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Sample records for stage iii colon

  1. Predictors of recurrence free survival for patients with stage II and III colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate clinico-pathologic specific predictors of recurrence for stage II/III disease. Improving recurrence prediction for resected stage II/III colon cancer patients could alter surveillance strategies, providing opportunities for more informed use of chemotherapy for high risk individuals. Methods 871 stage II and 265 stage III patients with colon cancers were included. Features studied included surgery date, age, gender, chemotherapy, tumor location, number of positive lymph nodes, tumor differentiation, and lymphovascular and perineural invasion. Time to recurrence was evaluated, using Cox’s proportional hazards models. The predictive ability of the multivariable models was evaluated using the concordance (c) index. Results For stage II cancer patients, estimated recurrence-free survival rates at one, three, five, and seven years following surgery were 98%, 92%, 90%, and 89%. Only T stage was significantly associated with recurrence. Estimated recurrence-free survival rates for stage III patients at one, three, five, and seven years following surgery were 94%, 78%, 70%, and 66%. Higher recurrence rates were seen in patients who didn’t receive chemotherapy (p = 0.023), with a higher number of positive nodes (p < 0.001). The c-index for the stage II model was 0.55 and 0.68 for stage III. Conclusions Current clinic-pathologic information is inadequate for prediction of colon cancer recurrence after resection for stage II and IIII patients. Identification and clinical use of molecular markers to identify the earlier stage II and III colon cancer patients at elevated risk of recurrence are needed to improve prognostication of early stage colon cancers. PMID:24886281

  2. CDX2 as a Prognostic Biomarker in Stage II and Stage III Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dalerba, Piero; Sahoo, Debashis; Paik, Soonmyung; Guo, Xiangqian; Yothers, Greg; Song, Nan; Wilcox-Fogel, Nate; Forgó, Erna; Rajendran, Pradeep S; Miranda, Stephen P; Hisamori, Shigeo; Hutchison, Jacqueline; Kalisky, Tomer; Qian, Dalong; Wolmark, Norman; Fisher, George A; van de Rijn, Matt; Clarke, Michael F

    2016-01-21

    Background The identification of high-risk stage II colon cancers is key to the selection of patients who require adjuvant treatment after surgery. Microarray-based multigene-expression signatures derived from stem cells and progenitor cells hold promise, but they are difficult to use in clinical practice. Methods We used a new bioinformatics approach to search for biomarkers of colon epithelial differentiation across gene-expression arrays and then ranked candidate genes according to the availability of clinical-grade diagnostic assays. With the use of subgroup analysis involving independent and retrospective cohorts of patients with stage II or stage III colon cancer, the top candidate gene was tested for its association with disease-free survival and a benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. Results The transcription factor CDX2 ranked first in our screening test. A group of 87 of 2115 tumor samples (4.1%) lacked CDX2 expression. In the discovery data set, which included 466 patients, the rate of 5-year disease-free survival was lower among the 32 patients (6.9%) with CDX2-negative colon cancers than among the 434 (93.1%) with CDX2-positive colon cancers (hazard ratio for disease recurrence, 3.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60 to 7.38; P=0.002). In the validation data set, which included 314 patients, the rate of 5-year disease-free survival was lower among the 38 patients (12.1%) with CDX2 protein-negative colon cancers than among the 276 (87.9%) with CDX2 protein-positive colon cancers (hazard ratio, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.36 to 4.29; P=0.003). In both these groups, these findings were independent of the patient's age, sex, and tumor stage and grade. Among patients with stage II cancer, the difference in 5-year disease-free survival was significant both in the discovery data set (49% among 15 patients with CDX2-negative tumors vs. 87% among 191 patients with CDX2-positive tumors, P=0.003) and in the validation data set (51% among 15 patients with CDX2-negative

  3. Prognostic impact of mutation profiling in patients with stage II and III colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yinchen; Han, Xiaohong; Wang, Jianfei; Wang, Shuai; Yang, Hongying; Lu, Shih-Hsin; Shi, Yuankai

    2016-01-01

    Development of colorectal cancer (CRC) associates with accumulation of genetic mutations include the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway. However, whether mutations in KRAS together with downstream factors BRAF, PIK3CA and NRAS impact prognosis is still unclear for stage II-III colon cancer. In the present study a total of 228 stage II-III colon cancer samples were retrospectively collected, KRAS (codons 12, 13 and 61), BRAF (exon 11 and exon 15), PIK3CA (exon 9 and exon 20) and NRAS (codons 12, 13 and 61) status was detected by Sanger sequencing, 37.89% (86/227) tumors harbored a KRAS mutation, 7.02% (16/228) harbored a BRAF mutation, 13.18% (29/220) harbored a PIK3CA mutation and 0.89% (2/224) harbored a NRAS mutation. NRAS mutations existed only in stage II colon cancer. Older groups harbored a higher KRAS and BRAF mutation (P < 0.05), PIK3CA (exon9) mutations appeared more common in worse differentiation tumors (P = 0.032). Moreover, PIK3CA (E545K) mutation was significantly associated with tumor recurrence (P = 0.031) and acted independently prognostic for poor OS (P = 0.044), while only in stage III colon cancer. KRAS, BRAF and NRAS mutations do not have major prognostic value in stage II and III colon cancer, subtypes of gene mutations should be further investigated for a better understanding in CRC. PMID:27074743

  4. Collaboration Between Surgeons and Medical Oncologists and Outcomes for Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tanvir; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Veenstra, Christine M.; Pollack, Craig E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Collaboration between specialists is essential for achieving high-value care in patients with complex cancer needs. We explore how collaboration between oncologists and surgeons affects mortality and cost for patients requiring multispecialty cancer care. Patients and Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of patients with stage III colon cancer from SEER-Medicare diagnosed between 2000 and 2009. Patients were assigned to a primary treating surgeon and oncologist. Collaboration between surgeon and oncologist was measured as the number of patients shared between them; this has been shown to reflect advice seeking and referral relationships between physicians. Outcomes included hazards for all-cause mortality, subhazards for colon cancer–specific mortality, and cost of care at 12 months. Results: A total of 9,329 patients received care from 3,623 different surgeons and 2,319 medical oncologists, representing 6,827 unique surgeon–medical oncologist pairs. As the number of patients shared between specialists increased from to one to five (25th to 75th percentile), patients experienced an approximately 20% improved survival benefit from all-cause and colon cancer–specific mortalities. Specifically, for each additional patient shared between oncologist and surgeon, all-cause mortality improved by 5% (hazard ratio, 0.95; 95%CI, 0.92 to 0.97), and colon cancer–specific mortality improved by 5% (subhazard ratio, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.91 to 0.97). There was no association with cost. Conclusion: Specialist collaboration is associated with lower mortality without increased cost among patients with stage III colon cancer. Facilitating formal and informal collaboration between specialists may be an important strategy for improving the care of patients with complex cancers. PMID:25873063

  5. Stage III Colon Cancer: The Individualized Strategy of Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Aged Under and Over 70

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chieh-Sheng; Chang, Ping-Ying; Chen, Yu-Guang; Chen, Jia-Hong; Wu, Yi-Ying; Ho, Ching-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to examine the specific chemoregimens selected for adjuvant therapy in the patients with stage III colon cancer. We investigated the trends in chemotherapeutic prescribing patterns and looked for adequate therapeutic setting for these patients. Methods 288 patients presenting with stage III colon cancer and undergoing adjuvant therapies after curative surgery for more than 3-month were enrolled between January 2006 and December 2011. Demographic characteristics and therapeutic factors were analyzed, including age, gender, histological grade, tumor sizes, tumor location, pathologic stage, performance status, serum carcinoembryonic antigen, regimens selection, interval from the operation to the start of adjuvant therapy and prolonged adjuvant therapy. Kaplan– Meier methods were utilized for drawing survival curves and Cox model was used to analyze survival, prognostic factors. Results The analysis showed that the patients aged under 70 received more intensive therapies than those aged over 70 (P<0.001). Later, advanced analysis in therapeutic factors was conducted between the patients aged under 70 and those over 70. In the patients aged under 70, significant differences in 4-year overall survival (OS) were noted between UFUR (oral tegafur-uracil plus leucovorin) groups and FOLFOX (5-FU plus oxaliplatin) [65.6% versus (vs) 89.8%, relative risk (RR) 3.780, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.263–11.315, P = 0.017]. There were also differences in 4-year OS between these patients with and without oxaliplatin-contained regimens (92.1% vs 83.4%, respectively, RR 0.385, 95% CI 0.157–0.946, P = 0.037). In addition, the patients who received intravenous or combined therapy also had higher 4-year OS than those only received oral regimens (92.1% vs 76.6%, P = 0.077), though the finding did not reach statistical significance. In contrast to the survival benefits of above therapeutic settings for the patients aged under 70, there was less

  6. [Postoperative Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Stage III Colon Cancer - Drug Selection, Tolerability, and Safety in Clinical Practice].

    PubMed

    Okada, Kazutake; Sadahiro, Sotaro; Saito, Gota; Tanaka, Akira; Suzuki, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    In the National Comprehensive Cancer Network(NCCN)guidelines, oxaliplatin(L-OHP)-based chemotherapeutic regimens, including 5-fluorouracil, Leucovorin(LV), and L-OHP(FOLFOX); capecitabine and L-OHP(CapeOX); , and 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid, and L-OHP(FLOX)are designated as category 1 recommendations for postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy in Stage III colon cancer, followed by capecitabine and 5-fluorouracil plus LV as category 2A recommendations. We studied the selection of drugs for adjuvant chemotherapy and assessed the tolerability and safety of CapeOX and tegafur- uraci(l UFT)plus LV(UFT/LV)in patients with Stage III colon cancer. The study group included 104 consecutive patients with Stage III colon cancer who underwent curative surgery. One patient changed hospitals immediately after surgery. Among the remaining 103 patients, 82(80%)received adjuvant chemotherapy and 21(20%)did not. CapeOX was administered to 32 patients(31%), UFT/LV to 49 patients(48%), and capecitabine to 1 patient(1%). In 59 patients, the treatment choice was determined according to the patient's preference; 32 patient(s 54%)selected CapeOX, 26(44%)selected UFT/LV, and 1(2%) selected no chemotherapy. The treatment completion rate was 80% for CapeOX and 84% for UFT/LV. Among patients who completed chemotherapy, dose reduction and drug withdrawal were not required in 22% of patients who received CapeOX and 80% of those who received UFT/LV. Neither CapeOX nor UFT/LV was associated with any serious adverse events. The tolerability and safety of CapeOX and UFT/LV were acceptable. However, CapeOX dose had to be carefully adjusted according to each patient's condition. PMID:27210088

  7. Adjuvant Chemotherapy Use and Adverse Events among Older Patients with Stage III Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Katherine L.; Adams, John L.; Weeks, Jane C.; Chrischilles, Elizabeth A.; Schrag, Deborah; Ayanian, John Z.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Bhoopalam, Nirmala; Potosky, Arnold L.; Harrington, David P.; Fletcher, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Context Randomized trials suggest adjuvant chemotherapy is effective for elderly patients with stage III colon cancer. However, the elderly are less likely to receive this therapy than younger patients, perhaps because of concern about adverse effects. Objective To evaluate adjuvant chemotherapy use and outcomes for older patients with stage III colon cancer from well-defined population-based settings and healthcare systems. Design Observational study of adjuvant chemotherapy use and outcomes by age, using Poisson regression to estimate the number of adverse events adjusted for demographic and clinical factors, including comorbid illness and specific elements of chemotherapy regimens documented with clinically detailed medical record reviews and patient and surrogate surveys. Setting Five geographically defined regions (Alabama, Iowa, Los Angeles County, Northern California, and North Carolina), five integrated health-care delivery systems, and 15 Veterans hospitals. Patients All 675 patients diagnosed with stage III colon cancer during 2003-2005 who underwent surgical resection were followed up to 15 months post-diagnosis. Main outcome measures Chemotherapy regimen, dose, duration and annualized mean number of adverse events stratified by age. Results Half of the 202 patients >=75 years received adjuvant chemotherapy compared with 87% of 473 younger patients (diff 37%, 95% CI 30%-45%). Among adjuvant chemotherapy users, 14 (14%) of patients >=75 years and 178 (44%) of younger patients received a regimen containing oxaliplatin (diff 30%, 95% CI 21%-38%). Older patients were less likely to continue. By 150 days, 99 (40%) patients >= 65 years and 68 (25%) younger patients had discontinued chemotherapy (diff 15%, 95% CI 7%-23%). Overall, 162 (24%) patients had at least one adverse clinical event, with more events among patients treated with vs. without adjuvant chemotherapy (mean 0.394 vs. 0.160, diff 0.234, 95% CI 0.11-0.36, p<0.001). Among adjuvant chemotherapy

  8. Predictive and Prognostic Analysis of PIK3CA Mutation in Stage III Colon Cancer Intergroup Trial

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xiaoyun; Imamura, Yu; Yamauchi, Mai; McCleary, Nadine J.; Ng, Kimmie; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Saltz, Leonard B.; Mayer, Robert J.; Whittom, Renaud; Hantel, Alexander; Benson, Al B.; Mowat, Rex B.; Spiegelman, Donna; Goldberg, Richard M.; Bertagnolli, Monica M.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Fuchs, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Somatic mutations in PIK3CA (phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphonate 3-kinase [PI3K], catalytic subunit alpha gene) activate the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway and contribute to pathogenesis of various malignancies, including colorectal cancer. Methods We examined associations of PIK3CA oncogene mutation with relapse, survival, and treatment efficacy in 627 stage III colon carcinoma case subjects within a randomized adjuvant chemotherapy trial (5-fluorouracil and leucovorin [FU/LV] vs irinotecan [CPT11], fluorouracil and leucovorin [IFL]; Cancer and Leukemia Group B 89803 [Alliance]). We detected PIK3CA mutation in exons 9 and 20 by polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing. Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess prognostic and predictive role of PIK3CA mutation, adjusting for clinical features and status of routine standard molecular pathology features, including KRAS and BRAF mutations and microsatellite instability (mismatch repair deficiency). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Compared with PIK3CA wild-type cases, overall status of PIK3CA mutation positivity or the presence of PIK3CA mutation in either exon 9 or 20 alone was not statistically significantly associated with recurrence-free, disease-free, or overall survival (log-rank P > .70; P > .40 in multivariable regression models). There was no statistically significant interaction between PIK3CA and KRAS (or BRAF) mutation status in survival analysis (P interaction > .18). PIK3CA mutation status did not appear to predict better or worse response to IFL therapy compared with FU/LV therapy (P interaction > .16). Conclusions Overall tumor PIK3CA mutation status is not associated with stage III colon cancer prognosis. PIK3CA mutation does not appear to serve as a predictive tumor molecular biomarker for response to irinotecan-based adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:24231454

  9. Association of Family History with Cancer Recurrence and Survival Among Patients with Stage III Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jennifer A.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Hollis, Donna; Saltz, Leonard B.; Mayer, Robert J.; Thomas, James; Schaefer, Paul; Whittom, Renaud; Hantel, Alexander; Goldberg, Richard M.; Warren, Robert S.; Bertagnolli, Monica; Fuchs, Charles S.

    2011-01-01

    Context A family history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative increases the risk of developing colorectal cancer. However, the influence of family history on cancer recurrence and survival among patients with established disease remains uncertain. Objective To examine the association of family history of colorectal cancer with cancer recurrence and survival of patients with colon cancer. Design, Setting, and Participants Prospective observational study of 1,087 patients with stage III colon cancer enrolled in a randomized adjuvant chemotherapy trial (CALGB 89803) between April 1999 and May 2001. Patients provided data on family history at baseline and were followed up until March 2007 for disease recurrence and death (median follow-up 5.6 years). In a subset of patients, we assessed microsatellite instability (MSI) and expression of the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, MLH1 and MSH2, in tumor specimens. Main Outcome Measure Disease-free survival, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival according to the presence or absence of a family history of colorectal cancer. Results Among 1,087 eligible patients, 195 (17.9%) reported a family history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative. Cancer recurrence or death occurred in 57/195 patients (29%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 23%-36%) with a family history of colorectal cancer and 343/892 patients (38%; 95% CI, 35%-42%) without a family history. Compared to patients without a family history, the adjusted hazard ratios (HR) among those with ≥1 affected first-degree relatives were 0.72 (95% CI, 0.54-0.96) for disease-free survival (DFS), 0.74 (95% CI, 0.55-0.99) for recurrence-free survival (RFS), and 0.75 (95% CI, 0.54-1.05) for overall survival (OS). This reduction in risk of cancer recurrence or death associated with a family history became stronger with an increasing number of affected first-degree relatives. Compared to participants without a family history of colorectal cancer, those with 1

  10. Preoperative serum markers for individual patient prognosis in stage I-III colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Giessen-Jung, Clemens; Nagel, Dorothea; Glas, Maria; Spelsberg, Fritz; Lau-Werner, Ulla; Modest, Dominik Paul; Schulz, Christoph; Heinemann, Volker; Di Gioia, Dorit; Stieber, Petra

    2015-09-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) remains the only recommended biomarker for follow-up care of colorectal cancer (CRC), but besides CEA, several other serological parameters have been proposed as prognostic markers for CRC. The present retrospective analysis investigates a comprehensive set of serum markers with regard to cancer-specific survival (CSS) and disease-free survival (DFS). A total of 472 patients with colon cancer underwent surgery for curative intent between January 1988 and June 2007. Preoperative serum was analyzed for the following parameters: albumin, alkaline phosphatase (aP), beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (βhCG), bilirubin, cancer antigen 125 (CA 125), cancer antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), CA 72-4, CEA, C-reactive protein (CRP), cytokeratin-19 soluble fragment (CYFRA 21-1), ferritin, gamma-glutamyltransferase (γGT), glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), hemoglobin, haptoglobin, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), serum amyloid A (SAA), and 25-hydroxyvitamin D. After a median follow-up period of 5.9 years, the overall 3- and 5-year CSS was 91.7 and 84.9 % and DFS rates were 82.7 % (3 years) and 77.6 % (5 years). Multivariate analyses confirmed preoperative CEA as an independent prognostic factor with regard to CSS and DFS. CA 19-9 and γGT also provided prognostic value for CSS and DFS, respectively. Younger age was negatively associated with DFS. According to UICC stage, CEA provided significant prognostic value with regard to CSS and DFS, while CA 19-9 was only prognostic for CSS. Combined analysis is able to identify patients with favorable prognosis. In addition to tumor baseline parameters, preoperative CEA could be confirmed as prognostic marker in colon cancer. CA 19-9 and γGT also provide additional prognostic value with regard to survival and recurrence in stage III and stage I disease, respectively. The combined use of CEA together with CA 19-9 and γGT improve

  11. Germline polymorphisms in genes involved in the Hippo pathway as recurrence biomarkers in stage II/III colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sebio, Ana; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Zhang, Wu; Yang, Dongyun; Ning, Yan; Stremitzer, Stefan; Stintzing, Sebastian; Sunakawa, Yu; Yamauchi, Shinichi; Fujimoto, Yoshiya; Ueno, Masashi; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo pathway regulates tissue growth and cell fate. In colon cancer, Hippo pathway deregulation promotes cellular quiescence and resistance to 5-Fluorouracil. In this study 14 polymorphisms in 8 genes involved in the Hippo pathway (MST1, MST2, LATS1, LATS2, YAP, TAZ, FAT4 and RASSF1A) were evaluated as recurrence predictors in 194 patients with stages II/III colon cancer treated with 5-Fu-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients with a RASSF1A rs2236947 AA genotype had higher 3-year recurrence rate than patients with CA/CC genotypes (56% vs 33%, HR: 1.87; p=0.017). Patients with TAZ rs3811715 CT or TT genotypes had lower 3-year recurrence rate than patients with a CC genotype (28% vs 40%; HR: 0.66; p=0.07). In left-sided tumors, this association was stronger (HR: 0.29; p=0.011) and a similar trend was found in an independent Japanese cohort. These promising results reveal polymorphisms in the Hippo pathway as biomarkers for stage II and III colon cancer. PMID:26370619

  12. Germline polymorphisms in genes involved in the Hippo pathway as recurrence biomarkers in stages II/III colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Sebio, A; Matsusaka, S; Zhang, W; Yang, D; Ning, Y; Stremitzer, S; Stintzing, S; Sunakawa, Y; Yamauchi, S; Fujimoto, Y; Ueno, M; Lenz, H-J

    2016-08-01

    The Hippo pathway regulates tissue growth and cell fate. In colon cancer, Hippo pathway deregulation promotes cellular quiescence and resistance to 5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu). In this study, 14 polymorphisms in 8 genes involved in the Hippo pathway (MST1, MST2, LATS1, LATS2, YAP, TAZ, FAT4 and RASSF1A) were evaluated as recurrence predictors in 194 patients with stages II/III colon cancer treated with 5-Fu-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients with a RASSF1A rs2236947 AA genotype had higher 3-year recurrence rate than patients with CA/CC genotypes (56 vs 33%, hazard ratio (HR): 1.87; P=0.017). Patients with TAZ rs3811715 CT or TT genotypes had lower 3-year recurrence rate than patients with a CC genotype (28 vs 40%; HR: 0.66; P=0.07). In left-sided tumors, this association was stronger (HR: 0.29; P=0.011) and a similar trend was found in an independent Japanese cohort. These promising results reveal polymorphisms in the Hippo pathway as biomarkers for stages II and III colon cancer.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 15 September 2015; doi:10.1038/tpj.2015.64. PMID:26370619

  13. Compliance with adjuvant capecitabine in patients with stage II and III colon cancer: comparison of administrative versus medical record data.

    PubMed

    Amlani, Adam; Kumar, Aalok; Ruan, Jenny Y; Cheung, Winson Y

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to examine the frequency of treatment delays as well as the reasons and appropriateness of such delays in early stage colon cancer patients receiving adjuvant capecitabine by comparing data from pharmacy dispensing versus medical records. Patients diagnosed with stage II or III colon cancer from 2008 to 2012 and who received at least two cycle of adjuvant capecitabine were reviewed for treatment delays. Data from pharmacy dispensing and patient medical records were compared. Multivariate regression models were constructed to identify predictors of treatment delays. A total of 697 patients were analyzed: median age was 70 years (IQR 30-89), 394 (57%) were men, 598 (86%) reported Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 0/1, and 191 (27%) had stage II disease. In this study cohort, 396 (57%) patients experienced at least 1 treatment delay during their adjuvant treatment. Upon medical record review, half of treatment delays identified using pharmacy administrative data were actually attributable to side effects, of which over 90% were considered clinically appropriate for patients to withhold rather than to continue the drug. The most prevalent side effects were hand-foot syndrome and diarrhea which occurred in 176 (44%) and 67 (17%) patients, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed a statistically significant association between stage and inappropriate treatment delays whereby patients with stage II disease were more likely to experience drug noncompliance (OR 1.79, 95% CI: 1.27-2.53, P < 0.001) than those with stage III disease. Compliance with adjuvant capecitabine was reasonable. Adherence ascertained from pharmacy administrative data differs significantly from that obtained from medical records. PMID:27228415

  14. A Lymph Node Ratio of 10% Is Predictive of Survival in Stage III Colon Cancer: A French Regional Study

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh, Charles; Mauvais, François; Cosse, Cyril; Rebibo, Lionel; Joly, Jean-Paul; Dromer, Didier; Aubert, Christine; Carton, Sophie; Dron, Bernard; Dadamessi, Innocenti; Maes, Bernard; Perrier, Guillaume; Manaouil, David; Fontaine, Jean-François; Gozy, Michel; Panis, Xavier; Foncelle, Pierre Henri; de Fresnoy, Hugues; Leroux, Fabien; Vaneslander, Pierre; Ghighi, Caroline; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Lymph node ratio (LNR) (positive lymph nodes/sampled lymph nodes) is predictive of survival in colon cancer. The aim of the present study was to validate the LNR as a prognostic factor and to determine the optimum LNR cutoff for distinguishing between “good prognosis” and “poor prognosis” colon cancer patients. From January 2003 to December 2007, patients with TNM stage III colon cancer operated on with at least of 3 years of follow-up and not lost to follow-up were included in this retrospective study. The two primary endpoints were 3-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) as a function of the LNR groups and the cutoff. One hundred seventy-eight patients were included. There was no correlation between the LNR group and 3-year OS (P = 0.06) and a significant correlation between the LNR group and 3-year DFS (P = 0.03). The optimal LNR cutoff of 10% was significantly correlated with 3-year OS (P = 0.02) and DFS (P = 0.02). The LNR was not an accurate prognostic factor when fewer than 12 lymph nodes were sampled. Clarification and simplification of the LNR classification are prerequisites for use of this system in randomized control trials. An LNR of 10% appears to be the optimal cutoff. PMID:25058763

  15. A lymph node ratio of 10% is predictive of survival in stage III colon cancer: a French regional study.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, Charles; Mauvais, François; Cosse, Cyril; Rebibo, Lionel; Joly, Jean-Paul; Dromer, Didier; Aubert, Christine; Carton, Sophie; Dron, Bernard; Dadamessi, Innocenti; Maes, Bernard; Perrier, Guillaume; Manaouil, David; Fontaine, Jean-François; Gozy, Michel; Panis, Xavier; Foncelle, Pierre Henri; de Fresnoy, Hugues; Leroux, Fabien; Vaneslander, Pierre; Ghighi, Caroline; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Lymph node ratio (LNR) (positive lymph nodes/sampled lymph nodes) is predictive of survival in colon cancer. The aim of the present study was to validate the LNR as a prognostic factor and to determine the optimum LNR cutoff for distinguishing between "good prognosis" and "poor prognosis" colon cancer patients. From January 2003 to December 2007, patients with TNM stage III colon cancer operated on with at least of 3 years of follow-up and not lost to follow-up were included in this retrospective study. The two primary endpoints were 3-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) as a function of the LNR groups and the cutoff. One hundred seventy-eight patients were included. There was no correlation between the LNR group and 3-year OS (P=0.06) and a significant correlation between the LNR group and 3-year DFS (P=0.03). The optimal LNR cutoff of 10% was significantly correlated with 3-year OS (P=0.02) and DFS (P=0.02). The LNR was not an accurate prognostic factor when fewer than 12 lymph nodes were sampled. Clarification and simplification of the LNR classification are prerequisites for use of this system in randomized control trials. An LNR of 10% appears to be the optimal cutoff. PMID:25058763

  16. PAK6 increase chemoresistance and is a prognostic marker for stage II and III colon cancer patients undergoing 5-FU based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dongwang; Cui, Feifei; Wang, Xiaoliang; Yu, Fudong; Xue, Yingming; Feng, Xiaodong; Wang, Jingtao; Wang, Xiao; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Senlin; Yu, Yang; Tang, Huamei; Peng, Zhihai

    2015-01-01

    p21-Activated kinase 6 (PAK6) has been implicated in radiotherapy and docetaxel resistance. We have further evaluated PAK6 as a predictor of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment response in colon cancer. Here we report that in colon cancer PAK6 promotes tumor progression and chemoresistance both in vitro and in vivo. In the clinical analysis, PAK6 was overexpressed in 104 of 147 (70.75%) stage II and III patients who received 5-FU based chemotherapy after surgery. Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that PAK6 was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (P < 0.001) and disease-free survival (P < 0.001). Colon cancer cell lines showed increased PAK6 expression upon 5-FU treatment. In PAK6-knockdown cells treated with 5-FU, cell viability and phosphorylation of BAD decreased, and the number of apoptotic cells, levels of cleaved caspase 3 and PARP increased compared to control cells. The opposite was observed in PAK6 overexpressing cells. Short hairpin RNA knockdown of PAK6 blocked cells in G2-M phase. Furthermore, Animal experiments results in vivo are consistent with outcomes in vitro. This study demonstrates that PAK6 is an independent prognostic factor for adjuvant 5-FU-based chemotherapy in patients with stage II and stage III colon cancer. PMID:25426562

  17. The effect of comorbidity on the use of adjuvant chemotherapy and type of regimen for curatively resected stage III colon cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Mei-Chin; Thompson, Trevor; Wu, Xiao-Cheng; Styles, Timothy; O'Flarity, Mary B; Morris, Cyllene R; Chen, Vivien W

    2016-05-01

    Postsurgical chemotherapy is guideline-recommended therapy for stage III colon cancer patients. Factors associated with patients not receiving adjuvant chemotherapy were identified in numerous studies; comorbidity was recognized as an important factor besides patient's age. We assessed the association between comorbidity and the use of adjuvant chemotherapy and type of chemotherapy regimen. Stage III colon cancer patients who underwent surgical resection were obtained from ten Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-NPCR Specialized Registries which participated in the Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER) project. Comorbidity was classified into no comorbidity recorded, Charlson, non-Charlson comorbidities, number, and severity of Charlson comorbidity. Pearson chi-square test and multivariable logistic regression were employed. Of 3180 resected stage III colon cancer patients, 64% received adjuvant chemotherapy. After adjusting for patient's demographic and tumor characteristics, there were no significant differences in receipt of chemotherapy between Charlson and non-Charlson comorbidity. However, patients who had two or more Charlson comorbidities or had moderate to severe disease were significantly less likely to have chemotherapy (ORs 0.69 [95% CI, 0.51-0.92] and 0.62 [95% CI, 0.42-0.91], respectively) when compared with those with non-Charlson comorbidity. In addition, those with moderate or severe comorbidities were more likely to receive single chemotherapy agent (P < 0.0001). Capecitabine and FOLFOX were the most common single- and multi-agent regimens regardless of type of comorbidity grouping. Both the number and severity of comorbidity were significantly associated with receipt of guideline-recommended chemotherapy and type of agent in stage III resected colon cancer patients. Better personalized care based on individual patient's condition ought to be recognized. PMID:26773804

  18. Randomized phase III trial of treatment duration for oral uracil and tegafur plus leucovorin as adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with stage IIB/III colon cancer: final results of JFMC33-0502

    PubMed Central

    Sadahiro, S.; Tsuchiya, T.; Sasaki, K.; Kondo, K.; Katsumata, K.; Nishimura, G.; Kakeji, Y.; Baba, H.; Sato, S.; Koda, K.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Morita, T.; Matsuoka, J.; Usuki, H.; Hamada, C.; Kodaira, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background While adjuvant chemotherapy is preferable for high-risk colon cancer, treatment duration is controversial. Oral uracil and tegafur (UFT)/leucovorin (LV) is widely used as a standard adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer in Japan. We conducted a phase III trial to investigate the optimal duration of adjuvant chemotherapy for stage IIB/III colon cancer. Patients and methods Patients with curatively resected stage IIB/III colon cancer were eligible for enrollment in this trial. Patients were registered within 6 weeks after surgery and were randomly assigned to receive UFT/LV for 28 of 35 days for 6 months in the control group or for 5 consecutive days per week for 18 months in the study group. The primary end point was the disease-free survival (DFS), and the secondary end points were overall survival (OS) and safety. Result A total of 1071 patients were registered from 233 centers. A statistically significant difference in DFS was not observed between the study group and the control group; the 5-year DFS was 69% in the study group and 69% in the control group. The 5-year OS was 85% in the study group and 85% in the control group. Conclusion Eighteen-month treatment with UFT/LV did not improve DFS or OS compared with 6-month UFT/LV treatment in patients with stage IIB/III colon cancer. The important finding from this study is that not 18 months but 6 months of treatment is enough for postoperative UFT/LV for stage IIB/III colon cancer. Clinical trial number UMIN-CTR C000000245. PMID:26347106

  19. LINE-1 Methylation Status Correlates Significantly to Post-Therapeutic Recurrence in Stage III Colon Cancer Patients Receiving FOLFOX-4 Adjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yun-Ching; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Lu, Chien-Yu; Wu, I-Chen; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Huang, Ching-Wen; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Methylation levels of long interspersed nucleotide elements (LINE-1) are representative of genome-wide methylation status and crucial in maintaining genomic stability and expression. Their prognostic impact on colon cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy has not been well established. We evaluated the association between LINE-1 methylation status and clinicopathologic features and postoperative oncological outcomes in stage III colon cancer patients. Materials and Methods 129 UICC stage III colon cancer patients who had received radical resection and FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy were enrolled. Global methylation was estimated by analyzing tumor LINE-1 methylation status using bisulfite-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and pyrosequencing assay. Demographics, clinicopathological data, and postoperative outcomes were recorded by trained abstractors. Outcome measurements included postoperative recurrence and disease-free survival. Univariate, multivariate, and survival analyses were conducted to identify prognostic factors of oncological outcomes. Results The LINE-1 methylation of all 129 patients was measured on a 0–100 scale (mean 63.3; median 63.7, standard deviation 7.1), LINE-1 hypomethylation was more common in patients aged 65 years and above (61.7%±7.6% vs. 64.6±6.4, p=0.019) and those with post-therapeutic recurrence (61.7±7.4 vs 64.3±6.7, p=0.041). Considering risk adjustment, LINE-1 hypomethylation was found to be an independent risk factor of post-therapeutic recurrence (Adjusted OR=14.1, p=0.012). Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that patients in the low methylation group had shorter period of disease free survival (p=0.01). In a stratified analysis that included 48 patients with post-therapeutic recurrence, it was found that those who experienced shorter period of disease free survival (≦6 months) appeared to have lower LINE-1 methylation levels than patients who reported of recurrence after 6 months (56.68±15.75 vs. 63.55±7

  20. Navigated Early Survivorship Transition in Improving Survivorship Care Planning in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage I-III Breast, Lung, Prostate, or Colorectal Cancer and Their Caregivers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-17

    Cancer Survivor; Caregiver; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Lung Cancer; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage III Lung Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  1. Validation of the 12-Gene Colon Cancer Recurrence Score in NSABP C-07 As a Predictor of Recurrence in Patients With Stage II and III Colon Cancer Treated With Fluorouracil and Leucovorin (FU/LV) and FU/LV Plus Oxaliplatin

    PubMed Central

    Yothers, Greg; O'Connell, Michael J.; Lee, Mark; Lopatin, Margarita; Clark-Langone, Kim M.; Millward, Carl; Paik, Soonmyung; Sharif, Saima; Shak, Steven; Wolmark, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Accurate assessments of recurrence risk and absolute treatment benefit are needed to inform colon cancer adjuvant therapy. The 12-gene Recurrence Score assay has been validated in patients with stage II colon cancer from the Cancer and Leukemia Group B 9581 and Quick and Simple and Reliable (QUASAR) trials. We conducted an independent, prospectively designed clinical validation study of Recurrence Score, with prespecified end points and analysis plan, in archival specimens from patients with stage II and III colon cancer randomly assigned to fluorouracil (FU) or FU plus oxaliplatin in National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project C-07. Methods Recurrence Score was assessed in 892 fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens (randomly selected 50% of patients with tissue). Data were analyzed by Cox regression adjusting for stage and treatment. Results Continuous Recurrence Score predicted recurrence (hazard ratio for a 25-unit increase in score, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.50 to 2.55; P < .001), as well as disease-free and overall survival (both P < .001). Recurrence Score predicted recurrence risk (P = .001) after adjustment for stage, mismatch repair, nodes examined, grade, and treatment. Recurrence Score did not have significant interaction with stage (P = .90) or age (P = .76). Relative benefit of oxaliplatin was similar across the range of Recurrence Score (interaction P = .48); accordingly, absolute benefit of oxaliplatin increased with higher scores, most notably in patients with stage II and IIIA/B disease. Conclusion The 12-gene Recurrence Score predicts recurrence risk in stage II and stage III colon cancer and provides additional information beyond conventional clinical and pathologic factors. Incorporating Recurrence Score into the clinical context may better inform adjuvant therapy decisions in stage III as well as stage II colon cancer. PMID:24220557

