutations and aberrant methylation in esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs) have not been fully analyzed. In this study, we aimed to clarify in ESCC, what components of the SWI/SNF complex have somatic mutations and aberrant methylation, and when somatic mutations of the SWI/SNF complex occur. Deep sequencing of components of the SWI/SNF complex using a bench-top next generation sequencer revealed that eight of 92 ESCCs (8.7%) had 11 somatic mutations of 7 genes, ARID1A, ARID2, ATRX, PBRM1, SMARCA4, SMARCAL1, and SMARCC1. The SMARCA4 mutations were located in the Forkhead (85Ser>Leu) and SNF2 family N-terminal (882Glu>Lys) domains. The PBRM1 mutations were located in a bromodomain (80Asn>Ser) and an HMG-box domain (1,377Glu>Lys). For most mutations, their mutant allele frequency was 31–77% (mean 61%) of the fraction of cancer cells in the same samples, indicating that most of the cancer cells in individual ESCC samples had the SWI/SNF mutations on one allele, when present. In addition, a BeadChip array analysis revealed that a component of the SWI/SNF complex, ACTL6B, had aberrant methylation at its promoter CpG island in 18 of 52 ESCCs (34.6%). These results showed that genetic and epigenetic alterations of the SWI/SNF complex are present in ESCCs, and suggested that genetic alterations are induced at an early stage of esophageal squamous cell carcinogenesis. PMID:26812616

  14. Diet and Physical Activity Change or Usual Care in Improving Progression-Free Survival in Patients With Previously Treated Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  15. Lymph node ratio-based staging system for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shao-Bin; Weng, Hong-Rui; Wang, Geng; Zou, Xiao-Fang; Liu, Di-Tian; Chen, Yu-Ping; Zhang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze a modified staging system utilizing lymph node ratio (LNR) in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). METHODS: Clinical data of 2011 patients with ESCC who underwent surgical resection alone between January 1995 and June 2010 at the Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College were reviewed. The LNR, or node ratio (Nr) was defined as the ratio of metastatic LNs ompared to the total number of resected LNs. Overall survival between groups was compared with the log-rank test. The cutoff point of LNR was established by grouping patients with 10% increment in Nr, and then combining the neighborhood survival curves using the log-rank test. A new TNrM staging system, was constructed by replacing the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) N categories with the Nr categories in the new TNM staging system. The time-dependent receiver operating characteristic curves were used to evaluate the predictive performance of the seventh edition AJCC staging system and the TNrM staging system. RESULTS: The median number of resected LNs was 12 (range: 4-44), and 25% and 75% interquartile rangeswere8 and 16. Patients were classified into four Nr categories with distinctive survival differences (Nr0: LNR = 0; Nr1: 0% < LNR ? 10%; Nr2: 10% < LNR ? 20%; and Nr3: LNR > 20%). From N categories to Nr categories, 557 patients changed their LN stage. The median survival time (MST) for the four Nr categories (Nr0-Nr3) was 155.0 mo, 39.0 mo, 28.0 mo, and 19.0 mo, respectively, and the 5-year overall survival was 61.1%, 41.1%, 33.0%, and 22.9%, respectively (P < 0.001). Overall survival was significantly different for the AJCC N categories when patients were subgrouped into 15 or more vs fewer than 15 examined nodes, except for the N3 category (P = 0.292). However, overall survival was similar when the patients in all four Nr categories were subgrouped into 15 or more vs fewer than 15 nodes. Using the time-dependent receiver operating characteristic, we found that the Nr category and TNrM stage had higher accuracy in predicting survival than the AJCC N category and TNM stage. CONCLUSION: A staging system based on LNR may have better prognostic stratification of patients with ESCC than the current TNM system, especially for those undergoing limited lymphadenectomy. PMID:26139998

  16. Image-Guided Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-04

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  17. Utility-based optimization of phase II/III programs.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Marietta; Kieser, Meinhard; Gtte, Heiko; Schler, Armin

    2016-01-30

    Phase II and phase III trials play a crucial role in drug development programs. They are costly and time consuming and, because of high failure rates in late development stages, at the same time risky investments. Commonly, sample size calculation of phase III is based on the treatment effect observed in phase II. Therefore, planning of phases II and III can be linked. The performance of the phase II/III program crucially depends on the allocation of the resources to phases II and III by appropriate choice of the sample size and the rule applied to decide whether to stop the program after phase II or to proceed. We present methods for a program-wise phase II/III planning that aim at determining optimal phase II sample sizes and go/no-go decisions in a time-to-event setting. Optimization is based on a utility function that takes into account (fixed and variable) costs of the drug development program and potential gains after successful launch. The proposed methods are illustrated by application to a variety of scenarios typically met in oncology drug development. Copyright 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26256550

  18. FOLFOX-6 Induction Chemotherapy Followed by Esophagectomy and Post-operative Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-20

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastric Cardia; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer

  19. Results of chemoradiotherapy for stage I esophageal cancer in medically inoperable patients compared with results in operable patients.

    PubMed

    Jingu, K; Matsushita, H; Takeda, K; Narazaki, K; Ariga, H; Umezawa, R; Sugawara, T; Miyata, G; Onodera, K; Nemoto, K; Yamada, S

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate long-term results of chemoradiotherapy for clinical T1b-2N0M0 esophageal cancer and to compare outcomes for operable and inoperable patients. Patients with stage I esophageal cancer (Union for International Cancer Control [UICC] 2009), excluding patients with cT1a esophageal cancer, were studied. All patients had histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma. Operable patients received cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil with concurrent radiotherapy of 60 Gy including a 2-week break. Inoperable patients received nedaplatin and 5-fluorouracil with concurrent radiotherapy of 60-70 Gy without a pause. End-points were overall survival rate (OS), cause-specific survival rate (CSS), progression-free survival rate (PFS), and locoregional control rate (LC). Thirty-seven operable patients and 30 medically inoperable patients were enrolled. There was a significant difference in only age between the operable group and inoperable group (P = 0.04). The median observation period was 67.9 months. In all patients, 5-year OS, CSS, PFS, and LC were 77.9%, 91.5%, 66.9%, and 80.8%, respectively. Comparison of the operable group and inoperable group showed that there was a significant difference in OS (5-year, 85.5% vs. 68.7%, P = 0.04), but there was no difference in CSS, PFS, or LC. Grade 3 or more late toxicity according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v 3.0 was found in seven patients. Even in medically inoperable patients with stage I esophageal cancer, LC of more than 80% can be achieved with chemoradiotherapy. However, OS in medically inoperable patients is significantly worse than that in operable patients. PMID:22925398

  20. Circulating microRNAs in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: association with locoregional staging and survival

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing-Xin; Yu, Qi; Shi, Ze-Liang; Li, Ping; Fu, Shen

    2015-01-01

    Locoregional staging and prognostic information play a critical role in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) treatment strategies. Although microRNA (miRNA) is a promising marker for cancer detection, the relationship between circulating plasma miRNAs and ESCC remains unclear. Our study aims to investigate the association between circulating plasma miRNAs and tumor diagnosis or prognosis in ESCC patients. Plasma levels of miR-16, miR-21, miR-22, miR-126, miR-148b, miR-185, miR-221, miR-223, and miR-375 were evaluated by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays from 38 ESCC patients prior to treatment and 19 healthy subjects. Differences in selected miRNAs and their diagnostic and prognostic value were examined. Levels of four of the selected miRNAs were found to be significantly higher in ESCC patients than in controls; namely, miR-16, miR-21, miR-185, and miR-375 (P < 0.050). In addition, the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) for miR-375 was 0.921 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.817-0.976). Moreover, the expression levels of miR-16 were higher in patients with T3-4 tumors than in patients with T1-2 tumors (P = 0.020). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that high expression levels of miR-16 and miR-21 in the plasma correlated significantly with shortened progression-free survival (PFS; P = 0.031 and P = 0.038, respectively) and overall survival (OS; P = 0.022 and P = 0.041, respectively) in ESCC patients. Four plasma miRNAs were identified that could potentially serve as novel diagnostic biomarkers for ESCC. Moreover, specific miRNAs, such as miR-16 and miR-21, can predict poor survival in ESCC. PMID:26221263

  1. Learning Curve and Interobserver Agreement of Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy for Detecting Precancerous or Early-Stage Esophageal Squamous Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Li, Ming; Li, Zhen; Zuo, Xiu-Li; Li, Chang-Qing; Dong, Yan-Yan; Zhou, Cheng-Jun; Li, Yan-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Background Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) can provide in vivo subcellular resolution images of esophageal lesions. However, the learning curve in interpreting CLE images of precancerous or early-stage esophageal squamous cancer is unknown. The goal of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and inter-observer agreement for differentiating esophageal lesions in CLE images among experienced and inexperienced observers and to assess the learning curve. Method After a short training, 8 experienced and 14 inexperienced endoscopists evaluated in sequence 4 sets of high-quality CLE images. Their diagnoses were corrected and discussed after each set. For each image, the diagnostic results, confidence in diagnosis, quality and time to evaluate were recorded. Results Overall, diagnostic accuracy was greater for the second, third, fourth set of images as compared with the initial set (odds ratio [OR] 2.01, 95% CI 1.223.31; 7.95, 3.7416.87; and 6.45, 3.1413.27), respectively, with no difference between the third and fourth sets in accuracy (p?=?0.67). Previous experience affected the diagnostic accuracy only in the first set of images (OR 3.70, 1.877.29, p<0.001). Inter-observer agreement was higher for experienced than inexperienced endoscopists (0.732 vs. 0.666, p<0.01) Conclusion CLE is a promising technology that can be quickly learned after a short training period; previous experience is associated with diagnostic accuracy only at the initial stage of learning. PMID:24897112

  2. SU-E-I-85: Exploring the 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET Characteristics in Staging of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C; Yin, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the characteristics derived from 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET image and assess its capacity in staging of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Methods: 26 patients with newly diagnosed ESCC who underwent 18F-FDG PET scan were included in this study. Different image-derived indices including the standardized uptake value (SUV), gross tumor length, texture features and shape feature were considered. Taken the histopathologic examination as the gold standard, the extracted capacities of indices in staging of ESCC were assessed by Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test. Specificity and sensitivity for each of the studied parameters were derived using receiver-operating characteristic curves. Results: 18F-FDG SUVmax and SUVmean showed statistically significant capability in AJCC and TNM stages. Texture features such as ENT and CORR were significant factors for N stages(p=0.040, p=0.029). Both FDG PET Longitudinal length and shape feature Eccentricity (EC) (p≤0.010) provided powerful stratification in the primary ESCC AJCC and TNM stages than SUV and texture features. Receiver-operating-characteristic curve analysis showed that tumor textural analysis can capability M stages with higher sensitivity than SUV measurement but lower in T and N stages. Conclusion: The 18F-FDG image-derived characteristics of SUV, textural features and shape feature allow for good stratification AJCC and TNM stage in ESCC patients.

  3. 40 CFR Appendixes II-Iii to Part 264 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false II Appendixes II-III to Part 264 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Appendixes II-III...

  4. 40 CFR Appendixes II-Iii to Part 264 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false II Appendixes II-III to Part 264 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Appendixes II-III...

  5. Epoetin alfa improves survival after chemoradiation for Stage III esophageal cancer: Final results of a prospective observational study

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk . E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Tribius, Silke; Yekebas, Emre F.; Bahrehmand, Roia; Wildfang, Ingeborg; Kilic, Ergin; Muellerleile, Ulrich; Gross, Eberhard; Schild, Steven E.; Alberti, Winfried

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: This prospective, nonrandomized study evaluates the effectiveness of epoetin alfa to maintain the hemoglobin levels at 12 to14 g/dL (optimal range for tumor oxygenation) during chemoradiation for Stage III esophageal cancer and its impact on overall survival (OS), metastatic-free survival (MFS), and locoregional control (LC). Methods and Materials: Ninety-six patients were included. Forty-two patients received epoetin alfa (150 IU/kg, 3 times a week) during radiotherapy, which was started at hemoglobin less than 13 g/dL and stopped at 14 g/dL or higher. Hemoglobin levels were measured weekly during RT. Results: Both groups were balanced for age, sex, performance status, tumor length/location, histology, grading, T-stage/N-stage, chemotherapy, treatment schedule, and hemoglobin before RT. Median change of hemoglobin was +0.3 g/dL/wk with epoetin alfa and -0.5 g/dL/wk without epoetin alfa. At least 60% of hemoglobin levels were 12 to 14 g/dL in 64% and 17% of the patients, respectively (p < 0.001). Patients who received epoetin alfa had better OS (32% vs. 8% at 2 years, p = 0.009) and LC (67% vs. 15% at 2 years, p = 0.001). MFS was not significantly different (42% vs. 18% at 2 years, p = 0.09). Conclusions: The findings suggest that epoetin alfa when used to maintain the hemoglobin levels at 12 to 14 g/dL can improve OS and LC of Stage III esophageal cancer patients.

  6. [Esophageal stenting complications].

    PubMed

    Smoliar, A N; Radchenko, Iu A; Nefedova, G A; Abakumov, M M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze esophageal stenting complications in case of cancer and benign diseases. It was investigated complications in 8 patients in terms from 7 days to 1 year after intervention. In 4 patients esophageal stenting was performed for constrictive esophageal cancer and compression with pulmonary cancer metastases into mediastinal lymphatic nodes. 2 patients had esophageal stenting for post-tracheostomy tracheo-esophageal fistula, 1 patient - for spontaneous esophageal rupture, 1 patient - for post-burn scar narrowing of esophagus and output part of the stomach. Severe patients' condition with tumor was determined by intensive esophageal bleeding in 2 cases, bilateral abscessed aspiration pneumonia, tumor bleeding, blood aspiration (1 case), posterior mediastinitis (1 case). Severe patients' condition with benign disease was associated with decompensated esophageal narrowing about proximal part of stent (1 case), increase of tracheo-esophageal fistula size complicated by aspiration pneumonia (1 case), stent migration into stomach with recurrence of esophago-mediastino-pleural fistula and pleural empyema (1 case), decompensated narrowing of esophagus and output part of the stomach (1 case). Patients with cancer died. And patients with benign diseases underwent multi-stage surgical treatment and recovered. Stenting is palliative method for patients with esophageal cancer. Patients after stenting should be under outpatient observation for early diagnosis of possible complications. Esophageal stenting in patients with benign diseases should be performed only by life-saving indications, in case of inability of other treatment and for the minimum necessary period. PMID:25589315

  7. Feasibility of endoscopic mucosal resection as salvage treatment for patients with local failure after definitive chemoradiotherapy for stage IB, II, and III esophageal squamous cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Makazu, M; Kato, K; Takisawa, H; Yoshinaga, S; Oda, I; Saito, Y; Mayahara, H; Ito, Y; Itami, J; Hamaguchi, T; Yamada, Y; Shimada, Y

    2014-01-01

    Local failure after definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for stage IB, II, and III esophageal cancer is one of the causes of poor outcome. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) is an effective treatment for superficial esophageal cancer. However, its feasibility as a salvage treatment for local recurrent or residual tumors after definitive CRT for stage IB, II, and III esophageal cancer remains unclear. Between January 2000 and February 2008, 274 patients with stage IB, II, and III esophageal squamous cell cancer excluding T4 received definitive CRT at the National Cancer Center Hospital, Japan. Of these patients, nine patients with local recurrence after achieving complete response and two patients with residual tumor underwent salvage EMR. The technique of salvage EMR involved a strip biopsy method. We retrospectively reviewed the 11 patients (13 lesions). Characteristics of all 11 patients were as follows: median age of 69 (range: 45-78); male/female: 10/1; baseline clinical stage (Union for International Cancer Control 7th) IB/IIA/IIB/III: 1/3/7/0. The depth of resected tumor was limited to the mucosal layer in seven lesions and submucosal in six lesions. En bloc resection was performed on six lesions (46%). The vertical margin was free of cancer cells in 11 lesions (84.6%). No major complications, such as hemorrhage requiring blood transfusion and perforation, were experienced. At a median follow-up period of 38.9 months (range: 5.3-94 months) after salvage EMR, no recurrence was detected in six patients (54%). Local recurrence was detected in five patients (27%). Of these patients, two had lung metastasis simultaneously, and one was also detected lung metastasis 2 months after the detection of local recurrence. The 5-year survival rate after salvage EMR was 41.6%. Salvage EMR is a feasible treatment option for local recurrent or residual lesions after definitive chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy for stage IB, II, and III esophageal squamous cell cancer. PMID:23442160

  8. Infrequent chemoradiation-induced acute esophagitis in the Asian population: A meta-analysis of published clinical trials for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Komiya, Takefumi; Palla, Shana L; Wang, Feng; Perez, Raymond P; Huang, Chao H

    2014-01-01

    Severe (grade 3 or higher) esophagitis is one of the major toxicities for chemoradiation in the treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The difference among ethnic groups has never been investigated in detail. Prospective trials with concurrent platinum-containing chemoradiation in unresectable disease were investigated, and a total of 116 treatment arms with 7520 patients were identified. Univariate analysis demonstrated that treatment arms conducted in Asia had significantly lower incidence of severe esophagitis (170/2534, 6.7%, odds ratio 0.289) than in other nations (1025/4986, 20.6%). In the multivariable model, Asian/non-Asian ethnicity, multi-/single-agent, and split are jointly significant predictors after adjusting for all possible factors. This study suggests that severe esophagitis occurs less frequently in the Asian population compared to the non-Asian population.

  9. Comparison of the clinical value of multi-band mucosectomy versus endoscopic mucosal resection for the treatment of patients with early-stage esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, ZI-YANG; YANG, YUN-CHAO; LIU, LI-MEI; LIU, XIAO-GANG; LI, YI; LI, LIANG-PING; HU, XIAO; ZHANG, REN-YI; SONG, YAN; QIN, QIN

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare the clinical value of multi-band mucosectomy (MBM) versus endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) for the treatment of patients with early-stage esophageal cancer. Between January 2011 and December 2012, 68 patients with early-stage esophageal cancer who underwent MBM and EMR were enrolled into the present study. The curative resection rate, duration of surgery, complications and follow-up records were retrospectively analyzed. Of the 68 patients included, 33 were treated with MBM and 35 with EMR. There was no significant difference in the rate of complete resection between the MBM and EMR groups (P>0.05). The mean duration of surgery in the MBM group was statistically lower than that in the EMR group (P<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in the intraoperative and post-operative complications between the MBM and EMR groups (P>0.05). Esophageal cancer reoccurred in 2 patients treated with MBM and 1 patient treated with EMR during the follow-up period (range, 3–24 months). Overall, MBM can be considered a better surgical option for the management of patients with early-stage esophageal cancer, as it offers higher histological curative resection rates and improved safety. However, further studies and a larger follow-up period are required to confirm the long-term curative effect. PMID:26137134

  10. Risk of node metastasis of sentinel lymph nodes detected in level II/III of the axilla by single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    SHIMA, HIROAKI; KUTOMI, GORO; SATOMI, FUKINO; MAEDA, HIDEKI; TAKAMARU, TOMOKO; KAMESHIMA, HIDEKAZU; OMURA, TOSEI; MORI, MITSURU; HATAKENAKA, MASAMITSU; HASEGAWA, TADASHI; HIRATA, KOICHI

    2014-01-01

    In breast cancer, single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) shows the exact anatomical location of sentinel nodes (SN). SPECT/CT mainly exposes axilla and partly exposes atypical sites of extra-axillary lymphatic drainage. The mechanism of how the atypical hot nodes are involved in lymphatic metastasis was retrospectively investigated in the present study, particularly at the level II/III region. SPECT/CT was performed in 92 clinical stage 0-IIA breast cancer patients. Sentinel lymph nodes are depicted as hot nodes in SPECT/CT. Patients were divided into two groups: With or without hot node in level II/III on SPECT/CT. The existence of metastasis in level II/III was investigated and the risk factors were identified. A total of 12 patients were sentinel lymph node biopsy metastasis positive and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) was performed. These patients were divided into two groups: With and without SN in level II/III, and nodes in level II/III were pathologically proven. In 11 of the 92 patients, hot nodes were detected in level II/III. There was a significant difference in node metastasis depending on whether there were hot nodes in level II/III (P=0.0319). Multivariate analysis indicated that the hot nodes in level II/III and lymphatic invasion were independent factors associated with node metastasis. There were 12 SN-positive patients followed by ALND. In four of the 12 patients, hot nodes were observed in level II/III. Two of the four patients with hot nodes depicted by SPECT/CT and metastatic nodes were pathologically evident in the same lesion. Therefore, the present study indicated that the hot node in level II/III as depicted by SPECT/CT may be a risk of SN metastasis, including deeper nodes. PMID:25289038

  11. Prognostic Impact of the 6th and 7th American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM Staging Systems on Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Motoo; Shitara, Kohei; Kodaira, Takeshi; Hatooka, Shunzo; Mizota, Ayako; Kondoh, Chihiro; Yokota, Tomoya; Takahari, Daisuke; Ura, Takashi; Muro, Kei

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The new 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system is based on pathologic data from esophageal cancers treated by surgery alone. There is no information available on evaluation of the new staging system with regard to prognosis of patients treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT). The objective of this study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of the new staging system on esophageal cancer patients treated with CRT. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on 301 consecutive esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with CRT. Comparisons were made of the prognostic impacts of the 6th and 7th staging systems and the prognostic impacts of stage and prognostic groups, which were newly defined in the 7th edition. Results: There were significant differences between Stages I and III (p < 0.01) according to both editions. However, the 7th edition poorly distinguishes the prognoses of Stages III and IV (p = 0.36 by multivariate analysis) in comparison to the 6th edition (p = 0.08 by multivariate analysis), although these differences were not significant. For all patients, T, M, and gender were independent prognostic factors by multivariate analysis (p < 0.05). For the Stage I and II prognostic groups, survival curves showed a stepwise decrease with increase in stage, except for Stage IIA. However, there were no significant differences seen between each prognostic stage. Conclusions: Our study indicates there are several problems with the 7th TNM staging system regarding prognostic factors in patients undergoing CRT.

  12. Bevacizumab and Combination Chemotherapy Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Esophageal or Stomach Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage IA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer

  13. Esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Coia, L R; Sauter, E R

    1994-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is an important problem in the United States. It results in more deaths (over 10,000 annually) than rectal cancer. Furthermore, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma is increasing at a rate faster than that of nearly any other cancer and the reasons for the increase are not well understood. A variety of tumor-suppressor genes (including p53, APC, DCC and Rb) and proto-oncogenes (including prad1, EGFR, c-erb-2 and TGF alpha) may be involved in the development and progression of esophageal cancer. Clinical prognostic factors include stage, Karnofsky performance status, sex, age, anatomic location of the tumor, and degree of weight loss. A new staging system based on depth of wall penetration and lymph node involvement correlates well with prognosis for patients undergoing esophagectomy. Newer staging procedures including endoscopic ultrasound as well as the use of minimally invasive surgery, such as thoracoscopy and laparoscopy, may allow accurate staging without esophagectomy. Surgical resection provides excellent palliation; however, the chance for cure with esophagectomy alone is only 10% to 20%. Adjuvant treatment with pre- or postesophagectomy radiation may improve local-regional control but does not improve survival. Nor has preoperative chemotherapy been shown to improve survival; however, it remains an active area of investigation. Multimodality therapy, namely, chemotherapy and radiation (chemoradiation), given concurrently prior to surgical resection shows promise, with one study indicating a 5-year survival of 34%. A complete pathologic response to chemoradiation correlates with improved survival. Chemoradiation has been shown to be superior to radiation as primary management of esophageal cancer. There has been no successfully completed randomized trial of surgery versus definitive radiation or chemoradiation. However, chemoradiation represents a reasonable alternative to esophagectomy in the primary management of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus and chemoradiation also appears to be effective in the treatment of patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, offering significant palliation and a chance for long-term survival as well. Randomized studies of preoperative chemoradiation versus surgery or versus chemoradiation alone are needed. The treatment of advanced esophageal cancer must be directed toward palliation of symptoms. Newer endoscopic techniques, including the use of expansile metal stents, laser ablation, intraluminal high-dose rate brachytherapy, BICAP tumor probe, or photodynamic therapy, offer selected patients short-term palliation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:7533069

  14. Imaging of esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, R; DuBrow, R

    2004-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is a relatively uncommon gastrointestinal malignancy but carries a poor prognosis unless it is of early stage and can be surgically resected for cure. Resectability is determined by the stage of disease at diagnosis and therefore accurate staging is of importance in patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer. Imaging studies that play a role in the evaluation of esophageal cancer include barium studies, computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasound and positron emission tomography. Imaging provides important information regarding the local extent and any distant spread of disease, which in turn helps in determining optimal management for these patients. This review discusses the imaging findings that may be encountered with various imaging modalities in the diagnosis, staging and follow-up of esophageal cancer. PMID:18250021

  15. VIEW OF BRIDGE CONCRETE PIERS ?II?, ?III?, ?IV? AND ?V? ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BRIDGE CONCRETE PIERS ?II?, ?III?, ?IV? AND ?V? AND SOUTHWEST FACE OF PORTION OF SUPERSTRUCTURE CANTILEVER THROUGH TRUSS CANTILEVER AND SIMPLE THROUGH TRUSS SPAN, LOOKING NORTH. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  16. C-Met Inhibitor AMG 337, Oxaliplatin, Leucovorin Calcium, and Fluorouracil in Treating Patients With Advanced Stomach or Esophageal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-16

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Gastrointestinal Cancer; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  17. Esophageal cancer in Iran.

    PubMed

    Ghavamzadeh, A; Moussavi, A; Jahani, M; Rastegarpanah, M; Iravani, M

    2001-04-01

    Esophageal cancer is among the 10 most frequent cancers in the world. Iran is one of the known areas with a high incidence of esophageal cancer. Most of the patients in Iran have been reported from the north and northeast regions of the country. In one survey by the Iran Cancer Institute, 9% of all cancers and 27% of gastrointestinal cancers were esophageal carcinoma. The male to female ratio was 1.7/1. The distal portion of the esophagus is involved more often than other parts. Consumption of wheat flour, exposure to residues from opium pipes, drinking hot tea, and chewing nass (a mixture of tobacco, lime, ash, and other ingredients) are the suspect etiologic agents for esophageal cancer in Iran. Dysphagia, weight loss, anorexia, abdominal pain, and odynophagia are the common symptoms and signs of Iranian patients with esophageal cancer. For clinical staging, chest computed tomographic scanning is performed. Adenocarcinoma of the esophagus is not as common in Iran as in western countries. Public education, nutritional support, and eradication of opium addiction may decrease the morbidity and mortality that result from esophageal cancer. Surgery has traditionally been the mainstay of esophageal cancer treatment in Iran. Radiotherapy is mainly used postoperatively. The usual combination chemotherapy regimen is cisplatin plus flurouracil (5-Fu). Semin Oncol 28:153-157. PMID:11301377

  18. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... More information Clinical Trials to Screen for Esophageal Cancer Statistics Esophageal cancer statistics based on data from large groups of patients to be used as a general guide. General Resources on Coping ... for both patients and caregivers. National ...

  19. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  20. Esophageal cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    Cancer - esophagus ... Esophageal cancer is not common in the United States. It occurs most often in men over 50 years old. There are two main types of esophageal cancer: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. These two types ...

  1. Initial Stage Affects Survival Even After Complete Pathologic Remission is Achieved in Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer: Analysis of 70 Patients With Pathologic Major Response After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min Kyoung; Cho, Kyung-Ja; Park, Seung-Il; Kim, Yong Hee; Kim, Jong Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Shin, Ji Hoon; Jung, Hwoon Yong; Lee, Gin Hyug; Choi, Kee Don; Song, Ho June; Ryu, Jin-Sook; Kim, Sung-Bae

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To analyze outcomes and factors predictive for recurrence and survival in patients with operable esophageal carcinoma who achieved pathologic complete response (PCR) or microscopic residual disease (MRD) after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Materials and Methods: Outcomes were assessed in 70 patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer who achieved pathologic major response (53 with PCR and 17 with MRD) after preoperative CRT. Results: At a median follow-up of 38.6 months for surviving patients, 17 of 70 patients (24.3%) experienced disease recurrence and 31 (44.3%) died. Clinical stage (II vs III; p = 0.013) and pathologic response (PCR vs. MRD; p = 0.014) were independent predictors of disease recurrence. Median overall survival (OS) was 99.6 months (95% CI, 44.1-155.1 months) and the 5-year OS rate was 57%. Median recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 71.5 months (95% CI, 39.5-103.6 months) and the 5-year RFS rate was 51.3%. Median OS of patients with Stage II and Stage III disease was 108.8 months and 39.9 months, respectively, and the 5-year OS rates were 68.2% and 27.0%, respectively (p = 0.0003). In a subgroup of patients with PCR, median OS and RFS were also significantly different according to clinical stage. Multivariate analysis showed that clinical stage was an independent predictor of RFS (p = 0.01) and OS (p = 0.008). Conclusions: Even though patients achieved major response after preoperative CRT, pretreatment clinical stage is an important prognostic marker for recurrence and survival. Patients with MRD have an increased recurrence risk but similar survival compared with patients achieved PCR.

  2. A prospective evaluation of the impact of 18-F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography staging on survival for patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Blackstock, A. William . E-mail: ablackst@wfubmc.edu; Farmer, Michael R.; Lovato, James; Mishra, Girish; Melin, Susan A.; Oaks, Timothy; Aklilu, Mabea; Clark, Paige B.; Levine, Edward A.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of 18-F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the staging and prognosis of patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (LAEC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and October 2004, all patients with LAEC evaluated in the Department of Radiation Oncology were considered for enrollment into a Phase II trial of preoperative chemoradiation. Entry required a staging whole-body FDG-PET scan. Results: One hundred ten consecutive patients were evaluated; 38 were ineligible for reasons including treatment elsewhere, prior malignancy, or refusal of treatment. After conventional staging (clinical examination, endoscopic ultrasound, and chest/abdominal computerized tomography), 33 patients were ineligible because of metastatic disease or poor performance status. Of the remaining 39 patients, 23 were confirmed to have LAEC after FDG-PET staging and were treated in the Phase II trial (Cohort I). Sixteen patients, however, had FDG-PET findings consistent with occult metastatic disease and were deemed ineligible for the trial but were treated with curative intent (Cohort II). The 2-year survival rate for the 23 patients in Cohort I was 64%, compared with 17% (p = 0.003) for patients in Cohort II (FDG-PET positive). Conclusions: More than one-third of patients determined to have LAEC with conventional staging were upstaged with the use of FDG-PET. Despite comparable therapy, upstaging with FDG-PET predicts poor 2-year survival.

  3. Herpetic esophagitis

    SciTech Connect

    Shortsleeve, M.J.; Gauvin, G.P.; Gardner, R.C.; Greenberg, M.S.

    1981-12-01

    Four patients with herpetic esophagitis were examined. In three of them, the presenting symptom was odynophagia. Early in the course of herpetic esophagitis, shallow round and oval ulcers were seen on barium esophagograms. Later, the ulcers filled with fibrinous exudate, forming nodular plaques that projected into the esophageal lumen. Although these findings are diagnostic of esophagitis, they are not specific for a herpes virus infection. The definitive diagnosis must be established by histologic examination, which demonstrates the cytopathic effect of the herpes virus infection within the squamous epithelium.

  4. Thermosonimetry of the phase II/III transition of hexachloroethane.

    PubMed

    Lee, O; Koga, Y; Wade, A P

    1990-09-01

    A thermosonimetric study has shown that the Phase II/III polymorphic transition of hexachloroethane emits acoustic signals. This solid-solid phase transition is known to occur by a nucleation-growth process during which a nucleus of the new phase, once formed, grows at the expense of the mother phase to form a complete crystal without fracture. Acoustic emissions from a conditioned multi-crystal sample have been used to study the transition. Acoustic activity correlated well with dilatometric measurements. Frequency analysis on waveforms of many hundreds of individual acoustic emissions revealed marked differences between individual signals. Principal-components analysis on 24 signal features revealed a single dispersed cluster with a highly non-uniform distribution of signals. These experiments provided highly reproducible average power spectra. Time-resolved acoustic power spectra were also generated. These additional types of information cannot be obtained by other techniques. PMID:18965034

  5. Clinical results of proton beam therapy for twenty older patients with esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Takashi; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Azami, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Hisashi; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Motohisa; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Tsukiyama, Iwao; Hareyama, Masato; Kikuchi, Yasuhiro; Nemoto, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Background In an aging society, increasing number of older patients are diagnosed with esophageal cancer. The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of proton beam therapy for older patients with esophageal cancer. Patients and methods. Older patients (age: ? 65 years) newly diagnosed with esophageal cancer between January 2009 and June 2013 were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent either proton beam therapy alone or proton beam therapy with initial X-ray irradiation. Toxicities were evaluated using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results Twenty patients were eligible for this study and all completed the treatment. The median age was 78 years (range: 6589 years) and the median follow-up time was 26.5 months (range: 662 months). Seven patients had lymph node metastases and 10 had stage II/III cancer. The median dose of proton beam therapy was 72.6 Gy relative biological dose effectiveness (RBE) (range: 6674.8 Gy [RBE]) for proton beam therapy alone and 33 Gy (RBE) (range: 30.839.6 Gy [RBE]; total dose range: 66.875.6 Gy [RBE]) for proton beam therapy with initial X-ray irradiation. The 2-year overall survival rate was 81.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 62.4%100%), and the 2-year local control rate was 89.4% (95% CI: 75.5%100%). Grade 2 or 3 toxicities occurred in some cases; however, no grade 4 or 5 toxicity was observed. Conclusions High-dose (6675.6 Gy [RBE]) proton beam therapy without chemotherapy was an efficacious and safe treatment for older patients with esophageal cancer. PMID:26834524

  6. Pilot Trial of CRLX101 in Treatment of Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Stomach, Gastroesophageal, or Esophageal Cancer That Cannot be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  7. Proton Beam Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Steven H.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing; Wei, Caimiao; Myles, Bevan; Guo Xiaomao; Palmer, Matthew; Mohan, Radhe; Swisher, Stephen G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Proton beam therapy (PBT) is a promising modality for the management of thoracic malignancies. We report our preliminary experience of treating esophageal cancer patients with concurrent chemotherapy (CChT) and PBT (CChT/PBT) at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: This is an analysis of 62 esophageal cancer patients enrolled on a prospective study evaluating normal tissue toxicity from CChT/PBT from 2006 to 2010. Patients were treated with passive scattering PBT with two- or three-field beam arrangement using 180 to 250 MV protons. We used the Kaplan-Meier method to assess time-to-event outcomes and compared the distributions between groups using the log-rank test. Results: The median follow-up time was 20.1 months for survivors. The median age was 68 years (range, 38-86). Most patients were males (82%) who had adenocarcinomas (76%) and Stage II-III disease (84%). The median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (RBE [relative biologic equivalence]) (range, 36-57.6). The most common grade 2 to 3 acute toxicities from CChT/PBT were esophagitis (46.8%), fatigue (43.6%), nausea (33.9%), anorexia (30.1%), and radiation dermatitis (16.1%). There were two cases of grade 2 and 3 radiation pneumonitis and two cases of grade 5 toxicities. A total of 29 patients (46.8%) received preoperative CChT/PBT, with one postoperative death. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate for the surgical cohort was 28%, and the pCR and near CR rates (0%-1% residual cells) were 50%. While there were significantly fewer local-regional recurrences in the preoperative group (3/29) than in the definitive CChT/PBT group (16/33) (log-rank test, p = 0.005), there were no differences in distant metastatic (DM)-free interval or overall survival (OS) between the two groups. Conclusions: This is the first report of patients treated with PBT/CChT for esophageal cancer. Our data suggest that this modality is associated with a few severe toxicities, but the pathologic response and clinical outcomes are encouraging. Prospective comparison with more traditional approach is warranted.

  8. Esophageal Stenosis Associated With Tumor Regression in Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer: Frequency and Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Atsumi, Kazushige; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Arimura, Hidetaka; Terashima, Kotaro; Matsuki, Takaomi; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Tsurumaru, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Asai, Kaori; Matsumoto, Keiji; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine clinical factors for predicting the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 109 patients with esophageal cancer of T1-4 and Stage I-III who were treated with definitive radiotherapy and achieved a complete response of their primary lesion at Kyushu University Hospital between January 1998 and December 2007. Esophageal stenosis was evaluated using esophagographic images within 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. We investigated the correlation between esophageal stenosis after radiotherapy and each of the clinical factors with regard to tumors and therapy. For validation of the correlative factors for esophageal stenosis, an artificial neural network was used to predict the esophageal stenotic ratio. Results: Esophageal stenosis tended to be more severe and more frequent in T3-4 cases than in T1-2 cases. Esophageal stenosis in cases with full circumference involvement tended to be more severe and more frequent than that in cases without full circumference involvement. Increases in wall thickness tended to be associated with increases in esophageal stenosis severity and frequency. In the multivariate analysis, T stage, extent of involved circumference, and wall thickness of the tumor region were significantly correlated to esophageal stenosis (p = 0.031, p < 0.0001, and p = 0.0011, respectively). The esophageal stenotic ratio predicted by the artificial neural network, which learned these three factors, was significantly correlated to the actual observed stenotic ratio, with a correlation coefficient of 0.864 (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Our study suggested that T stage, extent of involved circumference, and esophageal wall thickness of the tumor region were useful to predict the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer.

  9. Epidemiology of esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuwei

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal cancer (EsC) is one of the least studied and deadliest cancers worldwide because of its extremely aggressive nature and poor survival rate. It ranks sixth among all cancers in mortality. In retrospective studies of EsC, smoking, hot tea drinking, red meat consumption, poor oral health, low intake of fresh fruit and vegetables, and low socioeconomic status have been associated with a higher risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Barretts esophagus is clearly recognized as a risk factor for EsC, and dysplasia remains the only factor useful for identifying patients at increased risk, for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma in clinical practice. Here, we investigated the epidemiologic patterns and causes of EsC. Using population based cancer data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program of the United States; we generated the most up-to-date stage distribution and 5-year relative survival by stage at diagnosis for 1998-2009. Special note should be given to the fact that esophageal cancer, mainly adenocarcinoma, is one of the very few cancers that is contributing to increasing death rates (20%) among males in the United States. To further explore the mechanism of development of EsC will hopefully decrease the incidence of EsC and improve outcomes. PMID:24039351

  10. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... lower part of the esophagus near the stomach. Squamous cell carcinoma - the most common type of esophageal cancer worldwide. ... use, and diseases such as achalasia can cause squamous cell carcinoma, while gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can lead to ...

  11. Esophageal culture

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for infection-causing germs in a sample of tissue from the esophagus. ... Culture - esophageal ... A sample of tissue from your esophagus is needed. The sample is ... or viruses. Other tests may be done to determine what medicine ...

  12. Esophageal perforation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or call 911 if: You have recently had surgery or a tube placed in the esophagus and you have pain, problems swallowing or breathing You have another reason to suspect that you may have esophageal perforation.

  13. Cutaneous metastases from esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllou, Stamatina; Georgia, Doulami; Gavriella-Zoi, Vrakopoulou; Dimitrios, Mpistarakis; Stulianos, Katsaragakis; Theodoros, Liakakos; Georgios, Zografos; Dimitrios, Theodorou

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to present 2 rare cases of cutaneous metastases originated from adenocarcinoma of the gastro-esophageal junction, thus, underline the need for early diagnosis and possible treatment of suspicious skin lesions among patients with esophageal malignancy. Metastatic cancer to the skin originated from internal malignancies, mostly lung cancer, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer, constitute 0.5 to 9% of all metastatic cancers. (5 , 8 , 15) Skin metastases, mainly from squamous cell carcinomas of the esophagus, are rarely reported. Cutaneous metastasis is a finding indicating progressiveness of the disease. (17) More precisely, median survival is estimated approximately 4.7 months. (2 , 14) This study is a retrospective review of 2 cases of patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and a review of the literature. Two patients aged 60 and 32 years old, respectively, underwent esophagectomy. Both pathologic reports disclosed adenocarcinoma of the gastro-esophageal junction staged T3 N2 M0 (stage IIIB). During follow-up time, the 2 patients were diagnosed with cutaneous metastases originated from the primary esophageal tumor 11 and 4 months after surgery, respectively. The first patient is alive 37 months after diagnosis, while the second one died 16 months after surgery. Cutaneous metastasis caused by esophageal adenocarcinoma is possible. Therefore, follow-up of patients who were diagnosed with esophageal malignancy and underwent esophagectomy is mandatory in order to reveal early surgical stages. PMID:25785344

  14. A systematic review and meta-analysis of somatic and germline DNA sequence biomarkers of esophageal cancer survival, therapy response and stage

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, J. M.; Middleton, M. R.; Tomlinson, I.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There is an urgent need for biomarkers to help predict prognosis and guide management of esophageal cancer. This review identifies, evaluates and meta-analyses the evidence for reported somatic and germline DNA sequence biomarkers of outcome and stage. Methods A systematic review was carried out of the PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases (20 August 2014), in conjunction with the ASCO Level of Evidence scale for biomarker research. Meta-analyses were carried out for all reported markers associated with outcome measures by more than one study. Results Four thousand and four articles were identified, 762 retrieved and 182 studies included. There were 65 reported markers of survival or recurrence 12 (18.5%) were excluded due to multiple comparisons. Following meta-analysis, significant associations were seen for six tumor variants (mutant TP53 and PIK3CA, copy number gain of ERBB2/HER2, CCND1 and FGF3, and chromosomal instability/ploidy) and seven germline polymorphisms: ERCC1 rs3212986, ERCC2 rs1799793, TP53 rs1042522, MDM2 rs2279744, TYMS rs34743033, ABCB1 rs1045642 and MTHFR rs1801133. Twelve germline markers of treatment complications were reported; 10 were excluded. Two tumor and 15 germline markers (11 excluded) of chemo (radio)therapy response were reported. Following meta-analysis, associations were demonstrated for mutant TP53, ERCC1 rs11615 and XRCC1 rs25487. There were 41 tumor/germline reported markers of stage; 27 (65.9%) were excluded. Conclusions Numerous DNA markers of outcome and stage have been reported, yet few are backed by high-quality evidence. Despite this, a small number of variants appear reliable. These merit evaluation in prospective trials, within the context of high-throughput sequencing and gene expression. PMID:25214541

  15. Prognostic factors in patients with thoracic esophageal carcinoma staged pT1-4aN0M0 undergone esophagectomy with three-field lymphadenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaohui; Zheng, Xiongwei; Chen, Yuanmei; Lin, Yu; Zheng, Qingfeng; Zhu, Kunshou; Pan, Jianji

    2015-01-01

    Background To analyze prognostic factors in patients with thoracic esophageal carcinoma staged pT1-4aN0M0 and undergone esophagectomy with 3-field lymphadenectomy and to evaluate the effect of postoperative radiotherapy. Methods From January 1993 to March 2007, 770 patients with stage pT1-4aN0M0 underwent 3-field lymphadenectomy at Fujian Province Cancer Hospital, China were enrolled for analysis. The study consisted of 770 patients with stage pT1-4aN0M0 who underwent 3-field lymphadenectomy at Fujian Province Cancer Hospital, China. A total of 687 had received surgery only, and 83 patients had undergone surgery followed by postoperative radiotherapy. Radiation dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Results The overall survival rates at 1, 3, 5, and 10 years were 92.9%, 80.8%, 71.7% and 57.4%, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that age and T staging were two independent factors on prognoses. Five-year survival in cases younger and older than 60 were 76.5% vs. 63.3% (P=0.001), while those of pT1, pT2, pT3 and pT4a were 83.8%, 78.8%, 67.8% and 54.1%, respectively (P=0.000). Five-year survival in group of simple surgery was 71.3%, compared with 74.5% in group of surgery plus postoperative radiotherapy (P=0.763), while stratified analysis indicated that postoperative radiotherapy was able to boost the survival of patients in pT4a which were 72.4% vs. 33.8% (P=0.036) and to lower relapse rate of tumor bed in patients with pT4a (P=0.005). Multivariate analysis showed that age and T staging were two independent factors on prognoses. Conclusions Patients with high T staging and at an age more than 60 turned out bad prognoses, neither could postoperative radiotherapy improve their survival. PMID:26697442

  16. A Phase I/II Study of Oblimersen Plus Cisplatin and Fluorouracil in Gastric & Esophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-10

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  17. ARSENIC INTERACTION WITH IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST: IMPLICATIONS FOR ARSENIC REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zerovalent iron is being used in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remediate groundwater arsenic contamination. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron under anaerobic conditions. The interaction between arsenic and this green...

  18. Esophageal Microbiome in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J. Kirk; Fang, Rui; Wagner, Brandie D.; Choe, Ha Na; Kelly, Caleb J.; Schroeder, Shauna; Moore, Wendy; Stevens, Mark J.; Yeckes, Alyson; Amsden, Katie; Kagalwalla, Amir F.; Zalewski, Angelika; Hirano, Ikuo; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Henry, Lauren N.; Masterson, Joanne C.; Robertson, Charles E.; Leung, Donald Y.; Pace, Norman R.; Ackerman, Steven J.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Fillon, Sophie A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The microbiome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of allergic and inflammatory diseases. The mucosa affected by eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is composed of a stratified squamous epithelia and contains intraepithelial eosinophils. To date, no studies have identified the esophageal microbiome in patients with EoE or the impact of treatment on these organisms. The aim of this study was to identify the esophageal microbiome in EoE and determine whether treatments change this profile. We hypothesized that clinically relevant alterations in bacterial populations are present in different forms of esophagitis. Design In this prospective study, secretions from the esophageal mucosa were collected from children and adults with EoE, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) and normal mucosa using the Esophageal String Test (EST). Bacterial load was determined using quantitative PCR. Bacterial communities, determined by 16S rRNA gene amplification and 454 pyrosequencing, were compared between health and disease. Results Samples from a total of 70 children and adult subjects were examined. Bacterial load was increased in both EoE and GERD relative to normal subjects. In subjects with EoE, load was increased regardless of treatment status or degree of mucosal eosinophilia compared with normal. Haemophilus was significantly increased in untreated EoE subjects as compared with normal subjects. Streptococcus was decreased in GERD subjects on proton pump inhibition as compared with normal subjects. Conclusions Diseases associated with mucosal eosinophilia are characterized by a different microbiome from that found in the normal mucosa. Microbiota may contribute to esophageal inflammation in EoE and GERD. PMID:26020633

  19. Confirmatory seamless phase II/III clinical trials with hypotheses selection at interim: opportunities and limitations.

    PubMed

    Jenniso, Christopher; Turnbull, Bruce W

    2006-08-01

    This is a discussion of the following two papers in this special issue on adaptive designs: 'Confirmatory seamless phase II/III clinical trials with hypotheses selection at interim: General concepts' by Frank Bretz, Heinz Schmidli, Franz Knig, Amy Racine and Willi Maurer, and 'Confirmatory seamless phase II/III clinical trials with hypotheses selection at interim: Applications and practical considerations' by Heinz Schmidli, Frank Bretz, Amy Racine and Willi Maurer. PMID:16972717

  20. [Eosinophilic esophagitis].

    PubMed

    Kusunose, Hiroaki; Ohara, Shuichi

    2015-07-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a clinicopathologic condition of increasing recognition and prevalence. Because of elevated total IgE levels and high rates of concurrent allergic diseases compared with the general population, EoE appears to be an antigen-driven immunologic process that caused by allergens like food or aeroallergens. EoE is a disease that features dense intraepithelial infiltration by eosinophils which cause excessive mucosal immunologic reactions which cause several symptoms that mostly involve dysphagia. For establishment of the diagnosis, infiltration of eosinophils (? 20 eosinophils/HPF) should be identified in an esophageal mucosal biopsy specimen. In treatment of patients have a possibility of EoE, proton-pump inhibitors(PPIs) must be tried as first choice. Other proved therapeutic options include topical or systemic corticosteroids, chronic dietary elimination, and esophageal dilation, but local administration of glucocorticoids has recently been reported as useful therapy for EoE. PMID:26165084

  1. Everolimus and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Stomach or Esophageal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-10

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  2. Esophageal perforation during or after conformal radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hai-yan; Ma, Xiu-mei; Ye, Ming; Hou, Yan-li; Xie, Hua-Ying; Bai, Yong-rui

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the risk factors and prognosis for patients with esophageal perforation occurring during or after radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. We retrospectively analyzed 322 patients with esophageal carcinoma. These patients received radiotherapy for unresectable esophageal tumors, residual tumors after operation, or local recurrence. Of these, 12 had radiotherapy to the esophagus before being admitted, 68 patients had concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT), and 18 patients had esophageal perforation after RT (5.8%). Covered self-expandable metallic stents were placed in 11 patients. Two patients continued RT after stenting and control of infection; one of these suffered a new perforation, and the other had a massive hemorrhage. The median overall survival was 2 months (03 months) compared with 17 months in the non-perforation group. In univariate analysis, the Karnofsky performance status (KPS) being ?70, age younger than 60, T4 stage, a second course of radiotherapy to the esophagus, extracapsular lymph nodes (LN) involving the esophagus, a total dose >100 Gy (biologically effective dose?10), and CRT were risk factors for perforation. In multivariate analysis, age younger than 60, extracapsular LN involving the esophagus, T4 stage, and a second course of radiotherapy to the esophagus were risk factors. In conclusion, patients with T4 stage, extracapsular LN involving the esophagus, and those receiving a second course of RT should be given particular care to avoid perforation. The prognosis after perforation was poor. PMID:24914102

  3. [Is an esophageal transit scintigram necessary in patients with gastroesophageal reflux?].

    PubMed

    T?ranu, D; Oproiu, C; Aposteanu, G; Jovin, G; Murgoci, P; Timi?, E; Oproiu, A

    1989-01-01

    Efficient esophageal clearance has an important defence role in the pathogenesis of the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Many GERD patients have esophageal disturbances associated with or secondary to reflux, producing delayed clearance. This delay exposes the esophageal mucosa to the reflux acid content. To determine esophageal transit we scanned the esophageal transit of a 15 ml bolus containing colloidal 300/cCi 99m Tc. The esophageal transit was calculated in seconds according to formula E.T. = T 1/2 x 5. The study included 74 GERD patients. The following investigations were carried out in all the cases: esophageal X-ray, GER scintigram, endoscopy, esophageal biopsy, Bernstein test and esophageal transit scintigram. Endoscopy revealed lesions of the esophagus (of 1st, 2nd and 3rd degree) in 39 patients, Barrett syndrome in 8 cases and normal in 27. Esophageal transit scanning was normal in 18 cases (24%), and prolonged in 56 cases (76%). Only 7 (39%) of the 18 patients with a normal transit presented lesions of the mucosa, the latter being more frequent in patients with a prolonged transit, i.e. 40 of 56 patients (71.5%). The mean value of the transit in different degrees of esophagitis (I, II, III) and Barrett syndrome were: 12.73 +/- 5.36; 13.30 +/- 7.90; 10.35 +/- 5.78; 17.25 +/- 11.17. In conclusion esophageal transit scanning is a useful test in GERD patients as it has a prognostic value. A prolonged esophageal transit is frequently associated with lesions, the more severe the slower is the transit. Moreover the test may indicate certain drugs acting upon the esophageal motor disturbances. PMID:2573947

  4. Esophageal strictures and diverticula.

    PubMed

    Smith, C Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Esophageal disease and dysfunction of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) manifesting as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) particularly, is the most common of all gastrointestinal conditions impacting patients on a day-to-day basis. LES dysfunction can lead to anatomic changes to the distal esophagus, with GERD-mediated changes being benign stricture or progression of GERD to Barrett's esophagus and even esophageal cancer, and LES hypertension impairing esophageal emptying with subsequent development of pulsion esophageal diverticulum. This article details the causes, clinical presentation, workup, and treatment of esophageal stricture and epiphrenic esophageal diverticulum. Other types of esophageal diverticula (Zenker's and midesophageal) are also covered. PMID:25965138

  5. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Merves, Jamie; Muir, Amanda; Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna Modayur; Cianferoni, Antonella; Wang, Mei-Lun; Spergel, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To review the understanding of the pathogenesis of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and the role of the immune system in the disease process. Data Sources Peer-reviewed articles on EoE from PubMed searching for Eosinophilic Esophagitis and fibrosis in the period of 1995 to 2013. Study Selection Studies on the clinical and immunologic features, pathogenesis, and management of EoE. Results Recent work has revealed that thymic stromal lymphopoietin and basophil have an increased role in the pathogenesis of disease. Additional understanding on the role of fibrosis in EoE is emerging. Conclusion The incidence of EoE is increasing like most atopic disease. Similar to other allergic diseases, EoE is treated with topical steroids and/or allergen avoidance. PMID:24566295

  6. CHEMICAL INTERACTIONS OF ARSENATE, ARSENITE, PHOSPHATE, AND SILICATE WITH IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular zerovalent iron has been proposed to be used as a medium in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remove arsenic from contaminated groundwater. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust (carbonate green rust, or CGR) is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron under ...

  7. CHEMICAL INTERACTIONS OF ARSENATE, ARSENITE, PHOSPHATE, AND SILICATE WITH IRON (II,III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular zerovalent iron has been proposed to be used as a medium in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remove arsenic from contaminated groundwater. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust (carbonate green rust, or CGR) is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron under ...

  8. ARSENATE AND ARSENITE SORPTION AND ARSENITE OXIDATION BY IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron (II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron that is being used in permeable reactive barriers to remediate groundwater arsenic contamination. To optimize the design of iron barriers, it is important to evaluate the influence of geoch...

  9. VIEW OF BRIDGE SUBSTRUCTURE CONCRETE PIERS ?II?, ?III?, ?1V? AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BRIDGE SUBSTRUCTURE CONCRETE PIERS ?II?, ?III?, ?1V? AND ?V? AND SUPERSTRUCTURE MAIN BRIDGE CANTILEVER THROUGH TRUSS CANTILEVER SPAN AND SIMPLE THROUGH TRUSS SPAN LOOKING NORTHWEST AND UP. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  10. Esophageal dilation in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joel E

    2015-10-01

    Tissue remodeling with scaring is common in adult EoE patients with long standing disease. This is the major factor contributing to their complaints of solid food dysphagia and recurrent food impactions. The best tests to define the degree of remodeling are barium esophagram, high resolution manometry and endoscopy. Many physicians are fearful to dilate EoE patients because of concerns about mucosal tears and perforations. However, multiple recent case series attest to the safety of esophageal dilation and its efficacy with many patients having symptom relief for an average of two years. This chapter will review the sordid history of esophageal dilation in EoE patients and outline how to perform this procedure safely. The key is graduated dilation over one to several sessions to a diameter of 15-18mm. Postprocedural pain is to be expected and mucosal tears are a sign of successful dilation, not complications. In some healthy adults, occasional dilation may be preferred to regular use of medications or restricted diets. This approach is now supported by recent EoE consensus statements and societal guidelines. PMID:26552780

  11. Regulatory Fe(II/III) heme: the reconstruction of a molecule's biography.

    PubMed

    Khl, Toni; Imhof, Diana

    2014-09-22

    More than 20 years of research on heme as a temporary effector molecule of proteins have revealed its widespread impact on virtually all primary functions in the human organism. As our understanding of this influence is still growing, a comprehensive overview of compiled data will give fresh impetus for creativity and developing new strategies in heme-related research. From known data concerning heme-regulated proteins and their involvement in the development of diseases, we provide concise information of Fe(II/III) heme as a regulator and the availability of "regulatory heme". The latter is dependent on the balance between free and bound Fe(II/III) heme, here termed "hemeostasis". Imbalance of this system can lead to the development of diseases that were not always attributed to this small molecule. Diseases such as cancer or Alzheimer's disease highlight the reawakened interest in heme, whose function was previously believed to be completely understood. PMID:25196849

  12. Photochemical and photophysical properties of three carbon-bridged fullerene dimers: C121 (I, II, III).

    PubMed

    Ren, Tongxiang; Sun, Baoyun; Chen, Zhenling; Qu, Li; Yuan, Hui; Gao, Xingfa; Wang, Shukuan; He, Rui; Zhao, Feng; Zhao, Yuliang; Liu, Zhongshi; Jing, Xiping

    2007-06-14

    The photochemical and photophysical properties of the three C121 isomers (I, II, III) were investigated with MADLI-TOF-MS, UV-vis spectra, fluorescence spectra, absorption spectra of their DMA complexes, and theoretical calculations. The three isomers of C121 (I, II, III) have different stabilities under laser irradiation, but isomer I and isomer II show good stability against the heat-induced conversion between different isomers: No conversion between the isomers was found after heating the mixture of isomer I and isomer II at 353 K for 12 h in Ar atmosphere. The results of UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectra indicate that interactions between two C60 moieties of C60=C=C60 in the ground and singlet states are not significant, C121 (I, II, III) behaves as an electron-acceptor similar to C60. These indicate that the formation of the fullerene chain structure (e.g., C60=C=C60) does not disturb the photochemical and photophysical properties of the C60 monomer itself, even that the properties were enhanced by the formation of the polymer. This is significant for the C60 polymer in photochemical or photoelectronic applications in which C60=C=C60 can be an excellent basic unit of polymers. PMID:17506544

  13. A Case of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Pancreatic Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Choulki; Kim, Youn Hwa; Hwang, Eun Jung; Na, Ki Yong; Kim, Kyung-Yup; Park, Jae Hyun; Chang, Young Woon

    2013-01-01

    Solitary pancreatic metastasis of esophageal cancer is extremely rare. We report the case of a 58-year-old male admitted with esophageal cancer. Additional asymptomatic solitary hepatic and pancreatic masses were observed in the staging work-up for esophageal cancer. The hepatic mass was confirmed as a primary hepatocellular carcinoma with an ultrasound-guided needle biopsy. An esophagectomy with a distal pancreatectomy and radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma were performed. Histologically, the pancreatic mass was confirmed to be a metastasis from the esophageal cancer. The patient has been followed up with chemotherapy. PMID:23614134

  14. Esophageal cancer: Recent advances in screening, targeted therapy, and management

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Puja; Kim, Min P.; Dunkin, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal cancer remains on the rise worldwide and despite aggressive research in the field of gastrointestinal oncology, the survival remains poor. Much remains to be defined in esophageal cancer, including the development of an effective screening tool, identifying a good tumor marker for surveillance purposes, ways to target esophageal cancer stem cells as well as circulating tumor cells, and developing minimally invasive protocols to treat early-stage disease. The goal of this chapter is to highlight some of the recent advances and ongoing research in the field of esophageal cancer. PMID:25395880

  15. Robotic benign esophageal procedures.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Jennifer M; Onaitis, Mark W

    2014-05-01

    Robotic master-slave devices can assist surgeons to perform minimally invasive esophageal operations with approaches that have already been demonstrated using laparoscopy and thoracoscopy. Robotic-assisted surgery for benign esophageal disease is described for the treatment of achalasia, epiphrenic diverticula, refractory reflux, paraesophageal hernias, duplication cysts, and benign esophageal masses, such as leiomyomas. Indications and contraindications for robotic surgery in benign esophageal disease should closely approximate the indications for laparoscopic and thoracoscopic procedures. Given the early application of the technology and paucity of clinical evidence, there are currently no procedures for which robotic esophageal surgery is the clinically proven preferred approach. PMID:24780427

  16. Assessment of esophageal carcinoma undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy with quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    LEI, JING; HAN, QIAN; ZHU, SHAOCHENG; SHI, DAPENG; DOU, SHEWEI; SU, ZIHUA; XU, XIAO

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) can predict an early response in primary esophageal carcinoma patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy. A total of 25 patients with who were pathologically confirmed stage IIIII esophageal carcinoma underwent quantitative DCE-MRI prior to chemoradiotherapy, and at 3 weeks post-treatment, the quantitative parameters [Ktrans (volume transfer constant; the rate at which contrast agent distributes from the plasma to the EES), Kep (rate contrast; the rate at which the contrast agent that has diffused to the EES returns to the plasma) and Ve (the contrast agent percentage in the space of the extracellular fluid)] were analyzed respectively. The 25 cases were categorized as a complete response (CR) or a partial response (PR). An independent samples Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the quantitative parameters between CR and PR. A receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) was used to determine the best predictor. In total, 17 patients were in the CR group and 8 patients were in the PR group. Pretreatment Ktrans, Kep and Ve values were 0.540.17/min, 1.120.46/min and 0.370.14, respectively, in the CR group, and 0.400.21/min, 1.070.37/min and 0.400.22, respectively, in the PR group. There was a significant difference between the two groups for Ktrans, but there were no significant differences between the two groups for Kep and Ve. The Ktrans, Kep and Ve values at 3 weeks post-treatment were 0.330.11/min, 0.860.31/min and 0.660.05, respectively, in the CR group, and 0.620.22/min, 1.190.39/min and 0.450.19, respectively, in the PR group. The corresponding U values were ?3.319, ?1.719 and ?2.628, respectively, and the P-values were 0.006, 0.119 and 0.021, respectively. The areas under the ROC curve of Ktrans prior to chemoradiotherapy, and of Ktrans and Kep at 3 weeks post-treatment were 0.648, 0.741 and 0.796, respectively. In conclusion, DCE-MRI can predict an early response in primary esophageal carcinoma following 3 weeks of concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Ktrans prior to chemoradiotherapy, and Ktrans and Kep at 3 weeks post-treatment are sensitive prediction parameters.

  17. Staging of neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Glazer, G.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters and 10 case studies. Some of the chapter titles are: Metastatic Disease to the Thorax, CT Staging of Esophageal Carcinoma, CT Staging of Renal Carcinoma, CT Staging of Lymphoma, Staging of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, and Initital Experience with MRI Staging of Neoplasms.

  18. Abiotic selenium redox transformations in the presence of Fe(II,III) oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Myneni, S.C.B.; Tokunaga, T.K.; Brown, G.E. Jr.

    1997-11-07

    Many suboxic sediments and soils contain an Fe(II,III) oxide called green rust. Spectroscopic evidence showed that selenium reduces from an oxidation state of +VI to 0 in the presence of green rust at rates comparable with those found in sediments. Selenium speciation was different in solid and aqueous phases. These redox reactions represent an abiotic pathway for selenium cycling in natural environments, which has previously been considered to be mediated principally by microorganisms. Similar green rust-mediated abiotic redox reactions are likely to be involved in the mobility of several other trace elements and contaminants in the environment. 27 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Diet and esophageal disease

    PubMed Central

    Dawsey, Sanford M.; Fagundes, Renato B.; Jacobson, Brian C.; Kresty, Laura A.; Mallery, Susan R.; Paski, Shirley; van den Brandt, Piet A.

    2014-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on macronutrients, dietary patterns, and risk of adenocarcinoma in Barretts esophagus; micronutrients, trace elements, and risk of Barretts esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma; the role of mate consumption in the development of squamous cell carcinoma; the relationship between energy excess and development of esophageal adenocarcinoma; and the nutritional management of the esophageal cancer patient. PMID:25266021

  20. Esophageal lichen planus*

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Janine Pichler; Uribe, Natalia Caballero; Abulafia, Luna Azulay; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the skin, mucous membranes, nails and scalp. Esophageal lichen planus is a rarely reported manifestation of lichen planus, presenting itself commonly in middle-aged women, with symptoms such as dysphagia. We report a case of esophageal lichen planus in a 54-year-old woman associated with oral, cutaneous and ungual lichen planus. Although lichen planus is a disorder well known by dermatologists, reports of esophageal lichen planus are rare in dermatologic literature. The esophageal lichen planus is little known and underdiagnosed, with a significant delay between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis. PMID:26131872

  1. Aluminium substitution in iron(II III)-layered double hydroxides: Formation and cationic order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruby, Christian; Abdelmoula, Mustapha; Aissa, Rabha; Medjahdi, Ghouti; Brunelli, Michela; Franois, Michel

    2008-09-01

    The formation and the modifications of the structural properties of an aluminium-substituted iron(II-III)-layered double hydroxide (LDH) of formula Fe4IIFe(2-6y)IIIAl6yIII (OH) 12 SO 4, 8H 2O are followed by pH titration curves, Mssbauer spectroscopy and high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction using synchrotron radiation. Rietveld refinements allow to build a structural model for hydroxysulphate green rust, GR(SO 42-), i.e. y=0, in which a bilayer of sulphate anions points to the Fe 3+ species. A cationic order is proposed to occur in both GR(SO 42-) and aluminium-substituted hydroxysulphate green rust when y<0.08. Variation of the cell parameters and a sharp decrease in average crystal size and anisotropy are detected for an aluminium content as low as y=0.01. The formation of Al-GR(SO 42-) is preceded by the successive precipitation of Fe III and Al III (oxy)hydroxides. Adsorption of more soluble Al III species onto the initially formed ferric oxyhydroxide may be responsible for this slowdown of crystal growth. Therefore, the insertion of low aluminium amount ( y0.01) could be an interesting way for increasing the surface reactivity of iron(II-III) LDH that maintains constant the quantity of the reactive Fe II species of the material.

  2. Recent Advances of Cobalt(II/III) Redox Couples for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Applications.

    PubMed

    Giribabu, Lingamallu; Bolligarla, Ramababu; Panigrahi, Mallika

    2015-08-01

    In recent years dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have emerged as one of the alternatives for the global energy crisis. DSSCs have achieved a certified efficiency of >11% by using the I(-) /I3 (-) redox couple. In order to commercialize the technology almost all components of the device have to be improved. Among the various components of DSSCs, the redox couple that regenerates the oxidized sensitizer plays a crucial role in achieving high efficiency and durability of the cell. However, the I(-) /I3 (-) redox couple has certain limitations such as the absorption of triiodide up to 430 nm and the volatile nature of iodine, which also corrodes the silver-based current collectors. These limitations are obstructing the commercialization of this technology. For this reason, one has to identify alternative redox couples. In this regard, the Co(II/III) redox couple is found to be the best alternative to the existing I(-) /I3 (-) redox couple. Recently, DSSC test cell efficiency has risen up to 13% by using the cobalt redox couple. This review emphasizes the recent development of Co(II/III) redox couples for DSSC applications. PMID:26081939

  3. Bleeding esophageal varices

    MedlinePLUS

    ... if the veins break open. Any type of chronic liver disease can cause esophageal varices. Varices can also occur ... People with chronic liver disease and esophageal varices may have no symptoms. If there is only a small amount of bleeding, the only ...