  2. Relationship Between Tumor Gene Expression and Recurrence in Four Independent Studies of Patients With Stage II/III Colon Cancer Treated With Surgery Alone or Surgery Plus Adjuvant Fluorouracil Plus Leucovorin

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Michael J.; Lavery, Ian; Yothers, Greg; Paik, Soonmyung; Clark-Langone, Kim M.; Lopatin, Margarita; Watson, Drew; Baehner, Frederick L.; Shak, Steven; Baker, Joffre; Cowens, J. Wayne; Wolmark, Norman

    2010-01-01

    Purpose These studies were conducted to determine the relationship between quantitative tumor gene expression and risk of cancer recurrence in patients with stage II or III colon cancer treated with surgery alone or surgery plus fluorouracil (FU) and leucovorin (LV) to develop multigene algorithms to quantify the risk of recurrence as well as the likelihood of differential treatment benefit of FU/LV adjuvant chemotherapy for individual patients. Patients and Methods We performed quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) on RNA extracted from fixed, paraffin-embedded (FPE) tumor blocks from patients with stage II or III colon cancer who were treated with surgery alone (n = 270 from National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project [NSABP] C-01/C-02 and n = 765 from Cleveland Clinic [CC]) or surgery plus FU/LV (n = 308 from NSABP C-04 and n = 508 from NSABP C-06). Overall, 761 candidate genes were studied in C-01/C-02 and C-04, and a subset of 375 genes was studied in CC/C-06. Results A combined analysis of the four studies identified 48 genes significantly associated with risk of recurrence and 66 genes significantly associated with FU/LV benefit (with four genes in common). Seven recurrence-risk genes, six FU/LV-benefit genes, and five reference genes were selected, and algorithms were developed to identify groups of patients with low, intermediate, and high likelihood of recurrence and benefit from FU/LV. Conclusion RT-qPCR of FPE colon cancer tissue applied to four large independent populations has been used to develop multigene algorithms for estimating recurrence risk and benefit from FU/LV. These algorithms are being independently validated, and their clinical utility is being evaluated in the Quick and Simple and Reliable (QUASAR) study. PMID:20679606

  3. Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer or Adenoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Adenomatous Polyp; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  4. Chemotherapy for Stage II Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The adjuvant treatment of patients with stage II colon cancer is an area of controversy in medical oncology. Adjuvant chemotherapy aims to eradicate micrometastatic disease present at the time of surgery, preventing the development of distant metastatic disease and thereby curing those patients of their cancer. National and international guidelines for the adjuvant treatment of stage II colon cancer recommend a range of treatment options from observation to chemotherapy with single-agent or combination regimens, depending on the presence or absence of high-risk features (poorly differentiated histology, presence of lymphovascular invasion, presence of perineural invasion, report of < 12 lymph nodes, bowel obstruction, localized perforation, or positive margins). In the one prospective study designed to address the role of adjuvant chemotherapy in stage II colon cancer, a small but statistically significant benefit in overall survival was seen for those patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy; however, multiple meta-analyses and retrospective subgroup analyses have called these findings into question. Though there may be a role for adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with stage II colon cancer, its incremental benefit is small, at best, and comes with the risks of real and rarely fatal complications of chemotherapy. PMID:26648796

  5. Two or Three Year Disease Free Survival (DFS) as a Primary Endpoint in Stage III Adjuvant Colon Cancer Trials with fluoropyrimidines with or without Oxaliplatin or Irinotecan: Data from 12,676 patients from MOSAIC, X-ACT, PETACC-3, C-06, C-07, and C89803

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, D; Shi, Q; Yothers, G; Van Cutsem, E; Cassidy, J; Saltz, L; Wolmark, N; Bot, B; Grothey, A; Buyse, M; de Gramont, A

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The ACCENT group previously established disease-free survival (DFS) with 2 or 3 years median follow-up to predict 5 year overall survival (5yr OS) in stage II and III colon cancer. ACCENT further proposed (1) a stronger association between DFS and OS in stage III than II, and (2) 6 or 7 years necessary to demonstrate DFS/OS surrogacy in recent trials. The relationship between endpoints in trials with oral fluoropyrimidines, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan is unknown. Methods Associations between the treatment effect hazard ratios (HRs) on 2 and 3yr DFS, and 5 and 6yr OS were examined in 6 phase III trials not included in prior analyses from 1997-2002. Individual data for 12,676 patients were analyzed; two trials each tested oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and oral treatment vs 5-FU/LV. Findings Overall association between 2/3 yr DFS and 5/6 yr OS HRs was modest to poor (simple R2 measures: 0.58 to 0.76, model-based R2: 0.17 to 0.49). In stage III patients, the association increased (model-based R2≥0.79). Observed treatment effects on 2 yr DFS accurately 5/6 yr OS effects overall and in stage III patients. Interpretation In recent trials of cytotoxic chemotherapy, 2 or 3yr DFS HRs are highly predictive of 5 and 6yr OS HRs in stage III but not stage II patients. In all patients the DFS/OS association is stronger for 6yr OS, thus at least 6 year follow-up is recommended to assess OS benefit. These data support DFS as the primary endpoint for stage III colon cancer trials testing cytotoxic agents. Funding Funded by NCI Grant CA-25224 to the Mayo Clinic to support the North Central Cancer Treatment Group. PMID:21257306

  6. Rituximab and Oblimersen in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Follicular Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  7. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  8. Devil's Wake: Early-stage bone colonization by breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai; Yu, Cuijuan; Zhang, Xiang H. F.

    2016-01-01

    We recently discovered that bone micrometastases of breast cancer predominantly reside in the microenvironment termed the “osteogenic niche”. The heterotypic adherens junctions between cancer cells and osteogenic cells promote early-stage bone colonization by activating the mTOR pathway in cancer cells. Here, we discuss a few questions raised by these findings.

  9. Telomere Length in Predicting Toxicity in Older Patients With Stage III-IV Colorectal Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  10. Bevacizumab, Cisplatin, Radiation Therapy, and Fluorouracil in Treating Patients With Stage IIB, Stage III, Stage IVA, or Stage IVB Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-21

    Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx

  11. Chemotherapy Toxicity On Quality of Life in Older Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  12. VAC protocol for treatment of dogs with stage III hemangiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Francisco J; Hosoya, Kenji; Lara-Garcia, Ana; Kisseberth, William; Couto, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Hemangiosarcomas (HSAs) are aggressive tumors with a high rate of metastasis. Clinical stage has been considered a negative prognostic factor for survival. The study authors hypothesized that the median survival time (MST) of dogs with metastatic (stage III) HSA treated with a vincristine, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (VAC) chemotherapy protocol would not be different than those with stage I/II HSA. Sixty-seven dogs with HSA in different anatomic locations were evaluated retrospectively. All dogs received the VAC protocol as an adjuvant to surgery (n = 50), neoadjuvant (n = 3), or as the sole treatment modality (n = 14). There was no significant difference (P = 0.97) between the MST of dogs with stage III and stage I/II HSA. For dogs presenting with splenic HSA alone, there was no significant difference between the MST of dogs with stage III and stage I/II disease (P = 0.12). The overall response rate (complete response [CR] and partial response [PR]) was 86%). No unacceptable toxicities were observed. Dogs with stage III HSA treated with the VAC protocol have a similar prognosis to dogs with stage I/II HSA. Dogs with HSA and evidence of metastases at the time of diagnosis should not be denied treatment. PMID:24051260

  13. AJCC-7TH Edition Staging Criteria for Colon Cancer: Do the Complex Modifications Improve Prognostic Assessment?

    PubMed Central

    Hari, Danielle M; Leung, Anna M; Lee, Ji-Hey; Sim, Myung-Shin; Vuong, Brooke; Chiu, Connie G; Bilchik, Anton J

    2015-01-01

    Background The seventh edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system (AJCC-7) includes significant changes for colon cancer (CC), which are particularly complex in patients with stage II and III disease. We used a national cancer database to determine if these changes improved prediction of survival. Study Design The database of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program was queried to identify patients with pathologically confirmed stage I-III CC diagnosed between 1988 and 2008. CC was staged by sixth edition AJCC criteria (AJCC-6) and then restaged by AJCC-7. Five-year disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS) were compared. Results After all exclusion criteria were applied, AJCC-6 and AJCC-7 staging was possible in 157,588 patients (68.9%). Bowker's test of symmetry showed that the number of patients per substage was different for AJCC-6 and AJCC-7 (p < 0.001). The Akaike information criteria comparison showed superior fit with the AJCC-7 model (p < 0.001). However, although AJCC-7 staging yielded a progressive decrease in DSS and OS of patients with stage IIA (86.3% and 72.4%, respectively), IIB (79.4% and 63.2%, respectively), and IIC (64.9% and 54.6%, respectively) disease, DSS and OS of patients with stage IIIA disease increased (89% and 79%, respectively). Subset analysis of patients with > 12 lymph nodes examined did not affect this observation. Conclusion AJCC-7 staging of CC does not address all survival discrepancies, regardless of the number of lymph nodes examined. Consideration of other prognostic factors is critical for decisions regarding therapy, particularly for patients with stage II CC. PMID:23768788

  14. Oblimersen Sodium and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-10-11

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  15. Endoscopic mucosal resection of early stage colon neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Yasushi; Uedo, Noriya; Ishihara, Ryu; Tomita, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Early stage colorectal neuroendocrine carcinoma is rare. A small colon tumour was found in a 56-year-old man during diagnostic colonoscopy performed after a positive faecal occult blood test, and he was referred for treatment. A slightly reddish superficial elevated lesion with a shallow depression 10 mm in size was found in the transverse colon. Magnifying narrow-band imaging revealed disrupted irregular microvessels and the absence of a surface pattern in the depressed area. En bloc endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of the tumour was undertaken. The tumour was positive for chromogranin A and synaptophysin, and had a mitotic rate of >20/10 high-power fields and a Ki-67 proliferative index of >50%; it was diagnosed as a neuroendocrine carcinoma. The tumour minimally invaded the submucosa (300 μm) without lymphovascular involvement. The patient was followed up carefully, and at 1 year after EMR, no recurrence was found using colonoscopy and CT scans. PMID:25737221

  16. Stage migration vs immunology: The lymph node count story in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Märkl, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Lymph node staging is of crucial importance for the therapy stratification and prognosis estimation in colon cancer. Beside the detection of metastases, the number of harvested lymph nodes itself has prognostic relevance in stage II/III cancers. A stage migration effect caused by missed lymph node metastases has been postulated as most likely explanation for that. In order to avoid false negative node staging reporting of at least 12 lymph nodes is recommended. However, this threshold is met only in a minority of cases in daily practice. Due to quality initiatives the situation has improved in the past. This, however, had no influence on staging in several studies. While the numbers of evaluated lymph nodes increased continuously during the last decades the rate of node positive cases remained relatively constant. This fact together with other indications raised doubts that understaging is indeed the correct explanation for the prognostic impact of lymph node harvest. Several authors assume that immune response could play a major role in this context influencing both the lymph node detectability and the tumor’s behavior. Further studies addressing this issue are need. Based on the findings the recommendations concerning minimal lymph node numbers and adjuvant chemotherapy should be reconsidered. PMID:26604632

  17. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Colon, Pancreatic, or Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer

  18. Launch of Titan III, Mars Observer/Transfer Orbit Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Titan III vehicle launched the Mars Observer spacecraft and the Transfer Orbit Stage (TOS) from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on September 25, 1992. Managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), TOS will fire to send the Observer on an 11-month interplanetary journey to the Mars. The Observer failed to reach the Mars orbit in August 1993.

  19. MK2206 in Treating Patients With Stage I, Stage II, or Stage III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-16

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; HER2/Neu Positive; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  20. VEGF Trap in Treating Patients With Recurrent Stage III or Stage IV Melanoma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-02

    Ciliary Body and Choroid Melanoma, Medium/Large Size; Extraocular Extension Melanoma; Iris Melanoma; Metastatic Intraocular Melanoma; Recurrent Intraocular Melanoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Stage III Melanoma; Stage IV Melanoma

  1. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Low-Grade Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-26

    Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  2. Psychosexual Intervention in Patients With Stage I-III Gynecologic or Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-02

    Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage I Vaginal Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage III Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell

  3. Lenalidomide and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Follicular Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-28

    Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  4. Cetuximab and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-11

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Tongue Cancer

  5. Forward-viewing radial-array echoendoscope for staging of colon cancer beyond the rectum

    PubMed Central

    Kongkam, Pradermchai; Linlawan, Sittikorn; Aniwan, Satimai; Lakananurak, Narisorn; Khemnark, Suparat; Sahakitrungruang, Chucheep; Pattanaarun, Jirawat; Khomvilai, Supakij; Wisedopas, Naruemon; Ridtitid, Wiriyaporn; Bhutani, Manoop S; Kullavanijaya, Pinit; Rerknimitr, Rungsun

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate feasibility of the novel forward-viewing radial-array echoendoscope for staging of colon cancer beyond rectum as the first series. METHODS: A retrospective study with prospectively entered database. From March 2012 to February 2013, a total of 21 patients (11 men) (mean age 64.2 years) with colon cancer beyond the rectum were recruited. The novel forward-viewing radial-array echoendoscope was used for ultrasonographic staging of colon cancer beyond rectum. Ultrasonographic T and N staging were recorded when surgical pathology was used as a gold standard. RESULTS: The mean time to reach the lesion and the mean time to complete the procedure were 3.5 and 7.1 min, respectively. The echoendoscope passed through the lesions in 13 patients (61.9%) and reached the cecum in 10 of 13 patients (76.9%). No adverse events were found. The lesions were located in the cecum (n = 2), ascending colon (n = 1), transverse colon (n = 2), descending colon (n = 2), and sigmoid colon (n = 14). The accuracy rate for T1 (n = 3), T2 (n = 4), T3 (n = 13) and T4 (n = 1) were 100%, 60.0%, 84.6% and 100%, respectively. The overall accuracy rates for the T and N staging of colon cancer were 81.0% and 52.4%, respectively. The accuracy rates among traversable lesions (n = 13) and obstructive lesions (n = 8) were 61.5% and 100%, respectively. Endoscopic ultrasound and computed tomography had overall accuracy rates of 81.0% and 68.4%, respectively. CONCLUSION: The echoendoscope is a feasible staging tool for colon cancer beyond rectum. However, accuracy of the echoendoscope needs to be verified by larger systematic studies. PMID:24627604

  6. Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients With Progressive, Refractory, or Recurrent Stage II or Stage III Testicular or Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Ovarian Dysgerminoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Seminoma

  7. Vorinostat, Rituximab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  8. Cisplatin, Radiation Therapy, and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-16

    Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  9. Aldesleukin and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Melanoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-21

    Metastatic Melanoma; Stage III Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IVA Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck; Stage IVB Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck; Stage IVC Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck

  10. Cisplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage IIB, Stage IIC, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Gastrointestinal Complication; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  11. Comparison of Two Combination Chemotherapy Regimens Plus Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-30

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma, Variant With Squamous Differentiation; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer

  12. Alcohol consumption and colon cancer prognosis among participants in north central cancer treatment group phase III trial N0147.

    PubMed

    Phipps, Amanda I; Shi, Qian; Limburg, Paul J; Nelson, Garth D; Sargent, Daniel J; Sinicrope, Frank A; Chan, Emily; Gill, Sharlene; Goldberg, Richard M; Kahlenberg, Morton; Nair, Suresh; Shields, Anthony F; Newcomb, Polly A; Alberts, Steven R

    2016-09-01

    Alcohol consumption is associated with a modest increased risk of colon cancer, but its relationship with colon cancer survival has not been elucidated. Using data from a phase III randomized adjuvant trial, we assessed the association of alcohol consumption with colon cancer outcomes. Patients completed a risk factor questionnaire before randomization to FOLFOX or FOLFOX + cetuximab (N = 1984). Information was collected on lifestyle factors, including smoking, physical activity and consumption of different types of alcohol. Cox models assessed the association between alcohol consumption and outcomes of disease-free survival (DFS), time-to-recurrence (TTR) and overall survival (OS), adjusting for age, sex, study arm, body mass, smoking, physical activity and performance status. No statistically significant difference in outcomes between ever and never drinkers were noted [hazard ratio (HR)DFS  = 0.86, HRTTR  = 0.87, HROS  = 0.86, p-values = 0.11-0.17]. However, when considering alcohol type, ever consumers of red wine (n = 628) had significantly better outcomes than never consumers (HRDFS  = 0.80, HRTTR  = 0.81, HROS  = 0.78, p-values = 0.01-0.02). Favorable outcomes were confirmed in patients who consumed 1-30 glasses/month of red wine (n = 601, HR = 0.80-0.83, p-values = 0.03-0.049); there was a suggestion of more favorable outcomes in patients who consumed >30 glasses/month of red wine (n = 27, HR = 0.33-0.38, p-values = 0.05-0.06). Beer and liquor consumption were not associated with outcomes. Although alcohol consumption was not associated with colon cancer outcomes overall, mild to moderate red wine consumption was suggestively associated with longer OS, DFS and TTR in stage III colon cancer patients. PMID:27060850

  13. Gefitinib and Radiation Therapy With or Without Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx

  14. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Radiation Therapy in Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-10-30

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

  15. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-08

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx

  16. Imaging inflammation in mouse colon using a rapid stage-scanning confocal fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Saldua, Meagan A; Olsovsky, Cory A; Callaway, Evelyn S; Chapkin, Robert S; Maitland, Kristen C

    2012-01-01

    Large area confocal microscopy may provide fast, high-resolution image acquisition for evaluation of tissue in pre-clinical studies with reduced tissue processing in comparison to histology. We present a rapid beam and stage-scanning confocal fluorescence microscope to image cellular and tissue features along the length of the entire excised mouse colon. The beam is scanned at 8,333 lines/sec by a polygon scanning mirror while the specimen is scanned in the orthogonal axis by a motorized translation stage with a maximum speed of 7 mm/sec. A single 1 × 60 mm(2) field of view image spanning the length of the mouse colon is acquired in 10 s. Z-projection images generated from axial image stacks allow high resolution imaging of the surface of non-flat specimens. In contrast to the uniform size, shape, and distribution of colon crypts in confocal images of normal colon, confocal images of chronic bowel inflammation exhibit heterogeneous tissue structure with localized severe crypt distortion. PMID:22352656

  17. Imaging inflammation in mouse colon using a rapid stage-scanning confocal fluorescence microscope

    PubMed Central

    Saldua, Meagan A.; Olsovsky, Cory A.; Callaway, Evelyn S.; Chapkin, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Large area confocal microscopy may provide fast, high-resolution image acquisition for evaluation of tissue in pre-clinical studies with reduced tissue processing in comparison to histology. We present a rapid beam and stage-scanning confocal fluorescence microscope to image cellular and tissue features along the length of the entire excised mouse colon. The beam is scanned at 8,333  lines/sec by a polygon scanning mirror while the specimen is scanned in the orthogonal axis by a motorized translation stage with a maximum speed of 7  mm/sec. A single 1×60 mm2 field of view image spanning the length of the mouse colon is acquired in 10 s. Z-projection images generated from axial image stacks allow high resolution imaging of the surface of non-flat specimens. In contrast to the uniform size, shape, and distribution of colon crypts in confocal images of normal colon, confocal images of chronic bowel inflammation exhibit heterogeneous tissue structure with localized severe crypt distortion. PMID:22352656

  18. Anticancer Activity of Organogallium(III) Complexes in Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kaluđerović, Milena R; Mojić, Marija; Gómez-Ruiz, Santiago; Mijatović, Sanja; Maksimović-Ivanić, Danijela

    2016-01-01

    In vitro antitumor activity of various organogallium(III) complexes (1-8) has been tested against CT26CL25, HCT116, SW480 colon cancer cell lines. CV and MTT assays were used to assess on the antiproliferative effect of investigated organogallium(III) complexes. From the investigated complexes, the most active was found to be tetranuclear compound 8 against CT26CL25 cells. Flow cytometric analysis of the CT26CL25 cells upon the treatment with 8 was performed in order to determine the role of apoptosis, caspase activation, autophagy and proliferation rate on the cell death caused with this compound. Results indicate cytotoxic potential of the tetranuclear complex 8 by inducing caspase independent apoptosis and blocking most of the cells before first division. PMID:26443026

  19. Cesarean delivery and colon resection in a patient with type III osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Fiegel, Matthew J

    2011-09-01

    OBJECTIVE. Osteogenesis imperfecta is a connective tissue disorder that results from the inability to produce normal collagen. Eight types are described; type II is considered the lethal variant. Because of abnormal collagen production, these patients possess many anatomic and functional abnormalities. In addition to the obvious brittle bones, osteogenesis imperfecta patients may also possess respiratory, cardiac, spinal, endocrine, and hematologic abnormalities. These numerous derangements can lead to a challenging perioperative course. CASE REPORT. This report describes a case of a 27-year-old woman, G1P0 with history of type III osteogenesis imperfecta presenting at 31+ weeks with preterm premature rupture of membranes, lower extremity edema, and constipation. Because of progressive labor and cephalopelvic disproportion, an urgent cesarean section was performed under general anesthesia. Intraoperative coagulopathy was noted. After hemostasis was achieved, a colonic mass below the splenic flexure that measured 20 × 10 cm was revealed. General surgery was consulted intraoperatively, and a rectosigmoid resection was performed for a presumed colonic pseudo-obstruction. Patient tolerated the procedure well and was extubated at the completion of the case. The patient was discharged home on postoperative day 5. CLINICAL CHALLENGES. (a) Preoperative assessment of an osteogenesis imperfecta patient, (b) determination of anesthetic type, (c) management of hemorrhage/cardiovascular instability, and (d) management of hyperthermia. CONCLUSIONS. This case report illustrates that, with proper knowledge of this disease state, osteogenesis imperfecta patients can undergo a safe anesthetic during a potentially challenging combined cesarean section/colonic resection. PMID:21813546

  20. Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Stage III Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  1. [Stage III and IV epithelial ovarian cancers. Therapeutic problems].

    PubMed

    Picaud, A; Walter, P; Minko Mi Etoua, D; Faye, A; N'Sounda, C; Nlome Nze, A R; Lunven, B

    1992-01-01

    Between 1986 and 1989 (4 years), 11 epithelial malignant tumours of the ovary were treated in the department of gynecology and obstetrics of the Libreville teaching hospital group. Epithelial tumours accounted for 78 per cent of malignant tumours in the adult. Burkitt's lymphoma predominated in young girls. Cancer of the ovary takes sixth place among female cancers in Gabon, with an incidence identical to that of cancer of the liver. Cases involved stage III and IV malignancies. Four patients died (36 per cent) and seven are still alive (63.6 per cent) with a mean survival of 25 months at the time of the study (the longest living patient having a survival of 5 years). The fullest possible initial surgical excision is essential in ensuring the greater efficacy of polychemotherapy (including Cisplatin), the only guarantee of total second look surgery. Monitoring of residual disease was based upon ultrasonography. Pelvic radiotherapy was used in the presence of a residual pelvic mass measuring less than 3 cm. Future efforts must be direct towards early detection, in particular since more than 45 per cent of our patients were aged under 30. PMID:1565942

  2. Comparison of outcomes in patients with stage III versus limited stage IV non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Standard therapy for metastatic non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) includes palliative systemic chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Recent studies of patients with limited metastases treated with curative-intent stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) have shown encouraging survival. We hypothesized that patients treated with SBRT for limited metastases have comparable outcomes with those treated with curative-intent radiation for Stage III NSCLC. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of NSCLC patients treated with curative-intent radiotherapy at the University of Rochester from 2000-2008. We identified 3 groups of patients with NSCLC: stage III, stage IV, and recurrent stage IV (initial stage I-II). All stage IV NSCLC patients treated with SBRT had ≤ 8 lesions. Results Of 146 patients, 88% had KPS ≥ 80%, 30% had > 5% weight loss, and 95% were smokers. The 5-year OS from date of NSCLC diagnosis for stage III, initial stage IV and recurrent stage IV was 7%, 14%, and 27% respectively. The 5-year OS from date of metastatic diagnosis was significantly (p < 0.00001) superior among those with limited metastases (≤ 8 lesions) versus stage III patients who developed extensive metastases not amenable to SBRT (14% vs. 0%). Conclusion Stage IV NSCLC is a heterogeneous patient population, with a selected cohort apparently faring better than Stage III patients. Though patients with limited metastases are favorably selected by virtue of more indolent disease and/or less bulky disease burden, perhaps staging these patients differently is appropriate for prognostic and treatment characterization. Aggressive local therapy may be indicated in these patients, though prospective clinical studies are needed. PMID:21718501

  3. Single stage management of a unique variant of congenital pouch colon with triplet fistula and normal anus.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vaibhav; Gangopadhyay, Ajay Narayan; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar; Sharma, Shiv Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Congenital pouch colon (CPC) in the female patient presents with highly variable and anomalous anatomy. We herein report the first case of CPC with uterus didelphys having normal anal opening, H-type vestibular fistula, two other fistulous communications between pouch colon and two vagina managed in a single stage with excellent postoperative outcome. PMID:26166988

  4. Single stage management of a unique variant of congenital pouch colon with triplet fistula and normal anus

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Vaibhav; Gangopadhyay, Ajay Narayan; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar; Sharma, Shiv Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Congenital pouch colon (CPC) in the female patient presents with highly variable and anomalous anatomy. We herein report the first case of CPC with uterus didelphys having normal anal opening, H-type vestibular fistula, two other fistulous communications between pouch colon and two vagina managed in a single stage with excellent postoperative outcome. PMID:26166988

  5. Analysis of surgical complications of primary tumor resection after neoadjuvant treatment in stage IV colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Patricia; Baixauli, Jorge; Pastor, Carlos; Rodríguez, Javier; Pardo, Fernando; Rotellar, Fernando; Chopitea, Ana; Hernández-Lizoáin, José Luís

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Assess the surgical complications of primary tumor resection in stage IV colon cancer patients previously treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods Between July 2001 and September 2010, 67 consecutive patients received preoperative chemotherapy. Clinical and surgical complications were obtained from the medical records. This study was retrospective in design. Results All patients were affected with liver metastasis, and 29.8% had metastasis in additional organs. Three different schemes of preoperative chemotherapy were employed, based on FOLFIRI, XELOXIRI or XELOX plus cetuximab. Eighteen patients (26.8%) reported some side effects to the chemotherapy, without contraindicating any intervention. All patients underwent colon surgery and within those, eight patients (11.9%), underwent liver surgery simultaneously. Median hospital admission was 8 [3-29] days. The perioperative complication rate was 16.2%, when the estimated physiological and operative severity score for the enumeration of mortality and morbidity (POSSUM) was 58.3%. There was not perioperative mortality, despite the mortality prediction for Portsmouth-POSSUM (P-POSSUM) being 5.07%. No differences were observed between the chemotherapy regimen (P=0.72) or the kind of the surgery—simple or combined (P=0.58). Conclusions Neoadjuvant chemotherapy as a systemic treatment for stage IV colon cancer does not indicate surgery contraindication nor increases postoperative morbimortality by a significant amount. PMID:24772343

  6. Palliative Care in Improving Quality of Life and Symptoms in Patients With Stage III-IV Pancreatic or Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-18

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  7. Quantification of functional abilities in Rett syndrome: a comparison between stages III and IV

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Carlos BM; Savelsbergh, Geert JP; Smorenburg, Ana RP; Graciani, Zodja; Torriani-Pasin, Camila; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Valenti, Vitor E; Kok, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the functional abilities of persons with Rett syndrome (RTT) in stages III and IV. The group consisted of 60 females who had been diagnosed with RTT: 38 in stage III, mean age (years) of 9.14, with a standard deviation of 5.84 (minimum 2.2/maximum 26.4); and 22 in stage IV, mean age of 12.45, with a standard deviation of 6.17 (minimum 5.3/maximum 26.9). The evaluation was made using the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory, which has 197 items in the areas of self-care, mobility, and social function. The results showed that in the area of self-care, stage III and stage IV RTT persons had a level of 24.12 and 18.36 (P=0.002), respectively. In the area of mobility, stage III had 37.22 and stage IV had 14.64 (P<0.001), while in the area of social function, stage III had 17.72 and stage IV had 12.14 (P=0.016). In conclusion, although persons with stage III RTT have better functional abilities when compared with stage IV, the areas of mobility, self-care, and social function are quite affected, which shows a great functional dependency and need for help in basic activities of daily life. PMID:25061307

  8. Prospective Multicenter Study of the Impact of Oncotype DX Colon Cancer Assay Results on Treatment Recommendations in Stage II Colon Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Geetika; Renfro, Lindsay A.; Behrens, Robert J.; Lopatin, Margarita; Chao, Calvin; Soori, Gamini S.; Dakhil, Shaker R.; Mowat, Rex B.; Kuebler, J. Philip; Kim, George; Mazurczak, Miroslaw; Lee, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The Oncotype DX colon cancer assay is a clinically validated predictor of recurrence risk in stage II colon cancer patients. This prospective study evaluated the impact of recurrence score (RS) results on physician recommendations regarding adjuvant chemotherapy in T3, mismatch repair-proficient (MMR-P) stage II colon cancer patients. Patients and Methods. Stage IIA colon cancer patients were enrolled in 17 centers. Patient tumor specimens were assessed by the RS test (quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) and mismatch repair (immunohistochemistry). For each patient, the physician’s recommended postoperative treatment plan of observation, fluoropyrimidine monotherapy, or combination therapy with oxaliplatin was recorded before and after the RS and mismatch repair results were provided. Results. Of 221 enrolled patients, 141 patients had T3 MMR-P tumors and were eligible for the primary analysis. Treatment recommendations changed for 63 (45%; 95% confidence interval: 36%–53%) of these 141 T3 MMR-P patients, with intensity decreasing for 47 (33%) and increasing for 16 (11%). Recommendations for chemotherapy decreased from 73 patients (52%) to 42 (30%), following review of RS results by physician and patient. Increased treatment intensity was more often observed at higher RS values, and decreased intensity was observed at lower values (p = .011). Conclusion. Compared with traditional clinicopathological assessment, incorporation of the RS result into clinical decision making was associated with treatment recommendation changes for 45% of T3 MMR-P stage II colon cancer patients in this prospective multicenter study. Use of the RS assay may lead to overall reduction in adjuvant chemotherapy use in this subgroup of stage II colon cancer patients. PMID:24710310

  9. Prognostic and Predictive Model for Stage II Colon Cancer Patients With Nonemergent Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chun-Dong; Wang, Ji-Nan; Sui, Bai-Qiang; Zeng, Yong-Ji; Chen, Jun-Qing; Dai, Dong-Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract No ideal prognostic model has been applied to clearly identify which suitable high-risk stage II colon cancer patients with negative margins undergoing nonemergent surgery should receive adjuvant chemotherapy routinely. Clinicopathologic and prognostic data of 333 stage II colon cancer patients who underwent D2 or D3 lymphadenectomy during nonemergent surgery were retrospectively analyzed. Four pathologically determined factors, including adjacent organ involvement (RR 2.831, P = 0.001), histologic differentiation (RR 2.151, P = 0.009), lymphovascular invasion (RR 4.043, P < 0.001), and number of lymph nodes retrieved (RR 2.161, P = 0.011), were identified as independent prognostic factors on multivariate analysis. Importantly, a simple cumulative scoring system clearly categorizing prognostic risk groups was generated: risk score = ∑ coefficient’ × status (AOI + histological differentiated + lymphovascular invasion + LNs retrieved). Our new prognostic model may provide valuable information on the impact of lymphovascular invasion, as well as powerfully and reliably predicting prognosis and recurrence for this particular cohort of patients. This model may identify suitable patients with an R0 resection who should receive routine postoperative adjuvant therapy and may help clinicians to facilitate individualized treatment. In this study, we aim to provide an ideal and quantifiable method for clinical decision making in the nonemergent surgical treatment of stage II colon cancer. Our prognostic and predictive model should be applied in multicenter, prospective studies with large sample sizes, in order to obtain a more reliable clinical recommendation. PMID:26735527

  10. Effects of resistant starch type III polymorphs on human colon microbiota and short chain fatty acids in human gut models.

    PubMed

    Lesmes, Uri; Beards, Emma J; Gibson, Glenn R; Tuohy, Kieran M; Shimoni, Eyal

    2008-07-01

    This study probed the possible effects of type III resistant starch (RS) crystalline polymorphism on RS fermentability by human gut microbiota and the short chain fatty acids production in vitro. Human fecal pH-controlled batch cultures showed RS induces an ecological shift in the colonic microbiota with polymorph B inducing Bifidobacterium spp. and polymorph A inducing Atopobium spp. Interestingly, polymorph B also induced higher butyrate production to levels of 0.79 mM. In addition, human gut simulation demonstrated that polymorph B promotes the growth of bifidobacteria in the proximal part of the colon and double their relative proportion in the microbiota in the distal colon. These findings suggest that RS polymorph B may promote large bowel health. While the findings are limited by study constraints, they do raise the possibility of using different thermal processing to delineate differences in the prebiotic capabilities of RS, especially its butryrogenicity in the human colon. PMID:18543927

  11. Effect of enrofloxacin in the carrier stage of Haemophilus parasuis in naturally colonized pigs

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Nubia; Rovira, Albert; Oliveira, Simone; Holtcamp, Andrew; Torremorell, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of enrofloxacin in the carrier stage of Haemophilus parasuis in naturally colonized weaned pigs. Twenty-three pigs colonized by H. parasuis received either 7.5 mg/kg body weight (BW) of enrofloxacin or a saline solution intramuscularly at weaning. Nasal and tonsillar swab samples were collected daily throughout the study and at necropsy and tested by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The H. parasuis isolates obtained from samples collected at necropsy were subjected to genotyping by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) and a multiplex PCR for the detection of the virulence-associated trimeric autotransporter (vtaA) genes. Haemophilus parasuis was detected in the nasal cavity and tonsils of pigs in the control group throughout the study. Antibiotic-treated pigs tested negative for H. parasuis at 1 d post-treatment and the proportion of nasal samples that tested positive was higher for control pigs than for treated pigs at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 d post-treatment and at 2, 4, and 5 d post-treatment for tonsil samples (P < 0.003). Genotyping by ERIC-PCR demonstrated that pigs were colonized with a common H. parasuis strain at the end of the study. Isolates were negative for the vtaA gene, which indicates the absence of vtaA virulence factor. In conclusion, enrofloxacin significantly reduced the H. parasuis load in naturally colonized pigs, but was unable to completely eliminate the organism. PMID:24396176

  12. Use of Mueller polarimetric imaging for the staging of human colon cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierangelo, Angelo; Manhas, Sandeep; Benali, Abdelali; Antonelli, Maria Rosaria; Novikova, Tatiana; Validire, Pierre; Gayet, Brice; De Martino, Antonello

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we show the results of multi-spectral Mueller Imaging applied to the analysis of human colon cancer in a backscattering configuration with diffuse light illumination. The analyzed sample behaves as a pure depolarizer. The depolarization power, for both healthy and cancerous zones, is lower for linearly than for circularly polarized incident light for all used wavelengths and increases with increasing wavelength. Based on their visual staging and polarimetric responses, we chose specific zones which we correlated to the histology of the corresponding cuts. The histological examination shows that we see a multilayer interaction in both healthy and abnormal zones, if the light penetration depth is sufficient. The measured depolarization depends on several factors: the presence or absence of tumor, the microscopic structure of cancer (ratio between cellular density and stroma), its exophytic (budding) or endophytic (penetrating) nature, its thickness, the degree of cancer penetration in deeper layers and the nature of healthy tissue left under abnormal layers. These results demonstrate that multi-spectral Mueller imaging can provide useful contrasts for the quick staging of human colon cancer ex-vivo, with additional information about cancerous zones with different microscopic structures.

  13. Redefining Adjuvant Therapy for Colon Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with resected stage III colon cancer are being randomly assigned to receive FOLFOX chemotherapy for either 3 or 6 months and to take either a pill called celecoxib or a matching placebo pill for 3 years.

  14. Ipilimumab, Cetuximab, and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage III-IVB Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-10

    Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  15. AZD1775, Docetaxel, and Cisplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Borderline Resectable Stage III-IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-04

    Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  16. Radiotherapy Improves Survival in Unresected Stage I-III Bronchoalveolar Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Damien; Mishra, Mark; Onn, Amir; Dicker, Adam P.; Symon, Zvi; Pfeffer, M. Raphael; Lawrence, Yaacov Richard

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that radiotherapy (RT) improves the outcome of patients with unresected, nonmetastatic bronchoalveolar carcinoma (BAC) by performing a population-based analysis within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry. Methods and Materials: Inclusion criteria were as follows: patients diagnosed with BAC, Stage I-III, between 2001 and 2007. Exclusion criteria included unknown stage, unknown primary treatment modality, Stage IV disease, and those diagnosed at autopsy. Demographic data, treatment details, and overall survival were retrieved from the SEER database. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. Results: A total of 6933 patients with Stage I-III BAC were included in the analysis. The median age at diagnosis was 70 years (range, 10-101 years). The majority of patients were diagnosed with Stage I (74.4%); 968 patients (14%) did not undergo surgical resection. Unresected patients were more likely to be older (p < 0.0001), male (p = 0.001), black (p < 0.0001), and Stage III (p < 0.0001). Within the cohort of unresected patients, 300 (31%) were treated with RT. The estimated 2-year overall survival for patients with unresected, nonmetastatic BAC was 58%, 44%, and 27% in Stage I, II, and III, respectively. Factors associated with improved survival included female sex, earlier stage at diagnosis, and use of RT. Median survival in those not receiving RT vs. receiving RT was as follows: Stage I, 28 months vs. 33 months (n = 364, p = 0.06); Stage II, 18 months vs. not reached (n = 31, nonsignificant); Stage III, 10 months vs. 17 months (n = 517, p < 0.003). Conclusions: The use of RT is associated with improved prognosis in unresected Stage I-III BAC. Less than a third of patients who could have potentially benefited from RT received it, suggesting that the medical specialists involved in the care of these patients underappreciate the importance of RT.

  17. Stage III and localized stage IV breast cancer: irradiation alone vs irradiation plus surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Bedwinek, J.; Rao, V.; Perez, C.; Lee, J.; Fineberg, B.

    1981-01-01

    One hundred forty-seven patients with non-inflammatory, Stage III and IV breast cancer were treated with irradiation alone (54 patients) or with a combination of irradiation and mastectomy (93 patients). In the T/sub 3/ category, the local failure rate was 45% (5/11) for the irradiation alone patients vs 12% (3/25) for the irradiation plus surgery patients; in the T/sub 4/ category these figures were 65% (28/43) vs 13% (9/68), respectively. Corresponding local failure rates by size of primary tumor were 50% (2/4) vs 15% (5/29) for tumors 0-5 cm, 43% (0/21) vs 14% (6/45) for 5-8 cm tumors, and 75% (22/29) vs 5% (1/20) for tumors greater than or equal to8 cm. The rates of regional failure for the two treatment methods were compared according to N stage; they were 9% (2/23) for irradiation alone vs 11% (8/76) for irradiation plus surgery in the N/sub 0//sub -//sub 1/ category, and 58% (18/31) vs 18% (3/17), respectively, for the N/sub 2//sub -//sub 3/ category. A dose response analysis for patients with tumors greater than 5 cm treated with irradiation alone did not show a decrease in local failure rate with increasing total tumor dose over a range of 4000 to 7000 rad, suggesting that doses in this range are too low for these large tumors. Since a significant late complication rate has been reported with doses higher than this, patients with non-inflammatory, but large (>5 cm) tumors, should be treated with a combination of surgery and irradiation whenever possible to achieve maximum local-regional control with a minimum probability of complications. In 36 patients with inflammatory carcinoma, the rates of local and regional failure were 52% (15/29) and 38% (11/29), respectively, for patients treated with irradiation alone, and 14% (1/7) and 29% (2/7), respectively, for patients receiving irradiation plus surgery.

  18. Bioimpedance Spectroscopy in Detecting Lower-Extremity Lymphedema in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Vulvar Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Lymphadenectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Lymphedema; Perioperative/Postoperative Complications; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  19. Entolimod in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer Receiving Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-10

    Mucositis; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral

  20. A Three-Stage Colonization Model for the Peopling of the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, Andrew; Miyamoto, Michael M.; Mulligan, Connie J.

    2008-01-01

    Background We evaluate the process by which the Americas were originally colonized and propose a three-stage model that integrates current genetic, archaeological, geological, and paleoecological data. Specifically, we analyze mitochondrial and nuclear genetic data by using complementary coalescent models of demographic history and incorporating non-genetic data to enhance the anthropological relevance of the analysis. Methodology/Findings Bayesian skyline plots, which provide dynamic representations of population size changes over time, indicate that Amerinds went through two stages of growth ≈40,000 and ≈15,000 years ago separated by a long period of population stability. Isolation-with-migration coalescent analyses, which utilize data from sister populations to estimate a divergence date and founder population sizes, suggest an Amerind population expansion starting ≈15,000 years ago. Conclusions/Significance These results support a model for the peopling of the New World in which Amerind ancestors diverged from the Asian gene pool prior to 40,000 years ago and experienced a gradual population expansion as they moved into Beringia. After a long period of little change in population size in greater Beringia, Amerinds rapidly expanded into the Americas ≈15,000 years ago either through an interior ice-free corridor or along the coast. This rapid colonization of the New World was achieved by a founder group with an effective population size of ≈1,000–5,400 individuals. Our model presents a detailed scenario for the timing and scale of the initial migration to the Americas, substantially refines the estimate of New World founders, and provides a unified theory for testing with future datasets and analytic methods. PMID:18270583

  1. Proton Beam Therapy of Stage II and III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Satoh, Hiroaki; Sugahara, Shinji; Kurishima, Koichi; Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Ishikawa, Shigemi; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The present retrospective study assessed the role of proton beam therapy (PBT) in the treatment of patients with Stage II or III non-small-cell lung cancer who were inoperable or ineligible for chemotherapy because of co-existing disease or refusal. Patients and Methods: Between November 2001 and July 2008, PBT was given to 35 patients (5 patients with Stage II, 12 with Stage IIIA, and 18 with Stage IIIB) whose median age was 70.3 years (range, 47.4-85.4). The median proton dose given was 78.3 Gy (range, 67.1-91.3) (relative biologic effectiveness). Results: Local progression-free survival for Stage II-III patients was 93.3% at 1 year and 65.9% at 2 years during a median observation period of 16.9 months. Four patients (11.4%) developed local recurrence, 13 (37.1%) developed regional recurrence, and 7 (20.0%) developed distant metastases. The progression-free survival rate for Stage II-III patients was 59.6% at 1 year and 29.2% at 2 years. The overall survival rate of Stage II-III patients was 81.8% at 1 year and 58.9% at 2 years. Grade 3 or greater toxicity was not observed. A total of 15 patients (42.9%) developed Grade 1 and 6 (17.1%) Grade 2 toxicity. Conclusion: PBT for Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer without chemotherapy resulted in good local control and low toxicity. PBT has a definite role in the treatment of patients with Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer who are unsuitable for surgery or chemotherapy.

  2. Differential expression of collagen types I and III in consequential and primary fibrosis in irradiated mouse colon

    SciTech Connect

    Followill, D.S.; Travis, E.L.

    1995-12-01

    These studies were undertaken to understand further the pathogenesis of consequential and primary fibrosis in mouse colon after irradiation. The distal 2.5 cm of colon of C3Hf/Kam mice was irradiated with either a single dose of 27 Gy or a split dose of 2 x 14.75 Gy separated by 10 days to induce a consequential or primary fibrotic lesion, respectively. The amount of total collagen in the two lesions was quantified by hydroxyproline, and tensile strength, an assay of tissue rigidity, was measured as a function of dose and time after irradiation. The relative distribution of collagen types I, III and IV in the colon was visualized by immunohistochemistry. Collagen types I, III and IV were quantified by immunoblot techniques, and in situ hybridization was used to identify and score the cells producing procollagen mRNA types I and III as a function of time after irradiation. The hydroxyproline and tensile strength measurements demonstrated that both lesions contained significantly increased amounts of collagen compared to controls. However, the ulcerated lesion of consequential fibrosis contained three times as much collagen and required a three- to fourfold increase in the peak force to rupture the colon as did the non-ulcerative lesion of primary fibrosis. The fibrosis accompanying the consequential lesion contained elevated levels of both collagen types I and III, but primary fibrosis contained only elevated levels of type I collagen compared to controls. The in situ hybridization studies showed cells producing increased amounts of procollagen mRNA 8 and 25 weeks before the elevated levels of collagen were detected for consequential and primary fibrosis, respectively. The cells producing the excess collagen mRNA were identified as fibroblasts. No distinction between the two lesions could be made based on the cell types producing the collagen. 48 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Radiation Therapy With or Without Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Who Have Undergone Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-06

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Spindle Cell Variant; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  4. Inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer: Current treatment and role of vinorelbine

    PubMed Central

    Provencio, Mariano; Isla, Dolores; Sánchez, Antonio; Cantos, Blanca

    2011-01-01

    Most lung cancer patients are diagnosed with a non-resectable disease; and around 40% in advanced stages. Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a heterogeneous disease with great variations in its clinical extent which presents a major therapeutic challenge. Although chemo-radiotherapy treatment has become the most widely used, there is currently no consensus on the best standard treatment and the experience of the therapy team plays an important role in the decision taking. We review the treatment of inoperable stage III NSCLC and the role of concomitant vinorelbine in this clinical scenario. PMID:22263088

  5. The role of multidetector CT in local staging and evaluation of retroperitoneal surgical margin involvement in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elibol, Funda Dinç; Obuz, Funda; Sökmen, Selman; Terzi, Cem; Canda, Aras Emre; Sağol, Özgül; Sarıoğlu, Sülen

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate preoperative T and N staging and retroperitoneal surgical margin (RSM) involvement in colon cancer using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). METHODS In this retrospective study, preoperative MDCTs of 141 patients with colon adenocarcinoma were evaluated in terms of T and N staging and retroperitoneal surgical margin involvement by two observers. Results were compared with histopathology. RESULTS In determining extramural invasion, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy of MDCT were 81%, 50%, 95%, 26%, and 81% for observer 1 and 87%, 75%, 97%, 27%, and 84% for observer 2, respectively. Moderate interobserver agreement was observed (κ=0.425). In determining T stage of the tumor, accuracy of MDCT was 55% for observer 1 and 51% for observer 2. In the detection of lymph node metastasis, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of MDCT were 84%, 46%, 60%, 74% and 64% for observer 1 and 84%, 56%, 65%, 78%, and 70% for observer 2, respectively. Interobserver agreement was substantial (κ=0.650). RSM was involved in six cases (4.7%). When only retroperitoneal colon segments were considered, 1.6% of subjects demonstrated RSM involvement. Four of the six RSM-positive tumors were located on sigmoid colon and one tumor was on transverse colon and caecum. Considering all colon tumors, in the detection of RSM involvement, sensitivity and specificity of MDCT were 33% and 81% for observer 1 and 50% and 80% for observer 2. Interobserver agreement was moderate (κ=0.518). CONCLUSION MDCT is a promising technique with moderate interobserver agreement in detection of extramural invasion, lymph node metastases, and RSM involvement in colon carcinomas. PMID:26611110

  6. PPP1R12A Copy Number Is Associated with Clinical Outcomes of Stage III CRC Receiving Oxaliplatin-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chenbo; Li, Ajian; Li, Huaguang; Peng, Kangsheng; Wei, Qing; Lin, Moubin; Liu, Zhanju; Yin, Lu; Li, Jianwen

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the correlation between PPP1R12A gene copy number and clinical outcomes of oxaliplatin-based regimen in stage III colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods. A total of 139 paraffin-embedded tissue samples of stage III CRC patients who received oxaliplatin-based treatment after radical surgery were recruited. Genomic DNA was extracted and purified from paraffin-embedded sections. Quantitative PCR methods were used to detect the relative copy number (RCN) of PPP1R12A. Results. Statistical analysis demonstrated that low PPP1R12A RCN was associated with poor RFS (HR = 2.186, 95% CI: 1.293–3.696; P = 0.003) and OS (HR = 2.782, 95% CI: 1.531–5.052; P < 0.001). Additionally, when patients were stratified according to subgroups of stage III and tumor location, poor RFS and OS were also observed in the low PPP1R12A RCN group with significance (RFS: IIIB HR = 2.870, P < 0.001; colon HR = 1.910, P = 0.037; OS: IIIB HR = 3.527, P < 0.001; IIIC HR = 2.662, P = 0.049; rectum HR = 4.229, P = 0.002). Conclusion. Our findings suggest the copy number of PPP1R12A can independently predict recurrence and overall survival of stage III colorectal cancer patients receiving oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. PMID:26113782

  7. Associations Between Cigarette Smoking Status and Colon Cancer Prognosis Among Participants in North Central Cancer Treatment Group Phase III Trial N0147

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Amanda I.; Shi, Qian; Newcomb, Polly A.; Nelson, Garth D.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Alberts, Steven R.; Limburg, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose By using data from North Central Cancer Treatment Group Phase III Trial N0147, a randomized adjuvant trial of patients with stage III colon cancer, we assessed the relationship between smoking and cancer outcomes, disease-free survival (DFS), and time to recurrence (TTR), accounting for heterogeneity by patient and tumor characteristics. Patients and Methods Before random assignment to infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) or FOLFOX plus cetuximab, 1,968 participants completed a questionnaire on smoking history and other risk factors. Cox models assessed the association between smoking history and the primary trial outcome of DFS (ie, time to recurrence or death), as well as TTR, adjusting for other clinical and patient factors. The median follow-up was 3.5 years among patients who did not experience events. Results Compared with never-smokers, ever smokers experienced significantly shorter DFS (3-year DFS proportion: 70% v 74%; hazard ratio [HR], 1.21; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.42). This association persisted after multivariate adjustment (HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.49). There was significant interaction in this association by BRAF mutation status (P = .03): smoking was associated with shorter DFS in patients with BRAF wild-type (HR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.66) but not BRAF mutated (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.50 to 1.29) colon cancer. Smoking was more strongly associated with poorer DFS in those with KRAS mutated versus KRAS wild-type colon cancer (HR, 1.50 [95% CI, 1.12 to 2.00] v HR, 1.09 [95% CI, 0.85 to 1.39]), although interaction by KRAS mutation status was not statistically significant (P = .07). Associations were comparable in analyses of TTR. Conclusion Overall, smoking was significantly associated with shorter DFS and TTR in patients with colon cancer. These adverse relationships were most evident in patients with BRAF wild-type or KRAS mutated colon cancer. PMID:23547084

  8. A varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Dong, Gaohong

    2014-04-15

    Currently, adaptive phase II/III clinical trials are typically carried out with a strict two-stage design. The first stage is a learning stage called phase II, and the second stage is a confirmatory stage called phase III. Following phase II analysis, inefficacious or harmful dose arms are dropped, then one or two promising dose arms are selected for the second stage. However, there are often situations in which researchers are in dilemma to make 'go or no-go' decision and/or to select 'best' dose arm(s), as data from the first stage may not provide sufficient information for their decision making. In this case, it is challenging to follow a strict two-stage plan. Therefore, we propose a varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design, in which we consider whether there is a need to have an intermediate stage to obtain more data, so that a more informative decision could be made. Hence, the number of further investigational stages in our design is determined on the basis of data accumulated to the interim analysis. With respect to adaptations, we consider dropping dose arm(s), switching another plausible endpoint as the primary study endpoint, re-estimating sample size, and early stopping for futility. We use an adaptive combination test to perform final analyses. By applying closed testing procedure, we control family-wise type I error rate at the nominal level of α in the strong sense. We delineate other essential design considerations including the threshold parameters and the proportion of alpha allocated in the two-stage versus three-stage setting. PMID:24273128

  9. Changes in Brain Function in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Who Are Receiving Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Malignant Ovarian Epithelial Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Dysgerminoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Polyembryoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Teratoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  10. Validation of a modified clinical risk score to predict cancer-specific survival for stage II colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oliphant, Raymond; Horgan, Paul G; Morrison, David S; McMillan, Donald C

    2015-01-01

    Many patients with stage II colon cancer will die of their disease despite curative surgery. Therefore, identification of patients at high risk of poor outcome after surgery for stage II colon cancer is desirable. This study aims to validate a clinical risk score to predict cancer-specific survival in patients undergoing surgery for stage II colon cancer. Patients undergoing surgery for stage II colon cancer in 16 hospitals in the West of Scotland between 2001 and 2004 were identified from a prospectively maintained regional clinical audit database. Overall and cancer-specific survival rates up to 5 years were calculated. A total of 871 patients were included. At 5 years, cancer-specific survival was 81.9% and overall survival was 65.6%. On multivariate analysis, age ≥75 years (hazard ratio (HR) 2.11, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.57–2.85; P<0.001) and emergency presentation (HR 1.97, 95% CI 1.43–2.70; P<0.001) were independently associated with cancer-specific survival. Age and mode of presentation HRs were added to form a clinical risk score of 0–2. The cancer-specific survival at 5 years for patients with a cumulative score 0 was 88.7%, 1 was 78.2% and 2 was 65.9%. These results validate a modified simple clinical risk score for patients undergoing surgery for stage II colon cancer. The combination of these two universally documented clinical factors provides a solid foundation for the examination of the impact of additional clinicopathological and treatment factors on overall and cancer-specific survival. PMID:25487740

  11. Adjuvant chemotherapy is not associated with improved survival for all high-risk factors in stage II colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Verhoeff, S R; van Erning, F N; Lemmens, V E P P; de Wilt, J H W; Pruijt, J F M

    2016-07-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy can be considered in high-risk stage II colon cancer comprising pT4, poor/undifferentiated grade, vascular invasion, emergency surgery and/or <10 evaluated lymph nodes (LNs). Adjuvant chemotherapy administration and its effect on survival was evaluated for each known risk factor. All patients with high-risk stage II colon cancer who underwent resection and were diagnosed in the Netherlands between 2008 and 2012 were included. After stratification by risk factor(s) (vascular invasion could not be included), Cox regression was used to discriminate the independent association of adjuvant chemotherapy with the probability of death. Relative survival was used to estimate disease-specific survival. A total of 4,940 of 10,935 patients with stage II colon cancer were identified as high risk, of whom 790 (16%) patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients with a pT4 received adjuvant chemotherapy more often (37%). Probability of death in pT4 patients receiving chemotherapy was lower compared to non-recipients (3-year overall survival 91% vs. 73%, HR 0.43, 95% CI 0.28-0.66). The relative excess risk (RER) of dying was also lower for pT4 patients receiving chemotherapy compared to non-recipients (3-year relative survival 94% vs. 85%, RER 0.36, 95% CI 0.17-0.74). For patients with only poor/undifferentiated grade, emergency surgery or <10 LNs evaluated, no association between receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy and survival was observed. In high-risk stage II colon cancer, adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with higher survival in pT4 only. To prevent unnecessary chemotherapy-induced toxicity, further refinement of patient subgroups within stage II colon cancer who could benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy seems indicated. PMID:26914273

  12. Paclitaxel, Cisplatin, and Topotecan With or Without Filgrastim in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III or Stage IV Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  13. Tumor Heterogeneity of FIGO Stage III Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yong Bae; Lee, Ik Jae; Kim, Song Yih; Kim, Jun Won; Yoon, Hong In; Kim, Sang Wun; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Young Tae; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze tumor heterogeneity based on tumor extent and suggest reappraisal of the system of the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) for Stage III carcinoma of the uterine cervix from a radiotherapeutic viewpoint. Methods and Materials: Between 1986 and 2004, 407 patients with FIGO Stage III (FIGO Stage IIIa in 19 and IIIb in 388) were treated with external beam radiotherapy (RT) and high-dose rate brachytherapy. All patients were reviewed with respect to tumor extent. Patterns of failure and survival parameters were analyzed by use of the chi{sup 2} test and Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The complete response rate was 79.6%, and the 5-year overall survival rates for Stage IIIa and Stage IIIb carcinoma of the cervix were 82.1% and 54.8%, respectively. To determine which parameters of tumor extent had an influence on prognosis for Stage IIIb patients, pelvic wall (PW) extension and hydronephrosis (HD) retained significance on multivariate analysis. Stage IIIb patients were divided into three subgroups according to PW extension and HD: low risk (unilateral PW extension without HD), intermediate risk (HD without PW extension or bilateral PW extension without HD), and high risk (unilateral or bilateral PW extension with HD). The high-risk group had a remarkably low complete response rate, high locoregional failure rate, and low 5-year survival rate compared with the intermediate- and low-risk groups. Conclusions: FIGO Stage III carcinoma of the cervix covers considerably heterogeneous subgroups according to tumor extent. Before initiation of treatment, we suggest that physicians determine a tailored treatment policy based on tumor heterogeneity for each Stage III patient.

  14. Genetically Modified T Cells in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer or Mesothelioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-02

    Advanced Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; HLA-A*0201 Positive Cells Present; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage III Pleural Mesothelioma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pleural Mesothelioma

  15. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer

  16. High Risk Stage 2 and Stage 3 Colon Cancer, Predictors of Recurrence and Effect of Adjuvant Therapy in a Nonselected Population

    PubMed Central

    van Eeghen, Elmer E.; Bakker, Sandra D.; van Bochove, Aart; Loffeld, Ruud J. L. F.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with stage 2 and stage 3 colon cancer often are treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. However, patients seen in daily practice have more comorbidity than those enrolled in clinical trials. This study aims to evaluate prognostic factors for recurrence and to ascertain the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy on recurrence-free survival (RFS) of patients in a nonselected population. Furthermore, the impact of relative dose intensity (RDI) of adjuvant therapy on RFS is examined. Chart review was performed for 243 consecutive patients diagnosed and treated at a single center for stage 2 and stage 3 colon cancer from 2002 to 2008. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 66 patients. Median overall survival (OS) was 5.84 years and median RFS was 5.37 years. For stage 2 disease, patients treated with or without adjuvant therapy had a median RFS of 5.49 and 5.73, respectively (p = ns). For stage 3 disease, median RFS rates were 5.08 and 1.19, respectively (p = 0.084). Overall RDI of oxaliplatin based chemotherapy higher than median was associated with increased RFS (p = 0.045). In conclusion, adjuvant therapy did not significantly increase recurrence-free survival. This could be the result of comorbidity in patients. Relative dose intensity of oxaliplatin based therapy is associated with RFS.

  17. Vaccine Therapy With Sargramostim (GM-CSF) in Treating Patients With Her-2 Positive Stage III-IV Breast Cancer or Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-02

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  18. Time to Treatment in Patients With Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Li; Correa, Candace R.; Hayman, James A.; Zhao Lujun; Cease, Kemp; Brenner, Dean; Arenberg, Doug; Curtis, Jeffery; Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Kong, F.-M.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether time to treatment (TTT) has an effect on overall survival (OS) in patients with unresectable or medically inoperable Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and whether patient or treatment factors are associated with TTT. Methods and Materials: Included in the study were 237 consecutive patients with Stage III NSCLC treated at University of Michigan Hospital (UM) or the Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System (VA). Patients were treated with either palliative or definitive radiotherapy and radiotherapy alone (n = 106) or either sequential (n = 69) or concurrent chemoradiation (n = 62). The primary endpoint was OS. Results: Median follow-up was 69 months, and median TTT was 57 days. On univariate analysis, the risk of death did not increase significantly with longer TTT (p = 0.093). However, subset analysis showed that there was a higher risk of death with longer TTT in patients who survived {>=} 5 years (p = 0.029). Younger age (p = 0.027), male sex (p = 0.013), lower Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) (p = 0.002), and treatment at the VA (p = 0.001) were significantly associated with longer TTT. However, on multivariate analysis, only lower KPS remained significantly associated with longer TTT (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Time to treatment is significantly associated with OS in patients with Stage III NSCLC who lived longer than 5 years, although it is not a significant factor in Stage III patients as a whole. Lower KPS is associated with longer TTT.

  19. Titan III Mars Explorer Transfer Orbital Stage Delivery to the PHSF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center video presents live footage of the delivery of the Titan III Mars Explorer Transfer Orbital Stage (TOS) to the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF). The TOS is a single-stage, solid propellant upper stage vehicle used to propel a spacecraft from low Earth orbit toward it's ultimate destination. The TOS is delivered to the PHSF where it is designed to accommodate a variety of NASA and NASA customer payloads and can be used as a payload processing facility (PPF) or a hazardous processing facility (HPF).

  20. Fosaprepitant Dimeglumine, Palonosetron Hydrochloride, and Dexamethasone in Preventing Nausea and Vomiting Caused by Cisplatin in Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Head and Neck Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Nausea and Vomiting; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx

  1. Radiation Therapy With Cisplatin, Docetaxel, or Cetuximab After Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-14

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  2. Protein signatures correspond to survival outcomes of AJCC stage III melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Mactier, Swetlana; Kaufman, Kimberley L; Wang, Penghao; Crossett, Ben; Pupo, Gulietta M; Kohnke, Philippa L; Thompson, John F; Scolyer, Richard A; Yang, Jean Y; Mann, Graham J; Christopherson, Richard I

    2014-01-01

    Summary Outcomes for melanoma patients with stage III disease differ widely even within the same subcategory. Molecular signatures that more accurately predict prognosis are needed to stratify patients according to risk. Proteomic analyses were used to identify differentially abundant proteins in extracts of surgically excised samples from patients with stage IIIc melanoma lymph node metastases. Analysis of samples from patients with poor (n = 14, <1 yr) and good (n = 19, >4 yr) survival outcomes identified 84 proteins that were differentially abundant between prognostic groups. Subsequent selected reaction monitoring analysis verified 21 proteins as potential biomarkers for survival. Poor prognosis patients are characterized by increased levels of proteins involved in protein metabolism, nucleic acid metabolism, angiogenesis, deregulation of cellular energetics and methylation processes, and decreased levels of proteins involved in apoptosis and immune response. These proteins are able to classify stage IIIc patients into prognostic subgroups (P < 0.02). This is the first report of potential prognostic markers from stage III melanoma using proteomic analyses. Validation of these protein markers in larger patient cohorts should define protein signatures that enable better stratification of stage III melanoma patients. PMID:24995518

  3. GALNT14 Genotype Predicts Postoperative Outcome of Stage III Colorectal Cancer With Oxaliplatin as Adjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wey-Ran; Chiang, Jy-Ming; Liang, Kung-Hao; Lim, Siew-Na; Lai, Ming-Wei; Tsou, Yung-Kuan; Hsieh, Tzu-Yun; Hsu, Chih-Kai; Yeh, Chau-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Adjuvant oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy is widely used for stage III colorectal cancer (CRC) after curative surgery. CRC is a molecularly heterogeneous disease, and our current knowledge of therapeutic response-related genetic factors remains limited. N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 14 (GALNT14)-rs9679162 genotype is a prognostic predictor for chemotherapy response in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Here, we investigated whether this genotype was related to the therapeutic outcome of stage III CRC. A cohort of 300 stage III CRC patients receiving curative resection followed by oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy was retrospectively recruited. GALNT14 genotypes and the clinicopathological factors were correlated with posttherapeutic prognosis. Of these patients, 18% patients had GALNT14-rs9679162 “TT” and 82% had the “GT” + “GG” genotypes. The analysis showed that the “TT” genotype was associated with unfavorable overall survival (OS, P = 0.009) but not with recurrence-free survival (RFS, P = 0.700). The subgroup analysis showed that the “TT” genotype was associated with unfavorable OS in the following subgroups: age ≤65 years, men, left side CRC, N2 stage, carcinoembryonic antigen >5 ng/mL, and mucinous histology (P = 0.012, 0.011, 0.009, 0.025, 0.013, and 0.007, respectively). Within the latter 2 subgroups, the “TT” genotype was the only independent predictor for OS. Finally, the “TT” genotype was associated with the T4 tumor stage (P = 0.017) and in patients with T4 tumors, the “TT” genotype was the only independent predictor for unfavorable RFS (P = 0.007). GALNT14 “TT” genotype was associated with unfavorable OS in stage III CRC patients receiving curative surgery and adjuvant oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. PMID:27124048

  4. Impact of Neoadjuvant Radiation on Survival in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koshy, Matthew; Goloubeva, Olga; Suntharalingam, Mohan

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: The role of surgery in Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is controversial. This study was undertaken to assess the impact of neoadjuvant radiation therapy for Stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database that included patients who were 18 years and older with NSCLC classified as Stage III and who underwent definitive therapy from 1988 to 2004. Patients were characterized by type of treatment received. Survival functions were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox regression model was used to analyze trends in overall (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS). Results: A total of 48,131 patients were selected, with a median follow-up of 10 months (range, 0-203 months). By type of treatment, the 3-year OS was 10% with radiation therapy (RT), 37% with surgery (S), 34% with surgery and postoperative radiation (S-RT), and 45% with neoadjuvant radiation followed by surgery (Neo-RT) (p = 0.0001). Multivariable Cox model identified sex, race, laterality, T stage, N stage, and type of treatment as factors affecting survival. Estimated hazard ratios (HR) adjusted for other variables in regression model showed the types of treatment: S (HR, 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-1.4), S-RT (HR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3), and RT (HR, 2.3; 95% CI, 2.15-2.53) were associated with significantly worse overall survival when compared with Neo-RT (p = 0.0001). Conclusion: This population based study demonstrates that patients with Stage III NSCLC receiving Neo-RT had significantly improved overall survival when compared with other treatment groups.