  4. Chemoprevention of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, Gary D. Wang Lishu; Chen Tong

    2007-11-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is responsible for approximately one-sixth of all cancer-related mortality worldwide. This malignancy has a multifactorial etiology involving several environmental, dietary and genetic factors. Since esophageal cancer has often metastasized at the time of diagnosis, current treatment modalities offer poor survival and cure rates. Chemoprevention offers a viable alternative that could well be effective against the disease. Clinical investigations have shown that primary chemoprevention of this disease is feasible if potent inhibitory agents are identified. The Fischer 344 (F-344) rat model of esophageal SCC has been used extensively to investigate the biology of the disease, and to identify chemopreventive agents that could be useful in human trials. Multiple compounds that inhibit tumor initiation by esophageal carcinogens have been identified using this model. These include several isothiocyanates, diallyl sulfide and polyphenolic compounds. These compounds influence the metabolic activation of esophageal carcinogens resulting in reduced genetic (DNA) damage. Recently, a few agents have been shown to inhibit the progression of preneoplastic lesions in the rat esophagus into tumors. These agents include inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and c-Jun [a component of activator protein-1 (AP-1)]. Using a food-based approach to cancer prevention, we have shown that freeze-dried berry preparations inhibit both the initiation and promotion/progression stages of esophageal SCC in F-344 rats. These observations have led to a clinical trial in China to evaluate the ability of freeze-dried strawberries to influence the progression of esophageal dysplasia to SCC.

  5. Randomized Phase 2 Trial of S1 and Oxaliplatin-Based Chemoradiotherapy With or Without Induction Chemotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Dok Hyun; Jang, Geundoo; Kim, Jong Hoon; Kim, Yong-Hee; Kim, Ji Youn; Kim, Hyeong Ryul; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Lee, Gin-Hyug; Song, Ho Young; Cho, Kyung-Ja; Ryu, Jin-Sook; Kim, Sung-Bae

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To assess, in a randomized, phase 2 trial, the efficacy and safety of chemoradiotherapy with or without induction chemotherapy (ICT) of S1 and oxaliplatin for esophageal cancer. Patients and Methods: Patients with stage II, III, or IVA esophageal cancer were randomly allocated to either 2 cycles of ICT (oxaliplatin 130 mg/m{sup 2} on day 1 and S1 at 40 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily on days 1-14, every 3 weeks) followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) (46 Gy, 2 Gy/d with oxaliplatin 130 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1 and 21 and S1 30 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily, 5 days per week during radiation therapy) and esophagectomy (arm A), or the same CCRT followed by esophagectomy without ICT (arm B). The primary endpoint was the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. Results: A total of 97 patients were randomized (arm A/B, 47/50), 70 of whom underwent esophagectomy (arm A/B, 34/36). The intention-to-treat pCR rate was 23.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.2-35.6%) in arm A and 38% (95% CI 24.5% to 51.5%) in arm B. With a median follow-up duration of 30.3 months, the 2-year progression-free survival rate was 58.4% in arm A and 58.6% in arm B, whereas the 2-year overall survival rate was 60.7% and 63.7%, respectively. Grade 3 or 4 thrombocytopenia during CCRT was more common in arm A than in arm B (35.4% vs 4.1%). The relative dose intensity of S1 (89.5% ± 20.6% vs 98.3% ± 5.2%, P=.005) and oxaliplatin (91.4% ± 16.8% vs 99.0% ± 4.2%, P=.007) during CCRT was lower in arm A compared with arm B. Three patients in arm A, compared with none in arm B, died within 90 days after surgery. Conclusions: Combination chemotherapy of S1 and oxaliplatin is an effective chemoradiotherapy regimen to treat esophageal cancer. However, we failed to show that the addition of ICT to the regimen can improve the pCR rate.

  6. Simultaneous Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Adenocarcinoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Iradj; Shekarriz, Ramin; Nosrati, Anahita; Orang, Elahe

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is a rather common cancer in northern Iran. Incidence of adenocarcinoma of esophagus has an increasing trend in Iran. Co-existence of both cancers in one patient is very rare. We report a middle age woman from northern Iran with a typical presentation of esophageal cancer, who was found to have a dual esophageal cancer. The disease was found in the advanced stage with pulmonary metastasis at the presentation. Palliative chemo-radiotherapy induced partial clinical response PMID:26609356

  7. ROLE OF IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST IN ARSENIC REMEDIATION USING ZEROVALENT IRON IN COLUMN TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined corrosion products of zerovalent iron (Peerless iron) that was used in three column tests for removing arsenic under dynamic flow conditions with and without added phosphate and silicate. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate and magnetite were major iron corrosion products...

  8. 40 CFR 147.2650 - State-administered program-Class I, II, III, IV, and V wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CONTROL PROGRAMS Puerto Rico 147.2650 State-administered programClass I, II, III, IV, and V wells. The Underground Injection Control Program for all classes of wells in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, other than those on Indian lands, is the program administered by Puerto Rico's Environmental Quality Board...

  9. 40 CFR 147.2650 - State-administered program-Class I, II, III, IV, and V wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CONTROL PROGRAMS Puerto Rico 147.2650 State-administered programClass I, II, III, IV, and V wells. The Underground Injection Control Program for all classes of wells in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, other than those on Indian lands, is the program administered by Puerto Rico's Environmental Quality Board...

  10. 40 CFR 147.2650 - State-administered program-Class I, II, III, IV, and V wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTROL PROGRAMS Puerto Rico 147.2650 State-administered programClass I, II, III, IV, and V wells. The Underground Injection Control Program for all classes of wells in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, other than those on Indian lands, is the program administered by Puerto Rico's Environmental Quality Board...

  11. 40 CFR 147.2650 - State-administered program-Class I, II, III, IV, and V wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CONTROL PROGRAMS Puerto Rico 147.2650 State-administered programClass I, II, III, IV, and V wells. The Underground Injection Control Program for all classes of wells in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, other than those on Indian lands, is the program administered by Puerto Rico's Environmental Quality Board...

  12. 40 CFR 147.2650 - State-administered program-Class I, II, III, IV, and V wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL PROGRAMS Puerto Rico 147.2650 State-administered programClass I, II, III, IV, and V wells. The Underground Injection Control Program for all classes of wells in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, other than those on Indian lands, is the program administered by Puerto Rico's Environmental Quality Board...

  13. Surgical treatment analysis of idiopathic esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    de AQUINO, José Luis Braga; SAID, Marcelo Manzano; PEREIRA, Douglas Rizzanti; do AMARAL, Paula Casals; LIMA, Juliana Carolina Alves; LEANDRO-MERHI, Vânia Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Background Idiopathic esophageal achalasia is an inflammatory disease of unknown origin, characterized by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and failure of the lower esophageal sphincter in response to swallowing, with consequent dysphagia. Aim To demonstrate the results of surgical therapy in these patients, evaluating the occurred local and systemic complications. Methods Were studied retrospectively 32 patients, 22 of whom presented non-advanced stage of the disease (Stage I/II) and 10 with advanced disease (Stage III/IV). All of them had the clinical conditions to be submitted to surgery. The diagnoses were done by clinical, endoscopic, cardiological, radiological and esophageal manometry analysis. Pre-surgical evaluation was done with a questionnaire based on the most predisposing factors in the development of the disease and the surgical indication was based on the stage of the disease. Results The patients with non-advanced stages were submitted to cardiomyotomy with fundoplication, wherein in the post-surgical early assessment, only one (4,4%) presented pulmonary infection, but had a good outcome. In patients with advanced disease, seven were submitted to esophageal mucosectomy preserving the muscular layer, wherein one patient (14,2%) presented dehiscence of gastric cervical esophagus anastomosis as well as pulmonary infection; all of these complications were resolved with proper specific treatment; the other three patients with advanced stage were submitted to transmediastinal esophagectomy; two of them presented hydropneumothorax with good evolution, and one of them also presented fistula of the cervical esophagogastric anastomosis, but with spontaneous healing after conservative treatment and nutritional support. The two patients with fistula of the cervical anastomosis progressed to stenosis, with good results after endoscopic dilations. In the medium and long term assessment done in 23 patients, all of them reported improvement in life quality, with return to swallowing. Conclusion The strategy proposed for the surgical treatment of idiopathic esophageal achalasia according to the stages of the disease was of great value, due to post-surgical low morbidity complications and proper recovery of swallowing. PMID:26176243

  14. Esophageal Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the type of cells that become malignant (cancerous): Squamous cell carcinoma : Cancer that begins in squamous cells , the thin, ... chance of developing esophageal cancer increases with age. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus is more common in blacks ...

  15. Esophageal stricture - benign

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the esophagus. These may include household cleaners, lye, disc batteries, or battery acid. Treatment of esophageal varices ... to prevent the stricture from narrowing again. Proton pump inhibitors (acid-blocking medicines) can keep a peptic ...

  16. Methylation in esophageal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Da-Long; Sui, Feng-Ying; Jiang, Xiao-Ming; Jiang, Xiao-Hong

    2006-01-01

    Genetic abnormalities of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes have been demonstrated to be changes that are frequently involved in esophageal cancer pathogenesis. However, hypermethylation of CpG islands, an epigenetic event, is coming more and more into focus in carcinogenesis of the esophagus. Recent studies have proved that promoter hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes is frequently observed in esophageal carcinomas and seems to play an important role in the pathogenesis of this tumor type. In this review, we will discuss current research on genes that are hypermethylated in human esophageal cancer and precancerous lesions of the esophagus. We will also discuss the potential use of hypermethylated genes as targets for detection, prognosis and treatment of esophageal cancer. PMID:17109513

  17. Aluminium substitution in iron(II-III)-layered double hydroxides: Formation and cationic order

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby, Christian Abdelmoula, Mustapha; Aissa, Rabha; Medjahdi, Ghouti; Brunelli, Michela; Francois, Michel

    2008-09-15

    The formation and the modifications of the structural properties of an aluminium-substituted iron(II-III)-layered double hydroxide (LDH) of formula Fe{sub 4}{sup II}Fe{sub (2-6y)}{sup III}Al{sub 6y}{sup III} (OH){sub 12} SO{sub 4}, 8H{sub 2}O are followed by pH titration curves, Moessbauer spectroscopy and high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction using synchrotron radiation. Rietveld refinements allow to build a structural model for hydroxysulphate green rust, GR(SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}), i.e. y=0, in which a bilayer of sulphate anions points to the Fe{sup 3+} species. A cationic order is proposed to occur in both GR(SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) and aluminium-substituted hydroxysulphate green rust when y<0.08. Variation of the cell parameters and a sharp decrease in average crystal size and anisotropy are detected for an aluminium content as low as y=0.01. The formation of Al-GR(SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) is preceded by the successive precipitation of Fe{sup III} and Al{sup III} (oxy)hydroxides. Adsorption of more soluble Al{sup III} species onto the initially formed ferric oxyhydroxide may be responsible for this slowdown of crystal growth. Therefore, the insertion of low aluminium amount (y{approx}0.01) could be an interesting way for increasing the surface reactivity of iron(II-III) LDH that maintains constant the quantity of the reactive Fe{sup II} species of the material. - Graphical abstract: (a) Crystallographical structure of sulphated green rust: SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} point to the Fe{sup 3+} cations (red) that form an ordered array with the Fe{sup 2+} cations (green). (b) Width and asymmetry of the synchrotron XRD peaks increase rapidly when some Al{sup 3+} species substitute the Fe{sup 3+} cations; z is molar ratio Al{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 3+}.

  18. Esophageal disease in scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Ellen C

    2006-10-01

    Progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) causes smooth muscle atrophy and fibrosis of the distal two-thirds of the esophagus. Motility studies show reduced-amplitude or absent peristaltic contractions in this region and normal or decreased lower esophageal sphincter pressure. Patients complain of dysphagia, heartburn, and regurgitation due to reflux and dysmotility. Complications include strictures found in 17% to 29% of patients and Barrett esophagus is 0% to 37%. Candida esophagitis is a complication of PSS not seen with non-PSS reflux. Esophageal disease correlates with pulmonary involvement but not with disease in the stomach or intestines. Whether reflux contributes to the pulmonary disease is an open question. Although manometry is the gold standard for diagnosis, cine-esophagram and scintography are only slightly less sensitive and should be considered for following the patients. Symptoms correlate poorly with evidence of esophagitis or abnormal 24-hour pH recordings. As a result, it is unclear which patients should receive acid-reducing or prokinetic medications and which medication to use. Aspiration precautions are important in those with severe esophageal dysmotility. This review of the literature highlights many areas of uncertainty in the diagnosis and treatment of esophageal disease in PSS that can be addressed in clinical studies. PMID:17016130

  19. [Congenital Esophageal Atresia].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Makoto; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    In this report, we describe the esophageal atresia in terms of current surgical management on the basis of our experience and literatures. Traditionally, infants with esophageal atresia have presented shortly after birth because of an inability to pass an orogastric tube, respiratory distress, or an inability to tolerate feeding. And also, an isolated trachea-esophageal fistula (TEF) usually cases coughing, recurrent pneumonia, or choking during feedings. To ignore these symptoms is to risk a delayed diagnosis. The condition may be associated with other major congenital anomalies such as those seen in the vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheo-esophageal, renal/radial (VACTER) association, or it may be an isolated defect. Therapeutic strategies for esophageal atresia are a prevention of pulmonary complication by TEF closing and an early establishment of enteral alimentation. We promptly repair healthy infants without performing a gastrostomy and delay repair in infants with high-risk factors such as associated severe cardiac anomaly and respiratory insufficiency. Esophageal atresia has been classically approached through a thoracotomy. The disadvantages of such a thoracotomy have been recognized for a long time, for example winged scapula, elevation of fixation of shoulder, asymmetry of the chest wall, rib fusion, scoliosis, and breast and pectoral muscle maldevelopment. To avoid such disadvantages, thoracoscopic repair was recently reported. PMID:26197921

  20. Soft recovery of polytetrafluoroethylene shocked through the crystalline phase II-III transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. N.; Trujillo, C. P.; Gray, G. T.; Rae, P. J.; Bourne, N. K.

    2007-01-01

    Polymers are increasingly being utilized as monolithic materials and composite matrices for structural applications historically reserved for metals. High strain-rate applications in aerospace, defense, and the automotive industries have lead to interest in the shock response of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and the ensuing changes in polymer structure due to shock prestraining. We present an experimental study of crystalline structure evolution due to pressure-induced phase transitions in a semicrystalline polymer using soft-recovery, shock loading techniques coupled with mechanical and chemical postshock analyses. Gas-launched, plate impact experiments have been performed on pedigreed PTFE 7C, mounted in momentum trapped, shock assemblies, with impact pressures above and below the phase II to phase III crystalline transition. Below the phase transition only subtle changes were observed in the crystallinity, microstructure, and mechanical response of PTFE. Shock loading of PTFE 7C above the phase II-III transition was seen to cause both an increase in crystallinity from 38% to 53% (by differential scanning calorimetry) and a finer crystalline microstructure, and changed the yield and flow stress behavior.

  1. Water ice phases II, III, and V - Plastic deformation and phase relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, W. B.; Boro, C. O.; Kirby, S. H.; Stern, L. A.; Heard, H. C.

    1988-01-01

    The ordinary water phase I was transformed to the ice phases that are known to exist in the interiors of large ice moons, such as Ganymede and Callisto for the purpose of investigating plastic deformation behavior of these ices. Ices II, III, and V were prepared using an apparatus and techniques similar to those described by Durham et al. (1983) and subsequently deformed in a gas deformation apparatus, and their deformation data were obtained. It was found that ice II was the strongest of the high-pressure phases, with a strength that was comparable to that of ice I; ice III was very weak, with the flow rate 100 to 1000 times higher than that of ice II at the same levels of stress. It was also found that ices III and V can exist metastably within the ice II field and that they may be deformed plastically within much of the metastable region without reverting to ice II. It is suggested that the weakness of the ice III phase may have profoundly influenced the evolution and the present-day behavior of the icy moons.

  2. In situ redox flexibility of FeII-III Oxyhydroxycarbonate green rust and fougerite.

    PubMed

    Ruby, Christian; Upadhyay, Chandan; Ghin, Antoine; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Gnin, Jean-Marie R

    2006-08-01

    Bacterial activity is commonly thought to be directly responsible for denitrification in soils and groundwater. However, nitrate reduction in low organic sediments occurs abiotically by FeII ions within the fougerite mineral (IMA 2003-057), giving the bluish-green color of gleysols. Fougerite, the mineral counterpart of FeII-III oxyhydroxycarbonate, FeII6(1-x)FeIII6xO12H2(7-3x)CO3, provides a unique in situ redox flexibility, which can adapt x = {[FeIII]/[Fetotal]} between 1/3 and 2/3 as shown using Mssbauer spectroscopy. Chemical potential and Eh-pH diagrams for this system were determined from electrode potential monitored during deprotonation of hydroxycarbonate FeII4FeIII2(OH)12CO3 to assess the possibility of reducing pollutants in the field. Bioreduction of ferric oxyhydroxides in anoxic groundwater yields dissolved FeII, whereas HCO3- anions produced from organic matter are incorporated into fougerite layered double oxyhydroxide structure. Thus, fougerite is the solid-state redox mediator acting as electron shuttle that helps bacterial activity for reducing nitrate by coupling dissimilatory FeIII reduction and oxidation of FeII with reduction of NO3-. It is proposed that this system could be used in the remediation of soils and nitrified waters. PMID:16913126

  3. Structure of the Fe(II-III) layered double hydroxysulphate green rust two from Rietveld analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Lilian; Franois, Michel; Refait, Philippe; Renaudin, Guillaume; Lelaurain, Michle; Gnin, Jean-Marie R.

    2003-02-01

    Synthetic samples of the iron(II-III) hydroxysulphate known as green rust two were obtained by aerial oxidation of iron(II) hydroxide precipitates and studied using chemical and thermal analyses, transmission Mssbauer spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. The ideal formula is Fe II4Fe III2(OH) 12SO 48H 2O. The structure is trigonal, P 3m1 with cell parameters a=0.5524 1 nm, c=1.1011 3 nm, V=0.29097 nm 3 and Z=1/2. It is characterised by the succession of positively charged hydroxide sheets [Fe II4 Fe III2(OH) 12] 2+ and negatively charged interlayers composed of the sulphate anions and water molecules, [SO 48H 2O] 2-. These interlayers are made of two planes of H 2O and SO 2-4, in contrast with those found in the rhombohedral green rust one compounds, which are made of a single plane. A superstructure ( a=a 03) is found along the [110] direction of the parent hexagonal unit cell, where a0 is the lattice parameter of Fe(OH) 2, and due to an ordering of the sulphate anions in the interlayers.

  4. ROTATION OF THE K3 II-III GIANT STAR {alpha} HYDRA

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, David F.

    2013-08-01

    Fundamental spectroscopic determination of projected rotation rates of slowly rotating stars is challenging because the rotational broadening of the spectral lines is often comparable to, or smaller than, the broadening from other sources, most notably macroturbulence. Fourier techniques have the advantage over direct profile matching when the observed profiles are complete, but when the profiles are severely blended, the Fourier analysis is compromised. A process of modeling partial profiles for determining the rotation rate for stars having blended spectral lines is investigated and applied to the evolved star {alpha} Hya (K3 II-III). Projected rotation higher than 5 km s{sup -1} can be definitively ruled out for this star. Not all lines are equally good, depending on the amount of blending and also depending on the strength of the line, as the balance between the thermal and non-thermal components changes. A modest ambiguity arises between macroturbulence and rotational broadening, but a careful look at the differences between the observations and the models allows one to measure the rotation with acceptable precision. The result for {alpha} Hya is v sin i = 2.6 {+-} 0.3 km s{sup -1}.

  5. Fougerite FeII - III oxyhydroxycarbonate in environmental chemistry and nitrate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnin, J.-M. R.; Renard, A.; Ruby, Ch.

    2008-09-01

    The identification of the fougerite mineral responsible for the bluish-green shade of gleysols in aquifers as being the FeII - III oxyhydroxycarbonate text{GR}(text{CO}3^{2-})^* of formula, [text{Fe}^II_{6x}text{Fe}^III_{6(1 - x)}text{O}_{12}text{H}_{2(7-3x)}]^{2+}bullet[text{CO}3^{2-}bullet3text{H}2text{O}]^{2-} where the ferric molar ratio x = [FeIII/Fetotal] is restricted to the domain [1/3 2/3] induces to study the reactivity of the synthetic green rust for reducing some major pollutants. The oxidation within the solid compound text{GR}(text{CO}3^{2-})^* in the presence of nitrates is followed by miniaturized Mssbauer spectrometer (MIMOS). Ratio x = [FeIII/Fetotal] increases up to 0.67 where text{GR}(text{CO}3^{2-})^* transforms gradually into magnetite. This could well explain the composition variability of fougerite occurrences.

  6. Clinical Implications and Pathogenesis of Esophageal Remodeling in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Ikuo; Aceves, Seema S.

    2014-01-01

    In eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), remodeling changes are manifest histologically in both the epithelium as well as in the subepithelium where lamina propria (LP) fibrosis, expansion of the muscularis propria and increased vascularity occur. The major clinical symptoms and complications of EoE are largely consequences of esophageal remodeling. Important mediators of the process include IL-5, IL-13, TGF?1, mast cells, fibroblasts and eosinophils. Methods to detect remodeling effects include upper endoscopy, histopathology, barium esophagram, endoscopic ultrasonography, esophageal manometry, and functional luminal imaging. These modalities provide evidence of organ dysfunction that include focal and diffuse esophageal strictures, expansion of the mucosa and subepithelium, esophageal motor abnormalities and reduced esophageal distensibility. Complications of food impaction and perforations of the esophageal wall have been associated with reduction in esophageal caliber and increased esophageal mural stiffness. The therapeutic benefits of topical corticosteroids and elimination diet therapy in resolving mucosal eosinophilic inflammation of the esophagus are evident. Available therapies, however, have demonstrated variable ability to reverse existing remodeling changes of the esophagus. Systemic therapies that include novel, targeted biologic agents have the potential of addressing subepithelial remodeling. Esophageal dilation remains a useful, adjunctive therapeutic maneuver in symptomatic adults with esophageal stricture. As novel treatments emerge, it is essential that therapeutic endpoints account for the fundamental contributions of esophageal remodeling to overall disease activity. PMID:24813517

  7. Esophageal Atresia and Tracheoesophageal Fistula

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Return to Web version Esophageal Atresia and Tracheoesophageal Fistula Overview What is esophageal atresia? In babies who ... gets into the stomach. What is a tracheoesophageal fistula? A fistula (say “fist-you-lah”) is a ...

  8. Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Esophageal Surgery A Website Presented by Cardiothoracic Surgeons Committed to Improving Patient Care Menu Main menu ... and Esophageal Surgery A website presented by cardiothoracic surgeons committed to improving patient care Footer menu English | ...

  9. Significance of iron(II,III) hydroxycarbonate green rust in arsenic remediation using zerovalent iron in laboratory column tests.

    PubMed

    Su, Chunming; Puls, Robert W

    2004-10-01

    We examined the corrosion products of zerovalent iron used in three column tests for removing arsenic from water under dynamic flow conditions. Each column test lasted 3-4 months using columns consisting of a 10.3-cm depth of 50:50 (w:w, Peerless iron:sand) in the middle and a 10.3cm depth of a sediment from Elizabeth City, NC, in both upper and lower portions of the 31-cm-long glass column (2.5 cm in diameter). The feeding solutions were 1 mg of As(V) L(-1) + 1 mg of As(III) L(-1) in 7 mM NaCl + 0.86 mM CaSO4 with or without added phosphate (0.5 or 1 mg of P L(-1)) and silicate (10 or 20 mg of Si L(-1)) at pH 6.5. Iron(II,III) hydroxycarbonate green rust (or simply, carbonate green rust) and magnetite were the major iron corrosion products identified with X-ray diffraction for the separated fractions (5 and 1 min sedimentation and residual). The presence of carbonate green rust was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (hexagonal morphology) and FTIR-photoacoustic spectroscopy (interlayer carbonate stretching mode at 1352-1365 cm(-1)). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigation revealed the presence of predominantly As(V) at the surface of corroded iron particles despite the fact that the feeding solution in contact with Peerless iron contained more As(III) than As(V) as a result of a preferential uptake of As(V) over As(III) by the Elizabeth City sediment. Extraction of separated corrosion products with 1.0 M HCI showed that from 86 to 96% of the total extractable As (6.9-14.6 g kg(-1)) was in the form of As(V) in agreement with the XPS results. Combined microscopic and macroscopic wet chemistry results suggest that sorbed As(III) was partially oxidized by the carbonate green rust at the early stage of iron corrosion. The column experiments suggest that either carbonate green rust is kinetically favored or is thermodynamically more stable than sulfate green rust in the studied Peerless iron corrosion systems. PMID:15506221

  10. Endoscopic Management of Anastomotic Esophageal Strictures Secondary to Esophageal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The reported incidence of anastomotic stricture after esophageal atresia repair has varied in case series from as low as 9% to as high as 80%. The cornerstone of esophageal stricture treatment is dilation with either balloon or bougie. The goal of esophageal dilation is to increase the luminal diameter of the esophagus while also improving dysphagia symptoms. Once a stricture becomes refractory to esophageal dilation, there are several treatment therapies available as adjuncts to dilation therapy. These therapies include intralesional steroid injection, mitomycin C, esophageal stent placement, and endoscopic incisional therapy. PMID:26616905

  11. Optimizing the data combination rule for seamless phase II/III clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Hampson, Lisa V; Jennison, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    We consider seamless phase II/III clinical trials that compare K treatments with a common control in phase II then test the most promising treatment against control in phase III. The final hypothesis test for the selected treatment can use data from both phases, subject to controlling the familywise type I error rate. We show that the choice of method for conducting the final hypothesis test has a substantial impact on the power to demonstrate that an effective treatment is superior to control. To understand these differences in power, we derive decision rules maximizing power for particular configurations of treatment effects. A rule with such an optimal frequentist property is found as the solution to a multivariate Bayes decision problem. The optimal rules that we derive depend on the assumed configuration of treatment means. However, we are able to identify two decision rules with robust efficiency: a rule using a weighted average of the phase II and phase III data on the selected treatment and control, and a closed testing procedure using an inverse normal combination rule and a Dunnett test for intersection hypotheses. For the first of these rules, we find the optimal division of a given total sample size between phases II and III. We also assess the value of using phase II data in the final analysis and find that for many plausible scenarios, between 50% and 70% of the phase II numbers on the selected treatment and control would need to be added to the phase III sample size in order to achieve the same increase in power. PMID:25315892

  12. Spectroscopic and quantum chemical study of the structure of a new paramagnetic dimeric palladium(II,III) complex with creatine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitewa, Mariana; Enchev, Venelin; Bakalova, Tatyana

    2002-05-01

    The structure and coordination mode of the newly synthesized dimeric paramagnetic Pd(II,III) complex are studied using magneto-chemical, EPR and IR spectroscopic methods. In order to perform reliable assignment of the IR bands, the structure and IR spectrum of the free creatine were calculated using ab initio method. For calculation of the configuration of its deprotonated and doubly deprotonated forms the semiempirical AM1 method was used.

  13. Expression and clinical significance of Tiam1 gene in esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qi-Yong; Wang, Yong; Tong, Ji-Chun; Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between Tiam1 gene expression and the invasion and metastasis of esophageal cancer. Methods: By RT-PCR technique, Tiam1 mRNA expression levels in 49 cases of esophageal cancer tissues and normal esophageal tissues were detected. Results: Average Tiam1 mRNA expression level in 49 cases of esophageal cancer tissues (1.83 0.73) was significantly higher than that in normal esophageal tissues (0.87 0.45) (P < 0.01); High Tiam1 mRNA expression rate in esophageal cancer tissues was positively correlated with clinical stage and T stage; Tiam1 mRNA expression rate was 59.38% (19/32) in patients with lymph node metastasis, and in patients without lymph node metastasis it was 23.53% (4/17), with statistically significant differences (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Tiam1 gene expression in esophageal cancer tissues was significantly higher than that in normal esophageal tissues, and its overexpression was positively correlated with invasion and metastasis of esophageal cancer.

  14. Two cases of esophageal eosinophilia: eosinophilic esophagitis or gastro-esophageal reflux disease?

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ozlem; Karagol, Hacer Ilbilge Ertoy; Topal, Erdem; Unlusoy, Aysel Aksu; Egritas, Odul; Gonul, Ipek Isik; Bakirtas, Arzu

    2014-05-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and gastroesophageal reflux disease are among the major causes of isolated esophageal eosinophilia. Isolated esophageal eosinophilia meeting criteria for EoE may respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment. This entity is termed proton pumps inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE). Gastro-esophageal reflux is thought to comprise a subgroup of patients with PPI-REE. According to the latest guidelines, PPI responsiveness distinguishes people with PPI-REE from patients having EoE (non-responders). In this report, two unusual cases with findings belonging to both EoE and PPI-REE are discussed with known and unknown facts. PMID:24987510

  15. Two Cases of Esophageal Eosinophilia: Eosinophilic Esophagitis or Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Ozlem; Karagol, Hacer Ilbilge Ertoy; Topal, Erdem; Unlusoy, Aysel Aksu; Egritas, Odul; Gonul, Ipek Isik; Bakirtas, Arzu

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and gastroesophageal reflux disease are among the major causes of isolated esophageal eosinophilia. Isolated esophageal eosinophilia meeting criteria for EoE may respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment. This entity is termed proton pumps inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE). Gastro-esophageal reflux is thought to comprise a subgroup of patients with PPI-REE. According to the latest guidelines, PPI responsiveness distinguishes people with PPI-REE from patients having EoE (non-responders). In this report, two unusual cases with findings belonging to both EoE and PPI-REE are discussed with known and unknown facts. PMID:24987510

  16. Clinical experience of esophageal ulcers and esophagitis in AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, M T; Ko, F T; Cheng, N Y; Lin, K Y; Wang, C S; Siauw, C P; Shih, L S; Liao, S T

    1996-11-01

    In Taiwan, numbers of patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have been increasing in recent years. We present esophageal disease of different causes in 5(16%) heterosexual men among 31 AIDS patients over a 5-year period. Major symptoms included mild dysphagia in 4 (80%) patients and odynophagia in 3 (60%) patients. The duration of symptoms varied from 3 days to 6 months. The symptoms occurred before the diagnosis of AIDS in 3 patients. At esophagogastroduodenoscopy (endoscopy), all 5 patients had esophagitis and/or esophageal ulcers proved by histopathologic evaluation. Four had Candida esophagitis, 3 had cytomegalovirus esophagitis/ulcers and 2 had idiopathic esophageal ulcerations (IEU). Three patients had different esophagitis/ulcers at the same time or during follow-up. The median CD4 lymphocyte count at the time of diagnosis of esophageal disease was 12.2 cells/mm3 (range, 3 to 35 cells/mm3). The endoscopic pictures of the different causes of esophagitis/ ulcers lack uniformity in number, size and appearance. These observations make a conclusion that all AIDS patients with an esophageal disease should undergo endoscopy with biopsy to obtain a definitive diagnosis. PMID:8953856

  17. Structure and magnetism of decanuclear and octadecanuclear manganese(II/III) triethanolamine clusters.

    PubMed

    Langley, Stuart K; Berry, Kevin J; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S

    2009-02-14

    Two new potential single molecule magnets [Mn(10)O(3)(O(2)CCH(3))(6)(tea)(teaH)(3)(teaH(2))(3)][NO(3)](2).3H(2)O (1) and [Mn(18)(N(3))(12)O(12)(tea)(2)(teaH)(4)(OMe)(MeOH)].2MeOH.H(2)O.Et(2)O (2) have been synthesised using manganese(II) nitrate, the tripodal ligand triethanolamine (teaH(3)) and co-ligands such as acetate for 1 and azide for 2. Both compounds are mixed-valent with 1 consisting of 4 Mn(II) and 6 Mn(III) ions and 2 consisting of 3 Mn(II) and 15 Mn(III) ions. Complex 1 has a near planar Mn(7)(II/III) disc-like core with 3 Mn(II) ions positioned on the periphery of the disc, forming a star-like geometry. Complex 2 contains a hexa-capped truncated tetrahedral core. Variable temperature DC magnetic susceptibility data collected in 2, 1, 0.1 and 0.01 T fields, and in the 2-300 K temperature range, for 1 and 2, indicate a large ground spin-state for both compounds. Using a new approach to calculating the DC Mvs. H isotherms (or isofield Mvs. H/T curves) by means of the thermal population of Zeeman levels generated from a group of closely spaced S states (within 9 cm(-1) of ground), the ground S of 1 is 10. The ZFS term, D, is close to zero. For 2 , the magnetisation isotherms, and low temperature susceptibilities, point to a ground state spin of (21)/(2) with many closely spaced spin states (probably from (17)/(2) to (35)/(2)) close in energy, the lowest Zeeman level energies of which change as the field increases. AC magnetic susceptibility data show frequency-dependent out-of-phase signals indicating both clusters are possibly single molecule magnets. Extrapolation of the in-phase component, chi'(M)T, to 0 K suggests spin ground state of S = 10 for 1 and (21)/(2) for 2 , in agreement with the DC data. PMID:19173080

  18. Anorectal Malformations Associated with Esophageal Atresia in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Shin Yun; Lim, Ryoung Kyoung; Park, Kyung Hee; Kim, Hae Young

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Anorectal malformations are often associated with other anomalies, reporting frequency with 40-70%. Gastrointestinal anomalies have been known to be relatively less common than associated anomalies of other organ system. This study was performed to assess a distinctive feature of cases associated with esophageal atresia. Methods Clinical data (from January 2000 through December 2011) on the 196 subjects with anorectal malformations, managed in our Hospital, were reviewed. Total 14 neonates were identified with accompanying esophageal atresia and retrospective analysis was conducted. Results The incidence was 7.1% and there were 8 male and 6 female subjects. Only 2 cases were associated with esophageal atresia without tracheoesophageal fistula. Although variable cases of anorectal malformation in female subjects, almost cases were anorectal malformations with rectourethral fistula in male. Other associated anomalies were identified in all cases, with more than 3 anomalies in 10 cases. There were 4 VACTERL (Vertebral abnormalities, Anal atresia, Cardiac anomalies, Tracheoesophageal fistula, Esophageal atresia, Renal and Limb anomalies) associations accounting for 28.6%, but could not identify chromosomal anomaly. Most cases were managed with staged procedure, usually primary repair of esophageal atresia and diverting colostomy. Overall mortality rate was 21.4%, mainly caused by heart problems. Conclusion This study shows that early diagnosis and rational surgical approach with multidisciplinary plan are mandatory in managing anorectal malformations with esophageal atresia, when considering a high frequency of associated anomaly and a relative high mortality. PMID:24010103

  19. Parenteral nutrition in esophageal cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Daly, J M; Massar, E; Giacco, G; Frazier, O H; Mountain, C F; Dudrick, S J; Copeland, E M

    1982-01-01

    A review of operative therapy in 244 patients with esophageal cancer from 1960 to 1980 was done to evaluate the impact of TPN in 72 patients treated from 1973 to 1980 with 43 non-TPN patients treated during the same period and to 129 patients operated upon before 1973. Mean age, sex distribution, site, stage, and treatment of the disease were similar for the two study groups. The TPN group lost less weight during treatment (3 lbs vs. 11 lbs) and had fewer overall complications postoperatively (24% vs. 41%). Significant reductions in major wound, infectious, and postoperative complications were noted in these patients who received at least 5 days of preoperative TPN compared with postoperative TPN or the non-TPN groups (4% vs. 24% and 23%). Malnourished esophageal cancer patients can more safely undergo aggressive operative therapy and radiation treatment when adequate perioperative nutritional support is added to the treatment armamentarium. PMID:6807225

  20. Group II/III metabotropic glutamate receptors exert endogenous activity-dependent modulation of TRPV1 receptors on peripheral nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Carlton, Susan M.; Zhou, Shengtai; Govea, Rosann; Du, Junhui

    2011-01-01

    There is pharmacological evidence Group II and III metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) function as activity-dependent autoreceptors, inhibiting transmission in supraspinal sites. These receptors are expressed by peripheral nociceptors. We investigated whether mGluRs function as activity-dependent autoreceptors inhibiting pain transmission to the rat CNS, particularly TRPV1-induced activity. Blocking peripheral mGluR activity by intraplantar injection of antagonists LY341495 (LY, 20, 100 ?M, Group II/III ), APICA (100 ?M, Group II) or UBP1112 (30 ?M, Group III) increased capsaicin (CAP)-induced nociceptive behaviors and nociceptor activity. In contrast, Group II agonist APDC (0.1 ?M) or Group III agonist L-AP4 (10 ?M) blocked the LY-induced increase. Ca2+ imaging in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells confirmed LY enhanced CAP-induced Ca2+ mobilization which was blocked by APDC and L-AP4. We hypothesized that excess glutamate (GLU), released by high intensity and/or prolonged stimulation endogenously activated Group II/III, dampening nociceptor activation. In support of this, intraplantar GLU+LY produced heat hyperalgesia and exogenous GLU+LY applied to nociceptors produced enhanced nociceptor activity and thermal sensitization. Intraplantar formalin known to elevate extracellular GLU, enhanced pain behaviors in the presence of LY. LY alone produced no pain behaviors, no change in nociceptor discharge rate or heat-evoked responses and no change in cytosolic Ca2+ in DRG cells, demonstrating a lack of tonic inhibitory control. Group II/III mGluRs maintain an activity-dependent autoinhibition, capable of significantly reducing TRPV1-induced activity. They are endogenously activated following high frequency and/or prolonged nociceptor stimulation, acting as built-in negative modulators of TRPV1 and nociceptor function, reducing pain transmission to the CNS. PMID:21900552

  1. [Reflux esophagitis: respective roles of esophageal and gastric pathogenic factors].

    PubMed

    Bruley des Varannes, S; Touchais, J Y; Weber, J; Desechalliers, J P; Sauger, F; Denis, P; Galmiche, J P

    1986-10-01

    Multiple factors contribute to the production of esophagitis in gastroesophageal reflux (GER), but the respective roles of esophageal (i. e. lower esophageal sphincter (LES) tone, peristalsis) and gastric factors (i. e. acid secretion and gastric emptying) are not well known. The aim of this work was to study the frequency and the severity of esophageal and gastric abnormalities observed in the same patients and to correlate these findings with the degree of esophagitis. Thirty-three consecutive patients with GER proven by esophageal pH recording (3-hr postprandial pH-test) were classified according to the presence (group A, n = 18) or absence (group B, n = 15) of severe esophagitis (i. e. erosions, ulcerations, or stenosis) at endoscopy. LES basal tone and esophageal peristalsis were studied by manometry. Gastric acid secretion and emptying of liquids were measured by intragastric titration coupled with the dye dilution technique. Results obtained in GER patients were compared with those found in twenty-three normal subjects. Hypotonia of LES (i. e. LES tone less than 7 cm H2O) was more frequent in group A (72 p. 100) than in group B patients (30 p. 100, p less than 0.05). Magnitude of esophageal peristaltic waves was lower in group A than in group B (p less than 0.10). When compared to values found in normal subjects, gastric emptying and acid secretion were not significantly different both in presence and in absence of esophagitis. There was no linear correlation between esophageal pH parameters and acid secretion values or gastric emptying rates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3792741

  2. UPPER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER RESTING PRESSURE VARIES DURING ESOPHAGEAL MANOMETRY

    PubMed Central

    REZENDE, Daniel Tavares; HERBELLA, Fernando A. M.; SILVA, Luciana C.; PANOCCHIA-NETO, Sebastio; PATTI, Marco G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The upper esophageal sphincter is composed of striated muscle. The stress of intubation and the need to inhibit dry swallows during an esophageal manometry test may lead to variations in basal pressure of this sphincter. Upper esophageal sphincter is usually only studied at the final part of the test. Was observed during the performance of high resolution manometry that sphincter pressure may vary significantly over the course of the test. Aim To evaluate the variation of the resting pressure of the upper esophageal sphincter during high resolution manometry. Methods Was evaluated the variation of the basal pressure of the upper esophageal sphincter during high resolution manometry. Were reviewed the high resolution manometry tests of 36 healthy volunteers (mean age 31 years, 55% females). The basal pressure of the upper esophageal sphincter was measured at the beginning and at the end of a standard test. Results The mean time of the test was eight minutes. The basal pressure of the upper esophageal sphincter was 100 mmHg at the beginning of the test and 70 mmHg at the end (p<0.001). At the beginning, one patient had hypotonic upper esophageal sphincter and 14 hypertonic. At the end of the test, one patient had hypotonic upper esophageal sphincter (same patient as the beginning) and seven hypertonic upper esophageal sphincter. Conclusion A significant variation of the basal pressure of the upper esophageal sphincter was observed in the course of high resolution manometry. Probably, the value obtained at the end of the test may be more clinically relevant. PMID:25184767

  3. Expression of esophageal carcinoma related gene 4 (ECRG4) and its clinical significance in prognosis of esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yiyang; Hu, Xiaoshu

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the relationship between the expression level of esophageal carcinoma related gene 4 (ECRG4) in esophageal cancer tissues and the occurrence of esophageal carcinoma. 50 cases of esophageal carcinoma tissues and adjacent tissues were collected as study samples. mRNA and protein expression levels of ECRG4 in tumor tissues and adjacent tissues were analyzed by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The relationship between the expression level of ECRG4 and the clinical and pathological features and postoperative recurrence and survival was also analyzed. Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR and Western blot showed that the mRNA and protein levels of ECRG4 in esophageal cancer tissues were significantly down regulated (P<0.04). There was ECRG low expression in 74 cases and high expression in 17 cases. The expression level of ECRG4 protein in esophageal carcinoma tissues was closely related to tumor invasion level, TNM staging and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05), but not related to gender, age, tumor type and differentiation degree of patients (P>0.05). The cumulative recurrence rate of patients of higher ECRG expression was significantly lower than that of patients of lower ECRG4 expression in 5 years after surgery, and the cumulative recurrence rate was 5 years (P<0.05). And the cumulative survival rate of patients with high ECRG4 expression was significantly higher than that of patients with low expression of ECRG4 in 5 years after surgery (P<0.05). In conclusion, the low expression or no expression of ECRG4 in esophageal cancer tissues was closely related to the degree of tumor invasion level, TNM staging, lymph node metastasis and recurrence and survival after surgery. PMID:26823803

  4. Benign esophageal tumors.

    PubMed

    Ha, Cindy; Regan, James; Cetindag, Ibrahim Bulent; Ali, Aman; Mellinger, John D

    2015-06-01

    Benign esophageal and paraesophageal masses and cysts are a rare but important group of pathologies. Although often asymptomatic, these lesions can cause a variety of symptoms and, in some cases, demonstrate variable biological behavior. Contemporary categorization relies heavily on endoscopic ultrasound and other imaging modalities and immunohistochemical analysis when appropriate. Minimally invasive options including endoscopic, laparoscopic, and thoracoscopic methods are increasingly used for symptomatic or indeterminate lesions. PMID:25965126

  5. Hypnotherapy for Esophageal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Riehl, Megan E.; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    Hypnotherapy is an evidence based intervention for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome. While similar in pathophysiology, less is known about the utility of hypnotherapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal disorders, most of which are functional in nature, cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms that impact patient quality of life and are difficult to treat from a medical perspective. After a thorough medical workup and a failed trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy, options for treatment are significantly limited. While the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, two critical factors are believed to drive esophageal symptomsvisceral hypersensitivity and symptom hypervigilance. The goal of esophageal directed hypnotherapy is to promote a deep state of relaxation with focused attention allowing the patient to learn to modulate physiological sensations and symptoms that are not easily addressed with conventional medical intervention. Currently, the use of hypnosis is suitable for dysphagia, globus, functional chest pain/non-cardiac chest pain, dyspepsia, and functional heartburn. In this article the authors will provide a rationale for the use of hypnosis in these disorders, presenting the science whenever available, describing their approach with these patients, and sharing a case study representing a successful outcome. PMID:26046715

  6. Esophageal Carcinoma in African Americans: A Five-Decade Experience

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Zahra; Nouraie, Mehdi; Razjouyan, Hadi; Lee, Edward E.; Dowlati, Ehsan; El-Seyed, El-Waleed; Laiyemo, Adeyinka; Brim, Hassan; Smoot, Duane T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Esophageal cancer accounts for a considerable proportion of carcinomas of the upper gastrointestinal tract in African Americans. Our aim was to describe the epidemiology of esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) among African Americans in the last five decades. Methods A total of 601 records of patients with documented esophageal cancer between 1959 and 2007 at Howard University Hospital were reviewed. Demographic characteristics, risk factors, clinical stage and histological findings were reviewed. The change in prevalence of the disease and the interaction between main risk factors with tumor stage of the patients were assessed over the years of this study. Result A total of 552 patients (91.8%) had ESCC while 49 patients (8.2%) had EA. The mean age at diagnosis was 60.1 and 60.6 years for ESCC and EA, respectively (P = 0.8). The peak incidence was in the 19801989 decade. Out of 136 ESCC patients with TNM staging information, 130 (95.6%) were diagnosed in stage 2 and above. The majority (73%) of the ESCC were in the mid- and upper third of the esophagus and associated with smoking and alcohol exposure. The majority (81%) of the EA were in the mid- and lower third. The most common presenting symptoms were dysphagia (77.7%), and weight loss (31.9%). Conclusion ESCC is the predominant esophageal cancer in African Americans and diagnosed in late stages, and its diagnosis in our institution has decreased since 1990. A combination of genetic factors, environmental influences (e.g., those related to diet), and the deleterious changes associated with smoking and alcohol consumption, and differences in tumor histology, are the obvious parameters that should be the focus of future studies, and early diagnosis at an earlier stage should be considered among blacks. PMID:21847566

  7. Kinetic data for the hexacyanoferrate (II)/(III) couple on platinum electrode in various chlorides of monovalent cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krulic, D.; Fatouros, N.; Khoshtariya, D. E.

    1998-03-01

    An experimental study of the hexacyanoferrate (II)/(III) couple at a platinum disc electrode in hydrochloric acid, in alkali metal, ammonium and tetraalkylammonium chlorides solutions is carried out. Diffusion coefficients, equilibrium potentials and transfer rate constants are determined. Our results complete those previously published and clearly show a correlation between the magnitude of the apparent charge transfer rate constant and the extent of cation association with both hexacyanoferrate (II) and (III) anions. Le comportement du couple haxacyanoferrate (II)/(III) est tudi sur une lectrode disque de platine en prsence d'acide chlorhydrique et de chlorures de mtaux alcalins, d'ammonium et de ttraalkylammonium. Des coefficients de diffusion, des potentiels d'quilibre et des constantes de transfert de charge sont dtermins. Nos rsultats compltent les donnes dj disponibles et montrent une nette corrlation entre la valeur de la constante apparente du transfert de charge et le degr d'association des anions hexacyanoferrates (II) et (III) avec les cations de l'lectrolyte support.

  8. Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius ST169 and novel ST354 SCCmec II-III isolates related to the worldwide ST71 clone.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, K; Koizumi, A; Saito, M; Muramatsu, Y; Tamura, Y

    2016-01-01

    The recent appearance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) is a concern for both veterinary and human healthcare. MRSP clonal lineages with sequence type (ST) 71-spa t02-staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) II-III and ST68-spa t06-SCCmec V have spread throughout Europe and North America, respectively. The current study compared the molecular characteristics of 43 MRSP isolates from dogs in Japan with those of MRSP from previous reports using multilocus sequence typing based on seven housekeeping genes, SCCmec typing, and detection of antimicrobial resistance genes. Three related clonal lineages, ST71, ST169, and the newly registered ST354, were observed in SCCmec II-III isolates from Japan, despite MRSP SCCmec II-III isolates being thought to belong to a single clonal lineage. The majority of SCCmec II-III isolates belonging to ST169 (9/11) and ST354 (3/3), but not ST71 (0/11), harboured tetM. Four STs were observed for the SCCmec V isolates; however, neither ST68 nor related STs were found in the Japanese MRSP isolates. In conclusion, MRSP SCCmec II-III isolates from Japan belonged to ST71 and related STs (ST169 and ST354). A variety of MRSP SCCmec V clones, including some novel clones, were identified. PMID:26138564

  9. 1H-NMR based metabonomic profiling of human esophageal cancer tissue

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The biomarker identification of human esophageal cancer is critical for its early diagnosis and therapeutic approaches that will significantly improve patient survival. Specially, those that involves in progression of disease would be helpful to mechanism research. Methods In the present study, we investigated the distinguishing metabolites in human esophageal cancer tissues (n = 89) and normal esophageal mucosae (n = 26) using a 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) based assay, which is a highly sensitive and non-destructive method for biomarker identification in biological systems. Principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and orthogonal partial least-squares-discriminant anlaysis (OPLS-DA) were applied to analyse 1H-NMR profiling data to identify potential biomarkers. Results The constructed OPLS-DA model achieved an excellent separation of the esophageal cancer tissues and normal mucosae. Excellent separation was obtained between the different stages of esophageal cancer tissues (stage II = 28; stage III = 45 and stage IV = 16) and normal mucosae. A total of 45 metabolites were identified, and 12 of them were closely correlated with the stage of esophageal cancer. The downregulation of glucose, AMP and NAD, upregulation of formate indicated the large energy requirement due to accelerated cell proliferation in esophageal cancer. The increases in acetate, short-chain fatty acid and GABA in esophageal cancer tissue revealed the activation of fatty acids metabolism, which could satisfy the need for cellular membrane formation. Other modified metabolites were involved in choline metabolic pathway, including creatinine, creatine, DMG, DMA and TMA. These 12 metabolites, which are involved in energy, fatty acids and choline metabolism, may be associated with the progression of human esophageal cancer. Conclusion Our findings firstly identify the distinguishing metabolites in different stages of esophageal cancer tissues, indicating the attribution of metabolites disturbance to the progression of esophageal cancer. The potential biomarkers provide a promising molecular diagnostic approach for clinical diagnosis of human esophageal cancer and a new direction for the mechanism study. PMID:23556477

  10. Significance of Tumor Length as Prognostic Factor for Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zeybek, Arife; Erdo?an, Abdullah; Glkesen, Kemal Hakan; Ergin, Makbule; Sarper, Alpay; Dertsiz, Levent; Demircan, Abid

    2013-01-01

    Our study indicated the relationship between tumor length and clinicopathologic characteristics as well as long-term survival in esophageal cancer. A total of 116 patients who underwent curative surgery for thoracic esophageal cancer with standard lymphadenectomy in 2 fields between 2000 and 2010 were included in the study. The medical records of these patients were retrospectively reviewed. The patients with tumor length ?3 cm had a highly significant difference in the involvement of adventitia and lymph node stations. The patients with tumor length ?3 cm had significantly lower rates of involvement of the adventitia and lymph node stations. Tumor length could have a significant impact on both the overall survival and disease-free survival of patients with resected esophageal carcinomas and may provide additional prognostic value to the current tumor, node, and metastasis staging system before patients receive any cancer-specific treatment. PMID:23971777

  11. Lymph Node Metastases in Esophageal Carcinoma: An Endoscopist's View.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jin Woong; Choi, Suck Chei; Jang, Jae Young; Shin, Sung Kwan; Choi, Kee Don; Lee, Jun Haeng; Kim, Sang Gyun; Sung, Jae Kyu; Jeon, Seong Woo; Choi, Il Ju; Kim, Gwang Ha; Jee, Sam Ryong; Lee, Wan Sik; Jung, Hwoon-Yong

    2014-11-01

    One of the most important prognostic factors in esophageal carcinoma is lymph node metastasis, and in particular, the number of affected lymph nodes, which influences long-term outcomes. The esophageal lymphatic system is connected longitudinally and transversally; thus, the pattern of lymph node metastases is very complex. Early esophageal cancer frequently exhibits skipped metastasis, and minimal surgery using sentinel node navigation cannot be performed. In Korea, most esophageal cancer cases are squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), although the incidence of adenocarcinoma has started to increase recently. Most previous reports have failed to differentiate between SCC and adenocarcinoma, despite the fact that the Union for International Cancer Control (7th edition) and American Joint Committee on Cancer staging systems both consider these separately because they differ in cause, biology, lymph node metastasis, and outcome. Endoscopic tumor resection is an effective and safe treatment for lesions with no associated lymph node metastasis. Esophageal mucosal cancer confined to the lamina propria is an absolute indication for endoscopic resection, and a lesion that has invaded the muscularis mucosae can be cured by local resection if invasion to the lymphatic system has not occurred. PMID:25505718

  12. Gastro-esophageal reflux time parameters and esophagitis in children

    SciTech Connect

    Baulieu, F.; Baulieu, J.; Maurage, C.; Casset, D.; Itti, R.

    1985-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the correlation between the reflux timing and the presence of esophagitis, an inconstant but serious complication of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER). The hypothesis was that reflux occurring late after meal can be incriminated more than early reflux in esophagitis genesis. 32 children with GER (mean age = 10.5 months, 2 to 30 months) had esophagoscopy and scintigraphy in the same week. The children were classified in two groups according to esophagoscopy: group 1 (n = 18) no esophagitis, group 2 (n = 14) esophaqgitis. The scintigraphy involved the ingestion of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid milk mixture, followed by esophageal and gastric activity recording (one image per minute for 1 hour). The reflux was assessed from contrast enhanced images and esophageal time activity curves. Reflux intensity was quantitated by reflux index (Re). Mean reflux time was calculated as the mean esophageal activity peaks time (t-bar). Finally a composite parameter was calculated as the mean reflux time weighted by the relative intensity of each reflux peak (t-barw). Re was not found to be different between the two groups. t-bar was significantly higher in group 2: t-bar = 29.6 +- 3.0 mn (mean +- SD) than in group 1: t-bar = 24.5 +- 6.8 mn; rho <0.02. The difference between the two groups was enhanced by intensity weighting: group 1: t-barw = 16.6 +- 6.3 mn, group 2: t-barw = 33.5 +- 7.1 mn rho <0.001. t-barw value was not correlated to esophagitis grade. These results suggest that late reflux is more likely responsible of esophagitis.

  13. Manometric features of Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Esophageal Pressure Topography

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Sabine; Hirano, Ikuo; Kwiatek, Monika A; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Chen, Joan; Kahrilas, Peter J; Pandolfino, John E

    2010-01-01

    Backgrounds Although most patients with EoE have mucosal and structural changes that could potentially explain their symptoms, it is unclear whether EoE is associated with abnormal esophageal motor function. The aims of this study were to evaluate the esophageal pressure topography (EPT) findings in EoE and to compare them with controls and patients with gastro-esophageal disease (GERD). Methods EPT studies in 48 EoE patients, 48 GERD patients and 50 controls were compared. The esophageal contractile pattern was described for ten 5-ml swallows for each subject and each swallow was secondarily characterized based on the bolus pressurization pattern: absent, pan-esophageal pressurization, or compartmentalized distal pressurization. Key Results 37% of EoE patients were classified as having abnormal esophageal motility. The most frequent diagnoses were of weak peristalsis and frequent failed peristalsis. Although motility disorders were more frequent in EoE patients than in controls, the prevalence and type were similar to those observed in GERD patients (p=0.61, Chi square test). Pan-esophageal pressurization was present in 17% of EoE and 2% of GERD patients while compartmentalized pressurization was present in 19% of EoE and 10% of GERD patients. These patterns were not seen in control subjects. Conclusions & Inferences The prevalence of abnormal esophageal motility in EoE was approximately 37% and was similar in frequency and type to motor patterns observed in GERD. EoE patients were more likely to have abnormal bolus pressurization patterns during swallowing and we hypothesize that this may be a manifestation of reduced esophageal compliance. PMID:21091849

  14. Rh2(II,III) Catalysts with Chelating Carboxylate and Carboxamidate Supports: Electronic Structure and Nitrene Transfer Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Varela-Álvarez, Adrián; Yang, Tzuhsiung; Jennings, Heather; Kornecki, Katherine P; Macmillan, Samantha N; Lancaster, Kyle M; Mack, James B C; Du Bois, J; Berry, John F; Musaev, Djamaladdin G

    2016-02-24

    Dirhodium-catalyzed C-H amination is hypothesized to proceed via Rh2-nitrene intermediates in either the Rh2(II,II) or Rh2(II,III) redox state. Herein, we report joint theoretical and experimental studies of the ground electronic state (GES), redox potentials, and C-H amination of [Rh2(II,III)(O2CCH3)4(L)n](+) (1_L) (L = none, Cl(-), and H2O), [Rh2(esp)2](+) (2), and Rh2(espn)2Cl (3) (esp = α,α,α',α'-tetramethyl-1,3-benzenedipropanoate and espn = α,α,α',α'-tetramethyl-1,3-benzenedipropanamidate). CASSCF calculations on 1_L yield a wave function with two closely weighted configurations, (δ*)(2)(π1*)(2)(π2*)(1) and (δ*)(2)(π1*)(1)(π2*)(2), consistent with reported EPR g values [ Chem. Phys. Lett. 1986 , 130 , 20 - 23 ]. In contrast, EPR spectra of 2 show g values consistent with the DFT-computed (π*)(4)(δ*)(1) GES. EPR spectra and Cl K-edge XAS for 3 are consistent with a (π*)(4)(δ*)(1) GES, as supported by DFT. Nitrene intermediates 2N_L and 3N_L are also examined by DFT (the nitrene is an NSO3R species). DFT calculations suggest a doublet GES for 2N_L and a quartet GES for 3N_L. CASSCF calculations describe the GES of 2N as Rh2(II,II) with a coordinated nitrene radical cation, (π*)(4)(δ*)(2)(πnitrene,1)(1)(πnitrene,2)(0). Conversely, the GES of 3N is Rh2(II,III) with a coordinated triplet nitrene, (π*)(4)(δ*)(1)(πnitrene,1)(1)(πnitrene,2)(1). Quartet transition states ((4)TSs) are found to react via a stepwise radical mechanism, whereas (2)TSs are found to react via a concerted mechanism that is lower in energy compared to (4)TSs for both 2N_L and 3N_L. The experimental (determined by intramolecular competition) and (2)TS-calculated kinetic isotopic effect (KIE) shows a KIE ∼ 3 for both 2N and 3N, which is consistent with a concerted mechanism. PMID:26820386

  15. Layer II/III of the prefrontal cortex: Inhibition by the serotonin 5-HT1A receptor in development and stress.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Nathalie M; Benekareddy, Madhurima; Vaidya, Vidita A; Lambe, Evelyn K

    2009-08-12

    The modulation of the prefrontal cortex by the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) is thought to play a key role in determining adult anxiety levels. Layer II/III of the prefrontal cortex, which mediates communication across cortical regions, displays a high level of 5-HT(1A) receptor binding in normal individuals and a significantly lower level in patients with mood and anxiety disorders. Here, we examine how serotonin modulates pyramidal neurons in layer II/III of the rat prefrontal cortex throughout postnatal development and in adulthood. Using whole cell recordings in brain slices of the rat medial prefrontal cortex, we observed that serotonin directly inhibits layer II/III pyramidal neurons through 5-HT(1A) receptors across postnatal development (postnatal days 6-96). In adulthood, a sex difference in these currents emerges, consistent with human imaging studies of 5-HT(1A) receptor binding. We examined the effects of early life stress on the 5-HT(1A) receptor currents in layer II/III. Surprisingly, animals subjected to early life stress displayed significantly larger 5-HT(1A)-mediated outward currents throughout the third and fourth postnatal weeks after elevated 5-HT(1A) expression during the second postnatal week. Subsequent exposure to social isolation in adulthood resulted in the almost-complete elimination of 5-HT(1A) currents in layer II/III neurons suggesting an interaction between early life events and adult experiences. These data represent the first examination of functional 5-HT(1A) receptors in layer II/III of the prefrontal cortex during normal development as well as after stress. PMID:19675243

  16. Porphyrin-sensitized solar cells with cobalt (II/III)-based redox electrolyte exceed 12 percent efficiency.

    PubMed

    Yella, Aswani; Lee, Hsuan-Wei; Tsao, Hoi Nok; Yi, Chenyi; Chandiran, Aravind Kumar; Nazeeruddin, Md Khaja; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang; Yeh, Chen-Yu; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grtzel, Michael

    2011-11-01

    The iodide/triiodide redox shuttle has limited the efficiencies accessible in dye-sensitized solar cells. Here, we report mesoscopic solar cells that incorporate a Co((II/III))tris(bipyridyl)-based redox electrolyte in conjunction with a custom synthesized donor-?-bridge-acceptor zinc porphyrin dye as sensitizer (designated YD2-o-C8). The specific molecular design of YD2-o-C8 greatly retards the rate of interfacial back electron transfer from the conduction band of the nanocrystalline titanium dioxide film to the oxidized cobalt mediator, which enables attainment of strikingly high photovoltages approaching 1 volt. Because the YD2-o-C8 porphyrin harvests sunlight across the visible spectrum, large photocurrents are generated. Cosensitization of YD2-o-C8 with another organic dye further enhances the performance of the device, leading to a measured power conversion efficiency of 12.3% under simulated air mass 1.5 global sunlight. PMID:22053043

  17. Solvent dynamical control of ultrafast ground state electron transfer: implications for Class II-III mixed valency.

    PubMed

    Lear, Benjamin J; Glover, Starla D; Salsman, J Catherine; Londergan, Casey H; Kubiak, Clifford P

    2007-10-24

    We relate the solvent and temperature dependence of the rates of intramolecular electron transfer (ET) of mixed valence complexes of the type {[Ru3O(OAc)6(CO)(L)]2-BL}-1, where L = pyridyl ligand and BL = pyrazine. Complexes were reduced chemically or electrochemically to obtain the mixed valence anions in seven solvents: acetonitrile, methylene chloride, dimethylformamide, tetrahydrofuran, dimethylsulfoxide, chloroform, and hexamethylphosphoramide. Rate constants for intramolecular ET were estimated by simulating the observed degree of nu(CO) IR band shape coalescence in the mixed valence state. Correlations between rate constants for ET and solvent properties including static dielectric constant, optical dielectric constant, the quantity 1/epsilonop - 1/epsilonS, microscopic solvent polarity, viscosity, cardinal rotational moments of inertia, and solvent relaxation times were examined. In the temperature study, the complexes displayed a sharp increase in the ket as the freezing points of the solvents methylene chloride and acetonitrile were approached. The solvent phase transition causes a localized-to-delocalized transition in the mixed valence ions and an acceleration in the rate of ET. This is explained in terms of decoupling the slower solvent motions involved in the frequency factor nuN which increases the value of nuN. The observed solvent and temperature dependence of the ket for these complexes is used in order to formulate a new definition for Robin-Day class II-III mixed valence compounds. Specifically, it is proposed that class II-III compounds are those for which thermodynamic properties of the solvent exert no control over ket, but the dynamic properties of the solvent still influence ket. PMID:17902656

  18. Esophageal impacted dentures.

    PubMed Central

    Nwaorgu, Onyekwere G.; Onakoya, Paul A.; Sogebi, Olusola A.; Kokong, Daniel D.; Dosumu, Oluwole O.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aims to highlight the problems associated with impacted acrylic dentures and proffers advice to check them. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrospective review of all cases of impacted acrylic dentures over a 16-year period. RESULTS: Twenty-two adults had impacted esophageal acrylic dentures of which 16 (72.7%) and six (27.3%) were males and females, respectively (M:F ratio = 2.7:1) with age range 23-77 years. Fourteen patients (63.6%) had worn their dentures for more than 10 years without check-up, and 54.5% presented within 48 hours of impaction. The common symptoms in all the patients were difficulty with swallowing, throat pain and discomfort, followed by tenderness in the neck in 15 (68.2%). Dentures were extracted through esophagoscopy (17 cases) and cervical (three cases) esophagotomy, respectively. Observed complications included pulmonary edema in one and esophageal perforation in five patients. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic extraction of dentures carries a high risk of perforation. Extraction of an impacted denture via esophagoscopy can be undertaken under direct vision and in an ideal situation with judicious use of the Shears forceps. In the absence of these, the safest option is an esophagotomy. Proper treatment planning in the fabrication of dentures with incorporation of radiopaque materials in the dental resins and adequate postdenture delivery instructions are necessary as preventive measures. PMID:15540888

  19. Nuclear medicine and esophageal surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Taillefer, R.; Beauchamp, G.; Duranceau, A.C.; Lafontaine, E.

    1986-06-01

    The principal radionuclide procedures involved in the evaluation of esophageal disorders that are amenable to surgery are illustrated and briefly described. The role of the radionuclide esophagogram (RE) in the diagnosis and management of achalasia, oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy and its complications, tracheoesophageal fistulae, pharyngeal and esophageal diverticulae, gastric transposition, and fundoplication is discussed. Detection of columnar-lined esophagus by Tc-99m pertechnetate imaging and of esophageal carcinoma by Ga-67 citrate and Tc-99m glucoheptonate studies also is presented. 37 references.

  20. Esophageal tissue engineering: a new approach for esophageal replacement.

    PubMed

    Totonelli, Giorgia; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Fishman, Jonathan M; Orlando, Giuseppe; Ansari, Tahera; Sibbons, Paul; Birchall, Martin A; Pierro, Agostino; Eaton, Simon; De Coppi, Paolo

    2012-12-21

    A number of congenital and acquired disorders require esophageal tissue replacement. Various surgical techniques, such as gastric and colonic interposition, are standards of treatment, but frequently complicated by stenosis and other problems. Regenerative medicine approaches facilitate the use of biological constructs to replace or regenerate normal tissue function. We review the literature of esophageal tissue engineering, discuss its implications, compare the methodologies that have been employed and suggest possible directions for the future. Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, National Research Register and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched with the following search terms: stem cell and esophagus, esophageal replacement, esophageal tissue engineering, esophageal substitution. Reference lists of papers identified were also examined and experts in this field contacted for further information. All full-text articles in English of all potentially relevant abstracts were reviewed. Tissue engineering has involved acellular scaffolds that were either transplanted with the aim of being repopulated by host cells or seeded prior to transplantation. When acellular scaffolds were used to replace patch and short tubular defects they allowed epithelial and partial muscular migration whereas when employed for long tubular defects the results were poor leading to an increased rate of stenosis and mortality. Stenting has been shown as an effective means to reduce stenotic changes and promote cell migration, whilst omental wrapping to induce vascularization of the construct has an uncertain benefit. Decellularized matrices have been recently suggested as the optimal choice for scaffolds, but smart polymers that will incorporate signalling to promote cell-scaffold interaction may provide a more reproducible and available solution. Results in animal models that have used seeded scaffolds strongly suggest that seeding of both muscle and epithelial cells on scaffolds prior to implantation is a prerequisite for complete esophageal replacement. Novel approaches need to be designed to allow for peristalsis and vascularization in the engineered esophagus. Although esophageal tissue engineering potentially offers a real alternative to conventional treatments for severe esophageal disease, important barriers remain that need to be addressed. PMID:23322987

  1. Retrograde Lymphatic Spread of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oshiro, Hisashi; Osaka, Yoshiaki; Tachibana, Shingo; Aoki, Takaya; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Nagao, Toshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The concept of the retrograde lymphatic spread of cancer cells appears to account for a subset of the essential mechanisms of cancer metastasis in various organs. However, no adequate data currently exist to illustrate the pathology of the retrograde lymphatic metastasis of cancer cells in human bodies. To shed light on this phenomenon, we report a case of a 63-year-old Japanese man who underwent an esophagectomy and lymph node dissection for early-stage esophageal cancer. The patient's clinical information was evaluated by board-certified surgeons and internists. Surgically excised materials were histopathologically evaluated by attending pathologists. Postoperative pathological examination revealed that the patient's tumor was a well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with negative surgical margins (T1N0M0, stage I). Apart from the primary lesion, a single lymphatic vessel invasion was found between the lamina propria and lamina muscularis of the esophagus where intralymphatic cancer cells had spread against the direction of backflow prevention valves and skipped beyond these valves without destroying them. The present case demonstrated that the retrograde lymphatic spread of cancer cells can occur in valve-equipped lymphatic vessels. Our study may not only provide a scientific basis for the concept of retrograde lymphatic metastasis but also explain a portion of the complexities associated with the lymphogenous metastasis of esophageal cancer. PMID:26166121

  2. Clinical outcomes of synchronous head and neck and esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Won

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate clinical outcomes of synchronous head and neck and esophageal cancer (SHNEC). Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 27 SHNEC patients treated with curative intent at a single institution. The treatment modality for individual cases was usually determined on a case by case basis. Results The median follow-up duration for the surviving patients was 28.2 months. The most common site of head and neck cancer was hypopharyngeal carcinoma (n = 21, 77.7%). The lower esophagus was the most common location of esophageal carcinoma (n = 16, 59.3%). The 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 57.5% and 39.6%. Major pattern of failure was locoregional recurrence in the study patients. Esophageal cancer stage, the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status, and pretreatment weight loss were significant prognostic factors for OS in univariate analysis. Treatment-related death was observed in two patients, and one patient developed a grade 4 late treatment-related complication. Conclusion Although the survival outcome for SHNEC is poor, long-term survival might be achievable with aggressive treatment with stage I-II esophageal cancer and good performance. PMID:26484300

  3. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  4. [Esophageal involvement in Behet's disease].

    PubMed

    Martnez Salmern, J F; Gutirrez-Rave Pecero, V; Uariachi, M; Ogea Garca, J L; Franco Cebrin, J; Castillo Higueras, P

    1992-09-01

    We report the case of a female patient that fulfills major criteria of Behcet's disease. Multiple esophageal aphthous ulcers seen by endoscopy responded to therapy with steroids and colchicine. PMID:1419316

  5. Environmental Causes of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kamangar, Farin; Chow, Wong-Ho; Abnet, Christian; Dawsey, Sanford

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis This articles reviews the environmental risk factors and predisposing conditions for the two main histological types of esophageal cancer, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). Tobacco smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, drinking mat, low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, achalasia, and low socioeconomic status increase the risk of ESCC. Results of investigations on several other potential risk factors, including opium consumption, intake of hot drinks, eating pickled vegetables, poor oral health, and exposure to human papillomavirus, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, N-nitroso compounds, acetaldehyde, and fumonisins are also discussed. Gastroesophageal reflux, obesity, tobacco smoking, hiatal hernia, achalasia, and probably absence of H. pylori in the stomach increase the risk of EA. Results of studies investigating other factors, including low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, consumption of carbonated soft drink, use of H2 blockers, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and drugs that relax the lower esophageal sphincter are also discussed. PMID:19327566

  6. Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Cianferoni, Antonella; Spergel, Jonathan M

    2015-09-01

    Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disease (EGID) can be classified as eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) when the eosinophilia is limited to the esophagus or as eosinophilic gastritis (EG) if it is limited to the gastric tract, eosinophilic colitis (EC) if it is limited to the colon, and eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) if the eosinophilia involves one or more parts of the gastrointestinal tract. EoE is by far the most common EGID. It is a well-defined chronic atopic disease due to a T helper type 2 (Th2) inflammation triggered often by food allergens. EoE diagnosis is done if an esophageal biopsy shows at least 15 eosinophils per high power field (eos/hpf). Globally accepted long-term therapies for EoE are the use of swallowed inhaled steroids or food antigen avoidance. The treatment of EoE is done not only to control symptoms but also to prevent complications such as esophageal stricture and food impaction. EGE cause non-specific gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and are diagnosed if esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD)/colonoscopy show eosinophilia in one or more parts of the GI tract. They are rare diseases with an unclear pathogenesis, and they are poorly defined in terms of diagnostic criteria and treatment. Before initiating treatment of any EGE, it is imperative to conduct a differential diagnosis to exclude other causes of hypereosinophilia with GI localization. EGE are often poorly responsive to therapy and there is no commonly accepted long-term treatment. EG has many characteristics similar to EoE, including the fact that it is often due to a food allergen-driven Th2 inflammation; transcriptome analysis however shows that it is more a systemic disease and has a different gene signature than EoE. EC is a benign form of delayed food allergy in infant and is instead a difficult-to-treat severe inflammatory condition in older children and adults. EC in the latter groups can be a manifestation of drug allergy or autoimmune disease. Overall EGE, EC, and EG are rare and are a diagnosis of exclusion until more common causes of eosinophilia have been excluded. PMID:26233430

  7. [Value of training-induced effects on arterial vascular system and skeletal muscles in therapy of NYHA II/III heart failure].

    PubMed

    Huonker, M; Keul, J

    2001-11-01

    Dynamic muscular exercise performed by healthy subjects leads to a rise in the left ventricular blood ejection with an acute increase in the local wall shear stress on the endothelium of the arterial vessels. These hemodynamic changes results in a release of endothelium-dependent relaxing factors, one of them concerns nitric oxide (NO). Therefore an arterial vasodilatation with an acute increase in the blood flow volume to the exercising muscle groups occurs. If more than 1/6 of the skeletal musculature is involved in exercise and if training duration exceeds 3-5 hours a week the chronically increased blood flow volume in the cardiovascular system triggers structural and functional changes of the heart and the arterial vessels. It develops a functional intact excentric hypertrophy of the myocardium; within the arterial vessels an increase in the diameter of the muscular arteries supplying the trained muscle groups occurs. These training-induced adaptations of the cardiovascular system are adjusted to improve the aerobic skeletal muscle metabolism. In congestive heart failure a pathological excentric myocardial hypertrophy is found. In this case the systolic myocardial function is impaired and the left ventricular ejection fraction is reduced already in early stages, so that the cardiac output can not be sufficiently increased during exercise. In addition a dysfunction of the endothelium of the arterial vessels occurs. As a consequence the endothelium-dependent arterial vasodilation is reduced, so that the peripheral arteries could not supply the muscle groups involved in exercise with enough blood flow volume. Therefore, the acute delivery of the working musculature with oxygen and energy substrates is insufficient, so that premature muscular fatigue occurs. The reduced exercise resistance of the patients leads chronically to a generalized skeletal muscle atrophy. Ultrastructural analysis revealed a decrease of oxidative type 1 muscle fibers with a relative increase of more glycolytic type 2 fibers. In addition, the volume density and the surface area of the cristae of mitochondria are reduced. All these changes results in a decrease of aerobic skeletal muscle metabolism independent of the blood flow volume, so that the physical fitness of the patients progressively decline. On the basis of the training-induced physiological adaptations of the cardiovascular system, a special exercise therapy supervised by a physician was developed for patients with congestive heart failure NYHA II/III. It have been shown that various exercise programs, which are adjusted to the degree of cardiac function impairment are suitable to restore the endothelial dysfunction of the arterial vessels as well as to cure the disturbed skeletal muscle metabolism in these patients independent of an improvement of cardiac function. Therefore in patients with congestive heart failure NYHA II/III who underwent regularly such an exercise therapy, the secondary impaired physical fitness could be rebuild without an excessive risk for an acute exercise-induced cardiovascular emergency. PMID:11771449

  8. Upper esophageal and pharyngeal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Jonathan M.; Howell, Amy B.; Johnston, Nikki; Kresty, Laura A.; Lew, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on laryngopharyngeal reflux as a risk factor for laryngeal cancer; the role of pepsin in laryngopharyngeal neoplasia; natural fruit and vegetable compounds for the prevention and treatment of pharyngeal and esophageal cancers; and evaluation of cranberry constituents as inhibitors of esophageal adenocarcinoma utilizing in vitro assay and in vivo models. PMID:25266014

  9. Hyperfractionated Concomitant Boost Proton Beam Therapy for Esophageal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mizumoto, Masashi; Sugahara, Shinji; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Nakahara, Akira; Terashima, Hideo; Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of hyperfractionated concomitant boost proton beam therapy (PBT) for patients with esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study participants were 19 patients with esophageal cancer who were treated with hyperfractionated photon therapy and PBT between 1990 and 2007. The median total dose was 78 GyE (range, 70-83 GyE) over a median treatment period of 48 days (range, 38-53 days). Ten of the 19 patients were at clinical T Stage 3 or 4. Results: There were no cases in which treatment interruption was required because of radiation-induced esophagitis or hematologic toxicity. The overall 1- and 5-year actuarial survival rates for all 19 patients were 79.0% and 42.8%, respectively, and the median survival time was 31.5 months (95% limits: 16.7- 46.3 months). Of the 19 patients, 17 (89%) showed a complete response within 4 months after completing treatment and 2 (11%) showed a partial response, giving a response rate of 100% (19/19). The 1- and 5-year local control rates for all 19 patients were 93.8% and 84.4 %, respectively. Only 1 patient had late esophageal toxicity of Grade 3 at 6 months after hyperfractionated PBT. There were no other nonhematologic toxicities, including no cases of radiation pneumonia or cardiac failure of Grade 3 or higher. Conclusions: The results suggest that hyperfractionated PBT is safe and effective for patients with esophageal cancer. Further studies are needed to establish the appropriate role and treatment schedule for use of PBT for esophageal cancer.

  10. Esophageal development and epithelial homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rosekrans, Sanne L; Baan, Bart; Muncan, Vanesa; van den Brink, Gijs R

    2015-08-15

    The esophagus is a relatively simple organ that evolved to transport food and liquids through the thoracic cavity. It is the only part of the gastrointestinal tract that lacks any metabolic, digestive, or absorptive function. The mucosa of the adult esophagus is covered by a multilayered squamous epithelium with a remarkable similarity to the epithelium of the skin despite the fact that these tissues originate from two different germ layers. Here we review the developmental pathways involved in the establishment of the esophagus and the way these pathways regulate gut-airway separation. We summarize current knowledge of the mechanisms that maintain homeostasis in esophageal epithelial renewal in the adult and the molecular mechanism of the development of Barrett's metaplasia, the precursor lesion to esophageal adenocarcinoma. Finally, we examine the ongoing debate on the hierarchy of esophageal epithelial precursor cells and on the presence or absence of a specific esophageal stem cell population. Together the recent insights into esophageal development and homeostasis suggest that the pathways that establish the esophagus during development also play a role in the maintenance of the adult epithelium. We are beginning to understand how reflux of gastric content and the resulting chronic inflammation can transform the squamous esophageal epithelium to columnar intestinal type metaplasia in Barrett's esophagus. PMID:26138464

  11. Esophageal malignancy: A growing concern

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jianyuan; Jamal, M Mazen

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is mainly found in Asia and east Africa and is one of the deadliest cancers in the world. However, it has not garnered much attention in the Western world due to its low incidence rate. An increasing amount of data indicate that esophageal cancer, particularly esophageal adenocarcinoma, has been rising by 6-fold annually and is now becoming the fastest growing cancer in the United States. This rise has been associated with the increase of the obese population, as abdominal fat puts extra pressure on the stomach and causes gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Long standing GERD can induce esophagitis and metaplasia and, ultimately, leads to adenocarcinoma. Acid suppression has been the main strategy to treat GERD; however, it has not been proven to control esophageal malignancy effectively. In fact, its side effects have triggered multiple warnings from regulatory agencies. The high mortality and fast growth of esophageal cancer demand more vigorous efforts to look into its deeper mechanisms and come up with better therapeutic options. PMID:23236223

  12. GOLD B-C-D groups or GOLD II-III-IV grades: Which one better reflects the functionality of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed

    Moreira, Graciane L; Donria, Leila; Furlanetto, Karina C; Paes, Thais; Sant'Anna, Thas; Hernandes, Nidia A; Pitta, Fabio

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate which global initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease (GOLD) classification (B-C-D or II-III-IV) better reflects the functionality of patients with moderate to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Ninety patients with COPD were classified according to the GOLD B-C-D and II-III-IV classifications. Functionality was assessed by different outcomes: 6-min walk test (6MWT), activities of daily living (ADL) (London Chest ADL Scale), and daily life activity/inactivity variables assessed by activity monitoring (SenseWear armband, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA). The 6MWT was the only outcome significantly associated with both the GOLD classifications. Good functionality as assessed by the 6MWT was observed in 80%, 69%, and 43.5% (GOLD B, C, and D, respectively) and 81%, 59%, and 29% (GOLD II, III, and IV, respectively) of the patients. Association (V Cramer's) and correlation (Spearman) coefficients of 6MWT with GOLD B-C-D and II-III-IV were V = 0.30, r = -0.35, and V = 0.37, r = -0.25, respectively. Neither GOLD classification showed V or r ? 0.30 with any other functionality outcome. Both the GOLD B-C-D and II-III-IV classifications do not reflect well COPD patients' functionality. Despite low association and correlation coefficients in general, both GOLD classifications were better associated with functional exercise capacity (6MWT) than with subjectively assessed ADL and objectively assessed outcomes of physical activity/inactivity. PMID:25711468

  13. LYN, a Key Gene From Bioinformatics Analysis, Contributes to Development and Progression of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dabiao

    2015-01-01

    Background Esophageal adenocarcinoma is a lethal malignancy whose incidence is rapidly growing in recent years. Previous reports suggested that Barretts esophagus (BE), which is represented by metaplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma transition, is regarded as the premalignant lesion of esophageal neoplasm. However, our knowledge about the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma is still very limited. Material/Methods In order to acquire better understanding about the pathological mechanisms in this field, we obtained gene profiling data on BE, esophageal adenocarcinoma patients, and normal controls from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. Bioinformatics analyses, including Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis, were conducted. Results Our results revealed that several pathways, such as the wound healing, complement, and coagulation pathways, were closely correlated with cancer development and progression. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway was discovered to be responsible for the predisposition stage of cancer; while response to stress, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, nod-like receptor signaling pathway, and ECM-receptor interaction were chief contributors of cancer progression. More importantly, we discovered in this study that LYN was a critical gene. It was found to be the key nodule of several significant biological networks, which suggests its close correlation with cancer initiation and progression. Conclusions These results provided more information on the mechanisms of esophageal adenocarcinoma, which enlightened our way to the clinical discovery of novel therapeutic makers for conquering esophageal cancer. Keywords: esophageal adenocarcinoma; LYN; Go analysis; KEGG pathway. PMID:26708841

  14. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  15. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  16. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  17. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  18. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  19. Esophageal Helicobacter pylori colonization aggravates esophageal injury caused by reflux

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yun-Xiang; Wang, Wei-Hong; Dai, Yun; Teng, Gui-Gen; Wang, Shu-Jun

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate esophageal Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization on esophageal injury caused by reflux and the related mechanisms. METHODS: An esophagitis model, with acid and bile reflux, was surgically produced in male rats. The rats were randomly divided into either: (1) an esophagogastroduodenal anastomosis (EGDA) group; (2) an EGDA with H. pylori infection group; (3) a pseudo-operation with H. pylori infection group; or (4) a pseudo-operation group. All rats were kept for 36 wk. Based on the location of H. pylori colonization, the EGDA rats with H. pylori infection were subdivided into those with concomitant esophageal H. pylori colonization or those with only gastric H. pylori colonization. The esophageal injuries were evaluated grossly and microscopically. The expressions of CDX2 and MUC2 were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Ki-67 antigen expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. The mRNA levels of cyclin D1, c-Myc, Bax and Bcl-2 were determined by RT-PCR. Cell apoptosis was evaluated using the TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling method. RESULTS: Esophagitis, Barretts esophagus (BE), and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) developed in rats that underwent EGDA. When comparing rats with EGDA and concomitant esophageal H. pylori colonization to EGDA-only rats, the severity of injury (87.9 5.2 vs 77.2 8.6, macroscopically, 92.5 8.0 vs 83.8 5.5, microscopically, both P < 0.05) and the incidences of BE (80.0% vs 33.3%, P = 0.055) and EAC (60.0% vs 11.1%, P < 0.05) were increased. These increases were associated with upregulation of CDX2 and MUC2 mRNA (10.1 5.4 vs 3.0 2.9, 8.4 4.6 vs 2.0 3.2, respectively, Ps < 0.01) and protein (8.1 2.3 vs 3.3 3.1, 7.3 4.0 vs 1.8 2.7, respectively, all P < 0.05). The expression of Ki-67 (8.9 0.7 vs 6.0 1.7, P < 0.01) and the presence of apoptotic cells (8.3 1.1 vs 5.3 1.7, P < 0.01) were also increased significantly in rats with EGDA and concomitant esophageal H. pylori colonization compared with rats with EGDA only. The mRNA levels of cyclin D1 (5.8 1.9 vs 3.4 1.3, P < 0.01), c-Myc (6.4 1.7 vs 3.7 1.2, P < 0.01), and Bax (8.6 1.6 vs 5.1 1.3, P < 0.01) were significantly increased, whereas the mRNA level of Bcl-2 (0.6 0.3 vs 0.8 0.3, P < 0.01) was significantly reduced in rats with EGDA and concomitant esophageal H. pylori colonization compared with rats with EGDA only. CONCLUSION: Esophageal H. pylori colonization increases esophagitis severity, and facilitates the development of BE and EAC with the augmentation of cell proliferation and apoptosis in esophageal mucosa. PMID:25400455

  20. Prevention and treatment of esophageal stenosis after endoscopic submucosal dissection for early esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Lu, Zhongsheng; Liu, Qingsen

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for the treatment of esophageal mucosal lesions is associated with a risk of esophageal stenosis, especially for near-circumferential or circumferential esophageal mucosal defects. Here, we review historic and modern studies on the prevention and treatment of esophageal stenosis after ESD. These methods include prevention via pharmacological treatment, endoscopic autologous cell transplantation, endoscopic esophageal dilatation, and stent placement. This short review will focus on direct prevention and treatment, which may help guide the way forward. PMID:25386186

  1. A Comprehensive Review of Esophageal Stents

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jinwha; Lam-Tsai, Yvette; Gress, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal stents are important tools for palliative treatment of inoperable esophageal malignancies. With the development of multiple self-expandable stents, there are now several therapeutic options for managing benign and malignant esophageal diseases. This paper discusses the various types of esophageal stents currently available, indications for their placement, challenges and complications that gastroenterologists face when placing these stents, and some of the innovations that will become available in the near future. PMID:23293566

  2. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope. (a) Identification. An esophageal stethoscope is...

  3. Cux1 Enables Interhemispheric Connections of Layer II/III Neurons by Regulating Kv1-Dependent Firing.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Tornos, Fernanda M; Briz, Carlos G; Weiss, Linnea A; Sebastián-Serrano, Alvaro; Ares, Saúl; Navarrete, Marta; Frangeul, Laura; Galazo, Maria; Jabaudon, Denis; Esteban, José A; Nieto, Marta

    2016-02-01

    Neuronal subtype-specific transcription factors (TFs) instruct key features of neuronal function and connectivity. Activity-dependent mechanisms also contribute to wiring and circuit assembly, but whether and how they relate to TF-directed neuronal differentiation is poorly investigated. Here we demonstrate that the TF Cux1 controls the formation of the layer II/III corpus callosum (CC) projections through the developmental transcriptional regulation of Kv1 voltage-dependent potassium channels and the resulting postnatal switch to a Kv1-dependent firing mode. Loss of Cux1 function led to a decrease in the expression of Kv1 transcripts, aberrant firing responses, and selective loss of CC contralateral innervation. Firing and innervation were rescued by re-expression of Kv1 or postnatal reactivation of Cux1. Knocking down Kv1 mimicked Cux1-mediated CC axonal loss. These findings reveal that activity-dependent processes are central bona fide components of neuronal TF-differentiation programs and establish the importance of intrinsic firing modes in circuit assembly within the neocortex. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:26804994

  4. Esophageal fistula associated with intracavitary irradiation for esophageal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hishikawa, Y.; Tanaka, S.; Miura, T.

    1986-05-01

    Fifty-three patients with esophageal carcinoma were treated with high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation following external irradiation. Ten patients developed esophageal fistula. Perforations were found in the bronchus (four), major vessels (four), pericardium (one), and mediastinum (one). The frequency of fistula occurrence in these patients was not remarkably different from that in 30 other patients treated only with greater than or equal to 50 Gy external irradiation. From the time of the development of esophageal fistula, intracavitary irradiation did not seem to accelerate the development of fistula. The fistulas in our ten patients proved to be associated with tumor, deep ulcer (created before intracavitary irradiation), chemotherapy, infection, and trauma rather than the direct effect of intracavitary irradiation.

  5. Using aptamers to elucidate esophageal cancer clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenxu; Lu, Yi; Pu, Ying; Liu, Jun; Liu, Bo; Yu, Bo; Chen, Ke; Fu, Ting; Yang, Chaoyong James; Liu, Huixia; Tan, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is closely correlated with the occurrence and development of various cancers of epithelial origin. This study tested, for the first time, the ability of EpCAM aptamer SYL3C to detect EpCAM expression in 170 cases of esophageal cancer (EC) and precancerous lesions, as well as 20 cases of EC series samples, using immunofluorescence imaging analysis. Corresponding antibodies were used as control. EpCAM overexpression was 98% in both esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EACA) and 100% in metastasis, but no EpCAM overexpression was detected in undifferentiated EC (UEC). Significant differences were noted among various stages of differentiation (p?esophageal lesions. In a competitive binding experiment, EpCAM aptamer generated a staining pattern similar to that of antibody, but the binding sites with EpCAM were different. Based on these results, it can be concluded that EpCAM is suitable for use as an EC biomarker, therapeutic target, and effective parameter for tumor transfer and prognosis evaluation by aptamer SYL3C staining. PMID:26687301

  6. Using aptamers to elucidate esophageal cancer clinical samples

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenxu; Lu, Yi; Pu, Ying; Liu, Jun; Liu, Bo; Yu, Bo; Chen, Ke; Fu, Ting; Yang, Chaoyong James; Liu, Huixia; Tan, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is closely correlated with the occurrence and development of various cancers of epithelial origin. This study tested, for the first time, the ability of EpCAM aptamer SYL3C to detect EpCAM expression in 170 cases of esophageal cancer (EC) and precancerous lesions, as well as 20 cases of EC series samples, using immunofluorescence imaging analysis. Corresponding antibodies were used as control. EpCAM overexpression was 98% in both esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EACA) and 100% in metastasis, but no EpCAM overexpression was detected in undifferentiated EC (UEC). Significant differences were noted among various stages of differentiation (p?esophageal lesions. In a competitive binding experiment, EpCAM aptamer generated a staining pattern similar to that of antibody, but the binding sites with EpCAM were different. Based on these results, it can be concluded that EpCAM is suitable for use as an EC biomarker, therapeutic target, and effective parameter for tumor transfer and prognosis evaluation by aptamer SYL3C staining. PMID:26687301

  7. The pathophysiology of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Raheem, Mayumi; Leach, Steven T; Day, Andrew S; Lemberg, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease characterized by esophageal eosinophilia (>15eos/hpf), lack of responsiveness to acid-suppressive medication and is managed by allergen elimination and anti-allergy therapy. Although the pathophysiology of EoE is currently unsubstantiated, evidence implicates food and aeroallergen hypersensitivity in genetically predisposed individuals as contributory factors. Genome-wide expression analyses have isolated a remarkably conserved gene-expression profile irrespective of age and gender, suggesting a genetic contribution. EoE has characteristics of mainly TH2 type immune responses but also some TH1 cytokines, which appear to strongly contribute to tissue fibrosis, with esophageal epithelial cells providing a hospitable environment for this inflammatory process. Eosinophil-degranulation products appear to play a central role in tissue remodeling in EoE. This remodeling and dysregulation predisposes to fibrosis. Mast-cell-derived molecules such as histamine may have an effect on enteric nerves and may also act in concert with transforming growth factor-? to interfere with esophageal musculature. Additionally, the esophageal epithelium may facilitate the inflammatory process under pathogenic contexts such as in EoE. This article aims to discuss the contributory factors in the pathophysiology of EoE. PMID:24910846

  8. Endoscopic and clinicopathological patterns of esophageal cancer in Tanzania: experiences from two tertiary health institutions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Esophageal cancer is one of the most serious gastrointestinal cancer worldwide, owing to its rapid development and fatal prognoses in most cases. There is a paucity of published data regarding esophageal cancer in Tanzania and the study area in particular. This study was conducted to describe the endoscopic and clinicopathological patterns of esophageal cancer in this part of the world. The study provides baseline local data for future comparison. Methods This was a retrospective study of histologically confirmed cases of esophageal cancer seen at Bugando Medical Center and Muhimbili National Hospital between March 2008 and February 2013. Data were retrieved from medical record computer database and analyzed using SPSS computer software version 17.0. Results A total of 328 esophageal cancer patients were enrolled in the study, representing 25.3% of all malignant gastrointestinal tract tumors. The male to female ratio was 2.2:1. The median age of patients at presentation was 47 years. The majority of patients (86.6%) were peasants coming from the rural areas. Smoking and alcohol consumption were documented in 74.7% and 61.6% of patients respectively. Family history of esophageal cancer was reported in 4.6% of cases. The majority of patients (81.7%) presented late with advanced stage of cancer. Progressive dysphagia and weight loss were the most common presenting symptoms occurring in all patients. The middle third esophagus (58.5%) was the most frequent anatomical site for esophageal cancer followed by lower third (27.4%) and upper third esophagus (10.4%). Squamous cell carcinoma (96.0%) was the most common histopathological type. Adenocarcinoma occurred in 13 (4.0%) patients. TNM staging was documented in only 104 (31.7%) patients. Of these, 102(98.1%) patients were diagnosed with advanced esophageal cancer (Stages III and IV). According to tumor grading, most of tumors were moderately differentiated accounting for 56.1% of cases. Distant metastasis was documented in 43.3% of patients. Conclusion Esophageal cancer is not uncommon in this region and shows a trend towards a relative young age at presentation and the majority of patients present late with advanced stage. There is a need for screening of high-risk populations and detecting esophageal cancer at an early stage in order to improve chances for successful treatment and survival. PMID:24094270

  9. Recursive Partitioning Analysis for New Classification of Patients With Esophageal Cancer Treated by Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Motoo; Department of Clinical Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya; Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya ; Shitara, Kohei; Kodaira, Takeshi; Kondoh, Chihiro; Takahari, Daisuke; Ura, Takashi; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Kamata, Minoru; Muro, Kei; Sawada, Satoshi

    2012-11-01

    Background: The 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system does not include lymph node size in the guidelines for staging patients with esophageal cancer. The objectives of this study were to determine the prognostic impact of the maximum metastatic lymph node diameter (ND) on survival and to develop and validate a new staging system for patients with esophageal squamous cell cancer who were treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods: Information on 402 patients with esophageal cancer undergoing CRT at two institutions was reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses of data from one institution were used to assess the impact of clinical factors on survival, and recursive partitioning analysis was performed to develop the new staging classification. To assess its clinical utility, the new classification was validated using data from the second institution. Results: By multivariate analysis, gender, T, N, and ND stages were independently and significantly associated with survival (p < 0.05). The resulting new staging classification was based on the T and ND. The four new stages led to good separation of survival curves in both the developmental and validation datasets (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Our results showed that lymph node size is a strong independent prognostic factor and that the new staging system, which incorporated lymph node size, provided good prognostic power, and discriminated effectively for patients with esophageal cancer undergoing CRT.

  10. Esophageal tissue engineering: A new approach for esophageal replacement

    PubMed Central

    Totonelli, Giorgia; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Fishman, Jonathan M; Orlando, Giuseppe; Ansari, Tahera; Sibbons, Paul; Birchall, Martin A; Pierro, Agostino; Eaton, Simon; De Coppi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    A number of congenital and acquired disorders require esophageal tissue replacement. Various surgical techniques, such as gastric and colonic interposition, are standards of treatment, but frequently complicated by stenosis and other problems. Regenerative medicine approaches facilitate the use of biological constructs to replace or regenerate normal tissue function. We review the literature of esophageal tissue engineering, discuss its implications, compare the methodologies that have been employed and suggest possible directions for the future. Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, National Research Register and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched with the following search terms: stem cell and esophagus, esophageal replacement, esophageal tissue engineering, esophageal substitution. Reference lists of papers identified were also examined and experts in this field contacted for further information. All full-text articles in English of all potentially relevant abstracts were reviewed. Tissue engineering has involved acellular scaffolds that were either transplanted with the aim of being repopulated by host cells or seeded prior to transplantation. When acellular scaffolds were used to replace patch and short tubular defects they allowed epithelial and partial muscular migration whereas when employed for long tubular defects the results were poor leading to an increased rate of stenosis and mortality. Stenting has been shown as an effective means to reduce stenotic changes and promote cell migration, whilst omental wrapping to induce vascularization of the construct has an uncertain benefit. Decellularized matrices have been recently suggested as the optimal choice for scaffolds, but smart polymers that will incorporate signalling to promote cell-scaffold interaction may provide a more reproducible and available solution. Results in animal models that have used seeded scaffolds strongly sug- gest that seeding of both muscle and epithelial cells on scaffolds prior to implantation is a prerequisite for complete esophageal replacement. Novel approaches need to be designed to allow for peristalsis and vascularization in the engineered esophagus. Although esophageal tissue engineering potentially offers a real alternative to conventional treatments for severe esophageal disease, important barriers remain that need to be addressed. PMID:23322987

  11. Photodynamic therapy for esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hatogai, Ken; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Yoda, Yusuke; Kaneko, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment that uses a photosensitizing drug that is administered to the patient, localized to a tumor, and then activated with a laser to induce a photochemical reaction to destroy the cell. PDT using porfimer sodium followed by excimer dye laser irradiation is approved as a curative treatment for superficial esophageal cancer in Japan. While endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is currently more popular for esophageal cancer, there is evidence to support PDT as an alternative treatment and as a salvage treatment for local failure after chemoradiotherapy (CRT). A photosensitizing agent has also been developed that requires a shorter sun shade period after administration, and studies are currently underway to establish an esophageal cancer indication for this next-generation PDT in Japan. PMID:25333005

  12. Environmental causes of esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamangar, Farin; Chow, Wong-Ho; Abnet, Christian C; Dawsey, Sanford M

    2009-03-01

    This article reviews the environmental risk factors and predisposing conditions for the two main histologic types of esophageal cancer. Tobacco smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, drinking mat, low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, achalasia, and low socioeconomic status increase the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Results of investigations on other potential risk factors, including opium consumption, intake of hot drinks, eating pickled vegetables, poor oral health, and exposure to human papillomavirus, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, N-nitroso compounds, acetaldehyde, and fumonisins are discussed. Gastroesophageal reflux, obesity, tobacco smoking, hiatal hernia, achalasia, and, probably, absence of H pylori in the stomach increase the risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Results of studies investigating other factors are also discussed. PMID:19327566

  13. Surgical treatments for esophageal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Allum, William H.; Bonavina, Luigi; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Cuesta, Miguel A.; Dong, Zhao Ming; Felix, Valter Nilton; Figueredo, Edgar; Gatenby, Piers A.C.; Haverkamp, Leonie; Ibraev, Maksat A.; Krasna, Mark J.; Lambert, Ren; Langer, Rupert; Lewis, Michael P.N.; Nason, Katie S.; Parry, Kevin; Preston, Shaun R.; Ruurda, Jelle P.; Schaheen, Lara W.; Tatum, Roger P.; Turkin, Igor N.; van der Horst, Sylvia; van der Peet, Donald L.; van der Sluis, Peter C.; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Wormald, Justin C.R.; Wu, Peter C.; Zonderhuis, Barbara M.

    2015-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on the role of the nurse in preparation of esophageal resection (ER); the management of patients who develop high-grade dysplasia after having undergone Nissen fundoplication; the trajectory of care for the patient with esophageal cancer; the influence of the site of tumor in the choice of treatment; the best location for esophagogastrostomy; management of chylous leak after esophagectomy; the optimal approach to manage thoracic esophageal leak after esophagectomy; the choice for operational approach in surgery of cardioesophageal crossing; the advantages of robot esophagectomy; the place of open esophagectomy; the advantages of esophagectomy compared to definitive chemoradiotherapy; the pathologist report in the resected specimen; the best way to manage patients with unsuspected positive microscopic margin after ER; enhanced recovery after surgery for ER: expedited care protocols; and long-term quality of life in patients following esophagectomy. PMID:25266029

  14. Blunt Trauma Patient with Esophageal Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Oray, Nese C.; Sivrikaya, Semra; Bayram, Basak; Egeli, Tufan; Dicle, Oguz

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic perforation of the esophagus due to blunt trauma is a rare thoracic emergency. The most common causes of esophageal perforation are iatrogenic, and the upper cervical esophageal region is the most often injured. Diagnosis is frequently determined late, and mortality is therefore high. This case report presents a young woman who was admitted to the emergency department (ED) with esophageal perforation after having fallen from a high elevation. Esophageal perforation was diagnosed via thoracoabdominal tomography with ingestion of oral contrast. The present report discusses alternative techniques for diagnosing esophageal perforation in a multitrauma patient. PMID:25247037

  15. A Treatment Option for Esophageal Intramural Pseudodiverticulosis.

    PubMed

    Tyberg, Amy; Jodorkovsky, Daniela

    2014-04-01

    Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD) is a rare condition often presenting with esophageal strictures. Treatment is often limited to endoscopic dilatation and treatment of the underlying esophageal pathology. We present a case of a patient with longstanding GERD on famotidine (she experienced anaphylaxis with proton pump inhibitors [PPIs]) who presented with dysphagia and weight loss. Work-up revealed a diagnosis of EIPD with a 5-mm mid-esophageal stricture. Therapy with dilatation was unsuccessful until the addition of sucralfate, after which dilatation was successful and symptoms resolved. In patients who are unable to take PPIs, the addition of sucralfate may enhance the success of dilatations of esophageal strictures and EIPD. PMID:26157852

  16. Expression of Cofilin-1 and Transgelin in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Liao, Ruyi; Li, Hui; Liu, Ling; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Hongming

    2015-01-01

    Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has attracted much research attention around the world, and the number of ESCC cases has increased gradually in recent years. Identifying the specific biomarkers of ESCC is an effective approach for the early diagnosis of tumors. Material/Methods Immunohistochemical streptavidin-peroxidase method was used to determine the expressions of Cofilin-1 and transgelin in 68 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and 48 individuals with normal esophageal tissues. In addition to the relationships between the expression of Cofilin-1 and transgelin, the clinicopathologic features of ESCC were also discussed. The correlation between Cofilin-1 and transgelin protein expression in ESCC was analyzed. Results (1) The positive expression rates of Cofilin-1 and transgelin were 60.3% (41/68) and 54.4% (37/68) in esophageal carcinoma tissue, respectively. The positive expression rates of Cofilin-1 and transgelin in normal esophageal tissue were 27.1% (13/48) and 29.1% (14/48), respectively. The differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). (2) The positive expression rate of Cofilin-1 did not differ significantly (P>0.05) with sex, age, ethnicity, tumor size, or infiltration depth; but did have a statistically significant (P<0.05) difference with various degrees of tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, and clinical stages. (3) The positive expression rate of transgelin did not differ significantly (P>0.05) with sex, age, ethnicity, tumor size, infiltration depth, and clinical stage, but did significantly (P<0.05) differ with degree of tumor differentiation and lymph node metastasis. Conclusions Cofilin-1 and transgelin may play roles in the carcinogenesis and development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Cofilin-1 may be useful as an important biomarker for indicating the degree of malignancy of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and the detection of transgelin is valuable in early diagnosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26344167

  17. Dietary treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Nirmala; Kagalwalla, Amir F

    2014-06-01

    Emerging evidence supports impaired epithelial barrier function as the key initial event in the development of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and other allergic diseases. Symptom resolution, histologic remission, and prevention of both disease and treatment-related complications are the goals of treatment. Successful dietary treatments include elemental, empirical elimination and allergy test directed diets. Dietary therapy with exclusive elemental diet offers the best response. Cow's milk, wheat, egg, soy, peanut/tree nut, and fish/shellfish are the 6 food antigens most likely to induce esophageal inflammation. PMID:24813522

  18. Esophageal Cancer: Current Options for Therapeutic Management

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Zhang, Hongwei; Wu, Kaichun

    2014-01-01

    Background Esophageal cancer (EC) is the eighth most common cancer worldwide. A worldwide-established consensus on therapeutic pathways for EC is still missing. Debate exists on whether neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment regimens improve the prognosis and which surgical approach reaches objective benefits. Summary This article discusses the appropriate option of the current different curative treatments in patients with EC, including surgical treatment and adjuvant therapy. Key Message To maximize survival and quality of life and also decrease postoperative complications, the present recommended therapeutic management of EC should be individualized multidisciplinary team approaches according to patients' staging and physiologic reserve. Practical Implications The aim of this article is to provide a decision support and also a discussion based on clinical therapeutic strategy in order to characterize the beneficial approach which reaches an optimal balance between radical resection, postoperative outcome and long-term survival of EC. PMID:26674591

  19. Estrogen and progesterone differentially regulate carbonic anhydrase II, III, IX, XII, and XIII in ovariectomized rat uteri.

    PubMed

    Karim, Kamarulzaman; Giribabu, Nelli; Muniandy, Sekaran; Salleh, Naguib

    2016-02-01

    Changes in the uterus expression of carbonic anhydrase (CA) II, III, IX, XII, and XIII were investigated under the influence of sex-steroids in order to elucidate mechanisms underlying differential effects of these hormones on uterine pH. Uteri of ovariectomised rats receiving over three days either vehicle, estrogen, or progesterone or three days estrogen followed by three days either vehicle or progesterone were harvested. Messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels were quantified by real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The distribution of CA isoenzymes proteins were examined by immunohistochemistry. The levels of CAII, III, XII, and XIII mRNAs and proteins were elevated while levels of CAIX mRNA and protein were reduced following progesterone-only and estrogen plus progesterone treatment, compared to the control and estrogen plus vehicle, respectively. Following estrogen treatment, expression of CAII, IX, XII, and CAXIII mRNAs and proteins were reduced, but remained at a level higher than control, except for CAIX, where its level was higher than the control and following progesterone treatment. Under progesterone-only and estrogen plus progesterone influences, high levels of CAII, III, XII, and XIII were observed in uterine lumenal and glandular epithelia and myometrium. However, a high level of CAIX was observed only under the influence of estrogen at the similar locations. In conclusion, high expression of CAII, III, XII, and XIII under the influence of progesterone and estrogen plus progesterone could result in the reduction of uterine tissue and fluid pH; however, the significance of high levels of CAIX expression under the influence of estrogen remains unclear. PMID:26709452

  20. A novel intermediate mucolipidosis II/III?? caused by GNPTAB mutation in the cytosolic N-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Leroy, Jules G; Sillence, David; Wood, Tim; Barnes, Jarrod; Lebel, Robert Roger; Friez, Michael J; Stevenson, Roger E; Steet, Richard; Cathey, Sara S

    2014-01-01

    Mucolipidosis (ML) II and ML III?/? are allelic autosomal recessive metabolic disorders due to mutations in GNPTAB. The gene encodes the enzyme UDP-GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase (GNPT), which is critical to proper trafficking of lysosomal acid hydrolases. The ML phenotypic spectrum is dichotomous. Criteria set for defining ML II and ML III?/? are inclusive for all but the few patients with phenotypes that span the archetypes. Clinical and biochemical findings of the intermediate' ML in eight patients with the c.10A>C missense mutation in GNPTAB are presented to define this intermediate ML and provide a broader insight into ML pathogenesis. Extensive clinical information, including radiographic examinations at various ages, was obtained from a detailed study of all patients. GNPTAB was sequenced in probands and parents. GNPT activity was measured and cathepsin D sorting assays were performed in fibroblasts. Intermediate ML patients who share the c.10A>C/p.K4Q mutation in GNPTAB demonstrate a distinct, consistent phenotype similar to ML II in physical and radiographic features and to ML III?/? in psychomotor development and life expectancy. GNPT activity is reduced to 712% but the majority of newly synthesized cathepsin D remains intracellular. The GNPTAB c.10A>C/p.K4Q missense allele results in an intermediate ML II/III with distinct clinical and biochemical characteristics. This delineation strengthens the utility of the discontinuous genotypephenotype correlation in ML II and ML III?/? and prompts additional studies on the tissue-specific pathogenesis in GNPT-deficient ML. PMID:24045841

  1. Mediastinoscopic esophagectomy for patients with early esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian-Yun; Li, Jing-Pei; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Nan-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to detect the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of mediastinoscopic esophagectomy for early esophageal cancer. Methods The clinical data of 194 patients who underwent mediastinoscopic esophagectomy for early esophageal cancer in our center from December 2005 to October 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Results All the surgery was performed successfully. The average duration of thoracic surgery was 48.27.8 min and the average intra-operative blood loss was 128.134.5 mL. An average of 3.11.6 lymph node stations were dissected, with an average number of dissected lymph nodes being 9.386.2, among which 4.25.4 were mediastinal lymph nodes. No peri-operative mortality was noted, and the rate of peri-operative morbidity was 13.4%. The median duration of follow-up was 39 [3-108] months, and the overall survival was 72.73%. The overall survival rates significantly differed among different T stages; more specifically, the 5-year survival was 95.23% in patients with stage T1a esophageal cancer, 70.15% for T1b, and 55.56% for T2 (P<0.001). The overall survival was significantly better in patients with negative lymph nodes than those with lymph nodes metastasis (P=0.003); more specifically, the 5-year survival rate was 84.9% for N0, 62.5% for N1, and 50.0% for N2 + N3. Conclusions The mediastinoscopic esophagectomy can achieve a similar effectiveness as the conventional thoracoscopic surgery for patients with early stage esophageal cancer. PMID:26380740

  2. Changes in the BDNF-immunopositive cell population of neocortical layers I and II/III after focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yongwon; Kang, Sung Goo; Kam, Kyung-Yoon

    2015-04-24

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family and is widely distributed in the central nervous system, including the cerebral cortex. BDNF plays an important role in normal neural development, survival of existing neurons, and activity-dependent neuroplasticity. BDNF can also be neuroprotective and evoke neurogenesis in certain pathological conditions, such as cerebral ischemia. Neocortical layer I is an important region that can integrate feedforward and feedback information from other cortical areas and subcortical regions. In addition, it has recently been proposed as a possible source of neuronal progenitor cells after ischemia. Therefore, we investigated changes in the BDNF-immunoreactive cell population of neocortical layers I and II/III after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced cerebral ischemia in rats. In unaffected condition, the number of BDNF(+) cells in layer I was significantly less than in layer II/III in the cingulate cortex and in the motor and sensory areas. The increase in the number of BDNF(+) cells in layer I 8 days after MCAO was more remarkable than layer II/III, in all regions except the area of cingulate cortex farthest from the infarct core. Only BDNF(+)-Ox-42(+) cells showed a tendency to increase consistently toward the infarct core in both layers I and II/III, implying a major source of BDNF for response to ischemic injury. The present study suggests that some beneficial effects during recovery from ischemic injury, such as increased supportive microglia/macrophages, occur owing to a sensitive response of BDNF in layer I. PMID:25681548

  3. High expression of the stem cell marker nestin is an adverse prognostic factor in WHO grade II-III astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Foong, Chan; Raisanen, Jack M.; Oliver, Dwight; Hiemenz, Matthew C.; Burns, Dennis K.; White, Charles L.; Whitworth, L. Anthony; Mickey, Bruce; Stegner, Martha; Habib, Amyn A.; Fink, Karen; Maher, Elizabeth A.; Bachoo, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Infiltrating astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas of low to anaplastic grade (WHO grades II and III), in spite of being associated with a wide range of clinical outcomes, can be difficult to subclassify and grade by the current histopathologic criteria. Unlike oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas that can be identified by the 1p/19q codeletion and the more malignant glioblastomas (WHO grade IV astrocytomas) that can be diagnosed solely based on objective features on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections, no such objective criteria exist for the subclassification of grade II-III astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas (A+OA II-III). In this study, we evaluated the prognostic and predictive value of the stem cell marker nestin in adult A+OA II-III (n=50) using immunohistochemistry and computer-assisted analysis on tissue microarrays. In addition, the correlation between nestin mRNA level and total survival was analyzed in the NCI Rembrandt database. The results showed that high nestin expression is a strong adverse prognostic factor for total survival (p=0.0004). The strength of the correlation was comparable to but independent of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 (IDH 1/2) mutation status. Histopathological grading and subclassification did not correlate significantly with outcome, although the interpretation of this finding is limited by the fact that grade III tumors were treated more aggressively than grade II tumors. These results suggest that nestin level and IDH 1/2 mutation status are strong prognostic features in A+OA II-III and possibly more helpful for treatment planning than routine histopathological variables such as oligodendroglial component (astrocytoma vs. oligoastrocytoma) and WHO grade (grade II vs. III). PMID:24519516

  4. Proton Beam Therapy of Stage II and III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Satoh, Hiroaki; Sugahara, Shinji; Kurishima, Koichi; Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Ishikawa, Shigemi; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The present retrospective study assessed the role of proton beam therapy (PBT) in the treatment of patients with Stage II or III non-small-cell lung cancer who were inoperable or ineligible for chemotherapy because of co-existing disease or refusal. Patients and Methods: Between November 2001 and July 2008, PBT was given to 35 patients (5 patients with Stage II, 12 with Stage IIIA, and 18 with Stage IIIB) whose median age was 70.3 years (range, 47.4-85.4). The median proton dose given was 78.3 Gy (range, 67.1-91.3) (relative biologic effectiveness). Results: Local progression-free survival for Stage II-III patients was 93.3% at 1 year and 65.9% at 2 years during a median observation period of 16.9 months. Four patients (11.4%) developed local recurrence, 13 (37.1%) developed regional recurrence, and 7 (20.0%) developed distant metastases. The progression-free survival rate for Stage II-III patients was 59.6% at 1 year and 29.2% at 2 years. The overall survival rate of Stage II-III patients was 81.8% at 1 year and 58.9% at 2 years. Grade 3 or greater toxicity was not observed. A total of 15 patients (42.9%) developed Grade 1 and 6 (17.1%) Grade 2 toxicity. Conclusion: PBT for Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer without chemotherapy resulted in good local control and low toxicity. PBT has a definite role in the treatment of patients with Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer who are unsuitable for surgery or chemotherapy.

  5. Esophageal human beta-defensin expression in eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Shauna; Robinson, Zachary D.; Masterson, Joanne C.; Hosford, Lindsay; Moore, Wendy; Pan, Zhaoxing; Harris, Rachel; Souza, Rhonda F.; Spechler, Stuart Jon; Fillon, Sophie A.; Furuta, Glenn T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Defensins are antimicrobial peptides expressed on mucosal surfaces that contribute to maintaining intestinal homeostasis by providing innate defense mechanisms for the epithelia. Defensin expression is altered in a number of diseases that affect mucosal surfaces, such as atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Similar to atopic dermatitis, eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic disease in which the squamous epithelial surface is affected by a similar TH2 microenvironment and eosinophil predominant inflammation. Therefore, we hypothesized defensin expression would be decreased in EoE. Methods To address this, we measured defensin expression in vitro in cell lines derived from patients with EoE (EoE1-T) or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (NES-G4T cells), and ex vivo in esophageal mucosal biopsy samples from children with EoE, GERD, and control children without esophageal disease. Results IL-5 induced a decrease in human beta-defensin 1 (hBD1) and human beta-defensin 3 (hBD3) expression in EoE1-T but not in NES-G4T cells. Compared to esophageal biopsy specimens from GERD and control children, specimens from EoE pediatric patients revealed significant decrease in mRNA and protein expression for hBD1 and hBD3. Conclusion Diminished expression of hBD1 and hBD3 may make the esophageal epithelium more susceptible to the development and/or perpetuation of EoE. PMID:23385963

  6. Eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with esophageal atresia and chronic dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Kassabian, Sirvart; Baez-Socorro, Virginia; Sferra, Thomas; Garcia, Reinaldo

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is defined as a discontinuity of the lumen of the esophagus repaired soon after birth. Dysphagia is a common symptom in these patients, usually related to stricture, dysmotility or peptic esophagitis. We present 4 cases of patients with EA who complained of dysphagia and the diagnosis of Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was made, ages ranging from 9 to 16 years. Although our patients were on acid suppression years after their EA repair, they presented with acute worsening of dysphagia. Esophogastroduodenoscopy and/or barium swallow did not show stricture and biopsies revealed elevated eosinophil counts consistent with EoE. Two of 4 patients improved symptomatically with the topical steroids. It is important to note that all our patients have asthma and 3 out of 4 have tested positive for food allergies. One of our patients developed recurrent anastomotic strictures that improved with the treatment of the EoE. A previous case report linked the recurrence of esophageal strictures in patients with EA repair with EoE. Once the EoE was treated the strictures resolved. On the other hand, based on our observation, EoE could be present in patients without recurrent anastomotic strictures. There appears to be a spectrum in the disease process. We are suggesting that EoE is a frequent concomitant problem in patients with history of congenital esophageal deformities, and for this reason any of these patients with refractory reflux symptoms or dysphagia (with or without anastomotic stricture) may benefit from an endoscopic evaluation with biopsies to rule out EoE. PMID:25548504

  7. [Acute necrotizing esophagitis. Case report].

    PubMed

    Pierini, Angel; Imhof, Hugo; Burlando, Eduardo; Gianinetti, Leonardo; Pierini, Leandro

    2013-06-01

    Acute necrotizing esophagitis, also known as black esophagus, represents an extremely rare clinical entity, defined by the black pigmentation of the esophagus, secondary to necrosis of the mucosa and detected at endoscopy. We present a clinical case of this rare disease, with its manifestation, diagnosis, treatment, and we perform a review of the literature. PMID:23940914

  8. Esophageal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing esophageal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  9. Esophageal manifestations of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Lucendo, A J

    2011-09-01

    Celiac disease (CD) may often be associated with various motor disorders affecting the different segments of the digestive tract, including the esophagus. Although it has not been universally reported, some available evidences indicate that pediatric and adult celiac patients could manifest a higher frequency of esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease-related symptoms compared to nonceliac patients. In addition, several published studies have consistently shown the efficacy of a gluten-free diet in rapidly controlling esophageal symptoms and in preventing their recurrence. Since the participation of gluten in the esophageal symptoms of CD seems clear, its intimate mechanisms have yet to be elucidated, and several hypothesis have been proposed, including the specific immune alterations characterizing CD, the reduction in nutrient absorption determining the arrival of intact gluten to distal gastrointestinal segments, and various dysregulations in the function of gastrointestinal hormones and peptides. Recent studies have suggested the existence of a possible relationship between CD and eosinophilic esophagitis, which should be more deeply investigated. PMID:21438963

  10. Circulating anti-p53 antibodies in esophageal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Koz?owski, M; Kovalchuk, O; Nikli?ski, J; Chyczewski, L; Staros?awska, E; Ciecha?ski, A; Dabrowski, A; Nikli?ska, W; Dziegielewski, P; Lapu?, G; Wallner, G; Lauda?ski, J

    2001-01-01

    Circulating anti-p53 protein antibodies (p53-Abs) have been detected in some cancer patients. The aim of the study was to determine the presence of circulating anti-p53 protein antibodies and their clinical significance in patients with esophageal carcinoma. Serum specimens from 75 consecutive patients with squamous cell carcinomas and 10 healthy subjects were studied. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA--Pharma Cell) was used to detect p53-Abs. At the time of diagnosis 20 (26.6%) of 75 analyzed patients had positive result in the p53-Abs test, but not any of the healthy subjects. The positive rate was 25% (1/4) cases in stage I, 41% (10/24) cases in stage IIA, 0% (0/8) cases in stage IIB, 28% (8/28) cases in stage III and 9% (1/11) cases in stage IV. In respect of tumour differentiation, cases graded as G1, G2 and G3 were positive in 28.5% (4/14), 25.9% (7/27) and 26.4% (9/34), respectively. There was no correlation between presence of p53-Abs and stage, rumour differentiation, lymph nodes metastases, tumour size, patient age and sex. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that serum p53-Abs did not correlate with cliniocopathologic feature of esophageal carcinoma. PMID:11820593

  11. Aortic Pseudoaneurysm Formation Following Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy And Metallic Stent Insertion in a Patient With Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Pei-Yu; Teng, Chung-Jen; Chung, Chen-Shuan; Liu, Chao-Yu; Huang, Chun-Chieh; Chang, Miu-Hsiang; Shueng, Pei-Wei; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aortic pseudoaneurysm formation subsequent to concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for esophageal cancer patient with esophageal metallic stent insertion is a rare condition. A 52-year-old man with esophageal cancer, cT4N1M0, stage IIIC, was treated with concurrent weekly cisplatin (30?mg/m2) and 5-Fluorouracil (500?mg/m2) as well as radiotherapy (50.4?Gy in 28 fractions) for 6 weeks. An esophageal metallic stent was inserted for dysphagia 1 week after initiation of CCRT. During the treatment regimen, the platelet count dropped to less than 200??103?/?L. One month after the completion of CCRT, chest CT revealed the presence of an aortic pseudoaneurysm as well as aortoesophageal fistulas. A thoracic aortic endografting was performed and the patient responded well to surgery. However, the patient died 2 months later due to a nosocomial infection. Multimodality treatment for esophageal cancer comprising cisplatin-based CCRT and esophageal metallic stent placement near a great vessel may increase the risk of pseudoaneurysm formation. PMID:25997064

  12. The Changing Face of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Melhado, Rachel E.; Alderson, Derek; Tucker, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The two main histological esophageal cancer types, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, differ in incidence, geographic distribution, ethnic pattern and etiology. This article focuses on epidemiology with particular reference to geographic and temporal variations in incidence, along with a review of the evidence supporting environmental and genetic factors involved in esophageal carcinogenesis. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus remains predominantly a disease of the developing world. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma is mainly a disease of western developed societies, associated with obesity and gastro-esophageal reflux disease. There has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma in developed countries in parallel with migration of both esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas towards the gastro-esophageal junction. PMID:24281163

  13. Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis of the residual esophagus after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Nobuyoshi; Kanda, Naoki; Fukunaga, Toru; Kimura, Masayuki; Sugamoto, Yuji; Tasaki, Kentaro; Uesato, Masaya; Sazuka, Tetsutaro; Maruyama, Tetsuro; Aida, Naohiro; Tamachi, Tomohide; Hosokawa, Takashi; Asai, Yo; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2015-01-01

    A 91-year-old man was referred to our hospital with intermittent dysphagia. He had undergone esophagectomy for esophageal cancer (T3N2M0 Stage III) 11 years earlier. Endoscopic examination revealed an anastomotic stricture; signs of inflammation, including redness, erosion, edema, bleeding, friability, and exudate with white plaques; and multiple depressions in the residual esophagus. Radiographical examination revealed numerous fine, gastrografin-filled projections and an anastomotic stricture. Biopsy specimens from the area of the anastomotic stricture revealed inflammatory changes without signs of malignancy. Candida glabrata was detected with a culture test of the biopsy specimens. The stricture was diagnosed as a benign stricture that was caused by esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis. Accordingly, endoscopic balloon dilatation was performed and anti-fungal therapy was started in the hospital. Seven weeks later, endoscopic examination revealed improvement in the mucosal inflammation; only the pseudodiverticulosis remained. Consequently, the patient was discharged. At the latest follow-up, the patient was symptom-free and the pseudodiverticulosis remained in the residual esophagus without any signs of stricture or inflammation. PMID:26290650

  14. The Kagoshima consensus on esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Triadafilopoulos, G; Boeckxstaens, G E; Gullo, R; Patti, M G; Pandolfino, J E; Kahrilas, P J; Duranceau, A; Jamieson, G; Zaninotto, G

    2012-05-01

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder characterized by lack of peristalsis and a lower esophageal sphincter that fails to relax appropriately in response to swallowing. This article summarizes the most salient issues in the diagnosis and management of achalasia as discussed in a symposium that took place in Kagoshima, Japan, in September 2010 under the auspices of the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. PMID:21595779

  15. When the Gastrointestinal Conduit for Total Esophageal Reconstruction Is Not an Option: Review of the Role of Skin Flaps and Report of Salvage With a Single-Stage Tubed Anterolateral Thigh Flap.

    PubMed

    LoGiudice, John A; Wyler von Ballmoos, Moritz C; Gasparri, Mario G; Lao, William W

    2016-04-01

    This review adds to the limited body of literature describing the use of skin flaps for reconstruction of the esophagus and includes a report of a successful 1-stage, intrathoracic reconstruction of the cervical and thoracic esophagus after failed gastrointestinal conduit. Already widely used for reconstruction of the pharynx and cervical esophagus, the versatile anterolateral thigh flap can be considered an option for more extensive defects of the cervical and thoracic esophagus in this challenging patient population when gastric, jejunal, or colon conduits are not available. The authors believe the anterolateral thigh flap should be considered in 1-stage anatomic reconstruction of the cervical and thoracic esophagus in the absence of feasible gastrointestinal conduits. PMID:25536203

  16. From reflux esophagitis to Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Hua

    2015-05-01

    The occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease is common in the human population. Almost all cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma are derived from Barrett's esophagus, which is a complication of esophageal adenocarcinoma precancerous lesions. Chronic exposure of the esophagus to gastroduodenal intestinal fluid is an important determinant factor in the development of Barrett's esophagus. The replacement of normal squamous epithelium with specific columnar epithelium in the lower esophagus induced by the chronic exposure to gastroduodenal fluid could lead to intestinal metaplasia, which is closely associated with the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the exact mechanism of injury is not completely understood. Various animal models of the developmental mechanisms of disease, and theoretical and clinical effects of drug treatment have been widely used in research. Recently, animal models employed in studies on gastroesophageal reflux injury have allowed significant progress. The advantage of using animal models lies in the ability to accurately control the experimental conditions for better evaluation of results. In this article, various modeling methods are reviewed, with discussion of the major findings on the developmental mechanism of Barrett's esophagus, which should help to develop better prevention and treatment strategies for Barrett's esophagus. PMID:25954094

  17. Corrosive Esophagitis Caused by Ingestion of Picosulfate

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jae Yong; Kang, Ho Suk; Kim, Seong Eun; Park, Ji Won; Moon, Sung Hoon; Kim, Jong Hyeok; Park, Choong Kee

    2015-01-01

    Corrosive esophagitis is characterized by caustic injury due to the ingestion of chemical agents, mainly alkaline substances such as detergents. Esophageal bleeding, perforation, or stricture can be worsened by high-degree corrosive esophagitis. Picosulfate is a commonly used laxative frequently administered for bowel preparation before colonoscopy or colon surgery. Picosulfate powder should be completely dissolved in water before ingestion because the powder itself may cause chemical burning of the esophagus and stomach. Here, we report a case of corrosive esophagitis due to the ingestion of picosulfate powder that was not completely dissolved in water. PMID:25674529

  18. Allergic Mechanisms in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Wechsler, Joshua B; Bryce, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Paralleling the overall trend in allergic diseases, Eosinophilic Esophagitis is rapidly increasing in incidence. It is associated with food antigen-triggered, eosinophil-predominant inflammation and the pathogenic mechanisms have many similarities to other chronic atopic diseases, such as eczema and allergic asthma. Studies in animal models and from patients over the last 15 years have suggested that allergic sensitization leads to food-specific IgE and T-helper lymphocyte type 2 cells, both of which appear to contribute to the pathogenesis along with basophils, mast cells, and antigen-presenting cells. This review will outline our current understandings of the allergic mechanisms that drive eosinophilic esophagitis, drawing from clinical and translational studies in humans as well as experimental animal models. PMID:24813516

  19. [Histopathological diagnosis in reflux esophagitis].

    PubMed

    Fujita, M; Kusaka, T; Hirabayashi, K; Fujimori, T

    2000-09-01

    We reviewed the histopathological features for the diagnosis of reflux esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease(GERD) including carcinogenesis of the esophagus. Histologically, the presence of capillary dilatation, elongation of papillary, hyperplasia of basal layer, inflammatory cells-infiltration, balloon cells in the epithelium, and ulceration were evaluated in GERD cases. Although, histopathological changes were not clear in endoscopic-negative GERD cases, immunohistochemical examination with cell cycle protein(PCNA, p21, and p27) revealed the same abnormalities with GERD cases. In Japan, the majority cases of GERD are evaluated in grade according to Los Angeles system, therefore the prevalence of Barrett's esophagus and cancer is very low. We hypothesize that esophageal squamous cell carcinoma arising from GERD different from Barrett's cancer sequence, and clinicopathological long-term follow up will be required to assess the carcinogenesis including gene analysis. PMID:11004808

  20. Pradaxa-induced esophageal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Wood, Michele; Shaw, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Pradaxa (dabigatran) is a direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. We describe a case of esophageal ulceration associated with Pradaxa administration in a 75-year-old man. The patient reported difficulty swallowing and a burning sensation after taking his first dose of Pradaxa. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed linear ulcerations in the mid-esophagus. Pradaxa was held beginning the day before the EGD. The patient reported that his pain and difficulty swallowing resolved on stopping Pradaxa. Pradaxa is formulated with a tartaric acid excipient to reduce variability in absorption. We hypothesise that the capsule lodged in the patient's esophagus and the tartaric acid may have caused local damage resulting in an esophageal ulcer. It is important to educate patients on proper administration of Pradaxa, to decrease the risk of this rare, but potentially serious adverse event. PMID:26452739

  1. Structural, EPR, and Mssbauer characterization of (?-alkoxo)(?-carboxylato)diiron(II,III) model complexes for the active sites of mixed-valent diiron enzymes.

    PubMed

    Li, Feifei; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Dong, Yanhong; Kauffmann, Karl; Bominaar, Emile L; Mnck, Eckard; Que, Lawrence

    2012-03-01

    To obtain structural and spectroscopic models for the diiron(II,III) centers in the active sites of diiron enzymes, the (?-alkoxo)(?-carboxylato)diiron(II,III) complexes [Fe(II)Fe(III)(N-Et-HPTB)(O(2)CPh)(NCCH(3))(2)](ClO(4))(3) (1) and [Fe(II)Fe(III)(N-Et-HPTB)(O(2)CPh)(Cl)(HOCH(3))](ClO(4))(2) (2) (N-Et-HPTB = N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-(1-ethyl-benzimidazolylmethyl))-2-hydroxy-1,3-diaminopropane) have been prepared and characterized by X-ray crystallography, UV-visible absorption, EPR, and Mssbauer spectroscopies. Fe1-Fe2 separations are 3.60 and 3.63 , and Fe1-O1-Fe2 bond angles are 128.0 and 129.4 for 1 and 2, respectively. Mssbauer and EPR studies of 1 show that the Fe(III) (S(A) = 5/2) and Fe(II) (S(B) = 2) sites are antiferromagnetically coupled to yield a ground state with S = 1/2 (g= 1.75, 1.88, 1.96); Mssbauer analysis of solid 1 yields J = 22.5 2 cm(-1) for the exchange coupling constant (H = JS(A)S(B) convention). In addition to the S = 1/2 ground-state spectrum of 1, the EPR signal for the S = 3/2 excited state of the spin ladder can also be observed, the first time such a signal has been detected for an antiferromagnetically coupled diiron(II,III) complex. The anisotropy of the (57)Fe magnetic hyperfine interactions at the Fe(III) site is larger than normally observed in mononuclear complexes and arises from admixing S > 1/2 excited states into the S = 1/2 ground state by zero-field splittings at the two Fe sites. Analysis of the "D/J" mixing has allowed us to extract the zero-field splitting parameters, local g values, and magnetic hyperfine structural parameters for the individual Fe sites. The methodology developed and followed in this analysis is presented in detail. The spin Hamiltonian parameters of 1 are related to the molecular structure with the help of DFT calculations. Contrary to what was assumed in previous studies, our analysis demonstrates that the deviations of the g values from the free electron value (g = 2) for the antiferromagnetically coupled diiron(II,III) core in complex 1 are predominantly determined by the anisotropy of the effective g values of the ferrous ion and only to a lesser extent by the admixture of excited states into ground-state ZFS terms (D/J mixing). The results for 1 are discussed in the context of the data available for diiron(II,III) clusters in proteins and synthetic diiron(II,III) complexes. PMID:22360600

  2. High proximal pouch esophageal atresia with vertebral, rib, and sternal anomalies: an additional component to the VATER association.