  5. The Prognostic Value of Microsatellite Instability, KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA Mutations in Stage II Colon Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vogelaar, F Jeroen; N van Erning, Felice; Reimers, Marlies S; van der Linden, Hans; Pruijt, Hans; C van den Brule, Adriaan J; Bosscha, Koop

    2015-01-01

    In the era of personalized cancer medicine, identifying mutations within patient tumors plays an important role in defining high-risk stage II colon cancer patients. The prognostic role of BRAF V600E mutation, microsatellite instability (MSI) status, KRAS mutation and PIK3CA mutation in stage II colon cancer patients is not settled. We retrospectively analyzed 186 patients with stage II colon cancer who underwent an oncological resection but were not treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. KRAS mutations, PIK3CA mutation, V600E BRAF mutation and MSI status were determined. Survival analyses were performed. Mutations were found in the patients with each mutation in the following percentages: 23% (MSI), 35% (KRAS), 19% (BRAF) and 11% (PIK3CA). A trend toward worse overall survival (OS) was seen in patients with an MSI (5-year OS 74% versus 82%, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.6–4.9) and a KRAS-mutated tumor (5-year OS 77% versus 82%, adjusted HR 1.7, 95% CI 0.8–3.5). MSI and BRAF-mutated tumors tended to correlate with poorer disease-free survival (DFS) (5-year DFS 60% versus 78%, adjusted HR 1.6, 95% CI 0.5–2.1 and 5-year DFS 57% versus 77%, adjusted HR 1.1, 95% CI 0.4–2.6 respectively). In stage II colon cancer patients not treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, BRAF mutation and MSI status both tended to have a negative prognostic effect on disease-free survival. KRAS and MSI status also tended to be correlated with worse overall survival. PMID:26716438

  6. Impact of Diabetes Status and Medication on Presentation, Treatment, and Outcome of Stage II Colon Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Bae, Susie; Wong, Hui-Li; Tie, Jeanne; Desai, Jayesh; Field, Kathryn; Kosmider, Suzanne; Fourlanos, Spiros; Jones, Ian; Skinner, Iain; Gibbs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a risk factor for colorectal cancer and several reports suggest worse cancer-specific outcomes in diabetes patients. Recent studies in multiple tumour types indicate metformin may positively impact on cancer-specific and overall survival. A population-based series of stage II colorectal cancer patients treated and followed from 2000 to 2013 were analysed for baseline characteristics, treatment, and outcomes. 1116 patients with stage II colon cancer were identified, 55.5% were male and median age was 70.9 years (range 20.5-101.2). The diabetes patients (21.6%, n = 241) were older than nondiabetes patients (median 74.0 versus 69.6, p = 0.0001). There was no impact of diabetes on cancer presentation or pathology. Diabetes patients were less likely to receive adjuvant treatment (13.7 versus 24.8%, p = 0.002) but were equally likely to complete treatment (69.7 versus 67.7%, p = 1.00). Diabetes did not significantly impact cancer recurrence (HR = 1.07, 95% CI 0.71-1.63) or overall survival (HR = 1.23, 95% CI 0.88-1.72), adjusted for age. Diabetes medication did not impact cancer recurrence or survival. Cancer presentation and outcomes in diabetes patients are comparable to those of nondiabetes patients in those with stage II colon cancer. The effect of metformin merits further evaluation in patients with colon cancer. PMID:26074965

  7. Circulating tumor DNA analysis detects minimal residual disease and predicts recurrence in patients with stage II colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Tie, Jeanne; Wang, Yuxuan; Tomasetti, Cristian; Li, Lu; Springer, Simeon; Kinde, Isaac; Silliman, Natalie; Tacey, Mark; Wong, Hui-Li; Christie, Michael; Kosmider, Suzanne; Skinner, Iain; Wong, Rachel; Steel, Malcolm; Tran, Ben; Desai, Jayesh; Jones, Ian; Haydon, Andrew; Hayes, Theresa; Price, Tim J; Strausberg, Robert L; Diaz, Luis A; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Gibbs, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Detection of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) after resection of stage II colon cancer may identify patients at the highest risk of recurrence and help inform adjuvant treatment decisions. We used massively parallel sequencing-based assays to evaluate the ability of ctDNA to detect minimal residual disease in 1046 plasma samples from a prospective cohort of 230 patients with resected stage II colon cancer. In patients not treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, ctDNA was detected postoperatively in 14 of 178 (7.9%) patients, 11 (79%) of whom had recurred at a median follow-up of 27 months; recurrence occurred in only 16 (9.8 %) of 164 patients with negative ctDNA [hazard ratio (HR), 18; 95% confidence interval (CI), 7.9 to 40; P < 0.001]. In patients treated with chemotherapy, the presence of ctDNA after completion of chemotherapy was also associated with an inferior recurrence-free survival (HR, 11; 95% CI, 1.8 to 68; P = 0.001). ctDNA detection after stage II colon cancer resection provides direct evidence of residual disease and identifies patients at very high risk of recurrence. PMID:27384348

  8. Impact of Diabetes Status and Medication on Presentation, Treatment, and Outcome of Stage II Colon Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Susie; Wong, Hui-Li; Tie, Jeanne; Desai, Jayesh; Field, Kathryn; Kosmider, Suzanne; Fourlanos, Spiros; Jones, Ian; Skinner, Iain; Gibbs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a risk factor for colorectal cancer and several reports suggest worse cancer-specific outcomes in diabetes patients. Recent studies in multiple tumour types indicate metformin may positively impact on cancer-specific and overall survival. A population-based series of stage II colorectal cancer patients treated and followed from 2000 to 2013 were analysed for baseline characteristics, treatment, and outcomes. 1116 patients with stage II colon cancer were identified, 55.5% were male and median age was 70.9 years (range 20.5–101.2). The diabetes patients (21.6%, n = 241) were older than nondiabetes patients (median 74.0 versus 69.6, p = 0.0001). There was no impact of diabetes on cancer presentation or pathology. Diabetes patients were less likely to receive adjuvant treatment (13.7 versus 24.8%, p = 0.002) but were equally likely to complete treatment (69.7 versus 67.7%, p = 1.00). Diabetes did not significantly impact cancer recurrence (HR = 1.07, 95% CI 0.71–1.63) or overall survival (HR = 1.23, 95% CI 0.88–1.72), adjusted for age. Diabetes medication did not impact cancer recurrence or survival. Cancer presentation and outcomes in diabetes patients are comparable to those of nondiabetes patients in those with stage II colon cancer. The effect of metformin merits further evaluation in patients with colon cancer. PMID:26074965

  9. Characterization of a Vibrio fischeri Aminopeptidase and Evidence for Its Influence on an Early Stage of Squid Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Rader, Bethany A.; Gerling, David G.; Gutierrez, Nestor A.; Watkins, Katherine H.; Frey, Michelle West; Nyholm, Spencer V.; Whistler, Cheryl A.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri cells are the sole colonists of a specialized light organ in the mantle cavity of the sepiolid squid Euprymna scolopes. The process begins when the bacteria aggregate in mucus secretions outside the light organ. The cells eventually leave the aggregate, enter the light organ, and encounter a rich supply of peptides. The need to dissociate from mucus and presumably utilize peptides led us to hypothesize that protease activity is integral to the colonization process. Protease activity associated with whole cells of Vibrio fischeri strain ES114 was identified as the product of a putative cell membrane-associated aminopeptidase (PepN). To characterize this activity, the aminopeptidase was cloned, overexpressed, and purified. Initial steady-state kinetic studies revealed that the aminopeptidase has broad activity, with a preference for basic and hydrophobic side chains and kcat and Km values that are lower and smaller, respectively, than those of Escherichia coli PepN. A V. fischeri mutant unable to produce PepN is significantly delayed in its ability to colonize squid within the first 12 h, but eventually it establishes a wild-type colonization level. Likewise, in competition with the wild type for colonization, the mutant is outcompeted at 12 h postinoculation but then competes evenly by 24 h. Also, the PepN-deficient strain fails to achieve wild-type levels of cells in aggregates, suggesting an explanation for the initial colonization delay. This study provides a foundation for more studies on PepN expression, localization, and role in the early stages of squid colonization. PMID:22636772

  10. Characterization of a Vibrio fischeri aminopeptidase and evidence for its influence on an early stage of squid colonization.

    PubMed

    Fidopiastis, Pat M; Rader, Bethany A; Gerling, David G; Gutierrez, Nestor A; Watkins, Katherine H; Frey, Michelle West; Nyholm, Spencer V; Whistler, Cheryl A

    2012-08-01

    Vibrio fischeri cells are the sole colonists of a specialized light organ in the mantle cavity of the sepiolid squid Euprymna scolopes. The process begins when the bacteria aggregate in mucus secretions outside the light organ. The cells eventually leave the aggregate, enter the light organ, and encounter a rich supply of peptides. The need to dissociate from mucus and presumably utilize peptides led us to hypothesize that protease activity is integral to the colonization process. Protease activity associated with whole cells of Vibrio fischeri strain ES114 was identified as the product of a putative cell membrane-associated aminopeptidase (PepN). To characterize this activity, the aminopeptidase was cloned, overexpressed, and purified. Initial steady-state kinetic studies revealed that the aminopeptidase has broad activity, with a preference for basic and hydrophobic side chains and k(cat) and K(m) values that are lower and smaller, respectively, than those of Escherichia coli PepN. A V. fischeri mutant unable to produce PepN is significantly delayed in its ability to colonize squid within the first 12 h, but eventually it establishes a wild-type colonization level. Likewise, in competition with the wild type for colonization, the mutant is outcompeted at 12 h postinoculation but then competes evenly by 24 h. Also, the PepN-deficient strain fails to achieve wild-type levels of cells in aggregates, suggesting an explanation for the initial colonization delay. This study provides a foundation for more studies on PepN expression, localization, and role in the early stages of squid colonization. PMID:22636772

  11. CCL21 as an independent favorable prognostic factor for stage III/IV colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yifeng; Chen, Yufeng; Wu, Xianrui; Yuan, Ruixue; Cai, Zerong; He, Xiaosheng; Fan, Xinjuan; Wang, Lei; Wu, Xiaojian; Lan, Ping

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression dynamics of CCL21 and its prognostic significance in human stage III/IV colorectal cancer (CRC). CCL21 expression dynamics were detected with western blotting. The expression of CCL21 in CRC tissue microarrays was examined by immunohistochemistry. The optimal cut-point of CCL21 expression was assessed by the X-tile program. The prognostic significance was analyzed using both Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression analysis. Western blot analysis demonstrated that CCL21 expression was comparable in the CRC and normal colorectal tissues. According to the X-tile program, the cut-point for high expression of CCL21 in CRC was determined when the CCL21 expression index was >56.1. Overexpression of CCL21 was significantly correlated with larger tumor diameter, more mucinous carcinoma or signet ring cell carcinoma and poor tumor differentiation. Patients with high expression of CCL21 had a higher overall survival rate in comparison to patients with low expression. In the multivariate Cox regression analysis, CCL21 expression was found to be an independent prognostic biomarker for CRC. ROC curves showed that CCL21 expression could improve the prognostic capability of TNM stage in stage III/IV CRC patients. High expression of CCL21 is an independent and useful biomarker for predicting longer survival of stage III/IV CRC patients. PMID:23760102

  12. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  13. Enhanced expression of LINE-1-encoded ORF2 protein in early stages of colon and prostate transformation

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Chiara; Guadagni, Fiorella; Sinibaldi-Vallebona, Paola; Sentinelli, Steno; Gallucci, Michele; Hoffmann, Andreas; Schumann, Gerald G.; Spadafora, Corrado; Sciamanna, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons are a source of endogenous reverse transcriptase (RT) activity, which is expressed as part of the L1-encoded ORF2 protein (L1-ORF2p). L1 elements are highly expressed in many cancer types, while being silenced in most differentiated somatic tissues. We previously found that RT inhibition reduces cell proliferation and promotes differentiation in neoplastic cells, indicating that high endogenous RT activity promotes cancer growth. Here we investigate the expression of L1-ORF2p in several human types of cancer. We have developed a highly specific monoclonal antibody (mAb chA1-L1) to study ORF2p expression and localization in human cancer cells and tissues. We uncover new evidence for high levels of L1-ORF2p in transformed cell lines and staged epithelial cancer tissues (colon, prostate, lung and breast) while no or only basal ORF2p expression was detected in non-transformed cells. An in-depth analysis of colon and prostate tissues shows ORF2p expression in preneoplastic stages, namely transitional mucosa and prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), respectively. Our results show that L1-ORF2p is overexpressed in tumor and in preneoplastic colon and prostate tissues; this latter finding suggests that ORF2p could be considered as a potential early diagnostic biomarker. PMID:26716650

  14. Fixation with autogenous osteochondral grafts for the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans (stages III and IV)

    PubMed Central

    Balacó, Inês

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a clinical and functional assessment of the cases of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) treated with small mosaicplasty type osteochondral grafts. Between 1999 and 2004, we operated on 12 knees with OCD stages III and IV. They were assessed using the International Cartilage Research Society (ICRS) scale, the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scale, X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The study was carried out using a clinical series, was retrospective and had a level of evidence of 4. Before surgery, all patients were in classes III and IV on the ICRS scale (four in class III and eight in class IV). At the time of surgery, the patient age was 27.5 ± 7.9 years, with male predominance (75%). Eleven of the cases were assessed as classes I and II on the ICRS scale (seven in class I and four in class II), with one patient in class IV. X-ray assessment was less favourable, revealing alterations in the articular space in 75% of cases. The results show that this technique enables the biological fixation of fragments and, functionally, the clinical results obtained were very good. The osteochondral grafts avoid the implantation of foreign material and make use of bone fragments of the same rigidity as the OCD fragment. We conclude that the technique described is an excellent alternative to the techniques normally used for the fixation of stage III and IV OCD. PMID:18038231

  15. GIS-based NEXRAD Stage III precipitation database: automated approaches for data processing and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hongjie; Zhou, Xiaobing; Vivoni, Enrique R.; Hendrickx, Jan M. H.; Small, Eric E.

    2005-02-01

    This study develops a geographical information system (GIS) approach for automated processing of the Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) Stage III precipitation data. The automated processing system, implemented by using commercial GIS and a number of Perl scripts and C/C++ programs, allows for rapid data display, requires less storage capacity, and provides the analytical and data visualization tools inherent in GIS as compared to traditional methods. In this paper, we illustrate the development of automatic techniques to preprocess raw NEXRAD Stage III data, transform the data to a GIS format, select regions of interest, and retrieve statistical rainfall analysis over user-defined spatial and temporal scales. Computational expense is reduced significantly using the GIS-based automated techniques. For example, 1-year Stage III data processing (˜9000 files) for the West Gulf River Forecast Center takes about 3 days of computation time instead of months of manual work. To illustrate the radar precipitation database and its visualization capabilities, we present three application examples: (1) GIS-based data visualization and integration, and ArcIMS-based web visualization and publication system, (2) a spatial-temporal analysis of monsoon rainfall patterns over the Rio Grande River Basin, and (3) the potential of GIS-based radar data for distributed watershed models. We conclude by discussing the potential applications of automated techniques for radar rainfall processing and its integration with GIS-based hydrologic information systems.

  16. Analysis of Prognostic Factors and Patterns of Recurrence in Patients With Pathologic Stage III Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Samir; Portelance, Lorraine . E-mail: lorraine.portelance@muhc.mcgill.ca; Gilbert, Lucy; Tan, Leonard; Stanimir, Gerald; Duclos, Marie; Souhami, Luis

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess prognostic factors and patterns of recurrence in patients with pathologic Stage III endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 2003, 107 patients with pathologic International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage III endometrial adenocarcinoma confined to the pelvis were treated at our institution. Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) was delivered to 68 patients (64%). The influence of multiple patient- and treatment-related factors on pelvic and distant control and overall survival (OS) was evaluated. Results: Median follow-up for patients at risk was 41 months. Five-year actuarial OS was significantly improved in patients treated with adjuvant RT (68%) compared with those with resection alone (50%; p = 0.029). Age, histology, grade, uterine serosal invasion, adnexal involvement, number of extrauterine sites, and treatment with adjuvant RT predicted for improved survival in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed that grade, uterine serosal invasion, and treatment with adjuvant RT were independent predictors of survival. Five-year actuarial pelvic control was improved significantly with the delivery of adjuvant RT (74% vs. 49%; p = 0.011). Depth of myometrial invasion and treatment with adjuvant RT were independent predictors of pelvic control in multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Multiple prognostic factors predicting for the outcome of pathologic Stage III endometrial cancer patients were identified in this analysis. In particular, delivery of adjuvant RT seems to be a significant independent predictor for improved survival and pelvic control, suggesting that pelvic RT should be routinely considered in the management of these patients.

  17. The Benefit of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Elderly Patients with Stage III Colorectal Cancer is Independent of Age and Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Wildes, Tanya M.; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Powers, Brian; Vlahiotis, Anna; Mutch, Matthew; Spitznagel, Edward L.; Tan, Benjamin; Piccirillo, Jay F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine the combined effect of age and comorbidity on receipt of chemotherapy and its impact on survival in elderly patients with stage III colorectal cancer (CRC). Materials and methods All patients over age 65 with Stage III CRC diagnosed 1996–2006 were identified from the Barnes-Jewish Hospital Oncology Data Services registry. An age/comorbidity staging system was created using the ACE-27 comorbidity index and data from both Stage II and III CRC. The staging system was then applied to patients with Stage III CRC. Odds of receiving chemotherapy were calculated, and survival analyses determined the impact of chemotherapy on overall survival in each age/comorbidity stage. Results 435 patients with Stage III CRC were evaluated [median age 75 years (range 65–99)]. Advancing age/comorbidity stage (Alpha, Beta, Gamma) was associated with decreasing odds of receiving chemotherapy for Stage III CRC [Odds Ratio 0.83 (95% CI, 0.51–1.35) for Beta and 0.14 (95% CI, 0.08–0.24) for Gamma, compared to Alpha]. Chemotherapy was associated with lower risk of death in each of the age/comorbidity stages, compared to those who underwent surgery only. The hazard ratio for death in patients who did not receive chemotherapy, relative to those who did, within each age/comorbidity stage was 1.8 [95%CI 1.06–3.06] for Alpha, 2.24 [95%CI 1.38–3.63] for Beta and 2.10 [95% CI 1.23–3.57] for Gamma. Conclusion While stage III CRC patients with increasing age and comorbidity are less likely to receive chemotherapy, receipt of chemotherapy is associated with a lower risk of death. PMID:21113435

  18. Preliminary results of proton-beam therapy for stage III non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hatayama, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Suzuki, M.; Azami, Y.; Ono, T.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayashi, Y.; Tsukiyama, I.; Hareyama, M.; Kikuchi, Y.; Takai, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background We conducted a preliminary retrospective evaluation of the efficacy and toxicity of proton-beam therapy (pbt) for stage iii non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods Between January 2009 and August 2013, 27 patients (26 men, 1 woman) with stage iii non-small-cell lung cancer underwent pbt. The relative biologic effectiveness value of the proton beam was defined as 1.1. The beam energy and spread-out Bragg peak were fine-tuned such that the 90% isodose volume of the prescribed dose encompassed the planning target volume. Of the 27 patients, 11 underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Cumulative survival curves were calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Treatment toxicities were evaluated using version 4 of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Results Median age of the patients was 72 years (range: 57–91 years), and median follow-up was 15.4 months (range: 7.8–36.9 months). Clinical stage was iiia in 14 patients (52%) and iiib in 13 (48%). The median dose of pbt was 77 GyE (range: 66–86.4 GyE). The overall survival rate in the cohort was 92.3% at 1 year and 51.1% at 2 years. Locoregional failure occurred in 7 patients, and distant metastasis, in 10. In 2 patients, initial failure was both locoregional and distant. The 1-year and 2-year rates of local control were 68.1% and 36.4% respectively. The 1-year and 2-year rates of progression-free survival were 39.9% and 21.4% respectively. Two patients experienced grade 3 pneumonitis. Conclusions For patients with stage iii non-small-cell lung cancer, pbt can be an effective and safe treatment option. PMID:26628878

  19. Curative two-stage resection for synchronous triple cancers of the esophagus, colon, and liver: Report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Yuji; Iwaya, Takeshi; Konosu, Masafumi; Shioi, Yoshihiro; Endo, Fumitaka; Katagiri, Hirokatsu; Nitta, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Toshimoto; Otsuka, Koki; Koeda, Keisuke; Kashiwaba, Masahiro; Mizuno, Masaru; Kimura, Yusuke; Sasaki, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cases of synchronous triple cancers of the esophagus and other organs curatively resected are rare. Presentation of case A 73-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with bloody feces. He was diagnosed with synchronous triple cancers of the esophagus, colon, and liver. We selected a two-stage operation to safely achieve curative resection for all three cancers. The first stage of the operation comprised a laparoscopy-assisted sigmoidectomy and partial liver resection via open surgery. The patient was discharged without complications. Thirty days later, he was readmitted and thoracoscopic esophagectomy was performed. Although pneumonia-induced pulmonary aspiration occurred as a postoperative complication, it was treated conservatively. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 24. Discussion Esophagectomy is a highly invasive procedure; thus, simultaneous surgery for plural organs, including the esophagus, may induce life-threatening, severe complications. Two-stage surgery is useful in reducing surgical stress in high-risk patients. For synchronous multiple cancers, the planning of two-stage surgery should be considered for each cancer to maintain organ function and reduce the stress and difficulty of each stage. Conclusion We successfully treated synchronous triple cancers, including esophageal cancer, by a two-stage operation. PMID:26074482

  20. Radiotherapy for Stage II and Stage III Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Lymph Nodes After Preoperative Chemotherapy and Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Le Scodan, Romuald; Selz, Jessica; Stevens, Denise; Bollet, Marc A.; Lande, Brigitte de la; Daveau, Caroline; Lerebours, Florence; Labib, Alain; Bruant, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in Stage II-III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Patients and Materials: Of 1,054 breast cancer patients treated with NAC at our institution between 1990 and 2004, 134 had pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. The demographic data, tumor characteristics, metastatic sites, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The effect of PMRT on locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis, including known prognostic factors. Results: Of the 134 eligible patients, 78 (58.2%) received PMRT and 56 (41.8%) did not. At a median follow-up time of 91.4 months, the 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and OS rate was 96.2% and 88.3% with PMRT and 92.5% and 94.3% without PMRT, respectively (p = NS). The corresponding values at 10 years were 96.2% and 77.2% with PMRT and 86.8% and 87.7% without PMRT (p = NS). On multivariate analysis, PMRT had no effect on either locoregional recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-1.61; p = .18) or OS (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-6; p = .18). This remained true in the subgroups of patients with clinical Stage II or Stage III disease at diagnosis. A trend was seen toward poorer OS among patients who had not had a pathologic complete in-breast tumor response after NAC (hazard ratio, 6.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-54.12; p = .076). Conclusions: The results from the present retrospective study showed no increase in the risk of distant metastasis, locoregional recurrence, or death when PMRT was omitted in breast cancer patients with pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. Whether the omission of PMRT is acceptable for these patients should be addressed prospectively.

  1. [Pathological Complete Response to SOX plus Bevacizumab for Treating Stage IV Sigmoid Colon Cancer].

    PubMed

    Ibuki, Yuta; Yoshimitsu, Masanori; Emi, Manabu; Mukaida, Hidenori; Hirabayashi, Naoki; Kagimoto, Atsushi; Kaneko, Mayumi; Takiyama, Wataru

    2016-06-01

    Advanced sigmoid colon cancer with stenosis was discovered in a man in his 50's who presented with constipation. A radiological examination revealed peritoneal dissemination. Transverse colostomy was scheduled for the treatment of bowel obstruction. Multiple disseminated nodules were confirmed, and adenocarcinoma was detected from a nodule in the omentum. Eight courses of SOX plus bevacizumab caused the primary tumor to shrink and disseminated nodules to become radiologically undetectable. The patient underwent sigmoid colectomy 8 weeks after the last bevacizumab administration, and no disseminated nodules were found during the procedure. Histological assessment revealed no evidence of cancer cells in the colon and lymph nodes, and the histological effect was judged as Grade 3. PMID:27306818

  2. Family Caregiver Palliative Care Intervention in Supporting Caregivers of Patients With Stage II-IV Gastrointestinal, Gynecologic, and Urologic Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Healthy, no Evidence of Disease; Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Urethral Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Rectal

  3. The roles of demography and genetics in the early stages of colonization.

    PubMed

    Szűcs, Marianna; Melbourne, Brett A; Tuff, Ty; Hufbauer, Ruth A

    2014-10-01

    Colonization success increases with the size of the founding group. Both demographic and genetic factors underlie this relationship, yet because genetic diversity normally increases with numbers of individuals, their relative importance remains unclear. Furthermore, their influence may depend on the environment and may change as colonization progresses from establishment through population growth and then dispersal. We tested the roles of genetics, demography and environment in the founding of Tribolium castaneum populations. Using three genetic backgrounds (inbred to outbred), we released individuals of four founding sizes (2-32) into two environments (natal and novel), and measured establishment success, initial population growth and dispersal. Establishment increased with founding size, whereas population growth was shaped by founding size, genetic background and environment. Population growth was depressed by inbreeding at small founding sizes, but growth rates were similar across genetic backgrounds at large founding size, an interaction indicating that the magnitude of the genetic effects depends upon founding population size. Dispersal rates increased with genetic diversity. These results suggest that numbers of individuals may drive initial establishment, but that subsequent population growth and spread, even in the first generation of colonization, can be driven by genetic processes, including both reduced growth owing to inbreeding depression, and increased dispersal with increased genetic diversity. PMID:25143033

  4. The roles of demography and genetics in the early stages of colonization

    PubMed Central

    Szűcs, Marianna; Melbourne, Brett A.; Tuff, Ty; Hufbauer, Ruth A.

    2014-01-01

    Colonization success increases with the size of the founding group. Both demographic and genetic factors underlie this relationship, yet because genetic diversity normally increases with numbers of individuals, their relative importance remains unclear. Furthermore, their influence may depend on the environment and may change as colonization progresses from establishment through population growth and then dispersal. We tested the roles of genetics, demography and environment in the founding of Tribolium castaneum populations. Using three genetic backgrounds (inbred to outbred), we released individuals of four founding sizes (2–32) into two environments (natal and novel), and measured establishment success, initial population growth and dispersal. Establishment increased with founding size, whereas population growth was shaped by founding size, genetic background and environment. Population growth was depressed by inbreeding at small founding sizes, but growth rates were similar across genetic backgrounds at large founding size, an interaction indicating that the magnitude of the genetic effects depends upon founding population size. Dispersal rates increased with genetic diversity. These results suggest that numbers of individuals may drive initial establishment, but that subsequent population growth and spread, even in the first generation of colonization, can be driven by genetic processes, including both reduced growth owing to inbreeding depression, and increased dispersal with increased genetic diversity. PMID:25143033

  5. Chemoradiation with capecitabine and mitomycin-C for stage I-III anal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Standard therapy for patients with stage I-III squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the anal canal is chemo-radiotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and mitomycin C (MMC). While there is limited published evidence to substitute capecitabine (CAP) for 5-FU, the objectives of the study were to describe the toxicity, dose intensity and outcomes of a sequential cohort of patients treated with chemo-radiotherapy with CAP and MCC in a population-based setting. Methods Patients with stage I-III malignancies of the anal canal referred between February 2010 and March 2012 were included. Dose intensity was calculated by comparing delivered versus planned radiation and chemotherapy treatments and toxicity was retrospectively graded according to standard protocol-specified criteria. Results Among 66 eligible patients, median planned dose of radiation was 51.9 Gy over 5.5 weeks, range 25.0 to 63 Gy, and dose intensity was 98%. Median delivered dose of MCC delivered was 12 mg/m2 on day one, week one while median CAP dose was 825 mg/m2 twice daily on radiation days. CAP dose reductions due to toxicity were recorded for 13 patients (20%). Median follow-up was 20 months and 94% of patients with squamous cell histology had no evidence of relapse. Conclusions Chemo-radiation with CAP plus MMC is well tolerated and may be a reasonable consideration for patients with stage I-III SCC of the anal canal. A range of planned radiation dose was observed and longer follow-up is necessary to ensure that patients who received lower doses of radiation have similar outcomes to those who received larger doses. PMID:24885554

  6. Paclitaxel and Carboplatin Before Radiation Therapy With Paclitaxel in Treating HPV-Positive Patients With Stage III-IV Oropharynx, Hypopharynx, or Larynx Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Human Papilloma Virus Infection; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx

  7. Adjuvant Pelvic Radiotherapy vs. Sequential Chemoradiotherapy for High-Risk Stage I-II Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    El-Hadaad, Hend Ahmed; Wahba, Hanan Ahmed; Gamal, Anas Mohamed; Dawod, Tamer

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore if the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel and carboplatin to radiotherapy confers an advantage for overall survival (OAS), and progression free survival (PFS); to assess the incidence of relapses over standard pelvic radiotherapy; and to evaluate the related toxicity in high-risk stage I-II endometrial carcinoma Methods Medical records were reviewed to identify high-risk stage I-II endometrial carcinoma cases treated in the Clinical Oncology and Nuclear Medicine department between 2002 and 2008 with adjuvant radiotherapy alone (arm I) (57 patients) or with sequential carboplatin (AUC5-6) and paclitaxel (135−175 mg/m2) with radiotherapy (arm II) (51 patients). Radiotherapy was performed through the four-field box technique at doses of 45−50 Gy (1.8 Gy/day × 5 days/week). Results The toxicity was manageable and predominantly hematologic with a grade 3 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia in 9.8% and 6% of the patients in arm I and arm II, respectively, without febrile neutropenia. All patients experienced hair loss. Chemoradiotherapy arm was associated with a lower incidence rate of relapse (9.8% vs. 22.7%). After a median follow-up period of 48 months, the 5-year OAS and PFS rates for chemoradiotherapy-treated patients were significantly more favorable than those who did not receive chemotherapy (P=0.02 and 0.03, respectively). In arm I, the OAS and PFS rates were 73.7% and 66.7% compared with those in arm II, whose rates were 90.2% and 84.3%. Conclusions Adjuvant chemoradiation with paclitaxel and carboplatin improved the survival rates and decreased the recurrence rates in patients with high-risk stage I-II endometrial carcinoma. Chemotherapy was associated with an acceptable rate of toxicity. However, a prospective study with a larger number of patients is needed to define a standard adjuvant treatment for high-risk stage I-II endometrial carcinoma. PMID:23691474

  8. Lack of acute toxicity associated with a multimodality treatment of stage III ovarian epithelial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Belch, R.Z.; Coughlin, C.T.; Cooney, L.C.; Forcier, R.J.; Maurer, L.H. )

    1990-04-01

    Eleven patients with advanced stage III ovarian epithelial carcinoma were treated primarily according to an aggressive multimodality plan utilizing cytoreductive surgery, chemotherapy (high-dose cisplatin and Cytoxan), and consolidative radiation therapy (abdominopelvic bath plus pelvic boost). The treatment was tolerated remarkably well. There was no evidence of progressive disease during treatment, and all patients showed a positive response. There was a notable lack of significant acute morbidity, with the exception of a severe symptomatic peripheral neuropathy associated with cisplatin doses of 200 mg/m2. This was not evident with doses of cisplatin up to 150 mg/m2.

  9. Epacadostat and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Melanoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-12

    Mucosal Melanoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Uveal Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Uveal Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Uveal Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Uveal Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Uveal Melanoma

  10. DDA1 promotes stage IIB–IIC colon cancer progression by activating NFκB/CSN2/GSK-3β signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongcheng; Wen, Yugang; Yu, Fudong; Cui, Feifei; Zhang, Dongyuan; Xue, Yingming; Liu, Chenchen; Yue, Ben; Chen, Jian; Wang, Jingtao; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Meng; Yu, Yang; Jiang, Weiliang; Liu, Xisheng; Mi, Yushuai; Zhou, Zongguang; Qin, Xuebin; Peng, Zhihai

    2016-01-01

    Conventional high-recurrence risk factors are not sufficient to predict post-operative risk of tumor recurrence or sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy for stage II colon cancer. DDA1, an evolutionarily conserved gene located at 19p13.11, may be involved in the activation of nuclear factor kappaB (NFκB). This study aimed to investigate whether DDA1 contributes to tumorigenesis and progression of stage II colon cancer via activation of the NFκB pathway. We found that positive expression of DDA1 alone or in combination with p65 nuclear translocation correlated with increased risk of tumor recurrence in patients with stage IIB–IIC colon cancer. DDA1 overexpression in colon cancer lines promoted cell proliferation, facilitated cell cycle progression, inhibited 5-FU-induced apoptosis, enhanced invasion, and induced the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Suppression of DDA1 inhibited tumor progression, and reduced tumor growth in vivo. We also demonstrated that DDA1-mediated tumor progression is associated with the activation of the NFκB/COP9 signalosome 2(CSN2)/glycogen synthase kinase3β (GSK3β) pathway. These results indicate that DDA1 promotes colon cancer progression through activation of NFκB/CSN2/GSK3β signaling. DDA1, together with NFκB activation status, may serve as a sensitive biomarker for tumor recurrence risk and prognosis in patients with stage IIB–IIC colon cancers. PMID:26942699

  11. Progressive Staging of Pilot Studies to Improve Phase III Trials for Motor Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Bruce H.

    2014-01-01

    Based on the suboptimal research pathways that finally led to multicenter randomized clinical trials (MRCTs) of treadmill training with partial body weight support and of robotic assistive devices, strategically planned successive stages are proposed for pilot studies of novel rehabilitation interventions Stage 1, consideration-of-concept studies, drawn from animal experiments, theories, and observations, delineate the experimental intervention in a small convenience sample of participants, so the results must be interpreted with caution. Stage 2, development-of-concept pilots, should optimize the components of the intervention, settle on most appropriate outcome measures, and examine dose-response effects. A well-designed study that reveals no efficacy should be published to counterweight the confirmation bias of positive trials. Stage 3, demonstration-of-concept pilots, can build out from what has been learned to test at least 15 participants in each arm, using random assignment and blinded outcome measures. A control group should receive an active practice intervention aimed at the same primary outcome. A third arm could receive a substantially larger dose of the experimental therapy or a combinational intervention. If only 1 site performed this trial, a different investigative group should aim to reproduce positive outcomes based on the optimal dose of motor training. Stage 3 studies ought to suggest an effect size of 0.4 or higher, so that approximately 50 participants in each arm will be the number required to test for efficacy in a stage 4, proof-of-concept MRCT. By developing a consensus around acceptable and necessary practices for each stage, similar to CONSORT recommendations for the publication of phase III clinical trials, better quality pilot studies may move quickly into better designed and more successful MRCTs of experimental interventions. PMID:19240197

  12. Combined modality treatment for stage I-II non-Hodgkin's lymphomas: CVP versus BACOP chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bajetta, E.; Valagussa, P.; Bonadonna, G.; Lattuada, A.; Buzzoni, R.; Rilke, F.; Banfi, A.

    1988-07-01

    This paper reports the 5-year results of a prospective randomized study beginning in 1976 on 177 evaluable patients with pathologic Stage I-IE and II-IIE non-Hodgkin's lymphomas with diffuse histology according to the Rappaport classification. Treatment consisted of either CVP or BACOP chemotherapy (3 cycles) followed by regional radiotherapy (40 to 50 Gy) and further cycles of either combination. In both arms, complete remission at the end of combined treatment was high (CVP 93%, BACOP 98%) regardless of age, stage or bulky disease. At 5 years, the comparative freedom from first progression was 62% for CVP vs 78% for BACOP (p = 0.02), respectively. Clinically relevant differences favoring BACOP chemotherapy were essentially documented in patients with large cell lymphomas (International Working Formulation), those with Stage II having more than three involved anatomical sites, bulky disease and age over 60 years. Recurrence within radiation fields was documented in only 5% of complete responders. Combined treatment was, in general, well tolerated particularly when BACOP was used. In only 2 patients given CVP post radiation cutaneous fibrosis was documented. Second solid tumors were detected in 4 patients. One patient started on CVP died because of brain stem necrosis after 45 Gy. We conclude that in Stage I-II patients with nodal and extranodal diffuse non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, particularly large cell lymphomas, combined modality approach with primary Adriamycin and bleomycin containing regimen, such as BACOP, followed by adjuvant radiotherapy offers high chances of cure with minimal toxicity.