    PubMed

    Touloukian, R J; Keller, M S

    1988-01-01

    The base of the proximal esophageal pouch in babies born with esophageal atresia varies in location from the low cervical region to the upper third of the mediastinum, but the relevance of this finding to the VATER association is not known. The initial radiographs and hospital records of 42 newborns with esophageal atresia and a distal tracheoesophageal fistula treated in the Newborn Special Care Unit of the Yale-New Haven Hospital between 1977 and 1986 were examined to (1) determine the location of the base of the upper esophageal pouch on its superimposed vertebral body; (2) identify coexisting VATER associated anomalies; and (3) detect the presence of vertebral, rib, or sternal anomalies. Ten of 11 babies with the upper esophageal pouch at the first thoracic vertebra or above had additional VATER defects including vertebral, rib, or sternal anomalies. These patients also required staged repair or circular myotomy for wide gap esophageal atresia and were at greater risk of anastomotic leak, stricture, or gastroesophageal reflux requiring fundoplication. High proximal pouch esophageal atresia accompanied by vertebral, rib, and sternal anomalies constitutes a heretofore unrecognized high risk group with the VATER association. PMID:3351734

  3. True Intramural Esophageal Duplication Cyst.

    PubMed

    Al-Riyami, Salim; Al-Sawafi, Yaqoob

    2015-11-01

    Esophageal duplication is the second most common site of gastrointestinal duplication and most cases present with complications. These complications include bleeding, infection, dysphagia, and dyspnea. We report an incidental case of a true intramural esophageal duplication cyst in a new military recruit. The patient was diagnosed in Armed Forces Hospital, Oman. The patient came for a pre-recruitment routine check-up, he was found to have a suspicious soft tissue lesion on chest X-ray. He was referred to the thoracic surgeon for further investigations. The investigations included computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging chest scans, barium swallow, endoscopy and, finally, an endoscopic ultrasound. All workup pointed to a diagnosis of esophageal duplication cyst; therefore, the decision was made to excise the lesion after discussion with the patient about the possible diagnosis and nature of the treatment. The cyst was completely excised thoracoscopically with uneventful recovery. The patient was discharged a few days later and was doing well in subsequent visits to the outpatient department. The histopathological exam confirmed the diagnosis of a true congenital duplication cyst, which was lined by pseudostrati?ed ciliated columnar epithelium overlying double layers of thick bundles of smooth muscle ?bers. PMID:26674014

  4. Pharmacologic influence on esophageal varices

    SciTech Connect

    Lunderquist, A.; Owman, T.; Alwmark, A.; Gullstrand, P.; Hall-Angeras, M.; Joelsson, B.; Tranberg, K.G.; Pettersson, K.I.

    1983-06-01

    Selective catherization of the left gastric vein was performed after percutaneous transhepatic portography (PTP) in patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices. Following the hypothesis that drugs increasing the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure may obstruct the variceal blood flow throught the lower esophagus, the effect of different drugs (i.e., intravenous injection of vasopressin, pentagastrin, domperidone and somatostatin and subcutaneous injection of metacholine) on the variceal blood flow was examined. Vasopressin did not change the variceal blood flow; pentagastrine, with its known effect of increasing the LES pressure produced a total interruption of the flow in four of eight patients; domperiodone, also known to increase the LES pressure obstructed the variceal blood flow in the only patient examined with this drug; somatostatin has no reported action on the LES but blocked the flow in one of two patients; and metacholine, reported to increase the LES pressure did not produce any change in the flow in the three patients examined. LES pressure was recorded before and during vasopressin infusion in seven patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices. No reaction on the pressure was found. The patient number in the study is small and the results are nonuniform but still they suggest that drugs increasing the LES tonus might be useful to control variceal blood flow.

  5. True Intramural Esophageal Duplication Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Al-Riyami, Salim; Al-Sawafi, Yaqoob

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal duplication is the second most common site of gastrointestinal duplication and most cases present with complications. These complications include bleeding, infection, dysphagia, and dyspnea. We report an incidental case of a true intramural esophageal duplication cyst in a new military recruit. The patient was diagnosed in Armed Forces Hospital, Oman. The patient came for a pre-recruitment routine check-up, he was found to have a suspicious soft tissue lesion on chest X-ray. He was referred to the thoracic surgeon for further investigations. The investigations included computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging chest scans, barium swallow, endoscopy and, finally, an endoscopic ultrasound. All workup pointed to a diagnosis of esophageal duplication cyst; therefore, the decision was made to excise the lesion after discussion with the patient about the possible diagnosis and nature of the treatment. The cyst was completely excised thoracoscopically with uneventful recovery. The patient was discharged a few days later and was doing well in subsequent visits to the outpatient department. The histopathological exam confirmed the diagnosis of a true congenital duplication cyst, which was lined by pseudostrati?ed ciliated columnar epithelium overlying double layers of thick bundles of smooth muscle ?bers. PMID:26674014

  6. Voluntary exercise partially reverses neonatal alcohol-induced deficits in mPFC layer II/III dendritic morphology of male adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, G F; Criss, K J; Klintsova, A Y

    2015-08-01

    Developmental alcohol exposure in humans can produce a wide range of deficits collectively referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). FASD-related impairments in executive functioning later in life suggest long-term damage to the prefrontal cortex (PFC). In rodent neonates, moderate to high levels of alcohol exposure decreased frontal lobe brain size and altered medial PFC pyramidal neuron dendritic morphology. Previous research in our lab demonstrated that neonatal alcohol exposure decreased basilar dendritic complexity but did not affect spine density in Layer II/III pyramidal neurons in 26- to 30-day-old rats. The current study adds to the literature by evaluating the effect of neonatal alcohol exposure on mPFC Layer II/III basilar dendritic morphology in adolescent male rats. Additionally, it examines the potential for voluntary exercise to mitigate alcohol-induced deficits on mPFC dendritic complexity. An animal model of binge drinking during the third trimester of pregnancy was used. Rats were intubated with alcohol (alcohol-exposed, AE; 5.25 g kg(-1) day(-1)) on postnatal days (PD) 4-9; two control groups were included (suckle control and sham-intubated). Rats were anesthetized and perfused with heparinized saline solution on PD 42, and brains were processed for Golgi-Cox staining. Developmental alcohol exposure decreased spine density and dendritic complexity of basilar dendrites of Layer II/III neurons in the medial PFC (mPFC) compared to dendrites of control animals. Voluntary exercise increased spine density and dendritic length in AE animals resulting in elimination of the differences between AE and SH rats. Thus, voluntary exercise during early adolescence selectively rescued alcohol-induced morphological deficits in the mPFC. PMID:25967699

  7. Novel device to sample the esophageal microbiome--the esophageal string test.

    PubMed

    Fillon, Sophie A; Harris, J Kirk; Wagner, Brandie D; Kelly, Caleb J; Stevens, Mark J; Moore, Wendy; Fang, Rui; Schroeder, Shauna; Masterson, Joanne C; Robertson, Charles E; Pace, Norman R; Ackerman, Steven J; Furuta, Glenn T

    2012-01-01

    A growing number of studies implicate the microbiome in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation. Previous work has shown that adults with esophagitis related to gastroesophageal reflux disease have altered esophageal microbiota compared to those who do not have esophagitis. In these studies, sampling of the esophageal microbiome was accomplished by isolating DNA from esophageal biopsies obtained at the time of upper endoscopy. The aim of the current study was to identify the esophageal microbiome in pediatric individuals with normal esophageal mucosa using a minimally invasive, capsule-based string technology, the Enterotest. We used the proximal segment of the Enterotest string to sample the esophagus, and term this the "Esophageal String Test" (EST). We hypothesized that the less invasive EST would capture mucosal adherent bacteria present in the esophagus in a similar fashion as mucosal biopsy. EST samples and mucosal biopsies were collected from children with no esophageal inflammation (n = 15) and their microbiome composition determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Microbiota from esophageal biopsies and ESTs produced nearly identical profiles of bacterial genera and were different from the bacterial contents of samples collected from the nasal and oral cavity. We conclude that the minimally invasive EST can serve as a useful device for study of the esophageal microbiome. PMID:22957025

  8. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with dural and bone marrow metastases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Hao; Huang, Cheng-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma generally present at an advanced stage at the time of diagnosis. The most common sites of visceral metastasis are the lung, liver and bone, but brain and bone marrow involvement is exceedingly rare. Herein, we report a 62-year-old man with a 4-wk history of progressive low back pain with radiation to bilateral lower legs, dysphagia and body weight loss. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with regional lymph node, liver and bone metastases was diagnosed. He underwent concurrent chemoradiotherapy and got a partial response. Four months later, he complained of headache, diplopia and severe hearing impairment in the left ear. There was no evidence for bacterial, fungal, tuberculous infection or neoplastic infiltration. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain demonstrated thickening and enhancement of bilateral pachymeninges and multiple enhancing masses in bilateral skull. Dural metastasis was diagnosed and he received whole brain irradiation. In addition, laboratory examination revealed severe thrombocytopenia and leucopenia, and bone marrow study confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic squamous cell carcinoma. This is the first described case of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with dural and bone marrow metastases. We also discuss the pathogenesis of unusual metastatic diseases and differential diagnosis of pachymeningeal thickening. PMID:25253978

  9. Clinical Application of Esophageal High-resolution Manometry in the Diagnosis of Esophageal Motility Disorders

    PubMed Central

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) is replacing conventional manometry in the clinical evaluation of patients with esophageal symptoms, especially dysphagia. The introduction of HRM gave rise to new objective metrics and recognizable patterns of esophageal motor function, requiring a new classification scheme: the Chicago classification. HRM measurements are more detailed and more easily performed compared to conventional manometry. The visual presentation of acquired data improved the analysis and interpretation of esophageal motor function. This led to a more sensitive, accurate, and objective analysis of esophageal motility. In this review we discuss how HRM changed the way we define and categorize esophageal motility disorders. Moreover, we discuss the clinical applications of HRM for each esophageal motility disorder separately. PMID:26631942

  10. Clinical Application of Esophageal High-resolution Manometry in the Diagnosis of Esophageal Motility Disorders.

    PubMed

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-01-31

    Esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) is replacing conventional manometry in the clinical evaluation of patients with esophageal symptoms, especially dysphagia. The introduction of HRM gave rise to new objective metrics and recognizable patterns of esophageal motor function, requiring a new classification scheme: the Chicago classification. HRM measurements are more detailed and more easily performed compared to conventional manometry. The visual presentation of acquired data improved the analysis and interpretation of esophageal motor function. This led to a more sensitive, accurate, and objective analysis of esophageal motility. In this review we discuss how HRM changed the way we define and categorize esophageal motility disorders. Moreover, we discuss the clinical applications of HRM for each esophageal motility disorder separately. PMID:26631942

  11. Incidence and specificity of antibodies to types I, II, III, IV, and V collagen in rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases as measured by 125I-radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, J.M.; Huffstutter, E.H.; Townes, A.S.; Kang, A.H.

    1983-07-01

    Antibodies to human native and denatured types I, II, III, IV, and V collagens were measured using 125I-radioimmunoassay. Mean levels of binding by sera from 30 rheumatoid arthritis patients were significantly higher than those from 20 normal subjects against all of the collagens tested. The relative antibody concentration was higher in synovial fluid than in simultaneously obtained serum. Many patients with gout or various other rheumatic diseases also had detectable anticollagen antibodies. With a few notable exceptions, the majority of the reactivity detected in all patient groups was directed against covalent structural determinants present on all of the denatured collagens, suggesting a secondary reaction to tissue injury.

  12. High Resolution Microendoscopy for Quantitative Diagnosis of Esophageal Neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dongsuk

    Esophageal cancer is the eighth most common cancer in the world. Cancers of the esophagus account for 3.8% of all cases of cancers, with approximately 482,300 new cases reported in 2008 worldwide. In the United States alone, it is estimated that approximately 18,000 new cases will be diagnosed in 2013, and 15,210 deaths are expected. Despite advances in surgery and chemoradiation therapy, these advances have not led to a significant increase in survival rates, primarily because diagnosis often at an advanced and incurable stage when treatment is more difficult and less successful. Accurate, objective methods for early detection of esophageal neoplasia are needed. Here, quantitative classification algorithms for high resolution miscroendoscopic images were developed to distinguish between esophageal neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissue. A clinical study in 177 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) was performed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the classification algorithm in collaboration with the Mount Sinai Medical Center in the United States, the First Hospital of Jilin University in China, and the Cancer Institute and Hospital, the Chinese Academy of Medical Science in China. The study reported a sensitivity and specificity of 93% and 92%, respectively, in the training set, 87% and 97%, respectively, in the test set, and 84% and 95%, respectively, in an independent validation set. Another clinical study in 31 patients with Barrett's esophagus resulted in a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 85%. Finally, a compact, portable version of the high resolution microendoscopy (HRME) device using a consumer-grade camera was developed and a series of biomedical experimental studies were carried out to assess the capability of the device.

  13. Development of a Multicomponent Prediction Model for Acute Esophagitis in Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    De Ruyck, Kim; Sabbe, Nick; Oberije, Cary; Vandecasteele, Katrien; Thas, Olivier; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Lambin, Phillipe; Van Meerbeeck, Jan; De Neve, Wilfried; Thierens, Hubert

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To construct a model for the prediction of acute esophagitis in lung cancer patients receiving chemoradiotherapy by combining clinical data, treatment parameters, and genotyping profile. Patients and Methods: Data were available for 273 lung cancer patients treated with curative chemoradiotherapy. Clinical data included gender, age, World Health Organization performance score, nicotine use, diabetes, chronic disease, tumor type, tumor stage, lymph node stage, tumor location, and medical center. Treatment parameters included chemotherapy, surgery, radiotherapy technique, tumor dose, mean fractionation size, mean and maximal esophageal dose, and overall treatment time. A total of 332 genetic polymorphisms were considered in 112 candidate genes. The predicting model was achieved by lasso logistic regression for predictor selection, followed by classic logistic regression for unbiased estimation of the coefficients. Performance of the model was expressed as the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic and as the false-negative rate in the optimal point on the receiver operating characteristic curve. Results: A total of 110 patients (40%) developed acute esophagitis Grade {>=}2 (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0). The final model contained chemotherapy treatment, lymph node stage, mean esophageal dose, gender, overall treatment time, radiotherapy technique, rs2302535 (EGFR), rs16930129 (ENG), rs1131877 (TRAF3), and rs2230528 (ITGB2). The area under the curve was 0.87, and the false-negative rate was 16%. Conclusion: Prediction of acute esophagitis can be improved by combining clinical, treatment, and genetic factors. A multicomponent prediction model for acute esophagitis with a sensitivity of 84% was constructed with two clinical parameters, four treatment parameters, and four genetic polymorphisms.

  14. The efficacy and toxicities of combined lobaplatin with paclitaxel as a first-line chemotherapy for advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Qiu; Chen, Cheng; Lu, Hai-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Background To assess the efficacy and toxicities of combined lobaplatin with paclitaxel (LP) as a first line chemotherapy in esophageal cancer. Methods The clinical data of 45 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma treated initially with lobaplatin-paclitaxel chemotherapy were collected and reviewed retrospectively. The overall response, treatment toxicities and dysphagia relief were analyzed with SPSS software. Results The overall response rate was 42.2%, with 1 patient (2.2%) showing complete remission, 18 patients (40.0%) with partial remission, 19 (42.2%) with stable disease (SD), and 7 (15.6%) with progressive disease, respectively. The most common hematological toxicity was leucopenia with grade 0, I, II, III and IV in 16 (35.6%), 10 (22.2%), 11 (24.4%), 7 (15.6%), and 1 patient (2.2%), respectively. Thirty-seven patients (82.2%) experienced grade I-II nausea/vomiting without grade III-IV instances occurring. Four patients (8.9%) experienced grade I hepatotoxicity. No nephrotoxicity was observed. Five in thirteen patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) suffered severe radiation pneumonitis. The dysphagia resolved or improved in 32 patients (71%). Conclusions Lobaplatin-paclitaxel showed a significant antitumor effect to squamous esophageal cancer with manageable toxicities. Limitation of the surveillance time and the retrospective nature, the effect that based on these data formal prospective trials appear warranted and are needed prior to routine first line use of this regimen. PMID:26623097

  15. Epigenetics in the Pathogenesis of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kailasam, Aparna; Mittal, Sumeet K; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2015-08-01

    Epigenetic influences, such as DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and up-regulation/down-regulation of genes by microRNAs, change the genetic makeup of an individual without affecting DNA base-pair sequences. Indeed, epigenetic changes play an integral role in the progression from normal esophageal mucosa to Barrett's esophagus to esophageal adenocarcinoma via dysplasia-metaplasia-neoplasia sequence. Many genes involved in esophageal adenocarcinoma display hypermethylation, leading to their down-regulation. The classes of these genes include cell cycle control, DNA and growth factor repair, tumor suppressors, antimetastasis, Wnt-related genes, and proapoptotic genes. Histone acetylation in the pathophysiology of esophageal diseases has not been thoroughly investigated, and its critical role in the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma is less defined. Many microRNAs have been associated with the development of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Here, we critically addressed the specific steps most closely influenced by microRNAs in the progression from Barrett's esophagus to esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, microRNAs can target up to hundreds of genes, making it difficult to correlate directly with a given phenotype of the disease. Esophageal adenocarcinoma progressing from premalignant condition of Barrett's esophagus carries an extremely poor prognosis. Risk stratification for patients based on their epigenetic profiles may be useful in providing more targeted and directed treatment to patients. PMID:25388215

  16. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer With Malignant Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Ryuta; Nishimura, Yasumasa Nakamatsu, Kiyoshi; Kanamori, Shuichi; Shibata, Toru

    2008-04-01

    Background: We reviewed clinical results of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in the treatment of patients with advanced esophageal cancer with fistulae that developed before or during CRT. Methods and Materials: The study group included 16 patients with fistulous esophageal cancer treated by means of CRT between 1999 and 2006. Nine patients had fistulae before CRT, whereas 7 developed fistulae during CRT. The group included 12 men and four women with a median age of 55 years (range, 37-77 years). There were 9 patients with Stage III disease and 7 with Stage IV disease. All tumors were squamous cell carcinomas. Two courses of concurrent chemotherapy were combined with radiation therapy; 60 Gy/30 fractions/7 weeks (1-week split). For 15 patients, low-dose protracted chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (250-300 mg/m{sup 2} x 14 days) and cisplatin (7 mg/m{sup 2} x 10 days) was administered, whereas full-dose cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil were administered to the remaining patient. Results: The planned dose of 60 Gy was delivered to 11 patients (69%), whereas radiation therapy was terminated early in 5 patients (40-58 Gy) because of acute toxicities, including two treatment-related deaths. Disappearance of fistulae was noted during or after CRT in 7 patients (44%). All three esophagomediastinal fistulae were closed, but only four of 13 esophagorespiratory fistulae were closed by CRT. For patients with Stage III, 1- and 2-year survival rates were 33% and 22%, respectively. Median survival time was 8.5 months. Conclusion: Despite significant toxicity, concurrent CRT appears effective at closing esophageal malignant fistulae.

  17. Lichenoid esophagitis: clinicopathologic overlap with established esophageal lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Salaria, Safia N; Abu Alfa, Amer K; Cruise, Michael W; Wood, Laura D; Montgomery, Elizabeth A

    2013-12-01

    Lichen planus (LP) affects mucocutaneous surfaces and is characterized by intraepithelial and lamina propria lymphocytosis and squamous cell apoptosis (Civatte bodies). Lichen planus esophagitis (LPE) is underrecognized; concurrent cutaneous disease is present in some patients, but LPE alone is more common. We diagnose patients with characteristic pathologic findings of LPE and known correlation with skin disease or immunofluorescence (IF) results as LPE but use descriptive terminology ("lichenoid esophagitis pattern" [LEP]) when confirmation is unavailable. We reviewed clinicopathologic features of patients diagnosed at our institution with LPE or LEP. There were 88 specimens with LPE or LEP from 65 patients. Most patients were female. Seventeen patients had LPE confirmed by IF. Five patients had both esophageal (1 with IF) and skin LP. Strictures were a prominent presenting feature in LPE patients, with disease distribution more frequent in the upper and lower esophagus. Dysphagia was a common reason for endoscopy in LEP patients. Rheumatologic diseases are more common in patients with LPE compared with LEP. Viral hepatitides and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections are associated with LEP. We defined polypharmacy as patients taking >3 medications; this finding was present in both LPE and LEP cohorts; however, this is a prominent feature in those with established LPE. Progression to dysplasia was noted in both cohorts. About 5% of LPE patients have tandem skin manifestations. LPE is more likely than LEP to arise in women, result in stricture formation, and be associated with rheumatologic disorders and polypharmacy, whereas LEP is associated with viral hepatitis and HIV. Both can progress to neoplasia. As the risk of stricture formation is high in patients with LPE, it is worth performing pertinent IF studies to confirm LPE, although knowledge of the clinical association of LEP with viral hepatitis, HIV, and use of multiple medications is of value in daily practice. PMID:24061525

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Esophageal Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cancer cells. The following stages are used for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus: Stage 0 (High-grade Dysplasia) ... is also called high-grade dysplasia . Stage I squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus Stage I is divided into ...

  19. General Information about Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cancer cells. The following stages are used for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus: Stage 0 (High-grade Dysplasia) ... is also called high-grade dysplasia . Stage I squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus Stage I is divided into ...

  20. Cadmium diruthenium(II,III) carbonates showing diverse magnetism behavior arising from variety configuration of [Ru2(CO3)4]n(3n-) layer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Jia, Yan-Yan; Jin, Jin; Liu, Xue-Mei; Wang, Dan; Xue, Gang-Lin

    2013-07-28

    Two hetero-metallic carbonates, namely KCd(H2O)3Ru2(CO3)44H2O (1) and KCd(H2O)3Ru2(CO3)43.5H2O (2), have been synthesized in a neutral aqueous solution. Both of the 3D dimensional structured complexes contain mixed-valent diruthenium(II,III) carbonate paddlewheel cores of Ru2(II,III)(CO3)4(3-) that are connected to each other in trans- or cis-modes by carbonate oxygen atoms, forming rectangular square-grid and isomeric parallelogram layers [Ru2(CO3)4]n(3n-) in 1 and 2, respectively. The reaction temperature is found to play an important role in directing the final products with particular topologies and their layered structural diversity is due to the various linking modes between the Ru2(CO3)4(3-) units. The magnetic studies show that ferromagnetic interactions are propagated between the diruthenium units in both complexes 1 and 2 but their magnetic properties differ at low temperatures, in which the trans linking mode parallelogram layer [Ru2(CO3)4]n(3n-) in complex 2 leads to long-range magnetic ordering below 4.0 K. However, no Curie ordering down to 1.8 K is detected for complex 1 containing the isomeric rectangle square-grid layer linking in the cis mode. PMID:23727751

  1. Structural and magnetic characterization of mixed valence Co(II, III)xZn1-xO epitaxial thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negi, D. S.; Loukya, B.; Dileep, K.; Sahu, R.; Shetty, S.; Kumar, N.; Ghatak, J.; Pachauri, N.; Gupta, A.; Datta, R.

    2014-03-01

    In this article, we report on the Co atom incorporation, secondary phase formation and composition-dependent magnetic and optical properties of mixed valence Co(II, III)xZn1-xO epitaxial thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition. The intended total Co concentration is varied between ~6-60 at.% with relatively higher concentration of +3 over +2 charge state. Mixed valence Co(II, III) shows high solubility in ZnO (up to 38 at.%) and ferromagnetism is observed in samples with total Co incorporation of ~29 and 38 at.%. Electron diffraction pattern and high resolution transmission electron microscopy images reveal single crystalline nature of the thin films with wurtzite structure. Co oxide interlayer, with both rock salt and spinel structure, are observed to be formed between the substrate and wurtzite film for total Co concentration at ~17 at.% and above. Magnetization shows composition dependence with a saturation moment value of ~93 emu cm-3 and a coercive field of ~285 Oe observed for ~38 at.% Co:ZnO films. Ferromagnetism was not observed for films with Co concentration 17 and 9 at.%. The Co oxide interlayer does not show any ferromagnetism. All the films are n-type with carrier concentration ~1019 cm-3. The observed magnetism is probably resulting from direct antiferromagntic exchange interaction between Co2+ and Co3+ ions favored by heavy Co alloying giving rise to ferrimagnetism in the system.

  2. Novel ETF dehydrogenase mutations in a patient with mild glutaric aciduria type II and complex II-III deficiency in liver and muscle.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Lynne A; He, Miao; Vockley, Jerry; Payne, Nicole; Rhead, William; Hoppel, Charles; Spector, Elaine; Gernert, Kim; Gibson, K Michael

    2010-12-01

    We describe a 22-year-old male who developed severe hypoglycemia and lethargy during an acute illness at 4 months of age and subsequently grew and developed normally. At age 4 years he developed recurrent vomiting with mild hyperammonemia and dehydration requiring frequent hospitalizations. Glutaric aciduria Type II was suspected based upon biochemical findings and managed with cornstarch, carnitine and riboflavin supplements. He did not experience metabolic crises between ages 4-12 years. He experienced recurrent vomiting, mild hyperammonemia, and generalized weakness associated with acute illnesses and growth spurts. At age 18 years, he developed exercise intolerance and proximal muscle weakness leading to the identification of multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and complex II/III deficiencies in both skeletal muscle and liver. Subsequent molecular characterization of the ETFDH gene revealed novel heterozygous mutations, p.G274X:c.820 G > T (exon 7) and p.P534L: c.1601 C > T (exon 12), the latter within the iron sulfur-cluster and predicted to affect ubiquinone reductase activity of ETFDH and the docking of ETF to ETFDH. Our case supports the concept of a structural interaction between ETFDH and other enzyme partners, and suggests that the conformational change upon ETF binding to ETFDH may play a key role in linking ETFDH to II/III super-complex formation. PMID:21088898

  3. Novel ETF dehydrogenase mutations in a patient with mild glutaric aciduria type II and complex II-III deficiency in liver and muscle

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Lynne A.; He, Miao; Vockley, Jerry; Payne, Nicole; Rhead, William; Hoppel, Charles; Spector, Elaine; Gernert, Kim; Gibson, K. Michael

    2014-01-01

    We describe a 22-year-old male who developed severe hypoglycemia and lethargy during an acute illness at 4 months of age and subsequently grew and developed normally. At age 4 years he developed recurrent vomiting with mild hyperammonemia and dehydration requiring frequent hospitalizations. Glutaric aciduria Type II was suspected based upon biochemical findings and managed with cornstarch, carnitine and riboflavin supplements. He did not experience metabolic crises between ages 4-12 years. He experienced recurrent vomiting, mild hyperammonemia, and generalized weakness associated with acute illnesses and growth spurts. At age 18 years, he developed exercise intolerance and proximal muscle weakness leading to the identification of multiple acyl-CoAdehydrogenase and complex II/III deficiencies in both skeletal muscle and liver. Subsequent molecular characterization of the ETFDH gene revealed novel heterozygous mutations, p.G274X:c.820 G>T (exon 7) and p.P534L: c.1601 C>T (exon 12), the latter within the iron sulfur-cluster and predicted to affect ubiquinone reductase activity of ETFDH and the docking of ETF to ETFDH. Our case supports the concept of a structural interaction between ETFDH and other enzyme partners, and suggests that the conformational change upon ETF binding to ETFDH may play a key role in linking ETFDH to II/III super-complex formation. PMID:21088898

  4. Radiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer in Japan: Results of the Patterns of Care Study 1999-2001

    SciTech Connect

    Kenjo, Masahiro Uno, Takashi; Murakami, Yuji; Nagata, Yasushi; Oguchi, Masahiko; Saito, Susumu; Numasaki, Hodaka; Teshima, Teruki; Mitsumori, Michihide

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To describe patient characteristics and the process of radiotherapy (RT) for patients with esophageal cancer treated between 1999 and 2001 in Japan. Methods and Materials: The Japanese Patterns of Care Study (PCS) Working Group conducted a third nationwide survey of 76 institutions. Detailed information was accumulated on 621 patients with thoracic esophageal cancer who received RT. Results: The median age of patients was 68 years. Eighty-eight percent were male, and 12% were female. Ninety-nine percent had squamous cell carcinoma histology. Fifty-five percent had the main lesion in the middle thoracic esophagus. Fourteen percent had clinical Stage 0-I disease, 32% had Stage IIA-IIB, 43% had Stage III, and 10% had Stage IV disease. Chemotherapy was given to 63% of patients; 39% received definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) without surgery and 24% pre- or postoperative CRT. Sixty-two percent of the patients aged {>=}75 years were treated with RT only. Median total dose of external RT was 60 Gy for definitive CRT patients, 60 Gy for RT alone, and 40 Gy for preoperative CRT. Conclusions: This PCS describes general aspects of RT for esophageal cancer in Japan. Squamous cell carcinoma accounted for the majority of patients. The standard total external RT dose for esophageal cancer was higher in Japan than in the United States. Chemoradiotherapy had become common for esophageal cancer treatment, but patients aged {>=}75 years were more likely to be treated by RT only.

  5. Detection of Esophageal Fiducial Marker Displacement During Radiation Therapy With a 2-dimensional On-board Imager: Analysis of Internal Margin for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fukada, Junichi; Hanada, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Osamu; Ohashi, Toshio; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Kitagawa, Yuko; Seki, Satoshi; Shiraishi, Yutaka; Ogata, Haruhiko; Shigematsu, Naoyuki

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the interfraction displacement of esophageal fiducial markers for primary esophageal cancer radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Orthogonal 2-dimensional (2D) matching records fused to vertebrae were analyzed in clinically staged T1/2N0 esophageal cancer patients undergoing endoscopic clipping as fiducial metal markers. Displacement of the markers between the digitally reconstructed radiographs and on-board kilovoltage images during radiation therapy was analyzed according to direction and esophageal site. Results: Forty-four patients, with 81 markers (10 proximal, 42 middle, and 29 distal), underwent 367 2D matching sessions during radiation therapy. The mean (SD) absolute marker displacement was 0.26 (0.30) cm in the rightleft (RL), 0.50 (0.39) cm in the superiorinferior (SI), and 0.24 (0.21) cm in the anteriorposterior (AP) direction. Displacement was significantly larger in the SI than in the RL and AP directions (P<.0001). In the SI direction, mean absolute displacements of the distal, middle, and proximal esophagus were 0.67 (0.45) cm, 0.42 (0.32) cm, and 0.36 (0.30) cm, respectively. Distal esophagus displacement was significantly larger than those of the middle and proximal esophagus (P<.0001). The estimated internal margin to cover 95% of the cases was 0.75 cm in the RL and AP directions. In the SI direction, the margin was 1.25 cm for the proximal and middle esophagus and 1.75 cm for the distal esophagus. Conclusions: The magnitude of interfraction displacement of esophageal clips was larger in the SI direction, particularly in the distal esophagus, but substantial displacement was observed in other directions and at other esophageal sites. It is practical to take estimated movements into account with internal margins, even if vertebrae-based 2D matching is performed.

  6. Impact of histone deacetylase 1 and metastasis-associated gene 1 expression in esophageal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Tomoharu; Tajima, Hidehiro; Munemoto, Masayoshi; Shah, Furhawn A; Harmon, John W; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Shoji, Masatoshi; Okamoto, Koichi; Nakanuma, Shinichi; Sakai, Seisho; Kinoshita, Jun; Makino, Isamu; Nakamura, Keishi; Hayashi, Hironori; Oyama, Katsunobu; Inokuchi, Masafumi; Nakagawara, Hisatoshi; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Ninomiya, Itasu; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Fushida, Sachio; Mukaisho, Kenichi; Fujimura, Takashi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2014-08-01

    Animal models are important for the development of novel therapies for esophageal cancer. Histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1)/metastasis-associated gene (MTA1) complexes inhibit p53 acetylation and thus, inhibit p53-induced apoptosis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate HDAC1 and MTA1 expression in esophageal carcinogenesis in rats. The rats underwent a total gastrectomy followed by esophagojejunostomy to induce chronic duodenal content reflux esophagitis. The rats were sacrificed sequentially at 20, 30, 40 and 50 weeks post-surgery and the esophagi were examined. Immunohistochemical analysis was conducted to assess the expression and localization of HDAC1 and MTA1. At 20 weeks post-surgery, squamous proliferative hyperplasia and Barrett's metaplasia (BM) were observed. While, adenocarcinoma-associated BM and squamous cell carcinoma were observed at 30-50 weeks post-surgery. The nuclear expression of HDAC1 and MTA1 was observed in all of the stages of squamous carcinogenesis and adenocarcinogenesis, although not in the normal esophageal epithelium. The expression of HDAC1 and MTA1 may be involved in duodenoesophageal reflux-induced neoplastic transformation of the esophageal mucosa into cancer cells with squamous and adeno differentiation. PMID:25009653

  7. Trends in Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Incidence and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Chin; Miller, Melecia; Kong, Chung Yin; Dowling, Emily C.; Nattinger, Kevin J.; Dunn, Michelle; Feuer, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Over the past several decades, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has rapidly increased. The purpose of this analysis was to examine temporal trends in EAC incidence and mortality within the US population and, in addition, to explore these trends within subgroups of the population. Methods The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER 9) data were used to examine incidence and incidence-based (IB) mortality in EAC from 1975 to 2009. Secular trends in incidence and IB mortality by cancer stage, sex, and race were further characterized using the NCI's Joinpoint Regression program. Results Based on SEER 9 data, EAC incidence and IB mortality continues to increase in the United States. However, since the mid-1990s, the overall rate of increase in both EAC incidence and IB mortality appears to be slowing. In addition, in early-stage cancers, there is a noticeable leveling off of IB mortality rates and divergence from incidence starting in the late 1990s. Over the study period, the average annual percentage increase in incidence was 6.1% in men and 5.9% in women. Conclusions EAC incidence and IB mortality rates continue to rise in the United States, although at a slower rate in more recent years. In early-stage cancers, IB mortality and incidence rates have diverged primarily because IB mortality rates have plateaued beginning in the late 1990s. Although EAC continues to be less common in women, the rate of increase in EAC incidence is similar in both sexes. PMID:23303625

  8. Changes in Esophageal Gland Activity During the Life Cycle of Nacobbus aberrans (Nemata: Pratylenchidae)

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Ricardo M.; Baldwin, J. G.

    1998-01-01

    Electron and light microscopy were used to study the dorsal gland (DG) and the two subventral glands (SvG) of seven developmental phases of Nacobbus aberrans: pre-parasitic second-stage juveniles (J2), parasitic J2, third- (J3) and fourth- (J4) stages, migratory females, young sedentary females, and mature sedentary females. In each developmental phase the level of esophageal gland activity, was estimated by the abundance of organelles associated with secretory pathways, including endoplasmic reticulum, ribosomes, Golgi, multivesicular bodies, and secretory granules. All esophageal glands were metabolically active in all J2 examined, although only in parasitic J2 were there numerous secretory granules in the esophageal gland extensions and ampullae. No evidence of secretory activity was observed in the esophageal glands of the coiled and relatively inactive J3 and J4, nor in migratory females; these stages apparently do not feed. Observations suggest that reserves stored by J2 sustain three ecdyses and the migratory female's search for a feeding site and induction of a syncytium. Feeding activity is resumed in young and mature sedentary females, in which the DG is highly active and enlarged. The SvG are metabolically active, but with little synthesis of secretory granules, suggesting that in sedentary females the SvG may have physiological roles other than digestion. PMID:19274221

  9. Changes in Esophageal Gland Activity During the Life Cycle of Nacobbus aberrans (Nemata: Pratylenchidae).

    PubMed

    Souza, R M; Baldwin, J G

    1998-09-01

    Electron and light microscopy were used to study the dorsal gland (DG) and the two subventral glands (SvG) of seven developmental phases of Nacobbus aberrans: pre-parasitic second-stage juveniles (J2), parasitic J2, third- (J3) and fourth- (J4) stages, migratory females, young sedentary females, and mature sedentary females. In each developmental phase the level of esophageal gland activity, was estimated by the abundance of organelles associated with secretory pathways, including endoplasmic reticulum, ribosomes, Golgi, multivesicular bodies, and secretory granules. All esophageal glands were metabolically active in all J2 examined, although only in parasitic J2 were there numerous secretory granules in the esophageal gland extensions and ampullae. No evidence of secretory activity was observed in the esophageal glands of the coiled and relatively inactive J3 and J4, nor in migratory females; these stages apparently do not feed. Observations suggest that reserves stored by J2 sustain three ecdyses and the migratory female's search for a feeding site and induction of a syncytium. Feeding activity is resumed in young and mature sedentary females, in which the DG is highly active and enlarged. The SvG are metabolically active, but with little synthesis of secretory granules, suggesting that in sedentary females the SvG may have physiological roles other than digestion. PMID:19274221

  10. Does Metastatic Lymph Node SUVmax Predict Survival in Patients with Esophageal Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Vatankulu, Betül; Şanlı, Yasemin; Kaytan Sağlam, Esra; Kuyumcu, Serkan; Özkan, Zeynep Gözde; Yılmaz, Ebru; Purisa, Sevim; Adalet, Işık

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to investigate the SUVmax of primary tumor and metastatic lymph node in predicting survival in patients with esophageal cancer. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed patients with esophageal cancer between 2009 and 2011 who had FDG positron-emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT). All patients were followed-up to 2013. Clinical staging, SUVmax of primary tumor and metastatic lymph node were evaluated. Results: One hundred seven patients were included in the study. All patients were followed-up between 2 and 49 months. The mean SUVmax of primary tumor and metastatic lymph node were 19.3±8.8 and 10.4±9.1, respectively. Metastatic lymph node SUVmax had an effect in predicting survival whereas primary tumor SUVmax did not have an effect (p=0.014 and p=0.262, respectively). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that clinical stage of the disease was the only independent factor predicting survival (p=0.001). Conclusion: Among patients with esophageal cancer, the value of primary tumor SUVmax did not have an effect on survival. Clinical stage assessed with FDG PET/CT imaging was found to predict survival in esophageal carcinoma. Additionally, lymph node SUVmax was identified as a new parameter in predicting survival in the present study.

  11. Timing and intensity of changes in FDG uptake with symptomatic esophagitis during radiotherapy or chemo-radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To study whether esophageal FDG activity changes by time of mid-course of fractionated radiotherapy (RT), and whether these changes are associated with radiation esophagitis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Fifty patients with stage I-III NSCLC were enrolled prospectively and, all received ≥60 Gy RT. FDG-PET/CT scans were acquired prior to, and during-RT after delivery of 45 Gy. Normalized standardized uptake values (NSUV), defined by the esophageal maximum SUV relative to intravascular background level in the aortic arch, were sampled in the esophagus at the level of the primary tumor, sternal notch, aortic arch, carina, and gastro-esophageal junction. Symptomatic radiation esophagitis was defined as an event. Results Compared to baseline, esophageal NSUV increased significantly during-RT at the level of the primary tumor (1.09 ± 0.05 vs.1.28 ± 0.06, p = 0.001), but did not change at other levels in the esophagus. 16 patients had radiation esophagitis events and these patients had significantly higher during-RT to baseline NSUV ratios than those without esophagitis (1.46 ± 0.12, 95% CI 1.20-1.71; vs. 1.11 ± 0.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.21, p = 0.002). Maximum esophageal dose (p = 0.029), concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.022) and esophageal FDG PET NSUV ratio (during-RT to baseline, p = 0.007), were independent factors associated with esophagitis and area under curves (AUC) were 0.76, 0.70 and 0.78, respectively. Combining esophageal maximum dose and FDG PET NSUV Ratio at the tumor level increased AUC to 0.85 (p = 0.016). Conclusion FDG uptake increased in esophagus during-RT and this increase may predict radiation esphagitis during later course of treatment. PMID:24467939

  12. Meta-Analysis of Prognostic and Clinical Significance of CD44v6 in Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bangli; Luo, Wei; Hu, Rui-Ting; Zhou, You; Qin, Shan-Yu; Jiang, Hai-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract CD44v6 is a cell adhesion molecule that plays an important role in the development and progression of esophageal cancer. However, the prognostic value and clinical significance of CD44v6 in esophageal cancer remains controversial. In the present study, we aimed to clarify these relationships through a meta-analysis. We performed a comprehensive search of studies from PubMed, EMBASE, Ovid library database, Google scholar, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure databases that were published before June 2015. The odds ratio (OR) and pooled hazard ratio (HR) with the 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to estimate the effects. Twenty-one studies including 1504 patients with esophageal cancer were selected to assess the prognostic value and clinical significance of CD44v6 in these patients. The results showed that the expression of CD44v6 was higher in esophageal cancer tissue than in normal colorectal tissue (OR?=?9.19, 95% CI?=?6.3013.42). Moreover, expression of CD44v6 was higher in patients with lymphoid nodal metastasis, compared to those without (OR?=?6.91, 95% CI?=?4.819.93). The pooled results showed that CD44v6 was associated with survival in patients with esophageal cancer (HR?=?2.47, 95% CI?=?1.563.92). No significant difference in CD44v6 expression was found in patients with different histological types and tumor stages (both P?>?0.05). Moreover, no publication bias was found among the studies (all P?>?0.05). This meta-analysis demonstrates that CD44v6 is associated with the metastasis of esophageal cancer and a poor prognosis, but is not associated with the histological types and tumor stages. PMID:26252284

  13. [Diffuse esophageal leiomyomatosis. Apropos of 3 cases].

    PubMed

    Heloury, Y; Borgne, J L; Babut, J M; David, A; Guyot, C; Fremont, B; Le Neel, J C

    1990-01-01

    Three cases of diffuse esophageal leiomyomatosis are discussed. Two of these are familial one, the mother being affected. These familial cases can occur in association with Alport's syndrome. The occurrence of a case of esophageal leiomyomatosis imply a familial survey and the search of a renal or ocular disease. The surgical treatment of this affection in sub total oesophagectomy with esophageal substitution (with the colon especially). The long term prognosis is unknown, with the risk of renal failure if Alport's syndrome is associated or of other leiomyomatous localisation. PMID:2386998

  14. Photodynamic therapy of early esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Filonenko, Elena V; Sokolov, Victor V; Chissov, Valery I; Lukyanets, Evgeny A; Vorozhtsov, Georgy N

    2008-09-01

    In 1992-2006 at P.A. Hertsen Moscow Oncology Research Institute photodynamic therapy (PDT) was performed in 48 esophageal cancer patients (total 48 lesions). For PDT we used Russian photosensitizers (Photogem, Photosens, Radachlorin, Alasens), Russian diode lasers (Crystall) and endoscopic equipment. As a result of PDT complete regression was in 77% of esophageal cancer lesions, partial regression was in 23%. The follow-up period was 3-11 years. Median of survival was in 4.59 years of esophageal cancer patient. PMID:19356654

  15. Communication apprehension in esophageal and tracheoesophageal speakers.

    PubMed

    Byles, P L; Forner, L L; Stemple, J C

    1985-05-01

    A comparison of communication apprehension levels between a group of esophageal speakers and a group of tracheoesophageal (TEP) speakers was undertaken. Ten esophageal speakers and 10 tracheoesophageal speakers were given the Personal Report of Communication Apprehension (McCroskey, 1978) and also were rated on their degree of intelligibility. Results indicated no significant difference between the mean communication apprehension scores of the esophageal and TEP speakers. The majority of speakers in both groups were in the moderate to low range of communication apprehension. Results are compared with existing literature and related to clinical management considerations. PMID:3990256

  16. Sequential extraction method for determination of Fe(II/III) and U(IV/VI) in suspensions of iron-bearing phyllosilicates and uranium.

    PubMed

    Luan, Fubo; Burgos, William D

    2012-11-01

    Iron-bearing phyllosilicates strongly influence the redox state and mobility of uranium because of their limited hydraulic conductivity, high specific surface area, and redox reactivity. Standard extraction procedures cannot be accurately applied for the determination of clay-Fe(II/III) and U(IV/VI) in clay mineral-U suspensions such that advanced spectroscopic techniques are required. Instead, we developed and validated a sequential extraction method for determination of clay-Fe(II/III) and U(IV/VI) in clay-U suspensions. In our so-called "H(3)PO(4)-HF-H(2)SO(4) sequential extraction" method, H(3)PO(4)-H(2)SO(4) is used first to solubilize and remove U, and the remaining clay pellet is subject to HF-H(2)SO(4) digestion. Physical separation of U and clay eliminates valence cycling between U(IV/VI) and clay-Fe(II/III) that otherwise occurred in the extraction solutions and caused analytical discrepancies. We further developed an "automated anoxic KPA" method to measure soluble U(VI) and total U (calculate U(IV) by difference) and modified the conventional HF-H(2)SO(4) digestion method to eliminate a series of time-consuming weighing steps. We measured the kinetics of uraninite oxidation by nontronite using this sequential extraction method and anoxic KPA method and measured a stoichiometric ratio of 2.19 0.05 mol clay-Fe(II) produced per mol U(VI) produced (theoretical value of 2.0). We found that we were able to recover 98.0-98.5% of the clay Fe and 98.1-98.5% of the U through the sequential extractions. Compared to the theoretical stoichiometric ratio of 2.0, the parallel extractions of 0.5 M HCl for clay-Fe(II) and 1 M NaHCO(3) for U(VI) leached two-times more Fe(II) than U(VI). The parallel extractions of HF-H(2)SO(4) for clay Fe(II) and 1 M NaHCO(3) for U(VI) leached six-times more Fe(II) than U(VI). PMID:23075386

  17. [Complexes of cobalt (II, III) with derivatives of dithiocarbamic acid--effectors of peptidases of Bacillus thuringiensis and alpha-L-rhamnozidase of Eupenicillium erubescens and Cryptococcus albidus].

    PubMed

    Varbanets, L D; Matseliukh, E V; Seĭfullina, I I; Khitrich, N V; Nidialkova, N A; Hudzenko, E V

    2014-01-01

    The influence of cobalt (II, III) coordinative compounds with derivatives of dithiocarbamic acid on Bacillus thuringiensis IMV B-7324 peptidases with elastase and fibrinolytic activity and Eupenicillium erubescens and Cryptococcus albidus alpha-L-rhamnosidases have been studied. Tested coordinative compounds of cobalt (II, III) on the basis of their composition and structure are presented by 6 groups: 1) tetrachlorocobaltates (II) of 3,6-di(R,R')-iminio-1,2,4,5-tetratiane--(RR')2Ditt[CoCl4]; 2) tetrabromocobaltates (II) of 3,6-di(R,R')-iminio-1,2,4,5-tetratiane--(RR')2Ditt[CoBr4]; 3) isothiocyanates of tetra((R,R')-dithiocarbamatoisothiocyanate)cobalt (II)--[Co(RR'Ditc)4](NCS)2]; 4) dithiocarbamates of cobalt (II)--[Co(S2CNRR')2]; 5) dithiocarbamates of cobalt (III)--[Co(S2CNRR')3]; 6) molecular complexes of dithiocarbamates of cobalt (III) with iodine--[Co(S2CNRR')3] x 2I(2). These groups (1-6) are combined by the presence of the same complexing agent (cobalt) and a fragment S2CNRR' in their molecules. Investigated complexes differ by a charge of intrinsic coordination sphere: anionic (1-2), cationic (3) and neutral (4-6). The nature of substituents at nitrogen atoms varies in each group of complexes. It is stated that the studied coordination compounds render both activating and inhibiting effect on enzyme activity, depending on composition, structure, charge of complex, coordination number of complex former and also on the enzyme and strain producer. Maximum effect is achieved by activating of peptidases B. thuringiensis IMV B-7324 with elastase and fibrinolytic activity. So, in order to improve the catalytic properties of peptidase 1, depending on the type of exhibited activity, it is possible to recommend the following compounds: for elastase--coordinately nonsaturated complexes of cobalt (II) (1-4) containing short aliphatic or alicyclic substituents at atoms of nitrogen and increasing activity by 17-100% at an average; for fibrinolytic--neutral dithiocarbamates of cobalt (II, III) (4-5) (by 29-199%). For increasing the fibrinolytic activity of peptidase it is better to use dibenzyl- or ethylphenyldithiocarbamates of cobalt (III), which increase activity by 15-40% at an average. The same complexes, and also compound {(CH2)6}2Ditt[CoCl4] make an activating impact on alpha-L-rhamnosidase C. albidus (by 10-20%). PMID:25033554

  18. IDH mutation status and role of WHO grade and mitotic index in overall survival in grade II-III diffuse gliomas.

    PubMed

    Olar, Adriana; Wani, Khalida M; Alfaro-Munoz, Kristin D; Heathcock, Lindsey E; van Thuijl, Hinke F; Gilbert, Mark R; Armstrong, Terri S; Sulman, Erik P; Cahill, Daniel P; Vera-Bolanos, Elizabeth; Yuan, Ying; Reijneveld, Jaap C; Ylstra, Bauke; Wesseling, Pieter; Aldape, Kenneth D

    2015-04-01

    Diffuse gliomas are up till now graded based upon morphology. Recent findings indicate that isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation status defines biologically distinct groups of tumors. The role of tumor grade and mitotic index in patient outcome has not been evaluated following stratification by IDH mutation status. To address this, we interrogated 558 WHO grade II-III diffuse gliomas for IDH1/2 mutations and investigated the prognostic impact of WHO grade within IDH-mutant and IDH-wild type tumor subsets independently. The prognostic impact of grade was modest in IDH-mutant [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.21, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 0.91-1.61] compared to IDH-wild type tumors (HR = 1.74, 95 % CI = 0.95-3.16). Using a dichotomized mitotic index cut-off of 4/1000 tumor cells, we found that while mitotic index was significantly associated with outcome in IDH-wild type tumors (log-rank p < 0.0001, HR = 4.41, 95 % CI = 2.55-7.63), it was not associated with outcome in IDH-mutant tumors (log-rank p = 0.5157, HR = 1.10, 95 % CI = 0.80-1.51), and could demonstrate a statistical interaction (p < 0.0001) between IDH mutation and mitotic index (i.e., suggesting that the effect of mitotic index on patient outcome is dependent on IDH mutation status). Patient age, an established prognostic factor in diffuse glioma, was significantly associated with outcome only in the IDH-wild type subset, and consistent with prior data, 1p/19q co-deletion conferred improved outcome in the IDH-mutant cohort. These findings suggest that stratification of grade II-III gliomas into subsets defined by the presence or absence of IDH mutation leads to subgroups with distinct prognostic characteristics. Further evaluation of grading criteria and prognostic markers is warranted within IDH-mutant versus IDH-wild type diffuse grade II-III gliomas as independent entities. PMID:25701198

  19. Esophageal stenosis with sloughing esophagitis: A curious manifestation of graft-vs-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Trabulo, Daniel; Ferreira, Sara; Lage, Pedro; Rego, Rafaela Lima; Teixeira, Gilda; Pereira, A Dias

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 56-year-old woman with a history of allogenic bone marrow transplantation for two years, complaining with dysphagia and weight loss. Upper endoscopy revealed esophageal stenosis and extensive mucosa sloughing. Biopsies confirmed the diagnosis of graft-vs-host disease (GVHD). Balloon dilation, corticosteroids and cyclosporin resulted in marked clinical improvement. Gastrointestinal tract is involved in the majority of patients with chronic GVHD. Esophageal manifestations are rare and include vesiculobullous disease, ulceration, esophageal webs, casts or strictures. Sloughing esophagitis along with severe stenosis requiring endoscopic dilation has never been reported in this context. PMID:26290649

  20. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy using paclitaxel plus cisplatin in the treatment of elderly patients with esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tao; Zhang, Xuebang; Fang, Min; Wu, Shixiu

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed at assessing the efficiency and safety of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) using paclitaxel (PTX) plus cisplatin (CDDP) in elderly (age ?70 years) esophageal cancer patients. Patients and methods Between July 2008 and June 2011, 82 esophageal cancer patients aged ?70 years were retrospectively analyzed. Chemotherapy consisted of CDDP for 3 days plus PTX given for 3 hours. The preplanned total dose of concurrent irradiation with 60 Gy/30 Fx was given at the 1st day of chemotherapy. Results The average age for the enrolled patients was 76.41 years (range: 7087 years), and the clinical stages were stage I (two patients), stage II (23 patients), stage III (49 patients), and stage IV (eight patients). A total of 66 patients finished CCRT on schedule, including 55 (67.1%) patients in whom treatment regimen was not changed, and the clinical complete response was achieved in 29 patients. With a median follow-up time of 20.4 months, the median overall survival (OS) time and progression-free survival (PFS) time were 26.9 months and 18.2 months, respectively. The 2-year OS and PFS rates for stage III and IIIIV were 76.0%, 64.0% and 38.6%, 21.2%, respectively. Grade ?3 leukopenia was observed in 25 patients, and the most common nonhematologic toxicity was esophagitis including five and two patients with grade 3 and 4, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that clinical stage was a strong factor for OS and PFS. Conclusion CCRT using PTX plus CDDP for selected elderly esophageal cancer patients resulted in encouraging survival outcomes and tolerable toxicities. Future prospective studies in large cohorts are highly warranted to confirm the findings in our report. PMID:26543377

  1. Darier's Disease with Esophageal Involvement.

    PubMed

    Baba, Atsunori; Yonekura, Kentaro; Takeda, Koichiro; Kawai, Kazuhiro; Kanekura, Takuro

    2015-09-01

    We report the case of a Japanese man with Darier's disease (DD) that affected the esophagus as well as the skin. A 49-year-old man, who was diagnosed with DD 19 years earlier, visited us again in October 2008 because his skin lesions had exacerbated. Physical examination revealed reddish-brown crusted follicular papules mostly coalesced to produce irregularly-shaped warty plaques on his trunk, hip, upper and lower limbs, and scalp (Figure 1, a, b). Skin biopsy taken from the hip showed hyperkeratosis, papillomatosis, and suprabasal acantholysis with lacunae formation (Figure 1, c). The diagnosis of DD was confirmed and treatment with etretinate at 20 mg daily was started. The dose was increased to 50 mg 22 days later because his skin lesions failed to respond to the initial dose. When the dose was tapered to 20 mg after 2 months, painful erosions appeared on the hip. Tzanck smear testing showed balloon cells, and the serum level of Immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody against herpes simplex virus (HSV) was elevated. The erosion was successfully treated with intravenous acyclovir (750 mg/day for 5 consecutive days). The oral administration of valaciclovir (500 mg/day) was continued as prophylaxis against the recurrence of HSV infection. While the disease was well managed with 20 mg etretinate/day, the patient experienced aggravation in April 2010 and painful swallowing in September 2010. Gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed multiple hyperkeratotic lesions in the middle of the esophagus (Figure 2, a). A biopsy showed histology similar to lesions on the skin including acantholysis and lacunae formation (Figure 2, b). Immunostaining did not detect either HSV-1, HSV-2, or human papilloma virus (HPV) in the esophageal mucosa. The skin lesions improved but the esophageal lesions persisted unchanged 8 months after increasing the daily dose of etretinate to 40 mg. DD is a rare autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by abnormal keratinization that primarily affects the skin. A total of 8 cases of DD affecting the esophagus have been reported previously (1-6). Several important issues emerged from our experience and literature review. Firstly, DD predisposes to infections with HSV, varicella-zoster virus (VZV), HPV, and pox virus (7,8). HSV infection was diagnosed in 1 of 8 previously-reported cases of esophageal DD. In one case, a 20-year-old man had severe thoracic pain; his esophageal lesion was immunohistochemically positive for HSV type I, and acyclovir treatment produced an early clinical response (6). In our case, HSV was detected in the cutaneous lesions but not the esophagus; esophageal lesions developed and persisted during the administration of acyclovir or valacicrovir. Although a partial immune-deficiency has been proposed as causative in some reports, no specific immune function anomaly has been demonstrated (6,7). It is possible that suprabasal acantholysis, a characteristic histological feature of DD, may provide a favorable environment for viral infections and result in innate host defense system deficiencies (8). Secondly, there is a hypothetical association between DD and malignant neoplasms. Among patients with DD, one patient with the esophageal form developed squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (4). DD is attributed to a null-mutation in the ATP2A2 gene encoding the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase isoform 2 (SERCA2) (9). The functional association of the ATP2A2 gene mutation with the development of SCC has been demonstrated. Mice with a single functional Atp2a2 allele, a mouse homolog of ATP2A2, manifested reduced levels of SERCA2; subsequent perturbations in calcium homeostasis or signaling served as a primary initiating event in the development of SCC. Heterozygous mutant Atp2a2 (+/-) mice developed SCC in the skin, oral mucosa, and esophagus where SERCA2 protein levels were decreased (10). We reported a rare case of DD with esophageal involvement and encourage dermatologists to be alert to viral infections and the possible development of cancer in patients with DD. PMID:26476908

  2. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis... of a plastic, metal, or polymeric material that is intended to be implanted to restore the...

  3. Esophagitis dissecans superficialis associated with pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, R P; Touloukian, J; Ahmed, A R; Newcomer, V D

    1981-06-01

    A number of dermatologic conditions may have associated esophageal manifestations. Teleologically, this may be because both the skin and the esophagus are lined by stratified squamous epithelium. Bullous dermatoses that may produce blisters, erosions, and/or stricture of the esophagus include cicatricial pemphigoid, Hailey-Hailey disease, Darier's disease, various forms of epidermolysis bullosa, bullous pemphigoid, and pemphigus vulgaris. Very rarely, bullous diseases may affect the esophagus in such a manner that there is a sloughing of the entire mucous membrane. The production of such an esophageal cast has been termed esophagitis dissecans superficialis. This is the second case recorded in the medical literature of pemphigus vulgaris associated with esophagitis dissecans superficialis. Additionally, this is the first case of pemphigus vulgaris in which the esophagus is demonstrated to be positive by direct immunofluorescence. PMID:7016940

  4. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  5. Tissue engineering: an option for esophageal replacement?

    PubMed

    Zani, Augusto; Pierro, Agostino; Elvassore, Nicola; De Coppi, Paolo

    2009-02-01

    Esophageal replacement is required in several pediatric surgical conditions, like long-gap esophageal atresia. Although several techniques have been described to bridge the gap, all of them could be followed by postoperative complications. Esophageal tissue engineering could represent a valid alternative thanks to the recent advances in biomaterial science and cellular biology. Numerous attempts to shape a new esophagus in vitro have been described in the last decade. Herein, we review the main studies on the experimental use of nonabsorbable and absorbable materials as well as the development of cellularized patches. Furthermore, we describe the future perspectives of esophageal tissue engineering characterized by the use of stem cells seeded on new biopolymers. This opens to the construction of a functional allograft that could allow an anatomical replacement that grows with the children and does not severely impair their anatomy. PMID:19103424

  6. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis... of a plastic, metal, or polymeric material that is intended to be implanted to restore the...

  7. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis... of a plastic, metal, or polymeric material that is intended to be implanted to restore the...

  8. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis... of a plastic, metal, or polymeric material that is intended to be implanted to restore the...

  9. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis... of a plastic, metal, or polymeric material that is intended to be implanted to restore the...

  10. Magnetic lower esophageal sphincter augmentation device removal.

    PubMed

    Harnsberger, Cristina R; Broderick, Ryan C; Fuchs, Hans F; Berducci, Martin; Beck, Catherine; Gallo, Alberto; Jacobsen, Garth R; Sandler, Bryan J; Horgan, Santiago

    2015-04-01

    Implantation of a magnetic lower esophageal sphincter augmentation device is now an alternative to fundoplication in the surgical management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Although successful management of GERD has been reported following placement of the device, there are instances when device removal is needed. The details of the technique for laparoscopic magnetic lower esophageal sphincter device removal are presented to assist surgeons should device removal become necessary. PMID:25119542

  11. Esophageal function after sclerotherapy of bleeding varices.

    PubMed

    Sauerbruch, T; Wirsching, R; Leisner, B; Weinzierl, M; Pfahler, M; Paumgartner, G

    1982-09-01

    To study the effect of sclerotherapy of varices on esophageal function, the motility of the tubular esophagus and of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) were recorded in 19 patients after 7 to 13 sclerotherapy sessions and in 15 healthy volunteers. In addition, esophageal functional scintigraphy (EFS) was performed in the patient group. Compared with the volunteers the patients had lower contraction amplitudes in the distal esophagus (30.5 +/- 17.5 mm Hg versus 43.6 +/- 9.1 mm Hg, p less than 0.01) and a higher percentage of non-propulsive simultaneous contractions (NPC) in the distal (33.4 +/- 23.2% versus 9.0 +/- 8.6%, p less than 0.005) and mid-esophagus (15.0 +/- 8.2% versus 8.3 +/- 8.1%, p less than 0.05). There was a negative correlation between the percentage of NPC in the distal and mid-esophagus and radionuclide transit (rs - 0.53, p less than 0.02). Three of 19 patients had a positive reflux index by EFS. The LES tone was only slightly lower in the patients than in the controls (10.7 +/- 3.2 mm Hg versus 13.4 +/- 3.6 mm Hg, p less than 0.05). Our findings indicate that sclerotherapy of esophageal varices may lead to a reduced peristaltic esophageal motility with an impaired transport function. This could contribute to the development of dysphagia or esophagitis. PMID:6984219

  12. Analysis of the correlation between P53 and Cox-2 expression and prognosis in esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, JUN; WU, FANG; PEI, HONG-LEI; GU, WEN-DONG; NING, ZHONG-HUA; SHAO, YING-JIE; HUANG, JIN

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the importance of P53 and Cox-2 protein expression in esophageal cancer and assess their influence on prognosis. The expression of P53 and Cox-2 was assessed in esophageal cancer samples from 195 patients subjected to radical surgery at Changzhou First People's Hospital (Changzhou, China) between May 2010 and December 2011. Expression of P53 and Cox-2 proteins were detected in 60.5% (118/195) and 69.7% (136/195) of the samples, respectively, and were co-expressed in 43.1% (84/195) of the samples. A correlation was identified between P53 expression and overall survival (OS) (P=0.0351) as well as disease-free survival (DFS) (P=0.0307). In addition, the co-expression of P53 and Cox-2 also correlated with OS (P=0.0040) and DFS (P=0.0042). P53 expression (P=0.023), TNM staging (P<0.001) and P53/Cox-2 co-expression (P=0.009) were identified as independent factors affecting OS in patients with esophageal cancer via a Cox multivariate regression model analysis. A similar analysis also identified P53 expression (P=0.020), TNM staging (P<0.001) and P53/Cox-2 co-expression (P=0.008) as independent prognostic factors influencing DFS in these patients. Binary logistic regression analysis demonstrated a correlation between P53 expression (P=0.012), TNM staging (P<0.001), tumor differentiation level (P=0.023) and P53/Cox-2 co-expression (P=0.021), and local recurrence or distant esophageal cancer metastasis. The results of the present study indicate that P53 and Cox-2 proteins may act synergistically in the development of esophageal cancer, and the assessment of P53/Cox-2 co-expression status in esophageal cancer biopsies may become an important diagnostic criterion to evaluate the prognosis of patients with esophageal cancer. PMID:26622818

  13. Chronic xerostomia increases esophageal acid exposure and is associated with esophageal injury

    SciTech Connect

    Korsten, M.A.; Rosman, A.S.; Fishbein, S.; Shlein, R.D.; Goldberg, H.E.; Biener, A. )

    1991-06-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of chronic xerostomia on parameters of gastroesophageal reflux and esophagitis. DESIGN: Observational study of a cohort of male patients with xerostomia and age-matched control subjects. SETTING: Tertiary-care Veterans Affairs Medical Center. SUBJECTS: Sixteen male patients with chronic xerostomia secondary to radiation for head and neck cancers or medications. Nineteen age-matched male control subjects with comparable alcohol and smoking histories. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Esophageal motility was similar in patients with xerostomia and controls. Clearance of acid from the esophagus and 24-hour intraesophageal pH were markedly abnormal in patients with xerostomia. Symptoms and signs of esophagitis were significantly more frequent in subjects with xerostomia. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic xerostomia may predispose to esophageal injury, at least in part, by decreasing the clearance of acid from the esophagus and altering 24-hour intraesophageal pH. Esophageal injury is a previously unreported complication of long-term salivary deficiency.

  14. Clinical features, outcomes and treatment-related pneumonitis in elderly patients with esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    He, Jian; Zeng, Zhao-Chong; Shi, Shi-Ming; Yang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical features and prognoses of elderly patients with esophageal carcinoma and to compare the effects of radiotherapy and rates of treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP) between elderly and non-elderly patients. METHODS: A total of 236 patients with esophageal carcinoma who received radiotherapy between 2002 and 2012 were enrolled. The patients were divided into two groups: an elderly group (age ≥ 65 years) and a non-elderly group (age < 65 years). The tumor position and stage, lymph node and distant metastases, and incidence and severity of TRP were compared. Multivariate analysis was applied to identify independent prognostic factors. RESULTS: The median overall survival times after radiotherapy in the elderly and non-elderly groups were 18.5 and 20.5 mo, respectively. Cox regression analysis showed that TRP grade and tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage were independent prognostic factors in the elderly group. High-dose radiotherapy (> 60 Gy) was associated with a high incidence of TRP. Tumor TNM staging was significantly different between the two groups in which TRP occurred. Multivariate analysis showed that TNM stage was an independent prognostic factor. Esophageal carcinoma in elderly patients was relatively less malignant compared with that in non-elderly patients. CONCLUSION: An appropriate dose should be used to decrease the incidence of TRP in radiotherapy, and intensity modulated radiation therapy should be selected if possible. PMID:25278715

  15. [FEATURES OF TREATMENT OF EOSINOPHILIC ESOPHAGITIS IN SCHOOLCHILDREN].

    PubMed

    Horodylovska, M I

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of probiotic L. reuteri into the complex therapy of eosinophilic esophagitis significantly affect the outcomes of children--there was significant decrease in the number of eosinophils in the esophageal mucosa of children. PMID:26118052

  16. Transabdominal approach assisted by thoracoscopic drainage for lower esophageal perforation

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Harufumi; Azuma, Masaki; Kanamaru, Hitoshi; Nishiyama, Motohiro; Okamoto, Kazuya; Shimamura, Takahiro; Kyo, Kennoki; Maema, Atsushi; Nakamura, Toshio; Shirakawa, Motoaki; Yokoyama, Hidetaro

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of use of thoracoscopy for esophageal perforation has not been fully evaluated. We herein report a case of esophageal perforation for which a transabdominal approach assisted by thoracoscopic drainage was performed. PMID:26628716

  17. Transabdominal approach assisted by thoracoscopic drainage for lower esophageal perforation.

    PubMed

    Maki, Harufumi; Azuma, Masaki; Kanamaru, Hitoshi; Nishiyama, Motohiro; Okamoto, Kazuya; Shimamura, Takahiro; Kyo, Kennoki; Maema, Atsushi; Nakamura, Toshio; Shirakawa, Motoaki; Yokoyama, Hidetaro

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of use of thoracoscopy for esophageal perforation has not been fully evaluated. We herein report a case of esophageal perforation for which a transabdominal approach assisted by thoracoscopic drainage was performed. PMID:26628716

  18. Poorer Black Patients Have Lower Survival from Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_156988.html Poorer Black Patients Have Lower Survival From Esophageal Cancer Affluence ... 29, 2016 FRIDAY, Jan. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Blacks with low incomes who are diagnosed with esophageal ...

  19. Blunt traumatic esophageal injury: Unusual presentation and approach?

    PubMed Central

    Abdulrahman, Husham; Ajaj, Ahmad; Shunni, Adam; El-Menyar, Ayman; Chaikhouni, Amer; Al-Thani, Hassan; Latifi, Rifat

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Blunt esophageal injury is extremely rare event. However, it is a potential morbid injury unless managed early. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a rare case of blunt esophageal injury for a 28-year old male who presented with history of fall of heavy object over the right side of the chest. Diagnostic work up including chest X-ray, computerized tomography scans and gastrografin esophagogram revealed lower esophageal rupture. Right mini-thoracotomy with esophageal repair was performed. Postoperative course was uneventful. DISCUSSION The exact mechanism of blunt esophageal injury remains uncertain. This report described a unique location of esophageal rupture after blunt trauma that happened on the right side. Diagnosis of esophageal injury needs high index of suspicion and accurate diagnostic workup. CONCLUSION Prompt diagnosis and management are the key for better prognosis in patients with blunt esophageal injury. PMID:24394856

  20. Evaluation of urgent esophagectomy in esophageal perforation

    PubMed Central

    de AQUINO, Jos Luis Braga; de CAMARGO, Jos Gonzaga Teixeira; CECCHINO, Gustavo Nardini; PEREIRA, Douglas Alexandre Rizzanti; BENTO, Caroline Agnelli; LEANDRO-MERHI, Vnia Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    Background Esophageal trauma is considered one of the most severe lesions of the digestive tract. There is still much controversy in choosing the best treatment for cases of esophageal perforation since that decision involves many variables. The readiness of medical care, the patient's clinical status, the local conditions of the perforated segment, and the severity of the associated injuries must be considered for the most adequate therapeutic choice. Aim To demonstrate and to analyze the results of urgent esophagectomy in a series of patients with esophageal perforation. Methods A retrospective study of 31 patients with confirmed esophageal perforation. Most injuries were due to endoscopic dilatation of benign esophageal disorders, which had evolved with stenosis. The diagnosis of perforation was based on clinical parameters, laboratory tests, and endoscopic images. ?The main surgical technique used was transmediastinal esophagectomy followed by reconstruction of the digestive tract in a second surgical procedure. Patients were evaluated for the development of systemic and local complications, especially for the dehiscence or stricture of the anastomosis of the cervical esophagus with either the stomach or the transposed colon. Results Early postoperative evaluation showed a survival rate of 77.1% in relation to the proposed surgery, and 45% of these patients presented no further complications. The other patients had one or more complications, being pulmonary infection and anastomotic fistula the most frequent. The seven patients (22.9%) who underwent esophageal resection 48 hours after the diagnosis died of sepsis. At medium and long-term assessments, most patients reported a good quality of life and full satisfaction regarding the surgery outcomes. Conclusions Despite the morbidity, emergency esophagectomy has its validity, especially in well indicated cases of esophageal perforation subsequent to endoscopic dilation for benign strictures. PMID:25626932

  1. Treatment outcomes of neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by esophagectomy for patients with esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Hyub; Song, Sang-Yun; Shim, Hyun-Jeong; Chung, Woong-Ki; Ahn, Sung-Ja; Yoon, Mee Sun; Jeong, Jae-Uk; Song, Ju-Young

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate treatment outcomes and determine prognostic factors in patients with esophageal cancer treated with esophagectomy after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT). Materials and Methods We retrospectively evaluated 39 patients with esophageal cancer who underwent concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by esophagectomy between 2002 and 2012. Initial clinical stages of patients were stage IB in 1 patient (2.6%), stage II in 5 patients (12.9%), and stage III in 33 patients (84.6%). Results The median age of all the patients was 62 years, and the median follow-up period was 17 months. The 3-year overall survival (OS) rate was 33.6% in all the patients. The 3-year locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) rate was 33.7%. In multivariate analysis with covariates of age, the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, tumor length, clinical response, clinical stage, pathological response, pathological stage, lymphovascular invasion, surgical type, and radiotherapy to surgery interval, only pathological stage was an independent significant prognostic factor affecting both OS and LRFS. The complications in postoperative day 90 were pneumonia in 9 patients, anastomotic site leakage in 3 patients, and anastomotic site stricture in 2 patients. Postoperative 30-day mortality rate was 10.3% (4/39); the cause of death among these 4 patients was respiratory failure in 3 patients and myocardial infarction in one patient. Conclusion Only pathological stage was an independent prognostic factor for both OS and LRFS in patients with esophageal cancer treated with esophagectomy after NCRT. We could confirm the significant role of NCRT in downstaging the initial tumor bulk and thus resulting in better survival of patients who gained earlier pathological stage after NCRT. PMID:25874173

  2. Broken Esophageal Stent Successfully Treated by Interventional Radiology Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenak, Kamil; Mistuna, Dusan; Lucan, Jaroslav; Polacek, Hubert

    2010-06-15

    Esophageal stent fractures occur quite rarely. A 61-year-old male patient was previously treated for rupture of benign stenosis, occurring after dilatation, by implanting an esophageal stent. However, a year after implantation, the patient suffered from dysphagia caused by the broken esophageal stent. He was treated with the interventional radiology technique, whereby a second implantation of the esophageal stent was carried out quite successfully.

  3. From Barrett metaplasia to esophageal adenocarcinoma: the molecular background.

    PubMed

    Saraggi, Deborah; Fassan, Matteo; Bornschein, Jan; Farinati, Fabio; Realdon, Stefano; Valeri, Nicola; Rugge, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The molecular landscape of Barrett's esophagus and Barrett-related neoplastic lesions is still far from being completely elucidated. Both in vitro and in vivo studies pinpointed the pathogenetic role of different morphogenic pathways (the para-homeobox, the Notch and the Sonic Hedgehog families in particular) implicated in the acquisition of the metaplastic phenotype of the esophageal mucosa. On the other hand, the most common genetic alterations observed during Barrett's carcinogenesis include disorders of major regulators of the cell cycle, as well as deregulation of the TGF-?/Smad and receptor tyrosine kinases signalling pathways. Recent comprehensive mutational profiling studies identified that the inactivation of the TP53 and of the SMAD4 tumour suppressor genes occurred in a stage-specific manner, confined to (high grade) dysplastic and neoplastic lesions, respectively. The next step will be the correlation of these findings into multidisciplinary diagnostic approaches integrating endoscopy, histology, molecular profiling and liquid biopsies. This will allow the introduction of innovative strategies for secondary prevention of esophageal adenocarcinoma based on biological rationales, and the implementation of potential novel therapeutic targets. PMID:26334343

  4. [A case of mediastinoscope-assisted transhiatal esophagectomy for thoracic esophageal cancer after radical operation for lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Tokumitsu, Yukio; Yamamoto, Tatsuhito; Kitamura, Yoshinori; Ando, Seiichiro; Tsushimi, Kureo; Tangoku, Akira

    2009-11-01

    We herein report a case of thoracic esophageal cancer operated on by mediastinoscope-assisted transhiatal esophagectomy after a right upper lobectomy for primary lung cancer. A 70-year-old male with non-small-cell lung cancer (T4N2M0, cStage III B) underwent chemo-radiation therapy followed by an upper lobectomy of the right lung with mediastinal lymph node dissection. The lung cancer histologically showed complete remission (CR), and no recurrence has been shown. Five years after the operation of lung cancer, esophageal cancer (T3N0M0, cStage II) was endoscopically detected in this patient. Partial remission was obtained after neoadjuvant FP chemotherapy for esophageal cancer. Therefore, mediastinoscope-assisted transhiatal esophagectomy was performed in consideration of a history of a right thoracotomy and of pulmonary dysfunction. Preventive tracheostomy was performed because of recurrent nerve paralysis, but no other severe postoperative complication has developed in this case. Histopathological findings showed a well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (pT3 (Ad), pN0, M0, pStage II), with involvement at resection margin. He was alive for 11 months after the operation for esophageal cancer, although a local recurrence was observed. There are still many problems remained of the treatment for esophageal cancer patients who had previously undergone a radical operation for lung cancer. However, mediastinoscope-assisted transhiatal esophagectomy may become a procedure for surgical approach if it seems to be difficult to approach the esophageal cancer by thoracotomy again. PMID:20037451

  5. Variations of gastric corpus microbiota are associated with early esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and squamous dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Nasrollahzadeh, Dariush; Malekzadeh, Reza; Ploner, Alexander; Shakeri, Ramin; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Fahimi, Saman; Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh; Kamangar, Farin; Abnet, Christian C.; Winckler, Bjrn; Islami, Farhad; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Ye, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Observational studies revealed a relationship between changes in gastric mucosa and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) which suggested a possible role for gastric microbiota in ESCC carcinogenesis. In this study we aimed to compare pattern of gastric corpus microbiota in ESCC with normal esophagus. Cases were included subjects with early ESCC (stage III) and esophageal squamous dysplasia (ESD) as the cancer precursor. Control groups included age and sex-matched subjects with mid-esophagus esophagitis (diseased-control), and histologically normal esophagus (healthy-control). DNA was extracted from snap-frozen gastric corpus tissues and 16S rRNA was sequenced on GS-FLX Titanium. After noise removal, an average of 3004 reads per sample was obtained from 93 subjects. We applied principal coordinate analysis to ordinate distances from beta diversity data. Pattern of gastric microbiota using Unifrac (p = 0.004) and weighted Unifrac distances (p = 0.018) statistically varied between cases and healthy controls. Sequences were aligned to SILVA database and Clostridiales and Erysipelotrichales orders were more abundant among cases after controling for multiple testing (p = 0.011). No such difference was observed between mid-esophagitis and healthy controls. This study is the first to show that composition of gastric corpus mucosal microbiota differs in early ESCC and ESD from healthy esophagus. PMID:25743945

  6. Esophageal surgery in minimally invasive era.

    PubMed

    Bencini, Lapo; Moraldi, Luca; Bartolini, Ilenia; Coratti, Andrea

    2016-01-27

    The widespread popularity of new surgical technologies such as laparoscopy, thoracoscopy and robotics has led many surgeons to treat esophageal diseases with these methods. The expected benefits of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) mainly include reductions of postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, and pain and better cosmetic results. All of these benefits could potentially be of great interest when dealing with the esophagus due to the potentially severe complications that can occur after conventional surgery. Moreover, robotic platforms are expected to reduce many of the difficulties encountered during advanced laparoscopic and thoracoscopic procedures such as anastomotic reconstructions, accurate lymphadenectomies, and vascular sutures. Almost all esophageal diseases are approachable in a minimally invasive way, including diverticula, gastro-esophageal reflux disease, achalasia, perforations and cancer. Nevertheless, while the limits of MIS for benign esophageal diseases are mainly technical issues and costs, oncologic outcomes remain the cornerstone of any procedure to cure malignancies, for which the long-term results are critical. Furthermore, many of the minimally invasive esophageal operations should be compared to pharmacologic interventions and advanced pure endoscopic procedures; such a comparison requires a difficult literature analysis and leads to some confounding results of clinical trials. This review aims to examine the evidence for the use of MIS in both malignancies and more common benign disease of the esophagus, with a particular emphasis on future developments and ongoing areas of research. PMID:26843913

  7. Fatty acid synthase expression and esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongli; Niu, Chunyan; Li, Yandong; Gao, Baohua; Zheng, Jianyun; Guo, Xiaoli; Ma, Weiguo

    2012-10-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN) overexpression has also been associated with a variety of human malignancies including tumor progression, aggressiveness, and metastasis. To investigate the role of FASN expression in esophageal cancer, we evaluated 60 cases of squamous cell carcinoma, 20 cases of adenocarcinoma, and 10 cases of normal esophageal tissues. We found that FASN was detected in 95 % human squamous cell carcinoma, and in 90 % human adenocarcinoma samples. However, all cases of normal esophageal epithelium did not express the protein of FASN. Further, to investigate the role of FASN in tumorigenesis and development, we analyze the growth and migration by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), colony formation and wound healing assay. We found that inhibition of FASN expression in TE13 cells by RNAi suppressed the growth of cells. Decreased FASN expression mitigated the migration of TE13 cells. These studies demonstrated the functional importance of FASN in esophageal tumorigenesis, and suggested that inhibiting FASN might be applied to treat esophageal cancer. PMID:22723001

  8. Esophageal surgery in minimally invasive era

    PubMed Central

    Bencini, Lapo; Moraldi, Luca; Bartolini, Ilenia; Coratti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The widespread popularity of new surgical technologies such as laparoscopy, thoracoscopy and robotics has led many surgeons to treat esophageal diseases with these methods. The expected benefits of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) mainly include reductions of postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, and pain and better cosmetic results. All of these benefits could potentially be of great interest when dealing with the esophagus due to the potentially severe complications that can occur after conventional surgery. Moreover, robotic platforms are expected to reduce many of the difficulties encountered during advanced laparoscopic and thoracoscopic procedures such as anastomotic reconstructions, accurate lymphadenectomies, and vascular sutures. Almost all esophageal diseases are approachable in a minimally invasive way, including diverticula, gastro-esophageal reflux disease, achalasia, perforations and cancer. Nevertheless, while the limits of MIS for benign esophageal diseases are mainly technical issues and costs, oncologic outcomes remain the cornerstone of any procedure to cure malignancies, for which the long-term results are critical. Furthermore, many of the minimally invasive esophageal operations should be compared to pharmacologic interventions and advanced pure endoscopic procedures; such a comparison requires a difficult literature analysis and leads to some confounding results of clinical trials. This review aims to examine the evidence for the use of MIS in both malignancies and more common benign disease of the esophagus, with a particular emphasis on future developments and ongoing areas of research. PMID:26843913

  9. Esophageal Cancer: Insights From Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Ttreault, Marie-Pier

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the eighth leading cause of cancer and the sixth most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Despite recent advances in the development of surgical techniques in combination with the use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the prognosis for esophageal cancer remains poor. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that drive the pathogenesis of esophageal cancer are still poorly understood. Hence, understanding these mechanisms is crucial to improving outcomes for patients with esophageal cancer. Mouse models constitute valuable tools for modeling human cancers and for the preclinical testing of therapeutic strategies in a manner not possible in human subjects. Mice are excellent models for studying human cancers because they are similar to humans at the physiological and molecular levels and because they have a shorter gestation time and life cycle. Moreover, a wide range of well-developed technologies for introducing genetic modifications into mice are currently available. In this review, we describe how different mouse models are used to study esophageal cancer. PMID:26380556

  10. Eosinophilic esophagitis: a bulk of mysteries.

    PubMed

    Straumann, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), which was first described in the early 1990s, has rapidly evolved as a distinctive chronic inflammatory esophageal disease. The diagnosis is based clinically on the presence of symptoms related to esophageal dysfunction and histologically by an eosinophil-predominant inflammation once other conditions leading to esophageal eosinophilia are excluded. This striking male-prevalent disease has an increasing incidence and prevalence in the Westernized countries. Currently, EoE represents the main cause of dysphagia and bolus impaction in adult patients. Despite the fact that EoE often occurs in atopic patients, the value of allergic testing is still under discussion. Topical corticosteroids lead to a rapid improvement of active EoE clinically and histologically; they are therefore regarded as first-line drug therapy. Elimination diets have similar efficacy as topical corticosteroids, but their long-term use is limited by practical issues. Esophageal dilation of EoE-induced strictures can also be effective in improving symptoms, but this therapy has no effect on the underlying inflammation. Neither the diagnostic nor the long-term therapeutic strategies have been fully defined. Currently, the list of unsolved issues--or mysteries--is still long and a concerted effort on behalf of clinicians and scientists is required to improve the understanding and the therapeutic management of this mysterious disease. PMID:23797116

  11. Esophageal tissue engineering: Current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, T; Catry, J; Luong-Nguyen, M; Bruneval, P; Domet, T; Arakelian, L; Sfeir, R; Michaud, L; Vanneaux, V; Gottrand, F; Larghero, J; Cattan, P

    2016-02-01

    Tissue engineering, which consists of the combination and in vivo implantation of elements required for tissue remodeling toward a specific organ phenotype, could be an alternative for classical techniques of esophageal replacement. The current hybrid approach entails creation of an esophageal substitute composed of an acellular matrix and autologous epithelial and muscle cells provides the most successful results. Current research is based on the use of mesenchymal stem cells, whose potential for differentiation and proangioogenic, immune-modulator and anti-inflammatory properties are important assets. In the near future, esophageal substitutes could be constructed from acellular "intelligent matrices" that contain the molecules necessary for tissue regeneration; this should allow circumvention of the implantation step and still obtain standardized in vivo biological responses. At present, tissue engineering applications to esophageal replacement are limited to enlargement plasties with absorbable, non-cellular matrices. Nevertheless, the application of existing clinical techniques for replacement of other organs by tissue engineering in combination with a multiplication of translational research protocols for esophageal replacement in large animals should soon pave the way for health agencies to authorize clinical trials. PMID:26711880

  12. Targeting chemokine pathways in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Makardhwaj S; Hussain, Zulfiqar; Giricz, Orsolya; Shenoy, Niraj; Polineni, Rahul; Maitra, Anirban; Verma, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is one of the fastest growing malignancies in the US and needs newer therapeutic and diagnostic strategies. Chronic inflammation plays a role in the pathogenesis of EAC and contributes to the dysplastic conversion of normal esophageal epithelium to Barrett's esophagus and frank adenocarcinoma. Chemokines play important roles in mediating inflammation and recent evidence implicates these ligands and their receptors in the development and spread of various tumors. We demonstrated that the chemokines IL8, CXCL1 and CXCL3 are significantly overexpressed during esophageal carcinogenesis and accompanied by amplification and demethylation of the chr4q21 gene locus. We also demonstrated that IL8 levels can be detected in serum of patients with EAC and can serve as potential biomarkers. We now demonstrate that inhibition of IL8 receptor, CXCR2, leads to decreased invasiveness of esophageal adenocarcinoma derived cells without affecting cellular proliferation. Taken together, these studies reveal the important roles that chemokines play in development of esophageal cancer and demonstrate that these pathways can serve as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25485576

  13. Expression and mechanism of PinX1 and telomerase activity in the carcinogenesis of esophageal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Jing; Wang, Da-Hu; Zhang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Liang; Liu, Feng-Ling; Liu, Wei

    2013-10-01

    Esophageal tissues were collected from an esophageal carcinoma high-risk area of China and were used to detect the telomere length and the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) by immuhistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization; esophageal carcinoma tissues, paired-adjacent mucosa and paired normal mucosa were obtained from resected surgical specimens of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in order to determine telomerase activity and expression of hTERT and Pin2/TRF1 interacting protein X1 (PinX1) by telomeric repeat amplification protocol-silver staining, RT-PCR and flow cytometry (FCM). The cell proliferation and apoptosis of Eca109 cells were analyzed by FCM and MTT assay. We found that the length of telomere DNA decreased and hTERT protein expression increased in the carcinogenesis of esophageal epithelial cells; telomerase activity was significantly upregulated followed by a decrease of PinX1 expression in esophageal carcinoma compared with dysplasia and normal patients, which notably correlated with grade and lymph node metastasis. Overexpression of PinX1 inhibited cell growth, arrested cells at the G0/G1 stage and induced cell apoptosis in Eca109 cells. In addition, PinX1 overexpression significantly inhibited telomerase activity. In conclusion, the length shortening of telomere was an important characteristic in the carcinogenesis of esophageal epithelial cells, followed by increase of telomerase activity and downregulation of PinX1. Overexpression of PinX1 blocked Eca109 cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis by downregulating telomerase activity. PMID:23912465

  14. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Dario; Maione, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Alessandra; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Palma, Giovanni D

    2016-01-25

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by dysphagia, regurgitation of undigested food, chest pain, weight loss and respiratory symptoms. The most common form of achalasia is the idiopathic one. Diagnosis largely relies upon endoscopy, barium swallow study, and high resolution esophageal manometry (HRM). Barium swallow and manometry after treatment are also good predictors of success of treatment as it is the residue symptomatology. Short term improvement in the symptomatology of achalasia can be achieved with medical therapy with calcium channel blockers or endoscopic botulin toxin injection. Even though few patients can be cured with only one treatment and repeat procedure might be needed, long term relief from dysphagia can be obtained in about 90% of cases with either surgical interventions such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or with endoscopic techniques such pneumatic dilatation or, more recently, with per-oral endoscopic myotomy. Age, sex, and manometric type by HRM are also predictors of responsiveness to treatment. Older patients, females and type II achalasia are better after treatment compared to younger patients, males and type III achalasia. Self-expandable metallic stents are an alternative in patients non responding to conventional therapies. PMID:26839644

  15. Recent developments in esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lagergren, Jesper; Lagergren, Pernilla

    2013-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is characterized by 6 striking features: increasing incidence, male predominance, lack of preventive measures, opportunities for early detection, demanding surgical therapy and care, and poor prognosis. Reasons for its rapidly increasing incidence include the rising prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux and obesity, combined with the decreasing prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection. The strong male predominance remains unexplained, but hormonal influence might play an important role. Future prevention might include the treatment of reflux or obesity or chemoprevention with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs or statins, but no evidence-based preventive measures are currently available. Likely future developments include endoscopic screening of better defined high-risk groups for EAC. Individuals with Barrett esophagus might benefit from surveillance, at least those with dysplasia, but screening and surveillance strategies need careful evaluation to be feasible and cost-effective. The surgery for EAC is more extensive than virtually any other standard procedure, and postoperative survival, health-related quality of life, and nutrition need to be improved (eg, by improved treatment, better decision-making, and more individually tailored follow-up). Promising clinical developments include increased survival after preoperative chemoradiotherapy, the potentially reduced impact on health-related quality of life after minimally invasive surgery, and the new endoscopic therapies for dysplastic Barrett esophagus or early EAC. The overall survival rates are improving slightly, but poor prognosis remains a challenge. PMID:23818335

  16. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Dario; Maione, Francesco; D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Palma, Giovanni D

    2016-01-01

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by dysphagia, regurgitation of undigested food, chest pain, weight loss and respiratory symptoms. The most common form of achalasia is the idiopathic one. Diagnosis largely relies upon endoscopy, barium swallow study, and high resolution esophageal manometry (HRM). Barium swallow and manometry after treatment are also good predictors of success of treatment as it is the residue symptomatology. Short term improvement in the symptomatology of achalasia can be achieved with medical therapy with calcium channel blockers or endoscopic botulin toxin injection. Even though few patients can be cured with only one treatment and repeat procedure might be needed, long term relief from dysphagia can be obtained in about 90% of cases with either surgical interventions such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or with endoscopic techniques such pneumatic dilatation or, more recently, with per-oral endoscopic myotomy. Age, sex, and manometric type by HRM are also predictors of responsiveness to treatment. Older patients, females and type II achalasia are better after treatment compared to younger patients, males and type III achalasia. Self-expandable metallic stents are an alternative in patients non responding to conventional therapies. PMID:26839644

  17. Congenital esophageal stenosis owing to tracheobronchial remnants

    PubMed Central

    Rebelo, Priscila Guyt; Ormonde, Joo Victor C.; Ormonde, Joo Baptista C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To emphasize the need of an accurate diagnosis of congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, since its treatment differs from other types of congenital narrowing. CASE DESCRIPTION Four cases of lower congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, whose definitive diagnosis was made by histopathology. Except for the last case, in which a concomitant anti-reflux surgery was not performed, all had a favorable outcome after resection and anastomosis of the esophagus. COMMENTS The congenital esophageal stenosis is an intrinsic narrowing of the organ(tm)s wall associated with its structural malformation. The condition can be caused by tracheobronchial remnants, fibromuscular stenosis or membranous diaphragm and the first symptom is dysphagia after the introduction of solid food in the diet. The first-choice treatment to tracheobronchial remnants cases is the surgical resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the esophagus. PMID:24142326

  18. Exome sequencing identifies NFS1 deficiency in a novel Fe-S cluster disease, infantile mitochondrial complex II/III deficiency.

    PubMed

    Farhan, Sali M K; Wang, Jian; Robinson, John F; Lahiry, Piya; Siu, Victoria M; Prasad, Chitra; Kronick, Jonathan B; Ramsay, David A; Rupar, C Anthony; Hegele, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are a class of highly conserved and ubiquitous prosthetic groups with unique chemical properties that allow the proteins that contain them, Fe-S proteins, to assist in various key biochemical pathways. Mutations in Fe-S proteins often disrupt Fe-S cluster assembly leading to a spectrum of severe disorders such as Friedreich's ataxia or iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme (ISCU) myopathy. Herein, we describe infantile mitochondrial complex II/III deficiency, a novel autosomal recessive mitochondrial disease characterized by lactic acidemia, hypotonia, respiratory chain complex II and III deficiency, multisystem organ failure and abnormal mitochondria. Through autozygosity mapping, exome sequencing, in silico analyses, population studies and functional tests, we identified c.215G>A, p.Arg72Gln in NFS1 as the likely causative mutation. We describe the first disease in man likely caused by deficiency in NFS1, a cysteine desulfurase that is implicated in respiratory chain function and iron maintenance by initiating Fe-S cluster biosynthesis. Our results further demonstrate the importance of sufficient NFS1 expression in human physiology. PMID:24498631

  19. Region- and cell-specific differences in the distribution of carbonic anhydrases II, III, XII, and XIV in the adult rat epididymis.

    PubMed

    Hermo, Louis; Chong, Dennis Lee; Moffatt, Pierre; Sly, William S; Waheed, Abdul; Smith, Charles E

    2005-06-01

    We employed RT-PCR followed by light microscope immunocytochemistry on St. Marie's- and Bouin's-fixed tissues to define the distribution of carbonic anhydrase (CA) isoforms in the male reproductive tract. The data revealed that CA II, III, IV, XII, and XIV were expressed in rat epididymis. Whereas CA III was found in principal cells of all epididymal regions, CA II was localized in narrow cells of the initial segment and principal cells of all regions. CA XII expression was most intense in the corpus and proximal cauda regions, where it appeared over the basolateral plasma membranes of principal cells. Narrow cells of the initial segment also revealed intense reactions, as did basal cells of the corpus and proximal cauda regions. Principal cells of the initial segment and proximal caput regions showed diffuse apical cytosolic reactions and occasional basolateral staining for CA XIV, whereas principal cells of distal regions showed more diffuse cytosolic reactions highlighting both apical and basal regions of the cell, with basal cells also being reactive. These data suggest subtle differences in cell type and subcellular- and region-specific distributions for CAs in their role of fine-tuning pH in the lumen, cell cytosol, and intervening intercellular spaces of the epididymis. PMID:15928319

  20. Exome sequencing identifies NFS1 deficiency in a novel Fe-S cluster disease, infantile mitochondrial complex II/III deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Farhan, Sali M K; Wang, Jian; Robinson, John F; Lahiry, Piya; Siu, Victoria M; Prasad, Chitra; Kronick, Jonathan B; Ramsay, David A; Rupar, C Anthony; Hegele, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are a class of highly conserved and ubiquitous prosthetic groups with unique chemical properties that allow the proteins that contain them, Fe-S proteins, to assist in various key biochemical pathways. Mutations in Fe-S proteins often disrupt Fe-S cluster assembly leading to a spectrum of severe disorders such as Friedreich's ataxia or iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme (ISCU) myopathy. Herein, we describe infantile mitochondrial complex II/III deficiency, a novel autosomal recessive mitochondrial disease characterized by lactic acidemia, hypotonia, respiratory chain complex II and III deficiency, multisystem organ failure and abnormal mitochondria. Through autozygosity mapping, exome sequencing, in silico analyses, population studies and functional tests, we identified c.215G>A, p.Arg72Gln in NFS1 as the likely causative mutation. We describe the first disease in man likely caused by deficiency in NFS1, a cysteine desulfurase that is implicated in respiratory chain function and iron maintenance by initiating Fe-S cluster biosynthesis. Our results further demonstrate the importance of sufficient NFS1 expression in human physiology. PMID:24498631

  1. Comparative cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of cobalt (II, III) oxide, iron (III) oxide, silicon dioxide, and aluminum oxide nanoparticles on human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rajiv, S; Jerobin, J; Saranya, V; Nainawat, M; Sharma, A; Makwana, P; Gayathri, C; Bharath, L; Singh, M; Kumar, M; Mukherjee, A; Chandrasekaran, N

    2016-02-01

    Despite the extensive use of nanoparticles (NPs) in various fields, adequate knowledge of human health risk and potential toxicity is still lacking. The human lymphocytes play a major role in the immune system, and it can alter the antioxidant level when exposed to NPs. Identification of the hazardous NPs was done using in vitro toxicity tests and this study mainly focuses on the comparative in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of four different NPs including cobalt (II, III) oxide (Co3O4), iron (III) oxide (Fe2O3), silicon dioxide (SiO2), and aluminum oxide (Al2O3) on human lymphocytes. The Co3O4 NPs showed decrease in cellular viability and increase in cell membrane damage followed by Fe2O3, SiO2, and Al2O3 NPs in a dose-dependent manner after 24 h of exposure to human lymphocytes. The oxidative stress was evidenced in human lymphocytes by the induction of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, and depletion of catalase, reduced glutathione, and superoxide dismutase. The Al2O3 NPs showed the least DNA damage when compared with all the other NPs. Chromosomal aberration was observed at 100 g/ml when exposed to Co3O4 NPs and Fe2O3 NPs. The alteration in the level of antioxidant caused DNA damage and chromosomal aberration in human lymphocytes. PMID:25829403

  2. Characterization of monomeric Mn(II/III/IV)-hydroxo complexes from X- and Q-band dual mode electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rupal; Taguchi, Taketo; Borovik, A S; Hendrich, Michael P

    2013-11-01

    Manganese-hydroxo species have been implicated in C-H bond activation performed by metalloenzymes, but the electronic properties of many of these intermediates are not well characterized. The present work presents a detailed characterization of three Mn(n)-OH complexes (where n = II, III, and IV) of the tris[(N'-tert-butylureaylato)-N-ethylene]aminato ([H3buea](3-)) ligand using X- and Q-band dual mode electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Quantitative simulations for the [Mn(II)H3buea(OH)](2-) complex demonstrated the ability to characterize similar Mn(II) species commonly present in the resting states of manganese-containing enzymes. The spin states of the Mn(III) and Mn(IV) complexes determined from EPR spectroscopy are S = 2 and 3/2, respectively, as expected for the C3 symmetry imposed by the [H3buea](3-) ligand. Simulations of the spectra indicated the constant presence of two Mn(IV) species in solutions of [Mn(IV)H3buea(OH)] complex. The simulations of perpendicular- and parallel-mode EPR spectra allow determination of zero-field splitting and hyperfine parameters for all complexes. For the Mn(III) and Mn(IV) complexes, density functional theory calculations are used to determine the isotropic Mn hyperfine values, to compare the excited electronic state energies, and to give theoretical estimates of the zero-field energy. PMID:24156406

  3. Cobalt-iron(II,III) oxide hybrid catalysis with enhanced catalytic activities for oxygen reduction in anion exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen-Hao; Yang, Chih-Wei; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Chang, Sun-Tang; Chang, Shery L. Y.

    2015-03-01

    Carbon-supported cobalt-iron(II,III) oxide (Co-Fe3O4) hybrid nanoparticles (Co-Fe3O4/C) are prepared as efficient catalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media and in the cathode of the anion exchange membrane fuel cell (AEMFC). The ORR activity of Co-Fe3O4/C gives an electron transfer number of 3.99, revealing almost perfect four-electron transfer, over a very wide range of potentials of 0.1-0.8 V. Co-Fe3O4/C is more durable than Pt/C in alkaline media, undergoing almost no degradation in 10,000 s at 0.76 V (vs. RHE). The potential-cycling method shows that the rate of decline of Co-Fe3O4/C is only 5% decay after 10,000 cycles. The AEMFC using Co-Fe3O4/C also shows good performance and excellent durability in this study.

  4. Combining non-destructive nuclear techniques to study Roman leaded copper coins from Ilipa (II-I centuries B.C.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Surez, A. I.; Gmez-Tubo, B.; Respaldiza, M. A.; Chaves, F.; Ortega-Feliu, I.; Ontalba-Salamanca, M. .; Ager, F. J.

    2011-12-01

    A set of 32 bronze coins (II-I centuries B.C.) from the Roman city of Ilipa Magna (present-day Alcal del Ro, Seville) have been analyzed by means of non-destructive techniques. These coins are classified in different series according to their numismatic characteristics. They are very interesting from the archaeological point of view because a freshwater fish is depicted on the obverse (unusual in Mediterranean Cultures) and a spike on the reverse (also unusual but frequent in the South of the Iberian Peninsula). A comparative study has been made by PIXE (Proton Induced X-ray Emission) and XRF (X-ray Fluorescence) both corrected by GRT (Gamma Ray Transmission) in order to avoid the polishing of the coins. The results show that after the correction with GRT both independent methods give compatible concentrations for all of the coins that can be assumed as the actual bulk compositions [1]. The average concentrations of the different series have been calculated and they could help to classify the series of coins chronologically.

  5. In vivo methylmercury exposure induced long-lasting epileptiform activity in layer II/III neurons in cortical slices from the rat

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Sameera; Yuan, Yukun

    2010-01-01

    Prenatal and postnatal methylmercury (MeHg) exposure has been shown to increase neuronal excitability and seizure susceptibility. To determine if early postnatal MeHg exposure causes a similar effect, we examined changes in field potentials in layer II/III neurons in cortical slices of rat following in vivo MeHg treatment. Rats received 0 (0.9% NaCl), 0.75 or 1.5 mg/kg/day MeHg subcutaneously for 15 or 30 days beginning on postnatal day 5, after which cortical slices were prepared for field potential recordings. In slices from rats treated with vehicle, single pulse stimulation of layer IV of cortical slices induced a typical field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) with a single spike. This type of fEPSPs was also seen in slices from rats with 15 day treatment with 0.75 or 1.5 mg/kg/day MeHg. However, 30 day treatment with either MeHg dose resulted in fEPSPs with multiple spikes (epileptiform activity) in 40% of animals examined. This epileptiform activity remained observable in 50 – 60% animals in which MeHg exposure had been terminated for 30 days. However, slices from control animals still showed fEPSPs with single spike. Thus, these data suggest that postnatal MeHg exposure in vivo altered neuronal excitability and induced a long-lasting hyperexcitability in cortical neurons. PMID:20051253

  6. Minimally invasive management of epiphrenic esophageal diverticula.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Brent D; Nelms, Cynthia D; Lohr, Charles E; Harold, Kristi L; Kercher, Kent W; Heniford, B Todd

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to review our initial experience with a minimally invasive approach to manage symptomatic epiphrenic esophageal diverticula. Five patients with symptomatic epiphrenic esophageal diverticula underwent surgical management between August 1997 and December 2002. All patients complained of dysphagia; had experienced symptoms for at least 12 months; and were evaluated preoperatively by a barium esophagram, esophagogastroduodenoscopy, and esophageal manometry. The epiphrenic esophageal diverticula measured 5 cm or less in all patients. Manometry demonstrated esophageal dysmotility in three patients. A minimally invasive technique was completed in all five patients. Four patients underwent laparoscopic diverticulectomy and myotomy including a concomitant Toupet fundoplication, and one patient underwent thoracoscopic diverticulectomy and myotomy. The mean operative time was 245 minutes (range 175-334). The longest operative time was for the thoracoscopic procedure. The estimated blood loss was minimal (range 30-100 cm3). The laparoscopic patients had a mean postoperative length of stay of 2.75 days (range 2-4) and the patient undergoing a thoracoscopic approach was discharged on postoperative day 6 due to a history of lung disease and home oxygen requirements. There were no other postoperative complications. After a mean follow-up of 16.2 months (range 3-36) all patients are asymptomatic. Short-term follow-up after our initial experience with minimally invasive approaches for epiphrenic esophageal diverticula demonstrates that thoracoscopic and laparoscopic approaches are feasible; safe; and effectively alleviate dysphagia, regurgitation, and other associated symptoms. Long-term outcomes should be monitored during the evolution of these novel minimally invasive techniques to ensure outcomes comparable to those of a transthoracic open approach. PMID:12852502

  7. Systematic review: Eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian countries

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Ishimura, Norihisa; Oshima, Naoki; Ishihara, Shunji

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence and the clinical characteristics of Asian patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. METHODS: We conducted a systematic search of the PubMed and Web of Science databases for original studies, case series, and individual case reports of eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian countries published from January 1980 to January 2015. We found 66 and 80 articles in the PubMed and Web of Science databases, respectively; 24 duplicate articles were removed. After excluding animal studies, articles not written in English, and meeting abstracts, 25 articles containing 217 patients were selected for analysis. RESULTS: Sample size-weighted mean values were determined for all pooled prevalence data and clinical characteristics. The mean age of the adult patients with eosinophilic esophagitis was approximately 50 years, and 73% of these patients were male. They frequently presented with allergic diseases including bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy, and atopic dermatitis. Bronchial asthma was the most frequent comorbid allergic disease, occurring in 24% of patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. Dysphagia was the primary symptom reported; 44% of the patients complained of dysphagia. Although laboratory blood tests are not adequately sensitive for an accurate diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis, endoscopic examinations revealed abnormal findings typical of this disease, including longitudinal furrows and concentric rings, in 82% of the cases. One-third of the cases responded to proton pump inhibitor administration. CONCLUSION: The characteristics of eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian patients were similar to those reported in Western patients, indicating that this disease displays a similar pathogenesis between Western and Asian patients. PMID:26217096

  8. MicroRNAs and esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, Santosh Kumar; Mallick, Reema

    2010-01-01

    Cancer of the esophagus is a highly aggressive disease associated with an overall poor prognosis. There is an insistent need for improving our understanding of the molecular basis of this disease. The recent emergence of observations on the role of microRNAs in cancer and their potential as biomarkers has prompted many investigations to examine their relevance to esophageal cancer. This article provides an introduction to microRNA biology and the techniques involved in studying them, and summates what is now known about their role and utility in regard to neoplastic esophageal diseases. PMID:22811805

  9. Esophageal recurrence of medullary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dworzynska, Agnieszka; Lorente-Poch, Leyre; Sancho, Juan Jose; Sitges-Serra, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) metastasizes to the regional lymph nodes and to the lungs, liver and bones. Only one case of recurrence of MTC involving the upper gastrointestinal tract has been reported so far. We describe the case of a 38-year-old woman with MTC, who developed an upper esophageal submucosal recurrence after two previous local recurrences treated surgically and one ethanol injection. After resection of the right lateral esophageal wall, calcitonin dropped by 60% and showed a doubling time >1 year. We cannot rule out the role of deep ethanol injection in the involvement of the cervical esophagus wall. PMID:26645011

  10. Maturation of upstream and downstream esophageal reflexes in human premature neonates: the role of sleep and awake states

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chin Yee; Fernandez, Soledad; Splaingard, Mark

    2013-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the sensory-motor characteristics of aerodigestive reflexes are dependent on stimulus type and volumes, sleep or awake states, and maturation. Thirteen neonates were studied at 33.6 0.5 wk (time 1) and 37.3 0.5 wk (time 2) postmenstrual age using multimodal provocative esophageal manometry concurrent with video polysomnography. Effects of graded volumes (399 infusions at time 1, 430 infusions at time 2) of midesophageal stimulation with air, water, and apple juice on the sensory thresholds and recruitment frequency of upper esophageal sphincter (UES), esophageal body, and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) reflexes were investigated during sleep and awake states. Sensory thresholds for aerodigestive reflexes between maturational stages were similar. Increased frequency recruitment of UES contractile reflex, LES relaxation reflex, and peristaltic reflexes were noted at time 2 (all, P < 0.05). Graded stimulus-response relationships were evident at time 1 and time 2 during awake and sleep states (P < 0.05). Secondary peristalsis vs. esophago-deglutition response proportions during sleep at time 1 vs. time 2 (P = 0.001) and awake vs. sleep at time 2 (P = 0.02) were distinct. We concluded that sensory-motor effects of esophageal mechanosensitivity, osmosensitivity, and chemosensitivity are advanced in sleep with maturation. Sleep further modulates the frequency recruitment and the type of aerodigestive reflexes. PMID:24008357

  11. Immunologic function of dendritic cells in esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenfeng; Yu, Jinming

    2008-07-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the frequently occurring malignant cancers. The current therapy, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or a combination, is only to palliate the symptoms; overall the prognosis is poor. The immunotherapy of dendritic cells for esophageal cancer is a valuable method. Dendritic cells existing in the esophageal tissues play an important role in the host's immunosurveillance against cancer as the professional antigen-presenting cells. This review concerns the immunology of dendritic cells in esophageal cancer; it describes the expression of DCs in the normal esophageal tissues and benign disease of esophagus, relations between the DCs and cancer development in esophageal cancer, and the DC-based approach to establish treatment for esophageal cancer. PMID:18080193

  12. Simultaneous Esophageal and Gastric Metastases from Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Yong; Hong, Seung Wook; Lee, Joo Young; Kim, Ji Hye; Kang, Jin Woo; Lee, Hyun Woo

    2015-01-01

    We report of a patient with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and stomach from lung cancer. The patient was a 68-year-old man receiving radiotherapy and chemotherapy for stage IV lung cancer, without metastases to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract at the time of the initial diagnosis. During the treatment period, dysphagia and melena newly developed. Upper GI endoscopy revealed geographic erosion at the distal esophagus and multiple volcano-shaped ulcers on the stomach body. Endoscopic biopsy was performed for each lesion. To determine whether the lesions were primary esophageal and gastric cancer masses or metastases from the lung cancer, histopathological testing including immunohistochemical staining was performed, and metastasis from lung cancer was confirmed. The disease progressed despite chemotherapy, and the patient died 5 months after the diagnosis of lung cancer. This is a case report of metastatic adenocarcinoma in the esophagus and stomach, which are very rare sites of spread for lung cancer. PMID:26240809

  13. Simultaneous Esophageal and Gastric Metastases from Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Yong; Hong, Seung Wook; Lee, Joo Young; Kim, Ji Hye; Kang, Jin Woo; Lee, Hyun Woo; Im, Jong Pil

    2015-07-01

    We report of a patient with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and stomach from lung cancer. The patient was a 68-year-old man receiving radiotherapy and chemotherapy for stage IV lung cancer, without metastases to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract at the time of the initial diagnosis. During the treatment period, dysphagia and melena newly developed. Upper GI endoscopy revealed geographic erosion at the distal esophagus and multiple volcano-shaped ulcers on the stomach body. Endoscopic biopsy was performed for each lesion. To determine whether the lesions were primary esophageal and gastric cancer masses or metastases from the lung cancer, histopathological testing including immunohistochemical staining was performed, and metastasis from lung cancer was confirmed. The disease progressed despite chemotherapy, and the patient died 5 months after the diagnosis of lung cancer. This is a case report of metastatic adenocarcinoma in the esophagus and stomach, which are very rare sites of spread for lung cancer. PMID:26240809

  14. False esophageal hiatus hernia caused by a foreign body: a fatal event.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ya-Ping; Yao, Ming; Zhou, Xu-Yan; Huang, Bing; Qi, Wei-Bo; Chen, Zhi-Heng; Xu, Long-Sheng

    2014-10-21

    Foreign body ingestion is a common complaint in gastrointestinal clinics. It is usually not difficult to diagnose because most of the patients report a definitive history of accidental foreign body ingestion. However, in rare cases, patients do not have a clear history. Thus, the actual condition of the patient is difficult to diagnosis or is misdiagnosed; consequently, treatment is delayed or the wrong treatment is administered, respectively. This report describes a fatal case of esophageal perforation caused by an unknowingly ingested fishbone, which resulted in lower esophageal necrosis, chest cavity infection, posterior mediastinum fester, and significant upper gastrointestinal accumulation of blood. However, his clinical symptoms and imaging data are very similar with esophageal hiatal hernia. Unfortunately, because the patient was too late in consulting a physician, he finally died of chest infection and hemorrhage caused by thoracic aortic rupture. First, this case report underlines the importance of immediate consultation with a physician as soon as symptoms are experienced so as not to delay diagnosis and treatment, and thus avoid a fatal outcome. Second, diagnostic imaging should be performed in the early stage, without interference by clinical judgment. Third, when computed tomography reveals esophageal hiatus hernia with stomach incarceration, posterior mediastinal hematoma, and pneumatosis caused by esophageal, a foreign body should be suspected. Finally, medical professionals are responsible for making people aware of the danger of foreign body ingestion, especially among children, those who abuse alcohol, and those who wear dentures, particularly among the elderly, whose discriminability of foreign bodies is decreased, to avoid dire consequences. PMID:25339840

  15. GADD45A expression is correlated with patient prognosis in esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    ISHIGURO, HIDEYUKI; KIMURA, MASAHIRO; TAKAHASHI, HIROKI; TANAKA, TATSUYA; MIZOGUCHI, KOJI; TAKEYAMA, HIROMITSU

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with esophageal cancer remains poor, and the tumor-node-metastasis classification system is not sufficient for predicting patient prognoses. Therefore, the identification of novel predictive markers for esophageal cancer is required. The present study investigated the clinicopathological significance of growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible 45α (GADD45A) and p53 in resectable esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The study consisted of 62 patients with esophageal cancer who underwent surgery between 2001 and 2007. The expression of the GADD45A gene product (GADD45A) and the p53 protein was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The correlations among GADD45A expression, clinicopathological factors and prognosis were then analyzed in the patients with ESCC. GADD45A and p53 were expressed in 56.5% (35/62) and 48.4% (30/62) of patients, respectively. The expression of GADD45A did not show a marked correlation with that of p53. However, GADD45A expression correlated with pathological stage (stage 0-I vs. stages II–IV; P=0.014) and did not correlate with the tumor (T) or node (N) status. Furthermore, patients who were positive for GADD45A exhibited a significantly higher survival rate than those who were negative for GADD45A (log-rank test, P=0.009). Multivariate analysis indicated that T status, N status and GADD45A expression were significant variables predicting survival (hazard ratio, 2.486; 95% confidence interval, 1.168–5.290; P=0.018). Overall, GADD45A expression significantly affected the survival of patients with ESCC, and the reduced expression of GADD45A was correlated with a poor prognosis following curative surgery in these patients. PMID:26870203

  16. Hereditary Factors in Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    van Nistelrooij, Anna M.J.; Dinjens, Winand N.M.; Wagner, Anja; Spaander, Manon C.W.; van Lanschot, J. Jan B.; Wijnhoven, Bas P.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The vast majority of Barrett's esophagus (BE) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) cases are sporadic and caused by somatic mutations. However, over the last decades several families have been identified with clustering of EAC. Here, we review data from the published literature in order to address the current knowledge on familial EAC. Summary Although familial EAC comprises a relatively small group of patients, it is a clinically relevant category due to the poor prognosis of this type of cancer. Efforts should be made to identify specific genetic risk factors for familial EAC to enable identification of relatives at risk, since endoscopic surveillance can diagnose preneoplastic or early neoplastic lesions leading to early treatment, with improved outcome. Key Message Although familial EAC comprises a relatively small group of patients, this is a clinically relevant category due to the poor prognosis. Efforts should be made to identify specific genetic risk factors for familial EAC in order to facilitate the identification of other family members with a predisposition for this type of cancer. Practical Implications Approximately 7% of BE and EAC cases are considered familial. Age at diagnosis is generally lower for patients with familial EAC as compared to sporadic cases, while other known risk factors for EAC, such as male gender and Caucasian ethnicity, do not differ between the two groups. In several described families with clustering of EAC the pattern of inheritance seems to be consistent with a rare autosomal dominant genetic trait. However, some association has been found with (attenuated) familial adenomatous polyposis, mismatch repair deficiency and recently with the genes MSR1, ASCC1 and CTHRC1. Nevertheless, no specific genetic predisposition has yet been identified.

  17. IgG4-Related Esophageal Disease Presenting as Esophagitis Dissecans Superficialis With Chronic Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Dumas-Campagna, Myriam; Bouchard, Simon; Soucy, Genevieve; Bouin, Mickael

    2014-01-01

    IgG4-related disease is a recently recognized autoimmune systemic disorder that has been described in various organs. The disease is characterized histologically by a dense lymphoplasmocytic infiltrate of IgG4-positive cells, storiform fibrosis and can be associated with tumefactive lesions. IgG4-related disease involving the upper gastrointestinal tract is rare and only two previous case reports have reported IgG4-related esophageal disease. We report the case of a 63-year-old female patient with a long-standing history of severe dysphagia and odynophagia with an initial diagnosis of reflux esophagitis. Symptoms persisted despite anti-acid therapy and control esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed endoscopic images consistent with esophagitis dissecans superficialis (sloughing esophagitis). An underlying autoimmune process was suspected and immunosuppressant agents were tried to control her disease. The patient eventually developed disabling dysphagia secondary to multiple chronic esophageal strictures. A diagnosis of IgG4-related disease was eventually made after reviewing esophageal biopsies and performing an immunohistochemical study with an anti-IgG4 antibody. Treatment attempts with corticosteroids and rituximab was not associated with a significant improvement of the symptoms of dysphagia and odynophagia, possibly because of the chronic nature of the disease associated with a high fibrotic component. Our case report describes this unique case of IgG4-related esophageal disease presenting as chronic esophagitis dissecans with strictures. We also briefly review the main histopathological features and treatment options in IgG4-related disease. PMID:24883156

  18. Influence of Ionizing Radiation on Stromal-Epithelial Communication in Esophageal Carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Janice; Patel, Zarana; Grugan, Katharine; Rustgi, Anil; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    Esophageal cancer is the 6th leading cause of cancer death worldwide and is associated with a variety of risk factors including tobacco use, heavy alcohol consumption, human papilloma virus infection, and certain dietary factors such as trace mineral and vitamin deficiencies. A connection with ionizing radiation exposure is revealed by the high excess relative risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma observed in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. Esophageal carcinomas are also seen as secondary malignancies in patients who received radiotherapy for breast and thoracic cancers; additionally, patients with head/neck and oral squamous cell cancers are at increased risk for metachronous esophageal squamous cell cancers. This malignancy is rapidly fatal, mainly because it remains asymptomatic until late, advanced stages when the disease is rarely responsive to treatment. In normal epithelium, the stromal microenvironment is essential for the maintenance and modulation of cell growth and differentiation. Cross talk between the epithelial and stromal compartments can influence many aspects of malignant progression, including tumor cell proliferation, migration, invasion and recruitment of new blood vessels. To test the hypothesis that radiation exposure plays a role in esophageal carcinogenesis via non-targeted mechanisms involving stromal-epithelial cell communication, we are studying radiation effects on hTERT-immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells and genetic variants grown in co-culture with human esophageal stromal fibrob-lasts (Okawa et al., Genes Dev. 2007. 21: 2788-2803). We examined how irradiation of stromal fibroblasts affected epithelial migration and invasion, behaviors associated with cancer promotion and progression. These assays were conducted in modified Boyden chambers using conditioned media from irradiated fibroblasts. Our results using low LET gamma radiation showed a dose-dependent increase in migration of epithelial cells when exposed to conditioned media from irradiated vs. non-irradiated fibroblasts. We also observed enhanced invasion through a basement membrane matrix in similarly treated cells. Candidate factors that me-diate these effects were identified using antibody capture arrays, and their increased secretion in irradiated fibroblasts was confirmed using ELISAs. We are currently analyzing the effect of these individual factors on epithelial migration and invasion, as well as their influence on cell survival and DNA repair. Our current studies using high-LET radiation will elucidate radiation quality effects on these processes. These results should further our understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation impacts the tissue microenvironment and how it influences cancer development processes.

  19. Urinary metabolomic signature of esophageal cancer and Barretts esophagus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) often presents at a late, incurable stage, and mortality has increased substantially, due to an increase in incidence of EAC arising out of Barretts esophagus. When diagnosed early, however, the combination of surgery and adjuvant therapies is associated with high cure rates. Metabolomics provides a means for non- invasive screening of early tumor-associated perturbations in cellular metabolism. Methods Urine samples from patients with esophageal carcinoma (n = 44), Barretts esophagus (n = 31), and healthy controls (n = 75) were examined using 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Targeted profiling of spectra using Chenomx software permitted quantification of 66 distinct metabolites. Unsupervised (principal component analysis) and supervised (orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis OPLS-DA) multivariate pattern recognition techniques were applied to discriminate between samples using SIMCA-P+ software. Model specificity was also confirmed through comparison with a pancreatic cancer cohort (n = 32). Results Clear distinctions between esophageal cancer, Barretts esophagus and healthy controls were noted when OPLS-DA was applied. Model validity was confirmed using two established methods of internal validation, cross-validation and response permutation. Sensitivity and specificity of the multivariate OPLS-DA models were summarized using a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and revealed excellent predictive power (area under the curve = 0.9810 and 0.9627 for esophageal cancer and Barretts esophagus, respectively). The metabolite expression profiles of esophageal cancer and pancreatic cancer were also clearly distinguishable with an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUROC) = 0.8954. Conclusions Urinary metabolomics identified discrete metabolic signatures that clearly distinguished both Barretts esophagus and esophageal cancer from controls. The metabolite expression profile of esophageal cancer was also discrete from its precursor lesion, Barretts esophagus. The cancer-specific nature of this profile was confirmed through comparison with pancreatic cancer. These preliminary results suggest that urinary metabolomics may have a future potential role in non-invasive screening in these conditions. PMID:23241138

  20. Family history of esophageal cancer increases the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tiantian; Cheng, Hongwei; Chen, Xingdong; Yuan, Ziyu; Yang, Xiaorong; Zhuang, Maoqiang; Lu, Ming; Jin, Li; Ye, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    A population-based case-control was performed to explore familial aggregation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Family history of cancer was assessed by a structured questionnaire, and from which 2 cohorts of relatives of cases and controls were reconstructed. Unconditional logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression were applied for case-control design and reconstructed cohort design, respectively. We observed a close to doubled risk of ESCC associated with a positive family history of esophageal cancer among first degree relatives (odds ratio [OR]?=?1.85, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.42-2.41), after adjusting age, sex, family size and other confounders. The excess risks of ESCC increased with the increasing of first-degree relatives affected by esophageal cancer (p?esophageal cancer had an 8-fold excess risk of ESCC (95%?CI: 1.74-36.32). The reconstructed cohort analysis showed that the cumulative risk of esophageal cancer to age 75 was 12.2% in the first-degree relatives of cases and 7.0% in those of controls (hazard ratio?=?1.91, 95%?CI: 1.54-2.37). Our results suggest family history of esophageal cancer significantly increases the risk for ESCC. Future studies are needed to understand how the shared genetic susceptibility and/or environmental exposures contribute to the observed excess risk. PMID:26526791

  1. Family history of esophageal cancer increases the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tiantian; Cheng, Hongwei; Chen, Xingdong; Yuan, Ziyu; Yang, Xiaorong; Zhuang, Maoqiang; Lu, Ming; Jin, Li; Ye, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    A population-based case-control was performed to explore familial aggregation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Family history of cancer was assessed by a structured questionnaire, and from which 2 cohorts of relatives of cases and controls were reconstructed. Unconditional logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression were applied for case-control design and reconstructed cohort design, respectively. We observed a close to doubled risk of ESCC associated with a positive family history of esophageal cancer among first degree relatives (odds ratio [OR]?=?1.85, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.422.41), after adjusting age, sex, family size and other confounders. The excess risks of ESCC increased with the increasing of first-degree relatives affected by esophageal cancer (p?esophageal cancer had an 8-fold excess risk of ESCC (95%?CI: 1.7436.32). The reconstructed cohort analysis showed that the cumulative risk of esophageal cancer to age 75 was 12.2% in the first-degree relatives of cases and 7.0% in those of controls (hazard ratio?=?1.91, 95%?CI: 1.542.37). Our results suggest family history of esophageal cancer significantly increases the risk for ESCC. Future studies are needed to understand how the shared genetic susceptibility and/or environmental exposures contribute to the observed excess risk. PMID:26526791

  2. Barretts and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    An international consortium with epidemiologic studies of Barrett's Esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Analyses so far have included alcohol consumption, anthropometry, cigarette smoking, excess risk models, gastroesophageal reflux disease, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, reproductive factors, and genome-wide studies to identify susceptibility loci associated with Barretts esophagus and/or adenocarcinomas of the esophagus.

  3. A safe treatment option for esophageal bezoars

    PubMed Central

    Yaqub, Sheraz; Shafique, Muhammad; Kjæstad, Erik; Thorsen, Yngve; Lie, Erik S.; Dahl, Vegard; Bakka, Njål; Røkke, Ola

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Bezoar in the esophagus is a rare condition and associated with structural or functional abnormalities of the esophagus. Endoscopy is the main tool for diagnosis and treatment for bezoar in the esophagus. PRESENTATION OF CASE Here we present a case where an endoscopic evacuation of an esophageal bezoar was unsuccessful. We treated the bezoar through a nasogastric tube using a cocktail composed of pancreatic enzymes dissolved in Coca-Cola. DISCUSSION Endoscopy is regarded as the mainstay for the diagnosis and treatment of esophageal bezoars. However, when this approach fails, other treatment options include dissolution therapy, and surgical exploration and removal of the bezoar. Surgical removal of an esophageal bezoar is associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality. We advocate that dissolving therapy should be the first choice of treatment when endoscopic evacuation is not possible. CONCLUSION This is the first report describing a successful treatment of an esophageal bezoar with a cocktail of Coca-Cola and pancreatic enzymes. It is an effective, inexpensive, and worldwide available treatment and should be considered when endoscopic evacuation fails. PMID:22609703

  4. Current Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis 2015.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joel E

    2016-02-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory condition characterized by esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilic infiltrate (?15/hpf) in the esophageal epithelium and the absence of other potential causes of eosinophilia. The prevalence is increasing and is the most common cause of solid food dysphagia in children and young adults. This article will review the diagnosis and management of EoE based on consensus conferences, systematic reviews, and meta-analysis and highlights seminal studies in our evolving treatment of this disease. However, all answers are not available and I will remark about the lessons learned in my clinical practice seeing EoE patients over the last 25 years. The complicated etiology of the complaint of dysphagia in EoE patients will be reviewed. The importance of utilizing endoscopy, biopsies, and barium esophagram to help define the 2 phenotypes (inflammatory, fibrostenosis) of EoE will be highlighted. The controversy about PPI-responsive esophageal eosinophilia will be discussed and contrasted with idiopathic EoE. Finally, the 3 treatment options for EoE (drugs, diet, dilation) will be reviewed in detail and a useful clinical management algorithm presented. PMID:26485101

  5. Acute esophageal necrosis caused by alcohol abuse

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Tetsu; Sakamoto, Juichi; Sato, Ken; Takimoto, Miyako; Shimaya, Koji; Mikami, Tatsuya; Munakata, Akihiro; Shimoyama, Tadashi; Fukuda, Shinsaku

    2005-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN) is extremely rare and the pathogenesis of this is still unknown. We report a case of AEN caused by alcohol abuse. In our case, the main pathogenesis could be accounted for low systemic perfusion caused by severe alcoholic lactic acidosis. After the healing of AEN, balloon dilatation was effective to manage the stricture. PMID:16222758

  6. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enable the user to listen to heart and breath sounds. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls)....

  7. Esophageal testing: What we have so far

    PubMed Central

    de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Bertani, Lorenzo; Russo, Salvatore; Franchi, Riccardo; Furnari, Manuele; Tolone, Salvatore; Bodini, Giorgia; Bolognesi, Valeria; Bellini, Massimo; Savarino, Vincenzo; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Edoardo Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. In the last few decades, new technologies have evolved and have been applied to the functional study of the esophagus, allowing for the improvement of our knowledge of the pathophysiology of GERD. High-resolution manometry (HRM) permits greater understanding of the function of the esophagogastric junction and the risks associated with hiatal hernia. Moreover, HRM has been found to be more reproducible and sensitive than conventional water-perfused manometry to detect the presence of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Esophageal 24-h pH-metry with or without combined impedance is usually performed in patients with negative endoscopy and reflux symptoms who have a poor response to anti-reflux medical therapy to assess esophageal acid exposure and symptom-reflux correlations. In particular, esophageal 24-h impedance and pH monitoring can detect acid and non-acid reflux events. EndoFLIP is a recent technique poorly applied in clinical practice, although it provides a large amount of information about the esophagogastric junction. In the coming years, laryngopharyngeal symptoms could be evaluated with up and coming non-invasive or minimally invasive techniques, such as pepsin detection in saliva or pharyngeal pH-metry. Future studies are required of these techniques to evaluate their diagnostic accuracy and usefulness, although the available data are promising. PMID:26909230

  8. Esophageal testing: What we have so far.

    PubMed

    de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Bertani, Lorenzo; Russo, Salvatore; Franchi, Riccardo; Furnari, Manuele; Tolone, Salvatore; Bodini, Giorgia; Bolognesi, Valeria; Bellini, Massimo; Savarino, Vincenzo; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Edoardo Vincenzo

    2016-02-15

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. In the last few decades, new technologies have evolved and have been applied to the functional study of the esophagus, allowing for the improvement of our knowledge of the pathophysiology of GERD. High-resolution manometry (HRM) permits greater understanding of the function of the esophagogastric junction and the risks associated with hiatal hernia. Moreover, HRM has been found to be more reproducible and sensitive than conventional water-perfused manometry to detect the presence of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Esophageal 24-h pH-metry with or without combined impedance is usually performed in patients with negative endoscopy and reflux symptoms who have a poor response to anti-reflux medical therapy to assess esophageal acid exposure and symptom-reflux correlations. In particular, esophageal 24-h impedance and pH monitoring can detect acid and non-acid reflux events. EndoFLIP is a recent technique poorly applied in clinical practice, although it provides a large amount of information about the esophagogastric junction. In the coming years, laryngopharyngeal symptoms could be evaluated with up and coming non-invasive or minimally invasive techniques, such as pepsin detection in saliva or pharyngeal pH-metry. Future studies are required of these techniques to evaluate their diagnostic accuracy and usefulness, although the available data are promising. PMID:26909230

  9. [Esophageal foreign body revealed by respiratory distress].

    PubMed

    Chouaib, N; Rafai, M; Belyamani, L; Dimou, M; El Koraichi, A; El Haddoury, M; Ech-Cherif El Kettani, S

    2014-08-01

    Ingestion of a foreign body is usually accidental in children. Respiratory symptoms, often favored by the persistence of the foreign body in the esophagus, can be revealing, but rarely respiratory distress as a method telling. We report a case of unrecognized esophageal foreign body revealed by respiratory distress. PMID:24051189

  10. 21 CFR 868.5650 - Esophageal obturator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Esophageal obturator. 868.5650 Section 868.5650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... patient during emergency resuscitation by occluding (blocking) the esophagus, thereby permitting...