  13. Dose-Escalated Robotic SBRT for Stage I-II Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Meier, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is the precise external delivery of very high-dose radiotherapy to targets in the body, with treatment completed in one to five fractions. SBRT should be an ideal approach for organ-confined prostate cancer because (I) dose-escalation should yield improved rates of cancer control; (II) the unique radiobiology of prostate cancer favors hypofractionation; and (III) the conformal nature of SBRT minimizes high-dose radiation delivery to immediately adjacent organs, potentially reducing complications. This approach is also more convenient for patients, and is cheaper than intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Several external beam platforms are capable of delivering SBRT for early-stage prostate cancer, although most of the mature reported series have employed a robotic non-coplanar platform (i.e., CyberKnife). Several large studies report 5-year biochemical relapse rates which compare favorably to IMRT. Rates of late GU toxicity are similar to those seen with IMRT, and rates of late rectal toxicity may be less than with IMRT and low-dose rate brachytherapy. Patient-reported quality of life (QOL) outcomes appear similar to IMRT in the urinary domain. Bowel QOL may be less adversely affected by SBRT than with other radiation modalities. After 5 years of follow-up, SBRT delivered on a robotic platform is yielding outcomes at least as favorable as IMRT, and may be considered appropriate therapy for stage I-II prostate cancer. PMID:25905037

  14. Immunophenotyping of Stage III Melanoma Reveals Parameters Associated with Patient Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Jacquelot, Nicolas; Roberti, María Paula; Enot, David P; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Semeraro, Michaela; Jégou, Sarah; Flores, Camila; Chen, Lieping; Kwon, Byoung S; Borg, Christophe; Weide, Benjamin; Aubin, François; Dalle, Stéphane; Kohrt, Holbrook; Ayyoub, Maha; Kroemer, Guido; Marabelle, Aurélien; Cavalcanti, Andréa; Eggermont, Alexander; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2016-05-01

    Stage III metastatic melanomas require adequate adjuvant immunotherapy to prevent relapses. Prognostic factors are awaited to optimize the clinical management of these patients. The magnitude of metastatic lymph node invasion and the BRAF(V600) activating mutation have clinical significance. Based on a comprehensive immunophenotyping of 252 parameters per patient in paired blood and metastatic lymph nodes performed in 39 metastatic melanomas, we found that blood markers were as contributive as tumor-infiltrated lymphocyte immunotypes, and parameters associated with lymphocyte exhaustion/suppression showed higher clinical significance than those related to activation or lineage. High frequencies of CD45RA(+)CD4(+) and CD3(-)CD56(-) tumor-infiltrated lymphocytes appear to be independent prognostic factors of short progression-free survival. High NKG2D expression on CD8(+)tumor-infiltrated lymphocytes, low level of regulatory T-cell tumor-infiltrated lymphocytes, and low PD-L1 expression on circulating T cells were retained in the multivariate Cox analysis model to predict prolonged overall survival. Prospective studies are needed to determine whether such immunological markers may guide adjuvant therapies in stage III metastatic melanomas. PMID:26829031

  15. Identification and characterization of ANO9 in stage II and III colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunxiang; Cai, Sanjun; Wang, Xishan; Jiang, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The precise role and potential underlying mechanisms of anoctamin 9 (ANO9) remain largely unknown. This study aims to characterize the role and oncogenic mechanisms of ANO9 in stage II and III colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods: We examined the expression of ANO9 in colorectal cancerous tissues and cells using real-time quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Multiple cellular and molecular approaches such as gene transfection, CCK-8 assay, flow cytometry, and invasion assay were also performed to explore its oncogenic mechanisms. Furthermore, the clinical significance of ANO9 in clinical CRC specimens was assessed by clinical correlation and survival analyses. Results: Lower expression of ANO9 messenger RNA (mRNA) was frequently detected both in CRC tissues with recurrence and metastasis-derived cell lines. Compared with matched nontumorous tissues, lower expression of ANO9 protein was observed in tumors, which was significantly correlated with tumorigenesis (p < 0.05). In vitro functional studies showed that ANO9 contributed to tumor cell proliferation, apoptosis, and invasion. Moreover, investigation of clinical CRC specimens showed that ANO9 were markedly overexpressed in metastatic tissue compared with primary tissue. Decreased expression of ANO9 was correlated with poor prognostic outcomes. Conclusions: This study highlighted the role of ANO9 in progression and metastasis of stage II and III CRC. These findings suggested that up-regulation of ANO9, as a metastasis-related gene, could be a novel approach for inhibiting CRC progression. PMID:26317553

  16. Treatment of base of tongue cancer, stage III and stage IV with primary surgery: survival and functional outcomes.

    PubMed

    Al-Qahtani, Khaled; Rieger, Jen; Harris, Jeffery R; Mlynarek, Alex; Williams, David; Islam, Tahera; Seikaly, Hadi

    2015-08-01

    This study examines functional outcome (speech and swallowing), survival, and disease control in patients receiving an intensified treatment regimen with primary aggressive surgery, and postoperative radiotherapy or postoperative concomitant chemoradiotherapy, for previously untreated, resectable, stage III and IV squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tongue base. Sixty-six consecutive patients treated from June 1997 to June 2006 were followed prospectively through the Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Surgery Reconstruction Clinic. Speech and swallowing data were gathered at four evaluation times during the first year. Speech assessment was conducted by PERCI, Nasometer, and C-AIDS and swallowing assessment by Modified barium swallow, Diet survey and G-tube. Also, the overall survival, disease-specific survival and loco regional control were measured. The average age of the patients was 56.8, 85 % male and 15 % female. All patients had primary surgical resection and 83 % received postoperative radiotherapy and 17 % chemoradiation therapy. Overall survival at 3 years was 80.3 % and 5 years 52.2 %. Disease-specific survival at 3 years was 86.7 % and 5 years was 77.5 %. Local control was 94 %. Distal metastasis and second primary were found to be 7.5 % each. Primary surgical treatment of advanced BOT cancer offers excellent functional outcome, local control and disease-specific survival. PMID:24961437

  17. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab Compared to Docetaxel, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Carcinoma (Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  18. Paclitaxel, Bevacizumab And Adjuvant Intraperitoneal Carboplatin in Treating Patients Who Had Initial Debulking Surgery for Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  19. Heterogeneity of Disease Classified as Stage III in Wilms Tumor: A Report From the Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP)

    SciTech Connect

    Spreafico, Filippo; Gandola, Lorenza; Terenziani, Monica; Collini, Paola; Bianchi, Maurizio; Provenzi, Massimo; Indolfi, Paolo; Pession, Andrea; Nantron, Marilina; Di Cataldo, Andrea; Marchiano, Alfonso; Piva, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We analyzed whether the prognosis can differ among Wilms tumors (WT) labeled as Stage III according to currently adopted classification systems. Methods and Materials: Patients with nonanaplastic Stage III WT consecutively registered in two Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) trials (CNR-92, TW-2003) were the subjects in the present analysis. The steady mainstay of therapy was primary nephrectomy, followed by three-drug chemotherapy with vincristine, dactinomycin, doxorubicin, and abdominal radiotherapy (RT). Results: Ninety-nine WT patients met the criteria for classification as Stage III according to a revised version of the National Wilms Tumor Study-3 staging system (51 patients in CNR-92, 48 patients in TW-2003). Regional lymph nodes (LN) were not biopsied in 16 patients. After a median follow-up of 66 months, the 4-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 85% {+-} 4% and 92% {+-} 3%, respectively, for the whole group. For 38 children with positive LN, the 4-year DFS rate was 73% {+-} 7%, as opposed to 98% {+-} 2% for the 45 children with Stage III WT according to the other criteria but with negative biopsied LN (p = 0.001). The subgroup with the worst prognosis consisted of children more than 2 years old with positive LN (DFS 67% {+-} 8%). A delay between surgery and RT > 30 days had an adverse impact on the abdominal tumor relapse rate. Conclusions: This study provides further evidence that Stage III tumors with LN metastases might be distinguished from WTs meeting the other criteria for classification as Stage III. The worse outcome of the former may warrant a prospective study on the effects of intensified therapy. A subclassification of Stage III tumors is discussed.

  20. High-Dose Conformal Radiotherapy for Patients With Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Satoh, Hiroaki; Kurishima, Koichi; Ishikawa, Hiroichi; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of high-dose conformal radiotherapy to the involved field for patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between May 1999 and April 2006, a total of 100 consecutive patients with inoperable Stage IIIA or IIIB NSCLC with a performance score of 0 to 2 and treatment by radical radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy were included. Up to August 2002, 33 patients underwent conventional radiotherapy of 56 Gy to 66 Gy using anteroposterior opposite ports to the primary tumor and elective lymph nodes (conventional group). After September 2002, the remaining 67 patients underwent high-dose radiotherapy of 66 Gy to 84 Gy to the involved volume with three-dimensional (3-D) conformal radiotherapy (conformal group). Results: The median survival was 13.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.5-18.5 months) in the conventional group and 17.3 months (95% CI, 10.7- 24.0 months) in the conformal group. The overall survival at 3 years were 9.1% (95% CI, -0.7-18.9%) in the conventional group and 31.0% (95% CI, 18.9-43.1%) in the conformal group; the conformal group had a significantly better overall survival (p < 0.05). The radiotherapy method (hazard ratio = 0.55, p < 0.05) and performance status (hazard ratio = 1.48, p < 0.05) were shown to be statistically significant independent prognostic factors. Conclusions: Based on the practical experience reported here, 3-D conformal radiotherapy allowed dose escalation without excessive toxicity, and may improve overall survival rates for patients with Stage III NSCLC.

  1. Prognostic and predictive value of YKL-40 in stage IIB-III melanoma.

    PubMed

    Krogh, Merete; Christensen, Ib; Bouwhuis, Marna; Johansen, Julia S; Nørgaard, Peter; Schmidt, Henrik; Hansson, Johan; Suciu, Stefan; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Bastholt, Lars

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates the prognostic and predictive value of YKL-40 in stage IIB-III melanoma patients who were randomized to adjuvant interferon α-2b (IFN) or observation. Serum YKL-40 was determined postoperatively in patients from the Nordic IFN Trial (n=602), EORTC 18952 (n=246), and EORTC 18991 (n=386) (EORTC, European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer). YKL-40 protein expression was determined in 300 tissue sections of primary melanoma or lymph node metastases from 204 Danish patients from the Nordic IFN Trial. Multivariate Cox analysis (including sex, age, stage, ulceration, YKL-40) showed that elevated baseline YKL-40 level was associated with shorter overall survival (OS) in observation groups from the Nordic IFN Trial and EORTC 18952 [hazard ratio (HR)=1.33; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.74; P=0.04], but not in the interferon groups (1-year IFN: HR=0.97; 95% CI 0.76-1.25; P=0.83; 2-years IFN: HR=1.06; 95% CI 0.83-1.34; P=0.64). During follow-up, increases in YKL-40 were significantly associated with shorter OS, but not with recurrence-free survival in univariate analysis. YKL-40 expression was stronger in tumor-associated macrophages than melanoma cells in primary melanoma. High YKL-40 expression in macrophages in lymph node metastases was associated with shorter OS in the observation group (HR=2.76; 95% CI: 1.13-6.76, P=0.02), but not in the interferon-treated groups. YKL-40 was an independent prognostic biomarker of OS in melanoma patients stage IIB-III. High serum YKL-40 in poor-prognosis patients may originate from macrophages in the tumor microenvironment and the melanoma cells. Furthermore, we hypothesize that elevated serum YKL-40 after surgery may predict the efficacy of adjuvant IFN treatment. PMID:27076041

  2. Cost-effectiveness of adjuvant FOLFOX and 5FU/LV chemotherapy for patients with stage II colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ayvaci, Mehmet U.S.; Shi, Jinghua; Alagoz, Oguzhan; Lubner, Sam

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy using 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin (5FU/LV), and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) compared with 5FU/LV alone and 5FU/LV compared with observation alone for patients who had resected stage II colon cancer. Methods We developed two Markov models to represent the adjuvant chemotherapy and follow-up periods and a single Markov model to represent the observation group. We used calibration to estimate the transition probabilities among different toxicity levels. The base-case considered 60-year-old patients who had undergone an uncomplicated hemicolectomy for stage II colon cancer and was medically fit to receive 6 months of adjuvant chemotherapy. We measured health outcomes in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and estimated costs using 2007 US$. Results In the base-case, adjuvant chemotherapy of FOLFOX regimen had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $54,359/QALY compared with the 5FU/LV regimen and the 5FU/LV regimen had an ICER of $14,584/QALY compared with the observation group from the third-party payer perspective. The ICER values were most sensitive to 5-year relapse probability, cost of adjuvant chemotherapy, and the discount rate for the FOLFOX arm, whereas the ICER value of 5FU/LV was most sensitive to the 5-year relapse probability, 5-year survival probability, and the relapse cost. The probabilistic sensitivity analysis indicate that the ICER of 5FU/LV is less than $50,000/QALY with a probability of 99.62% and the ICER of FOLFOX as compared to 5FU/LV is less than $50,000/QALY and $100,000/QALY with a probability of 44.48% and 97.24%, respectively. Conclusion While adjuvant chemotherapy with 5FU/LV is cost-effective at all ages for patients who had undergone an uncomplicated hemicolectomy for stage II colon cancer, FOLFOX is not likely to be cost-effective as compared to 5FU/LV. PMID:23313932

  3. SU-E-J-269: Tracking of Tumor Regression for Stage III Lung Cancer Using CBCT

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, K; Biswas, T; Podder, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study is to evaluate the tumor regression over the course of EBRT treatment and to determine the difference of tumor reduction for stage III lung squamous cell cancer (SCC) and adenocarcinoma using CBCT. Methods: Twenty three stage III lung cancer patients treated in our clinic who had daily cone beam CT (CBCT) were selected for this study (16 adenocarcinoma and 7 SCC cases). Patients received prescription dose in the range of 50Gy–71.4Gy (mean =60.3Gy, median =50Gy) at 1.8Gy or 2Gy per fraction. Treatments spanned over a minimum of five weeks. Initial mean volume of the gross tumor volume (GTV) was 123cc (range = 14.7cc–353.3cc). For this study, we choose six sets of CBCTs at an interval of one week, starting from the first fraction of treatment. Daily CBCTs from treatment linac computer were transferred to MIM Software version 6.0. An experienced physician contoured the primary GTV on each slices of the CBCT for these patients. Results: A consistent regression of the GTVs was observed in all patients, except in one patient (adeno case) where GTV did not change. Weekly volumetric reduction was in the range of 11.2%–16.6%. Maximum reductions were noticed in the first two weeks of the treatment cycle; mean overall (for adeno+SCC) reductions were 16.6%, 14.2% in week-1 and week-2, respectively. Mean reduction over five weeks of treatment was 49.8% (range = 0.1%–75.5%). Higher reduction was observed in SCC patients as compare to adenocarcinoma cases (54.9% vs. 47.6%); however, the difference was not statistically significant (p-value > 0.05). Conclusion: Large regression of tumors over the course of EBRT for stage III lung cancer patients was observed. Both SCC and adenocarcinoma responded well; overall reduction for SCC cases was higher. A future study is warranted for determining the co-relation between tumor volume reduction and treatment outcome.

  4. Automated VMAT treatment planning for stage III lung cancer: how does it compare with IMRT?

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Enzhuo M.; Chang, Joe Y.; Liao, Zhongxing; Xia, Tingyi; Yuan, Zhiyong; Liu, Hui; Li, Xiaoqiang; Wages, Cody A.; Mohan, Radhe; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To compare the quality of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans generated by an automated inverse planning system with that of dosimetrist-generated IMRT treatment plans for patients with stage III lung cancer. Methods and Materials Two groups of eight patients with stage III lung cancer were randomly selected. For group I, the dosimetrists spent their best effort in designing IMRT plans to compete with the automated inverse planning system (mdaccAutoPlan); for group II, the dosimetrists were not in competition and spent their regular effort. Five experienced radiation oncologists independently blind-reviewed and ranked the three plans for each patient, a rank of “1” being the best and “3” the worst. Dosimetric measures were also performed to quantitatively evaluate the three types of plans. Results Blind rankings from different oncologists were generally consistent. For group I, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual-IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.6, 2.13, and 2.18, respectively. The auto-VMAT plans in group I had 10% higher PTV conformality and 24% lower esophagus V70 than the manual-IMRT plans; they also resulted in over 20% higher complication-free tumor control probability (p+) than either type of IMRT plans. The auto- and manual-IMRT plans in this group yielded generally comparable dosimetric measures. For group II, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual-IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.55, 1.75, and 2.75, respectively. Compared to the manual-IMRT plans in this group, the auto-VMAT plans and the auto-IMRT plans showed, respectively, 17% and 14% higher PTV dose conformality, 8% and 17% lower mean lung dose, 17% and 26% lower mean heart dose, and 36% and 23% higher p+. Conclusions mdaccAutoPlan is capable of generating high-quality VMAT and IMRT treatment plans for stage III lung cancer. Manual-IMRT plans could achieve quality similar to auto-IMRT plans if best effort were spent

  5. Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  6. Paclitaxel and Carboplatin With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-21

    Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinofibroma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  7. [Treatment of patients with clinical stage III and IV nonseminomas-- 15 years' experience].

    PubMed

    Base, J

    1991-12-01

    At the Urological Clinic in Hradec Králové in 1975-1989 a total of 182 patients with germ cell tumours of the testis--nonseminomas were treated. Of these patients 37 were in stage III-IV (20%). In 27 (72.9%) initial chemotherapy was administered, since 1980 combined with cisplatinum, as outlined. In 20 patients also revision of retroperitoneal nodes (54%) was made, to 19 patients adjuvant chemotherapy was administered (5th and 6th cycle). In 12 patients irradiation was indicated (32.4%). Histological examination of the preparation removed from the retroperitoneum was implemented in 15 patients: in four a vital tumour was revealed, in two a mature teratoma and in nine fibrosis or necrosis of a metastatic tumour was found. In seven patient a relapse of the disease occurred, 14 patients survive for 1-15 years. Twenty-three patients died. PMID:1822636

  8. Randomized trial of chemotherapy versus chemotherapy plus radiotherapy for stage I-II Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Pavlovsky, S; Maschio, M; Santarelli, M T; Muriel, F S; Corrado, C; Garcia, I; Schwartz, L; Montero, C; Sanahuja, F L; Magnasco, O

    1988-11-16

    A total of 277 patients with untreated Hodgkin's disease, clinical stages I-II, were randomized to cyclophosphamide, vinblastine, procarbazine, and prednisone (CVPP) alone for 6 monthly cycles or to CVPP plus radiation therapy (RT), 3,000 rad, to involved areas (CVPP plus RT). One or more of the following factors were considered as unfavorable prognosis: age greater than 45 years, more than two lymph node areas involved, or bulky disease. In the favorable group, disease-free survival (77% vs. 70%) or overall survival (92% vs. 91%) at 84 months for CVPP versus RT plus CVPP was similar. Patients with unfavorable prognosis treated with RT plus CVPP had longer disease-free survival (75% vs. 34%) (P = .001) and overall survival (84% vs. 66%) than patients treated with CVPP alone. PMID:3184196

  9. A Composite Measure of Personal Financial Burden Among Patients With Stage III Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Veenstra, Christine M.; Regenbogen, Scott E.; Hawley, Sarah T.; Griggs, Jennifer J.; Banerjee, Mousumi; Kato, Ikuko; Ward, Kevin C.; Morris, Arden M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite improved survival with chemotherapy for stage III colorectal cancer (CRC), patients may suffer substantial economic hardship during treatment. Methods for quantifying financial burden in CRC patients are lacking. Objective To derive and validate a novel patient-reported measure of personal financial burden during CRC treatment. Data Collection Within a population-based survey of patients in the Detroit and Georgia Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results regions diagnosed with stage III CRC between 2011 and 2013, we asked 7 binary questions assessing effects of disease and treatment on personal finances. Data Analysis We used factor analysis to compute a composite measure of financial burden. We used χ2 tests to evaluate relationships between individual components of financial burden and chemotherapy use with χ2 analyses. We used Mantel-Haenszel χ2 trend tests to examine relationships between the composite financial burden metric and chemotherapy use. Results Among 956 patient surveys (66% response rate), factor analysis of 7 burden items yielded a single-factor solution. Factor loadings of 6 items were >0.4; these were included in the composite score. Internal consistency was high (Cronbach α = 0.79). The mean financial burden score among all respondents was 1.72 (range, 0–6). The 812 (85%) who reported chemotherapy use had significantly higher financial burden scores than those who did not (mean burden score 1.88 vs. 0.88, P < 0.001). Conclusions Financial burden is high among CRC patients, particularly those who use adjuvant chemotherapy. We encourage use of our instrument to validate our measure in the identification of patients in need of additional financial support during treatment. PMID:25304021

  10. Eugenia jambolana (Java Plum) Fruit Extract Exhibits Anti-Cancer Activity against Early Stage Human HCT-116 Colon Cancer Cells and Colon Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Charepalli, Venkata; Reddivari, Lavanya; Vadde, Ramakrishna; Walia, Suresh; Radhakrishnan, Sridhar; Vanamala, Jairam K. P

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization predicts over a 70% increase in cancer incidents in developing nations over the next decade. Although these nations have limited access to novel therapeutics, they do have access to foods that contain chemopreventive bioactive compounds such as anthocyanins, and as such, consumption of these foods can be encouraged to combat cancer. We and others have previously characterized the anti-colon cancer properties of dietary anthocyanins from different sources. Eugenia jambolana (Java plum) is a tropical medicinal fruit rich in anthocyanins, however, its anti-colon cancer properties are not well characterized. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that colon cancer stem cells (colon CSCs) promote resistance to chemotherapy, relapse of tumors and contribute to poor prognosis. The objectives of this study were to 1) characterize the anthocyanin profile of Java plum using HPLC-MS; and 2) determine the anti-proliferative (cell counting and MTT) and pro-apoptotic (TUNEL and caspase 3/7 glo assay) properties of Java plum fruit extract (JPE) using HCT-116 colon cancer cell line and colon CSCs (positive for CD 44, CD 133 and ALDH1b1 markers). HPLC-MS analysis showed that JPE contains a variety of anthocyanins including glucosides of delphinidin, cyanidin, petunidin, peonidin and malvidin. JPE anthocyanins suppressed (p < 0.05) proliferation in HCT-116 cells and elevated (p < 0.05) apoptosis in both HCT-116 cells and colon CSCs. JPE also suppressed the stemness in colon CSCs as evaluated using colony formation assay. These results warrant further assessment of the anti-cancer activity of JPE, and its molecular mechanisms using pre-clinical models of colon cancer. PMID:26927179

  11. Eugenia jambolana (Java Plum) Fruit Extract Exhibits Anti-Cancer Activity against Early Stage Human HCT-116 Colon Cancer Cells and Colon Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Charepalli, Venkata; Reddivari, Lavanya; Vadde, Ramakrishna; Walia, Suresh; Radhakrishnan, Sridhar; Vanamala, Jairam K P

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization predicts over a 70% increase in cancer incidents in developing nations over the next decade. Although these nations have limited access to novel therapeutics, they do have access to foods that contain chemopreventive bioactive compounds such as anthocyanins, and as such, consumption of these foods can be encouraged to combat cancer. We and others have previously characterized the anti-colon cancer properties of dietary anthocyanins from different sources. Eugenia jambolana (Java plum) is a tropical medicinal fruit rich in anthocyanins, however, its anti-colon cancer properties are not well characterized. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that colon cancer stem cells (colon CSCs) promote resistance to chemotherapy, relapse of tumors and contribute to poor prognosis. The objectives of this study were to 1) characterize the anthocyanin profile of Java plum using HPLC-MS; and 2) determine the anti-proliferative (cell counting and MTT) and pro-apoptotic (TUNEL and caspase 3/7 glo assay) properties of Java plum fruit extract (JPE) using HCT-116 colon cancer cell line and colon CSCs (positive for CD 44, CD 133 and ALDH1b1 markers). HPLC-MS analysis showed that JPE contains a variety of anthocyanins including glucosides of delphinidin, cyanidin, petunidin, peonidin and malvidin. JPE anthocyanins suppressed (p < 0.05) proliferation in HCT-116 cells and elevated (p < 0.05) apoptosis in both HCT-116 cells and colon CSCs. JPE also suppressed the stemness in colon CSCs as evaluated using colony formation assay. These results warrant further assessment of the anti-cancer activity of JPE, and its molecular mechanisms using pre-clinical models of colon cancer. PMID:26927179

  12. The prognostic value of polycomb group protein B-cell-specific moloney murine leukemia virus insertion site 1 in stage II colon cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Espersen, Maiken L M; Linnemann, Dorte; Christensen, Ib J; Alamili, Mahdi; Troelsen, Jesper T; Høgdall, Estrid

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of B-cell-specific moloney murine leukemia virus insertion site 1 (BMI1) protein expression in primary tumors of stage II colon cancer patients. BMI1 protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in a retrospective patient cohort consisting of 144 stage II colon cancer patients. BMI1 expression at the invasive front of the primary tumors correlated with mismatch repair status of the tumors. Furthermore, BMI1 expression at the luminal surface correlated with T-stage, tumor location, and the histological subtypes of the tumors. In a univariate Cox proportional hazard analysis, no statistical significant association between risk of relapse and BMI1 protein expression at the invasive front (HR: 1.12; 95% CI 0.78-1.60; p = 0.53) or at the luminal surface of the tumor (HR: 1.06; 95% CI 0.75-1.48; p = 0.70) was found. Likewise, there was no association between 5-year overall survival and BMI1 expression at the invasive front (HR: 1.12; 95% CI 0.80-1.56; p = 0.46) or at the luminal surface of the tumor (HR: 1.16; 95% CI 0.86-1.60; p = 0.33). In conclusion, BMI1 expression in primary tumors of stage II colon cancer patients could not predict relapse or overall survival of the patients, thus having a limited prognostic value in stage II colon cancer patients. PMID:27102362

  13. Phase I/II trial of whole-abdominal plus pelvic irradiation for Astler-Coller stage beta 2, C colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Patanaphan, V.; Salazar, O.M.; Slawson, R.G.; Sewchand, W.

    1988-02-01

    From 1982 to 1986, after radical surgery (S) for carcinoma of the rectum and rectosigmoid colon, 25 consecutive patients were entered into a Phase I/II study exploring adjuvant radiation (RT). The latter was given with a single fraction of whole abdomen (mid-body) irradiation (MBI), followed by conventional whole pelvis irradiation (WPI). The minimum follow-up time was 12 months, and the maximum was 44 months. There was escalation of the single MBI dose: 5 Gy in 11 patients, 6 Gy in two patients, and 8 Gy in 10 patients. The 2-year survival rate has been 100 and 45% for Stages B2 and C patients. Only 1/7 Astler-Coller Stage B2 patients failed; this failure was in the lungs. Seven of 15 patients with Stage C failed: one locally, three in the liver, and three in the lungs. Single MBI doses greater than 5 Gy have yielded a high incidence of intestinal obstruction when combined with routine WPI. Consequently, this combination requires both some modification and careful attention if used in future trials exploring new treatment approaches for colorectal cancer.

  14. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-10

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  15. Evaluation of preoperative serum markers for individual patient prognosis in stage I-III rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Giessen, Clemens; Nagel, Dorothea; Glas, Maria; Spelsberg, Fritz; Lau-Werner, Ulla; Modest, Dominik Paul; Michl, Marlies; Heinemann, Volker; Stieber, Petra; Schulz, Christoph

    2014-10-01

    Several independent serum biomarkers have been proposed as prognostic and/or predictive markers for colorectal cancer (CRC). To this date, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) remains the only recommended serological CRC biomarker. The present retrospective analysis investigates the prognostic value of several serum markers. A total of 256 patients with rectal cancer underwent surgery for curative intent in a university cancer center between January 1988 and June 2007. Preoperative serum was retrospectively analyzed for albumin, alkaline phosphatase (aP), beta-human chorionic gonadotropin, bilirubin, CA 125, cancer antigen 19-9, cancer antigen 72-4 (CA 72-4), CEA, CRP, CYFRA 21-1, ferritin, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, glutamate oxaloacetate transanunase, glutamate pyruvate transaminase, hemoglobin, haptoglobin, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, creatinine, lactate-dehydrogenase, serum amyloid A (SAA), and 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Cancer-specific survival (CSS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated. Median follow-up time was 8.4 years. Overall 3- and 5-year CSS was 88.6 and 78.9 %, respectively. DFS rates were 72.8 % (3 years) and 67.5 % (5 years). Univariate analysis of CSS indicated aP, CA 72-4, CEA, and SAA as prognostic factors, while aP, CEA, and SAA were also prognostic with regard to DFS. Multivariate analysis confirmed SAA together with T and N stage as prognostic factors. According to UICC stage, CEA and SAA add prognostic value in stages II and III with regard to DFS and CSS, respectively. The combined use of CEA and SAA is able to identify patients with favorable and poor prognosis. In addition to tumor baseline parameters, routine analysis of SAA together with CEA provided markedly improved prognostic value on CSS and DFS in resected rectal cancer. PMID:25027407

  16. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D.; Rose, Brent S.; Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal; McHale, Michael T.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Vaida, Florin; Mell, Loren K.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) = 1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (ω), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification.

  17. Induction of KIAA1199/CEMIP is associated with colon cancer phenotype and poor patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Stephen P.; Myeroff, Lois L.; Kariv, Revital; Platzer, Petra; Xin, Baozhong; Mikkola, Debra; Lawrence, Earl; Morris, Nathan; Nosrati, Arman; Willson, James K. V.; Willis, Joseph; Veigl, Martina; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Wang, Zhenghe; Markowitz, Sanford D.

    2015-01-01

    Genes induced in colon cancer provide novel candidate biomarkers of tumor phenotype and aggressiveness. We originally identified KIAA1199 (now officially called CEMIP) as a transcript highly induced in colon cancer: initially designating the transcript as Colon Cancer Secreted Protein 1. We molecularly characterized CEMIP expression both at the mRNA and protein level and found it is a secreted protein induced an average of 54-fold in colon cancer. Knockout of CEMIPreduced the ability of human colon cancer cells to form xenograft tumors in athymic mice. Tumors that did grow had increased deposition of hyaluronan, linking CEMIP participation in hyaluronan degradation to the modulation of tumor phenotype. We find CEMIP mRNA overexpression correlates with poorer patient survival. In stage III only (n = 31) or in combined stage II plus stage III colon cancer cases (n = 73), 5-year overall survival was significantly better (p = 0.004 and p = 0.0003, respectively) among patients with low CEMIP expressing tumors than those with high CEMIP expressing tumors. These results demonstrate that CEMIP directly facilitates colon tumor growth, and high CEMIP expression correlates with poor outcome in stage III and in stages II+III combined cohorts. We present CEMIP as a candidate prognostic marker for colon cancer and a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26437221

  18. Induction of KIAA1199/CEMIP is associated with colon cancer phenotype and poor patient survival.

    PubMed

    Fink, Stephen P; Myeroff, Lois L; Kariv, Revital; Platzer, Petra; Xin, Baozhong; Mikkola, Debra; Lawrence, Earl; Morris, Nathan; Nosrati, Arman; Willson, James K V; Willis, Joseph; Veigl, Martina; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Wang, Zhenghe; Markowitz, Sanford D

    2015-10-13

    Genes induced in colon cancer provide novel candidate biomarkers of tumor phenotype and aggressiveness. We originally identified KIAA1199 (now officially called CEMIP) as a transcript highly induced in colon cancer: initially designating the transcript as Colon Cancer Secreted Protein 1. We molecularly characterized CEMIP expression both at the mRNA and protein level and found it is a secreted protein induced an average of 54-fold in colon cancer. Knockout of CEMIPreduced the ability of human colon cancer cells to form xenograft tumors in athymic mice. Tumors that did grow had increased deposition of hyaluronan, linking CEMIP participation in hyaluronan degradation to the modulation of tumor phenotype. We find CEMIP mRNA overexpression correlates with poorer patient survival. In stage III only (n = 31) or in combined stage II plus stage III colon cancer cases (n = 73), 5-year overall survival was significantly better (p = 0.004 and p = 0.0003, respectively) among patients with low CEMIP expressing tumors than those with high CEMIP expressing tumors. These results demonstrate that CEMIP directly facilitates colon tumor growth, and high CEMIP expression correlates with poor outcome in stage III and in stages II+III combined cohorts. We present CEMIP as a candidate prognostic marker for colon cancer and a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26437221

  19. ColoLipidGene: signature of lipid metabolism-related genes to predict prognosis in stage-II colon cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Teodoro; Moreno-Rubio, Juan; Herranz, Jesús; Cejas, Paloma; Molina, Susana; González-Vallinas, Margarita; Mendiola, Marta; Burgos, Emilio; Aguayo, Cristina; Custodio, Ana B.; Machado, Isidro; Ramos, David; Gironella, Meritxell; Espinosa-Salinas, Isabel; Ramos, Ricardo; Martín-Hernández, Roberto; Risueño, Alberto; De Las Rivas, Javier; Reglero, Guillermo; Yaya, Ricardo; Fernández-Martos, Carlos; Aparicio, Jorge; Maurel, Joan; Feliu, Jaime; de Molina, Ana Ramírez

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism plays an essential role in carcinogenesis due to the requirements of tumoral cells to sustain increased structural, energetic and biosynthetic precursor demands for cell proliferation. We investigated the association between expression of lipid metabolism-related genes and clinical outcome in intermediate-stage colon cancer patients with the aim of identifying a metabolic profile associated with greater malignancy and increased risk of relapse. Expression profile of 70 lipid metabolism-related genes was determined in 77 patients with stage II colon cancer. Cox regression analyses using c-index methodology was applied to identify a metabolic-related signature associated to prognosis. The metabolic signature was further confirmed in two independent validation sets of 120 patients and additionally, in a group of 264 patients from a public database. The combined analysis of these 4 genes, ABCA1, ACSL1, AGPAT1 and SCD, constitutes a metabolic-signature (ColoLipidGene) able to accurately stratify stage II colon cancer patients with 5-fold higher risk of relapse with strong statistical power in the four independent groups of patients. The identification of a group of 4 genes that predict survival in intermediate-stage colon cancer patients allows delineation of a high-risk group that may benefit from adjuvant therapy, and avoids the toxic and unnecessary chemotherapy in patients classified as low-risk group. PMID:25749516

  20. High-Dose Recombinant Interferon Alfa-2B, Ipilimumab, or Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV High Risk Melanoma That Has Been Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Metastatic Non-Cutaneous Melanoma; Non-Cutaneous Melanoma; Recurrent Melanoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-Cutaneous Melanoma; Stage III Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IVA Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck; Stage IVB Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck; Stage IVC Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck

  1. Effectiveness of a thoracic multidisciplinary clinic in the treatment of stage III non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Eliot L; Kruklitis, Robert J; Patson, Brian J; Sopka, Dennis M; Weiss, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Institute of Medicine, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and the European Society of Medical Oncology promote a multidisciplinary approach for the treatment of cancer. Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents a heterogeneous group of diseases necessitating coordination of care among medical, radiation, and surgical oncology. The optimal care of stage III NSCLC underscores the need for a multidisciplinary approach. Methods From tumor registry data, we identified all cases of stage III NSCLC seen at Lehigh Valley Health Network between March 2010 and March 2013. The care received by patients when seen in the thoracic multidisciplinary clinic (MDC) was compared with the care received when not seen in the thoracic MDC. Results All patients seen in the MDC, compared to <50% of patients seen outside the MDC, were evaluated by more than one physician prior to beginning the treatment. Time to initiate treatment was shorter in MDC patients than in non-MDC patients. Patients seen in the MDC had a greater concordance with clinical pathways. A greater percentage of patients seen in the thoracic MDC had pathologic staging of their mediastinum. Patients seen in the MDC were more likely to receive all of their care at Lehigh Valley Health Network. Conclusion Multidisciplinary care is essential in the treatment of patients with stage III NSCLC. Greater utilization of MDCs for this complex group of patients will result in more efficient coordination of care, pretreatment evaluation, and therapy, which in turn should translate to improve patients’ outcomes. PMID:27358568

  2. Subcutaneous and intranasal immunization with type III secreted proteins can prevent colonization and shedding of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in mice.

    PubMed

    Babiuk, Shawn; Asper, David J; Rogan, Dragan; Mutwiri, George K; Potter, Andrew A

    2008-07-01

    Type III secreted proteins from Escherichia coli O157:H7 are involved in the attachment of the organism to mammalian cells and have been shown to be effective vaccine components capable of reducing colonization of cattle by the organism. In the current study, we used a streptomycin-treated mouse model to evaluate the efficacy of subcutaneous vs intranasal administration of the vaccine. Following immunization, mice were infected with E. coli O157:H7 and feces were monitored for shedding. Immune responses against EspA and Tir were also monitored. Subcutaneous immunization of mice with type III secreted proteins induced significant EspA- and Tir-specific serum IgG antibodies but did not significantly induce any antigen-specific IgA in feces, whereas intranasal immunization elicited significant EspA- and Tir-specific serum IgG antibodies with some animals developing antigen-specific IgA in feces. Only mice that were immunized intranasally with formulations containing mucosal adjuvants, either cholera toxin or CpG-containing oligonucleotides, showed decreased E. coli O157:H7 shedding following experimental infection. Mice immunized subcutaneously with type III secreted proteins did not shed E. coli in feces. These results demonstrate the potential for the use of type III secreted proteins in mucosal vaccine formulations to prevent colonization and shedding of E. coli O157:H7. PMID:18487034

  3. Adjuvant dendritic cell vaccination induces tumor-specific immune responses in the majority of stage III melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Boudewijns, Steve; Bol, Kalijn F.; Schreibelt, Gerty; Westdorp, Harm; Textor, Johannes C.; van Rossum, Michelle M.; Scharenborg, Nicole M.; de Boer, Annemiek J.; van de Rakt, Mandy W. M. M.; Pots, Jeanne M.; van Oorschot, Tom G. M.; Duiveman-de Boer, Tjitske; Olde Nordkamp, Michel A.; van Meeteren, Wilmy S. E. C.; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; Bonenkamp, Johannes J.; de Wilt, Johannes H. W.; Aarntzen, Erik H. J. G.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Gerritsen, Winald R.; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of adjuvant dendritic cell (DC) vaccination to induce tumor-specific immunological responses in stage III melanoma patients. Experimental design: Retrospective analysis of stage III melanoma patients, vaccinated with autologous monocyte-derived DC loaded with tumor-associated antigens (TAA) gp100 and tyrosinase after radical lymph node dissection. Skin-test infiltrating lymphocytes (SKILs) obtained from delayed-type hypersensitivity skin-test biopsies were analyzed for the presence of TAA-specific CD8+ T cells by tetrameric MHC-peptide complexes and by functional TAA-specific T cell assays, defined by peptide-recognition (T2 cells) and/or tumor-recognition (BLM and/or MEL624) with specific production of Th1 cytokines and no Th2 cytokines. Results: Ninety-seven patients were analyzed: 21 with stage IIIA, 34 with stage IIIB, and 42 had stage IIIC disease. Tetramer-positive CD8+ T cells were present in 68 patients (70%), and 24 of them showed a response against all 3 epitopes tested (gp100:154–162, gp100:280–288, and tyrosinase:369–377) at any point during vaccinations. A functional T cell response was found in 62 patients (64%). Rates of peptide-recognition of gp100:154–162, gp100:280–288, and tyrosinase:369–377 were 40%, 29%, and 45%, respectively. Median recurrence-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival of the whole study population were 23.0 mo and 36.8 mo, respectively. Conclusions: DC vaccination induces a functional TAA-specific T cell response in the majority of stage III melanoma patients, indicating it is more effective in stage III than in stage IV melanoma patients. Furthermore, performing multiple cycles of vaccinations enhances the chance of a broader immune response. PMID:27622047

  4. On the interplay effects with proton scanning beams in stage III lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yupeng; Kardar, Laleh; Liao, Li; Lim, Gino; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Zhang, Xiaodong; Cao, Wenhua; Chang, Joe Y.; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay between spot-scanning proton beam and respiratory motion in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III lung cancer. Methods: Eleven patients were sampled from 112 patients with stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer to well represent the distribution of 112 patients in terms of target size and motion. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined according to the authors' clinical protocol. Uniform and realistic breathing patterns were considered along with regular- and hypofractionation scenarios. The dose contributed by a spot was fully calculated on the computed tomography (CT) images corresponding to the respiratory phase that the spot is delivered, and then accumulated to the reference phase of the 4DCT to generate the dynamic dose that provides an estimation of what might be delivered under the influence of interplay effect. The dynamic dose distributions at different numbers of fractions were compared with the corresponding 4D composite dose which is the equally weighted average of the doses, respectively, computed on respiratory phases of a 4DCT image set. Results: Under regular fractionation, the average and maximum differences in CTV coverage between the 4D composite and dynamic doses after delivery of all 35 fractions were no more than 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The maximum differences between the two dose distributions for the maximum dose to the spinal cord, heart V40, esophagus V55, and lung V20 were 1.2 Gy, 0.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. Although relatively large differences in single fraction, correlated with small CTVs relative to motions, were observed, the authors' biological response calculations suggested that this interfractional dose variation may have limited biological impact. Assuming a hypofractionation scenario, the differences between the 4D composite and dynamic doses were well confined even for single fraction. Conclusions: Despite

  5. Intraperitoneal Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  6. The Presence of Telomere Fusion in Sporadic Colon Cancer Independently of Disease Stage, TP53/KRAS Mutation Status, Mean Telomere Length, and Telomerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiromi; Beam, Matthew J.; Caruana, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Defects in telomere maintenance can result in telomere fusions that likely play a causative role in carcinogenesis by promoting genomic instability. However, this proposition remains to be fully understood in human colon carcinogenesis. In the present study, the temporal sequence of telomere dysfunction dynamics was delineated by analyzing telomere fusion, telomere length, telomerase activity, hotspot mutations in KRAS or BRAF, and TP53 of tissue samples obtained from 18 colon cancer patients. Our results revealed that both the deficiency of p53 and the shortening of mean telomere length were not necessary for producing telomere fusions in colon tissue. In five cases, telomere fusion was observed even in tissue adjacent to cancerous lesions, suggesting that genomic instability is initiated in pathologically non-cancerous lesions. The extent of mean telomere attrition increased with lymph node invasiveness of tumors, implying that mean telomere shortening correlates with colon cancer progression. Telomerase activity was relatively higher in most cancer tissues containing mutation(s) in KRAS or BRAF and/or TP53 compared to those without these hotspot mutations, suggesting that telomerase could become fully active at the late stage of colon cancer development. Interestingly, the majority of telomere fusion junctions in colon cancer appeared to be a chromatid-type containing chromosome 7q or 12q. In sum, this meticulous correlative study not only highlights the concept that telomere fusion is present in the early stages of cancer regardless of TP53/KRAS mutation status, mean telomere length, and telomerase activity, but also provides additional insights targeting key telomere fusion junctions which may have significant implications for colon cancer diagnoses. PMID:25379018

  7. Identification of differentially expressed genes using an annealing control primer system in stage III serous ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most patients with ovarian cancer are diagnosed with advanced stage disease (i.e., stage III-IV), which is associated with a poor prognosis. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in stage III serous ovarian carcinoma compared to normal tissue were screened by a new differential display method, the annealing control primer (ACP) system. The potential targets for markers that could be used for diagnosis and prognosis, for stage III serous ovarian cancer, were found by cluster and survival analysis. Methods The ACP-based reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT PCR) technique was used to identify DEGs in patients with stage III serous ovarian carcinoma. The DEGs identified by the ACP system were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Cluster analysis was performed on the basis of the expression profile produced by quantitative real-time PCR and survival analysis was carried out by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards multivariate model; the results of gene expression were compared between chemo-resistant and chemo-sensitive groups. Results A total of 114 DEGs were identified by the ACP-based RT PCR technique among patients with stage III serous ovarian carcinoma. The DEGs associated with an apoptosis inhibitory process tended to be up-regulated clones while the DEGs associated with immune response tended to be down-regulated clones. Cluster analysis of the gene expression profile obtained by quantitative real-time PCR revealed two contrasting groups of DEGs. That is, a group of genes including: SSBP1, IFI6 DDT, IFI27, C11orf92, NFKBIA, TNXB, NEAT1 and TFG were up-regulated while another group of genes consisting of: LAMB2, XRCC6, MEF2C, RBM5, FOXP1, NUDCP2, LGALS3, TMEM185A, and C1S were down-regulated in most patients. Survival analysis revealed that the up-regulated genes such as DDAH2, RNase K and TCEAL2 might be associated with a poor prognosis. Furthermore, the prognosis of patients with chemo-resistance was predicted to be

  8. Georgetown University Integrated Community Energy System (GU-ICES). Phase III, Stage I: feasibility analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, Victor

    1980-10-01

    Candidate energy alternatives are analyzed in Phase III, Stage I, and the appendices are presented for the feasibility analysis. Information in eight appendices includes the following: detailed statement of work; PEPCO rate schedules; cogeneration schemes; added coal, limestone, and ash storage; hot and cold thermal storage; absorption refrigeration; high temperature heat pumps; and life cycle cost analysis. (MCW)

  9. Trace elements and heavy metals in hair of stage III breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Benderli Cihan, Yasemin; Sözen, Selim; Oztürk Yıldırım, Sema

    2011-12-01

    This prospective study was designed to compare the hair levels of 36 elements in 52 patients with stage III breast cancer to those of an equal number of healthy individuals. Principal component and cluster analysis were used for source of identification and apportionment of heavy metals and trace elements in these two groups. A higher average level of iron was found in samples from patients while controls had higher levels of calcium. Both patients and controls had elevated levels of tin, magnesium, zinc, and sodium. Almost all element values in cancer patients showed higher dispersion and asymmetry than in healthy controls. Between the two groups, there were statistically significant differences in the concentrations of silver, arsenic, gold, boron, barium, beryllium, calcium, cadmium, cerium, cobalt, cesium, gadolinium, manganese, nickel, lead, antimony, scandium, selenium, and zinc (p < 0.05). Strong positive correlations were found between lead and gold (r = 0.785) in the cancer group and between palladium and cobalt (r = 0.945) in the healthy individuals. Our results show that there are distinct patterns of heavy metals and trace elements in the hair of breast cancer patients in comparison to healthy controls. These results could be of significance in the diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:21660533

  10. Battling regional (stage III) lung cancer: bumpy road of a cancer survivor in the immunotherapy age.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhonglin; Biddinger, Paul; Schroeder, Carsten; Tariq, Khurram

    2016-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman, a heavy smoker, was diagnosed with stage III squamous cell lung cancer. She was treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy, with partial response. 2 months later, she had haemoptysis caused by brisk bleeding from the radiated right upper lobe. Fortunately, her bleed was self-limited. 4 months later, a rapidly enlarging renal mass was discovered and turned out to be metastatic from the lung primary. Second-line chemotherapy with docetaxel and ramucirumab did not have effects on the renal mass after 2 cycles. Despite not being eligible for a durvalumab trial because of lack of PD-L1 expression, she had a meaningful response to nivolumab. Once every 2 weeks, infusion of nivolumab resulted in rapid tumour shrinkage in multiple areas. In the next few months, she experienced a variety of side effects, some of which were potentially life-threatening. She had disease progression 9 months into treatment. PMID:27389724

  11. Small bowel double-contrast enema in stage III ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wittich, G; Salomonowitz, E; Szepesi, T; Czembirek, H; Fruehwald, F

    1984-02-01

    The efficiency of small bowel double-contrast enema in the detection and localization of tumor- or therapy-induced lesions of the intestine was studied retrospectively in 43 patients with stage III ovarian carcinoma. The radiographic findings in 62 examinations were verified by operative and autopsy findings and by the clinical course. Postoperative changes in the small bowel were noted in 69% of the patients (63% moderate, 6% severe). Signs of acute radiation enteritis were found in 36% (all moderate). Signs of chronic radiation enteropathy were detected in 71% (53% moderate, 18% severe). Small bowel obstruction due to recurrent tumor was correctly identified in 9%. Nonobstructing peritoneal implants were detected in 27% of the patients. The small bowel double-contrast enema is accurate in localizing lesions resulting from adhesions, acute and chronic radiation enteritis, or obstructing tumor; it is less efficient in detecting nonobstructive peritoneal metastases. The major clinical value of this examination is its ability to differentiate "dysfunctional intestine," which is managed conservatively, from focal obstruction requiring surgery. The radiographic features of chronic radiation enteritis on double-contrast enema examination are discussed in detail. PMID:6607594

  12. The treatment of Stage III nonseminomatous testicular tumors. Roswell Park Memorial Institute results (1970-1979).

    PubMed

    Pontes, J E; Wajsman, Z; Beckley, S; Williams, P; Murphy, G P

    1983-04-01

    A review of 92 patients with Stage III nonseminomatous tumors treated at Roswell Park Memorial Institute between 1970-1979 was undertaken to verify changes in concepts as related to multiple agent chemotherapy and cytoreductive surgery. Each patient had a minimal follow-up of 18 months. Fifty-three patients were seen before 1975. Eighteen had metastasis to the lungs only. These were treated with a variety of single chemotherapeutic agents and cytoreductive surgery. The survival of this group was 38%. Among 35 patients with lung and visceral involvement seen at the same time, only one patient is alive. Thirty-nine patients were seen after 1975 and treated with multi-drug chemotherapy and cytoreductive surgery. The current survival rate of 23 patients with lung metastasis only is 69%. Among 16 patients with lung and visceral involvement, the present survival rate is 31%. This report confirms the effectiveness of multi-drug therapy in conjunction with cytoreductive surgery in the treatment of disseminated testicular tumors. PMID:6186354

  13. The proportion cured of patients diagnosed with Stage III-IV cutaneous malignant melanoma in Sweden 1990-2007: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Hanna; Lyth, Johan; Andersson, Therese M-L

    2016-06-15

    The survival in cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) is highly dependent on the stage of the disease. Stage III-IV CMM patients are at high risk of relapse with a heterogeneous outcome, but not all experience excess mortality due to their disease. This group is referred to as the cure proportion representing the proportion of patients who experience the same mortality rate as the general population. The aim of this study was to estimate the cure proportion of patients diagnosed with Stage III-IV CMM in Sweden. From the population-based Swedish Melanoma Register, we included 856 patients diagnosed with primary Stage III-IV CMM, 1990-2007, followed-up through 2013. We used flexible parametric cure models to estimate cure proportions and median survival times (MSTs) of uncured by sex, age, tumor site, ulceration status (in Stage III patients) and disease stage. The standardized (over sex, age and site) cure proportion was lower in Stage IV CMMs (0.15, 95% CI 0.09-0.22) than non-ulcerated Stage III CMMs (0.48, 95% CI 0.41-0.55) with a statistically significant difference of 0.33 (95% CI = 0.24-0.41). Ulcerated Stage III CMMs had a cure proportion of 0.27 (95% CI 0.21-0.32) with a statistically significant difference compared to non-ulcerated Stage III CMMs (difference 0.21; 95% CI = 0.13-0.30). The standardized MST of uncured was approximately 9-10 months longer for non-ulcerated versus ulcerated Stage III CMMs. We could demonstrate a significantly better outcome in patients diagnosed with non-ulcerated Stage III CMMs compared to ulcerated Stage III CMMs and Stage IV disease after adjusting for age, sex and tumor site. PMID:26815934

  14. Colon cancer - Series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Colon cancer is the third most common cancer in the United States. Risk factors include a diet low ... The treatment of colon cancer depends on the stage of the disease. Stage I cancer is limited to the inner lining of the colon; ...

  15. 125I Seed Permanent Implantation as a Palliative Treatment for Stage III and IV Hypopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Yang, Jie; Li, Xiaojiang; Wang, Xiaoli; Ren, Yanxin; Fei, Jimin; Xi, Yan; Sun, Ruimei; Ma, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of percutaneous 125I seed permanent implantation for advanced hypopharyngeal carcinoma from toxicity, tumor response, and short-term outcome. Methods. 125I seeds implant procedures were performed under computed tomography for 34 patients with advanced hypopharyngeal carcinoma. We observed the local control rate, overall survival, and acute or late toxicity rate. Results. In the 34 patients (stage III, n=6; stage IV, n=28), the sites of origin were pyriform sinus (n=29) and postcricoid area (n=5). All patients also received one to four cycles of chemotherapy after seed implantation. The post-plan showed that the actuarial D90 of 125I seeds ranged from 90 to 158 Gy (median, 127 Gy). The mean follow-up was 12.3 months (range, 3.4 to 43.2 months). The local control was 2.1–31.0 months with a median of 17.7 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.4 to 22.0 months). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year local controls were 65.3%, 28.6%, and 9.5% respectively. Twelve patients (35%) died of local recurrence, fourteen patients (41%) died of distant metastases, and three patients (9%) died of recurrence and metastases at the same time. Five patients (15%) still survived to follow-up. At the time of analysis, the median survival time was 12.5 months (95% CI, 9.5 to 15.4 months). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall survival rates were 55.2%, 20.3%, and 10.9%, respectively. Five patients (15%) experienced grade 3 toxic events and nine patients (26%) have experienced grade 2 toxic events. Conclusion. This review shows relatively low toxicity for interstitial 125I seed implantation in the patients with advanced stage hypopharyngeal cancer. The high local control results suggest that 125I seed brachytherapy implant as a salvage or palliative treatment for advanced hypopharyngeal carcinoma merit further investigation. PMID:27440132

  16. Activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway correlates with prognosis in stage II colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Malinowsky, K; Nitsche, U; Janssen, K-P; Bader, F G; Späth, C; Drecoll, E; Keller, G; Höfler, H; Slotta-Huspenina, J; Becker, K-F

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with UICC/AJCC stage II colon cancer have a high 5-year overall survival rate after surgery. Nevertheless, a significant subgroup of patients develops tumour recurrence. Currently, there are no clinically established biomarkers available to identify this patient group. We applied reverse-phase protein arrays (RPPA) for phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase pathway activation mapping to stratify patients according to their risk of tumour recurrence after surgery. Methods: Full-length proteins were extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples of 118 patients who underwent curative resection. RPPA technology was used to analyse expression and/or phosphorylation levels of six major factors of the phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase pathway. Oncogenic mutations of KRAS and BRAF, and DNA microsatellite status, currently discussed as prognostic markers, were analysed in parallel. Results: Expression of phospho-AKT (HR=3.52; P=0.032), S6RP (HR=6.3; P=0.044), and phospho-4E-BP1 (HR=4.12; P=0.011) were prognostic factors for disease-free survival. None of the molecular genetic alterations were significantly associated with prognosis. Conclusions: Our data indicate that activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway evidenced on the protein level might be a valuable prognostic marker to stratify patients for their risk of tumour recurrence. Beside adjuvant chemotherapy targeting of upregulated PI3K/AKT signalling may be an attractive strategy for treatment of high-risk patients. PMID:24619078

  17. The benefit of microsatellite instability is attenuated by chemotherapy in stage II and stage III gastric cancer: Results from a large cohort with subgroup analyses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Young; Choi, Yoon Young; An, Ji Yeong; Shin, Hyun Beak; Jo, Ara; Choi, Hyeji; Seo, Sang Hyuk; Bang, Hui-Jae; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon

    2015-08-15

    We previously reported that the prognosis of microsatellite instability high (MSI-H) gastric cancer is similar to that of MSI-low/microsatellite stable (MSI-L/MSS) gastric cancer. The reason for this seemed to be related to the effects of chemotherapy. To verify this hypothesis, we expanded the study population and reanalyzed the prognosis of MSI-H gastric cancer. Data from 1,276 patients with Stage II and III gastric cancer who underwent gastrectomy with curative intent between January 2005 and June 2010 were reviewed. The prognosis of MSI-H tumors in comparison with MSI-L/MSS tumors was analyzed, according to the administration of chemotherapy and other clinicopathologic features. A total of 361 (28.3%) patients did not receive chemotherapy (MSI-H = 47 and MSI-L/MSS = 314), whereas 915 (71.7%) patients did receive chemotherapy (MSI-H = 58 and MSI-L/MSS = 857). The hazard ratio of MSI-H versus MSI-L/MSS was 0.49 (95% confidence interval: 0.26-0.94, p = 0.031) when chemotherapy was not received and 1.16 (95% confidence interval: 0.78-1.71, p = 0.466) when chemotherapy was received. In subgroup analyses, the prognosis of MSI-H was better in Stage III, women, with lymph node metastasis, and undifferentiated histology subgroups when chemotherapy was not received. However, in patients treated with chemotherapy, prognosis was worse for MSI-H tumors in Stage III, undifferentiated histology, and diffuse type subgroups of gastric cancer. In conclusion, MSI-H tumors were associated with a good prognosis in Stage II and III gastric cancer when patients were treated by surgery alone, and the benefits of MSI-H status were attenuated by chemotherapy. PMID:25614197

  18. Dasatinib, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-22

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  19. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Rituximab in Treating Younger Patients With Stage III-IV Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or B-Cell Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-20

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma

  20. Neo-adjuvant Therapy With Anastrozole Plus Pazopanib in Stage II and III ER+ Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-24

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  1. A randomized phase III trial comparing S-1 versus UFT as adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II/III rectal cancer (JFMC35-C1: ACTS-RC)

    PubMed Central

    Oki, E.; Murata, A.; Yoshida, K.; Maeda, K.; Ikejiri, K.; Munemoto, Y.; Sasaki, K.; Matsuda, C.; Kotake, M.; Suenaga, T.; Matsuda, H.; Emi, Y.; Kakeji, Y.; Baba, H.; Hamada, C.; Saji, S.; Maehara, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds Preventing distant recurrence and achieving local control are important challenges in rectal cancer treatment, and use of adjuvant chemotherapy has been studied. However, no phase III study comparing adjuvant chemotherapy regimens for rectal cancer has demonstrated superiority of a specific regimen. We therefore conducted a phase III study to evaluate the superiority of S-1 to tegafur–uracil (UFT), a standard adjuvant chemotherapy regimen for curatively resected stage II/III rectal cancer in Japan, in the adjuvant setting for rectal cancer. Patients and methods The ACTS-RC trial was an open-label, randomized, phase III superiority trial conducted at 222 sites in Japan. Patients aged 20–80 with stage II/III rectal cancer undergoing curative surgery without preoperative therapy were randomly assigned to receive UFT (500–600 mg/day on days 1–5, followed by 2 days rest) or S-1 (80–120 mg/day on days 1–28, followed by 14 days rest) for 1 year. The primary end point was relapse-free survival (RFS), and the secondary end points were overall survival and adverse events. Results In total, 961 patients were enrolled from April 2006 to March 2009. The primary analysis was conducted in 480 assigned to receive UFT and 479 assigned to receive S-1. Five-year RFS was 61.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 57.1% to 65.9%] for UFT and 66.4% (95% CI 61.9% to 70.5%) for S-1 [P = 0.0165, hazard ratio (HR): 0.77, 95% CI 0.63–0.96]. Five-year survival was 80.2% (95% CI 76.3% to 83.5%) for UFT and 82.0% (95% CI 78.3% to 85.2%) for S-1. The main grade 3 or higher adverse events were increased alanine aminotransferase and diarrhea (each 2.3%) in the UFT arm and anorexia, diarrhea (each 2.6%), and fatigue (2.1%) in the S-1 arm. Conclusion One-year S-1 treatment is superior to UFT with respect to RFS and has therefore become a standard adjuvant chemotherapy regimen for stage II/III rectal cancer following curative resection. PMID:27056996

  2. Histological pattern of Merkel cell carcinoma sentinel lymph node metastasis improves stratification of Stage III patients.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jennifer S; Prieto, Victor G; Elson, Paul J; Vilain, Ricardo E; Pulitzer, Melissa P; Scolyer, Richard A; Reynolds, Jordan P; Piliang, Melissa P; Ernstoff, Marc S; Gastman, Brian R; Billings, Steven D

    2016-02-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy is used to stage Merkel cell carcinoma, but its prognostic value has been questioned. Furthermore, predictors of outcome in sentinel lymph node positive Merkel cell carcinoma patients are poorly defined. In breast carcinoma, isolated immunohistochemically positive tumor cells have no impact, but in melanoma they are considered significant. The significance of sentinel lymph node metastasis tumor burden (including isolated tumor cells) and pattern of involvement in Merkel cell carcinoma are unknown. In this study, 64 Merkel cell carcinomas involving sentinel lymph nodes and corresponding immunohistochemical stains were reviewed and clinicopathological predictors of outcome were sought. Five metastatic patterns were identified: (1) sheet-like (n=38, 59%); (2) non-solid parafollicular (n=4, 6%); (3) sinusoidal, (n=11, 17%); (4) perivascular hilar (n=1, 2%); and (5) rare scattered parenchymal cells (n=10, 16%). At the time of follow-up, 30/63 (48%) patients had died with 21 (33%) attributable to Merkel cell carcinoma. Patients with pattern 1 metastases had poorer overall survival compared with patients with patterns 2-5 metastases (P=0.03), with 22/30 (73%) deaths occurring in pattern 1 patients. Three (10%) deaths occurred in patients showing pattern 5, all of whom were immunosuppressed. Four (13%) deaths occurred in pattern 3 patients and 1 (3%) death occurred in a pattern 2 patient. In multivariable analysis, the number of positive sentinel lymph nodes (1 or 2 versus >2, P<0.0001), age (<70 versus ≥70, P=0.01), sentinel lymph node metastasis pattern (patterns 2-5 versus 1, P=0.02), and immune status (immunocompetent versus suppressed, P=0.03) were independent predictors of outcome, and could be used to stratify Stage III patients into three groups with markedly different outcomes. In Merkel cell carcinoma, the pattern of sentinel lymph node involvement provides important prognostic information and utilizing this data with other

  3. A study on the vitrification of stage III zebrafish (Danio rerio) ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Leandro Cesar; Streit, Danilo P; Zampolla, Tiziana; Bos-Mikich, Adriana; Zhang, Tiantian

    2013-10-24

    Attempts to cryopreserve fish embryos have been conducted over the past three decades, nevertheless successful cryopreservation protocol for long-term storage still remains elusive. Fish oocytes offer some advantages when compared to embryos, which may help in improving the chances of cryopreservation. In the present study, a series of cryo-solutions were designed and tested for their vitrifying ability using different devices (0.25 ml plastic straw, vitrification block and fibreplug(TM)). Toxicity of vitrification solutions was evaluated by assessing follicle membrane integrity with trypan blue staining. In addition, the effect of vitrification protocol on stage III zebrafish ovarian follicles was investigated by measuring the cytoplasmic ATP content and the mitochondrial distribution and activity using JC-1 probe and confocal microscopy. After vitrification, follicles showed membrane integrity of 59.9 ± 18.4% when fibreplug and V16 (1.5 M methanol + 4.5 M propylene glycol) solution were employed. When vitrified in V2 (1.5 M methanol + 5.5 M Me2SO) the membrane integrity decreased to 42.0 ± 21.0%. It was observed that follicles located in the middle of the fragments were more protected from injuries and some of them showed good morphological appearance two hours post-warming. Mitochondria integrity of granulosa cells layer was clearly damaged by the vitrification protocol and ATP level in the follicles declined significantly after warming. Vitrification of zebrafish follicles in ovarian tissue fragments and its effect at sub-cellular level is reported here for the first time. Information gained from this study will help in guiding development of optimal protocol for cryopreservation of fish oocytes. PMID:24513460

  4. Vinblastine plus bleomycin continuous infusion chemotherapy of stage III testicular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Monfardini, S; Fossati, V; Pizzocaro, G; Villa, E

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-four consecutive patients with stage III testicular carcinomas were treated with vinblastine, 8 mg/m2 given in 2 fractions on day 1 and 2, followed by continuous intravenous administration of bleomycin, 15 mg/m2 in 1000 cc of 5% glucose and distilled water over a 24-hour period for 5 successive days beginning on day 2. This cycle was repeated every 28-35 days as toxicity permitted. Complete remission occurred in 18% and complete plus partial remission in 79%. Only 2 of 22 patients with advanced abdominal disease achieved a complete remission. After cytoreductive surgery the complete remission rate was increased to 39%. Median survival of complete responders at 3 years has not been reached, and it has been shown to be significantly superior to that of partial (p less than 0.01) and nonresponders (p less than 0.01). Toxic effects consisted mainly in severe leukopenia, stomatitis, adynamic ileum and osteoarticular pain. One drug-related death due to sepsis with agranulocytopenic fever was observed. Probably because of different patient selection, this report could not reproduce the results reported by Samuels et al. with equivalent drug dosage, but it was confirmed that this regimen is able to achieve a high overall response rate and a prolonged median survival in complete responders. The consistent success of this aggressive combination in inducing a high percentage of partial responses has opened the way for a better definition of the role of surgery for the treatment of advanced testicular carcinoma at out Institute. PMID:6167041

  5. Combined pulmonary and thoracic wall resection for stage III lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Shah, S. S.; Goldstraw, P.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Carcinoma of the lung with thoracic wall involvement constitutes stage III disease. The management of patients with this condition is complicated. However, improvement in perioperative care coupled with advances in surgical technique have enabled a more aggressive approach to the problem to be adopted. METHODS--A retrospective review was carried out of 58 patients (40 men) of mean age 63 years who underwent thoracotomy for lung cancer with chest wall invasion between 1980 and 1993. RESULTS--Chest wall resection was performed in 55 patients (94.8%); in three patients the discovery of N2 disease at operation precluded resection. The TNM status was T3N0M0 in 38 patients, T3N1M0 in 13, and T3N2M0 in seven. Squamous cell carcinoma was the commonest cell type (26 patients). Reconstruction of the chest wall was performed in 29 patients (Marlex mesh in six, Marlex-methacrylate in 22, myocutaneous flap in one patient). The morbidity and mortality were 22.4% and 3.4% respectively. Follow up was complete in 51 patients. Nineteen (37.2%) survived > or = 5 years. The absolute five year survival for N0 and N1 disease was 44.7% and 38.4%, respectively. No patients with N2 disease survived five years. CONCLUSIONS--In patients with carcinoma of the lung and chest wall invasion, combined pulmonary and thoracic wall resection offers the prospect of cure with minimal morbidity and mortality. The prognosis of patients with coexistent N2 disease remains poor. PMID:7570416

  6. Report on stage III Pig-a mutation assays using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-comparison with other in vivo genotoxicity endpoints.

    PubMed

    Cammerer, Zoryana; Bhalli, Javed A; Cao, Xuefei; Coffing, Stephanie L; Dickinson, Donna; Dobo, Krista L; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Engel, Maria; Fiedler, Ronald D; Gunther, William C; Heflich, Robert H; Pearce, Mason G; Shaddock, Joseph G; Shutsky, Thomas; Thiffeault, Catherine J; Schuler, Maik

    2011-12-01

    N-Ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) was evaluated as part of the Stage III trial for the rat Pig-a gene mutation assay. Groups of six- to eight-week-old male Sprague Dawley (SD) or Fischer 344 (F344) rats were given 28 daily doses of the phosphate buffered saline vehicle, or 2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg ENU, and evaluated for a variety of genotoxicity endpoints in peripheral blood, spleen, liver, and colon. Blood was sampled predose (Day-1) and at various time points up to Day 57. Pig-a mutant frequencies were determined in total red blood cells (RBCs) and reticulocytes (RETs) as RBC(CD592-) and RET(CD592-) frequencies. Consistent with the results from a reference laboratory, RBC(CD592-) and RET(CD592-) frequencies increased in a dose and time-dependent manner, producing significant increases at all doses by Day 15, with similar frequencies seen in both rat strains. ENU also induced small but significant increases in % micronucleated RETs on Days 4 and 29. No significant increases in micronuclei were seen in the liver or colon of the ENU-treated SD rats. Hprt and Pig-a lymphocyte mutation assays conducted on splenocytes from Day 56 F344 rats detected two- to fourfold stronger responses for Hprt than Pig-a mutations. Results from the in vivo Comet assay in SD rats at Day 29 showed generally weak increases in DNA damage in all tissues evaluated. The results with ENU indicate that the Pig-a RET and RBC assays are reproducible, transferable, and complement other genotoxicity endpoints that could potentially be integrated into 28-day repeat dose rat studies. PMID:22167886

  7. A phase II trial of RCHOP followed by radioimmunotherapy for early stage (stages I/II) diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: ECOG3402.

    PubMed

    Witzig, Thomas E; Hong, Fangxin; Micallef, Ivana N; Gascoyne, Randy D; Dogan, Ahmet; Wagner, Henry; Kahl, Brad S; Advani, Ranjana H; Horning, Sandra J

    2015-09-01

    Patients with early stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) receive RCHOP (rituximab cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone) alone or with involved field radiotherapy (IFRT). Anti-CD20 radioimmunotherapy (RIT) delivers radiation to microscopic sites outside of known disease. This phase II study aimed to achieve a functional complete response (CR) rate of ≥75% to RCHOP and (90) Yttrium-ibritumomab tiuxetan RIT. Patients with stages I/II DLBCL received 4-6 cycles of RCHOP followed by RIT [14·8 MBq/kg (0·4 mCi/kg)]; patients with positron emission tomographypositive sites of disease after RCHOP/RIT received 30 Gy IFRT. Of the 62 patients enrolled; 53 were eligible. 42% (22/53) had stage I/IE; 58% (31/53) stage II/IIE. After RCHOP, 79% (42/53) were in CR/unconfirmed CR. Forty-eight patients proceeded to RIT. One partial responder after RIT received IFRT and achieved a CR. The best response after RCHOP + RIT in all 53 patients was a functional CR rate of 89% (47/53; 95% confidence interval: 77-96%). With a median follow-up of 5·9 years, 7 (13%) patients have progressed and 4 (8%) have died (2 with DLBCL). At 5 years, 78% of patients remain in remission and 94% are alive. Chemoimmunotherapy and RIT is an active regimen for early stage DLBCL patients. Eighty-nine percent of patients achieved functional CR without the requirement of IFRT. This regimen is worthy of further study for early stage DLBCL in a phase III trial. PMID:25974212

  8. Stages of Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... The digestive system removes and processes nutrients ( vitamins , minerals , carbohydrates , fats, proteins , and water) from foods and ... also called colonography or CT colonography. Biopsy : The removal of cells or tissues so they can be ...

  9. Analysis of local chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate combined with systemic inflammation improves prognostication in stage II colon cancer independent of standard clinicopathologic criteria.