  11. Histomorphological and Immunophenotypic Features of Pill-Induced Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Hwan; Kim, Won; Lee, Kook Lae; Byeon, Sun-ju; Choi, Euno; Chang, Mee Soo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate histomorphological and immunophenotypic features in pill-induced esophagitis. We comparatively evaluated the histomorphological, immunophenotypic features of pill-induced esophagitis vs. reflux esophagitis, as well as clinical information and endoscopic findings. Fifty-two tissue pieces from 22 cases of pill-induced esophagitis, 46 pieces from 20 reflux esophagitis, and 16 pieces from 14 control samples were subjected to immunohistochemistry for inflammatory infiltrates (CD3 for T lymphocyte, CD20 for B lymphocyte, CD56 for NK cell, CD68 for macrophage, CD117 for mast cell) and eosinophil chemotaxis-associated proteins (Erk, leptin, leptin receptor, pSTAT3, phospho-mTOR). As a result, Histomorphology showed that a diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis, while reactive atypia and subepithelial papillary elongation were more often found in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). Interestingly, intraepithelial eosinophilic microabscess, intraepithelial pustule and diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces were observed in 14% (3 cases), 9% (2 cases) and 32% (7 cases) of pill-induced esophagitis, respectively, but in no cases of reflux esophagitis. Regarding intraepithelial inflammatory infiltrates in pill-induced esophagitis, T lymphocytes were the most common cells, followed by eosinophil; 11 and 7 in one x400 power field, respectively. Intraepithelial pSTAT3-positive pattern was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis than in reflux esophagitis, at 45% (10 cases) versus 10% (2 cases), respectively (P < 0.05). Considering the distal esophageal lesion only, intraepithelial pustule, diffuse dilated intercellular spaces and stromal macrophages were more frequently found in distal pill-induced esophagitis, whereas reactive atypia and intraepithelial mast cells in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). In conclusion, diffuse dilated intercellular spaces, intraepithelial eosinophil microabscess, pustule, T lymphocytes, eosinophils, and pSTAT3 positivity can be added to histopathological features of pill-induced esophagitis, other than non-specific ulcer. Besides, distal pill-induced esophagitis may be histopathologically differentiated from reflux esophagitis. PMID:26047496

  12. Systemic, postsymptomatic antisense oligonucleotide rescues motor unit maturation delay in a new mouse model for type II/III spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanik, Laurent P.; Osborne, Melissa A.; Davis, Crystal; Martin, Whitney P.; Austin, Andrew; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C. Frank; Lutz, Cathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical presentation of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) ranges from a neonatal-onset, very severe disease to an adult-onset, milder form. SMA is caused by the mutation of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, and prognosis inversely correlates with the number of copies of the SMN2 gene, a human-specific homolog of SMN1. Despite progress in identifying potential therapies for the treatment of SMA, many questions remain including how late after onset treatments can still be effective and what the target tissues should be. These questions can be addressed in part with preclinical animal models; however, modeling the array of SMA severities in the mouse, which lacks SMN2, has proven challenging. We created a new mouse model for the intermediate forms of SMA presenting with a delay in neuromuscular junction maturation and a decrease in the number of functional motor units, all relevant to the clinical presentation of the disease. Using this new model, in combination with clinical electrophysiology methods, we found that administering systemically SMN-restoring antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) at the age of onset can extend survival and rescue the neurological phenotypes. Furthermore, these effects were also achieved by administration of the ASOs late after onset, independent of the restoration of SMN in the spinal cord. Thus, by adding to the limited repertoire of existing mouse models for type II/III SMA, we demonstrate that ASO therapy can be effective even when administered after onset of the neurological symptoms, in young adult mice, and without being delivered into the central nervous system. PMID:26460027

  13. Systemic, postsymptomatic antisense oligonucleotide rescues motor unit maturation delay in a new mouse model for type II/III spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Bogdanik, Laurent P; Osborne, Melissa A; Davis, Crystal; Martin, Whitney P; Austin, Andrew; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C Frank; Lutz, Cathleen M

    2015-10-27

    Clinical presentation of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) ranges from a neonatal-onset, very severe disease to an adult-onset, milder form. SMA is caused by the mutation of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, and prognosis inversely correlates with the number of copies of the SMN2 gene, a human-specific homolog of SMN1. Despite progress in identifying potential therapies for the treatment of SMA, many questions remain including how late after onset treatments can still be effective and what the target tissues should be. These questions can be addressed in part with preclinical animal models; however, modeling the array of SMA severities in the mouse, which lacks SMN2, has proven challenging. We created a new mouse model for the intermediate forms of SMA presenting with a delay in neuromuscular junction maturation and a decrease in the number of functional motor units, all relevant to the clinical presentation of the disease. Using this new model, in combination with clinical electrophysiology methods, we found that administering systemically SMN-restoring antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) at the age of onset can extend survival and rescue the neurological phenotypes. Furthermore, these effects were also achieved by administration of the ASOs late after onset, independent of the restoration of SMN in the spinal cord. Thus, by adding to the limited repertoire of existing mouse models for type II/III SMA, we demonstrate that ASO therapy can be effective even when administered after onset of the neurological symptoms, in young adult mice, and without being delivered into the central nervous system. PMID:26460027

  14. Differential expression of miR200a-3p and miR21 in grade IIIII and grade IV gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Berthois, Yolande; Delfino, Christine; Metellus, Philippe; Fina, Frederic; Nanni-Metellus, Isabelle; Al Aswy, Hayat; Pirisi, Victor; Ouafik, LHoucine; Boudouresque, Franoise

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor and is among the deadliest of human cancers. Dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) expression is an important step in tumor progression as miRNAs can act as tumor suppressors or oncogenes and may affect cell sensitivity to chemotherapy. Whereas the oncogenic miR21 has been shown to be overexpressed in gliomas, the expression and function of the tumor-supressor miR200a in GBMs remains unknown. In this study, we show that miR21 is upregulated in grade IV (GBMs) vs. grade IIIII (LGs) gliomas, confirming that miR21 expression level is correlated with tumor grade, and that it may be considered as a marker of tumor progression. Conversely, miR200a is demonstrated for the first time to be downregulated in GBMs compared with LGs, and overexpression of miR200a in GBM cells is shown to promote TMZ-sensitivity. Interestingly, miR200a but not miR21 expression level is significantly higher in TMZ-responsive vs. -unresponsive tumoral glial cells in primary culture. Furthermore, miR200a appears negatively correlated with the expression of the DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT), and the inhibition of MGMT activity results in an increase of miR200a expression in GBM cells. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that miR200a is likely to act as a crucial antitumoral factor regarding glioma progression. Interplay between miR200a and MGMT should be considered as potential mechanism involved in therapeutic response. PMID:24755707

  15. Fougerite and Fe II-III hydroxycarbonate green rust; ordering, deprotonation and/or cation substitution; structure of hydrotalcite-like compounds and mythic ferrosic hydroxide Fe(

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnin, Jean-Marie R.; Assa, Rabha; Ghin, Antoine; Abdelmoula, Mustapha; Benali, Omar; Ernstsen, Vibeke; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Upadhyay, Chandan; Ruby, Christian

    2005-05-01

    A green rust has been recognised as a new mineral (IMA 2003-057) and given the name fougerite. Its chemical counterpart is Fe II-III hydroxycarbonate GR1(CO32-) compound, which is partially deprotonated since formed by reduction of ferric oxyhydroxides through the activity of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB) in anaerobic gley soils. Preparation of GR1(CO32-) by co-precipitation of Fe II and Fe III cations in carbonated medium shows by using Mssbauer spectroscopy that the domain of existence of GR1(CO32-) lies within [0.25,0.33] for x={[Fe]/[Fe]} with ordered upper limit [?[. GR1(CO32-) gets oxidised into ferrihydrite evolving to goethite by aerial oxidation, or into ferric green rust GR1(, [?[ by OH - deprotonation. A mass balance of iron ox(yhydrox)ides is drawn accordingly in the carbonated medium. Mssbauer spectra measured at 12 K show quite different magnetic properties and the three quadrupole doublets, comprising 2 ferrous and 1 ferric in GR1(CO32-), become 3 magnetically split ferric sextets in GR1(. Structures of ordered GR1(CO32-), GR1( and GR1(Cl -) hydroxychloride are drawn. Extension to other hydrotalcite-like compounds is proposed whereas occurrences of fougerite mixed with clay minerals are presented. Fougerite is FeII6(1-x)FeIII6x((CO, the partially deprotonated green rust where 1/3?x<2/3. Substitution of Fe cations by Mg II or Al III may occur but the proposal advocating a ferrosic hydroxide Fe( is discarded.

  16. The trifunctional antibody catumaxomab for the treatment of malignant ascites due to epithelial cancer: Results of a prospective randomized phase II/III trial

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, Markus M; Murawa, Pawel; Koralewski, Piotr; Kutarska, Elzbieta; Kolesnik, Olena O; Ivanchenko, Vladimir V; Dudnichenko, Alexander S; Aleknaviciene, Birute; Razbadauskas, Arturas; Gore, Martin; Ganea-Motan, Elena; Ciuleanu, Tudor; Wimberger, Pauline; Schmittel, Alexander; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Burges, Alexander; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Lindhofer, Horst; Lahr, Angelika; Parsons, Simon L

    2010-01-01

    Malignant ascites is a common manifestation of advanced cancers, and treatment options are limited. The trifunctional antibody catumaxomab (anti-epithelial cell-adhesion molecule x anti-CD3) represents a targeted immunotherapy for the intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment of malignant ascites secondary to epithelial cancers. In this phase II/III trial (EudraCT 2004-000723-15; NCT00836654), cancer patients (n = 258) with recurrent symptomatic malignant ascites resistant to conventional chemotherapy were randomized to paracentesis plus catumaxomab (catumaxomab) or paracentesis alone (control) and stratified by cancer type (129 ovarian and 129 nonovarian). Catumaxomab was administered as an i.p. infusion on Days 0, 3, 7 and 10 at doses of 10, 20, 50 and 150 ?g, respectively. The primary efficacy endpoint was puncture-free survival. Secondary efficacy parameters included time to next paracentesis, ascites signs and symptoms and overall survival (OS). Puncture-free survival was significantly longer in the catumaxomab group (median 46 days) than the control group (median 11 days) (hazard ratio = 0.254: p < 0.0001) as was median time to next paracentesis (77 versus 13 days; p < 0.0001). In addition, catumaxomab patients had fewer signs and symptoms of ascites than control patients. OS showed a positive trend for the catumaxomab group and, in a prospectively planned analysis, was significantly prolonged in patients with gastric cancer (n = 66; 71 versus 44 days; p = 0.0313). Although adverse events associated with catumaxomab were frequent, they were manageable, generally reversible and mainly related to its immunologic mode of action. Catumaxomab showed a clear clinical benefit in patients with malignant ascites secondary to epithelial cancers, especially gastric cancer, with an acceptable safety profile. PMID:20473913

  17. Deterioration in quality of life (QoL) in patients with malignant ascites: results from a phase II/III study comparing paracentesis plus catumaxomab with paracentesis alone

    PubMed Central

    Wimberger, P.; Gilet, H.; Gonschior, A-K.; Heiss, M. M.; Moehler, M.; Oskay-Oezcelik, G.; Al-Batran, S-E.; Schmalfeldt, B.; Schmittel, A.; Schulze, E.; Parsons, S. L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Malignant ascites (MA) is associated with poor prognosis and limited palliative therapeutic options. Therefore, quality of life (QoL) assessment is of particular importance to demonstrate new treatment value. Following the demonstration of the superiority of catumaxomab and paracentesis over paracentesis on puncture-free survival, this analysis aimed at comparing deterioration in QoL between both the treatment options. Patients and methods In a randomised, multicentre, phase II/III study of patients with MA due to epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) positive cancer, the QoL was evaluated using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 items (EORTC QLQ-C30) questionnaire at screening, 1, 3 and 7 months after treatment and in the case of re-puncture on the day of paracentesis. Time to first deterioration in QoL was defined as a decrease in the QoL score of at least five points and compared between the catumaxomab (n=160) and control (n=85) groups using the log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for baseline score, country and primary tumour type. Results Deterioration in QoL scores appeared more rapidly in the control than in the catumaxomab group (median 1926 days versus 4749 days). The difference in time to deterioration in QoL between the groups was statistically significant for all scores (P<0.01). The hazard ratios ranged from 0.08 to 0.24 (P<0.01). Conclusions Treatment with catumaxomab delayed deterioration in QoL in patients with MA. Compared with paracentesis alone, catumaxomab enabled patients to benefit from better QoL for a prolonged survival period. PMID:22734013

  18. The trifunctional antibody catumaxomab for the treatment of malignant ascites due to epithelial cancer: Results of a prospective randomized phase II/III trial.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Markus M; Murawa, Pawel; Koralewski, Piotr; Kutarska, Elzbieta; Kolesnik, Olena O; Ivanchenko, Vladimir V; Dudnichenko, Alexander S; Aleknaviciene, Birute; Razbadauskas, Arturas; Gore, Martin; Ganea-Motan, Elena; Ciuleanu, Tudor; Wimberger, Pauline; Schmittel, Alexander; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Burges, Alexander; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Lindhofer, Horst; Lahr, Angelika; Parsons, Simon L

    2010-11-01

    Malignant ascites is a common manifestation of advanced cancers, and treatment options are limited. The trifunctional antibody catumaxomab (anti-epithelial cell-adhesion molecule x anti-CD3) represents a targeted immunotherapy for the intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment of malignant ascites secondary to epithelial cancers. In this phase II/III trial (EudraCT 2004-000723-15; NCT00836654), cancer patients (n = 258) with recurrent symptomatic malignant ascites resistant to conventional chemotherapy were randomized to paracentesis plus catumaxomab (catumaxomab) or paracentesis alone (control) and stratified by cancer type (129 ovarian and 129 nonovarian). Catumaxomab was administered as an i.p. infusion on Days 0, 3, 7 and 10 at doses of 10, 20, 50 and 150 mug, respectively. The primary efficacy endpoint was puncture-free survival. Secondary efficacy parameters included time to next paracentesis, ascites signs and symptoms and overall survival (OS). Puncture-free survival was significantly longer in the catumaxomab group (median 46 days) than the control group (median 11 days) (hazard ratio = 0.254: p < 0.0001) as was median time to next paracentesis (77 versus 13 days; p < 0.0001). In addition, catumaxomab patients had fewer signs and symptoms of ascites than control patients. OS showed a positive trend for the catumaxomab group and, in a prospectively planned analysis, was significantly prolonged in patients with gastric cancer (n = 66; 71 versus 44 days; p = 0.0313). Although adverse events associated with catumaxomab were frequent, they were manageable, generally reversible and mainly related to its immunologic mode of action. Catumaxomab showed a clear clinical benefit in patients with malignant ascites secondary to epithelial cancers, especially gastric cancer, with an acceptable safety profile. PMID:20473913

  19. Japanese POEMS syndrome with Thalidomide (J-POST) Trial: study protocol for a phase II/III multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Kanako; Misawa, Sonoko; Sato, Yasunori; Sobue, Gen; Yabe, Ichiro; Watanabe, Osamu; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Kusunoki, Susumu; Kikuchi, Seiji; Nakashima, Ichiro; Ikeda, Shu-ichi; Kohara, Nobuo; Kanda, Takashi; Kira, Jun-ichi; Hanaoka, Hideki; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein and skin changes (POEMS) syndrome is a fatal systemic disorder associated with plasma cell dyscrasia and the overproduction of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Recently, the prognosis of POEMS was substantially improved by introduction of therapeutic intervention for myeloma. However, no randomised clinical trial has been performed because of the rarity and severity of the disease. Methods and analysis The Japanese POEMS syndrome with Thalidomide (J-POST) Trial is a phase II/III multicentre, double-blinded, randomised, controlled trial that aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a 24-week treatment with thalidomide in POEMS syndrome, with an additional 48-week open-label safety study. Adults with POEMS syndrome who have no indication for transplantation are assessed for eligibility at 12 tertiary neurology centres in Japan. Patients who satisfy the eligibility criteria are randomised (1:1) to receive thalidomide (100–300 mg daily) plus dexamethasone (12 mg/m2 on days 1–4 of a 28-day cycle) or placebo plus dexamethasone. Both treatments were administered for 24 weeks (six cycles; randomised comparative study period). Patients who complete the randomised study period or show subacute deterioration during the randomised period participate in the subsequent 48-week open-label safety study (long-term safety period). The primary end point of the study is the reduction rate of serum VEGF levels at 24 weeks. Ethics and dissemination The protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board of each hospital. The trial was notified and registered at the Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency, Japan (No. 22-1716). The J-POST Trial is currently ongoing and is due to finish in August 2015. The findings of this trial will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations and will also be disseminated to participants. Trial registration number UMIN000004179 and JMA-IIA00046. PMID:25573527

  20. Contributions of Kv7-mediated potassium current to sub- and suprathreshold responses of rat layer II/III neocortical pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Guan, D.; Higgs, M. H.; Horton, L. R.; Spain, W. J.

    2011-01-01

    After block of Kv1- and Kv2-mediated K+ currents in acutely dissociated neocortical pyramidal neurons from layers II/III of rat somatosensory and motor cortex, the remaining current is slowly activating and persistent. We used whole cell voltage clamp to show that the Kv7 blockers linopirdine and XE-991 blocked a current with similar kinetics to the current remaining after combined block of Kv1 and Kv2 channels. This current was sensitive to low doses of linopirdine and activated more slowly and at more negative potentials than Kv1- or Kv2-mediated current. The Kv7-mediated current decreased in amplitude with time in whole cell recordings, but in most cells the current was stable for several minutes. Current in response to a traditional M-current protocol was blocked by muscarine, linopirdine, and XE-991. Whole cell slice recordings revealed that the Q10 for channel deactivation was ?2.5. Sharp electrode current-clamp recordings from adult pyramidal cells demonstrated that block of Kv7-mediated current with XE-991 reduced rheobase, shortened the latency to firing to near rheobase current, induced more regular firing at low current intensity, and increased the rate of firing to a given current injection. XE-991 did not affect single action potentials or spike frequency adaptation. Application of XE-991 also eliminated subthreshold voltage oscillations and increased gain for low-frequency inputs (<10 Hz) without affecting gain for higher frequency inputs. These data suggest important roles for Kv7 channels in subthreshold regulation of excitability, generation of theta-frequency subthreshold oscillations, regulation of interspike intervals, and biasing selectivity toward higher frequency inputs. PMID:21697446

  1. Contributions of Kv7-mediated potassium current to sub- and suprathreshold responses of rat layer II/III neocortical pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Guan, D; Higgs, M H; Horton, L R; Spain, W J; Foehring, R C

    2011-10-01

    After block of Kv1- and Kv2-mediated K(+) currents in acutely dissociated neocortical pyramidal neurons from layers II/III of rat somatosensory and motor cortex, the remaining current is slowly activating and persistent. We used whole cell voltage clamp to show that the Kv7 blockers linopirdine and XE-991 blocked a current with similar kinetics to the current remaining after combined block of Kv1 and Kv2 channels. This current was sensitive to low doses of linopirdine and activated more slowly and at more negative potentials than Kv1- or Kv2-mediated current. The Kv7-mediated current decreased in amplitude with time in whole cell recordings, but in most cells the current was stable for several minutes. Current in response to a traditional M-current protocol was blocked by muscarine, linopirdine, and XE-991. Whole cell slice recordings revealed that the Q₁₀ for channel deactivation was ∼2.5. Sharp electrode current-clamp recordings from adult pyramidal cells demonstrated that block of Kv7-mediated current with XE-991 reduced rheobase, shortened the latency to firing to near rheobase current, induced more regular firing at low current intensity, and increased the rate of firing to a given current injection. XE-991 did not affect single action potentials or spike frequency adaptation. Application of XE-991 also eliminated subthreshold voltage oscillations and increased gain for low-frequency inputs (<10 Hz) without affecting gain for higher frequency inputs. These data suggest important roles for Kv7 channels in subthreshold regulation of excitability, generation of theta-frequency subthreshold oscillations, regulation of interspike intervals, and biasing selectivity toward higher frequency inputs. PMID:21697446

  2. Slow magnetic relaxation and electron delocalization in an S = 9/2 iron(II/III) complex with two crystallographically inequivalent iron sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Susanta; Sasmal, Sujit; Fleck, Michel; Grandjean, Fernande; Sougrati, Moulay T.; Ghosh, Meenakshi; Harris, T. David; Bonville, Pierre; Long, Gary J.; Mohanta, Sasankasekhar

    2011-05-01

    The magnetic, electronic, and Mssbauer spectral properties of [Fe2L(?-OAc)2]ClO4, 1, where L is the dianion of the tetraimino-diphenolate macrocyclic ligand, H2L, indicate that 1 is a class III mixed valence iron(II/III) complex with an electron that is fully delocalized between two crystallographically inequivalent iron sites to yield a [Fe2]V cationic configuration with a St = 9/2 ground state. Fits of the dc magnetic susceptibility between 2 and 300 K and of the isofield variable-temperature magnetization of 1 yield an isotropic magnetic exchange parameter, J, of -32(2) cm-1 for an electron transfer parameter, B, of 950 cm-1, a zero-field uniaxial D9/2 parameter of -0.9(1) cm-1, and g = 1.95(5). In agreement with the presence of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy, ac susceptibility measurements reveal that 1 is a single-molecule magnet at low temperature with a single molecule magnetic effective relaxation barrier, Ueff, of 9.8 cm-1. At 5.25 K the Mssbauer spectra of 1 exhibit two spectral components, assigned to the two crystallographically inequivalent iron sites with a static effective hyperfine field; as the temperature increases from 7 to 310 K, the spectra exhibit increasingly rapid relaxation of the hyperfine field on the iron-57 Larmor precession time of 5 10-8 s. A fit of the temperature dependence of the average effective hyperfine field yields |D9/2| = 0.9 cm-1. An Arrhenius plot of the logarithm of the relaxation frequency between 5 and 85 K yields a relaxation barrier of 17 cm-1.

  3. Manganese(II,III) Oxyborate, Mn 2OBO 3: A Distorted Homometallic WarwickiteSynthesis, Crystal Structure, Band Calculations, and Magnetic Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrestam, R.; Kritikos, M.; Sjdin, A.

    1995-02-01

    The manganese(II,III) oxyborate with the composition Mn2OBO3 has been synthesized by high-temperature techniques. X-ray studies show that crystals of the specimen, grown with borax as flux, are monoclinic, with space group P21/n, = 9.2866(7), b = 9.5333(10), c = 3.2438(3) , and ? = 90.757(7). A model of the crystal structure has been refined with the 2064 most significant (l ? 5 ?1) X-ray reflections with sin(?)/? ? 1.08 -1 to R = 0.40. The structure of Mn2OBO3 can be considered to be a distorted modification of the orthorhombic warwickite structure. The distortions, apparently caused by Jahn-Teller effects induced by the Mn3+ ions, remove the mirror symmetry of the parent undistorted warwickite. As a consequence, the space group symmetry is lowered from Pnam to one of its subgroups, P21/n. The structural results as well as the measured magnetic susceptibilities indicate high-spin manganese ions. The magnetic susceptibilities in the temperature region 110-300 K follow the Curie-Weiss law. The Weiss constant of -132(1) K indicates an antiferromagnetic ordering at low temperature. The bond distances and calculated bond valence sums indicate that the trivalent manganese ions are located in the two inner columns of the four-octahedra-wide walls. This metal charge distribution is supported by extended Hckel band calculations on some homometallic warwickites. The difference in metal coordination around one of the borate oxygen atoms is reflected by a significant deviation of the borate group geometry from the ideal trigonal symmetry.

  4. Clinicopathologic Features and Clinical Outcomes of Esophageal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Fan; Tian, Yangzi; Liu, Zhen; Xu, Guanghui; Liu, Shushang; Guo, Man; Lian, Xiao; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) in esophagus are limited, because of the relatively rare incidence of esophageal GISTs. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes of esophageal GISTs, and to investigate the potential factors that may predict prognosis. Esophageal GIST cases were obtained from our center and from case reports and clinical studies extracted from MEDLINE. Clinicopathologic features and survivals were analyzed and compared with gastric GISTs from our center. The most common location was lower esophagus (86.84%), followed by middle and upper esophagus (11.40% and 1.76%). The majority of esophageal GISTs were classified as high-risk category (70.83%). Mitotic index was correlated with histologic type, mutational status, and tumor size. The 5-year disease-free survival and disease-specific survival were 65.1% and 65.9%, respectively. Tumor size, mitotic index, and National Institutes of Health risk classification were associated with prognosis of esophageal GISTs. Only tumor size, however, was the independent risk factor for the prognosis of esophageal GISTs. In comparison to gastric GISTs, the distribution of tumor size, histologic type, and National Institutes of Health risk classification were significantly different between esophageal GISTs and gastric GISTs. The disease-free survival and disease-specific survival of esophageal GISTs were significantly lower than that of gastric GISTs. The most common location for esophageal GISTs was lower esophagus, and most of the esophageal GISTs are high-risk category. Tumor size was the independent risk factor for the prognosis of esophageal GISTs. Esophageal GISTs differ significantly from gastric GISTs in respect to clinicopathologic features. The prognosis of esophageal GISTs was worse than that of gastric GISTs. PMID:26765432

  5. Long-term outcome of esophageal myotomy for achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Jun; Tian, Zi-Qiang; Wang, Qi-Zhang; Li, Bao-Qing; Wang, Fu-Shun; Cao, Fu-Min; Zhang, Yue-Feng; Li, Yong; Fan, Zhao; Han, Jian-Jing; Liu, Hui

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Modified Hellers myotomy is still the first choice for achalasia and the assessment of surgical outcomes is usually made based on the subjective sensation of patients. This study was to objectively assess the long-term outcomes of esophageal myotomy for achalasia using esophageal manometry, 24-hourour pH monitoring, esophageal scintigraphy and fiberoptic esophagoscopy. METHODS: From February 1979 to October 2000, 176 patients with achalasia underwent modified Hellers myotomy, including esophageal myotomy alone in 146 patients, myotomy in combination with Gallone or Dor antireflux procedure in 22 and 8 patients, respectively. Clinical score, pressure of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), esophageal clearance rate and gastroesophageal reflux were determined before and 1 to 22 years after surgery. RESULTS: After a median follow-up of 14 years, 84.5% of patients had a good or excellent relief of symptoms, and clinical scores as well as resting pressures of the esophageal body and LES were reduced compared with preoperative values (P < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference in DeMeester score between pre- and postoperative patients (P = 0.51). Esophageal transit was improved in postoperative patients, but still slower than that in normal controls. The incidence of gastroesophageal reflux in patients who underwent esophageal myotomy alone was 63.6% compared to 27.3% in those who underwent myotomy and antireflux procedure (P = 0.087). Three (1.7%) patients were complicated with esophageal cancer after surgery. CONCLUSION: Esophageal myotomy for achalasia can reduce the resting pressures of the esophageal body and LES and improve esophageal transit and dysphagia. Myotomy in combination with antireflux procedure can prevent gastroesophageal reflux to a certain extent, but further randomized studies should be carried out to demonstrate its efficacy. PMID:14716841

  6. Viruses, Other Pathogenic Microorganisms and Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenjia; Liu, Zhongshun; Bao, Qunchao; Qian, Zhikang

    2015-01-01

    Background Esophageal cancer (EC) is the eighth most prevalent malignant tumor and the sixth leading cause of cancer mortality throughout the world. Despite the technical developments in diagnosis and treatment, the 5-year survival rate is still low. The etiology of EC remains poorly understood; multiple risk factors may be involved and account for the great variation in EC incidence in different geographic regions. Summary Infection with carcinogenetic pathogens has been proposed as a risk factor for EC. This review explores the recent studies on the association of human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Helicobacter pylori and esophageal bacterial biota with EC. Key Message Among the above-mentioned pathogens, HPV most likely contributes to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in high-risk populations. New techniques are being applied to studies on the role of infection in EC, which will inevitably bring novel ideas to the field in the near future. Practical Implications Multiple meta-analyses support the finding of a higher HPV detection rate in regions associated with high risk for ESCC compared to low-risk areas. A potential role of HPV in the rise of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) was proposed recently. However, further studies are required before a firm conclusion can be drawn. Less work has been done in studying the association between EBV and ESCC, and the results are quite controversial. H. pylori infection is found to be inversely related to EC, which is probably due to the reduced incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Analysis of the esophageal bacterial biota revealed distinct clusters of bacteria in normal and diseased esophagi. A type II microbiome rich in Gram-negative bacteria potentially contributes to EAC by inducing chronic inflammation. Novel findings from such studies as these may benefit public health by justifying anti-infection measures to prevent EC. PMID:26674173

  7. Esophagitis of likely traumatic origin in newborns.

    PubMed

    Deneyer, M; Goossens, A; Pipeleers-Marichal, M; Hauser, B; Blecker, U; Sacre, L; Vandenplas, Y

    1992-07-01

    We describe 17 full-term newborns presenting with vague symptoms related to the upper gastrointestinal tract (anorexia, poor feeding, retching, regurgitation, and incessant crying) during their stay in the maternity unit. After an esophagogastroduodenoscopy performed between days 2 and 5 of life, the babies could clearly be divided into two groups. Twelve babies (group 1) had an extremely severe esophagitis (circular ulcerations), without gastroduodenitis. In the remaining five babies (group 2), the upper gastrointestinal tract was unaffected. Allergic, infectious, metabolic, and toxic etiologies were excluded. Esophageal pH monitoring data were within normal ranges in all. All babies of group 1 were treated as follows: prone anti-Trendelenburg position, cisapride, and cimetidine syrup. Symptoms and lesions disappeared within 48-72 h. Reendoscopy after 72 h showed an almost normal esophagus with greatly improved histology. These observations highlight four points of interest: (a) the existence of an extremely severe ulcerative esophagitis in apparently healthy newborns, (b) the very rapid clinical and histological recovery, (c) the difficulties in predicting esophagitis on clinical grounds, and (d) the mysterious origin despite thorough assessment. The distribution of the lesions (more severe in the upper esophagus), the early onset (almost at birth), the very rapid healing, and the absence of gastric and duodenal lesions are in favor of a possible "traumatic" origin (pharyngeal, esophageal, and gastric suction at birth). Finally, because the condition described is transient, questions arise regarding the necessity of treatment, and we currently do not recommend overtreating newborns presenting with similar symptoms and/or endoscopic findings. PMID:1403453

  8. The NMR structure of the II-III-VI three-way junction from the Neurospora VS ribozyme reveals a critical tertiary interaction and provides new insights into the global ribozyme structure.

    PubMed

    Bonneau, Eric; Girard, Nicolas; Lemieux, Sbastien; Legault, Pascale

    2015-09-01

    As part of an effort to structurally characterize the complete Neurospora VS ribozyme, NMR solution structures of several subdomains have been previously determined, including the internal loops of domains I and VI, the I/V kissing-loop interaction and the III-IV-V junction. Here, we expand this work by determining the NMR structure of a 62-nucleotide RNA (J236) that encompasses the VS ribozyme II-III-VI three-way junction and its adjoining stems. In addition, we localize Mg(2+)-binding sites within this structure using Mn(2+)-induced paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. The NMR structure of the J236 RNA displays a family C topology with a compact core stabilized by continuous stacking of stems II and III, a cis WC/WC GA base pair, two base triples and two Mg(2+) ions. Moreover, it reveals a remote tertiary interaction between the adenine bulges of stems II and VI. Additional NMR studies demonstrate that both this bulge-bulge interaction and Mg(2+) ions are critical for the stable folding of the II-III-VI junction. The NMR structure of the J236 RNA is consistent with biochemical studies on the complete VS ribozyme, but not with biophysical studies performed with a minimal II-III-VI junction that does not contain the II-VI bulge-bulge interaction. Together with previous NMR studies, our findings provide important new insights into the three-dimensional architecture of this unique ribozyme. PMID:26124200

  9. Esophageal Adenocarcinoma in Patients Younger than 40 Years: A Two-Decade Experience at a Public and Private Hospital.

    PubMed

    Boys, Joshua A; Oh, Daniel S; Lewis, Justin S; DeMeester, Steven R; Hagen, Jeffrey A

    2015-10-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma is typically observed in the older non-Hispanic white population. Changing demographics are altering the epidemiology of the disease. The aim of this study is to review the presentation and outcomes of esophageal adenocarcinoma patients <40 years old at our institution. A retrospective review was performed of patients diagnosed with esophageal adenocarcinoma between 1990 and 2013. Demographics, presentation, and outcomes were compared in those <40 years old and those ?40 years old. There were 772 total cases with 42 (5%) <40 years old consisting of 37 (88.1%) males, five females and median age of diagnosis of 35 (interquartile range: 31-38). The two most common ethnicities were White non-Hispanic/Latino in 19 (45.2%), Hispanic /Latino in 18 (42.9%). Compared with patients 40 years and older, the younger group had more Hispanic/Latinos than the older group (43% vs 17%, P < 0.001), more frequently presented with stage IV disease (50% vs 29%) and had a shorter median survival. In conclusion, younger patients tend to present at a much later stage than the older counterparts, which may be due to a delay in diagnosis as well as more aggressive biology. Esophageal adenocarcinoma seems to be increasing in the Hispanic/Latino population. PMID:26463292

  10. Prognostic value of cancer stem cell marker CD133 expression in esophageal carcinoma: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    SUI, YUN-PENG; JIAN, XUE-PING; MA, LI; XU, GUI-ZHEN; LIAO, HUAI-WEI; LIU, YAN-PING; WEN, HUI-CAI

    2016-01-01

    CD133 has been identified as a putative neoplastic stem cell marker in esophageal carcinoma. However, the prognostic value of CD133 overexpression in patients with esophageal carcinoma remains controversial. A meta-analysis of previous studies was performed, in order to assess the association of CD133 overexpression with the clinicopathological characteristics of esophageal carcinoma patients. A total of 7 studies, including 538 patients, were subjected to the final analysis. Our results indicated that a positive CD133 expression was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis [odds ratio (OR)=3.09, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.934.95; P<0.00001], clinical stage (OR=4.26, 95% CI: 1.5511.73; P=0.005) and histopathological grade (OR=2.40, 95% CI: 1.164.94; P=0.02). There was no statistically significant association of CD133 with depth of invasion (OR=1.89, 95% CI: 0.428.43; P=0.41). Based on the results of this study, we concluded that CD133 is an efficient prognostic factor in esophageal carcinoma. Higher CD133 expression is significantly associated with lymph node metastasis, clinical stage and histopathological grade. PMID:26870362

  11. A striking local esophageal cytokine expression profile in eosinophilic esophagitis1

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Carine; Stucke, Emily M.; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Beatriz; Burwinkel, Karen; Collins, Margaret H.; Ahrens, Annette; Alexander, Eileen S.; Butz, Bridget K. Buckmeier; Jameson, Sean C.; Kaul, Ajay; Franciosi, James P.; Kushner, Jonathan P.; Putnam, Philip E.; Abonia, J. Pablo; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is an emerging worldwide disease that mimics gastroesophageal reflux disease. Objective Early studies have suggested that esophageal eosinophilia occurs in association with T helper type 2 allergic responses, yet the local and systemic expression of relevant cytokines has not been well characterized. Methods A human inflammatory cytokine and receptor PCR array containing 84 genes followed by PCR validation and multiplex arrays were used to quantify cytokine mRNA in esophageal biopsies and blood levels. Results Esophageal transcripts of numerous chemokines [e.g. CCL1, CCL23, CCL26 (eotaxin-3), CXCL1, and CXCL2], cytokines (e.g. IL13 and ABCF1), and cytokine receptors (e.g. IL5RA) were induced at least 4-fold in individuals with EE. Analysis of esophageal biopsies (n=288) revealed that eotaxin-3 mRNA level alone had 89% sensitivity for distinguishing EE from non-EE individuals. The presence of allergy was associated with significantly increased esophageal expression of IL4 and IL5 mRNA in active EE patients. We identified 8 cytokines (IL-4, IL-13, IL-5, IL-6, IL-12p70, CD40L, IL-1?, and IL-17) whose blood levels retrospectively distinguished 12 non-EE from 13 EE patients with 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity. When applied to a blinded, prospectively recruited group of 36 patients, the cytokine panel scoring system had a 79% positive predictive value, 68% negative predictive value, 61% sensitivity, and 83% specificity for identifying EE. Conclusion Evidence is presented that IL13 and IL5 associate with eosinophil and eotaxin-3 levels, indicating the key role of adaptive Th2 immunity in regulating eotaxin-3-driven esophageal eosinophilia in the absence of a consistent systemic change in cytokines. PMID:21211656

  12. Esophageal perforation post pneumatic dilatation for achalasia managed by esophageal stenting

    PubMed Central

    Elhanafi, Sherif; Othman, Mohamed; Sunny, Joseph; Said, Sarmad; Cooper, Chad J.; Alkhateeb, Haider; Quansah, Raphael; McCallum, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 82 Final Diagnosis: Achalasia Symptoms: Nocturnal regurgtation weight loss Medication: Clinical Procedure: Esophageal stenting Specialty: Gastroenterology Hepatology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Pneumatic dilatation is one of the most effective methods for treating achalasia. Esophageal perforation is the most serious complication after pneumatic dilatation and has been reported to occur in the range of 1 to 4.3%. The appropriate management of esophageal perforation can range from conservative medical treatment to surgical intervention. Case Report: We report a case of an 82-year-old male who had an 8 month history of dysphagia for solid and liquids, a 10 lb weight loss and nocturnal regurgitation. The diagnosis of achalasia was established by endoscopic; barium and manometric criteria. He underwent a pneumatic dilation with a 30 mm Rigiflex balloon. A confined or limited esophageal perforation projecting into the mediastinum and located 12 cm above the diaphragm was confirmed by a gastrografin swallow study performed immediately after the procedure. There was some accompanying epigastric abdominal pain. Patient was treated later that day by placing a fully covered metallic esophageal stent in addition to antibiotics, proton pump inhibitor, and fasting. Patient was discharged home 3 days later able to eat liquid-soft foods. Follow up endoscopy 2 weeks later and a gastrografin swallow showed a completely healed perforation and the stent was removed. Symptomatically he has done well, with no dysphagia or heartburn at six and twelve months follow up. Conclusions: Early esophageal stenting for esophageal perforation after pneumatic dilation for achalasia is a treatment option which accelerates healing shortens recovery period, as well as decreasing hospital stay and costs. PMID:24349606

  13. Screening pre-bariatric surgery patients for esophageal disease with esophageal capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ashish; Boettcher, Erica; Fahmy, Marianne; Savides, Thomas; Horgan, Santiago; Jacobsen, Garth R; Sandler, Bryan J; Sedrak, Michael; Kalmaz, Denise

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine if esophageal capsule endoscopy (ECE) is an adequate diagnostic alternative to esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) in pre-bariatric surgery patients. METHODS: We conducted a prospective pilot study to assess the diagnostic accuracy of ECE (PillCam ESO2, Given Imaging) vs conventional EGD in pre-bariatric surgery patients. Patients who were scheduled for bariatric surgery and referred for pre-operative EGD were prospectively enrolled. All patients underwent ECE followed by standard EGD. Two experienced gastroenterologists blinded to the patients history and the findings of the EGD reviewed the ECE and documented their findings. The gold standard was the findings on EGD. RESULTS: Ten patients with an average body mass index of 50 kg/m2 were enrolled and completed the study. ECE identified 11 of 14 (79%) positive esophageal/gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) findings and 14 of 17 (82%) combined esophageal and gastric findings identified on EGD. Fishers exact test was used to compare the findings and no significant difference was found between ECE and EGD (P = 0.64 for esophageal/GEJ and P = 0.66 for combined esophageal and gastric findings respectively). Of the positive esophageal/GEJ findings, ECE failed to identify the following: hiatal hernia in two patients, mild esophagitis in two patients, and mild Schatzki ring in two patients. ECE was able to identify the entire esophagus in 100%, gastric cardia in 0%, gastric body in 100%, gastric antrum in 70%, pylorus in 60%, and duodenum in 0%. CONCLUSION: There were no significant differences in the likelihood of identifying a positive finding using ECE compared with EGD in preoperative evaluation of bariatric patients. PMID:24115815

  14. [Surgically resected local recurrence after endoscopic submucosal dissection of esophageal cancer--a case report].

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hiroko; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Suchi, Kentarou; Okamura, Shinichi; Umehara, Seiji; Konishi, Hirotaka; Todo, Momoko; Kubota, Takeshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Kikuchi, Shojiro; Okamoto, Kazuma; Kuriu, Yoshiaki; Ikoma, Hisashi; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Ochiai, Toshiya; Sakakura, Chouhei; Kokuba, Yukihito; Sonoyama, Teruhisa; Otsuji, Eigo

    2009-11-01

    We report a case of surgically resected esophageal cancer which was locally recurred after endoscopic submucosal dissection. A 66-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of further examination and a treatment of superficial esophageal cancer. A type 0-IIb+IIa cancer occupying the whole circumference of the lumen of the middle to lower esophagus was revealed. The depth of the invasion was judged to be T1a-EP or LPM by endoscopic ultrasonography, and no metastasis to other organs or lymph nodes was detected. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was performed. However, macroscopic residual cancer didn't seem to exist. Pathological diagnosis was squamous cell carcinoma, moderately differentiated, the depth of tumor invasion was T1a-LPM. The presence of the residual cancer of the horizontal cut margin could not be judged because en bloc resection could not be achieved. After that, endoscopic balloon dilatation of the esophageal stenosis was performed repeatedly for about one year. Then, he was diagnosed as the local recurrence of the squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. Thoraco-abdominal esophagectomy reconstructed by stomach tube via a retrosternal route was undergone. The final stage of the lesion was judged T3N1M0 (Stage III, UICC) by the histological examination from the resected specimen. After the operation, he is receiving adjuvant chemotherapy and alive without recurrence. When endoscopic resection of the esophageal cancer is performed to the lesion, which relatively indicated to endoscopic resection or outside the guideline criteria for endoscopic resection, it is important that we choose the appropriate treatment protocol obtaining an informed consent from the patient sufficiently. PMID:20037452

  15. Thoracoscopic Repair of Esophageal Atresia and Tracheoesophageal Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Holcomb, George W.; Rothenberg, Steven S.; Bax, Klaas M. A.; Martinez-Ferro, Marcelo; Albanese, Craig T.; Ostlie, Daniel J.; van Der Zee, David C.; Yeung, C K.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: For the past 60 years, successful repair of esophageal atresia (EA) and distal tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) has been performed via a thoracotomy. However, a number of reports have described adverse musculoskeletal sequelae following thoracotomy in infants and young children. Until now, only a few scattered case reports have detailed an individual surgeon's success with thoracoscopic repair of EA/TEF. This multi-institutional review represents the largest experience describing the results with this approach. Methods: A cohort of international pediatric surgeons from centers that perform advanced laparoscopic and thoracoscopic operations in infants and children retrospectively reviewed their data on primary thoracoscopic repair in 104 newborns with EA/TEF. Newborns with EA without a distal TEF or those with an isolated TEF without EA were excluded. Results: In these 104 patients, the mean age at operation was 1.2 days (1.1), the mean weight was 2.6 kg (0.5), the mean operative time was 129.9 minutes (55.5), the mean days of mechanical ventilation were 3.6 (5.8), and the mean days of total hospitalization were 18.1 (18.6). Twelve (11.5%) infants developed an early leak or stricture at the anastomosis and 33 (31.7%) required esophageal dilatation at least once. Five operations (4.8%) were converted to an open thoracotomy and one was staged due to a long gap between the 2 esophageal segments. Twenty-five newborns (24.0%) later required a laparoscopic fundoplication. A recurrent fistula between the esophagus and trachea developed in 2 infants (1.9%). A number of other operations were required in these patients, including imperforate anus repair in 10 patients (7 high, 3 low), aortopexy (7), laparoscopic duodenal atresia repair (4), and various major cardiac operations (5). Three patients died, one related to the EA/TEF on the 20th postoperative day. Conclusions: The thoracoscopic repair of EA/TEF represents a natural evolution in the operative correction of this complicated congenital anomaly and can be safely performed by experienced endoscopic surgeons. The results presented are comparable to previous reports of babies undergoing repair through a thoracotomy. Based on the associated musculoskeletal problems following thoracotomy, there will likely be long-term benefits for babies with this anomaly undergoing the thoracoscopic repair. PMID:16135928

  16. Detection of esophageal ulcerations with technetium-99m albumin sucralfate

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, J.S.; Adcock, K.A.; Schmelter, R.

    1986-07-01

    Technetium-99m albumin-sucralfate ((/sup 99m/Tc)Su) can be used to demonstrate peptic ulcer disease in man and animals. We evaluated the usefulness of (/sup 99m/Tc)Su for detecting various grades of esophagitis. (/sup 99m/Tc)Su adhered to the distal esophagus for up to 3 hr in five of six patients with esophageal ulcers but adhered to only two of nine with lesser degrees of esophagitis. No adherence was seen in five patients without esophagitis. Thus, (/sup 99m/Tc)Su may not be useful for detecting any but the most severe grade of esophagitis. Based on these results, we speculate that the previously documented beneficial effects of sucralfate on mild to moderate esophagitis may be due to other mechanisms besides adherence to the ulcerated mucosa.

  17. Esophageal leiomyoma: experience from a single institution.

    PubMed

    Jiang, W; Rice, T W; Goldblum, J R

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal leiomyomas are rare. We report the clinicopathologic features of one of the largest series of esophageal leiomyomas from a single institution. We retrospectively reviewed the Cleveland Clinic pathology database (1985-2010) for patients with a diagnosis of esophageal leiomyoma(s). Clinicopathologic features of 30 cases from 28 patients were analyzed. The group included 15 females and 13 males with a mean age at diagnosis of 56 years. These include 9 excisions, 9 esophagectomies, and 12 endoscopic biopsies. Only one partial esophagectomy was performed solely for a symptomatic 14-cm leiomyoma; the remainder of the resections (n= 8) were for other indications, including esophageal cancer (Barrett's esophagus-related adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma) and emergent esophageal perforation, with leiomyoma being an incidental finding. One patient (2.5%) had two synchronous leiomyomas (14 cm and 0.3 cm). Tumor size ranged from 0.1 to 14 cm (mean = 2.0 cm). Mean tumor size among symptomatic patients was 5.2 cm, as compared with 0.4 cm in asymptomatic patients. Dysphagia was the most common complaint in symptomatic patients (71.4%). Sixty-nine percent of the tumors were located in the distal and middle thirds of the esophagus, with most (69.6%) arising from muscularis propria. Histologically, these tumors were composed of bland spindle cells with low cellularity, no nuclear atypia, or mitotic activity. Only one case (14 cm) showed focal moderate cellularity and nuclear atypia, with low mitotic activity (<1/10 high power field). Immunohistochemical studies showed tumor cells were positive for smooth muscle actin, and negative for CD34 and CD117. Follow-up information was available for 22 patients (78.6%), and none had adverse events related to leiomyoma. In summary, esophageal leiomyoma is a rare benign tumor of the esophagus. Patients with larger tumors were more likely to have symptoms. The majority of the tumors were in the lower and mid-esophagus, and arose from muscularis propria. These tumors behave in a clinically benign fashion. PMID:22458777

  18. Endoscopic palliation of advanced esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mocanu, A; Brla, R; Hoara, P; Constantinoiu, S

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer represents one of the most aggressive digestive tumors, with a survival rate at 5 years of only 10%. Globally, during the last three decades, there has been an increasing incidence of the esophageal cancer, approx. 400,000 new esophageal cancers being currently diagnosed annually. This represents the eighth leading cause of cancer incidence and the sixth leading cause of cancer death overall. Taking into account the populations global aging and thus, the increase in the number of patients who will not bear surgery, PCT and radiation, or the fact that they do not want it especially because of deficiencies and associated pathology, the endoscopic ablative techniques with palliation purposes represent the alternative. If we refer to the Western Europe countries and North America, we notice an increase of esophageal adenocarcinoma rate versus squamous cancer. As for the Asian region, referring in particular to China and Japan, 9 out of 10 esophageal cancers are squamous cell carcinomas. For at least half of the patients with EC (esophageal cancer) there is no hope of healing because of the advanced regional malignant invasion (T3-4, N+, M+) with no chemo and radiotherapy response, poor preoperative patients conditions or systemic metastasis. The low life expectancy does not justify the risky medical procedures, the goal of the therapy consisting in the improvement of the quality of life by eliminating dysphagia (reestablishing oral feeding) which represents the most common complication of EC, the respiratory tract complication caused by eso-tracheal fistulas or by eliminating chest pain. To treat dysphagia, which is the main target of palliation, combined methods like endoscopic, chemo and radio-therapy, can be used, each one with indications, benefits and risks. Abbreviations: SEPS = self expanding plastic stent, SREMS = self expanding metal stent, EBRT = Endoscopic brachy radiotherapy, EUS = Ultra sound endoscopy, CT = Computer tomograph, UGE = Upper gastro endoscopy, PET-CT = Positron Emission Tomography, APC = argon plasma coagulation, PDT = photo dynamic therapy, PCT = Poli-chemotherapy, RT = Radio-therapy PMID:25866578

  19. HER2 amplification, overexpression and score criteria in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yingchuan; Bandla, Santhoshi; Godfrey, Tony E.; Tan, Dongfeng; Luketich, James D.; Pennathur, Arjun; Qiu, Xing; Hicks, David G.; Peters, Jeffrey; Zhou, Zhongren

    2011-01-01

    The HER2 oncogene was recently reported to be amplified and overexpressed in esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the relationship of HER2 amplification in esophageal adenocarcinoma with prognosis has not been well defined. The scoring systems for clinically evaluating HER2 in esophageal adenocarcinoma are not established. The aims of the study were to establish a HER2 scoring system and comprehensively investigate HER2 amplification and overexpression in esophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursor lesion. Using a tissue microarray, containing 116 cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma, 34 cases of BE, 18 cases of low grade dysplasia and 15 cases of high grade dysplasia, HER2 amplification and overexpression were analyzed by HercepTest and CISH methods. The amplification frequency in an independent series of 116 esophageal adenocarcinoma samples was also analyzed using Affymetrix SNP 6.0 microarrays. In our studies, we have found that HER2 amplification does not associate with poor prognosis in total 232 esophageal adenocarcinoma patients by CISH and high density microarrays. We further confirm the similar frequency of HER2 amplification by CISH (18.10%; 21/116) and SNP 6.0 microarrays (16.4%, 19/116) in esophageal adenocarcinoma. HER2 protein overexpression was observed in 12.1 % (14/116) of esophageal adenocarcinoma and 6.67% (1/15) of HGD. No HER2 amplification or overexpression was identified in BE or LGD. All HER2 protein overexpression cases showed HER2 gene amplification. Gene amplification was found to be more frequent by CISH than protein overexpression in esophageal adenocarcinoma (18.10% vs 12.9%). A modified two-step model for esophageal adenocarcinoma HER-2 testing is recommend for clinical esophageal adenocarcinoma HER-2 trial. PMID:21460800

  20. HER2 amplification, overexpression and score criteria in esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yingchuan; Bandla, Santhoshi; Godfrey, Tony E; Tan, Dongfeng; Luketich, James D; Pennathur, Arjun; Qiu, Xing; Hicks, David G; Peters, Jeffrey H; Zhou, Zhongren

    2011-07-01

    The HER2 oncogene was recently reported to be amplified and overexpressed in esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the relationship of HER2 amplification in esophageal adenocarcinoma with prognosis has not been well defined. The scoring systems for clinically evaluating HER2 in esophageal adenocarcinoma are not established. The aims of the study were to establish a HER2 scoring system and comprehensively investigate HER2 amplification and overexpression in esophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursor lesion. Using a tissue microarray, containing 116 cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma, 34 cases of Barrett's esophagus, 18 cases of low-grade dysplasia and 15 cases of high-grade dysplasia, HER2 amplification and overexpression were analyzed by HercepTest and chromogenic in situ hybridization methods. The amplification frequency in an independent series of 116 esophageal adenocarcinoma samples was also analyzed using Affymetrix SNP 6.0 microarrays. In our studies, we have found that HER2 amplification does not associate with poor prognosis in total 232 esophageal adenocarcinoma patients by chromogenic in situ hybridization and high-density microarrays. We further confirm the similar frequency of HER2 amplification by chromogenic in situ hybridization (18%; 21 out of 116) and SNP 6.0 microarrays (16%, 19 out of 116) in esophageal adenocarcinoma. HER2 protein overexpression was observed in 12% (14 out of 116) of esophageal adenocarcinoma and 7% (1 out of 15) of high-grade dysplasia. No HER2 amplification or overexpression was identified in Barrett's esophagus or low-grade dysplasia. All HER2 protein overexpression cases showed HER2 gene amplification. Gene amplification was found to be more frequent by chromogenic in situ hybridization than protein overexpression in esophageal adenocarcinoma (18 vs 12%). A modified two-step model for esophageal adenocarcinoma HER2 testing is recommended for clinical esophageal adenocarcinoma HER2 trial. PMID:21460800

  1. Desmoglein-1 regulates esophageal epithelial barrier function and immune responses in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Sherrill, J D; Kc, K; Wu, D; Djukic, Z; Caldwell, J M; Stucke, E M; Kemme, K A; Costello, M S; Mingler, M K; Blanchard, C; Collins, M H; Abonia, J P; Putnam, P E; Dellon, E S; Orlando, R C; Hogan, S P; Rothenberg, M E

    2014-05-01

    The desmosomal cadherin desmoglein-1 (DSG1) is an essential intercellular adhesion molecule that is altered in various human cutaneous disorders; however, its regulation and function in allergic disease remains unexplored. Herein, we demonstrate a specific reduction in DSG1 in esophageal biopsies from patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), an emerging allergic disorder characterized by chronic inflammation within the esophageal mucosa. Further, we show that DSG1 gene silencing weakens esophageal epithelial integrity, and induces cell separation and impaired barrier function (IBF) despite high levels of desmoglein-3. Moreover, DSG1 deficiency induces transcriptional changes that partially overlap with the transcriptome of inflamed esophageal mucosa; notably, periostin (POSTN), a multipotent pro-inflammatory extracellular matrix molecule, is the top induced overlapping gene. We further demonstrate that IBF is a pathological feature in EoE, which can be partially induced through the downregulation of DSG1 by interleukin-13 (IL-13). Taken together, these data identify a functional role for DSG1 and its dysregulation by IL-13 in the pathophysiology of EoE and suggest that the loss of DSG1 may potentiate allergic inflammation through the induction of pro-inflammatory mediators such as POSTN. PMID:24220297

  2. Desmoglein-1 regulates esophageal epithelial barrier function and immune responses in eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Sherrill, J D; KC, K; Wu, D; Djukic, Z; Caldwell, J M; Stucke, E M; Kemme, K A; Costello, M S; Mingler, M K; Blanchard, C; Collins, M H; Abonia, J P; Putnam, P E; Dellon, E S; Orlando, R C; Hogan, S P; Rothenb, M E

    2014-01-01

    The desmosomal cadherin desmoglein-1 (DSG1) is an essential intercellular adhesion molecule that is altered in various human cutaneous disorders; however, its regulation and function in allergic disease remains unexplored. Herein, we demonstrate a specific reduction in DSG1 in esophageal biopsies from patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), an emerging allergic disorder characterized by chronic inflammation within the esophageal mucosa. Further, we show that DSG1 gene silencing weakens esophageal epithelial integrity, and induces cell separation and impaired barrier function (IBF) despite high levels of desmoglein-3 (DSG3). Moreover, DSG1 deficiency induces transcriptional changes that partially overlap with the transcriptome of inflamed esophageal mucosa; notably, periostin, a multipotent pro-inflammatory extracellular matrix molecule, is the top induced overlapping gene. We further demonstrate that IBF is a pathological feature in EoE, which can be partially induced through the downregulation of DSG1 by interleukin-13 (IL-13). Taken together, these data identify a functional role for DSG1 and its dysregulation by IL-13 in the pathophysiology of EoE and suggest that the loss of DSG1 may potentiate allergic inflammation through the induction of pro-inflammatory mediators such as periostin. PMID:24220297

  3. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy and endoscopy in the diagnosis of esophageal reflux and esophagitis

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, W.P.; Van der Schaaf, A.; Grieve, J.C.

    1985-04-01

    The value of gastroesophageal (G/E) scintigraphy in the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux was assessed in 51 subjects, who presented with heartburn and had endoscopic evidence of reflux esophagitis. G/E scintigraphy was done using /sup 99m/Tc sulfur-colloid in acidified orange juice. The G/E reflux index was calculated according to previous reports. The mean (+/- SD) G/E reflux index in 18 patients with severe esophagitis and 30 patients with moderate esophagitis were 1.6% (+/- 1.5) and 3.2% (+/- 5.0), respectively. The mean G/E reflux index in 14 control subjects was 2.4% (+/- 1.1). There was no significant difference between the esophagitis and control groups. Furthermore, if 4% was taken as upper limit of normal, this will include almost all the esophagitis patients and controls. It is concluded that the G/E reflux index based on G/E scintigraphy is of little value in the diagnosis of G/E reflux.

  4. Innovative techniques in evaluating the esophagus; imaging of esophageal morphology and function; and drugs for esophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Helmut; Neurath, Markus F; Vieth, Michael; Lever, Frederiek M; Meijer, Gert J; Lips, Irene M; McMahon, Barry P; Ruurda, J P; van Hillegersberg, R; Siersema, P; Levine, Marc S; Scharitzer, Martina; Pokieser, Peter; Zerbib, Frank; Savarino, Vincenzo; Zentilin, Patrizia; Savarino, Edoardo; Chan, Walter W

    2013-10-01

    This paper reporting on techniques for esophageal evaluation and imaging and drugs for esophageal disease includes commentaries on endoscopy techniques including dye-based high-resolution and dye-less high-definition endoscopy; the shift from CT to MRI guidance in tumor delineation for radiation therapy; the role of functional lumen imaging in measuring esophageal distensibility; electrical stimulation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) as an alternative to fundoduplication for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); the morphological findings of reflux esophagitis and esophageal dysmotility on double-contrast esophagography; the value of videofluoroscopy in assessing protecting mechanisms in patients with chronic reflux or swallowing disorders; targeting visceral hypersensitivity in the treatment of refractory GERD; and the symptoms and treatments of nighttime reflux and nocturnal acid breakthrough (NAB). PMID:24117631

  5. Eosinophilic esophagitis as paraneoplastic syndrome in a patient with ganglioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Prader, S; Spalinger, J; Caduff, J; Hürlimann, S; Rischewski, J

    2015-05-01

    A 16-month-old boy presented with failure to thrive despite sufficient caloric intake, hypersalivation, abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea and blepharitis. An eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was diagnosed by esophageal biopsy. Dietary restrictions and topical steroid treatment lead to no improvement. Further diagnostic work-up revealed an intrathoracal, paraspinal ganglioneuroblastoma. After operative extirpation of the tumour, all initial symptoms resolved. An esophageal control biopsy 4 weeks after tumour resection was normal. This is the first report of eosinophilic esophagitis as part of a paraneoplastic syndrome in a patient with a malignant disease other than a carcinoma. PMID:25985452

  6. Aortic Pseudoaneurysm Secondary to Mediastinitis due to Esophageal Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Zuluaga, Claudia Patricia; Aluja Jaramillo, Felipe; Velásquez Castaño, Sergio Andrés; Rivera Bernal, Aura Lucía; Granada, Julio Cesar; Carrillo Bayona, Jorge Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal perforation is a condition associated with high morbidity and mortality rates; it requires early diagnosis and treatment. The most common complication of esophageal rupture is mediastinitis. There are several case reports in the literature of mediastinitis secondary to esophageal perforation and development of aortic pseudoaneurysm as a complication. We report the case of a patient with an 8-day history of esophageal perforation due to foreign body (fishbone) with mediastinitis and aortic pseudoaneurysm. The diagnosis was made using Computed Tomography (CT) with intravenous and oral water-soluble contrast material. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy did not detect the perforation. PMID:26977330

  7. SU-E-J-88: Margin Reduction of Level II/III Planning Target Volume for Image-Guided Simultaneous Integrated Boost Head-And-Neck Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Can, S; Neylon, J; Qi, S; Santhanam, A; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of improved normal tissue sparing for head-and-neck (H'N) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) by employing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for target level II/III though a GPU-based deformable image registration and dose accumulation framework. Methods: Ten H'N simultaneous integrated boost cases treated on TomoTherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Weekly kVCT scans in addition to daily MVCT scans were acquired for each patient. Reduced margin plans were generated with 0- mm margin for level II and III PTV (while 3-5 mm margin for PTV1) and compared with the standard margin plan using 3-5mm margin to all CTV1-3 (reference plan). An in-house developed GPU-based 3D image deformation tool was used to register and deform the weekly KVCTs with the planning CT and determine the delivered mean/minimum/maximum dose, dose volume histograms (DVHs), etc. Results: Compared with the reference plans, the averaged cord maximum, the right and left parotid doses reduced by 22.7 %, 16.5 %, and 9 % respectively in the reduced margin plans. The V95 for PTV2 and PTV3 were found within 2 and 5% between the reference and tighter margin plans. For the reduced margin plans, the averaged cumulative mean doses were consistent with the planned dose for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 within 1.5%, 1.7% and 1.4%. Similar dose variations of the delivered dose were seen for the reference and tighter margin plans. The delivered maximum and mean doses for the cord were 3.55 % and 2.37% higher than the planned doses; a 5 % higher cumulative mean dose for the parotids was also observed for the delivered dose than the planned doses in both plans. Conclusion: By imposing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for level II and III targets for H'N irradiation, acceptable cumulative doses were achievable when coupled with weekly kVCT guidance while improving normal structure sparing.

  8. Apolipocrustacein, formerly vitellogenin, is the major egg yolk precursor protein in decapod crustaceans and is homologous to insect apolipophorin II/I and vertebrate apolipoprotein B

    PubMed Central

    Avarre, Jean-Christophe; Lubzens, Esther; Babin, Patrick J

    2007-01-01

    Background In animals, the biogenesis of some lipoprotein classes requires members of the ancient large lipid transfer protein (LLTP) superfamily, including the cytosolic large subunit of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP), vertebrate apolipoprotein B (apoB), vitellogenin (Vtg), and insect apolipophorin II/I precursor (apoLp-II/I). In most oviparous species, Vtg, a large glycolipoprotein, is the main egg yolk precursor protein. Results This report clarifies the phylogenetic relationships of LLTP superfamily members and classifies them into three families and their related subfamilies. This means that the generic term Vtg is no longer a functional term, but is rather based on phylogenetic/structural criteria. In addition, we determined that the main egg yolk precursor protein of decapod crustaceans show an overall greater sequence similarity with apoLp-II/I than other LLTP, including Vtgs. This close association is supported by the phylogenetic analysis, i.e. neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods, of conserved sequence motifs and the presence of three common conserved domains: an N-terminal large lipid transfer module marker for LLTP, a DUF1081 domain of unknown function in their central region exclusively shared with apoLp-II/I and apoB, and a von Willebrand-factor type D domain at their C-terminal end. Additionally, they share a conserved functional subtilisin-like endoprotease cleavage site with apoLp-II/I, in a similar location. Conclusion The structural and phylogenetic data presented indicate that the major egg yolk precursor protein of decapod crustaceans is surprisingly closely related to insect apoLp-II/I and vertebrate apoB and should be known as apolipocrustacein (apoCr) rather than Vtg. These LLTP may arise from an ancient duplication event leading to paralogs of Vtg sequences. The presence of LLTP homologs in one genome may facilitate redundancy, e.g. involvement in lipid metabolism and as egg yolk precursor protein, and neofunctionalization and subfunctionalization, e.g. involvement in clotting cascade and immune response, of extracellular LLTP members. These protein-coding nuclear genes may be used to resolve phylogenetic relationships among the major arthropod groups, especially the Pancrustacea-major splits. PMID:17241455

  9. Chlorine and temperature directed self-assembly of Mg-Ru2(ii,iii) carbonates and particle size dependent magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian-Hui; Cheng, Ru-Mei; Jia, Yan-Yan; Jin, Jin; Yang, Bing-Bing; Cao, Zhi; Liu, Bin

    2016-02-21

    A series of heterometallic magnesium diruthenium(ii,iii) carbonates, namely K{Mg(H2O)6}2[Ru2(CO3)4Cl2]4H2O (1), K2[{Mg(H2O)4}2Ru2(CO3)4(H2O)Cl]Cl22H2O (2), K[Mg(H2O)5Ru2(CO3)4]5H2O (3) and K[Mg(H2O)4Ru2(CO3)4]H2O (4), were synthesized from the reaction of Ru2(CO3)4(3-) and Mg(2+) in aqueous solution. Compound 1 is composed of ionic crystals with the Ru2(CO3)4Cl2(5-)?:?Mg(H2O)6(2+)?:?K(+) ratio of 1?:?2?:?1. Compound 2 consists of two dimensional layer structures, in which each octahedral environment Mg(H2O)4(2+) bonds to two [Ru2(CO3)4(H2O)Cl](4-) units in a cis manner forming a neutral square-grid layer {Mg(H2O)4Ru2(CO3)4(H2O)Cl}n. For compound 3, one water molecule of each Mg(H2O)6(2+) is substituted by an oxygen atom of Ru2(CO3)4(3-) forming [Mg(H2O)5Ru2(CO3)4](-), and then the neighboring Ru2 dimers are linked together by the rest of the two oxygen atoms of carbonates to form a layer structure {Mg(H2O)5Ru2(CO3)4}n(n-). In compound 4, the neighboring squared-grid layers {Ru2(CO3)4}n(3n-), similar to those in compound 3, are linked by each octahedral environment Mg(H2O)4(2+) in a cis manner forming the three-dimensional network {Mg(H2O)4Ru2(CO3)4}n(n-). Compound 3 shows ferromagnetic coupling between Ru2 dimers, and a long-range ordering is observed below 3.8 K. Compound 4 displays a magnetic ordering below 3.5 K, and a systematic study of the size-dependent magnetic properties of compound 4 reveals that the coercivity of 4 has been improved with reduced sample particle size from the micrometer to the nanometer scale. PMID:26750871

  10. Microbiome, innate Immunity, and esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Baghdadi, Jonathan; Chaudhary, Noami; Pei, Zhiheng; Yang, Liying

    2014-01-01

    With the development of culture-independent technique, a complex microbiome has been established and described in the distal esophagus. Over recent decades, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC)—a relatively rare cancer with high mortality—has increased dramatically in the United States. Several studies documenting an altered microbiome associated with EAC and its precedents (i.e., Barrett’s esophagus and reflux esophagitis) suggest that dysbiosis may be contributing to carcinogenesis, potentially mediated by interactions with toll-like receptors. Investigations attempting to associate viruses, in particular human papilloma virus, with EAC have not been as consistent. Regardless, currently available data is cross-sectional and therefore cannot prove causal relationships. Prospectively, microbiome studies open a new avenue to the understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of reflux disorders and EAC. PMID:25439272

  11. Current strategies in chemoradiation for esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has an important role in the treatment of esophageal cancer in both the inoperable and the pre-operative settings. Pre-operative chemoradiation therapy is generally given to 41.4-50.4 Gy with platinum or paclitaxel based chemotherapy. The most common definitive dose in the U.S. is 50-50.4 Gy. New advances in CRT for esophageal cancer have come from looking for ways to minimize toxicity and maximize efficacy. Recent investigations for minimizing toxicity have focused advanced radiation techniques such as IMRT and proton therapy, have sought to further define normal tissue tolerances, and have examined the use of tighter fields with less elective clinical target volume coverage. Efforts to maximize efficacy have included the use of early positron emission tomography (PET) response directed therapy, molecularly targeted therapies, and the use of tumor markers that predict response. PMID:24982764

  12. GWAS identifies four novel eosinophilic esophagitis loci

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Patrick MA; Wang, Mei-Lun; Cianferoni, Antonella; Aceves, Seema; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Nadeau, Kari; Bredenoord, Albert J.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Spergel, Jonathan M.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergic disorder characterized by infiltration of the esophagus with eosinophils. We had previously reported association of the TSLP/WDR36 locus with EoE. Here we report genome-wide significant associations at four additional loci; c11orf30 and STAT6, which have been previously associated with both atopic and autoimmune disease, and two EoE-specific loci, ANKRD27 that regulates the trafficking of melanogenic enzymes to epidermal melanocytes and CAPN14, that encodes a calpain whose expression is highly enriched in the esophagus. The identification of five EoE loci, not only expands our etiological understanding of the disease but may also represent new therapeutic targets to treat the most debilitating aspect of EoE, esophageal inflammation and remodeling. PMID:25407941

  13. Reversal of lower esophageal sphincter hypotension and esophageal aperistalsis after treatment for hypothyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Eastwood, G.L.; Braverman, L.E.; White, E.M.; Vander Salm, T.J.

    1982-08-01

    A 65-year-old woman suffered from both chronic gastroesophageal reflux, which was complicated by columnar metaplasia (Barrett's epithelium), and profound hypothyroidism. An esophageal motility tracing showed absence of peristalsis in the lower esophagus and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) could not be identified. Thyroid replacement therapy, in conjunction with antacid and cimetidine treatment, was associated not only with improvement in the gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, but also with a return of esophageal peristalsis and LES pressure to normal. To support our clinical observations, we rendered four cats hypothyroid with /sup 131/I and documented a fall in LES pressure. We propose that abnormal smooth-muscle function of the esophagus may be another manifestation of the gastrointestinal motility disturbances which are associated with hypothyroidism.

  14. Reversal of lower esophageal sphincter hypotension and esophageal aperistalsis after treatment for hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, G L; Braverman, L E; White, E M; Vander Salm, T J

    1982-08-01

    A 65-year-old woman suffered from both chronic gastroesophageal reflux, which was complicated by columnar metaplasia (Barrett's epithelium), and profound hypothyroidism. An esophageal motility tracing showed absence of peristalsis in the lower esophagus and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) could not be identified. Thyroid replacement therapy, in conjunction with antacid and cimetidine treatment, was associated not only with improvement in the gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, but also with a return of esophageal peristalsis and LES pressure to normal. To support our clinical observations, we rendered four cats hypothyroid with 131I and documented a fall in LES pressure. We propose that abnormal smooth-muscle function of the esophagus may be another manifestation of the gastrointestinal motility disturbances which are associated with hypothyroidism. PMID:7119407

  15. The Prognostic Significance of FGFR4 Gly388 Polymorphism in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma after Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Hyun-Jeong; Shin, Min-Ho; Kim, Hee-Nam; Kim, Jo-Heon; Hwang, Jun-Eul; Bae, Woo-Kyun; Chung, Ik-Joo; Cho, Sang-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) polymorphism in esophageal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Materials and Methods Peripheral blood samples from 244 patients treated with CRT for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma were assessed for the role of FGFR4 genotype on treatment response and survival. Results A total of 94 patients were homozygous for the Gly388 allele, and 110 were heterozygous and 40 homozygous for the Arg388 allele. No significant association was found between the FGFR4 genotype and clinicopathological parameters. However, patients carrying the Gly388 allele showed a better overall response rate than Arg388 carriers (p=0.038). In addition, Gly388 allele patients at an earlier stage showed better overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival than Arg388 carriers. Among these, the Gly388 allele showed significantly improved OS compared to Arg388 carriers in the lymph node (LN) metastasis group (p=0.042) compared to the no LN metastasis group (p=0.125). However, similar survival outcomes were observed for advanced-stage disease regardless of genotype. Conclusion This result suggests that the role of FGFR4 Gly388 in treatment outcomes differs according to esophageal cancer stage. It showed a predictive role in the response of esophageal cancer patients to CRT with a better trend for OS in Gly388 than Arg388 carriers in the early stages. In particular, LN-positive early-stage patients carrying the Gly388 allele showed improved OS compared to those carrying Arg388. PMID:25989802

  16. Significance of feeding dysfunction in eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Menard-Katcher, Calies; Henry, Michelle; Furuta, Glenn T; Atkins, Dan; Maune, Nancy Creskoff; Haas, Angela M

    2014-01-01

    Feeding dysfunction is a frequent presenting symptom of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Here we present 3 children of various ages whose manifestations of EoE associated feeding dysfunction led to significant and life altering impact on their growth and development. Early identification of presenting symptoms of EoE will allow for prompt diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatments. Recognition of salient features of dysfunction and treatment by feeding therapists and nutritionists led to symptom resolution and growth. PMID:25152606

  17. Endoscopic management of impacted esophageal foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Chen, T; Wu, H-F; Shi, Q; Zhou, P-H; Chen, S-Y; Xu, M-D; Zhong, Y-S; Yao, L-Q

    2013-01-01

    There are many reports on the endoscopic management of ingested foreign bodies in the upper gastrointestinal tract, however, little is known about the management of a specific subset of esophageal foreign bodies - impacted esophageal foreign bodies (IEFBs), especially perforating esophageal foreign bodies (PEFBs). The aim of this retrospective study on 78 cases was to report experience and outcome in the endoscopic management of the IEFBs in Chinese patients. From January 2006 to July 2011, a total of 750 patients with suspected upper gastrointestinal foreign bodies were admitted to the endoscopy center. Among these 750 patients, 78 cases that met the defined criteria of IEFBs were retrospectively enrolled in the present study, including 12 cases (12/78, 15.4%) with PEFBs. The major types of IEFBs were poultry bones (35.9%) and fish bones (17.9%). Most of the IEFBs (80.8%) were located in the upper esophagus, as were two thirds (66.7%) of the PEFBs. Foreign-body retrieval forceps were the most frequently used accessory devices. Extraction of IEFBs failed in eight patients (10.3%) during the endoscopic procedure. The difficult points in endoscopic management were PEFBs, IEFBs with sharp points, and those with impaction for more than 24 hours. IEFBs should be treated as early as possible, and their endoscopic management is safe and effective. Endoscopic management is the first choice for PEFBs when the duration of impaction is less than 24 hours and there are no abscesses outside of the esophageal tract as determined by a computed tomography scan. PMID:22973974

  18. Significance of feeding dysfunction in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Menard-Katcher, Calies; Henry, Michelle; Furuta, Glenn T; Atkins, Dan; Maune, Nancy Creskoff; Haas, Angela M

    2014-08-21

    Feeding dysfunction is a frequent presenting symptom of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Here we present 3 children of various ages whose manifestations of EoE associated feeding dysfunction led to significant and life altering impact on their growth and development. Early identification of presenting symptoms of EoE will allow for prompt diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatments. Recognition of salient features of dysfunction and treatment by feeding therapists and nutritionists led to symptom resolution and growth. PMID:25152606

  19. Advances in Clinical Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Dellon, Evan S.; Liacouras, Chris A.

    2014-01-01

    EoE is a chronic immune/antigen-mediated clinicopathologic condition that has become an increasingly important cause of upper gastrointestinal morbidity in adults and children over the past 2 decades. It is diagnosed based on symptoms of esophageal dysfunction, the presence of at least 15 eosinophils/high-power field in esophageal biopsies, and exclusion of competing causes of esophageal eosinophilia, including proton pump inhibitor-responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE). We review what we have recently learned about the clinical aspects of EoE, discussing the clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of EoE in adults and children. We explain the current diagnostic criteria and challenges to diagnosis, including the role of gastroesophageal reflux disease and PPI-REE. It is also important to consider the epidemiology of EoE (current incidence of 1/10,000 new cases per year and prevalence of 0.5-1/1,000 cases per year) and disease progression. We review the main treatment approaches and new treatment options; EoE can be treated with topical corticosteroids such as fluticasone and budesonide, or dietary strategies, such as amino acid-based formulas, allergy test-directed elimination diets, and non-directed empiric elimination diets. Endoscopic dilation has also become an important tool for treatment of fibrostenostic complications of EoE. There are number of unresolved issues in EoE, including phenotypes, optimal treatment endpoints, the role of maintenance therapy, and treatment of refractory EoE. The care of patients with EoE and the study of the disease span many disciplines—EoE is ideally managed by a multidisciplinary team of gastroenterologists, allergists, pathologists, and dieticians. PMID:25109885

  20. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: update on treatment approaches

    PubMed Central

    Fotis, L; Xatzipsalti, M; Papadopoulou, A

    2012-01-01

    ?osinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a clinical entity with continuously increasing incidence in children and adults. Diet therapy and corticosteroids are the most important therapeutic interventions currently used, while new therapies are being developed, based on the research of the disease mechanisms. In this review we assess the results of the latest clinical trials on management of patients with EoE, and the advances in the development of novel drug therapies. Hippokratia 2012; 16 (3): 200-204 PMID:23935283

  1. Lidocaine inhibition of esophageal peristalsis and lower esophageal sphincter pressure in baboons.

    PubMed

    Sinar, D R; Carey, L C; Cordova, C; Fletcher, J R; Castell, D O

    1985-11-01

    Intravenous lidocaine was infused at 0.82 ml/min in a concentration of 1.2 mg/ml (2.3 mg/kg) for 120 min in awake chair-restrained baboons (Papio anubis), and measurements of esophageal peristalsis and LES pressure were compared before and after lidocaine or control infusions. Lidocaine produced a progressive and significant (P less than 0.05) decrease in amplitude in the peristaltic wave in the smooth muscle portion of the distal esophagus during the 120-min infusion. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure was similarly significantly lower than control after the infusion of lidocaine (P less than 0.05). Velocity and duration of the peristaltic wave were unchanged during the infusion. The decreased amplitude occurred during therapeutic and stable serum concentrations of lidocaine. It did not appear that the inhibitory effect of lidocaine was due to an induction of prostaglandin synthesis, because pretreatment of animals with indomethacin did not change the inhibitory effect of lidocaine, and serum metabolites of prostacyclin decreased during the infusion. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of lidocaine was not topical. The response to the muscarinic agonist, bethanechol was similar in lidocaine-treated animals and control animals. The preservation of a bethanechol response after lidocaine inhibition of LES pressure and distal esophageal amplitude suggests that lidocaine acts proximal to the muscarinic receptor in the esophageal body and smooth muscle portion of the lower esophageal sphincter. This study suggests that lidocaine produces an inhibitory effect on the peristaltic wave and lower esophageal sphincter pressure that is similar to inhibitory effects described after anticholinergic agents and calcium channel blocking drugs, but intravenous lidocaine infusion requires a longer period of time to produce inhibition of muscle function. PMID:2865090

  2. The neural regulation of the mammalian esophageal motility and its implication for esophageal diseases.

    PubMed

    Shiina, Takahiko; Shima, Takeshi; Wrl, Jrgen; Neuhuber, Winfried L; Shimizu, Yasutake

    2010-04-01

    In contrast to the tunica muscularis of the stomach, small intestine and large intestine, the external muscle layer of the mammalian esophagus contains not only smooth muscle but also striated muscle fibers. Although the swallowing pattern generator initiates the peristaltic movement via vagal preganglionic neurons that project to the myenteric ganglia in the smooth muscle esophagus, the progressing front of contraction is organized by a local reflex circuit composed by intrinsic neurons similarly to other gastrointestinal tracts. On the other hand, the peristalsis of the striated muscle esophagus is both initiated and organized by the swallowing pattern generator via vagal motor neurons that directly innervate the muscle fibers. The presence of a distinct ganglionated myenteric plexus in the striated muscle portion of the esophagus had been enigmatic and neglected in terms of peristaltic control for a long time. Recently, the regulatory roles of intrinsic neurons in the esophageal striated muscle have been clarified. It was reported that esophageal striated muscle receives dual innervation from both vagal motor fibers originating in the brainstem and varicose intrinsic nerve fibers originating in the myenteric plexus, which is called 'enteric co-innervation' of esophageal motor endplates. Moreover, a putative local neural reflex pathway that can control the motility of the striated muscle was identified in the rodent esophagus. This reflex circuit consists of primary afferent neurons and myenteric neurons, which can modulate the release of neurotransmitters from vagal motor neurons in the striated muscle esophagus. The pathogenesis of some esophageal disorders such as achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease might be involved in dysfunction of the neural networks including alterations of the myenteric neurons. These evidences indicate the physiological and pathological significance of intrinsic nervous system in the regulation of the esophageal motility. In addition, it is assumed that the components of intrinsic neurons might be therapeutic targets for several esophageal diseases. PMID:19497713

  3. Eosinophilic esophagitis: From pathophysiology to treatment

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Esposito, Dario; Pesce, Marcella; Cuomo, Rosario; De Palma, Giovanni Domenico; Sarnelli, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune disease, characterized by a dense eosinophilic infiltrate in the esophagus, leading to bolus impaction and reflux-like symptoms. Traditionally considered a pediatric disease, the number of adult patients with EoE is continuously increasing, with a relatively higher incidence in western countries. Dysphagia and food impaction represent the main symptoms complained by patients, but gastroesophageal reflux-like symptoms may also be present. Esophageal biopsies are mandatory for the diagnosis of EoE, though clinical manifestations and proton pump inhibitors responsiveness must be taken into consideration. The higher prevalence of EoE in patients suffering from atopic diseases suggests a common background with allergy, however both the etiology and pathophysiology are not completely understood. Elimination diets are considered the first-line therapy in children, but this approach appears less effective in adults patients, who often require steroids; despite medical treatments, EoE is complicated in some cases by esophageal stricture and stenosis, that require additional endoscopic treatments. This review summarizes the evidence on EoE pathophysiology and illustrates the safety and efficacy of the most recent medical and endoscopic treatments. PMID:26600973

  4. Endoscopic resection of gastric and esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Balmadrid, Bryan; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) techniques have reduced the need for surgery in early esophageal and gastric cancers and thus has lessened morbidity and mortality in these diseases. ESD is a relatively new technique in western countries and requires rigorous training to reproduce the proficiency of Asian countries, such as Korea and Japan, which have very high complete (en bloc) resection rates and low complication rates. EMR plays a valuable role in early esophageal cancers. ESD has shown better en bloc resection rates but it is easier to master and maintain proficiency in EMR; it also requires less procedural time. For early esophageal adenocarcinoma arising from Barrett's, ESD and EMR techniques are usually combined with other ablative modalities, the most common being radiofrequency ablation because it has the largest dataset to prove its success. The EMR techniques have been used with some success in early gastric cancers but ESD is currently preferred for most of these lesions. ESD has the added advantage of resecting into the submucosa and thus allowing for endoscopic resection of more aggressive (deeper) early gastric cancer. PMID:26510452

  5. Endoscopic resection of gastric and esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balmadrid, Bryan; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) techniques have reduced the need for surgery in early esophageal and gastric cancers and thus has lessened morbidity and mortality in these diseases. ESD is a relatively new technique in western countries and requires rigorous training to reproduce the proficiency of Asian countries, such as Korea and Japan, which have very high complete (en bloc) resection rates and low complication rates. EMR plays a valuable role in early esophageal cancers. ESD has shown better en bloc resection rates but it is easier to master and maintain proficiency in EMR; it also requires less procedural time. For early esophageal adenocarcinoma arising from Barrett’s, ESD and EMR techniques are usually combined with other ablative modalities, the most common being radiofrequency ablation because it has the largest dataset to prove its success. The EMR techniques have been used with some success in early gastric cancers but ESD is currently preferred for most of these lesions. ESD has the added advantage of resecting into the submucosa and thus allowing for endoscopic resection of more aggressive (deeper) early gastric cancer. PMID:26510452

  6. Current advances in esophageal cancer proteomics.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Norihisa; Kondo, Tadashi

    2015-06-01

    We review the current status of proteomics for esophageal cancer (EC) from a clinician's viewpoint. The ultimate goal of cancer proteomics is the improvement of clinical outcome. The proteome as a functional translation of the genome is a straightforward representation of genomic mechanisms that trigger carcinogenesis. Cancer proteomics has identified the mechanisms of carcinogenesis and tumor progression, detected biomarker candidates for early diagnosis, and provided novel therapeutic targets for personalized treatments. Our review focuses on three major topics in EC proteomics: diagnostics, treatment, and molecular mechanisms. We discuss the major histological differences between EC types, i.e., esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, and evaluate the clinical significance of published proteomics studies, including promising diagnostic biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets, which should be further validated prior to launching clinical trials. Multi-disciplinary collaborations between basic scientists, clinicians, and pathologists should be established for inter-institutional validation. In conclusion, EC proteomics has provided significant results, which after thorough validation, should lead to the development of novel clinical tools and improvement of the clinical outcome for esophageal cancer patients. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Medical Proteomics. PMID:25233958

  7. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer: Impact on extracapsular lymph node involvement

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Ralf; Bollschweiler, Elfriede; Drebber, Uta; Mnig, Stefan P; Schrder, Wolfgang; Alakus, Hakan; Kocher, Martin; Baldus, Stephan E; Hlscher, Arnulf H

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effects of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) on the presence of extracapsular lymph node involvement (LNI) and its prognostic value in patients with resected esophageal cancer. METHODS: Two hundred and ninety-eight patients with advanced esophageal cancer underwent esophagectomy between 1997 and 2006. One hundred and ninety patients (63.8%) were treated with neoadjuvant CRT prior to resection. A total of 986 metastatic LNs were examined. Survival of the patients was analyzed according to intra- and extra-capsular LNI. RESULTS: Five-year survival rate was 22.5% for the entire patient population. Patients with extracapsular LNI had a 5-year survival rate of 16.7%, which was comparable to the 15.8% in patients with infiltrated nodes of the celiac trunk (pM1lymph). In contrast to patients treated with surgery alone, neoadjuvant therapy resulted in significantly (P = 0.001) more patients with pN0/M0 (51.6% vs 25.0%). In 17.6% of the patients with surgery alone vs 16.8% with neoadjuvant CRT, extracapsular LNI was detected. Neoadjuvant therapy does not reduce the occurrence of extracapsular LNI. CONCLUSION: Extracapsular LNI is an independent negative prognostic factor not influenced by neoadjuvant CRT. In a revised staging system for esophageal cancer, extracapsular LNI should be considered. PMID:20419835

  8. Recent Advances From Basic and Clinical Studies of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Shinya; Miyamoto, Shin'ichi; Kikuchi, Osamu; Goto, Tomoyuki; Amanuma, Yusuke; Muto, Manabu

    2015-12-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the most aggressive squamous cell carcinomas and is highly prevalent in Asia. Alcohol and its metabolite, acetaldehyde, are considered definite carcinogens for the esophagus. Polymorphisms in the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 gene, which encodes an enzyme that eliminates acetaldehyde, have been associated with esophageal carcinogenesis. Studies of the mutagenic and carcinogenic effects of acetaldehyde support this observation. Several recent large-scale comprehensive analyses of the genomic alterations in ESCC have shown a high frequency of mutations in genes such as TP53 and others that regulate the cell cycle or cell differentiation. Moreover, whole genome and whole exome sequencing studies have frequently detected somatic mutations, such as G:C?A:T transitions or G:C?C:G transversions, in ESCC tissues. Genomic instability, caused by abnormalities in the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway, is also considered a pathogenic mechanism of ESCC. Advances in diagnostic techniques such as magnifying endoscopy with narrow band imaging or positron emission tomography have increased the accuracy of diagnosis of ESCC. Updated guidelines from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network standardize the practice for the diagnosis and treatment of esophageal cancer. Patients with ESCC are treated endoscopically or with surgery, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy, based on tumor stage. Minimally invasive treatments help improve the quality of life of patients who undergo such treatments. We review recent developments in the diagnosis and treatment of ESCC and advances gained from basic and clinical research. PMID:26376349

  9. Efficacy of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for resected thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wencheng; Liu, Xiao; Xiao, Zefen; Wang, Lvhua; Zhang, Hongxing; Chen, Dongfu; Zhou, Zongmei; Feng, Qinfu; Hui, Zhouguang; Liang, Jun; Yin, Weibo; He, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the clinical use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) of esophageal cancer; therefore, we retrospectively investigated the clinical value of postoperative IMRT among resected thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (TESCC) patients. Methods We enrolled a total of 228 patients with resected TESCC who underwent IMRT between January 2004 and June 2009 in the study. PORT was applied via IMRT with a median total dose of 60?Gy. The KaplanMeier method was used to calculate survival rates, and a log-rank test was used for univariate analysis. The Cox proportional model was used for multivariate analysis. Results The one, three, and five-year overall survival rates of all patients were 89.9%, 56.7%, and 45.1%, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that significant prognostic factors included Union for International Cancer Control 2002 stage, lymphatic metastasis, number of metastatic lymph nodes, the degree of metastatic lymph nodes, the degree of differentiation, and vascular tumor thrombus (P < 0.05). Treatment failure occurred in 98 (45.2%) patients because of recurrence or metastases. Early reactions were observed at rates of 18.0% for radiation esophagitis and 5.7% for radiation pneumonitis more than grade 2. Late side effects included anastomotic stenosis (1.3%) and gastrointestinal bleeding (3.1%). Conclusions The postoperative prophylactic IMRT of TESCC provided a favorable local control rate and acceptable toxicity. PMID:26445608

  10. Esophageal cancer: Risk factors, screening and endoscopic treatment in Western and Eastern countries

    PubMed Central

    Domper Arnal, Mara Jos; Ferrndez Arenas, ngel; Lanas Arbeloa, ngel

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the most unknown and deadliest cancers worldwide, mainly because of its extremely aggressive nature and poor survival rate. Esophageal cancer is the 6th leading cause of death from cancer and the 8th most common cancer in the world. The 5-year survival is around 15%-25%. There are clear differences between the risk factors of both histological types that affect their incidence and distribution worldwide. There are areas of high incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (some areas in China) that meet the requirements for cost-effectiveness of endoscopy for early diagnosis in the general population of those areas. In Europe and United States the predominant histologic subtype is adenocarcinoma. The role of early diagnosis of adenocarcinoma in Barretts esophagus remains controversial. The differences in the therapeutic management of early esophageal carcinoma (high-grade dysplasia, T1a, T1b, N0) between different parts of the world may be explained by the number of cancers diagnosed at an early stage. In areas where the incidence is high (China and Japan among others) early diagnoses is more frequent and has led to the development of endoscopic techniques for definitive treatment that achieve very effective results with a minimum number of complications and preserving the functionality of the esophagus. PMID:26185366

  11. Systematic review of health-related quality of life after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scarpa, Marco; Valente, Stefano; Alfieri, Rita; Cagol, Matteo; Diamantis, Giorgio; Ancona, Ermanno; Castoro, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    This study is aimed to assess the long-term health-related quality of life (HRQL) of patients after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer in comparison with es-tablished norms, and to evaluate changes in HRQL during the different stages of follow-up after esophageal resection. A systematic review was performed by searching medical databases (Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library) for potentially relevant studies that appeared between January 1975 and March 2011. Studies were included if they addressed the question of HRQL after esophageal resection for esophageal cancer. Two researchers independently performed the study selection, data extraction and analysis processes. Twenty-one observational studies were included with a total of 1282 (12-355) patients. Five studies were performed with short form-36 (SF-36) and 16 with European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ C30 (14 of them also utilized the disease-specific OES18 or its previous version OES24). The analysis of long-term generic HRQL with SF-36 showed pooled scores for physical, role and social function after esophagectomy similar to United States norms, but lower pooled scores for physical function, vitality and general health perception. The analysis of HRQL conducted using the Global EORTC C30 global scale during a 6-mo follow-up showed that global scale and physical function were better at the baseline. The symptom scales indicated worsened fatigue, dyspnea and diarrhea 6 mo after esophagectomy. In contrast, however, emotional function had significantly improved after 6 mo. In conclusion, short- and long-term HRQL is deeply affected after esophagectomy for cancer. The impairment of physical function may be a long-term consequence of esophagectomy involving either the respiratory system or the alimentary tract. The short- and long-term improvement in the emotional function of patients who have undergone successful operations may be attributed to the impression that they have survived a near-death experience. PMID:22180708

  12. MicroRNA Expression Differentiates Squamous Epithelium from Barrett’s Esophagus and Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garman, Katherine S.; Owzar, Kouros; Hauser, Elizabeth R.; Westfall, Kristen; Anderson, Blair R.; Souza, Rhonda F.; Diehl, Anna Mae; Provenzale, Dawn; Shaheen, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Current strategies fail to identify most patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) before the disease becomes advanced and incurable. Given the dismal prognosis associated with EAC, improvements in detection of early-stage esophageal neoplasia are needed. Aims We sought to assess whether differential expression of microRNAs could discriminate between squamous epithelium, Barrett’s esophagus (BE), and EAC. Methods We analyzed microRNA expression in a discovery cohort of human endoscopic biopsy samples from 36 patients representing normal squamous esophagus (n=11), BE (n=14), and high-grade dysplasia (HGD)/EAC (n=11). RNA was assessed using microarrays representing 847 human microRNAs followed by qRT-PCR verification of nine microRNAs. In a second cohort (n=18), qRT-PCR validation of five miRNAs was performed. Expression of 59 microRNAs associated with BE/EAC in the literature was assessed in our training cohort. Known esophageal cell lines were used to compare miRNA expression to tissue miRNAs. Results After controlling for multiple comparisons, we found 34 miRNAs differentially expressed between squamous esophagus and BE/EAC by microarray analysis. However, miRNA expression did not reliably differentiate non-dysplastic BE from EAC. In the validation cohort, all five microRNAs selected for qRT-PCR validation differentiated between squamous samples and BE/EAC. Microarray results supported 14 of the previously reported microRNAs associated with BE/EAC in the literature. Cell lines did not generally reflect miRNA expression found in vivo. Conclusions These data indicate that miRNAs differ between squamous esophageal epithelium and BE/EAC, but do not distinguish between BE and EAC. We suggest prospective evaluation of miRNAs in patients at high risk for EAC. PMID:23925817

  13. Pathological analysis of clinical target volume margin for radiotherapy in patients with esophageal and gastroesophageal junction carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Xianshu; Qiao Xueying; Wu Fengpeng; Cao Li; Meng Xianli; Dong Zhiming; Wang Xiaoling; Gao Guodong; Wu, T.-T.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y. . E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To clarify the radiotherapy clinical target volume (CTV) margin needed for esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma (SCC) and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Surgical specimens of esophageal SCC (n = 34) and GEJ adenocarcinoma (n = 32) were prospectively collected and analyzed for microscopic spread along the esophagus and GEJ both proximally and distally from gross tumor and for lymph node (LN) metastasis. Results: For SCC, the mean microscopic spread beyond the gross tumor was 10.5 {+-} 13.5 mm proximally (<30 mm in 32 of 34 cases) and 10.6 {+-} 8.1 mm distally (<30 mm in 33 of 34 cases). For GEJ adenocarcinoma, the spread was 10.3 {+-} 7.2 mm proximally (<30 mm in 29 of 29 cases) and 18.3 {+-} 16.3 mm distally (<30 mm in 27 of 32 cases). The extent of microscopic spread of cancer was significantly associated with pathologic T stage (p = 0.012). LN metastases were observed in 12 (35%) of 34 patients with middle and lower esophageal SCC and 15 (47%) of 32 patients with GEJ adenocarcinoma. Conclusions: The extent of microscopic spread within esophagus (recommended CTV margin) was <30 mm in about 94% of cases of esophageal cancer, except for distal microscopic spread in GEJ adenocarcinoma, in which 50 mm was needed to cover about 94% of cases.

  14. 21 CFR 868.1920 - Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors. 868.1920 Section 868.1920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices 868.1920 Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors....

  15. 21 CFR 868.1920 - Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors. 868.1920 Section 868.1920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1920 Esophageal stethoscope with electrical conductors....

  16. Esophageal perforation following cervical mediastinoscopy: a rare serious complication

    PubMed Central

    Salter, Benjamin; Evans, Adam; Reddy, Ramachandra

    2015-01-01

    We describe a rare case of esophageal perforation following cervical mediastinoscopy on a patient with mediastinal lymphadenopathy and right upper lobe (RUL) mass. The patient was successfully treated with esophageal stenting and bilateral pleural exploration and drainage with eventual discharge tolerating a regular diet. This report details an uncommon but noteworthy complication to keep in mind when performing this procedure. PMID:26793389

  17. High prevalence of esophageal dysmotility in asymptomatic obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Ct-Daigneault, Justin; Leclerc, Pierre; Joubert, Josette; Bouin, Mickael

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is an important health problem affecting >500 million people worldwide. Esophageal dysmotility is a gastrointestinal pathology associated with obesity; however, its prevalence and characteristics remain unclear. Esophageal dysmotilities have a high prevalence among obese patients regardless of gastrointestinal symptoms. OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence of esophageal dysmotility among obese patients. The secondary goals were to characterize these pathologies in obese patients and identify risk factors. METHOD: A prospective study from January 2009 to March 2010 at the University of Montreal Hospital Centre (Montreal, Quebec) was performed. Every patient scheduled for bariatric surgery underwent preoperatory esophageal manometry and was included in the study. Manometry was performed according to a standardized protocol with the following measures: superior esophageal sphincter coordination and release during deglutition; esophageal body presence, propagation, length, amplitude and type of esophageal waves of contraction; lower esophageal sphincter localization, tone, release, intragastic pressure and intraesophageal pressure. All reference values were those used in the digestive motility laboratory. A gastrointestinal symptoms questionnaire was completed on the day manometry was performed. Chart reviews were performed to identify comorbidities and treatments that could influence the results. RESULTS: A total of 53 patients were included (mean [ SD] age 4310 years; mean body mass index 467 kg/m2; 70% female). Esophageal manometry revealed dysmotility in 51% (n=27) of the patients. This dysmotility involved the esophageal body in 74% (n=20) of the patients and the inferior sphincter in 11% (n=3). Mixed dysmotility (body and inferior sphincter) was found in 15% (n=4) of cases. The esophageal body dysmotilities were hypomotility in 85% (n=23) of the patients, either from insignificant waves (74% [n=20]), nonpropagated waves (11% [n=3]) or low-amplitude waves (33% [n=9]). Gastroesophageal symptoms were found in 66% (n=35) of obese patients, including heartburn (66% [n=23]), regurgitation (26% [n=9]), dysphagia (43% [n=15]), chest pain (6% [n=2]) and dyspepsia (26% [n=9]). Among symptomatic patients, 51% (n=18) had normal manometry and 49% (n=17) had abnormal manometry (statistically nonsignificant). Among asymptomatic patients (n=18), 44% (n=8) had normal manometry and 56% (n=10) had abnormal manometry (statistically nonsignificant). Furthermore, no statistical differences were found between the normal manometry group and the abnormal manometry group with regard to medication intake or comorbidities. CONCLUSION: Esophageal dysmotilities had a high prevalence in obese patients. Gastrointestinal symptoms cannot predict the presence of esophageal dysmotility. Hypomotility of the esophageal body is the most common dysmotility, especially from the absence of significant waves. PMID:24945185

  18. Use of Germline Polymorphisms in Predicting Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Response in Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pei-Chun; Chen, Yen-Ching; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Chen, Shin-Kuang; Yang, Pei-Wen; Lee, Yung-Chie; Hsiao, Chuhsing K.; Lee, Jang-Ming; Chuang, Eric Y.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To identify germline polymorphisms to predict concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) response in esophageal cancer patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 139 esophageal cancer patients treated with CCRT (cisplatin-based chemotherapy combined with 40 Gy of irradiation) and subsequent esophagectomy were recruited at the National Taiwan University Hospital between 1997 and 2008. After excluding confounding factors (i.e., females and patients aged {>=}70 years), 116 patients were enrolled to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with specific CCRT responses. Genotyping arrays and mass spectrometry were used sequentially to determine germline polymorphisms from blood samples. These polymorphisms remain stable throughout disease progression, unlike somatic mutations from tumor tissues. Two-stage design and additive genetic models were adopted in this study. Results: From the 26 SNPs identified in the first stage, 2 SNPs were found to be significantly associated with CCRT response in the second stage. Single nucleotide polymorphism rs16863886, located between SGPP2 and FARSB on chromosome 2q36.1, was significantly associated with a 3.93-fold increase in pathologic complete response to CCRT (95% confidence interval 1.62-10.30) under additive models. Single nucleotide polymorphism rs4954256, located in ZRANB3 on chromosome 2q21.3, was associated with a 3.93-fold increase in pathologic complete response to CCRT (95% confidence interval 1.57-10.87). The predictive accuracy for CCRT response was 71.59% with these two SNPs combined. Conclusions: This is the first study to identify germline polymorphisms with a high accuracy for predicting CCRT response in the treatment of esophageal cancer.

  19. Spectrum of FDG uptake in large (>10 cm) esophageal leiomyomas

    PubMed Central

    Dendy, Meaghan; Johnson, Katelyn

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal leiomyomas are rare benign tumors that can be treated successfully with limited surgical resection. It is occasionally important to distinguish leiomyomas from more aggressive submucosal esophageal tumors, most notably gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). GISTs have a worse prognosis, particularly when they are large (>10 cm). Increased uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose on positron emission tomography (PET) scans is common in GISTs, potentially allowing PET scanning to differentiate between GIST and benign esophageal tumors. Three patients presented with large (>10 cm) esophageal masses of ranging PET avidity [maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of 1.310.1]. All were treated surgically and histologically confirmed to be esophageal leiomyomas. Unfortunately, the wide range of PET uptake precludes PET scanning from differentiating large leiomyomas from more aggressive lesions. PMID:26793383

  20. Spectrum of FDG uptake in large (>10 cm) esophageal leiomyomas.

    PubMed

    Dendy, Meaghan; Johnson, Katelyn; Boffa, Daniel J

    2015-12-01

    Esophageal leiomyomas are rare benign tumors that can be treated successfully with limited surgical resection. It is occasionally important to distinguish leiomyomas from more aggressive submucosal esophageal tumors, most notably gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). GISTs have a worse prognosis, particularly when they are large (>10 cm). Increased uptake of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose on positron emission tomography (PET) scans is common in GISTs, potentially allowing PET scanning to differentiate between GIST and benign esophageal tumors. Three patients presented with large (>10 cm) esophageal masses of ranging PET avidity [maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of 1.3-10.1]. All were treated surgically and histologically confirmed to be esophageal leiomyomas. Unfortunately, the wide range of PET uptake precludes PET scanning from differentiating large leiomyomas from more aggressive lesions. PMID:26793383

  1. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in human esophageal squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jian-Gang; Tang, Jiang-Bo; Chen, Chun-Lian; Liu, Bao-Xing; Fu, Xiang-Ning; Zhu, Zhi-Hui; Qu, Wei; Cianflone, Katherine; Waalkes, Michael P.; Wang, Dao-Wen

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was expressed in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. METHODS: Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blotting, immunohistoc-hemistry and immunofluorescence were used to assess the expression level of COX-2 in esophageal tissue. RESULTS: COX-2 mRNA levels were increased by > 80-fold in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma when compared to adjacent noncancerous tissue. COX-2 protein was present in 21 of 30 cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma tissues, but was undetectable in noncancerous tissue. Immunohistochemistry was performed to directly show expression of COX-2 in tumor tissue. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that COX-2 may be an important factor for esophageal cancer and inhibition of COX-2 may be helpful for prevention and possibly treatment of this cancer. PMID:15259059

  2. Andrographis paniculata elicits anti-invasion activities by suppressing TM4SF3 gene expression and by anoikis-sensitization in esophageal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Lee, Julia Kin-Ming; Li, Lin; Chan, Kar-Man; Wong, Eric Chun-Wai; Chan, Judy Yuet-Wah; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Lui, Vivian Wai Yan; Chiu, Philip Wai-Yan; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the sixth most common cancer in male causing death worldwide. It is usually diagnosed at advanced stage with high postoperative recurrence and systemic metastasis, which leads to poor prognosis. The potential inhibitory effect of herbal medicines on metastasis of esophageal cancer has drawn researchers great attention. In the present study, the anti-invasion activities of Andrographis paniculata (AP) have been evaluated in two esophageal cancer cell lines, EC-109 and KYSE-520, as well as human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1). The anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities of AP were also evaluated in human esophageal xenograft-bearing mouse models. Our results demonstrated for the first time that aqueous extract of AP inhibited the motility and invasion of esophageal cancer cells, which is the initial step of metastasis, without cytotoxicity. Anoikis resistance has also been reversed in AP-treated cancer cells. Besides, the expression of metastasis-related gene TM4SF3 in EC-109 cells was significantly decreased in AP extract-treated cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, the anti-tumor and anti-metastatic efficacies in subcutaneous and intraperitoneal esophageal xenograft-bearing mice were demonstrated after oral administration of AP aqueous extract for 3 weeks. Last but not least, the active component, isoandrographolide, responsible for the anti-migratory activity was firstly revealed here. In conclusion, the AP aqueous extract exerted inhibitory activities on the migration and anoikis resistance of esophageal cancer cells EC-109 and KYSE-520, as well as suppressed the proliferation and motility of endothelial cells. Combining the mentioned effects may account for the anti-tumor and anti-metastasis effects of AP aqueous extract in xenograft-bearing mice. The findings in the present study further enhance the understanding of the therapeutic mechanisms of the herb AP, which may lead to clinical applications. PMID:26885447

  3. Paclitaxel injection concentrate for nanodispersion versus nab-paclitaxel in women with metastatic breast cancer: a multicenter, randomized, comparative phase II/III study.

    PubMed

    Jain, Minish M; Gupte, Smita U; Patil, Shekhar G; Pathak, Anand B; Deshmukh, Chetan D; Bhatt, Niraj; Haritha, Chiramana; Govind Babu, K; Bondarde, Shailesh A; Digumarti, Raghunadharao; Bajpai, Jyoti; Kumar, Ravi; Bakshi, Ashish V; Bhattacharya, Gouri Sankar; Patil, Poonam; Subramanian, Sundaram; Vaid, Ashok K; Desai, Chirag J; Khopade, Ajay; Chimote, Geetanjali; Bapsy, Poonamalle P; Bhowmik, Shravanti

    2016-02-01

    Paclitaxel is widely used in the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Formulations of paclitaxel contain surfactants and solvents or albumin derived from human blood. The use of co-solvents such as polyoxyethylated castor oil is thought to contribute to toxicity profile and hypersensitivity reactions as well as leaching of plasticizers from polyvinyl chloride bags and infusion sets. Currently, nab-paclitaxel, an albumin-bound paclitaxel in nanometer range continues to be the preferred taxane formulation used in clinic. This study (CTRI/2010/091/001116) investigated the efficacy and tolerability of a polyoxyethylated castor oil- and albumin-free formulation of paclitaxel [paclitaxel injection concentrate for nanodispersion (PICN)] compared with nab-paclitaxel in women with refractory MBC. The current study was a multicenter, open-label, parallel-group, randomized, comparative phase II/III trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of PICN (260 mg/m(2) [n = 64] and 295 mg/m(2) [n = 58] every 3 weeks) compared with nab-paclitaxel (260 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks [n = 58]) in women 18 and 70 years old with confirmed MBC. Overall response rate (ORR) was assessed with imaging every 2 cycles. An independent analysis of radiologic data was performed for evaluable patients. Progression-free survival (PFS) was a secondary efficacy measure. Independent radiologist-assessed ORRs in the evaluable population of women aged ≥70 years were 35, 49, and 43 % in the PICN 260 mg/m(2), PICN 295 mg/m(2), and nab-paclitaxel 260 mg/m(2) arms, respectively. Median PFS in the evaluable population was 23, 35, and 34 weeks in the PICN 260 mg/m(2), PICN 295 mg/m(2), and nab-paclitaxel 260 mg/m(2) arms, respectively. Adverse events occurred in similar proportions of patients across treatment arms. Hypersensitivity reactions were not frequently observed with the clinical use of PICN across the treatment cohorts. In women with metastatic breast cancer, PICN at 260 and 295 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks was effective and well tolerated and showed similar tolerability compared with nab-paclitaxel 260 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks. Statistically, significant differences were not observed in the PICN and nab-paclitaxel treatment arms for radiologist-assessed ORR or median PFS. The novel paclitaxel formulation, PICN, offers apart from efficacy, potential safety advantage of decreased use of corticosteroid pretreatment and the absence of the risk of transmission of blood product-borne disease. PMID:26941199

  4. Unprecedented structural variations in trinuclear mixed valence Co(II/III) complexes: theoretical studies, pnicogen bonding interactions and catecholase-like activities.

    PubMed

    Hazari, Alokesh; Kanta Das, Lakshmi; Kadam, Ramakant M; Bauz, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio; Ghosh, Ashutosh

    2015-02-28

    Three new mixed valence trinuclear Co(II/III) compounds cis-[Co3L2(MeOH)2(N3)2(?1,1-N3)2] (1), trans-[Co3L2(H2O)2(N3)2(?1,1-N3)2](H2O)2 (2) and [Co3L(R)2(N3)3(?1,3-N3)] (3) have been synthesized by reacting a di-Schiff base ligand (H2L) or its reduced form [H2LR] (where H2L= N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-1,3-propanediamine and H2LR= N,N'-bis(2-hydroxybenzyl)-1,3-propanediamine) with cobalt perchlorate hexahydrate and sodium azide. All three products have been characterized by IR, UV-Vis and EPR spectroscopies, ESI-MS, elemental, powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Complex 2 is an angular trinuclear species in which two terminal octahedral Co(III)N2O4 centers coordinate to the central octahedral cobalt(II) ion through ?2-phenoxido oxygen and ?1,1-azido nitrogen atoms along with two mutually cis-oxygen atoms of methanol molecules. On the other hand, in linear trinuclear complex , in addition to the ?2-phenoxido and ?1,1-azido bridges with terminal octahedral Co(III) centres, the central Co(II) is bonded with two mutually trans-oxygen atoms of water molecules. Thus the cis-trans configuration of the central Co(II) is solvent dependent. In complex 3, the two terminal octahedral Co(III)N2O4 centers coordinate to the central penta-coordinated Co(II) ion through double phenoxido bridges along with the nitrogen atom of a terminal azido ligand. In addition, the two terminal Co(III) are connected through a ?1,3-azido bridge that participates in pnicogen bonding interactions (intermolecular N-N interaction) as an acceptor. Both the cis and trans isomeric forms of 1 and 2 have been optimized using density functional theory (DFT) calculations and it is found that the cis configuration is energetically more favorable than the trans one. However, the trans configuration of 2 is stabilized by the hydrogen bonding network involving a water dimer. The pnicogen bonding interactions have been demonstrated using MEP surfaces and CSD search which support the counter intuitive electron acceptor ability of the ?1,3-azido ligand. Complexes 1-3 exhibit catecholase-like activities in the aerial oxidation of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol to the corresponding o-quinone. Kinetic data analyses of this oxidation reaction in acetonitrile reveal that the catecholase-like activity follows the order: 1 (kcat = 142 h(-1)) > 3 (kcat = 99 h(-1)) > 2 (kcat = 85 h(-1)). Mechanistic investigations of the catalytic behaviors by X-band EPR spectroscopy and estimation of hydrogen peroxide formation indicate that the oxidation reaction proceeds through the reduction of Co(III) to Co(II). PMID:25611163

  5. Advanced esophageal cancer with tracheobronchial fistula successfully treated by?esophageal bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Masahiro; Ishiguro, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Tatsuya; Takeyama, Hiromitsu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction When esophageal cancer infiltrates the respiratory tract and forms a fistula, a patients quality of life falls remarkably. Abstinence from oral feeding is necessary to prevent respiratory complications including pneumonia. Surgery is sometimes necessary to maintain quality of life. The aim of this study was to examine clinical outcomes of esophageal cancer complicated by tracheobronchial fistula. Presentation of case Twelve patients who underwent esophageal bypass between 2006 and 2011 in our hospital were studied. Patient characteristics, therapeutic course, outcome, and operation type were compared. Six patients among 8 who could not tolerate oral feeding could do so after bypass surgery. Ten patients were able to enjoy oral intake up until the last few days of life. Three patients survived for more than 10 months. In spite of undergoing an operation, 1 patient survived for only 2 months and another for 4 months. The only complication was postoperative delirium in 1 patient. Discussion While surgical bypass is more invasive than procedures such as endoscopic stenting, we had few complications after operative intervention and were able to maintain quality of life in our patients. Conclusion This bypass procedure is a treatment option for patients with tracheobronchial fistula from advanced esophageal cancer. PMID:25765740

  6. Emerging techniques and efficacy of endoscopic esophageal reconstruction and lumen restoration for complete esophageal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Perbtani, Yaseen; Suarez, Alejandro L.; Wagh, Mihir S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Complete esophageal obstruction (CEO) is a rare occurrence characterized by progressive esophageal stricture, which eventually causes lumen obliteration. With recent advances in flexible endoscopy, various innovative techniques exist for restoring luminal continuity. The primary aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of patients undergoing combined antegrade-retrograde endoscopic dilation for CEO at our institution. The secondary aim was to review and highlight emerging techniques, outcomes, and adverse events after endoscopic treatment of CEO. Patients and methods: Our electronic endoscopy database was retrospectively reviewed to identify patients who underwent combined antegrade and retrograde endoscopy for CEO. Patient and procedural data collected included gender, age, technical success, pre- and post-dysphagia scores, and adverse events. Results: Six patients (67 % male, mean age 71.6 years [range 63 – 80]) underwent technically successful esophageal reconstruction with combined antegrade-retrograde endoscopy. All patients noted improvement in dysphagia with mean pre-procedure dysphagia score of 4 reduced to 1.33 (range 0 – 3) post-procedure. There were no adverse events and mean follow-up time was 17.3 months (range 3 – 48). Conclusions: Combined antegrade and retrograde endoscopic therapy for CEO is feasible and safe. We present our experience with endoscopic management of complete esophageal obstruction, and highlight emerging techniques, outcomes and adverse events related to this minimally invasive modality. PMID:26878039

  7. Initiation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in a murine 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide and alcohol carcinogenesis model.

    PubMed

    Osei-Sarfo, Kwame; Urvalek, Alison M; Tang, Xiao-Han; Scognamiglio, Theresa; Gudas, Lorraine J

    2015-03-20

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs) are very common, aggressive tumors, and are often associated with alcohol and tobacco abuse. Because ESCCs exhibit high recurrence rates and are diagnosed at late stages, identification of prognostic and drug targets for prevention and treatment is critical. We used the 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO) murine model of oral carcinogenesis and the Meadows-Cook model of alcohol abuse to assess changes in the expression of molecular markers during the initial stages of ESCC. Combining these two models, which mimic chronic alcohol and tobacco abuse in humans, we detected increased cellular proliferation (EGFR and Ki67 expression), increased canonical Wnt signaling and downstream elements (?-catenin, FoxM1, and S100a4 protein levels), changes in cellular adhesive properties (reduced E-cadherin in the basal layer of the esophageal epithelium), and increased levels of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and p38. Additionally, we found that treatment with ethanol alone increased the numbers of epithelial cells expressing solute carrier family 2 (facilitated glucose transporter, member 1) (SLC2A1) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), and increased the phosphorylation of p38. Thus, we identified both 4-NQO- and ethanol-specific targets in the initial stages of esophageal carcinogenesis, which should lead to the development of potential markers and therapeutic targets for human ESCC. PMID:25714027

  8. Initiation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in a murine 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide and alcohol carcinogenesis model

    PubMed Central

    Osei-Sarfo, Kwame; Scognamiglio, Theresa; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs) are very common, aggressive tumors, and are often associated with alcohol and tobacco abuse. Because ESCCs exhibit high recurrence rates and are diagnosed at late stages, identification of prognostic and drug targets for prevention and treatment is critical. We used the 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO) murine model of oral carcinogenesis and the Meadows-Cook model of alcohol abuse to assess changes in the expression of molecular markers during the initial stages of ESCC. Combining these two models, which mimic chronic alcohol and tobacco abuse in humans, we detected increased cellular proliferation (EGFR and Ki67 expression), increased canonical Wnt signaling and downstream elements (?-catenin, FoxM1, and S100a4 protein levels), changes in cellular adhesive properties (reduced E-cadherin in the basal layer of the esophageal epithelium), and increased levels of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and p38. Additionally, we found that treatment with ethanol alone increased the numbers of epithelial cells expressing solute carrier family 2 (facilitated glucose transporter, member 1) (SLC2A1) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), and increased the phosphorylation of p38. Thus, we identified both 4-NQO- and ethanol-specific targets in the initial stages of esophageal carcinogenesis, which should lead to the development of potential markers and therapeutic targets for human ESCC. PMID:25714027

  9. Altered esophageal histamine receptor expression in Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE): implications on disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Merves, Jamie; Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna Modayur; Benitez, Alain J; Muir, Amanda B; Lee, Anna J; Lim, Diana M; Dods, Kara; Mehta, Isha; Ruchelli, Eduardo D; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Spergel, Jonathan M; Wang, Mei-Lun

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic allergic disorder, whose pathobiology is incompletely understood. Histamine-producing cells including mast cells and basophils have been implicated in EoE. However, very little is currently known about the role of histamine and histamine receptor (HR) expression and signaling in the esophageal epithelium. Herein, we characterized HR (H1R, H2R, H3R, and H4R) expression in human esophageal biopsies and investigate the role of histamine signaling in inducible cytokine expression in human esophageal epithelial cells in vitro. HR expression was quantified in esophageal biopsies from non-EoE control (N = 23), inactive EoE (<15 eos/hpf, N = 26) and active EoE (>15 eos/hpf, N = 22) subjects using qRT-PCR and immunofluorescent localization. HR expression and histamine-mediated cytokine secretion were evaluated in human primary and telomerase-immortalized esophageal epithelial cells. H1R, H2R, and H4R expression were increased in active EoE biopsies compared to inactive EoE and controls. H2R was the most abundantly expressed receptor, and H3R expression was negligible in all 3 cohorts. Infiltrating eosinophils expressed H1R, H2R, and H4R, which contributed to the observed increase in HR in active subjects. H1R and H2R, but not H3R or H4R, were constitutively expressed by primary and immortalized cells, and epithelial histamine stimulation induced GM-CSF, TNFα, and IL-8, but not TSLP or eotaxin-3 secretion. Epithelial priming with the TLR3 ligand poly (I:C) induced H1R and H2R expression, and enhanced histamine-induced GM-CSF, TNFα, and IL-8 secretion. These effects were primarily suppressed by H1R antagonists, but unaffected by H2R antagonism. Histamine directly activates esophageal epithelial cytokine secretion in vitro in an H1R dependent fashion. However, H1R, H2R and H4R are induced in active inflammation in EoE in vivo. While systemic antihistamine (anti-H1R) therapy may not induce clinical remission in EoE, our study suggests that further study of histamine receptor signaling in EoE is warranted and that targeting of additional histamine receptors may lead to novel treatment strategies for this important disease. PMID:25723478

  10. Upper esophageal sphincter during transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation: effects of reflux content and posture

    PubMed Central

    Babaei, Arash; Bhargava, Valmik

    2010-01-01

    Although some studies show that the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) contracts during transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (TLESR), others show that it relaxes. We hypothesized that the posture of the subject and constituents of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) may determine the type of UES response during the TLESR. High-resolution manometry and esophageal pH/impedance recording were performed in 10 healthy volunteers in the right recumbent (1 h) and upright (1 h) positions following the ingestion of a 1,000-Kcal meal. The UES pressure response during TLESR and constituents of GER (liquid, air, and pH) were determined. 109 TLESRs (58 upright and 51 recumbent) were analyzed. The majority of TLESRs were associated with GER (91% upright and 88% recumbent) events. UES relaxation was the predominant response during upright position (81% of TLESRs), and it was characteristically associated with presence of air in the reflux (92%). On the other hand, UES contraction was the predominant response during recumbent position (82% of TLESRs), and it was mainly associated with liquid reflux (71%). The rate of esophageal pressure increase (dP/dt) during the GER, but not the pH, had major influence on the type of UES response during TLESR. The dP/dt during air reflux (127 ± 39 mmHg/s) was significantly higher than liquid reflux (31 ± 6 mmHg/s, P < 0.0001). We concluded that the nature of UES response during TLESR, relaxation or contraction, is related to the posture and the constituents of GER. We propose that the rapid rate of esophageal pressure increase associated with air reflux determines the UES relaxation response to GER. PMID:20167874

  11. Pathophysiological mechanisms linking obesity and esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Leo; Long, Elizabeth; Beales, Ian LP

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades there has been a dramatic rise in the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) in the developed world. Over approximately the same period there has also been an increase in the prevalence of obesity. Obesity, especially visceral obesity, is an important independent risk factor for the development of gastro-esophageal reflux disease, Barretts esophagus and EAC. Although the simplest explanation is that this mediated by the mechanical effects of abdominal obesity promoting gastro-esophageal reflux, the epidemiological data suggest that the EAC-promoting effects are independent of reflux. Several, not mutually exclusive, mechanisms have been implicated, which may have different effects at various points along the reflux-Barretts-cancer pathway. These mechanisms include a reduction in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection enhancing gastric acidity and possibly appetite by increasing gastric ghrelin secretion, induction of both low-grade systemic inflammation by factors secreted by adipose tissue and the metabolic syndrome with insulin-resistance. Obesity is associated with enhanced secretion of leptin and decreased secretion of adiponectin from adipose tissue and both increased leptin and decreased adiponectin have been shown to be independent risk factors for progression to EAC. Leptin and adiponectin have a set of mutually antagonistic actions on Barretts cells which appear to influence the progression of malignant behaviour. At present no drugs are of proven benefit to prevent obesity associated EAC. Roux-en-Y reconstruction is the preferred bariatric surgical option for weight loss in patients with reflux. Statins and aspirin may have chemopreventative effects and are indicated for their circulatory benefits. PMID:25400997

  12. Treatment of esophageal spirocercosis with milbemycin oxime.

    PubMed

    Kelly, P J; Fisher, M; Lucas, H; Krecek, R C

    2008-10-01

    Six medium sized mixed breed dogs treated with milbemycin oxime (11.5mg on days 0, 7 and 28 and then monthly) stopped shedding Spirocerca lupi ova after 3-44 days. There was no evidence of subsequent shedding in repeated tests (about 5/dog) carried out from 31 to 133 days after initiation of treatment. Esophageal nodules disappeared in all dogs within 95-186 days and radiographic signs resolved within 85-127 days in the five dogs that were studied. This preliminary data shows milbemycin oxime deserves further evaluation for the treatment of spirocercosis. PMID:18644677

  13. Unusual esophageal foreign body: a table fork.

    PubMed

    Mevio, Emilio; Mevio, Niccol

    2013-01-01

    The presence of an esophageal foreign body (EFB) is a medical emergency requiring urgent evaluation and treatment. Swallowing of foreign bodies is most common in children aged between 6 months and 6 years, in whom it usually occurs during games. In adults, foreign bodies tend to be ingested accidentally together with food. The authors report an unusual case of EFB (a table fork) in an adult and briefly report the clinical presentation and the therapeutic procedures adopted in this case and similar cases. PMID:23634316

  14. Application of Endobronchial Ultrasonography for the Preoperative Detecting Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Lymph Node Metastasis of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Rong; Li, Yin; Gao, Xiao-Yan; Lin, Shi-Yong; Luo, Guang-Yu; Li, Jian-Jun; Xu, Guo-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background The preoperative detection of recurrent laryngeal nerve lymph node (RLN LN) metastasis provides important information for the treatment of esophageal cancer. We investigated the possibility of applying endobronchial ultrasonography (EBUS) with conventional preoperative endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and computerized tomography (CT) examination to evaluate RLN LN metastasis in patients with esophageal cancer. Methods A total of 115 patients with advanced thoracic esophageal cancer underwent EBUS examinations. Patients also underwent EUS and CT imaging as reference diagnostic methods. Positron emission tomography /computed tomography (PET/CT) was also introduced in partial patients as reference method. The preoperative evaluation of RLN LN metastasis was compared with the surgical and pathological staging in 94 patients who underwent radical surgery. Results The sensitivities of the preoperative evaluations of RLN LN metastasis by EBUS, EUS and CT were 67.6%, 32.4% and 29.4%, respectively. The sensitivity of EBUS was significantly different from that of EUS or CT, especially in the detection of right RLN LNs. In addition, according to the extra data from reference method, PET/CT was not superior to EBUS or EUS in detecting RLN LN metastasis. Among all 115 patients, 21 patients who were diagnosed with tracheal invasions by EUS or EBUS avoided radical surgery. Another 94 patients who were diagnosed as negative for tracheobronchial tree invasion by EUS and EBUS had no positive findings in radical surgery. Conclusions EBUS can enhance the preoperative sensitivity of the detection of RLN LN metastasis in cases of thoracic esophageal cancer and is a useful complementary examination to conventional preoperative EUS and CT, which can alert thoracic surgeons to the possibility of a greater range of preoperative lymph node dissection. EBUS may also indicate tracheal invasion in cases of esophageal stricture. PMID:26372339

  15. On the Possible Correlations Between the Evolution of the Melting Behavior, the Change in Birefringence and Crystal Structure with Crystallization Temperature and the Existence of the II - III Regime Transition for Isotactic Polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiannong; Srinivas, Srivatsan; Subramaniam, Chitra; Marand, Herve

    1998-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the spherulitic growth rate, G(Tx), for isotactic polypropylene has been analyzed by a number of authors in the context of the Lauritzen-Hoffman secondary nucleation theory. In all cases, the existence of a regime II to regime III transition has been reported. We carried out similar studies using a number of metallocene based isotactic polypropylene fractions and failed to see any such transition when plotting ln G vs. Tx. On the other hand, plots of lnG vs 1/Tx(Tm-Tx), where Tm is the equilibrium melting temperature, do exhibit a change in slope at temperatures in the vicinity of the reported II-III regime transition. Studies of the melting behavior and birefringence of it-PP fractions crystallized isothermally in a temperature range encompassing this so called transition revealed a change in the slope of observed melting temperature vs crystallization temperature and a change in the sign of spherulite birefringence in the near vicinity of the II-III regime transition temperature. Current X-ray diffraction studies are probing the possibility that this transition temperature is associated with a gradual evolution in the structure of the crystal phase resulting from isothermal crystallization (alpha one vs alpha two)..

  16. Esophageal obstruction in horses: a retrospective study of 34 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Feige, K; Schwarzwald, C; Fürst, A; Kaser-Hotz, B

    2000-01-01

    The major purpose of this investigation was to describe the causes, possible complications, and prognoses of horses with esophageal obstruction. Of 34 cases presenting with esophageal obstruction, 28 cases were due to impaction of ingesta. Obstruction due to pre-existing esophageal disease occurred in 4 horses with megaesophagus, in 1 horse with stricture in the upper third of the esophagus, and in 1 horse with esophageal diverticulum. There was no significant difference in the contamination of the trachea between horses that subsequently developed aspiration pneumonia and those that did not. The duration of esophageal obstruction prior to admission was significantly longer in horses that developed aspiration pneumonia (median 18, range 2-48 h) than in those horses that did not (median 4, range 0.5-48 h). Although the obstruction was relieved in all 34 horses, 4 were euthanized because of recurring obstruction due to megaesophagus (n = 2), esophageal diverticulum (n = 1), and esophageal stricture (n = 1). Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:10738598

  17. The effect of concurrent esophageal pathology on bariatric surgical planning.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Daniel Davila; Louie, Brian E; Chen, Judy; Aye, Ralph W; McMahon, Ross; Farivar, Alexander S

    2015-01-01

    In the presence of esophageal pathology, there is risk of worse outcomes after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) and sleeve gastrectomy (SG). This study reviewed how an esophageal workup affected a bariatric operative plan in patients with concurrent esophageal pathology. We retrospectively reviewed patients planning bariatric surgery referred with significant reflux, dysphagia, and hiatal hernia (>3 cm) to determine how and why a thorough esophageal workup changed a bariatric operative plan. We identified 79 patients for analysis from 2009 to 2013. In 10/41 patients (24.3%) planning LAGB and 5/9 patients planning SG (55.5%), a Roux was preferred because of severe symptoms of reflux and aspiration, dysphagia, manometric abnormalities (aperistaltic or hypoperistaltic esophagus with low mean wave amplitudes), large hiatal hernia (>5 cm), and/or presence of Barrett's esophagus. Patients without these characteristics had a decreased risk of foregut symptoms after surgery. We recommend a thorough esophageal workup in bariatric patients with known preoperative esophageal pathology. The operative plan might need to be changed to a Roux to prevent adverse outcomes including dysphagia, severe reflux, or suboptimal weight loss. An esophageal workup may improve surgical decision making and improve patient outcomes. PMID:25213580

  18. Gastroesophageal reflux in cirrhotic patients without esophageal varices

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Cui, Pei-Lin; Lv, Dong; Yao, Shi-Wei; Xu, You-Qing; Yang, Zhao-Xu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the esophageal motility and abnormal acid and bile reflux incidence in cirrhotic patients without esophageal varices (EV). METHODS: Seventy-eight patients with liver cirrhosis without EV confirmed by upper gastroesophageal endoscopy and 30 healthy control volunteers were prospectively enrolled in this study. All the patients were evaluated using a modified protocol including Child-Pugh score, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, esophageal manometry, simultaneous ambulatory 24-h esophageal pH and bilirubin monitoring. All the patients and volunteers accepted the manometric study. RESULTS: In the liver cirrhosis group, lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP, 15.32 2.91 mmHg), peristaltic amplitude (PA, 61.41 10.52 mmHg), peristaltic duration (PD, 5.32 1.22 s), and peristaltic velocity (PV, 5.22 1.11 cm/s) were all significantly abnormal in comparison with those in the control group (P < 0.05), and LESP was negatively correlated with Child-Pugh score. The incidence of reflux esophagitis (RE) and pathologic reflux was 37.18% and 55.13%, respectively (vs control, P < 0.05). And the incidence of isolated abnormal acid reflux, bile reflux and mixed reflux was 12.82%, 14.10% and 28.21% in patients with liver cirrhosis without EV. CONCLUSION: Cirrhotic patients without EV presented esophageal motor disorders and mixed acid and bile reflux was the main pattern; the cirrhosis itself was an important causative factor. PMID:21483637

  19. [A case of juvenile esophageal cancer with hematemesis].

    PubMed

    Hirai, K; Taruishi, M; Ike, K; Takahashi, A; Shibata, Y; Namiki, M

    1989-03-01

    We here report a case of juvenile esophageal cancer which developed with a chief complaint of hematemesis. The case was a 36-year-old male patient who was admitted to the hospital because of dysphagia and repeated hematemesis episodes. Through various imaging studies, the patient was diagnosed as having advanced esophageal carcinoma. Since it was considered to be impossible to perform a curable surgical treatment, we tried, using a Laser apparatus, to alleviate the stenosis of the esophageal lumen and to control the bleeding from the cancerous lesion. However, an operation was finally performed after observing that the Laser therapy had not been so effective. Hematemesis is an uncommon symptom among primary complaints of esophageal cancer. The present case developed a protuberant cancerous mass which considerably obstructed the esophageal lumen. It is speculated that the patient repeatedly vomited blood which had gradually originated from ruptured capillary vessels in the tumor and had accumulated in the esophageal lumen. The histological type of the cancer was poorly-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma which partially contained an undifferentiated element. This histological nature might have accelerated the growth of the esophageal cancer in the present case. PMID:2659487

  20. Influence of Ionizing Radiation on Stromal-Epithelial Intercellular Communication in Esophageal Carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Kalabis, Jiri; Rustgi, Anil K.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Huff, Janice L.

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the 6th leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Its development is associated with a variety of risk factors including tobacco use, heavy alcohol consumption, human papilloma virus infection, and certain dietary factors such as trace mineral and vitamin deficiencies. An association with ionizing radiation exposure is revealed by the high excess relative risk for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus observed in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. It is also seen as a secondary malignancy in patients who received radiotherapy for breast and thoracic cancers; additionally, patients with head/neck and oral squamous cell cancers are at increased risk for metachronous esophageal squamous cell cancers. This malignancy is rapidly fatal, mainly because it remains asymptomatic until late, advanced stages when the disease is rarely curable. The stromal microenvironment plays an essential role in the maintenance and modulation of normal epithelial cell growth and differentiation and cross talk between the epithelial and stromal compartments can influence many aspects of malignant progression, including tumor cell proliferation, migration, invasion and recruitment of new blood vessels. To test the hypothesis that radiation exposure plays a role in esophageal carcinogenesis via non-targeted mechanisms involving stromal-epithelial cell communication, we are studying radiation effects on hTERT-immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells and genetic variants grown in co-culture with human esophageal stromal fibroblasts (Okawa et al., Genes & Dev. 2007. 21: 2788-2803). We examined how radiation treatment of stromal fibroblasts affected epithelial migration and invasion, behaviors associated with cancer promotion and progression. Chemotactic and haptotactic migration of epithelial cells stimulated by conditioned media from irradiated fibroblasts was measured using assays conducted in Transwell cell culture chambers. Our results using low LET radiation showed a dose-dependent increase in migration of epithelial cells when exposed to conditioned media from irradiated vs. non-irradiated fibroblasts. We also observed enhanced invasion through a basement membrane simulant. To identify chemotactic proteins secreted by irradiated stromal fibroblasts, we used antibody capture cytokine arrays and have identified several proteins as candidates. Increased secretion of these factors by irradiated fibroblasts was confirmed using ELISA. We are currently analyzing the contribution of these individual factors on epithelial migration and invasion, as well as their influence on cell survival and DNA repair. Studies using high-LET radiation will help determine radiation quality effects on these processes. These results should further our understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation impacts the tissue microenvironment and how it influences cancer development processes.

  1. Phase I evaluation of TNFerade biologic plus chemoradiotherapy before esophagectomy for locally advanced resectable esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kenneth J.; Reid, Tony; Senzer, Neil; Swisher, Stephen; Pinto, Harlan; Hanna, Nader; Chak, Amitabh; Soetikno, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery is the primary treatment option for patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer. This multicenter phase I trial examined intratumoral injection of TNFerade biologic, an adenoviral vector that expresses the human tumor necrosis factor-? gene, with chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced esophageal cancer. Objectives To assess pathologic complete response (pCR), time to disease progression, progression-free survival, survival, and safety and tolerance in patients treated with preoperative chemoradiation combined with endoscopy or EUS-guided intratumoral injection of TNFerade biologic. Design/Intervention Five weekly injections of TNFerade biologic, dose-escalated logarithmically from 4 108 to 4 1011 particle units (PU), were given in combination with cisplatin 75 mg/m2 and intravenous 5-fluorouracil 1000 mg/m2/d for 96 hours on days 1 and 29, and concurrent radiation therapy to 45 Gy. Surgery was performed 9 to 15 weeks after treatment. Setting U.S. multicenter study. Patients Patients with stage II and III esophageal cancer were enrolled. Main Outcome Measurements Primary outcome measures were safety, feasibility, tolerability, and rate of pCR. Secondary outcome measures were overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival. Results Twenty-four patients with a median age of 61 years were enrolled; 88% of the patients were men, 21% were stage II, and 79% were stage III. Six (29%) had a pCR, observed among 21 patients (20 who underwent esophagectomy and 1 at autopsy). Dose-limiting toxicities were not observed. The most frequent potentially related adverse events were fatigue (54%), fever (38%), nausea (29%), vomiting (21%), esophagitis (21%), and chills (21%). At the top dose of 4 1011 PU, thromboembolic events developed in 5 of 8 patients. The median OS was 47.8 months. The 3-and 5-year OS rates and disease-free survival rates were 54% and 41% and 38% and 38%, respectively. Limitations We included primarily adenocarcinoma. Conclusions Preoperative TNFerade, in combination with chemoradiotherapy, is active and safe at doses up to 4 1010 PU and is associated with long survival. This regimen warrants additional studies. (Clinical trial registration number: NCT00051480.) PMID:22520270

  2. A new three-layer-funnel-shaped esophagogastric anastomosis for surgical treatment of esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Han-Lei; Bai, Yang; Meng, Hui; Song, Cong-Lin; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Yong; Wan, Lei-Chi; Zhang, Ya-Li; Zhang, Zhen-Shu; Zhou, Dian-Yuan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To reduce the incidence of postoperative anastomotic leak, stenosis, gastroesophageal reflux (GER) for patients with esophageal carcinoma, and to evaluate the conventional method of esophagectomy and esophagogastroplasty modified by a new three-layer-funnel-shaped (TLF) esophagogastric anastomotic suturing technique. METHODS: From January 1997 to October 1999, patients with clinical stage I and II (IIa and IIb) esophageal carcinoma, which met the enrollment criteria, were surgically treated by the new method (Group A) and by conventional operation (Group B). All the patients were followed at least for 6 months. Postoperative outcomes and complications were recorded and compared with the conventional method in the same hospitals and with that reported previously by McLarty et al[7] in 1997 (Group C). RESULTS: 58 cases with stage I and II (IIa and IIb) esophageal carcinoma, including 38 males and 20 females aged from 34 to 78 (mean age: 57), were surgically treated by the TLF anastomosis and 64 by conventional method in our hospitals from January 1997 to October 1999. The quality of swallowing was improved significantly (Wilcoxon W = 2142, P = 0.0001) 2 to 3 months after the new operation in Group A. Only one patient had a blind anastomatic fistula diagnosed by barium swallow test 2 months but healed up 3 weeks later. Postoperative complications occurred in 25 (43%) patients, anastomotic stenosis in 8 (14%), and GER in 13 (22%). The incidences of postoperative anastomotic leak, stenosis and GER were significantly decreased by the TLF anastomosis method compared with that of conventional methods (?2 = 6.566, P = 0.038; ?2 = 10.214, P = 0.006; ?2 = 21.265, P = 0.000). CONCLUSION: The new three-layer-funnel-shaped esophagogastric anastomosis (TLFEGA) has more advantages to reduce postoperative complications of anastomotic leak, stricture and GER. PMID:12508344

  3. Massive Endoscopic Screening for Esophageal and Gastric Cancers in a High-Risk Area of China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kun; Lü, Lingshuang; Peng, Xianzhen; Wang, Min; Xu, Guisheng; Hua, Zhaolai; Wang, Jianping; Xue, Hengchuan; Wang, Jianming; Lu, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aims to describe the findings from a massive endoscopic screening program in a high-risk area of China and to evaluate the prognosis of patients diagnosed through endoscopic screening compared with those diagnosed at usual hospital visits because of illness. Methods In 2006, an early detection and treatment program was initiated in Yangzhong county, China. Local residents aged 40–69 years were eligible for free endoscopic screening. Endoscopic examination was performed with Lugol’s iodine staining, followed by biopsies. Patients diagnosed with esophageal or gastric cancer were referred for treatment and followed to assess their long-term survival status. Results From 2006 through 2012, we screened 12453 participants, including 5334 (42.8%) men and 7119 (57.2%) women. The average age was 52.8±8.0 years. We detected 166 patients with upper digestive tract cancers, including 106 cancers in the esophagus (detection rate: 0.85%) and 60 cancers in the stomach (detection rate: 0.48%). Of these patients, 98.11% with esophageal cancer and 100% with gastric cancer were defined as at the early stage. In the process of follow-up, 17 patients died from cancer-related causes, and the median survival time was greater than 85 months. The overall survival rates for 1, 3 and 5 years were 98.0%, 90.0% and 89.0%, respectively. A significant positive effect was observed for the long-term survival of patients diagnosed through massive endoscopic screening. Conclusions In a high-risk population, massive endoscopic screening can identify early stage carcinoma of esophageal and gastric cancers and improve patients’ prognosis through early detection and treatment. PMID:26699332

  4. [Transforming gene in human esophageal carcinoma tissue].

    PubMed

    Jiang, W

    1988-09-01

    The transforming gene in human esophageal carcinoma (HEC) tissues collected from Lin-xian county, a high incidence area of esophageal cancer was studied. Eight primary HEC tissues were used as sources for the preparation of DNA. High molecular weight DNAs were separately added to NIH 3T3 cells by the calcium phosphate coprecipitation method. Of the 8 HEC tissues examined, 3 DNAs showed transforming activity and produced secondary transformants. The use of uncloned NIH 3T3 cells resulted in the appearances of non-transforming. The efficiency of primary transfection foci was low (0.025--0.05 focus per ug of DNA). In the secondary transfection, the efficiency was increased (0.30 focus per ug of DNA). The primary and secondary transformants were capable of forming colonies in soft agar (0.33%) in contrast to the control NIH 3T3 cells, which did not show any anchorage-independent growth. About 1 X 10(6) cells of the cloned secondary transformants were injected subcutaneously into athymic BALB/c nude mice. The mice developed large tumors (approximately 20-30 mm in diameter) within 5--15 days after injection. No tumor developed in mice injected with control NIH 3T3 cells even after 2 months. The transforming DNA had a linkage to the Alu sequence, indicating that a common human DNA fragment is conserved in the tumors. H-ras was found in the transforming DNA using Southern blot assay. PMID:3248497

  5. Stent placement for esophageal strictures: an update.

    PubMed

    Hirdes, Meike Madeleine Catharine; Vleggaar, Frank Paul; Siersema, Peter Derk

    2011-11-01

    The use of stents for esophageal strictures has evolved rapidly over the past 10 years, from rigid plastic tubes to flexible self-expanding metal (SEMS), plastic (SEPS) and biodegradable stents. For the palliative treatment of malignant dysphagia both SEMS and SEPS effectively provide a rapid relief of dysphagia. SEMS are preferred over SEPS, as randomized controlled trials have shown more technical difficulties and late migration with plastic stents. Despite specific characteristics of recently developed stents, recurrent dysphagia due to food impaction, tumoral and nontumoral tissue overgrowth, or stent migration, remain a major challenge. The efficacy of stents with an antireflux valve for patients with distal esophageal cancer varies between different stent designs. Concurrent treatment with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy seems to be safe and effective. In the future, it can be expected that removable stents will be used as a bridge to surgery to maintain luminal patency during neoadjuvant treatment. For benign strictures, new stent designs, such as fully covered SEMS and biodegradable stents, may potentially reduce complications during stent removal. PMID:22029470

  6. Association of achalasia and eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Mandaliya, Rohan; DiMarino, Anthony J; Cohen, Sidney

    2013-01-01

    Various esophageal motor disorders including achalasia have been sporadically reported in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). The aim of this study was to determine the association between achalasia and EoE and to review the treatment outcomes in patients having both conditions. A retrospective search was conducted to identify the cases of achalasia having EoE over the last 10years at a tertiary care hospital in the United States. Subsequently, a review of the literature was performed to search for cases of achalasia that have concurrent EoE. The retrospective study showed that 4 out of 512 patients of achalasia (<1%) had concomitant EoE. The eosinophil counts were high (80-100/hpf) but the classic endoscopic features of EoE were present in only one patient. Long term outcome following treatment including botox, myotomy and corticosteroids was generally poor. Sixteen patients have been reported in the literature out of which five patients were reported in detail. Patients had good short term response to various therapies. The long term outcomes have not been reported. These studies suggest that a concurrence of these two conditions, although rare, may occur and may not be recognized by usual endoscopic features of EoE. Long term treatment outcomes, distinct from short term in the literature, may be poor. PMID:23054948

  7. The esophageal obturator airway: an appraisal.

    PubMed

    Donen, N; Tweed, W A; Dashfsky, S; Guttormson, B

    1983-03-01

    The use of the Esophageal Obturator Airway (EOA) was prospectively studied in 300 cases of prehospital cardiac arrests. Seventy-seven complications were documented in 72 patients. Inadvertent tracheal intubation occurred in 72 patients. Inadvertent tracheal intubation occurred in 13 patients, five unrecognized. No differences were found when initial emergency room rhythm and resuscitation outcome were compared to a previous study using the oral airway (OA). A subgroup of 124 EOA and 55 OA patients were compared. The EOA was effective in reducing the frequency of aspiration (17 vs 34 per cent). Arterial oxygenation was similar, and rose in both groups following tracheal intubation. Esophageal trauma was found in 10 per cent of the EOA patients who underwent autopsy. Although the EOA is useful in prehospital emergency care, the only advantage for this technique in comparison to the OA is the prevention of aspiration of gastric contents. It also appears that other techniques of advanced cardiac life support, i.e. defibrillation, drug therapy, etc. are necessary to improve survival statistics. PMID:6831297

  8. Esophageal obstruction 14 years after treatment for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplinsky, C.; Kornreich, L.; Tiomny, E.; Cohen, I.J.; Loven, D.; Zaizov, R. )

    1991-08-15

    The incidence of late radiation injury of the esophagus is not precisely determined but, overall, the occurrence of clinically apparent damage is infrequent. The authors report a complete esophageal obstruction in a 21-year-old man, 14 years after chemo-radiation therapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma. Although endoscopy failed to demonstrate a gross morphologic abnormality, an esophagogram detected abnormal peristalsis and stricture, and esophageal manometry coupled with dynamic isotopic study clearly demonstrated a multilevel secondary neuronal damage. Data in the literature suggest that alteration in motility is by far the most frequent radiologic manifestation. Further prospective studies will probably clarify the actual incidence of late esophageal damage after chemo-radiation therapy.

  9. Quality Management and Key Performance Indicators in Oncologic Esophageal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gockel, Ines; Ahlbrand, Constantin Johannes; Arras, Michael; Schreiber, Elke Maria; Lang, Hauke

    2015-12-01

    Ranking systems and comparisons of quality and performance indicators will be of increasing relevance for complex "high-risk" procedures such as esophageal cancer surgery. The identification of evidence-based standards relevant for key performance indicators in esophageal surgery is essential for establishing monitoring systems and furthermore a requirement to enhance treatment quality. In the course of this review, we analyze the key performance indicators case volume, radicality of resection, and postoperative morbidity and mortality, leading to continuous quality improvement. Ranking systems established on this basis will gain increased relevance in highly complex procedures within the national and international comparison and furthermore improve the treatment of patients with esophageal carcinoma. PMID:26177703

  10. Involvement of F-box proteins in esophageal cancer (Review).

    PubMed

    Gong, Jian; Huang, Zheng; Huo, Ji-Rong

    2016-03-01

    The F-box proteins (FBPs) in esophageal tumorigenesis are pivotal as they govern a broad array of basic physiological responses including cell growth, cell death and DNA damage repair. Esophageal cancer (EC) is a common and highly aggressive cancer worldwide. Aberrant stabilization of crucial proteins participates in esophageal tumorigenesis. Recently, growing evidence has shown that FBPs play a critical role in oncogenesis, invasion, metastasis and prognosis assessment of EC. In this review we summarized published data on the roles of known FBPs, their respective substrates and the key signaling pathways, in the development of EC, aiming to uncover new ways for the rational design of targeted therapies in EC. PMID:26782762

  11. Defining esophageal landmarks, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    DeVault, Kenneth; McMahon, Barry P; Celebi, Altay; Costamagna, Guido; Marchese, Michele; Clarke, John O; Hejazi, Reza A; McCallum, Richard W; Savarino, Vincenzo; Zentilin, Patrizia; Savarino, Edoardo; Thomson, Mike; Souza, Rhonda F; Donohoe, Claire L; O'Farrell, Naoimh J; Reynolds, John V

    2013-10-01

    The following paper on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and Barrett's esophagus (BE) includes commentaries on defining esophageal landmarks; new techniques for evaluating upper esophageal sphincter (UES) tone; differential diagnosis of GERD, BE, and hiatal hernia (HH); the use of high-resolution manometry for evaluation of reflux; the role of fundic relaxation in reflux; the use of 24-h esophageal pH-impedance testing in differentiating acid from nonacid reflux and its potential inclusion in future Rome criteria; classification of endoscopic findings in GERD; the search for the cell origin that generates BE; and the relationship between BE, Barrett's carcinoma, and obesity. PMID:24117649

  12. Chimeric Anterolateral Thigh Flap for Total Thoracic Esophageal Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Moya, Alejandro; Segura-Sampedro, Juan J; Sicilia-Castro, Domingo; Carvajo-Prez, Francisco; Gmez-Ca, Toms; Vzquez-Medina, Antonio; Ibez-Delgado, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Gastric pull-up is generally the first choice for a total thoracic esophageal reconstruction. Malfunction of this gastric conduit is uncommon, but devastating when it occurs: it causes marked comorbidity to the patient, preventing oral intake and worsening quality of life. Secondary salvage thoracic esophageal reconstruction surgery is usually performed with free or pedicled jejunum flaps or colon interposition. We present a case ofa total thoracic esophageal reconstruction with an externally monitored chimeric anterolateral thigh flap, extending from the cervical esophagus to the retrosternal gastroplasty remnant. Intestinal reconstructive techniques were not an available option for this patient. PMID:26694271

  13. Targeting AMCase reduces esophageal eosinophilic inflammation and remodeling in a mouse model of egg induced eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jae Youn; Rosenthal, Peter; Miller, Marina; Pham, Alexa; Aceves, Seema; Sakuda, Shohei; Broide, David H

    2014-01-01

    Studies of AMCase inhibition in mouse models of lung eosinophilic inflammation have produced conflicting results with some studies demonstrating inhibition of eosinophilic inflammation and others not. No studies have investigated the role of AMCase inhibition in eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). We have used a mouse model of egg (OVA) induced EoE to determine whether pharmacologic inhibition of AMCase with allosamidin reduced eosinophilic inflammation and remodeling in the esophagus in EoE. Administration of intra-esophageal OVA for 6 weeks to BALB/c mice induced increased levels of esophageal eosinophils, mast cells, and features of esophageal remodeling (fibrosis, basal zone hyperplasia, deposition of the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin). Administration of intraperitoneal (ip) allosamidin to BALB/c mice significantly inhibited AMCase enzymatic activity in the esophagus. Pharmacologic inhibition of AMCase with ip allosamidin inhibited both OVA induced increases in esophageal eosinophilic inflammation and OVA induced esophageal remodeling (fibrosis, epithelial basal zone hyperplasia, extracellular matrix deposition of fibronectin). This inhibition of eosinophilic inflammation in the esophagus by ip allosamidin was associated with reduced eotaxin-1 expression in the esophagus. Oral allosamidin inhibited eosinophilic inflammation in the epithelium but did not inhibit esophageal remodeling. These studies suggest that pharmacologic inhibition of AMCase results in inhibition of eosinophilic inflammation and remodeling in the esophagus in a mouse model of egg induced EoE partially through effects in the esophagus on reducing chemokines (i.e. eotaxin-1) implicated in the pathogenesis of EoE. PMID:24239745

  14. Increased expression of c-Ski as a co-repressor in transforming growth factor-beta signaling correlates with progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fukuchi, Minoru; Nakajima, Masanobu; Fukai, Yasuyuki; Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Masuda, Norihiro; Sohda, Makoto; Manda, Ryokuhei; Tsukada, Katsuhiko; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2004-03-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) regulates cell growth inhibition, and inactivation of the TGF-beta signaling pathway contributes to tumor development. In our previous study, altered expression of TGF-beta, TGF-beta-specific receptors and Smad4 was shown to correlate with tumor progression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). These components, however, were maintained normally in some patients with esophageal SCC. In our study, the mechanism by which aggressive esophageal SCC maintains these components was investigated, with particular emphasis on the participation of c-Ski and SnoN as transcriptional co-repressors in TGF-beta signaling. Immunohistochemistry for c-Ski and SnoN was carried out on surgical specimens obtained from 80 patients with esophageal SCC. The expression of c-Ski and SnoN was also studied in 6 established cell lines derived from esophageal SCC and compared to an immortalized human esophageal cell line by Western blotting. High levels of expression of c-Ski, detected immunohistologically, were found to correlate with depth of invasion (p = 0.0080) and pathologic stage (p = 0.0447). There was, however, no significant correlation between expression of SnoN and clinicopathologic characteristics. A significant correlation between c-Ski and TGF-beta expression was observed. Moreover, in patients with TGF-beta negative expression, the survival rates of patients with c-Ski positive expression were significantly lower than those of patients with c-Ski negative expression (p = 0.0486). c-Ski was expressed at a high level in 5 of 6 cell lines derived from esophageal SCC compared to immortalized esophageal keratinocytes. Furthermore, the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor, p21 that was up-regulated by TGF-beta signaling was expressed at a low level in the 5 cell lines. The expression of c-Ski protein as a transcriptional co-repressor in TGF-beta signaling seems to be correlated with tumor progression of esophageal SCC. PMID:14712482

  15. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and excision repair cross complement-1 (ERCC1) expression in esophageal cancers and response to cisplatin and irinotecan based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bharthuar, Anubha; Black, Jennifer D.; Levea, Charles; Malhotra, Usha; Mashtare, Terry L.; Iyer, Renuka

    2014-01-01

    Background Esophageal cancer patients face a dismal outcome despite tri-modality management and median survival remains 15-18 months. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is an ATP-dependent efflux protein associated with chemotherapy resistance. The role of BCRP expression in esophageal cancer and normal esophageal cells is not known. Excision repair cross complement-1 (ERCC1) overexpression has been correlated with poorer response to cisplatin based chemotherapy. We examined the expression of BCRP and ERCC1 in patients with esophageal cancer and correlated it with survival in patients receiving irinotecan and cisplatin based chemotherapy. Methods With IRB approval, 40 cases of esophageal cancer diagnosed from 2004-2008, were stained for BCRP and ERCC1 expression by immunohistochemistry and scored by a pathologist blinded to clinical data. Baseline demographics, therapy given and survival data were collected and correlated with BCRP and ERCC1 expression. Fishers exact test was used to determine association between BCRP and ERCC1 expression and demographics. Cox proportional hazards model was used for association of BCRP and ERCC1 with survival. Results On immunohistochemistry, 30/40 cancers (75%) expressed BCRP. Interestingly, down-regulation of BCRP expression in tumor compared with normal cells was seen in 40% of patients. ERCC1 positivity was seen in 15/30 cases (50%). Median overall survival (OS) was 19 months with no difference in survival between BCRP positive and negative patients (P=0.13) or ERCC1 positive and negative patients (P=0.85). Estimated hazard ratio (HR) of death for BRCP positive patients was 2.29 (95% CI: 0.79-6.64) and for ERCC1 positive patients was 1.09 (95% CI: 0.46-2.56). There was no association of BCRP and ERCC1 expression with disease stage, age, gender or histology. For patients who received cisplatin and irinotecan as first line chemotherapy, there was no difference in survival based on BCRP or ERCC1 status. Conclusions BCRP expression is seen in a majority of esophageal cancers and normal esophageal mucosa. ERCC1 expression is seen in about half of the patients with esophageal cancer. Irinotecan based studies with esophageal and gastric cancer suggest response rates of 14-65%. Whether the 40% of tumors in our study found with down regulation of BCRP expression, constitute a majority of these responders needs to be prospectively validated in a larger data set. It should include markers such as ERCC1 predicting response to 5-fluorouracil and platinum based chemotherapy, to enable individualizing therapy for this cancer. PMID:25083297

  16. Potato root diffusate-induced secretion of soluble, basic proteins originating from the subventral esophageal glands of potato cyst nematodes.

    PubMed

    Smant, G; Goverse, A; Stokkermans, J P; De Boer, J M; Pomp, H R; Zilverentant, J F; Overmars, H A; Helder, J; Schots, A; Bakker, J

    1997-08-01

    ABSTRACT In preparasitic second-stage juveniles (J(2)) of potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis, six proteins with molecular masses of 30, 31a/b, 32, 39, and 49 kDa were recognized on Western blots by a monoclonal antibody (MGR48) specific for the subventral esophageal glands. All of these subventral gland proteins (svp's) focused in the basic range (pI 6.8 to 8.6) of an immobilized pH gradient. Western blotting showed that the svp's were present in preparasitic and parasitic J(2) and not in later juvenile stages and adult females. Minor svp quantities also were observed in adult males. Immunogold labeling of preparasitic J(2) showed that the svp's were localized in the rough endoplasmic reticulum and secretory granules of the subventral esophageal glands. Potato root diffusate triggered the secretion of svp's through the stylet, and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine-hydrogen-oxalate had only a quantitative, additional effect. The forward flow of svp's through the metacorporal pump chamber was confirmed by the presence of svp's in the circular lumen of the esophagus (procorpus), as established by immunoelectron microscopy. Our data provide conclusive evidence that secretory proteins of the subventral glands of G. rostochiensis can be secreted through the stylet and support the hypothesis that the subventral esophageal glands play an important role in the early events of this nematode-plant interaction. PMID:18945052

  17. Overexpression of Ku80 correlates with aggressive clinicopathological features and adverse prognosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    WANG, SHUAI; WANG, ZHOU; YANG, YU; SHI, MO; SUN, ZHENGUO

    2015-01-01

    Ku80, a subunit of the heterodymeric Ku protein, is clearly implicated in nonhomologous end joining DNA repair, chemoresistance and radioresistance in malignant tumors. In the present study, the clinicopathological significance of Ku80 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) was investigated. The expression levels of Ku80 were determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry in ESCC specimens and normal esophageal mucosa. The mRNA and protein levels of Ku80 were significantly higher in ESCC tissues than in normal esophageal mucosa, and were significantly associated with tumor differentiation, local invasion, lymph node metastasis and tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage. However, overexpression of Ku80 mRNA and protein levels were not significantly correlated with age, gender, tumor site or tumor size. Cox proportional hazards regression model demonstrated that tumor local invasion, lymph node metastasis, TNM stage and Ku80 mRNA and protein levels were independent risk factors indicating the overall survival of patients with ESCC. The present study demonstrated that aberrant Ku80 overexpression is observed in ESCC. In addition, high expression levels of Ku80 are associated with adverse clinicopathological features and unfavorable prognosis in ESCC patients. PMID:26722230

  18. Response of the Upper Esophageal Sphincter to Esophageal Distension is Affected by Posture, Velocity, Volume, and Composition of the Infusate

    PubMed Central

    Babaei, Arash; Dua, Kulwinder; Naini, Sohrab Rahimi; Lee, Justin; Katib, Omar; Yan, Ke; Hoffmann, Raymond; Shaker, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Studies of the pressure response of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) to simulated or spontaneous gastroesophageal reflux have shown conflicting results. These discrepancies could result from uncontrolled influence of variables such as posture, volume, and velocity of distension. We characterized in humans the effects of these variables on UES pressure response to esophageal distension. Methods We studied 12 healthy volunteers (average 27±5 years old, 6 male) using concurrent esophageal infusion and high-resolution manometry to determine UES, lower esophageal sphincter, and intraesophageal pressure values. Reflux events were simulated by distal esophageal injections of room-temperature air and water (5, 10, 20, and 50 ml) in individuals in 3 positions (upright, supine and semi-supine). Frequencies of various UES responses were compared using χ2 analysis. Multinomial logistical regression analysis was used to identify factors that determine the UES response. Results UES contraction and relaxation were the overriding responses to esophageal water and air distension, respectively, in a volume-dependent fashion (P<.001). Water-induced UES contraction and air-induced UES relaxation were the predominant responses among individuals in supine and upright positions, respectively (P<.001). The prevalence of their respective predominant response significantly decreased in the opposite position. Proximal esophageal dp/dt significantly and independently differentiated the UES response to infusion with water or air. Conclusions The UES response to esophageal distension is affected by combined effects of posture (spatial orientation of the esophagus), physical properties, and volume of refluxate, as well as the magnitude and rate of increase in intraesophageal pressure. The UES response to esophageal distension can be predicted using a model that incorporates these factors. PMID:22248662

  19. Prospective assessment of the diagnostic utility of esophageal brushings in adults with eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Kern, E; Lin, D; Larson, A; Yang, G-Y; Taft, T; Zalewski, A; Gonsalves, N; Hirano, I

    2016-01-01

    Patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) undergo multiple endoscopies with biopsy for both diagnosis and assessment of treatment response, which is inconvenient and costly. Brush cytology has been examined in Barrett's esophagus to reduce the need for repeated endoscopic biopsies. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the ability of brush cytology to detect mucosal eosinophilia in patients with EoE. This prospective study included adults with untreated and treated esophageal eosinophilia undergoing endoscopy at a tertiary care center. Patients received paired brushings and biopsies at the proximal and distal esophagus. A blinded pathologist quantified the number of eosinophils and epithelial cells per high-power field (hpf) on the cytology slides. The ratio of eosinophils/epithelial cells was used to normalize the cytology specimens for density of cells collected. The main outcome measures were sensitivity and specificity of brush cytology, and correlation between cytology and histology. Twenty-eight patients enrolled. The average age of the cohort was 37.7 ± 10.4 years; 75% of subjects were male. The sensitivity of cytology was 67-69% at the proximal esophagus and 70-72% at the distal esophagus. The specificity was 61-67% proximally and 70-75% distally. Histology was not significantly correlated with the max ratio of eosinophils/epithelial cells per hpf or the absolute number of eosinophils on cytology slides. Cytology using esophageal brushing has limited sensitivity and specificity for the detection of esophageal mucosal eosinophilia. The presence of exudates on endoscopy increased the detection of eosinophilia, which could make cytology useful in pediatric EoE, which often has a more exudative presentation. Diagnostic yield may improve with alternative acquisition techniques or the incorporation of eosinophil degranulation proteins. PMID:25515533

  20. Enhanced Expression of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 IIIc Promotes Human Esophageal Carcinoma Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Nobuhiro; Shimizu, Akio; Kanai, Michiyuki; Iwaya, Yugo; Ueda, Shugo; Nakayama, Jun; Seo, Misuzu Kurokawa

    2016-01-01

    Deregulated expression of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) and their ligands plays critical roles in tumorigenesis. The gene expression of an alternatively spliced isoforms of FGFR3, FGFR3IIIc, was analyzed by RT-PCR in samples from patients with esophageal carcinoma (EC), including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and adenocarcinoma (EAC). The incidence of FGFR3IIIc was higher in EC [12/16 (75%); p=0.073] than in non-cancerous mucosa (NCM) [6/16 (38%)]. Indeed, an immunohistochemical analysis of early-stage ESCC showed that carcinoma cells expressing FGFR3IIIc stained positively with SCC-112, a tumor marker, and Ki67, a cell proliferation marker, suggesting that the expression of FGFR3IIIc promotes cell proliferation. We used EC-GI-10 cells endogenously expressing FGFR3IIIc as a model of ESCC to provide mechanistic insight into the role of FGFR3IIIc in ESCC. The knockdown of endogenous FGFR3 using siRNA treatment significantly abrogated cell proliferation and the overexpression of FGFR3IIIc in cells with enhanced cell proliferation. EC-GI-10 cells and ESCC from patients with EC showed endogenous expression of FGF2, a specific ligand for FGFR3IIIc, suggesting that the upregulated expression of FGFR3IIIc may create autocrine FGF signaling in ESCC. Taken together, FGFR3IIIc may have the potential to be an early-stage tumor marker and a molecular target for ESCC therapy. PMID:26487184

  1. From reflux esophagitis to Barretts esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease is common in the human population. Almost all cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma are derived from Barretts esophagus, which is a complication of esophageal adenocarcinoma precancerous lesions. Chronic exposure of the esophagus to gastroduodenal intestinal fluid is an important determinant factor in the development of Barretts esophagus. The replacement of normal squamous epithelium with specific columnar epithelium in the lower esophagus induced by the chronic exposure to gastroduodenal fluid could lead to intestinal metaplasia, which is closely associated with the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the exact mechanism of injury is not completely understood. Various animal models of the developmental mechanisms of disease, and theoretical and clinical effects of drug treatment have been widely used in research. Recently, animal models employed in studies on gastroesophageal reflux injury have allowed significant progress. The advantage of using animal models lies in the ability to accurately control the experimental conditions for better evaluation of results. In this article, various modeling methods are reviewed, with discussion of the major findings on the developmental mechanism of Barretts esophagus, which should help to develop better prevention and treatment strategies for Barretts esophagus. PMID:25954094

  2. [Esophagobronchial fistula and empyema resulting from esophageal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Hippo, Y; Kawana, A; Yoshizawa, A; Koshino, T; Toyota, E; Kobayashi, N; Kobori, O; Arai, T; Kudo, K; Kabe, J

    1997-05-01

    A 59-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital with a one-month history of hemoptysis, generalized fatigue, and a high fever. A chest X-ray film obtained on admission showed a massive right-sided pleural effusion. Examination of an aspirate showed a high level of amylase, and bacteria that were the same as oral bacteria. Closed drainage yielded ichorous pus and food residues, which led us to the diagnosis of empyema caused by esophageal perforation. Esophagography and fiberoptic esophagoscopy revealed that an esophagobronchial fistula related to an advanced esophageal carcinoma had caused the empyema. Surgical resection was done, and the patient was alive at the time of this writing, 7 months after she was first treated. Esophageal carcinoma is sometimes accompanied by esophagobronchial fistula. Patients with this condition usually have severe respiratory symptoms; those presenting with empyema are rare. Esophageal carcinoma must be carefully ruled out as the cause of empyema. PMID:9234640

  3. Fatal aorto-esophageal fistula in child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pehlivan, Sultan; Kara, Dogus Ozdemir; Turkkan, Dilhan; Akan, Ramazan; Gokmen, Asude; Akduman, Baris; Karapirli, Mustafa

    2014-02-01

    Esophageal foreign body ingestion is especially frequent in childhood and may cause fatal complications in case of late diagnosis and delayed treatment. We present a case of 2-year old girl who was admitted to emergency department with massive bleeding. However, she died due to an unrecognized foreign body resulted an aorto-esophageal fistula. At autopsy an aorto-esophageal fistula was detected by gross examination. Tissue samples were obtained from the organs and fistula region. In histopathological examination, a calcified body with multinucleated giant cell and surrounding granulation tissue was detected at the bleeding site. An ulcerated fistula tract ran from the intima to the adventitia, passing through layers of esophageal wall was also noticed. The mortality rate for foreign body ingestion is less than 1%, except in cases of perforation. Therefore the presented case is among rare examples of fatal foreign body ingestions. PMID:24485434

  4. Adding Targeted Therapy to Treatment for Esophageal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this phase III clinical trial, people with confirmed HER2-positive locally advanced esophageal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive preoperative radiation therapy and chemotherapy, with or without trastuzumab.

  5. [Management of the esophageal candidiasis by the primary care physician].

    PubMed

    Behrens, Garance; Bocherens, Astrid; Senn, Nicolas

    2014-05-14

    Esophageal candidiasis is one of the most common opportunistic infections in patients infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This pathology is also found in patients without overt immunodeficiency. Other risk factors are known to be associated with this disease like inhaled or systemic corticosteroid treatment or proton-pump inhibitors and H2 receptor antagonists. In the absence of identified risk factors, a primary immune deficiency should be sought. Prevention of esophageal candidiasis is based primarily on the identification of risk factors, and a better control of them. This article presents a review of the physiopathology, clinical presentation and management of esophageal candidiasis by primary care physicians. We will also discuss ways of preventing esophageal candidiasis when necessary. PMID:24930154

  6. Primary anastomosis in esophageal atresia type I without a gap.

    PubMed

    Karmarkar, S J; Martucciello, G; Repetto, P; Karande, T P

    1999-07-01

    This paper reports the case of an infant born with type I esophageal atresia (EA) associated with duodenal atresia (DA). The critical condition of the patient necessitated an exploratory laparotomy, which revealed severe dilatation of the stomach and duodenum. The routine procedure for repairing type I EA is a delayed primary anastomosis after 10 weeks of age because of the long gap between the two esophageal segments. In our case, due to the concomitant DA, the lower pouch was long enough to allow primary neonatal anastomosis. A radiograph taken with a Hegar dilator in the lower segment via the gastrostomy confirmed this suspicion, and the baby underwent a thoracotomy and primary anastomosis between the esophageal pouches. The authors propose the possibility of primary esophageal anastomosis in similar cases. PMID:10415289

  7. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: The "Not-So-Rare" Disease.

    PubMed

    Goh, Vi Lier

    2016-02-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a relatively newly described disorder with increasing incidence. Patients with EoE may present at all ages from childhood through adulthood. Presenting symptoms may vary from feeding refusal, gagging, and/or vomiting in the younger population, dysphagia, chest pain, and abdominal pain in adolescents, as well as emergent food impactions. However, there are strict diagnostic criteria that must be met to make the diagnosis. Specifically, the diagnosis of EoE requires at least 15 eosinophils per high-powered field in the esophageal biopsies and symptoms of esophageal dysfunction after other causes, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease and proton pump inhibitor-responsive esophageal eosinophilia, have been ruled out. Common treatments include diet modifications and/or topical corticosteroids. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(2):e63-e66.]. PMID:26878186

  8. Preoperative Chemotherapy, Radiation Improve Survival in Esophageal Cancer (Updated)

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with esophageal cancer who received chemotherapy and radiation before surgery survived, on average, nearly twice as long as patients treated with surgery alone, according to results of a randomized clinical trial published May 31, 2012, in NEJM.

  9. Buspirone, a new drug for the management of patients with ineffective esophageal motility?

    PubMed Central

    Scheerens, Charlotte; Tack, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) is the most frequently encountered esophageal motility disorder. Patients may present with a variety of symptoms, such as dysphagia, heartburn, odynophagia, and regurgitation. Over the past years, the landscape of esophageal motility testing has been revolutionized; however, our current treatment options for IEM still remain limited. Previous studies have suggested that buspirone, a serotonin receptor agonist, enhances esophageal peristalsis and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) function. Recent work provides the first evidence that buspirone may influence LES resting pressure in patients with systemic sclerosis. Future research should evaluate whether the beneficial effects of buspirone also apply to the broad clinical entity of esophageal dysphagia patients with IEM. PMID:26137300

  10. Role of Endoscopy in Diagnosis and Management of Pediatric Eosinophilic Esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Muir, Amanda B; Merves, Jamie; Liacouras, Chris A

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic allergic (immune-mediated) disease that leads to esophageal dysfunction and feeding disorders in children. Foods, and possibly environmental triggers, cause an inflammatory response in the esophagus, leading to esophageal inflammation, eosinophilic infiltration, and esophageal dysmotility, which may progress to dysphagia, food impaction, and esophageal stricture. Endoscopy with biopsy and histologic evaluation is currently the only method to diagnose EoE. Once diagnosed with EoE, children undergo follow-up endoscopy after therapy initiation and adjustments to ensure remission. Furthermore, children with food impactions or strictures may require endoscopic intervention such as foreign body removal and/or esophageal dilation. PMID:26616904

  11. Buspirone, a new drug for the management of patients with ineffective esophageal motility?

    PubMed

    Scheerens, Charlotte; Tack, Jan; Rommel, Nathalie

    2015-06-01

    Ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) is the most frequently encountered esophageal motility disorder. Patients may present with a variety of symptoms, such as dysphagia, heartburn, odynophagia, and regurgitation. Over the past years, the landscape of esophageal motility testing has been revolutionized; however, our current treatment options for IEM still remain limited. Previous studies have suggested that buspirone, a serotonin receptor agonist, enhances esophageal peristalsis and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) function. Recent work provides the first evidence that buspirone may influence LES resting pressure in patients with systemic sclerosis. Future research should evaluate whether the beneficial effects of buspirone also apply to the broad clinical entity of esophageal dysphagia patients with IEM. PMID:26137300

  12. Tenascin-C, a Prognostic Determinant of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhen-Hua; Lee, Hak-Min; Xuan, Yan-Hua; Cui, Yan; Kim, Seok-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Background Tenascin-C, an adhesion modulatory extracellular matrix molecule, is highly expressed in numerous human malignancies; thus, it may contribute to carcinogenesis and tumor progression. We explored the clinicopathological significance of Tenascin-C as a prognostic determinant of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Methods In ESCC patient tissues and cell lines, the presence of isoforms were examined using western blotting. We then investigated Tenascin-C immunohistochemical expression in 136 ESCC tissue samples. The clinical relevance of Tenascin-C expression and the correlation between Tenascin-C expression and expression of other factors related to cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) were also determined. Results Both 250 and 350 kDa sized isoforms of Tenascin-C were expressed only in esophageal cancer tissue not in normal tissue. Furthermore, both isoforms were also identified in all of four CAFs derived from esophageal cancer tissues. Tenascin-C expression was remarkably higher in ESCC than in adjacent non-tumor esophageal epithelium (p < 0.001). Tenascin-C expression in ESCC stromal fibroblasts was associated with patient’s age, tumor (pT) stage, lymph node metastasis, clinical stage, and cancer recurrence. Tenascin-C expression in cancer cells was correlated with an increase in tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) population, cancer recurrence, and hypoxia inducible factor1α (HIF1α) expression. Moreover, Tenascin-C overexpression in cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts was an independent poor prognostic factor for overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). In the Cox proportional hazard regression model, Tenascin-C overexpression in cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts was a significant independent hazard factor for OS and DFS in ESCC patients in both univariate and multivariate analyses. Furthermore, Tenascin-C expression in stromal fibroblasts of the ESCC patients was positively correlated with platelet-derived growth factor α (PDGFRα), PDGFRβ, and smooth muscle actin (SMA) expression. The 5-year OS and DFS rates were remarkably lower in patients with positive expressions of both Tenascin-C and PDGFRα (p < 0.001), Tenascin-C and PDGFRβ (p < 0.001), Tenascin-C and SMA (p < 0.001), Tenascin-C and fibroblast activation protein (FAP) (p < 0.001), and Tenascin-C and fibroblast-stimulating protein-1 (FSP1) (p < 0.001) in ESCC stromal fibroblasts than in patients with negative expressions of both Tenascin-C and one of the abovementioned CAF markers. Conclusion Our results show that Tenascin-C is a reliable and significant prognostic factor in ESCC. Tenascin-C may thus be a potent ESCC therapeutic target. PMID:26731558

  13. [Congenital esophagotracheal fistulas without esophageal atresia in children].

    PubMed

    Bourdinire, J; Lavalou, J F; Le Clech, G; Babut, J M; Camuzet, J P; Leprince, B; Le Gall, G

    1985-01-01

    Ten cases are reported of children presenting isolated, congenital esophagotracheal fistulae without esophageal atresia, or "H-type-fistula" of Anglo-Saxon authors. The malformation is rare, of difficult diagnosis and often associated with other malformations. Respiratory symptomatology is sometimes dramatic, but diagnosis is based on data from radiologic imaging of the esophagus and from esophageal and tracheobronchial endoscopy. Treatment is surgical by a cervicotomy approach due to the almost constant high localization of the lesion. PMID:4037619

  14. Esophageal web: a previously unrecognized complication of epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Hillemeier, C; Touloukian, R; McCallum, R; Gryboski, J

    1981-05-01

    The course of the esophageal disease in four patients with epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica recessive is examined. Three of four patients experienced web formation, a previously unrecognized finding, and the significance of this lesion in the evaluation and management of these patients is emphasized. One of four patients underwent a successful colonic interposition for severe esophageal disease and the role of this potentially life-saving procedure is discussed. PMID:7254996

  15. Androgens and esophageal cancer: What do we know?

    PubMed Central

    Sukocheva, Olga A; Li, Bin; Due, Steven L; Hussey, Damian J; Watson, David I

    2015-01-01

    Significant disparities exist between genders for the development and progression of several gastro-intestinal (GI) diseases including cancer. Differences in incidence between men vs women for colon, gastric and hepatocellular cancers suggest a role for steroid sex hormones in regulation of GI carcinogenesis. Involvement of intrinsic gender-linked mechanisms is also possible for esophageal adenocarcinoma as its incidence is disproportionally high among men. However, the cause of the observed gender differences and the potential role of androgens in esophageal carcinogenesis remains unclear, even though the cancer-promoting role of androgen receptors (AR) shown in other cancers such as prostate and bladder suggests this aspect warrants exploration. Several studies have demonstrated expression of ARs in esophageal cancer. However, only one study has suggested a potential link between AR signaling and outcome - poorer prognosis. Two groups have analyzed data from cohorts with prostate cancer and one of these found a decreased incidence of esophageal squamous and adenocarcinoma after androgen deprivation therapy. However, very limited information is available about the effects of androgen and AR-initiated signaling on esophageal cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Possible mechanisms for androgens/AR involvement in the regulation of esophageal cancer growth are considered, and the potential use of AR as a prognostic factor and clinical target is highlighted, although insufficient evidence is available to support clinical trials of novel therapies. As esophageal adenocarcinoma is a gender linked cancer with a large male predominance further studies are warranted to clarify the role of androgens and ARs in shaping intracellular signaling and genomic responses in esophageal cancer. PMID:26034350

  16. Evaluation and treatment of primary esophageal motility disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Patti, M G; Way, L W

    1997-01-01

    Achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, and nutcracker esophagus constitute the main primary esophageal motility disorders. During the past decade major progress has been made in understanding their pathophysiology and in the ability to establish a precise diagnosis. In addition, minimally invasive surgical intervention has radically changed the therapeutic approach, and thoracoscopic or laparoscopic myotomy is probably the best treatment for most patients. Images Figure 1. PMID:9168684

  17. [Efficacy of sorption therapy in patients with cicatricial esophageal stenosis].

    PubMed

    Chikinev, Iu V; Antonov, A R; Korobeĭnikov, A V

    2006-01-01

    We examined 110 patients treated conservatively for cicatricial esophageal stenosis including expansion on the string. The patients were divided into three groups: controls (n = 35), receiving adjuvant SUMS-1 (n = 38) and given adjuvant enterosgel (n = 37). According to electron microscopy, enterosorbents make esophageal mucosa denser by decreasing interstitial spaces as a result of microcirculatory improvement and reduction of edema. Enterosorbents elevate total protein and sugar in the blood. PMID:17002045

  18. Characterization of Esophageal Physiology Using Mechanical State Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leibbrandt, Richard E.; Dinning, Phil G.; Costa, Marcello; Cock, Charles; Wiklendt, Lukasz; Wang, Guangsong; Tack, Jan; van Beckevoort, Dirk; Rommel, Nathalie; Omari, Taher I.

    2016-01-01

    The esophagus functions to transport swallowed fluids and food from the pharynx to the stomach. The esophageal muscles governing bolus transport comprise circular striated muscle of the proximal esophagus and circular smooth muscle of the distal esophagus. Longitudinal smooth muscle contraction provides a mechanical advantage to bolus transit during circular smooth muscle contraction. Esophageal striated muscle is directly controlled by neural circuits originating in the central nervous system, resulting in coordinated contractions. In contrast, the esophageal smooth muscle is controlled by enteric circuits modulated by extrinsic central neural connections resulting in neural relaxation and contraction. The esophageal muscles are modulated by sensory information arising from within the lumen. Contraction or relaxation, which changes the diameter of the lumen, alters the intraluminal pressure and ultimately inhibits or promotes flow of content. This relationship that exists between the changes in diameter and concurrent changes in intraluminal pressure has been used previously to identify the “mechanical states” of the circular muscle; that is when the muscles are passively or actively, relaxing or contracting. Detecting these changes in the mechanical state of the muscle has been difficult and as the current interpretation of esophageal motility is based largely upon pressure measurement (manometry), subtle changes in the muscle function during peristalsis can be missed. We hypothesized that quantification of mechanical states of the esophageal circular muscles and the pressure-diameter properties that define them, would allow objective characterization of the mechanisms that govern esophageal peristalsis. To achieve this we analyzed barium swallows captured by simultaneous videofluoroscopy and pressure with impedance recording. From these data we demonstrated that intraluminal impedance measurements could be used to determine changes in the internal diameter of the lumen comparable with measurements from videofluoroscopy. Our data indicated that identification of mechanical state of esophageal muscle was simple to apply and revealed patterns consistent with the known neural inputs activating the different muscles during swallowing. PMID:26924967

  19. ABCG2/V-ATPase was associated with the drug resistance and tumor metastasis of esophageal squamous cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2) is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ABCG2 gene. ABCG2 participates in efflux of many chemotherapeutic agents. ABCG2 is often expressed in hematopoietic progenitor or stem cells. Vacuolar-H + ?ATPase (V-ATPase) plays a key role in adjusting and maintaining intracellular pH and in regulating the drug tolerance of cells. The TNM Classification of Malignant Tumours (TNM) is a cancer staging system that describes the extent of cancer in a patients body. In this study, the expression of ABCG2 and V-ATPase in esophageal squamous cancer cells was detected. Methods Immunohistochemistry staining and Immunofluorescence double staining were used to detect the expression of ABCG2 and V-ATPase in in 66 cases of esophageal squamous cancer cells. Associations and differences in expression of ABCG2 with that of V-ATPase were analyzed. Results Positive staining patterns for both ABCG2 (66.67%) and V-ATPase (68.18%) were located mainly in the plasma membrane and cytoplasm. Marked differences in expression were also shown (P?stages in these carcinomas. Marked differences were also found for ABCG2 expression between the two groups in the pathological grades and in the TNM staging groups (P?stages (P?stages. Marked differences in expression of ABCG2 and V-ATPase were found between metastatic and non-metastatic groups in the same carcinomas (P?stages. Conclusions Both ABCG2 and V-ATPase were over-expressed in esophageal squamous cancer cells. Their expression was associated with pathological grade, TNM stage and tumor metastasis in esophageal squamous cancer cells, suggesting interaction relationship between them. ABCG2 and V-ATPase expression may be strongly associated with drug resistance and tumor metastasis. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/3823783918433897 PMID:23244569

  20. Comparison of core decompression and conservative treatment for avascular necrosis of femoral head at early stage: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yu-Cai; Zhong, Hui-Ming; Lin, Tiao; Shi, Jian-Bin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the current meta-analysis was to compare the efficacy of core decompression (CD) and conservative treatment (CT) for saving femoral heads in patients with avascular necrosis of femoral head (ANFH). Four RCTs and two CCTs involving 323 hips with 24- to 48-months follow-up were included in this review. Our results suggested CD had a trend of favorable results in contrast to other CT (OR 3.28; 95% CI 0.77-14.02; P = 0.11) but saved much less hips compared to biophysical treatments [odds ratio (OR) 0.37; 95% CI 0.18-0.74; P = 0.005]. In the stratified survival rate analysis by ANFH stage, interestingly, CD group got a significantly higher successful rate of hip joint conservation than other CT group in both stage I and stage II-III (stage I: OR 4.43; 95% CI 1.34-14.65; P = 0.01; stage II-III: OR 6.75; 95% CI 2.18-20.90; P = 0.0009). In the biophysical stimulation subgroup, however, an even higher frequency of survived hips were observed compared to CD group at stage II-III (CD vs. biophysical stimulation: OR 0.34; 95% CI 0.17-0.67; P = 0.002). In conclusion, performing CD for ANFH is effective for preventing femoral collapse within a short-term follow-up, but an even higher successful rate were expected by biophysical stimulations. Nevertheless, the short-term follow-up, the small sample size of the current meta-analysis only provide limited quality of evidence, which required confirmation from further large-scale, well-designed RCT with longer follow-up. PMID:26131094

  1. Eosinophilic esophagitis: New insights in pathogenesis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Cicala, Michele; Behar, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a clinico-pathological entity with esophageal symptoms and dense esophageal eosinophilic infiltration throughout the esophagus that may persist despite treatment with proton pump inhibitors. This eosinophilic infiltration is usually absent in the stomach, small intestine and colon, although there are a number of reports of patients with a multi-organ involvement. EoE is associated with abnormalities involving TH2-dependent immunity, with multiple environmental factors strongly contributing to disease expression. The layer of the esophagus affected by the eosinophilic infiltration causes the specific symptoms. Esophageal involvement results mostly in dysphagia for solids that can be severe enough to cause recurrent esophageal obstruction with typical endoscopic features suggesting esophageal remodeling and pathological changes of eosinophilic infiltration of the mucosa, sub-epithelial fibrosis and muscle hypertrophy. This disease is frequently associated with other allergic conditions such as allergic asthma, allergic dermatitis and eosinophilia. The treatment of patients with EoE depends on the severity of the symptoms and of the inflammatory process as well as to their response to a gradual step-up treatment. The first line of treatment consists of steroid containing local inhalers. If unresponsive they are then treated with oral steroids. Intravenous interleukin blockers seem to have a consistent positive therapeutic effect. PMID:26855813

  2. A Zebrafish Model for Studies on Esophageal Epithelial Biology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Beasley, Andrea; Hu, Yuhui; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian esophagus exhibits a remarkable change in epithelial structure during the transition from embryo to adult. However, the molecular mechanisms of esophageal epithelial development are not well understood. Zebrafish (Danio rerio), a common model organism for vertebrate development and gene function, has not previously been characterized as a model system for esophageal epithelial development. In this study, we characterized a piece of non-keratinized stratified squamous epithelium similar to human esophageal epithelium in the upper digestive tract of developing zebrafish. Under the microscope, this piece was detectable at 5dpf and became stratified at 7dpf. Expression of esophageal epithelial marker genes (Krt5, P63, Sox2 and Pax9) was detected by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Knockdown of P63, a gene known to be critical for esophageal epithelium, disrupted the development of this epithelium. With this model system, we found that Pax9 knockdown resulted in loss or disorganization of the squamous epithelium, as well as down-regulation of the differentiation markers Krt4 and Krt5. In summary, we characterized a region of stratified squamous epithelium in the zebrafish upper digestive tract which can be used for functional studies of candidate genes involved in esophageal epithelial biology. PMID:26630178

  3. Ultrastructural Changes of the Smooth Muscle in Esophageal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Al-Shraim, Mubarak M; Eid, Refaat A; Musalam, Adel Osman; Radad, Khaled; Ibrahim, Ashraf H M; Malki, Talal A

    2015-12-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) with or without tracheo-esophageal fistula (TEF) is a relatively rare congenital anomaly. Despite the advances in the management techniques and neonatal intensive care, esophageal dysmotility remains a very common problem following EA/TEF repair. Our current study aimed to describe the most significant ultrastructural changes of the smooth muscle cells (SMCs) trying to highlight some of the underlying mechanisms of esophageal dysmotility following EA/TEF repair. Twenty-three biopsies were obtained from the tip of the lower esophageal pouch (LEP) of 23 patients during primary repair of EA/TEF. Light microscopic examination was performed with hematoxylin and eosin (HE), and Van Gieson's stains. Ultrastructural examination was done using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Histopathological examination showed distortion of smooth muscle layer and deposition of an abundant amount of fibrous tissue in-between smooth muscles. Using TEM, SMCs exhibited loss of the cell-to-cell adhesion, mitochondrial vacuolation, formation of myelin figures, and apoptotic fragmentation. There were also plasmalemmal projections and formation of ghost bodies. Interestingly, SMCs were found extending pseudopodia-like projections around adjacent collagen fibers. Engulfed collagen fibers by SMCs underwent degradation within autophagic vacuoles. Degeneration of SMCs and deposition of abundant extracellular collagen fibers are prominent pathological changes in LEP of EA/TEF. These changes might contribute to the pathogenesis of esophageal dysmotility in patients who have survived EA/TEF. PMID:26548437

  4. Eosinophilic esophagitis: New insights in pathogenesis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Cicala, Michele; Behar, Jose

    2016-02-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a clinico-pathological entity with esophageal symptoms and dense esophageal eosinophilic infiltration throughout the esophagus that may persist despite treatment with proton pump inhibitors. This eosinophilic infiltration is usually absent in the stomach, small intestine and colon, although there are a number of reports of patients with a multi-organ involvement. EoE is associated with abnormalities involving TH2-dependent immunity, with multiple environmental factors strongly contributing to disease expression. The layer of the esophagus affected by the eosinophilic infiltration causes the specific symptoms. Esophageal involvement results mostly in dysphagia for solids that can be severe enough to cause recurrent esophageal obstruction with typical endoscopic features suggesting esophageal remodeling and pathological changes of eosinophilic infiltration of the mucosa, sub-epithelial fibrosis and muscle hypertrophy. This disease is frequently associated with other allergic conditions such as allergic asthma, allergic dermatitis and eosinophilia. The treatment of patients with EoE depends on the severity of the symptoms and of the inflammatory process as well as to their response to a gradual step-up treatment. The first line of treatment consists of steroid containing local inhalers. If unresponsive they are then treated with oral steroids. Intravenous interleukin blockers seem to have a consistent positive therapeutic effect. PMID:26855813

  5. Protective Effect of ECQ on Rat Reflux Esophagitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyeon-Soon; Han, Jeong Hoon; Jeong, Jun Yeong

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the protective effect of Rumex Aquaticus Herba extracts containing quercetin-3-?-D-glucuronopyranoside (ECQ) on experimental reflux esophagitis. Reflux esophagitis was induced by surgical procedure. The rats were divided into seven groups, namely normal group, control group, ECQ (1, 3, 10, 30 mg/kg) group and omeprazole (30 mg/kg) group. ECQ and omeprazole groups received intraduodenal administration. The Rats were starved for 24 hours before the experiments, but were freely allowed to drink water. ECQ group attenuated the gross esophagitis significantly compared to that treated with omeprazole in a dose-dependent manner. ECQ decreased the volume of gastric juice and increased the gastric pH, which are similar to those of omeprazole group. In addition, ECQ inhibited the acid output effectively in reflux esophagitis. Significantly increased amounts of malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and the mucosal depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) were observed in the reflux esophagitis. ECQ administration attenuated the decrement of the GSH levels and affected the MDA levels and MPO activity. These results suggest that the ECQ has a protective effect which may be attributed to its multiple effects including anti-secretory, anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory actions on reflux esophagitis in rats. PMID:23269908

  6. A Zebrafish Model for Studies on Esophageal Epithelial Biology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Beasley, Andrea; Hu, Yuhui; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian esophagus exhibits a remarkable change in epithelial structure during the transition from embryo to adult. However, the molecular mechanisms of esophageal epithelial development are not well understood. Zebrafish (Danio rerio), a common model organism for vertebrate development and gene function, has not previously been characterized as a model system for esophageal epithelial development. In this study, we characterized a piece of non-keratinized stratified squamous epithelium similar to human esophageal epithelium in the upper digestive tract of developing zebrafish. Under the microscope, this piece was detectable at 5dpf and became stratified at 7dpf. Expression of esophageal epithelial marker genes (Krt5, P63, Sox2 and Pax9) was detected by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Knockdown of P63, a gene known to be critical for esophageal epithelium, disrupted the development of this epithelium. With this model system, we found that Pax9 knockdown resulted in loss or disorganization of the squamous epithelium, as well as down-regulation of the differentiation markers Krt4 and Krt5. In summary, we characterized a region of stratified squamous epithelium in the zebrafish upper digestive tract which can be used for functional studies of candidate genes involved in esophageal epithelial biology. PMID:26630178

  7. Data analyses and perspectives on laparoscopic surgery for esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Kazuto; Omura, Nobuo; Yano, Fumiaki; Hoshino, Masato; Yamamoto, Se-Ryung; Akimoto, Shunsuke; Masuda, Takahiro; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    In general, the treatment methods for esophageal achalasia are largely classified into four groups, including drug therapy using nitrite or a calcium channel blocker, botulinum toxin injection, endoscopic therapy such as endoscopic balloon dilation, and surgery. Various studies have suggested that the most effective treatment of esophageal achalasia is surgical therapy. The basic concept of this surgical therapy has not changed since Heller proposed esophageal myotomy for the purpose of resolution of lower esophageal obstruction for the first time in 1913, but the most common approach has changed from open-chest surgery to laparoscopic surgery. Currently, the laparoscopic surgery has been the procedure of choice for the treatment of esophageal achalasia. During the process of the transition from open-chest surgery to laparotomy, to thoracoscopic surgery, and to laparoscopic surgery, the necessity of combining antireflux surgery has been recognized. There is some debate as to which type of antireflux surgery should be selected. The Toupet fundoplication may be the most effective in prevention of postoperative antireflux, but many medical institutions have selected the Dor fundoplication which covers the mucosal surface exposed by myotomy. Recently, a new endoscopic approach, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM), has received attention. Future studies should examine the long-term outcomes and whether POEM becomes the gold standard for the treatment of esophageal achalasia. PMID:26478674

  8. Thallium cardiac stressing by esophageal pacing

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.L.; Vacek, J.L.; Preston, D.F.; Robinson, R.G.; Feldkamp, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Forty-three patients were examined with the transesophageal pacing method of cardiac stressing and thallium imaging. Transesophageal cardiac pacing, using a pill electrode or a permanent pacemaker lead, is a safe alternative for patients who are physically unable to exercise. Prior studies suggest that transvenous right atrial pacing with thallium injection is equivalent to physical exercise thallium studies in the detection of coronary artery disease. The esophageal pacing bipolar electrode similarly increases heart rate without the necessity of transvenous pacing or fluoroscopy and without the adverse side effects often seen when using pharmacologic stressing agents (i.e., dipyridamole). The results compare well with cardiac catheterization, echocardiographic, and electrocardiographic results. Cardiac paced stress testing requires no sedation, is performed on an out-patient basis, and causes little if any discomfort for the patient.

  9. Lymphatic spreading and lymphadenectomy for esophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiang; Cai, Jie; Chen, Yao; Chen, Long-Qi

    2016-01-27

    Esophageal carcinoma (EC) is a highly lethal malignancy with a poor prognosis. One of the most important prognostic factors in EC is lymph node status. Therefore, lymphadenectomy has been recognized as a key that influences the outcome of surgical treatment for EC. However, the lymphatic drainage system of the esophagus, including an abundant lymph-capillary network in the lamina propria and muscularis mucosa, is very complex with cervical, mediastinal and celiac node spreading. The extent of lymphadenectomy for EC has always been controversial because of the very complex pattern of lymph node spreading. In this article, published literature regarding lymphatic spreading was reviewed and the current lymphadenectomy trends for EC are discussed. PMID:26843917

  10. Primary extramedullary esophageal plasmacytoma - a case report.

    PubMed

    Debnath, C R; Debnath, M R; Shahjahan, S M; Rana, M S; Islam, M S; Rashid, M; Tarafder, A J

    2015-04-01

    Extramedullary plasmacytomas are very uncommon tumors, may occur commonly in the upper respiratory passages. These are rarely seen in the middle and lower gastrointestinal system and exceptional to originate in the esophagus. We present a novel case of a 65-year old man who presented with dysphagia and weight loss. After taking detailed clinical history and physical examination endoscopy was performed that showed an ulcero-proliferative lesion involving the lower third of esophagus. Histopathological examination revealed sheets of malignant plasma cells, some with prominent nucleoli. Immuno-histochemistry could not be done due to unavailability. A bone marrow biopsy was performed which was negative for involvement. This is a rare case of esophageal plasmacytoma diagnosed on endoscopy in a patient presenting with dysphagia. PMID:26007272

  11. Foscarnet-Resistant Cytomegalovirus Esophagitis with Stricturing

    PubMed Central

    Gaduputi, Vinaya; Patel, Harish; Vootla, Vamshidhar; Khan, Usman; Chilimuri, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 52-year-old man with HIV-AIDS, non-complaint with highly active antiretroviral therapy, who presented with long-standing dysphagia. He was treated for three episodes of severe Candida esophagitis with fluconazole and later caspofungin due to poor response. In spite of the prolonged treatment courses the patient did not report an improvement in his symptoms. He was also concomitantly being treated for other opportunistic infections including cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis with i.v. foscarnet for almost 2 months prior to the index presentation. Upper esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed multiple superficial ulcers with stricturing. Bougie dilatation was attempted but failed. The biopsy specimens revealed multiple intracellular inclusion bodies pathognomonic of CMV infection. We aim to highlight the increasing resistance of CMV to conventional first-line antiviral agents such as foscarnet. PMID:23466529

  12. Lymphatic spreading and lymphadenectomy for esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiang; Cai, Jie; Chen, Yao; Chen, Long-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma (EC) is a highly lethal malignancy with a poor prognosis. One of the most important prognostic factors in EC is lymph node status. Therefore, lymphadenectomy has been recognized as a key that influences the outcome of surgical treatment for EC. However, the lymphatic drainage system of the esophagus, including an abundant lymph-capillary network in the lamina propria and muscularis mucosa, is very complex with cervical, mediastinal and celiac node spreading. The extent of lymphadenectomy for EC has always been controversial because of the very complex pattern of lymph node spreading. In this article, published literature regarding lymphatic spreading was reviewed and the current lymphadenectomy trends for EC are discussed. PMID:26843917

  13. Endoscopic sclerotherapy compared with no specific treatment for the primary prevention of bleeding from esophageal varices. A randomized controlled multicentre trial [ISRCTN03215899

    PubMed Central

    van Buuren, Henk R; Rasch, Marijke C; Batenburg, Piet L; Bolwerk, Clemens JM; Nicolai, Jan J; van der Werf, Sjoerd DJ; Scherpenisse, Joost; Arends, Lidia R; Hattum, Jan van; Rauws, Erik AJ; Schalm, Solko W

    2003-01-01

    Background Since esophageal variceal bleeding is associated with a high mortality rate, prevention of bleeding might be expected to result in improved survival. The first trials to evaluate prophylactic sclerotherapy found a marked beneficial effect of prophylactic treatment. These results, however, were not generally accepted because of methodological aspects and because the reported incidence of bleeding in control subjects was considered unusually high. The objective of this study was to compare endoscopic sclerotherapy (ES) with nonactive treatment for the primary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis. Methods 166 patients with esophageal varices grade II, III of IV according to Paquet's classification, with evidence of active or progressive liver disease and without prior variceal bleeding, were randomized to groups receiving ES (n = 84) or no specific treatment (n = 82). Primary end-points were incidence of bleeding and mortality; secondary end-points were complications and costs. Results During a mean follow-up of 32 months variceal bleeding occurred in 25% of the patients of the ES group and in 28% of the control group. The incidence of variceal bleeding for the ES and control group was 16% and 16% at 1 year and 33% and 29% at 3 years, respectively. The 1-year survival rate was 87% for the ES group and 84% for the control group; the 3-year survival rate was 62% for each group. In the ES group one death occurred as a direct consequence of variceal bleeding compared to 9 in the other group (p = 0.01, log-rank test). Complications were comparable for the two groups. Health care costs for patients assigned to ES were estimated to be higher. Meta-analysis of a large number of trials showed that the effect of prophylactic sclerotherapy is significantly related to the baseline bleeding risk. Conclusion In the present trial, prophylactic sclerotherapy did not reduce the incidence of bleeding from varices in patients with liver cirrhosis and a low to moderate bleeding risk. Although sclerotherapy lowered mortality attributable to variceal bleeding, overall survival was not affected. The effect of prophylactic sclerotherapy seems dependent on the underlying bleeding risk. A beneficial effect can only be expected for patients with a high risk for bleeding. PMID:12919638

  14. Salvage chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced esophageal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Y; Kawada, K; Tokairin, Y; Miyawaki, Y; Okada, T; Ryotokuji, T; Fujiwara, N; Saito, K; Fujiwara, H; Ogo, T; Okuda, M; Nagai, K; Miyake, S; Kawano, T

    2015-07-01

    'Salvage chemoradiotherapy (CRT)' was introduced in 2005 to treat thoracic esophageal carcinomas deemed unresectable based on the intraoperative findings. The therapeutic concept is as follows: the surgical plan is changed to an operation that aims to achieve curability by the subsequent definitive CRT. For this purpose, the invading tumor is resected as much as possible, and systematic lymph node dissection is performed except for in the area around the bilateral recurrent nerves. The definitive CRT should be started as soon as possible and should be performed as planned. We hypothesized that this treatment would be feasible and provide good clinical effects. We herein verified this hypothesis. Twenty-seven patients who received salvage CRT were enrolled in the study, and their clinical course, therapeutic response, and prognosis were evaluated. The patients who had poor oral intake because of esophageal stenosis were able to eat solid food soon after the operation. The radiation field could be narrowed after surgery, and this might have contributed to the high rate of finishing the definitive CRT as planned. As a result, the overall response rate was 74.1%, and 48.1% of the patients had a complete response. No patient experienced fistula formation. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates were 66.5%, 35.2%, and 35.2%, respectively. Salvage CRT had clinical benefits, such as the fact that patients became able to have oral intake, that fistula formation could be prevented, that the adverse events associated with the definitive CRT could be reduced, and that prognosis of the patients was satisfactory. Although the rate of recurrent nerve paralysis was