    PubMed

    Turner, Natalie; Wong, Hui-Li; Templeton, Arnoud; Tripathy, Sagarika; Whiti Rogers, Te; Croxford, Matthew; Jones, Ian; Sinnathamby, Mathuranthakan; Desai, Jayesh; Tie, Jeanne; Bae, Susie; Christie, Michael; Gibbs, Peter; Tran, Ben

    2016-02-01

    In Stage II colon cancer, multiple independent studies have shown that a dense intratumoural immune infiltrate (local inflammation) is associated with improved outcomes, while systemic inflammation, measured by various markers, has been associated with poorer outcomes. However, previous studies have not considered the interaction between local and systemic inflammation, nor have they assessed the type of inflammatory response compared with standard clinicopathologic criteria. In order to evaluate the potential clinical utility of inflammatory markers in Stage II colon cancer, we examined local and systemic inflammation in a consecutive series of patients with resected Stage II colon cancer between 2000 and 2010 who were identified from a prospective clinical database. Increased intratumoural chronic inflammatory cell (CIC) density, as assessed by pathologist review of hematoxylin and eosin stained slides, was used to represent local inflammation. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) >5, as calculated from pre-operative full blood counts, was used to represent systemic inflammation. In 396 eligible patients identified, there was a non-significant inverse relationship between local and systemic inflammation. Increased CIC density was significantly associated with improved overall (HR 0.45, p = 0.001) and recurrence-free survival (HR 0.37, p = 0.003). High NLR was significantly associated with poorer overall survival (HR 2.56, p < 0.001). The combination of these markers further stratified prognosis independent of standard high-risk criteria, with a dominant systemic inflammatory response (low CIC/high NLR) associated with the worst outcome (5-year overall survival 55.8%). With further validation this simple, inexpensive combined inflammatory biomarker might assist in patient selection for adjuvant chemotherapy in Stage II colon cancer. PMID:26270488

  10. A scoring system based on artificial neural network for predicting 10-year survival in stage II A colon cancer patients after radical surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wu; Lu, Shi-Xun; Lu, Zhen-Hai; Li, Pei-Xing; Yun, Jing-Ping; Zhang, Rong-Xin; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Wan, De-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 20% patients with stage II A colon cancer will develop recurrent disease post-operatively. The present study aims to develop a scoring system based on Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for predicting 10-year survival outcome. The clinical and molecular data of 117 stage II A colon cancer patients from Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center were used for training set and test set; poor pathological grading (score 49), reduced expression of TGFBR2 (score 33), over-expression of TGF-β (score 45), MAPK (score 32), pin1 (score 100), β-catenin in tumor tissue (score 50) and reduced expression of TGF-β in normal mucosa (score 22) were selected as the prognostic risk predictors. According to the developed scoring system, the patients were divided into 3 subgroups, which were supposed with higher, moderate and lower risk levels. As a result, for the 3 subgroups, the 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were 16.7%, 62.9% and 100% (P < 0.001); and the 10-year disease free survival (DFS) rates were 16.7%, 61.8% and 98.8% (P < 0.001) respectively. It showed that this scoring system for stage II A colon cancer could help to predict long-term survival and screen out high-risk individuals for more vigorous treatment. PMID:27008710

  11. Practical Value of Molecular Pathology in Stage I-III Lung Cancer: Implications for the Clinical Surgeon.

    PubMed

    Azzoli, Christopher G

    2015-10-01

    Over a decade since the discovery of EGFR mutation, and 6 years since prospective clinical trial data proved that routine molecular pathology tests improve survival in stage IV lung cancer, there is still debate whether to test patients with earlier stages of disease (stage I-III). As discoveries of targeted drugs for stage IV patients accelerate-prompting routine testing for ALK, ROS1, RET, BRAF V600E, and HER2, among others-there is an argument that all lung cancers should be genotyped for the purpose of classification, regardless of stage of disease. The counterargument is that because targeted drugs have only been validated for use in stage IV disease, these molecular tests need only be conducted at the time of disease recurrence. This review will describe current, practical applications of molecular pathology testing in early stage lung cancer, focusing on the immediate diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications for individual patient management. Meanwhile, large-scale clinical trials are underway to test targeted drugs as adjuvant therapies in patients with early stage disease. PMID:26215190

  12. Non-digestible fraction of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) modulates signalling pathway genes at an early stage of colon cancer in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Haydé, Vergara-Castañeda; Ramón, Guevara-González; Lorenzo, Guevara-Olvera; Dave, Oomah B; Rosalía, Reynoso-Camacho; Paul, Wiersma; Guadalupe, Loarca-Piña

    2012-08-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in Western countries, the second cause of cancer mortality in the USA and a major public health problem in Mexico. A diet rich in legumes is directly related to the prevention of colon cancer, showing an inverse relationship with the development of colorectal adenomas in human subjects. The present study shows the results of molecular changes involved in the Tp53 pathway at an early stage in the distal colon tissue of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon cancer in rats evaluated by PCR array after exposure to diets containing the non-digestible fraction (NDF) of cooked bean (cultivar Bayo Madero). Significant differences were detected in seventy-two genes of the Tp53-mediated signalling pathway involved in apoptosis, cell-cycle regulation and arrest, inhibition of proliferation and inflammation, and DNA repair. Tp53, Gadd45a, Cdkn1a and Bax were highly expressed (9·3-, 18·3-, 5·5- and 3·5-fold, respectively) in the NDF+AOM group, whereas Cdc25c, Ccne2, E2f1 and Bcl2 were significantly suppressed ( - 9·2-, - 2·6-, - 18·4- and - 3·5-fold, respectively), among other genes, compared with the AOM group, suggesting that chemoprevention of aberrant crypt foci results from a combination of cell-cycle arrest in G1/S and G2/M phases and cell death by apoptotic induction. We demonstrate that the NDF from common bean modulates gene expression profiles in the colon tissue of AOM-induced rats, contributing to the chemoprotective effect of common bean on early-stage colon cancer. PMID:22916810

  13. Intra-Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy Using Cisplatin With Radiotherapy for Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneyasu, Yuko Nagai, Nobutaka; Nagata, Yasushi; Hashimoto, Yasutoshi; Yuki, Shintaro; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kakizawa, Hideaki; Toyota, Naoyuki; Fujiwara, Hisaya; Kudo, Yoshiki; Ito, Katsuhide

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To examine the effectiveness of concomitant intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy (IAIC) using cisplatin (CDDP) with radiotherapy for Stage III squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 29 cases of Stage III squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix treated with radiotherapy and IAIC of CDDP from 1991 to 2006. External-beam therapy was given to the whole pelvis using four opposing parallel fields with an 18-MV linear accelerator unit. A central shield was used after 30-40 Gy with external whole-pelvic irradiation, and the total dose was 50 Gy. High-dose-rate brachytherapy was given with {sup 192}Ir microSelectron. The dose at Point A was 6 Gy per fraction, 2 fractions per week, and the total number of fractions was either 3 or 4. Two or three courses of IAIC were given concomitantly with CDDP 120 mg or carboplatin 300 mg. Results: We confirmed excellent medicine distribution directly by using computed tomographic angiography. The 5-year overall survival rate for Stage III patients was 62%, the cause-specific survival rate was 70%, and the local relapse-free survival rate was 89%. Local recurrence, distant metastasis, and occurrences of both were 7%, 38%, and 3%, respectively. The incidence of severe acute hematologic adverse reactions (Grade {>=}3) was 27% for all patients; however, all recovered without interruption of radiotherapy. Severe nonhematologic effects (Grade {>=}3) were 3%, including nausea and ileus. Only 1 patient's radiotherapy was interrupted for a period of 1 week because of ileus. Severe late complication rates (Grade {>=}3) for the bladder, rectum, and intestine were 3%, 3%, and 10%, respectively. Conclusion: A combination of IAIC and systemic chemotherapy should be considered to improve the prognosis of patients with Stage III squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix.

  14. Pegylated interferon alpha-2b as adjuvant treatment of Stage III malignant melanoma: an evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Okuyama, Sonia; Gonzalez, Rene; Lewis, Karl D

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Stage III melanoma, also referred to as regional metastatic melanoma, has five-year survival rates ranging between 40% and 78%. In order to reduce the likelihood of recurrence in this high-risk population, patients undergo resection of primary tumors and all involved nodal basins. Systemic therapy is being pursued in an effort to improve outcome data, but the best strategy has yet to be defined. Interferon alpha-2b remains to date the most promising approach available. Toxicities and intensive intravenous administration, unfortunately, are major concerns. An alternative is the use of interferon in its pegylated subcutaneous form. The aim of this research was to review the evidence for the use of pegylated interferon alpha-2b in Stage III malignant melanoma. Evidence review: ECOG 1684 was the pivotal trial that first demonstrated a statistically significant benefit in relapse-free and overall survival for adjuvant interferon alpha-2b in high-risk melanoma. Other larger studies, such as ECOG 1690, confirmed a relapse-free survival benefit but did not achieve statistical significance for overall survival. The first study of the pegylated form of interferon alpha-2b in Stage III melanoma, EORTC 18991, is reviewed here. This trial showed a statistically significant improvement in relapse-free survival but not overall survival. Encouraging data of potential equivalent efficacy, easier administration, and fewer Grade 3 and 4 adverse reactions compared with high-dose intravenous interferon raises the question of its potential role in Stage III melanoma in the adjuvant setting. PMID:21042541

  15. Epibatidine Blocks Eye-Specific Segregation in Ferret Dorsal Lateral Geniculate Nucleus during Stage III Retinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Zachary W.; Sun, Chao; Derieg, Brittany; Chapman, Barbara; Cheng, Hwai-Jong

    2015-01-01

    The segregation and maintenance of eye-specific inputs in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) during early postnatal development requires the patterned spontaneous activity of retinal waves. In contrast to the development of the mouse, ferret eye-specific segregation is not complete at the start of stage III glutamatergic retinal waves, and the remaining overlap is limited to the C/C1 lamina of the dLGN. To investigate the role of patterned spontaneous activity in this late segregation, we disrupted retinal waves pharmacologically for 5 day windows from postnatal day (P) 10 to P25. Multi-electrode array recordings of the retina in vitro reveal that the cholinergic agonist epibatidine disrupts correlated retinal activity during stage III waves. Epibatidine also prevents the segregation of eye-specific inputs in vivo during that period. Our results reveal a novel role for cholinergic influence on stage III retinal waves as an instructive signal for the continued segregation of eye-specific inputs in the ferret dLGN. PMID:25794280

  16. Epibatidine blocks eye-specific segregation in ferret dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus during stage III retinal waves.

    PubMed

    Davis, Zachary W; Sun, Chao; Derieg, Brittany; Chapman, Barbara; Cheng, Hwai-Jong

    2015-01-01

    The segregation and maintenance of eye-specific inputs in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) during early postnatal development requires the patterned spontaneous activity of retinal waves. In contrast to the development of the mouse, ferret eye-specific segregation is not complete at the start of stage III glutamatergic retinal waves, and the remaining overlap is limited to the C/C1 lamina of the dLGN. To investigate the role of patterned spontaneous activity in this late segregation, we disrupted retinal waves pharmacologically for 5 day windows from postnatal day (P) 10 to P25. Multi-electrode array recordings of the retina in vitro reveal that the cholinergic agonist epibatidine disrupts correlated retinal activity during stage III waves. Epibatidine also prevents the segregation of eye-specific inputs in vivo during that period. Our results reveal a novel role for cholinergic influence on stage III retinal waves as an instructive signal for the continued segregation of eye-specific inputs in the ferret dLGN. PMID:25794280

  17. Survival Benefits and Trends in Use of Adjuvant Therapy Among Elderly Stage II and III Rectal Cancer Patients in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Dobie, Sharon A.; Warren, Joan L.; Matthews, Barbara; Schwartz, David; Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Billingsley, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study examined elderly stage II and III rectal cancer patients’ adjuvant chemoradiation therapy adherence, trends in adherence over time, and the relation of levels of adherence to mortality. METHODS The authors studied 2886 stage II and III rectal cancer patients who had surgical resection and who appeared in 1992–1999 linked SEER-Medicare claims data. The authors compared measures of adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy receipt and completion between stage II and III patients. Adjusted risk of cancer-related 5-year mortality was calculated by multivariate logistic regression for different levels of chemoradiation adherence among stage II and III patients. RESULTS Of the 2886 patients, 45.4% received both adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy. Stage III patients were more likely to receive chemoradiation than stage II patients. The receipt of chemoradiation by stage II patients increased significantly from 1992 to 1999. Stage III patients were more likely to complete radiation therapy (96.6%), chemotherapy (68.2%), and both modalities (67.5%) than stage II patients (91.5%, 49.8%, 47.6%, respectively). Only a complete course of both radiation and chemotherapy for both stage II (relative risk [RR] 0.74; 95% CI, 0.54, 0.97) and III (RR 0.80; 95% CI, 0.65, 0.96) decreased the adjusted 5-year cancer mortality risk compared with counterparts with no adjuvant therapy. CONCLUSIONS Even though stage II rectal cancer patients were less likely than stage III patients to receive and complete adjuvant chemoradiation, both patient groups in the general population had lower cancer-related mortality if they completed chemoradiation. These patients deserve support and encouragement to complete treatment. PMID:18189291

  18. Serum protein profiling using an aptamer array predicts clinical outcomes of stage IIA colon cancer: A leave-one-out crossvalidation

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jung Wook; Kim, Sung Chun; Sohn, Insuk; Jung, Sin-Ho; Kim, Hee Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study, we established and validated a model for predicting prognosis of stage IIA colon cancer patients based on expression profiles of aptamers in serum. Methods Bloods samples were collected from 227 consecutive patients with pathologic T3N0M0 (stage IIA) colon cancer. We incubated 1,149 serum molecule-binding aptamer pools of clinical significance with serum from patients to obtain aptamers bound to serum molecules, which were then amplified and marked. Oligonucleotide arrays were constructed with the base sequences of the 1,149 aptamers, and the marked products identified above were reacted with one another to produce profiles of the aptamers bound to serum molecules. These profiles were organized into low- and high-risk groups of colon cancer patients based on clinical information for the serum samples. Cox proportional hazards model and leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) were used to evaluate predictive performance. Results During a median follow-up period of 5 years, 29 of the 227 patients (11.9%) experienced recurrence. There were 212 patients (93.4%) in the low-risk group and 15 patients (6.6%) in the high-risk group in our aptamer prognosis model. Postoperative recurrence significantly correlated with age and aptamer risk stratification (p = 0.046 and p = 0.001, respectively). In multivariate analysis, aptamer risk stratification (p < 0.001) was an independent predictor of recurrence. Disease-free survival curves calculated according to aptamer risk level predicted through a LOOCV procedure and age showed significant differences (p < 0.001 from permutations). Conclusion Aptamer risk stratification can be a valuable prognostic factor in stage II colon cancer patients. PMID:26908450

  19. Increased Circulating Th17 Cells after Transarterial Chemoembolization Correlate with Improved Survival in Stage III Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yuan; Wang, Bo; Huang, Zhi-Liang; Shi, Ming; Yu, Xing-Juan; Zheng, Limin; Li, Shengping; Li, Lian

    2013-01-01

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) has therapeutic effects in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but its impact on the cellular immune response during disease progression is largely unknown. Here we conducted a prospective study to evaluate the effect of TACE on immune status and to identify prognostic immune markers governing treatment success. In this study, 51 stage III HCC patients, 28 stage I HCC patients (TNM classification) and 20 healthy donors were enrolled. Flow cytometry and cytometric bead array were used to evaluate the circulating immune cell subsets, including CD4+ T cells (Th1, Th17 and Treg cells), CD8+ T cells, NK cells, and NKT cells, and plasma cytokines before TACE and 30 days after TACE. Interestingly, among those immune parameters, the frequency of circulating Th17 cells was higher in stage III HCC patients than in stage I HCC patients (P = 0.015) and healthy donors (P<0.001). Moreover, an increased frequency of circulating Th17 cells was observed 30 days after TACE (Th17D30) compared with the baseline level (P = 0.036). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that Th17D30 was positively associated with overall survival (OS; P = 0.007) and time to progression (TTP; P = 0.009). Multivariate Cox analysis revealed that Th17D30 was an independent prognostic factor for OS (HR = 0.317, P = 0.032) and TTP (HR = 0.304, P = 0.010). These results provide a potential prognostic marker for stage III HCC patients undergoing TACE and may be useful for identifying patients who can benefit from adjuvant immunotherapies. PMID:23565248

  20. Molecular staging of lymph node-negative colon carcinomas by one-step nucleic acid amplification (OSNA) results in upstaging of a quarter of patients in a prospective, European, multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    Croner, R S; Geppert, C-I; Bader, F G; Nitsche, U; Späth, C; Rosenberg, R; Zettl, A; Matias-Guiu, X; Tarragona, J; Güller, U; Stürzl, M; Zuber, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Current histopathological staging procedures in colon carcinomas depend on midline division of the lymph nodes with one section of haematoxylin & eosin (H&E) staining only. By this method, tumour deposits outside this transection line may be missed and could lead to understaging of a high-risk group of stage UICC II cases, which recurs in ∼20% of cases. A new diagnostic semiautomated system, one-step nucleic acid amplification (OSNA), detects cytokeratin (CK) 19 mRNA in lymph node metastases and enables the investigation of the whole lymph node. The objective of this study was to assess whether histopathological pN0 patients can be upstaged to stage UICC III by OSNA. Methods: Lymph nodes from patients who were classified as lymph node negative after standard histopathology (single (H&E) slice) were subjected to OSNA. A result revealing a CK19 mRNA copy number >250, which makes sure to detect mainly macrometastases and not isolated tumour cells (ITC) or micrometastases only, was regarded as positive for lymph node metastases based on previous threshold investigations. Results: In total, 1594 pN0 lymph nodes from 103 colon carcinomas (median number of lymph nodes per patient: 14, range: 1–46) were analysed with OSNA. Out of 103 pN0 patients, 26 had OSNA-positive lymph nodes, resulting in an upstaging rate of 25.2%. Among these were 6/37 (16.2%) stage UICC I and 20/66 (30.3%) stage UICC II patients. Overall, 38 lymph nodes were OSNA positive: 19 patients had one, 3 had two, 3 had three, and 1 patient had four OSNA-positive lymph nodes. Conclusions: OSNA resulted in an upstaging of over 25% of initially histopathologically lymph node-negative patients. OSNA is a standardised, observer-independent technique, allowing the analysis of the whole lymph node. Therefore, sampling bias due to missing investigation of certain lymph node tissue can be avoided, which may lead to a more accurate staging. PMID:24722182

  1. Phase I/II Study of Postoperative Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Advanced-Stage Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck (cSCCHN)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-17

    Recurrent Skin Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity

  2. Monte Carlo analysis of the Titan III/Transfer Orbit Stage guidance system for the Mars Observer mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Stephen C.; Ginsburg, Marc A.; Rao, Prabhakara P.

    1993-01-01

    An important part of space launch vehicle mission planning for a planetary mission is the integrated analysis of guidance and performance dispersions for both booster and upper stage vehicles. For the Mars Observer mission, an integrated trajectory analysis was used to maximize the scientific payload and to minimize injection errors by optimizing the energy management of both vehicles. This was accomplished by designing the Titan III booster vehicle to inject into a hyperbolic departure plane, and the Transfer Orbit Stage (TOS) to correct any booster dispersions. An integrated Monte Carlo analysis of the performance and guidance dispersions of both vehicles provided sensitivities, an evaluation of their guidance schemes and an injection error covariance matrix. The polynomial guidance schemes used for the Titan III variable flight azimuth computations and the TOS solid rocket motor ignition time and burn direction derivations accounted for a wide variation of launch times, performance dispersions, and target conditions. The Mars Observer spacecraft was launched on 25 September 1992 on the Titan III/TOS vehicle. The post flight analysis indicated that a near perfect park orbit injection was achieved, followed by a trans-Mars injection with less than 2sigma errors.

  3. Molecular Phenotyping in Predicting Response in Patients With Stage IB-III Esophageal Cancer Receiving Combination Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-18

    Stage IB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIC Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

  4. A Population-Based Comparative Effectiveness Study of Radiation Therapy Techniques in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Jeremy P.; Murphy, James D.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Loo, Billy W.; Diehn, Maximilian

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Concerns have been raised about the potential for worse treatment outcomes because of dosimetric inaccuracies related to tumor motion and increased toxicity caused by the spread of low-dose radiation to normal tissues in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We therefore performed a population-based comparative effectiveness analysis of IMRT, conventional 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional radiation therapy (2D-RT) in stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database to identify a cohort of patients diagnosed with stage III NSCLC from 2002 to 2009 treated with IMRT, 3D-CRT, or 2D-RT. Using Cox regression and propensity score matching, we compared survival and toxicities of these treatments. Results: The proportion of patients treated with IMRT increased from 2% in 2002 to 25% in 2009, and the use of 2D-RT decreased from 32% to 3%. In univariate analysis, IMRT was associated with improved overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio [HR] 0.90, P=.02) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) (HR 0.89, P=.02). After controlling for confounders, IMRT was associated with similar OS (HR 0.94, P=.23) and CSS (HR 0.94, P=.28) compared with 3D-CRT. Both techniques had superior OS compared with 2D-RT. IMRT was associated with similar toxicity risks on multivariate analysis compared with 3D-CRT. Propensity score matched model results were similar to those from adjusted models. Conclusions: In this population-based analysis, IMRT for stage III NSCLC was associated with similar OS and CSS and maintained similar toxicity risks compared with 3D-CRT.

  5. Efficacy of Adjuvant 5-Fluorouracil Therapy for Patients with EMAST-Positive Stage II/III Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hamaya, Yasushi; Guarinos, Carla; Tseng-Rogenski, Stephanie S.; Iwaizumi, Moriya; Das, Ritabrata; Jover, Rodrigo; Castells, Antoni; Llor, Xavier; Andreu, Montserrat; Carethers, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated Microsatellite Alterations at Selected Tetranucleotide repeats (EMAST) is a genetic signature found in up to 60% of colorectal cancers (CRCs) that is caused by somatic dysfunction of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein hMSH3. We have previously shown in vitro that recognition of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) within DNA and subsequent cytotoxicity was most effective when both hMutSα (hMSH2-hMSH6 heterodimer) and hMutSβ (hMSH2-hMSH3 heterodimer) MMR complexes were present, compared to hMutSα > hMutSβ alone. We tested if patients with EMAST CRCs (hMutSβ defective) had diminished response to adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy, paralleling in vitro findings. We analyzed 230 patients with stage II/III sporadic colorectal cancers for which we had 5-FU treatment and survival data. Archival DNA was analyzed for EMAST (>2 of 5 markers mutated among UT5037, D8S321, D9S242, D20S82, D20S85 tetranucleotide loci). Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated and multivariate analysis was used to determine contribution to risk. We identified 102 (44%) EMAST cancers. Ninety-four patients (41%) received adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy, and median follow-up for all patients was 51 months. Patients with EMAST CRCs demonstrated improved survival with adjuvant 5FU to the same extent as patients with non-EMAST CRCs (P<0.05). We observed no difference in survival between patients with stage II/III EMAST and non-EMAST cancers (P = 0.36). There is improved survival for stage II/III CRC patients after adjuvant 5-FU-based chemotherapy regardless of EMAST status. The loss of contribution of hMSH3 for 5-FU cytotoxicity may not adversely affect patient outcome, contrasting patients whose tumors completely lack DNA MMR function (MSI-H). PMID:25996601

  6. High expression of glycolytic and pigment proteins is associated with worse clinical outcome in stage III melanoma.

    PubMed

    Falkenius, Johan; Lundeberg, Joakim; Johansson, Hemming; Tuominen, Rainer; Frostvik-Stolt, Marianne; Hansson, Johan; Egyhazi Brage, Suzanne

    2013-12-01

    There are insufficient numbers of prognostic factors available for prediction of clinical outcome in patients with stage III malignant cutaneous melanoma, even when known adverse pathological risk factors, such as macrometastasis, number of lymph node metastases, and ulceration are taken into consideration. The aim of this study was therefore to identify additional prognostic factors to better predict patients with a high risk of relapse, thus enabling us to better determine the need for adjuvant treatment in stage III disease. An RNA oligonucleotide microarray study was performed on first regional lymph node metastases in 42 patients with stage III melanoma: 23 patients with short-term survival (≤ 13 months) and 19 with long-term survival (≥ 60 months), to identify genes associated with clinical outcome. Candidate genes were validated by real-time PCR and immunohistochemical analysis. Several gene ontology (GO) categories were highly significantly differentially expressed including glycolysis (GO: 0006096; P<0.001) and the pigment biosynthetic process (GO: 0046148; P<0.001), in which overexpression was associated with short-disease-specific survival. Three overexpressed glycolytic genes, GAPDHS, GAPDH, and PKM2, and two pigment-related genes, TYRP1 and OCA2, were selected for validation. A significant difference in GAPDHS protein expression between short- and long-term survivors (P=0.021) and a trend for PKM2 (P=0.093) was observed in univariate analysis. Positive expression of at least two of four proteins (GAPDHS, GAPDH, PKM2, TYRP1) in immunohistochemical analysis was found to be an independent adverse prognostic factor for disease-specific survival (P=0.011). Our results indicate that this prognostic panel in combination with established risk factors may contribute to an improved prediction of patients with a high risk of relapse. PMID:24128789

  7. β-III tubulin modulates the behavior of Snail overexpressed during the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sobierajska, Katarzyna; Wieczorek, Katarzyna; Ciszewski, Wojciech M; Sacewicz-Hofman, Izabela; Wawro, Marta E; Wiktorska, Magdalena; Boncela, Joanna; Papiewska-Pajak, Izabela; Kwasniak, Pawel; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S; Niewiarowska, Jolanta

    2016-09-01

    Class III β-tubulin (TUBB3) is a marker of drug resistance expressed in a variety of solid tumors. Originally, it was described as an important element of chemoresistance to taxanes. Recent studies have revealed that TUBB3 is also involved in an adaptive response to a microenvironmental stressor, e.g. low oxygen levels and poor nutrient supply in some solid tumors, independently of the microtubule targeting agent. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that TUBB3 is a marker of biological aggressiveness associated with modulation of metastatic abilities in colon cancer. The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a basic cellular process by which epithelial cells lose their epithelial behavior and become invasive cells involved in cancer metastasis. Snail is a zinc-finger transcription factor which is able to induce EMT through the repression of E-cadherin expression. In the presented studies we focused on the analysis of the TUBB3 role in EMT-induced colon adenocarcinoma cell lines HT-29 and LS180. We observed a positive correlation between Snail presence and TUBB3 upregulation in tested adenocarcinoma cell lines. The cellular and behavioral analysis revealed for the first time that elevated TUBB3 level is functionally linked to increased cell migration and invasive capability of EMT induced cells. Additionally, the post-transcriptional modifications (phosphorylation, glycosylation) appear to regulate the cellular localization of TUBB3 and its phosphorylation, observed in cytoskeleton, is probably involved in cell motility modulation. PMID:27188792

  8. Clinical significance of HOTAIR expression in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhi-Fen; Zhao, Dan; Li, Xi-Qing; Cui, Yong-Xia; Ma, Ning; Lu, Chuang-Xin; Liu, Ming-Yue; Zhou, Yun

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To detect the expression of the long noncoding RNA HOTAIR in colon cancer and analyze its relationship with clinicopathological parameters of colon cancer. METHODS: Total RNA was extracted from 80 colon cancer tissues and matched tumor-adjacent normal colon tissues and reverse transcribed. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the expression of HOTAIR. The relationship between the expression of HOTAIR and clinicopathological parameters of colon cancer was analyzed. RESULTS: The expression of HOTAIR was significantly higher in colon cancer tissues than in matched tumor-adjacent normal colon tissues (P < 0.05). HOTAIR expression was significantly higher in cases with lymph node metastasis than in those without metastasis; in lowly differentiated and undifferentiated cases than in highly and moderately differentiated cases; and in stages III + IV cases than in stages I + II cases (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: HOTAIR expression is upregulated in colon cancer, suggesting that HOTAIR plays an important role in the tumorigenesis, development and metastasis of colon cancer. HOTAIR may act as an oncogene and represents a new molecular target for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:27298568

  9. ESCRT-III drives the final stages of CUPS maturation for unconventional protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Curwin, Amy J; Brouwers, Nathalie; Alonso Y Adell, Manuel; Teis, David; Turacchio, Gabriele; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; Ronchi, Paolo; Malhotra, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    The unconventional secretory pathway exports proteins that bypass the endoplasmic reticulum. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, conditions that trigger Acb1 secretion via this pathway generate a Grh1 containing compartment composed of vesicles and tubules surrounded by a cup-shaped membrane and collectively called CUPS. Here we report a quantitative assay for Acb1 secretion that reveals requirements for ESCRT-I, -II, and -III but, surprisingly, without the involvement of the Vps4 AAA-ATPase. The major ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 localizes transiently to CUPS and this was accelerated in vps4Δ cells, correlating with increased Acb1 secretion. Microscopic analysis suggests that, instead of forming intraluminal vesicles with the help of Vps4, ESCRT-III/Snf7 promotes direct engulfment of preexisting Grh1 containing vesicles and tubules into a saccule to generate a mature Acb1 containing compartment. This novel multivesicular / multilamellar compartment, we suggest represents the stable secretory form of CUPS that is competent for the release of Acb1 to cells exterior. PMID:27115345

  10. ESCRT-III drives the final stages of CUPS maturation for unconventional protein secretion

    PubMed Central

    Curwin, Amy J; Brouwers, Nathalie; Alonso Y Adell, Manuel; Teis, David; Turacchio, Gabriele; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; Ronchi, Paolo; Malhotra, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    The unconventional secretory pathway exports proteins that bypass the endoplasmic reticulum. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, conditions that trigger Acb1 secretion via this pathway generate a Grh1 containing compartment composed of vesicles and tubules surrounded by a cup-shaped membrane and collectively called CUPS. Here we report a quantitative assay for Acb1 secretion that reveals requirements for ESCRT-I, -II, and -III but, surprisingly, without the involvement of the Vps4 AAA-ATPase. The major ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 localizes transiently to CUPS and this was accelerated in vps4Δ cells, correlating with increased Acb1 secretion. Microscopic analysis suggests that, instead of forming intraluminal vesicles with the help of Vps4, ESCRT-III/Snf7 promotes direct engulfment of preexisting Grh1 containing vesicles and tubules into a saccule to generate a mature Acb1 containing compartment. This novel multivesicular / multilamellar compartment, we suggest represents the stable secretory form of CUPS that is competent for the release of Acb1 to cells exterior. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16299.001 PMID:27115345

  11. Vaccine Therapy and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Breast or Stage II-IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  12. Clinical-pathologic study of stage IIB, III, and IVA carcinoma of the cervix: extended diagnostic evaluation for paraaortic node metastasis--a Gynecologic Oncology Group study.

    PubMed

    Heller, P B; Maletano, J H; Bundy, B N; Barnhill, D R; Okagaki, T

    1990-09-01

    Three hundred twenty patients were entered into GOG Protocol 63, a clinical-pathologic study of stage IIB, III, and IVA cervical carcinoma. Following the completion of FIGO staging prerequisites, patients had computerized tomography (CT), a lymph-angiogram (LAG), and an ultrasound (US) of the aortic area. If any study was positive, a cytologic or histologic evaluation by fine-needle aspiration or selective paraaortic lymphadenectomy was performed. Paraaortic node dissection was mandated for patients with negative extended staging studies. Results of extended staging evaluations were compared with histologic or cytologic results. Two hundred sixty-four patients were eligible and evaluable. One hundred sixty-seven patients (63%) were stage IIB, 89 (34%) were stage III, and 8 (3%) were stage IVA. Positive paraaortic nodes occurred in 21% of stage IIB, 31% of stage III, and 13% of stage IVA. LAG sensitivity was 79% with a specificity of 73%. Sensitivity of CT and US was 34 and 19%, respectively, with specificities of 96 and 99%, respectively. The frequency of false-negative results with LAG for patients with stage IIB disease was 6%. This decrease is consistent with a stable sensitivity and specificity. These findings suggest that a negative LAG may be adequate to eliminate surgical staging in subgroups with low risk of metastasis to the aortic nodes. Until new noninvasive testing methods are developed, LAG appears to be the most reliable noninvasive examination to evaluate spread of cervical cancer to aortic nodes. PMID:2227556

  13. Epoetin alfa improves survival after chemoradiation for Stage III esophageal cancer: Final results of a prospective observational study

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk . E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Tribius, Silke; Yekebas, Emre F.; Bahrehmand, Roia; Wildfang, Ingeborg; Kilic, Ergin; Muellerleile, Ulrich; Gross, Eberhard; Schild, Steven E.; Alberti, Winfried

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: This prospective, nonrandomized study evaluates the effectiveness of epoetin alfa to maintain the hemoglobin levels at 12 to14 g/dL (optimal range for tumor oxygenation) during chemoradiation for Stage III esophageal cancer and its impact on overall survival (OS), metastatic-free survival (MFS), and locoregional control (LC). Methods and Materials: Ninety-six patients were included. Forty-two patients received epoetin alfa (150 IU/kg, 3 times a week) during radiotherapy, which was started at hemoglobin less than 13 g/dL and stopped at 14 g/dL or higher. Hemoglobin levels were measured weekly during RT. Results: Both groups were balanced for age, sex, performance status, tumor length/location, histology, grading, T-stage/N-stage, chemotherapy, treatment schedule, and hemoglobin before RT. Median change of hemoglobin was +0.3 g/dL/wk with epoetin alfa and -0.5 g/dL/wk without epoetin alfa. At least 60% of hemoglobin levels were 12 to 14 g/dL in 64% and 17% of the patients, respectively (p < 0.001). Patients who received epoetin alfa had better OS (32% vs. 8% at 2 years, p = 0.009) and LC (67% vs. 15% at 2 years, p = 0.001). MFS was not significantly different (42% vs. 18% at 2 years, p = 0.09). Conclusions: The findings suggest that epoetin alfa when used to maintain the hemoglobin levels at 12 to 14 g/dL can improve OS and LC of Stage III esophageal cancer patients.

  14. High Expression of the DNA Methyltransferase Gene Characterizes Human Neoplastic Cells and Progression Stages of Colon Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Deiry, Wafik S.; Nelkin, Barry D.; Celano, Paul; Chiu Yen, Ray-Whay; Falco, Joseph P.; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Baylin, Stephen B.

    1991-04-01

    DNA methylation abnormalities occur consistently in human neoplasia including widespread hypomethylation and more recently recognized local increases in DNA methylation that hold potential for gene inactivation events. To study this imbalance further, we have cloned and localized to chromosome 19 a portion of the human DNA methyltransferase gene that codes for the enzyme catalyzing DNA methylation. Expression of this gene is low in normal human cells, significantly increased (30- to 50-fold by PCR analysis) in virally transformed cells, and strikingly elevated in human cancer cells (several hundredfold). In comparison to colon mucosa from patients without neoplasia, median levels of DNA methyltransferase transcripts are 15-fold increased in histologically normal mucosa from patients with cancers or the benign polyps that can precede cancers, 60-fold increased in the premalignant polyps, and >200-fold increased in the cancers. Thus, increases in DNA methyltransferase gene expression precede development of colonic neoplasia and continue during progression of colonic neoplasms. These increases may play a role in the genetic instability of cancer and mark early events in cell transformation.

  15. [A case of stage IV colon cancer effectively treated with tegafur uracil/calcium folinate in a patient on hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ken; Kobayashi, Michiya; Maeda, Hiromichi; Takeshita, Atsunori

    2012-07-01

    A 61-year-old man on hemodialysis due to chronic renal failure caused by diabetes mellitus was diagnosed as having ascending colon cancer with multiple liver metastases. Colonoscopy revealed a Type 2 tumor located in the ascending colon. Abdominal CT showed hepatic tumors in S8 measuring 8×7 cm and in S6 measuring 5×4 cm, with a number of small tumors in the other sites. In order to prevent a hemorrhage from the colonic tumor, laparoscope-assisted right colectomy was performed. Seventeen days after the operation, oral administration of tegafur uracil(300mg/body/day)and calcium folinate(75mg/body/day)was initiated for the treatment of hepatic metastases. After three courses of treatment, size reduction of the hepatic metastases(the S8 4×3. 5 cm and the S6 2. 5×2. 5 cm)was obtained. Although nine months with seven courses of chemotherapy had passed without significant side effects, the size of hepatic metastases increased. Currently, therefore, CPT-11 and cetuximab are being administered as second-line treatment. PMID:22790059

  16. Tracheo-parenchymal fistula following concurrent chemo-radiation for stage III NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Alzghoul, Bashar; Meena, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Non-Small Cell Cancer (NSCLC) are frequently diagnosed at a later stage [1]. Treatment involves chemotherapy and radiation, either sequentially or concurrently [2]. Concurrent therapy is more efficacious but also associated with more complications [4-6]. We present a rare care of trachea-pulmonary fistula formation after concurrent chemo and radiation in a patient with Squamous Cell Cancer (SCC). PMID:27144112

  17. Effect of oncological treatment on serum adipocytokine levels in patients with stage II–III breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    COSKUN, TEOMAN; KOSOVA, FUNDA; ARI, ZEKI; SAKARYA, ASLAN; KAYA, YAVUZ

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived hormones (adipocytokines), such as adiponectin, leptin, resistin and visfatin, and the pancreatic hormone insulin, have been suggested to play a role in carcinogenesis. we therefore hypothesized that the oncological treatment of breast cancer may alter the serum levels of these adipocytokines and insulin. In this study, we aimed to compare the serum levels of adipocytokines and insulin between the pre- and post-treatment period in patients with breast cancer. In this prospective study, 20 consecutive patients with stage II and III breast cancer underwent breast-conserving surgery or total mastectomy and/or axillary dissection. The patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy, if necessary. Blood samples were obtained during the preoperative period and postoperatively after completion of the adjuvant therapy. There was no statistically significant difference between the pre- and post-treatment levels of visfatin, adiponectin and leptin. However, the serum insulin and resistin levels and insulin resistance were found to be statistically significantly increased following treatment (P<0.05). Post-treatment resistin levels were positively correlated with insulin resistance (r=0.45, P<0.05). Therefore, oncological treatment of stage II and III breast cancer did not affect visfatin, adiponectin and leptin levels, but statistically significantly increased resistin levels and insulin resistance. In addition, the post-treatment resistin levels were positively correlated with insulin resistance, suggesting that resistin may be involved in the development of insulin resistance in breast cancer patients following treatment. PMID:27123303

  18. Dosimetric evaluation of a simple planning method for improving intensity-modulated radiotherapy for stage III lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jia-Yang; Lin, Zhu; Zheng, Jing; Lin, Pei-Xian; Cheung, Michael Lok-Man; Huang, Bao-Tian

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the dosimetric outcomes of a base-dose-plan-compensation (BDPC) planning method for improving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for stage III lung cancer. For each of the thirteen included patients, three types of planning methods were applied to obtain clinically acceptable plans: (1) the conventional optimization method (CO); (2) a split-target optimization method (STO), in which the optimization objectives were set higher dose for the target with lung density; (3) the BDPC method, which compensated for the optimization-convergence error by further optimization based on the CO plan. The CO, STO and BDPC methods were then compared regarding conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) of the target, organs at risk (OARs) sparing and monitor units (MUs). The BDPC method provided better HI/CI by 54%/7% on average compared to the CO method and by 38%/3% compared to the STO method. The BDPC method also spared most of the OARs by up to 9%. The average MUs of the CO, STO and BDPC plans were 890, 937 and 1023, respectively. Our results indicated that the BDPC method can effectively improve the dose distribution in IMRT for stage III lung cancer, at the expense of more MUs. PMID:27009235

  19. ColoFinder: a prognostic 9-gene signature improves prognosis for 871 stage II and III colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mingguang; He, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogeneous disease with a high mortality rate and is still lacking an effective treatment. Our goal is to develop a robust prognosis model for predicting the prognosis in CRC patients. In this study, 871 stage II and III CRC samples were collected from six gene expression profilings. ColoFinder was developed using a 9-gene signature based Random Survival Forest (RSF) prognosis model. The 9-gene signature recurrence score was derived with a 5-fold cross validation to test the association with relapse-free survival, and the value of AUC was gained with 0.87 in GSE39582(95% CI [0.83-0.91]). The low-risk group had a significantly better relapse-free survival (HR, 14.8; 95% CI [8.17-26.8]; P < 0.001) than the high-risk group. We also found that the 9-gene signature recurrence score contributed more information about recurrence than standard clinical and pathological variables in univariate and multivariate Cox analyses when applied to GSE17536(p = 0.03 and p = 0.01 respectively). Furthermore, ColoFinder improved the predictive ability and better stratified the risk subgroups when applied to CRC gene expression datasets GSE14333, GSE17537, GSE12945and GSE24551. In summary, ColoFinder significantly improves the risk assessment in stage II and III CRC patients. The 9-gene prognostic classifier informs patient prognosis and treatment response. PMID:26989635

  20. Dosimetric evaluation of a simple planning method for improving intensity-modulated radiotherapy for stage III lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jia-Yang; Lin, Zhu; Zheng, Jing; Lin, Pei-Xian; Cheung, Michael Lok-Man; Huang, Bao-Tian

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the dosimetric outcomes of a base-dose-plan-compensation (BDPC) planning method for improving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for stage III lung cancer. For each of the thirteen included patients, three types of planning methods were applied to obtain clinically acceptable plans: (1) the conventional optimization method (CO); (2) a split-target optimization method (STO), in which the optimization objectives were set higher dose for the target with lung density; (3) the BDPC method, which compensated for the optimization-convergence error by further optimization based on the CO plan. The CO, STO and BDPC methods were then compared regarding conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) of the target, organs at risk (OARs) sparing and monitor units (MUs). The BDPC method provided better HI/CI by 54%/7% on average compared to the CO method and by 38%/3% compared to the STO method. The BDPC method also spared most of the OARs by up to 9%. The average MUs of the CO, STO and BDPC plans were 890, 937 and 1023, respectively. Our results indicated that the BDPC method can effectively improve the dose distribution in IMRT for stage III lung cancer, at the expense of more MUs. PMID:27009235

  1. Improved five year survival after combined radiotherapy-chemotherapy for Stage I-II non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Monfardini, S.; Banfi, A.; Bonadonna, G.; Rilke, F.; Milani, F.; Valagussa, P.; Lattuada, A.

    1980-02-01

    In order to improve the prognosis of patients with localized non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) who are treated with radiotherapy (RT), a prospective controlled study utilizing a combined modality approach was carried out in patients with pathologic Stage I-II NHL. After treatment with regional RT, patients in complete remission were randomized to receive either no further therapy or 6 cycles of cyclophosphamide, vincristine and prednisolone (CVP). At 5 years from completion of irradiation, the relapse-free survival was 46.3% after RT and 72.1% after RT plus CVP (P=0.005). The corresponding findings for the overall survival calculated from the beginning of irradiation were 55.8 and 82.8% respectively (P=0.03). The favorable effects of adjuvant chemotherapy on relapse-free survival were statistically significant only in the subgroup with diffuse histology. In patients who relapsed after RT alone, the salvage therapy failed to induce a high incidence of second durable remission. Adjuvant chemotherapy is indicated to improve the curve rate in pathologic stage I-II NHL with diffuse histology when regional RT is utilized.

  2. ColoFinder: a prognostic 9-gene signature improves prognosis for 871 stage II and III colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogeneous disease with a high mortality rate and is still lacking an effective treatment. Our goal is to develop a robust prognosis model for predicting the prognosis in CRC patients. In this study, 871 stage II and III CRC samples were collected from six gene expression profilings. ColoFinder was developed using a 9-gene signature based Random Survival Forest (RSF) prognosis model. The 9-gene signature recurrence score was derived with a 5-fold cross validation to test the association with relapse-free survival, and the value of AUC was gained with 0.87 in GSE39582(95% CI [0.83–0.91]). The low-risk group had a significantly better relapse-free survival (HR, 14.8; 95% CI [8.17–26.8]; P < 0.001) than the high-risk group. We also found that the 9-gene signature recurrence score contributed more information about recurrence than standard clinical and pathological variables in univariate and multivariate Cox analyses when applied to GSE17536(p = 0.03 and p = 0.01 respectively). Furthermore, ColoFinder improved the predictive ability and better stratified the risk subgroups when applied to CRC gene expression datasets GSE14333, GSE17537, GSE12945and GSE24551. In summary, ColoFinder significantly improves the risk assessment in stage II and III CRC patients. The 9-gene prognostic classifier informs patient prognosis and treatment response. PMID:26989635

  3. Comparison of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Rectal Cancer Who Are Receiving Radiation Therapy and Fluorouracil Before or After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-26

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  4. Pros: concurrent chemo-radiotherapy remains the ideal treatment in fit patients with large volume unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rabatic, Bryan M.

    2016-01-01

    The debate of treating stage III, large volume non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with definitive chemo-radiotherapy continues to be waged. A physically fit patient, having large volume and unresectable disease is the ideal candidate for this treatment approach. The ability of this patient population to successfully complete, and thereby benefit from an aggressive, combined treatment to improve local control and survival, drives the recommendation of treating oncologists for this approach. Until a phase III trial proves otherwise, concurrent chemo-radiotherapy will remain the ideal treatment for fit patients having large volume unresectable stage III NSCLC. PMID:27186513

  5. Xenogeneic cell-based vaccine therapy for stage III melanoma: safety, immune-mediated responses and survival benefits.

    PubMed

    Seledtsova, Galina V; Shishkov, Alexey A; Kaschenko, Erika A; Goncharov, Andrey G; Gazatova, Natalya D; Seledtsov, Victor I

    2016-04-01

    New therapies for melanoma have yielded promising results, but their application is limited because of serious side-effects and only moderate impact on patient survival. Vaccine therapies may offer some hope by targeting tumor-specific responses, considering the immunogenic nature of melanomas. To investigate the safety profile and efficiency of a xenogeneic cell-based vaccine therapy in stage III melanoma patients and evaluate the survival rate in treated patients. Twenty-seven stage III melanoma patients were immunized with a lyophilized xenogeneic polyantigenic vaccine (XPV) prepared from murine melanoma B16 and carcinoma LLC cells. Neither grade III/IV toxicities, nor clinically significant changes in blood and biochemical parameters were noted after an induction course of 10 XPV subcutaneous immunizations. No laboratory or clinical signs of systemic autoimmunity were documented. Following 10 vaccinations, a relative increase in the numbers of circulating memory CD4+CD45RO+ T cells (but not CD8+ CD45RO+ T cells) was observed. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from XPV-treated patients demonstrated increased proliferative responses to human BRO melanoma-associated antigens and marked increases in serum levels of IFN-γ and IL-8. Serum levels of TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-6 were not affected. The overall five-year survival rate in the treated patients was significantly higher than that in 27 control patients with matched clinical and prognostic characteristics (55% vs 18%). XPV-based immunotherapy could be maximally effective when started as early as possible before or after surgical excision of the primary tumor and local metastases, i.e. when tumor-mediated suppressive effects on immunity are minimal. PMID:27026566

  6. Gamma-Secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-03

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  7. Investigation of X24C-2 10-Stage Axial-Flow Compressor. III - Surge Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckner, Howard A., Jr.; Downing, Richard M.

    1948-01-01

    Compressor operation at low air flows for a given speed is limited by unstable flow conditions, commonly called surge. An investigation of surge in centrifugal compressors (reference 1) showed that the pulsation of pressures and velocities occurred when the slope of the compressor characteristic curve was positive and that the magnitude and frequency, as well as the incidence of surge, depended on the capacity and resistance of the total system. Although the theory presented in reference 1 is applicable to axial-floe compressors, little experimental information is available on the surge characteristics of the individual stages of axial-flow compressors, or on the variation of the surge characteristics with operating conditions. During the investigation to determine the performance of the X24C-2 compressor (references 2 and 3), instrumentation was added to study the surge characteristics and to determine the effect of speed and inlet pressure on the frequency, amplitude, and phase relation of the pressure pulsations behind each stage.

  8. Intravenous Chemotherapy or Oral Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage III-IV HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage IV AIDS-related Lymphoma

  9. Factors Affecting the Risk of Brain Metastasis in Small Cell Lung Cancer With Surgery: Is Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Necessary for Stage I-III Disease?

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Linlin; Wang, Q.I.; Zhao Lujun; Yuan Zhiyong; Li Ruijian; Wang Ping

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with surgical resection has not been fully identified. This study undertook to assess the factors affecting the risk of brain metastases in patients with stage I-III SCLC after surgical resection. The implications of PCI treatment for these patients are discussed. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-six patients treated with surgical resection for stage I-III SCLC from January 1998-December 2009 were retrospectively analyzed to elucidate the risk factors of brain metastases. Log-rank test and Cox regression model were used to determine the risk factors of brain metastases. Results: The median survival time for this patient population was 34 months, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 34.9%. For the whole group, 23.0% (29/126) of the patients had evidence of metastases to brain. Pathologic stage not only correlated with overall survival but also significantly affected the risk of brain metastases. The 5-year survival rates for patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 54.8%, 35.6%, and 14.1%, respectively (P=.001). The frequency of brain metastases in patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 6.25% (2/32), 28.2% (11/39), and 29.1% (16/55) (P=.026), respectively. A significant difference in brain metastases between patients with complete resection and incomplete resection was also observed (20.5% vs 42.9%, P=.028). The frequency of brain metastases was not found to be correlated with age, sex, pathologic type, induction chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, or adjuvant radiation therapy. Conclusions: Stage I SCLC patients with complete resection had a low incidence of brain metastases and a favorable survival rate. Stage II-III disease had a higher incidence of brain metastases. Thus, PCI might have a role for stage II-III disease but not for stage I disease.

  10. Management of localized seminoma, stage I-II: SIU/ICUD Consensus Meeting on Germ Cell Tumors (GCT), Shanghai 2009.

    PubMed

    Warde, P; Huddart, R; Bolton, D; Heidenreich, A; Gilligan, T; Fossa, S

    2011-10-01

    The treatment of patients with Stage I-II seminoma has changed considerably in the past decade, and in November 2009, an International Consensus meeting was held under the sponsorship of the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), Société Internationale d'Urologie (SIU), and International Consultation on Urological Diseases (ICUD) to review recent updates in the published data and develop international consensus guidelines on the treatment of this group of patients. In Stage I disease, the consensus conference recommended that patients should be informed of all treatment options, including the potential benefits and side effects of each treatment. It was agreed that this discussion should include a review of the possible salvage treatment effects. In addition, in patients willing and able to adhere to a surveillance program, this should be considered the management option of choice (assuming facilities are available for suitable monitoring). For Stage IIA disease, the consensus conference recommended that radiotherapy should be considered the standard treatment in the absence of contraindications. For Stage IIB disease, chemotherapy or radiotherapy were considered reasonable treatment approaches, and for Stage IIC disease, chemotherapy should be considered the standard treatment approach. For patients with a residual mass after chemotherapy, the consensus conference noted that patients with masses <3 cm in diameter could likely be safely observed, and patients with residual masses >3 cm in diameter could be considered for immediate surgery or close observation. It was also noted that surgery in this setting is technically challenging and could be associated with greater morbidity than in patients with nonseminomatous tumors. PMID:21986223

  11. Vitronectin and dermcidin serum levels predict the metastatic progression of AJCC I-II early-stage melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Martínez, Idoia; Gardeazabal, Jesús; Erramuzpe, Asier; Sanchez-Diez, Ana; Cortés, Jesús; García-Vázquez, María D; Pérez-Yarza, Gorka; Izu, Rosa; Luís Díaz-Ramón, Jose; de la Fuente, Ildefonso M; Asumendi, Aintzane; Boyano, María D

    2016-10-01

    Like many cancers, an early diagnosis of melanoma is fundamental to ensure a good prognosis, although an important proportion of stage I-II patients may still develop metastasis during follow-up. The aim of this work was to discover serum biomarkers in patients diagnosed with primary melanoma that identify those at a high risk of developing metastasis during the follow-up period. Proteomic and mass spectrophotometry analysis was performed on serum obtained from patients who developed metastasis during the first years after surgery for primary tumors and compared with that from patients who remained disease-free for more than 10 years after surgery. Five proteins were selected for validation as prognostic factors in 348 melanoma patients and 100 controls by ELISA: serum amyloid A and clusterin; immune system proteins; the cell adhesion molecules plakoglobin and vitronectin and the antimicrobial protein dermcidin. Compared to healthy controls, melanoma patients have high serum levels of these proteins at the moment of melanoma diagnosis, although the specific values were not related to the histopathological stage of the tumors. However, an analysis based on classification together with multivariate statistics showed that tumor stage, vitronectin and dermcidin levels were associated with the metastatic progression of patients with early-stage melanoma. Although melanoma patients have increased serum dermcidin levels, the REPTree classifier showed that levels of dermcidin <2.98 μg/ml predict metastasis in AJCC stage II patients. These data suggest that vitronectin and dermcidin are potent biomarkers of prognosis, which may help to improve the personalized medical care of melanoma patients and their survival. PMID:27216146

  12. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-07

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  13. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, Leucovorin Calcium, and Oxaliplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-24

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  14. Interactive Gentle Yoga in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-03

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Fatigue; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  15. Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-01

    Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  16. Circulating Tumor DNA in Predicting Outcomes in Patients With Stage IV Head and Neck Cancer or Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-11

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  17. Phase III study of cisplatin with pemtrexed or vinorelbine plus concurrent late course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian; Wang, Zhongtang; Huang, Wei; Wang, Qiang; Yu, Shuzeng; Zhou, Tao; Han, Dan; Wu, Zhenying; Gong, Heyi; Sun, Hongfu; Zhang, Jian; Wei, Yumei; Li, Hongsheng; Zhang, Zicheng; Lin, Haiqun; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cisplatin with pemtrexed or vinorelbine and concurrent late course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy (LCAHRT). Patients with unresectable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were randomly assigned to two regimens. The experimental (PP) arm included cisplatin, pemtrexed and concurrent LCAHRT based on bilateral lung V20 = 33%. The control (NP) arm used cisplatin, vinorelbine with the same radiotherapy protocol. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Median survival times were 26.0 months (95% CI 23.2 to 28.7 months) and 28.5 months (95% CI 17.1 to 39.9 months) for the NP and PP arms, respectively (P = 0.26). Median progression-free survival was 12.5 months and 17.5 months in the NP and PP arms (P = 0.07). In both arms of the study, there were no differences in overall survival between patients with squamous and nonsquamous NSCLC. The incidences of grade 3 or 4 toxicity were higher in NP than PP arm. With concurrent LCAHRT, pemetrexed/cisplatin was equally as efficacious as vinorelbine/cisplatin, but showed a more favorable toxicity profile. PMID:26761213

  18. Clinical Outcomes and Risks of Single-stage Bilateral Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty via Oxford Phase III

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Tong; Tu, Yi-Hui; Xue, Hua-Ming; Wen, Tao; Cai, Min-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis often affects the joint bilaterally, and the single-stage (SS) unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) is advantageous in terms of a single anesthesia administration, a short hospital stay, lower medical costs, and enhanced patient convenience. However, the complication risk of SS UKA continues to be debated. The aim of this article was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness, complications, and functional recovery of SS and two-stage (TS) UKA. Methods: From January 2008 to December 2013, we compared a series of 36 SS UKA with 45 TS UKA for osteoarthritis. The mean age was 65.4 years (range: 55–75 years). The mean body mass index was 25.2 kg/m2 (range: 22–29 kg/m2). The pre- and post-operative Oxford Knee Scores (OKSs), complications, operative times, tourniquet times, the amount of drainage, and hemoglobin (Hb) were evaluated. The Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and paired and grouped t-tests were used in this study. Results: The mean follow-up was 50 months. No complications of death, fat embolism, deep vein thrombosis, and prosthetic infection were reported. Patients who underwent SS UKA had a shorter cumulative anesthesia time (113.5 vs. 133.0 min, P < 0.01). There were no significant variations between the values of the mean tourniquet time, the amount of drainage, pre- and post-operative Hb in the different groups. No patient required a blood transfusion. No statistical differences were found in the complications between two groups (P > 0.05). At the final follow-up, the mean OKS improved from 39.48 ± 5.69 to 18.83 ± 3.82 (P < 0.01), with no statistical differences between the two groups (P > 0.05). Patients who underwent SS UKA had a faster recovery. Conclusions: The single-staged UKA offers the benefits of a single anesthesia administration, reduced total anesthetic time, decreased overall rehabilitation time, and absence of an increase in perioperative mortality or complications compared with the TS bilateral UKA

  19. Supporting patient centered computing through an undergraduate nursing informatics curriculum stage III.

    PubMed Central

    Travis, L. L.; Youngblut, J.

    1993-01-01

    The patient has been one of the focal points of the process followed to design, implement, and evaluate an integrated informatics curriculum in a baccalaureate nursing program. This paper describes the third stage of a process to design the informatics nursing courses. A challenge is to structure the nursing informatics curriculum so as to enhance the patient care process. A number of strategies were used to focus the curriculum, students, and faculty around the patient. The basic components of the framework are information, technology, and clinical care process. The clinical care process which emphasizes the patient is an inherent part of the conceptual framework in all aspects of the curriculum. Therefore the faculty has ensured a blend of information, technology, and the clinical care process throughout the curriculum. PMID:8130578

  20. Role of Postmastectomy Radiation After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fowble, Barbara L.; Einck, John P.; Kim, Danny N.; McCloskey, Susan; Mayadev, Jyoti; Yashar, Catheryn; Chen, Steven L.; Hwang, E. Shelley

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To identify a cohort of women treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy for whom postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) may be omitted according to the projected risk of local-regional failure (LRF). Methods and Materials: Seven breast cancer physicians from University of California cancer centers created 14 hypothetical clinical case scenarios, identified, reviewed, and abstracted the available literature (MEDLINE and Cochrane databases), and formulated evidence tables with endpoints of LRF, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Using the American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria methodology, appropriateness ratings for postmastectomy radiation were assigned for each scenario. Finally, an overall summary risk assessment table was developed. Results: Of 24 sources identified, 23 were retrospective studies from single institutions. Consensus on the appropriateness rating, defined as 80% agreement in a category, was achieved for 86% of the cases. Distinct LRF risk categories emerged. Clinical stage II (T1-2N0-1) patients, aged >40 years, estrogen receptor-positive subtype, with pathologic complete response or 0-3 positive nodes without lymphovascular invasion or extracapsular extension, were identified as having {<=}10% risk of LRF without radiation. Limited data support stage IIIA patients with pathologic complete response as being low risk. Conclusions: In the absence of randomized trial results, existing data can be used to guide the use of PMRT in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy setting. Using available studies to inform appropriateness ratings for clinical scenarios, we found a high concordance of treatment recommendations for PMRT and were able to identify a cohort of women with a low risk of LRF without radiation. These low-risk patients will form the basis for future planned studies within University of California Athena Breast Health Network.

  1. Monolithic in-based III-V compound semiconductor focal plane array cell with single stage CCD output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Krabach, Timothy N. (Inventor); Staller, Craig O. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A monolithic semiconductor imager includes an indium-based III-V compound semiconductor monolithic active layer of a first conductivity type, an array of plural focal plane cells on the active layer, each of the focal plane cells including a photogate over a top surface of the active layer, a readout circuit dedicated to the focal plane cell including plural transistors formed monolithically with the monolithic active layer and a single-stage charge coupled device formed monolithically with the active layer between the photogate and the readout circuit for transferring photo-generated charge accumulated beneath the photogate during an integration period to the readout circuit. The photogate includes thin epitaxial semiconductor layer of a second conductivity type overlying the active layer and an aperture electrode overlying a peripheral portion of the thin epitaxial semiconductor layer, the aperture electrode being connectable to a photogate bias voltage.

  2. Monolithic in-based III-V compound semiconductor focal plane array cell with single stage CCD output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Krabach, Timothy N. (Inventor); Staller, Craig O. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A monolithic semiconductor imager includes an indium-based III-V compound semiconductor monolithic active layer of a first conductivity type, an array of plural focal plane cells on the active layer, each of the focal plane cells including a photogate over a top surface of the active layer, a readout circuit dedicated to the focal plane cell including plural transistors formed monolithically with the monolithic active layer and a single-stage charge coupled device formed monolithically with the active layer between the photogate and the readout circuit for transferring photo-generated charge accumulated beneath the photogate during an integration period to the readout circuit. The photogate includes thin epitaxial semiconductor layer of a second conductivity type overlying the active layer and an aperture electrode overlying a peripheral portion of the thin epitaxial semiconductor layer, the aperture electrode being connectable to a photogate bias voltage.

  3. Inhibitory effect of phytoglycoprotein on tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and interleukin-6 at initiation stage of colon cancer in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-treated ICR mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sei-Jung; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2007-12-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the chemopreventive potentials of plant originated glycoprotein (UDN glycoprotein, 116 kDa) isolated from the stems of Ulmus davidiana Nakai (UDN) on aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-treated ICR mice. UDN glycoprotein was administered to mice at 0.01% and 0.02% levels for 5 weeks. The mice were treated with 20 mg/kg DMH twice a week for 2 weeks in presence of UDN glycoprotein and killed at week 6. We found that UDN glycoprotein has inhibitory effects on the frequency of colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF), activation of colonic proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and release of plasma lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in DMH-treated mice. In addition, UDN glycoprotein has anti-oxidative effects on the formation of plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and the production of plasma inducible nitric oxide (NO) in DMH-treated mouse. Also, 0.02% UDN glycoprotein suppressed the DNA binding activities of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) and activator protein-1 (AP-1), accompanying the inhibitions of its subunits (p50, p65, c-Jun, and c-Fos), pro-inflammatory proteins [inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)], and pro-inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} and interleukin (IL)-6] on DMH-stimulated ACF formation. On the basis of these results, we assume that UDN glycoprotein may be useful for colon cancer prevention at initiation stage.

  4. Randomized trial of chemotherapy versus chemotherapy plus radiotherapy for stage III-IV A & B Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Pavlovsky, S; Santarelli, M T; Muriel, F S; Fernández, I; Garcia, I; Schwartz, L; Montero, C; Sanahuja, F L; Magnasco, H; Costa, A

    1992-07-01

    A total of 151 patients with previously untreated Hodgkin's disease, clinical stages III-IV A & B, were randomized to receive CVPP for 6 cycles, or CVPP plus RT 3000 cGy to previously involved areas between the 3rd and 4th cycles. CVPP consists of cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2/i.v., vinblastine 6 mg/m2/i.v. on day 1, procarbazine 100 mg/m2/p.o. and prednisone 40 mg/m2/p.o. on days 1 to 14. Both groups displayed similar clinical characteristics at diagnosis. Sixty-six were treated with CVPP + RT (52 St III and 14 St IV) and 85 with CVPP alone (68 St III and 17 St IV). Complete remission was obtained in 57 (86%) of 66 patients who received CVPP plus RT, and in 62 (73%) of 85 patients treated with CVPP. Five and sixteen patients, respectively, achieved partial responses, while 2 in each group died during treatment. At 7 years, duration of complete remission and failure-free survival were: 51% and 45% for those treated with CVPP plus RT, and 23% and 21% with CVPP alone (p = 0.0150 and P = 0.0016, respectively). Overall survival at 7 years was 71% and 58%, respectively (p = 0.1488). A dose analysis performed in 84 pts showed that 91% and 88% received full protocol doses of CPM and PCZ, respectively, in the CVPP + RT group, and 95% and 94% for CVPP. The WBC nadir was 3.5 and 3.7 x mm3, respectively. Of 25 pts on CVPP + RT who relapsed, 9 are now disease-free, 5 are alive with disease and 11 have died, and with CVPP, of 37 relapsing pts, 18 are disease-free, 5 are alive with disease and 14 are dead.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1498073

  5. Stage III Melanoma in the Axilla: Patterns of Regional Recurrence After Surgery With and Without Adjuvant Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkham, Mark B.; Foote, Matthew C.; Burmeister, Elizabeth; Thomas, Janine; Meakin, Janelle; Smithers, B. Mark; Burmeister, Bryan H.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To describe the anatomic distribution of regionally recurrent disease in patients with stage III melanoma in the axilla after curative-intent surgery with and without adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A single-institution, retrospective analysis of a prospective database of 277 patients undergoing curative-intent treatment for stage III melanoma in the axilla between 1992 and 2012 was completed. For patients who received radiation therapy and those who did not, patterns of regional recurrence were analyzed, and univariate analyses were performed to assess for potential factors associated with location of recurrence. Results: There were 121 patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy because their clinicopathologic features conferred a greater risk of regional recurrence. There were 156 patients who received no radiation therapy. The overall axillary control rate was 87%. There were 37 patients with regional recurrence; 17 patients had received adjuvant radiation therapy (14%), and 20 patients (13%) had not. The likelihood of in-field nodal recurrence was significantly less in the adjuvant radiation therapy group (P=.01) and significantly greater in sites adjacent to the axilla (P=.02). Patients with high-risk clinicopathologic features who did not receive adjuvant radiation therapy also tended to experience in-field failure rather than adjacent-field failure. Conclusions: Patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy were more likely to experience recurrence in the adjacent-field regions rather than in the in-field regions. This may not simply reflect higher-risk pathology. Using this data, it may be possible to improve outcomes by reducing the number of adjacent-field recurrences after adjuvant radiation therapy.

  6. Effects of selenomethionine on acute toxicities from concurrent chemoradiation for inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mix, Michael; Ramnath, Nithya; Gomez, Jorge; de Groot, Charles; Rajan, Saju; Dibaj, Shiva; Tan, Wei; Rustum, Youcef; Jameson, Michael B; Singh, Anurag K

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively determine the safety and tolerability of oral L-selenomethionine (SLM) with concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) for Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and estimate if the incidence and/or severity of adverse events could be reduced by its use. METHODS: Sixteen patients with stage III NSCLC were accrued to this single arm, phase II study. CCRT consisted of radiation given at 2 Gy per fraction for 30-33 fractions, 5 d per week with concurrent weekly IV paclitaxel 50 mg/m2 followed by carboplatin dosed at an area under the time-concentration curve of 2. SLM was dosed in a loading phase at 4800 μg twice daily for one week prior to CCRT followed by once daily dosing during treatment. RESULTS: No selenium-related toxicity was observed. Analysis revealed grade 3 or higher esophagitis in 3 of 16 patients (19%), pneumonitis in 0, leukopenia in 2 (12.5%), and anemia in 1 (6%); the latter two were significantly reduced when compared to the protocol-stated expected rate of 35% (P = 0.045 for leukopenia, and P < 0.01 for anemia). Median overall survival was 14.9 mo and median failure-free survival was 9 mo (95%CI: 3.3-21.5). CONCLUSION: There may be some protective benefit of selenium in the setting of CCRT for inoperable NSCLC. The data suggests decreased rates of myelosuppression when compared to similarly-treated historical and contemporary controls. Further evaluation of selenium in this setting may be warranted. PMID:26468452

  7. Colonic Polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colonic polyps grow in the large intestine, or colon. Most polyps are not dangerous. However, some polyps ... member with polyps Have a family history of colon cancer Most colon polyps do not cause symptoms. ...

  8. Does Patient Rurality Predict Quality Colon Cancer Care? A Population Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Christopher J.; Al-Refaie, Waddah B.; Abraham, Anasooya; Markin, Abraham; Zhong, Wei; Rothenberger, David A; Kwaan, Mary R; Habermann, Elizabeth B

    2014-01-01

    Background Over fifty million people reside in rural America. However, the impact of patient rurality on colon cancer care has been incompletely characterized, despite its known impact on screening. Objective Our study sought to examine the impact of patient rurality on quality and comprehensive colon cancer care. Design Using the 1996–2008 California Cancer Registry, we constructed a retrospective cohort of 123,129 patients with stage 0–IV colon cancer. Rural residence was established based on the patient’s medical service study area designated by the registry. Patients All patients diagnosed between 1996–2008 with tumors located in the colon were eligible for inclusion in this study. Main Outcome Measures Baseline characteristics were compared by rurality status. Multivariate regression models then were used to examine the impact of rurality on stage in the entire cohort, adequate lymphadenectomy in stage I–III disease and receipt of chemotherapy for stage III disease. Proportional hazards regression was used to examine the impact of rurality on cancer specific survival. Results Of all patients diagnosed with colon cancer, 18,735 (15%) resided in rural areas. Our multivariate models demonstrate that rurality was associated with later stage of diagnosis, inadequate lymphadenectomy in stage I–III disease and lower likelihood of receiving chemotherapy for stage III disease. In addition, rurality was associated with worse cancer specific survival. Limitations We could not account for socioeconomic status directly, though we used insurance status as one surrogate. Furthermore, we did not have access to treatment location or distance traveled. We also could not account for provider or hospital case volume, patient comorbidities nor complications. Conclusions A significant portion of patients treated for colon cancer live in rural areas. Yet, rural residence is associated with modest differences in stage, adherence to quality measures and survival. Future

  9. [Photodynamic therapy in combined treatment of stage III non-small cell lung carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Akopov, A L; Rusanov, A A; Molodtsova, V P; Chistiakov, I V; Kazakov, N V; Urtenova, M A; Rait, Makhmud; Papaian, G V

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of combined treatment of locally advanced lung cancer with the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgery with the use of pre- and intraoperative photodynamic therapy. 20 patients with IIIa (n=7) and IIIb (n=13) stage of non-small cell lung carcinoma were included. At the time of diagnosis the surgical treatment was decided to abstain because of the trachea invasion in 9 patients, wide mediastinal invasion in 2 patients and contralateral mediastinal lymph nodes metastases in 2 patients; pneumonectomy was not possible due to the poor respiratory function in 7 patients. Neoadjuvant therapy included 3 courses of chemotherapy and endobronchial photodynamic therapy. During the operation, along with the lung resection (pneumonectomy - 15, lobectomy - 5), photodynamic therapy of the resection margins were carried out. No adjuvant treatment was done. Preoperative treatment led to partial regress of the disease in all cases; the goal of surgery was the complete tumor removal. No complications of the photodynamic therapy were observed. 18 surgical interventions were radical and two non-complete microscopically (R1). Postoperative morbidity was 20%, one patient died due to massive gastrointestinal bleeding. The average follow-up period was 18 months: 19 patients were alive, of them 18 with no signs of the disease recurrence. The first experience of the combined use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgery with pre- and intraoperative photodynamic therapy demonstrates safety and efficacy of the suggested treatment tactics. PMID:23612332

  10. Trastuzumab Emtansine in Treating Older Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-31

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer