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Sample records for stainless steel aluminum

  1. METHOD FOR JOINING ALUMINUM TO STAINLESS STEEL

    DOEpatents

    Lemon, L.C.

    1960-05-24

    Aluminum may be joined to stainless steel without the use of flux by tinning the aluminum with a tin solder containing 1% silver and 1% lead, tinning the stainless steel with a 50% lead 50% tin solder, and then sweating the tinned surfaces together.

  2. Electroless nickel plating on stainless steels and aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Procedures for applying an adherent electroless nickel plating on 303 SE, 304, and 17-7 PH stainless steels, and 7075 aluminum alloy was developed. When heat treated, the electroless nickel plating provides a hard surface coating on a high strength, corrosion resistant substrate.

  3. Dissolution of Stainless Steel by Molten Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J.C.

    2001-07-11

    The purpose of this task was to investigate on a laboratory-scale the interactions of molten aluminum with stainless steel under hypothetical severe reactor accident conditions. This experimental effort provided data necessary to assess the susceptibility of the reactor vessel to breaching (general through-wall failure of vessel) in accident scenarios where contact of molten aluminum and stainless steel may occur. This report summarizes the results of the extensive experimental program.

  4. Low cycle fatigue behavior of aluminum/stainless steel composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhagat, R. B.

    1983-01-01

    Composites consisting of an aluminum matrix reinforced with various volume fractions of stainless steel wire were fabricated by hot die pressing under various conditions of temperature, time, and pressure. The composites were tested in plane bending to complete fracture under cycle loading, and the results were analyzed on a computer to obtain a statistically valid mathematical relationship between the low-cycle fatigue life and the fiber volume fraction of the composite. The fractured surfaces of the composites were examined by scanning electron microscopy to identify the characteristic features of fatigue damage. Fatigue damage mechanisms are proposed and discussed.

  5. Aluminum nanocomposites having wear resistance better than stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    An, Linan; Qu, Jun; Luo, Jinsong; Fan, Yi; Zhang, Ligong; Liu, Jinling; Xu, Chengying; Blau, Peter Julian

    2011-01-01

    Tribological behavior of alumina-particle-reinforced aluminum composites made by powder metallurgy process has been investigated. The nanocomposite containing 15 vol% of Al2O3 nanoparticles exhibits excellent wear resistance by showing significantly low wear rate and abrasive wear mode. The wear rate of the nanocomposite is even lower than stainless steel. We have also demonstrated that such excellent wear resistance only occurred in the composite reinforced with the high volume fraction of nanosized reinforcing particles. The results were discussed in terms of the microstructure of the nanocomposite.

  6. Photon stimulated desorption from aluminum and stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.S. )

    1991-05-01

    Photon stimulated desorption of neutral species (PSD) is the major dynamic gas load in electron synchrotron light source. In the National Synchrotron Light Source, (NSLS) PSD presented initial machine commissioning difficulty. Sensitivity to surface contamination on PSD has been experienced during an incident of Fomblin Oil contamination.{sup 1} U10B-photon stimulated desorption experimental station is constructed to investigate: 1---the degree of the contribution to the photon stimulated desorption (PSD) from primary photon flux and scattered secondary photon flux, 2---the underlying mechanism for photon stimulated desorption, 3---criteria to chose the proper beam tube material for future accelerators such as SXLS, FEL, superconducting super collider (SSC), ALS... . In this report, only photon stimulated desorption of neutral species (PSD) from stainless steel and aluminum is reported.

  7. Photon stimulated desorption from aluminum and stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.S.

    1990-01-01

    Photon Stimulated Desorption of neutral species (PSD) is the major dynamic gas load in electron synchrotron light source. In the National Synchrotron Light Source, (NSLS) PSD presented initial machine commissioning difficulty. Sensitivity to surface contamination on PSD has been experienced during an incident of Fomblin Oil contamination. U1OB-Photon Stimulated Desorption Experimental Station is constructed to investigate: (1) the degree of the contribution to the photon stimulated desorption (PSD) from primary photon flux and scattered secondary photon flux, (2) the underlying mechanism for photon stimulated desorption, (3) criteria to choose the proper beam tube material for future accelerators such as SXLS, FEL, SSC, ALS... In this report, only photon stimulated desorption of neutral species (PSD) from stainless steel and aluminum is reported. 7 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Ultrasonic butt welding of aluminum, aluminum alloy and stainless steel plate specimens.

    PubMed

    Tsujino, Jiromaru; Hidai, Kazuaki; Hasegawa, Atsushi; Kanai, Ryoichi; Matsuura, Hisanori; Matsushima, Kaoru; Ueoka, Tetsugi

    2002-05-01

    Welding characteristics of aluminum, aluminum alloy and stainless steel plate specimens of 6.0 mm thickness by a 15 kHz ultrasonic butt welding system were studied. There are no detailed welding condition data of these specimens although the joining of these materials are required due to anticorrosive and high strength characteristics for not only large specimens but small electronic parts especially. These specimens of 6.0 mm thickness were welded end to end using a 15 kHz ultrasonic butt welding equipment with a vibration source using eight bolt-clamped Langevin type PZT transducers and a 50 kW static induction thyristor power amplifier. The stainless steel plate specimens electrolytically polished were joined with welding strength almost equal to the material strength under rather large vibration amplitude of 25 microm (peak-to-zero value), static pressure 70 MPa and welding time of 1.0-3.0 s. The hardness of stainless steel specimen adjacent to a welding surface increased about 20% by ultrasonic vibration. PMID:12159968

  9. Aerosol measurements from plasma torch cuts on stainless steel, carbon steel, and aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, V.J.; Brodrick, C.J.; Crawford, S.; Nasiatka, J.; Pierucci, K.; Reyes, V.; Sambrook, J.; Wrobel, S.; Yeary, J.

    1996-01-01

    The main purpose of this project is to quantify aerosol particle size and generation rates produced by a plasma torch whencutting stainless steel, carbon steel and aluminum. the plasma torch is a common cutting tool used in the dismantling of nuclear facilities. Eventually, other cutting tools will be characterized and the information will be compiled in a user guide to aid in theplanning of both D&D and other cutting operations. The data will be taken from controlled laboratory experiments on uncontaminated metals and field samples taken during D&D operations at ANL nuclear facilities. The plasma torch data was collected from laboratory cutting tests conducted inside of a closed, filtered chamber. The particle size distributions were determined by isokinetically sampling the exhaust duct using a cascade impactor. Cuts on different thicknesses showed there was no observable dependence of the aerosol quantity produced as a function of material thickness for carbon steel. However, data for both stainless steel and aluminum revealed that the aerosol mass produced for these materials appear to have some dependance on thickness, with thinner materials producing tmore aerosols. The results of the laboratory cutting tests show that most measured particle size distributions are bimodal with one mode at about 0.2 {mu}m and the other at about 10 {mu}m. The average Mass Median Aerodynamic Diameters (MMAD`s) for these tests are 0.36 {+-}0.08 {mu}m for stainless steel, 0.48 {+-}0.17{mu}m for aluminum and 0.52{+-}0.12 {mu}m for carbon steel.

  10. Prospects of increasing the strength of aluminum by reinforcing it with stainless steel wire (a review)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botvina, L. R.; Ivanova, V. S.; Kopev, I. M.

    1982-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental strength of aluminum reinforced with stainless steel wire is analyzed. Various methods of producing the composite material and it's static and cyclical strengths are considered. The reinforcement of aluminum with stainless steel wire was accomplished from the perspective of increasing the specific strength of aluminum and it's alloys, increasing the strength of the material with respect to high and low temperatures, as well as increasing the cyclical strength. The production of the composite aluminum-stainless steel wire material with approximated or calculated strengthening is possible by any of the considered methods. The selection of the proper production technology depends on precise details and conditions of application of the material.

  11. Dissolution of a 316L stainless steel vessel by a pool of molten aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Tutu, N.K.; Finfrock, C.C.; Lara, J.D.; Schwarz, C.E.; Greene, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    Two experiments to study the dissolution of a torospherical stainless steel vessel by an isothermal pool of molten aluminum have been performed. The test vessels consisted of 24 inch diameter 316L stainless steel ``ASME Flanged and Dished Heads.`` The nominal values of the average melt temperatures for the two tests were: 977{degree}C and 1007{degree}C. The measurements of the dissolution depth as a function of the position along the vessel surface showed the dissolution to be spatially highly non-uniform. Large variations in the dissolution depth with respect to the azimuthal coordinate were also observed. The maximum value of the measured time averaged dissolution rate was found to be 5.05 mm/hr, and this occurred near the edge of the molten pool. The concentration measurements indicated that the molten pool was highly stratified with respect to the concentration of stainless steel in the melt (molten aluminum-stainless steel solution).

  12. Mechanical impact tests of materials in oxygen effects of contamination. [Teflon, stainless steel, and aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ordin, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of contaminants on the mechanical impact sensitivity of Teflon, stainless steel, and aluminum in a high-pressure oxygen environment was investigated. Uncontaminated Teflon did not ignite under the test conditions. The liquid contaminants - cutting oil, motor lubricating oil, and toolmaker dye - caused Teflon to ignite. Raising the temperature lowered the impact energy required for ignition. Stainless steel was insensitive to ignition under the test conditions with the contaminants used. Aluminum appeared to react without contaminants under certain test conditions; however, contamination with cutting oil, motor lubricating oil, and toolmakers dye increased the sensitivity of aluminum to mechanical impact. The grit contaminants silicon dioxide and copper powder did not conclusively affect the sensitivity of aluminum.

  13. Materials data handbooks prepared for aluminum alloys 2014, 2219, and 5456, and stainless steel alloy 301

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Materials data handbooks summarize all presently known properties of commercially available structural aluminum alloys 2014, 2219, and 5456 and structural stainless steel alloy 301. The information includes physical and mechanical property data and design data presented in tables, illustrations, and text.

  14. Optical properties of ion beam textured metals. [using copper, silicon, aluminum, titanium and stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.; Weigand, A. J.; Mirtich, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    Copper, silicon, aluminum, titanium and 316 stainless steel were textured by 1000 eV xenon ions from an 8 cm diameter electron bombardment ion source. Simultaneously sputter-deposited tantalum was used to facilitate the development of the surface microstructure. Scanning electron microscopy of the ion textured surfaces revealed two types of microstructure. Copper, silicon, and aluminum developed a cone structure with an average peak-to-peak distance ranging from 1 micron for silicon to 6 microns for aluminum. Titanium and 316 stainless steel developed a serpentine ridge structure. The average peak-to-peak distance for both of these materials was 0.5 micron. Spectral reflectance was measured using an integrating sphere and a holraum reflectometer. Total reflectance for air mass 0 and 2, solar absorptance and total emittance normalized for a 425 K black body were calculated from the reflectance measurements.

  15. Explosion bonding: aluminum-magnesium alloys bonded to austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    The explosion bonding of 5000 series aluminum alloys to 300 series stainless steel alloys is summarized. The process technique involves a parallel gap arrangement with copper or aluminum bonding aids. Successful bonds have been achieved using either a single shot process for joining the trilayer clad or a sequential shot technique for each metal component. Bond success is monitored through a combined metallographic and tensile strength evaluation. Tensile properties are shown to be strongly dependent upon process parameters and the amount of intermetallic formation at the aluminum bond interface. Empirical data has been compared with experimental and destructive test results to determine the optimum procedures.

  16. Mechanical and microstructural behavior of brazed aluminum / stainless steel mixed joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, V.; Weis, S.; Wagner, G.

    2016-03-01

    There is a requirement to combine different materials such as aluminum and stainless steel in industrial applications like automotive heat exchangers. Brazing offers the possibility to reduce the joining temperature in comparison to welding due to the lower liquidus temperature of the fillers. In the present work, the mechanical and microstructural behavior of aluminum / stainless steel mixed joints is investigated. The specimens are produced by induction brazing using an AlSi10filler and a non-corrosive flux. To evaluate the mechanical properties of the joints, tensile tests at elevated temperatures are carried out. Additionally, long-term thermal exposure experiments are done in order to investigate the changes in the microstructure.

  17. The attack of stainless steel by molten aluminum in a solar concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, J.; Pohlman, S.L.

    1981-10-01

    Compatibility of ASI Type 316 stainless steel with molten aluminum was studied to determine probable lifetimes of unprotected steel components exposed to the liquid aluminum used for heat transfer and storage in a point focus solar receiver. Steel samples immersed in molten aluminum showed rapid growth of hemispherical pits accompanied by an exponential increase in weight loss. Using this model, rate constants for the dissolution process were determined at 705, 760, 816, 871, and 927/sup 0/C and an activation energy of 17.5 kcal/mole was calculated. An expression for the rate constant was developed enabling use of the pitting model to predict failure time envelopes for the steel receiver components at a given temperature. Maximum lifetimes of the steam coil and wall were predicted to be 94 and 172 hr at 705/sup 0/C, respectively. Mean predicted lifetimes and lifetimes predicted at higher temperatures were shorter. The empirical model accurately predicted actual lifetimes of field and laboratory tested components. Since failure of the steam coil could lead to a receiver wall failure and cause uncontrolled and possibly violent release of molten aluminum, a recommendation that the receiver be operated only at temperatures well below the melting point of aluminum was made.

  18. Characterization of Electron Beam Free-Form Fabricated 2219 Aluminum and 316 Stainless Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekrami, Yasamin; Forth, Scott C.; Waid, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have developed an additive manufacturing technology for ground and future space based applications. The electron beam free form fabrication (EBF3) is a rapid metal fabrication process that utilizes an electron beam gun in a vacuum environment to replicate a CAD drawing of a part. The electron beam gun creates a molten pool on a metal substrate, and translates with respect to the substrate to deposit metal in designated regions through a layer additive process. Prior to demonstration and certification of a final EBF3 part for space flight, it is imperative to conduct a series of materials validation and verification tests on the ground in order to evaluate mechanical and microstructural properties of the EBF3 manufactured parts. Part geometries of EBF3 2219 aluminum and 316 stainless steel specimens were metallographically inspected, and tested for strength, fatigue crack growth, and fracture toughness. Upon comparing the results to conventionally welded material, 2219 aluminum in the as fabricated condition demonstrated a 30% and 16% decrease in fracture toughness and ductility, respectively. The strength properties of the 316 stainless steel material in the as deposited condition were comparable to annealed stainless steel alloys. Future fatigue crack growth tests will integrate various stress ranges and maximum to minimum stress ratios needed to fully characterize EBF3 manufactured specimens.

  19. Thermal distortion tests of aluminum and stainless steel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Bielick, E.; Fornek, T.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.

    1993-06-25

    An important upgrade to the STAR detector at the Brookhaven National Laboratory RHIC accelerator will be an electromagnetic calorimeter. One design being considered for this calorimeter involves cast lead modules covering {Delta}{phi} = 6{degree} and 0 {le} {vert_bar}{eta}{vert_bar} {le} 1. These modules would consist of alternating layers of lead and sheets of plastic scintillator. The gaps for scintillator between the layers of lead would be created by parallel aluminum plates of thickness {approx_equal}6.6 mm = 0.260in. in the mold for the modules. These plates would need to be machined or ground to be reasonably flat, perhaps to {plus_minus}0.003in., and of uniform thickness from plate to plate. These requirements are imposed by the need to remove the plates from the casting after cooling, and to have good uniformity of the lead layer thickness, which gives good performance for the modules as a calorimeter. Aluminum was chosen for the plates because of its high coefficient of thermal expansion. An important cost in this calorimeter design is associated with the machining or grinding of the plates to proper thickness and flatness. In most cost estimates, it has been assumed that the mold parts could be used many times. This note describes a simple test which was conducted to investigate possible distortions in the plates after repeated heating to temperatures at which the lead would be poured into the mold and cooling.

  20. Study on stainless steel electrode based on dynamic aluminum liquid corrosion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hua; Yang, Ruifeng

    2009-01-01

    Scanning electrion microscope (SEM) was performed for investigations on the corrosion mechanism of stainless steel electrode in dynamic melting aluminum liquid. Microstructures and composition analysis was made by electron probe analysis (EPA) combined with metallic phase analysis. It can be concluded that the corrosion process is mainly composed of physical corrosion (flowing and scouring corrosion) and chemical corrosion (forming FeAl and Fe2Al5) and the two mechanisms usually exist simultaneously. The corrosion interface thickness is about 10 μm, which is different to usual interface width of hundreds μm in the static melting Al with iron matrix. PMID:25084422

  1. Thermal conductance of pressed aluminum and stainless steel contacts at liquid helium temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.; Scherkenbach, F. E.; Spivak, A. L.

    1988-01-01

    The thermal conductance of aluminum and stainless steel 304 sample pairs with surface finishes ranging from 0.1 to 1.6 microns rms roughness was investigated over a temperature range from 1.6 to 6.0 K. The thermal conductance follows a simple power law function of temperature, with the exponent ranging from 0.5 to 2.25, increases asymptotically with increasing applied force, and exhibits an anomaly for surface finishes in the 0.4 micron region.

  2. Thermal conductance of pressed aluminum and stainless steel contacts at liquid helium temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.; Scherkenbach, F. E.; Spivak, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal conductance of aluminum and stainless steel 304 sample pairs with surface finishes ranging from 0.1 to 1.6 microns rms roughness was investigated over a temperature range from 1.6 to 6.0 k. The thermal conductance follows a simple power law function of temperature, with the exponent ranging from 0.5 to 2.25, increases asymptotically with increasing applied force, and exhibits an anomaly for surface finishes in the 0.4 micron region.

  3. Ablation dominated implosion dynamics of aluminum and stainless steel nested cylindrical wire arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, K. M.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Ouart, N. D.; Yilmaz, F. M.; Shrestha, I. K.; Shlyaptseva, V.; McBride, R. D.; Chalenski, D. A.; Douglass, J. D.; Greenly, J. B.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.

    2009-01-15

    The results of experiments with combined aluminum (Al) and stainless steel (SS) alloy 304, nested wire arrays from the 1 MA COBRA generator at Cornell University are presented. The loads studied consisted of a 6 mm diameter inner array and a 13 mm diameter outer array with a different material in each array: SS or aluminum. Al implodes before SS in all loads studied, even when Al was on the inner array. The new wire ablation dynamic model and spectroscopic modeling are used to interpret these data. The observed implosion dynamics are likely a result of the higher ablation rate of Al. These initial results suggest that combining wire materials with different ablation rates in wire array loads could be developed into a useful technique for x-ray pulse shaping and radiation yield optimization.

  4. Correlation of outgassing of stainless steel and aluminum with various surface treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Dylla; D. M. Manos; P. H. LaMarche

    1993-09-01

    A number of important applications of ultrahigh vacuum technology involve the use of vacuum systems which cannot be baked in situ, e.g., materials processing equipment and various designs of accelerators and fusion devices. A choice of vessel material and surface treatment which minimizes outgassing in unbaked systems has obvious advantages. We report on a systematic comparison of outgassing measurements from type 304 stainless steels and type 6061/63 aluminum alloys after various standard and advanced surface treatments. Correlations were made with high-resolution secondary ion mass spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy profiles of the passivation oxide layer and profilometry measurements of the surface roughness. The observed outgassing rates Q obeyed a power law Q=Q{sub 0}t{sup -n} where n varied from 0.94 to 1.27. Over the standard observation period (50 h), the outgassing was dominated ([lte(approx)] 85%) by H{sub 2}O. The absolute outgassing rates varied by only a factor of 2.8 for the stainless steels and by a factor of 1.4 for the aluminum alloys, even though the surface roughness differed by more than two orders of magnitude. The high-value-added surface treatments (i.e., electropolishing) did not have significantly lower outgassing in comparison to simple detergent washes.

  5. Characterization of Thermal Sprayed Aluminum and Stainless Steel Coatings for Clean Laser Enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R; Decker, T A; Gansert, R V; Gansert, D

    2000-04-06

    Surfaces of steel structures that enclose high-fluence, large-beam lasers have conventional and unconventional requirements. Aside from rust prevention, the surfaces must resist laser-induced degradation and the contamination of the optical components. The latter requires a surface that can be precision cleaned to low levels of particulate and organic residue. In addition, the surface treatment for the walls should be economical to apply because of the large surface areas involved, and accommodating with intricate joint geometries. Thermal sprayed coatings of aluminum (Al) and stainless steel are candidate surface materials. Coatings are produced and characterized for porosity, smoothness, and hardness. These properties have a bearing on the cleanliness of the coating. The laser resistance of Al and 3 16L coatings are given. The paper summarizes the characterization of twin-wire-arc deposited Al, high-velocity-oxygen-fueled (HVOF) deposited Al, flame-sprayed 316L, and HVOF deposited316L. The most promising candidate coating is that of HVOF Al. This Al coating has the lowest porosity (8%) compared the other three coatings and relatively low hardness (100 VHN). The as-deposited roughness (Ra) is 433 pinches, but after a quick sanding by hand, the roughness decreased to 166 pinches. Other post-coat treatments are discussed. HVOF aluminum coatings are demonstrated. Al coatings are corrosion barriers for steel, and this work shows promising resistance to laser damage and low particulation rates.

  6. Mechanical and tribological properties of crystalline aluminum nitride coatings deposited on stainless steel by magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, R. K.; Mishra, S. C.; Mishra, P.; Limaye, P. K.; Singh, K.

    2015-11-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) coating is a potential candidate for addressing the problems of MHD pressure drop, tritium permeation and liquid metal corrosion of the test blanket module of fusion reactor. In this work, AlN coatings were grown on stainless steel by magnetron sputtering. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction measurement revealed that formation of mixed phase (wurtzite and rock salt) AlN was favored at low discharge power and substrate negative biasing. However, at sufficiently high discharge power and substrate bias, (100) oriented wurtzite AlN was obtained. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy showed presence of oxygen in the coatings. The highest value of hardness and Young's modulus were 14.1 GPa and 215 GPa, respectively. Scratch test showed adhesive failure at a load of about 20 N. Wear test showed improved wear resistance of the coatings obtained at higher substrate bias.

  7. Correlation of outgassing of stainless steel and aluminum with various surface treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F. ); Manos, D.M. ); LaMarche, P.H. )

    1993-09-01

    A number of important applications of ultrahigh vacuum technology involve the use of vacuum systems which cannot be baked [ital in] [ital situ], e.g., materials processing equipment and various designs of accelerators and fusion devices. A choice of vessel material and surface treatment which minimizes outgassing in unbaked systems has obvious advantages. We report on a systematic comparison of outgassing measurements from type 304 stainless steels and type 6061/63 aluminum alloys after various standard and advanced surface treatments. Correlations were made with high-resolution secondary ion mass spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy profiles of the passivation oxide layer and profilometry measurements of the surface roughness. The observed outgassing rates [ital Q] obeyed a power law [ital Q]=[ital Q][sub 0][ital t][sup [minus][ital n

  8. Mitigating Localized Corrosion Using Thermally Sprayed Aluminum (TSA) Coatings on Welded 25% Cr Superduplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Lu, Q.; Harvey, M. D. F.

    2015-04-01

    Thermally sprayed aluminum (TSA) coating has been increasingly used for the protection of carbon steel offshore structures, topside equipment, and flowlines/pipelines exposed to both marine atmospheres and seawater immersion conditions. In this paper, the effectiveness of TSA coatings in preventing localized corrosion, such as pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr superduplex stainless steel (SDSS) in subsea applications, has been investigated. Welded 25% Cr SDSS (coated and uncoated) with and without defects, and surfaces coated with epoxy paint were also examined. Pitting and crevice corrosion tests, on welded 25% Cr SDSS specimens with and without TSA/epoxy coatings, were conducted in recirculated, aerated, and synthetic seawater at 90 °C for 90 days. The tests were carried out at both the free corrosion potentials and an applied cathodic potential of -1100 mV saturated calomel electrode. The acidity (pH) of the test solution was monitored daily and adjusted to between pH 7.5 and 8.1, using dilute HCl solution or dilute NaOH, depending on the pH of the solution measured during the test. The test results demonstrated that TSA prevented pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr SDSS in artificial seawater at 90 °C, even when 10-mm-diameter coating defect exposing the underlying steel was present.

  9. Microstructure of arc brazed and diffusion bonded joints of stainless steel and SiC reinforced aluminum matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elßner, M.; Weis, S.; Grund, T.; Wagner, G.; Habisch, S.; Mayr, P.

    2016-03-01

    Joint interfaces of aluminum and stainless steel often exhibit intermetallics of Al-Fe, which limit the joint strength. In order to reduce these brittle phases in joints of aluminum matrix composites (AMC) and stainless steel, diffusion bonding and arc brazing are used. Due to the absence of a liquid phase, diffusion welding can reduce the formation of these critical in- termetallics. For this joining technique, the influence of surface treatments and adjusted time- temperature-surface-pressure-regimes is investigated. On the other hand, arc brazing offers the advantage to combine a localized heat input with the application of a low melting filler and was conducted using the system Al-Ag-Cu. Results of the joining tests using both approaches are described and discussed with regard to the microstructure of the joints and the interfaces.

  10. Reliability and durability study of a thermal receiver utilizing ASI Type 316 stainless steel in contact with molten aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, J.; Pohlman, S.

    1980-03-01

    Compatibility of ASI Type 316 stainless steel with molten aluminum was studied to determine probable lifetimes of unprotected steel components exposed to the liquid aluminum used for heat transfer and storage in a solar receiver supplied as a part of a commercial dish/electric solar generator. Steel samples immersed in molten aluminum showed rapid growth of hemispherical pits accompanied by an exponential increase in weight loss with time. A simple geometric model for the pitting process was developed that correlated well with the data collected on weight loss. Using this model, rate constants for the dissolution process were determined at 705, 760, 816, 871, and 927/sup 0/C and an activation energy of 17.5 kcal/mole was calculated. An expression for the rate constant was developed enabling use of the pitting model to predict failure time envelopes for the steel receiver components at a given temperature. Maximum lifetimes of the steam coil and wall were predicted to be 94 and 172 hr at 705/sup 0/C, respectively. Mean predicted lifetimes and lifetimes predicted at higher temperatures were shorter. The model accurately predicted actual lifetimes of field and laboratory tested components. Since failure of the steam coil could lead to a receiver wall failure and cause uncontrolled and possibly violent release of molten aluminum, a recommendation was made that the receiver be operated only at temperatures well below the melting point of aluminum.

  11. M551 metals melting experiment. [space manufacturing of aluminum alloys, tantalum alloys, stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. H.; Busch, G.; Creter, C.

    1976-01-01

    The Metals Melting Skylab Experiment consisted of selectively melting, in sequence, three rotating discs made of aluminum alloy, stainless steel, and tantalum alloy. For comparison, three other discs of the same three materials were similarly melted or welded on the ground. The power source of the melting was an electron beam unit. Results are presented which support the concept that the major difference between ground base and Skylab samples (i.e., large elongated grains in ground base samples versus nearly equiaxed and equal sized grains in Skylab samples) can be explained on the basis of constitutional supercooling, and not on the basis of surface phenomena. Microstructural observations on the weld samples and present explanations for some of these observations are examined. In particular, ripples and their implications to weld solidification were studied. Evidence of pronounced copper segregation in the Skylab A1 weld samples, and the tantalum samples studied, indicates a weld microhardness (and hence strength) that is uniformly higher than the ground base results, which is in agreement with previous predictions. Photographs are shown of the microstructure of the various alloys.

  12. Variation and optimization of acid-dissolved aluminum content in stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Le-chen; Bao, Yan-ping; Wang, Min; Zhang, Chao-jie

    2016-04-01

    As a key step in secondary refining, the deoxidation process in clean stainless steel production is widely researched by many scholars. In this study, vacuum oxygen decarburization (VOD) deoxidation refining in a 40-t electric arc furnace + VOD + ingot casting process was analyzed and optimized on the basis of Al deoxidation of stainless steel and thermodynamic equilibrium reactions between the slag and steel. Under good stirring conditions in VOD, the deoxidation reaction reaches equilibrium rapidly, and the oxygen activity in the bulk steel is controlled by the slag composition and Al content. A basicity of 3-5 and an Al content greater than 0.015wt% in the melt resulted in an oxygen content less than 0.0006wt%. In addition, the dissolved oxygen content decreased slightly when the Al content in the steel was greater than 0.02wt%. Because of the equilibrium of the Si-O reaction between the slag and steel, the activity of SiO2 will increase while the Si content increases; thus, the Si content should be lowered to enable the formation of a high-basicity slag. A high-basicity, low-Al2O3 slag and an increased Si content will reduce the Al consumption caused by SiO2 reduction.

  13. Supertough Stainless Bearing Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    1995-01-01

    Composition and processing of supertough stainless bearing steel designed with help of computer-aided thermodynamic modeling. Fracture toughness and hardness of steel exceeds those of other bearing steels like 440C stainless bearing steel. Developed for service in fuel and oxidizer turbopumps on Space Shuttle main engine. Because of strength and toughness, also proves useful in other applications like gears and surgical knives.

  14. Introducing a new optimization tool for femtosecond laser-induced surface texturing on titanium, stainless steel, aluminum and copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmmed, K. M. Tanvir; Ling, Edwin Jee Yang; Servio, Phillip; Kietzig, Anne-Marie

    2015-03-01

    The surface micro- and nano-scale features produced by femtosecond laser irradiation on titanium, stainless steel, aluminum and copper are reported in this work. Each observed surface microstructure, which was fabricated from a particular combination of four adjustable parameters, can be characterized by the fluence and pulses-per-spot (F-PPS) and accumulated fluence profile (AFP) models. By performing a wide screening of the experimental space, we have successfully mapped the evolution of microstructures as a function of two variables per model. We have also shown that these two models, in conjunction with one another and the data that we have presented, can be used as an optimization tool for scientists and engineers to quickly fine-tune the laser processing settings necessary for a desired surface topography. In addition, the electron-phonon coupling strength and thermal conductivity have been identified as the material properties that have the largest influence over the achievable surface patterns on metallic substrates.

  15. Stainless Steel Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in materials is critical to predicting tritium transport in structural metals (at high pressure), estimating tritium losses during production (fission environment), and predicting in-vessel inventory for future fusion devices (plasma driven permeation). Current models often assume equilibrium diffusivity and solubility for a class of materials (e.g. stainless steels or aluminum alloys), neglecting trapping effects or, at best, considering a single population of trapping sites. Permeation and trapping studies of the particular castings and forgings enable greater confidence and reduced margins in the models. For FY15, we have continued our investigation of the role of ferrite in permeation for steels of interest to GTS, through measurements of the duplex steel 2507. We also initiated an investigation of the permeability in work hardened materials, to follow up on earlier observations of unusual permeability in a particular region of 304L forgings. Samples were prepared and characterized for ferrite content and coated with palladium to prevent oxidation. Issues with the poor reproducibility of measurements at low permeability were overcome, although the techniques in use are tedious. Funding through TPBAR and GTS were secured for a research grade quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and replacement turbo pumps, which should improve the fidelity and throughput of measurements in FY16.

  16. Irradiation effects on 17-7 PH stainless steel, A-201 carbon steel, and titanium-6-percent-aluminum-4-percent-vanadium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasse, R. A.; Hartley, C. B.

    1972-01-01

    Irradiation effects on three materials from the NASA Plum Brook Reactor Surveillance Program were determined. An increase of 105 K in the nil-ductility temperature for A-201 steel was observed at a fluence of approximately 3.1 x 10 to the 18th power neutrons/sq cm (neutron energy E sub n greater than 1.0 MeV). Only minor changes in the mechanical properties of 17-7 PH stainless steel were observed up to a fluence of 2 x 10 to the 21st power neutrons/sq cm (E sub n greater than 1.0 MeV). The titanium-6-percent-aluminum-4-percent-vanadium alloy maintained its notch toughness up to a fluence of 1 x 10 to the 21st power neutrons/sq cm (E sub n greater than 1.0 MeV).

  17. Thermally Sprayed Aluminum (TSA) Coatings for Extended Design Life of 22%Cr Duplex Stainless Steel in Marine Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Shrestha, S.; Lee, C. M.; Harvey, M. D. F.

    2013-03-01

    In this article, evaluation of sealed and unsealed thermally sprayed aluminum (TSA) for the protection of 22%Cr duplex stainless steel (DSS) from corrosion in aerated, elevated temperature synthetic seawater is presented. The assessments involved general and pitting corrosion tests, external chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and hydrogen-induced stress cracking (HISC). These tests indicated that DSS samples, which would otherwise fail on their own in a few days, did not show pitting or fail under chloride SCC and HISC conditions when coated with TSA (with or without a sealant). TSA-coated specimens failed only at very high stresses (>120% proof stress). In general, TSA offered protection to the underlying or exposed steel by cathodically polarizing it and forming a calcareous deposit in synthetic seawater. The morphology of the calcareous deposit was found to be temperature dependent and in general was of duplex nature. The free corrosion rate of TSA in synthetic seawater was measured to be ~5-8 μm/year at ~18 °C and ~6-7 μm/year at 80 °C.

  18. Impact Welding of Aluminum to Copper and Stainless Steel by Vaporizing Foil Actuator: Effect of Heat Treatment Cycles on Mechanical Properties and Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivek, Anupam; Hansen, Steven; Benzing, Jake; He, Mei; Daehn, Glenn

    2015-10-01

    This work studies the mechanical property effect of microstructure on impact welds of aluminum alloy AA6061 with both copper alloy Cu 110 and stainless steel AISI 304. AA6061-T6 and T4 temper aluminum sheets of 1 mm thickness were launched toward copper and stainless steel targets using the vaporizing foil actuator technique. Flyer plate velocities, measured via photonic Doppler velocimetry, were observed to be approximately 800 m/s. The welded aluminum-copper samples were subjected to instrumented peel testing, microhardness testing, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The welded joints exhibited cracks through their continuous intermetallic layers. The cracks were impeded upon encountering a ductile metallic wave. The welds created with T6 temper flyer sheets were found to have smaller intermetallic-free and wavy interface regions as compared to those created with T4 temper flyer sheets. Peel strength tests of the two weld combinations resulted in failure along the interface in the case of the T6 flyer welds, while the failure generally occurred in the parent aluminum for the T4 temper flyer welds. Half of the T4 flyer welds were subjected to aging for 18 h at 433 K (160 °C) to convert the aluminum sheet to the T6 condition. Although the aged flyer material did not attain the hardness of the as-received T6 material, it was found to be significantly stronger than the T4 material. These welds retained their strength after the aging process, and diffusion across the interface was minimal. The welded aluminum-stainless steel samples were analyzed on a more basic level than aluminum-copper samples, but were found to exhibit similar results.

  19. Is stainless steel really "stainless"?

    PubMed

    Porteous, Joan

    2011-06-01

    Initial purchase and replacement costs for surgical instrumentation are significant components in today's operating room budgets. OR staff and medical device reprocessing personnel work together as a team to ensure effective management of this valuable commodity. The purpose of this article is to discuss the composition of stainless steel surgical instruments, to identify processes to minimize damage to instruments caused by staining, corrosion, and pitting, and to utilize that information to describe effective measures to manage instrumentation in both the OR and reprocessing areas. PMID:21823503

  20. Comparison of the Booster Interface Temperature in Stainless Steel (SS) V-Channel Versus the Aluminum (Al) Y-Channel Primer Chamber Assemblies (PCAs). Volume 2; Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Saulsberry, Regor L.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Technical Fellow for Propulsion, requested a technical assessment of the performance improvement achieved by the introduction of the stainless steel (SS) V-channel compared to the aluminum (Al) Y-channel Primer Chamber Assembly (PCA) design. The SS V-channel PCA was developed for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Project. The principle focus of the assessment was to measure the transient temperature at the booster interface with both designs. This document contains the Appendices to the Volume I main report.

  1. Investigation of effect of fluoride on corrosion of 2S-0 aluminum and 347 stainless steel in fuming nitric acid at 170 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiler, Charles E; Morrell, Gerald

    1954-01-01

    The effect of small additions of fluoride on the corrosion of 2S-0 aluminum and 347 stainless steel by fuming nitric acid at 170 degrees F has been evaluated quantitatively by the determination of the weight loss of metal specimens immersed in the acid. The ratio of metal surface area to volume of acid was approximately 7.5 inch (superscript)-1 in all cases. It was found that for acids containing no fluorides the weight loss of aluminum was approximately 1/5 that of stainless steel. Addition of 1 percent fluoride ion to the acid reduced the weight loss of both metals to practically zero even after 26 days of exposure to the acid at 170 degrees F. The minimum quantity of fluoride ion required to inhibit corrosion was found to be approximately 0.25 and 0.5 percent for aluminum and stainless steel, respectively, in white fuming nitric acid and 0.5 and 1 percent in red fuming nitric acid (18 percent nitrogen dioxide). These fluoride percentages were based on the total weight of acid. Provided the concentration of fluoride ion was sufficient to inhibit corrosion, the source of these ions was immaterial. Additional information concerning the effect of fluorides on corrosion was obtained by measuring the electrode potentials of the metals against a platinum reference electrode.

  2. Articles comprising ferritic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Rakowski, James M.

    2016-06-28

    An article of manufacture comprises a ferritic stainless steel that includes a near-surface region depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the ferritic stainless steel. The article has a reduced tendency to form an electrically resistive silica layer including silicon derived from the steel when the article is subjected to high temperature oxidizing conditions. The ferritic stainless steel is selected from the group comprising AISI Type 430 stainless steel, AISI Type 439 stainless steel, AISI Type 441 stainless steel, AISI Type 444 stainless steel, and E-BRITE.RTM. alloy, also known as UNS 44627 stainless steel. In certain embodiments, the article of manufacture is a fuel cell interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell.

  3. Tritium migration to the surfaces of Type 316 stainless steel; aluminum 6061; and oxygen-free, high-conductivity copper

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sharpe, M.; Shmayda, W. T.; Schroder, W. U.

    2016-05-25

    The migration of tritium to the surfaces of aluminum 6061, oxygen-free, high-conductivity copper (OFHC), and stainless-steel 316 from the bulk metal was studied using low-pressure Tonks–Langmuir argon plasma. The plasma is shown to be effective at removing tritium from metal surfaces in a controlled manner. Tritium is removed in decreasing quantities with successive plasma exposures, which suggests a depletion of the surface and near-surface tritium inventories. A diffusion model was developed to predict tritium migration from the bulk and its accumulation in the water layers present on the metal surface. The model reproduces the rate of tritium re-growth on themore » surface for all three metals and can be used to calculate the triton solubility in the water layers present on metal surfaces. The ratio of surface-to-bulk solubilities at the water-layer/bulk-metal interface uniquely determines the concentration ratio between these two media. Removing the tritium-rich water layers induces tritium to migrate from the bulk to the surface. Furthermore, this process is driven by a concentration gradient that develops in the bulk because of the perturbation on the surface.« less

  4. Sensitization of stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, James P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this experiment is to determine the corrosion rates of 18-8 stainless steels that have been sensitized at various temperatures and to show the application of phase diagrams. The laboratory instructor will assign each student a temperature, ranging from 550 C to 1050 C, to which the sample will be heated. Further details of the experimental procedure are detailed.

  5. Two-stage electrochemical treatment of bio-digested distillery spent wash using stainless steel and aluminum electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pinki; Joshi, Himanshu; Srivastava, Vimal C

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of two-stage electro-coagulation (EC) process using multi-parameter optimization for treating bio-digested distillery spent wash by stainless steel (SS) and aluminum (Al) electrodes. Operating parameters have been optimized and treatment efficiency of SS and Al electrodes have been compared by central composite design of response surface analysis in terms of COD, color and total organic carbon (TOC) removal. Individual and interactive effects of four independent parameters namely initial pH (pHo: 2-10 and 4-10 for SS and Al electrodes, respectively), current density (j: 30.86-154.32 A m(-2)), inter-electrode distance (g: 0.5-2.5 cm) and electrolysis time (t: 30-150 min) on the COD, color and TOC removal efficiency were evaluated for both the electrodes. SS electrode was found to be more effective for the removal of COD, color and TOC with removal efficiencies of 70%, 93% and 72%, respectively, as compared to Al electrode, which showed respective removal efficiencies of 59%, 80% and 55%. A two-stage EC process was also conducted to study the predominance of different types of electrodes, and to increase the efficiency of EC process. Results shows that SS followed by Al electrode (with total COD, color and TOC removal efficiency of 81%, 94% and 78%, respectively) was found to be more effective than Al followed by SS electrode combination (with total COD, color and TOC removal efficiency of 78%, 89% and 76%, respectively). Present study shows that EC process can be used as an additional step to bio-methanation process so as to meet effluent discharge standards in distilleries. PMID:25837564

  6. Residual stress of diffusion bonded aluminum-to-stainless steel joins. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, R.D.; Shackelford, J.F.

    1980-09-01

    An x-ray method for determination of residual stress as a function of surface position on a metal sample is described. This method is capable of spatial resolution on the order of 0.040 inch (1 mm) and precision positioning of the sample along three orthogonal axes to better than 0.001 inch. A high precision sample holder was designed and fabricated for this purpose. Apparent residual stress was found to be a strong function of sample position with respect to the axis of rotation of the diffractometer circle. This relationship is on the order of 400 to 500 Kpsi/inch for aluminum. The high precision sample holder allowed careful centering of the sample providing true (rather than apparent) residual stress measurements in the range of low stresses (less than 10 Ksi). Comparison was made between applied stress values obtained with strain gage output and those obtained by x-ray diffraction. Correlation was good with the accuracy of stress measurements being approximately +-500 psi.

  7. Investigation on the explosive welding mechanism of corrosion-resisting aluminum and stainless steel tubes through finite element simulation and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Guo-Fa; Li, Jin-Shan; Li, Hong-Wei; Sun, Feng; Zhang, Tie-Bang; Fu, Heng-Zhi

    2012-02-01

    To solve the difficulty in the explosive welding of corrosion-resistant aluminum and stainless steel tubes, three technologies were proposed after investigating the forming mechanism through experiments. Then, a 3D finite element model was established for systematic simulations in the parameter determination. The results show that the transition-layer approach, the coaxial initial assembly of tubes with the top-center-point the detonation, and the systematic study by numerical modeling are the key technologies to make the explosive welding of LF6 aluminum alloy and 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel tubes feasible. Numerical simulation shows that radial contraction and slope collision through continuous local plastic deformation are necessary for the good bonding of tubes. Stand-off distances between tubes ( D 1 and D 2) and explosives amount ( R) have effect on the plastic deformation, moving velocity, and bonding of tubes. D 1 of 1 mm, D 2 of 2 mm, and R of 2/3 are suitable for the explosive welding of LF6-L2-1Cr18Ni9Ti three-layer tubes. The plastic strain and moving velocity of the flyer tubes increase with the increase of stand-off distance. More explosives ( R>2/3) result in the asymmetrical distribution of plastic strain and non-bonding at the end of detonation on the tubes.

  8. Brazing titanium to stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batista, R. I.

    1980-01-01

    Titanium and stainless-steel members are usually joined mechanically for lack of any other effective method. New approach using different brazing alloy and plating steel member with nickel resolves problem. Process must be carried out in inert atmosphere.

  9. Surface modified stainless steels for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Wang, Heli [Littleton, CO; Turner, John A [Littleton, CO

    2007-07-24

    A nitridation treated stainless steel article (such as a bipolar plate for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell) having lower interfacial contact electrical resistance and better corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel article is disclosed. The treated stainless steel article has a surface layer including nitrogen-modified chromium-base oxide and precipitates of chromium nitride formed during nitridation wherein oxygen is present in the surface layer at a greater concentration than nitrogen. The surface layer may further include precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide. The surface layer in the treated article is chemically heterogeneous surface rather than a uniform or semi-uniform surface layer exclusively rich in chromium, titanium or aluminum. The precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide are formed by the nitriding treatment wherein titanium and/or aluminum in the stainless steel are segregated to the surface layer in forms that exhibit a low contact resistance and good corrosion resistance.

  10. Evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility Using Fracture Mechanics Techniques, Part 1. [environmental tests of aluminum alloys, stainless steels, and titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprowls, D. O.; Shumaker, M. B.; Walsh, J. D.; Coursen, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SSC) tests were performed on 13 aluminum alloys, 13 precipitation hardening stainless steels, and two titanium 6Al-4V alloy forgings to compare fracture mechanics techniques with the conventional smooth specimen procedures. Commercially fabricated plate and rolled or forged bars 2 to 2.5-in. thick were tested. Exposures were conducted outdoors in a seacoast atmosphere and in an inland industrial atmosphere to relate the accelerated tests with service type environments. With the fracture mechanics technique tests were made chiefly on bolt loaded fatigue precracked compact tension specimens of the type used for plane-strain fracture toughness tests. Additional tests of the aluminum alloy were performed on ring loaded compact tension specimens and on bolt loaded double cantilever beams. For the smooth specimen procedure 0.125-in. dia. tensile specimens were loaded axially in constant deformation type frames. For both aluminum and steel alloys comparative SCC growth rates obtained from tests of precracked specimens provide an additional useful characterization of the SCC behavior of an alloy.

  11. Photodesorption from stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mesarwi, A.; Ignatiev, A.

    1988-01-01

    The photodesorption by low-energy photons from three types of stainless steels is examined. For all these systems both CO and CO2 were observed to photodesorb with high yields: about 0.001 molecules/photon for CO2 and about 0.0001 molecules/photon for CO at 250 nm. The observed threshold energies were found to be the same for all systems at E0 = 2.92 eV for CO2 and E0 = 2.92-3.10 eV for CO.

  12. Switch to duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Quik, J.M.A.; Geudeke, M.

    1994-11-01

    Duplex stainless steels contain approximately equal proportions of ferrite and austenite. These stainless steels have become an established material of construction in the chemical process industries (CPI). Duplexes offer benefits over austenitic stainless steels and carbon steels because of their higher strength, and good toughness and ductility, in combination with equivalent resistance to general corrosion, as well as better resistance to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Additionally, duplex materials have thermal-conductivity and thermal-expansion coefficients similar to those of ferritic materials, are tough at low (sub-zero) temperatures, and have a high resistance to erosion and abrasion. In some of the highly corrosive environments encountered in the CPI, the super duplex stainless steels offer cost-effective options not possible with the standard austenitic stainless steels. The initial applications were almost exclusively as heat exchanger tubing in water-cooled service. In recent times, duplex stainless steels have been used in the oil, gas, and chemical industries. Examples include service in sweet and mildly sour corrosive environments, on offshore platforms where weight savings can be realized, and as a replacement for standard austenitic stainless steel in chemical-processing plants.

  13. Corrosion resistance of stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, C.P.

    1995-12-31

    This book reviews the mechanisms and forms of corrosion and examines the corrosion of stainless steels and similar chromium-bearing nickel containing higher alloys, detailing various corrosive environments including atmospheric and fire-side corrosion, corrosion by water and soil, and corrosion caused by particular industrial processes. It provides information on specific groups and grades of stainless steels; summarizes typical applications for specific stainless alloys; describes common corrosion problems associated with stainless steels; presents the acceptable isocorrosion parameters of concentration and temperature for over 250 chemicals for which stainless steels are the preferred materials of construction; discusses product forms and their availability; elucidates fabrication, welding, and joining techniques; and covers the effects of pickling and passivation.

  14. Combination Effects of Nocolok Flux with Ni Powder on Properties and Microstructures of Aluminum-Stainless Steel TIG Welding-Brazing Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Huan; Lin, Sanbao; Yang, Chunli; Fan, Chenglei; Chen, Zhe

    2013-11-01

    A flux consisting of Nocolok and nickel powder was first applied for TIG welding-brazing of aluminum-stainless steel. Results of tensile and impact tests illustrated that a significant improvement in mechanical properties of the butt joint was obtained with the flux, tensile strength increased from 116 to 158 MPa, and impact energy increased from 3.2 to 6.7 J. Investigation results on microstructures of interfaces and seams suggested that Ni addition significantly decreased the thickness of intermetallic compound (IMC) layer on the interfaces, but did not change the phase structure of Al13Fe4. Furthermore, precipitate phase in the welded seams changed from Al6Fe to Al9FeNi, and the quantity of precipitate phases decreased from 12 to 9% approximately. Finally, effect of Ni powder's addition on the joint was analyzed and discussed. The reduction in the thickness of IMC and quantity of precipitate phases are beneficial to joint properties.

  15. Effect of bacterial biofilm on corrosion of galvanically coupled aluminum and stainless steel alloys under conditions simulating wet storage of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.J.; Dirk, W.J.; Geesey, G.G.

    1999-10-01

    Galvanic corrosion is a concern during wet storage of spent nuclear fuels when aluminum alloys used as cladding for nuclear fuel rods become coupled to stainless steel alloys used as materials for construction of fuel rod hangers and containment equipment. A larger galvanic current density was observed between coupled UNS A96061 and UNS S30400 electrodes submerged in autoclave-sterilized makeup water. The differences were attributed to the development of a discontinuous bacterial biofilm on the couples submerged in as-received makeup water, which was not evident on the control couples that contained several orders of magnitude lower densities of bacteria. While pitting corrosion was observed on the UNS A96061 electrodes containing high or low densities of bacteria, maximum pit depth on the electrodes with high bacterial densities was twice that measured on electrodes with low bacterial densities.

  16. Stainless steel display evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, Darrel G.; Meyer, Frederick M.; Longo, Sam J.; Trissell, Terry L.

    2007-04-01

    Active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) technology is one candidate to become a low power alternative in some applications to the currently dominant, active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD), technology. Furthermore, fabrication of the AMOLED on stainless steel (SS) foil rather than the traditional glass substrate, while presenting a set of severe technical challenges, opens up the potential for displays that are both lighter and less breakable. Also, transition to an SS foil substrate may enable rollable displays - large when used but small for stowage within gear already worn or carried or installed. Research has been initiated on AMOLED/SS technology and the first 320 x 240 color pixel 4-in. demonstration device has been evaluated in the AFRL Display Test and Evaluation Laboratory. Results of this evaluation are reported along with a research roadmap.

  17. Welding tritium exposed stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1994-11-01

    Stainless steels that are exposed to tritium become unweldable by conventional methods due to buildup of decay helium within the metal matrix. With longer service lives expected for tritium containment systems, methods for welding on tritium exposed material will become important for repair or modification of the systems. Solid-state resistance welding and low-penetration overlay welding have been shown to mitigate helium embrittlement cracking in tritium exposed 304 stainless steel. These processes can also be used on stainless steel containing helium from neutron irradiation, such as occurs in nuclear reactors.

  18. Why stainless steel corrodes.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Mary P; Williams, David E; Chater, Richard J; Hutton, Bernie M; McPhail, David S

    2002-02-14

    Stainless steels are used in countless diverse applications for their corrosion resistance. Although they have extremely good general resistance, they are nevertheless susceptible to pitting corrosion. This localized dissolution of an oxide-covered metal in specific aggressive environments is one of the most common and catastrophic causes of failure of metallic structures. The pitting process has been described as random, sporadic and stochastic and the prediction of the time and location of events remains extremely difficult. Many contested models of pitting corrosion exist, but one undisputed aspect is that manganese sulphide inclusions play a critical role. Indeed, the vast majority of pitting events are found to occur at, or adjacent to, such second-phase particles. Chemical changes in and around sulphide inclusions have been postulated as a mechanism for pit initiation but such variations have never been measured. Here we use nanometre-scale secondary ion mass spectroscopy to demonstrate a significant reduction in the Cr:Fe ratio of the steel matrix around MnS particles. These chromium-depleted zones are susceptible to high-rate dissolution that 'triggers' pitting. The implications of these results are that materials processing conditions control the likelihood of corrosion failures, and these data provide a basis for optimizing such conditions. PMID:11845203

  19. Chromium-Makes stainless steel stainless

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Chromium, a steely-gray, lustrous, hard metal that takes a high polish and has a high melting point, is a silvery white, hard, and bright metal plating on steel and other material. Commonly known as chrome, it is one of the most important and indispensable industrial metals because of its hardness and resistance to corrosion. But it is used for more than the production of stainless steel and nonferrous alloys; it is also used to create pigments and chemicals used to process leather.

  20. Comparison of the Booster Interface Temperature in Stainless Steel (SS) V-Channel versus the Aluminum (Al) Y-Channel Primer Chamber Assemblies (PCAs). Volume 1; Technical Assessment Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Saulsberry, Regor L.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Technical Fellow for Propulsion, requested a technical assessment of the performance improvement achieved by the introduction of the stainless steel (SS) V-channel compared to the aluminum (Al) Y-channel Primer Chamber Assembly (PCA) design. The SS V-channel PCA was developed for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Project. The principle focus of the assessment was to measure the transient temperature at the booster interface with both designs. This document contains the findings of the assessment.

  1. Plating on stainless steel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1981-09-11

    Quantitative adhesion data are presented for a variety of electroplated stainless steel type alloys. Results show that excellent adhesion can be obtained by using a Wood's nickel strike or a sulfamate nickel strike prior to final plating. Specimens plated after Wood's nickel striking failed in the deposit rather than at the interface between the substrate and the coating. Flyer plate quantitative tests showed that use of anodic treatment in sulfuric acid prior to Wood's nickel striking even further improved adhesion. In contrast activation of stainless steels by immersion or cathodic treatment in hydrochloric acid resulted in very reduced bond strengths with failure always occurring at the interface between the coating and substrate.

  2. Correlation of acoustic emission generated during uniform biaxial loading to microstructural sources in 7075-T651 aluminum and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn stainless steel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, E.; Mukherjee, A.K.

    1981-12-01

    This paper reports on the effect on acoustic emission (AE) of uniform biaxial loading of a thin-walled tube designed by Hamstad, Patterson and Mukherjee. The AE generated during biaxial loading of 7075-T651 aluminum and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn stainless steel had several anomalous features relative to tensile generated AE. The biaxial AE data was of a much higher level and peaked at a lower strain than the uniaxial AE response. A particle cracking model was proposed in which inclusions with the largest projected surface area perpendicular to the principal axis of applied loading will crack before smaller inclusions, and the resulting energy released per AE will be proportional to the crack surface area. The inclusion contents were studied with respect to size, shape, density, hardness, and fracture/decohesion behavior. The inclusions in both 7075-T651 and 21-6-9 display the preferred cracking orientation predicted in the Hamstad, et al. model and are shown to be associated with the generated AE. However, other factors appear to contribute to the total AE responses. There is evidence that for 7075-T651 subjected to biaxial loading, a grain boundary-related mechanism becomes a significant source of AE in the latter stages of strain hardening. Also, for both materials, the complex applied load during biaxial loading appears to amplify the level of AE.

  3. Innovative Comparison of Transient Ignition Temperature at the Booster Interface, New Stainless Steel Pyrovalve Primer Chamber Assembly "V" (PCA) Design Versus the Current Aluminum "Y" PCA Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry, Regor L.; McDougle, Stephen H.; Garcia,Roberto; Johnson, Kenneth L.; Sipes, William; Rickman, Steven; Hosangadi, Ashvin

    2011-01-01

    An assessment of four spacecraft pyrovalve anomalies that occurred during ground testing was conducted by the NASA Engineering & Safety Center (NESC) in 2008. In all four cases, a common aluminum (Al) primer chamber assembly (PCA) was used with dual NASA Standard Initiators (NSIs) and the nearly simultaneous (separated by less than 80 microseconds) firing of both initiators failed to ignite the booster charge. The results of the assessment and associated test program were reported in AIAA Paper AIAA-2008-4798, NESC Independent Assessment of Pyrovalve Ground Test Anomalies. As a result of the four Al PCA anomalies, and the test results and findings of the NESC assessment, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) project team decided to make changes to the PCA. The material for the PCA body was changed from aluminum (Al) to stainless steel (SS) to avoid melting, distortion, and potential leakage of the NSI flow passages when the device functioned. The flow passages, which were interconnected in a Y-shaped configuration (Y-PCA) in the original design, were changed to a V-shaped configuration (V-PCA). The V-shape was used to more efficiently transfer energy from the NSIs to the booster. Development and qualification testing of the new design clearly demonstrated faster booster ignition times compared to the legacy AL Y-PCA design. However, the final NESC assessment report recommended that the SS V-PCA be experimentally characterized and quantitatively compared to the Al Y-PCA design. This data was deemed important for properly evaluating the design options for future NASA projects. This test program has successfully quantified the improvement of the SS V-PCA over the Al Y-PCA. A phase B of the project was also conducted and evaluated the effect of firing command skew and enlargement of flame channels to further assist spacecraft applications.

  4. Corrosion behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Platt, J A; Guzman, A; Zuccari, A; Thornburg, D W; Rhodes, B F; Oshida, Y; Moore, B K

    1997-07-01

    The corrosion of 2205 duplex stainless steel was compared with that of AISI type 316L stainless steel. The 2205 stainless steel is a potential orthodontic bracket material with low nickel content (4 to 6 wt%), whereas the 316L stainless steel (nickel content: 10 to 14 wt%) is a currently used bracket material. Both stainless steels were subjected to electrochemical and immersion (crevice) corrosion tests in 37 degrees C, 0.9 wt% sodium chloride solution. Electrochemical testing indicates that 2205 has a longer passivation range than 316L. The corrosion rate of 2205 was 0.416 MPY (milli-inch per year), whereas 316L exhibited 0.647 MPY. When 2205 was coupled to 316L with equal surface area ratio, the corrosion rate of 2205 reduced to 0.260 MPY, indicating that 316L stainless steel behaved like a sacrificial anode. When 316L is coupled with NiTi, TMA, or stainless steel arch wire and was subjected to the immersion corrosion test, it was found that 316L suffered from crevice corrosion. On the other hand, 2205 stainless steel did not show any localized crevice corrosion, although the surface of 2205 was covered with corrosion products, formed when coupled to NiTi and stainless steel wires. This study indicates that considering corrosion resistance, 2205 duplex stainless steel is an improved alternative to 316L for orthodontic bracket fabrication when used in conjunction with titanium, its alloys, or stainless steel arch wires. PMID:9228844

  5. Microbial corrosion of stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Ibars, J R; Moreno, D A; Ranninger, C

    1992-11-01

    Stainless steel, developed because of their greater resistance to corrosion in different aggressive environments, have proved to be affected, however, by various processes and types of corrosion. Some of these types of corrosion, mainly pitting, is activated and developed in the presence of microorganisms, which acting in an isolated or symbiotic way, according to their adaptation to the environment, create a favorable situation for the corrosion of these steel. The microorganisms that are involved, mainly bacteria of both the aerobic and anaerobic type, modify the environment where the stainless steel is found, creating crevices, differential aeration zones or a more aggressive environment with the presence of metabolites. In these circumstances, a local break of the passive and passivating layer is produced, which is proper to these types of steel and impedes the repassivation that is more favorable to corrosion. In the study and research of these types of microbiologically influenced corrosion are found electrochemical techniques, since corrosion is fundamentally an electrochemical process, and microbiological techniques for the identification, culture, and evaluation of the microorganisms involved in the process, as well as in the laboratory or field study of microorganism-metal pairs. Microstructural characterization studies of stainless steel have also been considered important, since it is known that the microstructure of steel can substantially modify their behavior when faced with corrosion. As for surface analysis studies, it is known that corrosion is a process that is generated on and progresses from the surface. The ways of dealing with microbiologically influenced corrosion must necessarily include biocides, which are not always usable or successful, the design of industrial equipment or components that do not favor the adherence of microorganisms, using microstructures in steel less sensitive to corrosion, or protecting the materials. PMID:1492953

  6. Development of New Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Robert F. Buck

    2005-08-30

    A new family of innovative martensitic stainless steels, 521-A, 521-B, and 521-C has been developed by Advanced Steel Technology, LLC (Trafford, PA) as high strength fastener (bolt) materials for use at moderate temperatures in turbine engines, including steam turbines, gas turbines, and aircraft engines. The primary objective of the development program was to create a martensitic stainless steel with high strength at moderate temperatures, and which could replace the expensive nickel-based superalloy IN 718 in some fasteners applications. A secondary objective was to replace conventional 12Cr steels such as AISI 422 used as blades, buckets and shafts that operate at intermediate temperatures in turbine engines with stronger steel. The composition of the new alloys was specifically designed to produce excellent mechanical properties while integrating heat treatment steps into production to reduce energy consumption during manufacturing. As a result, production costs and energy consumption during production of rolled bar products is significantly lower than conventional materials. Successful commercialization of the new alloys would permit the installed cost of certain turbine engines to be reduced without sacrificing high availability or operational flexibility, thereby enhancing the global competitiveness of U.S. turbine engine manufacturers. Moreover, the domestic specialty steel industry would also benefit through increased productivity and reduced operating costs, while increasing their share of the international market for turbine engine fasteners, blades, buckets and shafts.

  7. Nickel release from stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Haudrechy, P; Mantout, B; Frappaz, A; Rousseau, D; Chabeau, G; Faure, M; Claudy, A

    1997-09-01

    In 1994, a study of nickel release and allergic contact dermatitis from nickel-plated metals and stainless steels was published in this journal. It was shown that low-sulfur stainless steel grades like AISI 304, 316L or 430 (S < or = 0.007%) release less than 0.03 microgram/cm2/week of nickel in acid artificial sweat and elicit no reactions in patients already sensitized to nickel. In contrast, nickel-plated samples release around 100 micrograms/cm2/week of Ni and high-sulfur stainless steel (AISI 303-S approximately 0.3%) releases about 1.5 micrograms/cm2/week in this acid artificial sweat. Applied on patients sensitized to nickel, these metals elicit positive reactions in 96% and 14%, respectively, of the patients. The main conclusion was that low-sulfur stainless steels like AISI 304, 316L or 430, even when containing Ni, should not elicit nickel contact dermatitis, while metals having a mean corrosion resistance like a high-sulfur stainless steel (AISI 303) or nickel-plated steel should be avoided. The determining characteristic was in fact the corrosion resistance in chloride media, which, for stainless steels, is connected, among other factors, to the sulfur content. Thus, a question remained concerning the grades with an intermediate sulfur content, around 0.03%, which were not studied. They are the object of the study presented in this paper. 3 tests were performed: leaching experiments, dimethylglyoxime and HNO3 spot tests, and clinical patch tests; however, only stainless steels were tested: a low-sulfur AISI 304 and AISI 303 as references and 3 grades with a sulfur content around 0.03%: AISI 304L, AISI 304L added with Ca, AISI 304L+Cu. Leaching experiments showed that the 4 non-resulfurised grades released less than 0.5 microgram/cm2/week in acid sweat while the reulfurized AISI 303 released around or more than 0.5 microgram/cm2/week. This is explained by the poorer corrosion resistance of the resulfurized grade. Yet all these grades had the same

  8. Nano-composite stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Blue, Craig A.; Peter, William H.; Chen, Wei; Aprigliano, Louis F.

    2015-07-14

    A composite stainless steel composition is composed essentially of, in terms of wt. % ranges: 25 to 28 Cr; 11 to 13 Ni; 7 to 8 W; 3.5 to 4 Mo; 3 to 3.5 B; 2 to 2.5 Mn; 1 to 1.5 Si; 0.3 to 1.7 C; up to 2 O; balance Fe. The composition has an austenitic matrix phase and a particulate, crystalline dispersed phase.

  9. Nickel: makes stainless steel strong

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boland, Maeve A.

    2012-01-01

    Nickel is a silvery-white metal that is used mainly to make stainless steel and other alloys stronger and better able to withstand extreme temperatures and corrosive environments. Nickel was first identified as a unique element in 1751 by Baron Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, a Swedish mineralogist and chemist. He originally called the element kupfernickel because it was found in rock that looked like copper (kupfer) ore and because miners thought that "bad spirits" (nickel) in the rock were making it difficult for them to extract copper from it. Approximately 80 percent of the primary (not recycled) nickel consumed in the United States in 2011 was used in alloys, such as stainless steel and superalloys. Because nickel increases an alloy's resistance to corrosion and its ability to withstand extreme temperatures, equipment and parts made of nickel-bearing alloys are often used in harsh environments, such as those in chemical plants, petroleum refineries, jet engines, power generation facilities, and offshore installations. Medical equipment, cookware, and cutlery are often made of stainless steel because it is easy to clean and sterilize. All U.S. circulating coins except the penny are made of alloys that contain nickel. Nickel alloys are increasingly being used in making rechargeable batteries for portable computers, power tools, and hybrid and electric vehicles. Nickel is also plated onto such items as bathroom fixtures to reduce corrosion and provide an attractive finish.

  10. Li.sub.2 O-Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 -SiO.sub.2 glass ceramic-aluminum containing austenitic stainless steel composite body and a method of producing the same

    DOEpatents

    Cassidy, Roger T.

    1990-05-01

    The present invention relates to a hermetically sealed Li.sub.2 O-Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 -SiO.sub.2 glass ceramic-aluminum containing stainless steel composite body and a method of producing the body. The composite body includes an oxide interfacial region between the glass ceramic and metal, wherein the interfacial region consists essentially of an Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 layer. The interfacial Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 region includes constituents of both the metal and glass ceramic.

  11. Gravitational effects on weld pool shape and microstructural evolution during gas tungsten arc and laser beam welding on 304 stainless steel, nickel, and aluminum-4 wt.% copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Namhyun

    The objective of the present work was to investigate effects of gravitational (acceleration) level and orientation on Ni 200 alloy (99.5% Ni purity), 304 stainless steel, and Al-4 wt.% Cu alloy during gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and laser beam welding (LBW). Main characterization was focused on the weld pool shape, microstructure, and solute distribution as a function of gravitational level and orientation. The welds were divided into two classes, i.e., 'stable' and 'unstable' welds, in view of the variation of weld pool shape as a function of gravitational level and orientation. In general, higher arc current and translational GTAW produced more significant effects of gravitational orientation on the weld pool shape than the case of lower arc current and spot welding. Cross-sectional area (CSA) was a secondary factor in determining the stability of weld pool shape. For the 'stable' weld of 304 stainless steel GTAW, the II-U weld showed less convexity in the pool bottom and more depression of the free surface, therefore producing deeper penetration (10--20%) than the case of II-D weld. The II-D weld of 304 stainless steel showed 31% deeper penetration, 28% narrower width, and more hemispherical shape of the weld pool than the case of II-U weld. For GTAW on 304 stainless steel, gravitational level variation from low gravity (LG ≈ 1.2 go) to high gravity (HG ≈ 1.8 go) caused 10% increase in width and 10% decrease in depth while maintaining the overall weld pool volume. Furthermore, LBW on 304 stainless steels showed mostly constant shape of weld pool as a function of gravitational orientation. GTAW on Ni showed similar trends of weld pool shape compared with GTAW on 304 stainless steel, i.e., the weld pool became unstable by showing more penetration in the II-D weld for slower arc translational velocity (V a) and larger weld pool size. However, the Ni weld pool shape had greater stability of the weld pool shape with respect to the gravitational orientation

  12. 60 Years of duplex stainless steel applications

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, J.; Liljas, M.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the history of wrought duplex stainless steel development and applications is described. Ferritic-austenitic stainless steels were introduced only a few decades after stainless steels were developed. The paper gives details from the first duplex stainless steels in the 1930`s to the super duplex stainless steel development during the 1980`s. During the years much effort has been devoted to production and welding metallurgy as well as corrosion research of the duplex stainless steels. Therefore, duplex stainless steels are to-day established in a wide product range. Numerous important applications are exemplified. In most cases the selection of a duplex steel has been a result of the combination high strength excellent corrosion resistance. In the pulp and paper industry the most interesting use is as vessel material in digesters. For chemical process industry, the duplex steels are currently used in heat exchangers. The largest application of duplex steels exists in the oil and gas/offshore industry. Hundreds of kms of pipelines are installed and are still being installed. An increased use of duplex steels is foreseen in areas where the strength is of prime importance.

  13. Criticality Evaluation of Plutonium-239 Moderated by High-Density Polyethylene in Stainless Steel and Aluminum Containers Suitable for Non-Exclusive Use Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, T T

    2007-08-10

    Research is conducted at the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Facility (JASPER) on the effects of high pressure and temperature environments on plutonium-239, in support of the stockpile stewardship program. Once an experiment has been completed, it is necessary to transport the end products for interim storage or final disposition. Federal shipping regulations for nonexclusive use transportation require that no more than 180 grams of fissile material are present in at least 360 kilograms of contiguous non-fissile material. To evaluate the conservatism of these regulatory requirements, a worst-case scenario of 180g {sup 239}Pu and a more realistic scenario of 100g {sup 239}Pu were modeled using one of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Monte Carlo transport codes known as COG 10. The geometry consisted of {sup 239}Pu spheres homogeneously mixed with high-density polyethylene surrounded by a cube of either stainless steel 304 or aluminum. An optimized geometry for both cube materials and hydrogen-to-fissile isotope (H/X) ratio were determined for a single unit. Infinite and finite 3D arrays of these optimized units were then simulated to determine if the systems would exceed criticality. Completion of these simulations showed that the optimal H/X ratio for the most reactive units ranged from 800 to 1600. A single unit of either cube type for either scenario would not reach criticality. An infinite array was determined to reach criticality only for the 180g case. The offsetting of spheres in their respective cubes was also considered and showed a considerable decrease in the number of close-packed units needed to reach criticality. These results call into question the current regulations for fissile material transport, which under certain circumstances may not be sufficient in preventing the development of a critical system. However, a conservative, theoretical approach was taken in all assumptions and such idealized configurations may not be likely to

  14. Interaction between stainless steel and plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Dunwoody, John T; Mason, Richard E; Freibert, Franz J; Willson, Stephen P; Veirs, Douglas K; Worl, Laura A; Archuleta, Alonso; Conger, Donald J

    2010-01-01

    Long-term storage of excess plutonium is of great concern in the U.S. as well as abroad. The current accepted configuration involves intimate contact between the stored material and an iron-bearing container such as stainless steel. While many safety scenario studies have been conducted and used in the acceptance of stainless steel containers, little information is available on the physical interaction at elevated temperatures between certain forms of stored material and the container itself. The bulk of the safety studies has focused on the ability of a package to keep the primary stainless steel containment below the plutonium-iron eutectic temperature of approximately 410 C. However, the interactions of plutonium metal with stainless steel have been of continuing interest. This paper reports on a scoping study investigating the interaction between stainless steel and plutonium metal in a pseudo diffusion couple at temperatures above the eutectic melt-point.

  15. The comparison of frictional resistance in titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets using stainless steel and TMA archwires: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Syed Altaf; Kumar, Vadivel; Jayaram, Prithviraj

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to compare the frictional resistance of titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA) archwires. Materials and Methods: We compared the frictional resistance in 0.018 slot and 0.022 slot of the three brackets – titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel – using stainless steel archwires and TMA archwires. An in vitro study of simulated canine retraction was undertaken to evaluate the difference in frictional resistance between titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and TMA archwires. Results and Conclusion: We compared the frictional resistance of titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and TMA archwires, with the help of Instron Universal Testing Machine. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Student's “t” test, and post hoc multiple range test at level of <0.05 showed statistically significant difference in the mean values of all groups. Results demonstrated that the titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets of 0.018-inch and 0.022-inch slot had no significant variations in frictional résistance. The self-ligating bracket with TMA archwires showed relatively less frictional resistance compared with the other groups. The titanium bracket with TMA archwires showed relatively less frictional resistance compared with the stainless steel brackets. PMID:23066253

  16. Corrosion of stainless steel, 2. edition

    SciTech Connect

    Sedriks, A.J.

    1996-10-01

    The book describes corrosion characteristics in all the major and minor groups of stainless steels, namely, in austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, duplex, and precipitation hardenable steels. Several chapters are spent on those special forms of corrosion that are investigated in the great detail in stainless steels, namely, pitting corrosion, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking. The influences of thermal treatment (heat affected zone cases), composition, and microstructure on corrosion are given good coverage. Corrosive environments include high temperature oxidation, sulfidation as well as acids, alkalis, various different petroleum plant environments, and even human body fluids (stainless steels are commonly used prosthetic materials).

  17. Duplex stainless steels for osteosynthesis devices.

    PubMed

    Cigada, A; Rondelli, G; Vicentini, B; Giacomazzi, M; Roos, A

    1989-09-01

    The austenitic stainless steels used today for the manufacture of osteosynthesis devices are sensitive to crevice corrosion. In this study the corrosion properties of some duplex stainless steels were evaluated and compared to traditional austenitic stainless steels. According to our results the following ranking was established: 23Cr-4Ni less than AISI 316L less than ASTM F138 less than 22Cr-5Ni-3Mo less than 27Cr-31Ni-3.5Mo less than 25Cr-7Ni-4Mo-N. In particular the results showed that the high-performance 25Cr-7Ni-4Mo-N duplex stainless steel, with high molybdenum and nitrogen contents, can be considered not susceptible to crevice corrosion in the human body. The duplex stainless steels have also better mechanical properties at the same degree of cold working compared with austenitic stainless steels. Hence the 25Cr-7Ni-4Mo-N duplex stainless steel can be considered a convenient substitute of ASTM F138 for orthopedic and osteosynthesis devices. PMID:2777835

  18. Tritiated Water Interaction with Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-05-01

    Experiments conducted to study tritium permeation of stainless steel at ambient and elevated temperatures revealed that HT converts relatively quickly to HTO. Further, the HTO partial pressure contributes essentially equally with elemental tritium gas in driving permeation through the stainless steel. Such permeation appears to be due to dissociation of the water molecule on the hot stainless steel surface. There is an equilibrium concentration of HTO vapor above adsorbed gas on the walls of the experimental apparatus evident from freezing transients. The uptake process of tritium from the carrier gas involves both surface adsorption and isotopic exchange with surface bound water.

  19. Precise carbon control of fabricated stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, R.J.

    1975-12-01

    A process is described for controlling the carbon content of fabricated stainless steel components including the steps of heat treating the component in hydrogen atmospheres of varying dewpoints and carbon potentials.

  20. Hydrogen compatibility handbook for stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1983-06-01

    This handbook compiles data on the effects of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of stainless steels and discusses this data within the context of current understanding of hydrogen compatibility of metals. All of the tabulated data derives from continuing studies of hydrogen effects on materials that have been conducted at the Savannah River Laboratory over the past fifteen years. Supplementary data from other sources are included in the discussion. Austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, and precipitation hardenable stainless steels have been studied. Damage caused by helium generated from decay of tritium is a distinctive effect that occurs in addition to the hydrogen isotopes protium and deuterium. The handbook defines the scope of our current knowledge of hydrogen effects in stainless steels and serves as a guide to selection of stainless steels for service in hydrogen.

  1. Development of a carburizing stainless steel alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, D.E. )

    1994-06-01

    A new carburizing stainless steel alloy that resists corrosion, heat, and fatigue has been developed for bearing and gear applications. Pyrowear 675 Stainless alloy is vacuum induction melted and vacuum arc remelted (VIM/VAR) for aircraft-quality cleanliness. Test results show that it has corrosion resistance similar to that of AISI Type 440-C stainless, and its rolling fatigue resistance is superior to that of AISI M50 (UNS K88165). In contrast to alloy gear steels and Type 440C, Pyrowear 675 maintains case hardness of HRC 60 at operating temperatures up to 200 C (400 F). Impact and fracture toughness are superior to that of other stainless bearing steels, which typically are relatively brittle and can break under severe service. Toughness is also comparable or superior to conventional noncorrosion-resistant carburizing bearing steels, such as SAE Types 8620 and 9310.

  2. Stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaluzny, J. A.; Grimm, C.; Passarelli, D.

    2015-12-01

    In order to use stainless steel piping in an LCLS-II (Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade) cryomodule, stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions are needed to connect the stainless steel piping to the titanium cavity helium vessel. Explosion bonded stainless steel to titanium transition pieces and bimetallic transition material samples have been tested. A sample transition tube was subjected to tests and x-ray examinations between tests. Samples of the bonded joint material were impact and tensile tested at room temperature as well as liquid helium temperature. The joint has been used successfully in horizontal tests of LCLS-II cavity helium vessels and is planned to be used in LCLS-II cryomodules. Results of material sample and transition tube tests will be presented. Operated by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC under Contract No. De-AC02-07CH11359 with the United States Department of Energy.

  3. Stainless Steel to Titanium Bimetallic Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaluzny, J. A.; Grimm, C.; Passarelli, D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to use stainless steel piping in an LCLS-II (Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade) cryomodule, stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions are needed to connect the stainless steel piping to the titanium cavity helium vessel. Explosion bonded stainless steel to titanium transition pieces and bimetallic transition material samples have been tested. A sample transition tube was subjected to tests and x-ray examinations between tests. Samples of the bonded joint material were impact and tensile tested at room temperature as well as liquid helium temperature. The joint has been used successfully in horizontal tests of LCLS-II cavity helium vessels and is planned to be used in LCLS-II cryomodules. Results of material sample and transition tube tests will be presented.

  4. A Duplex Stainless Steel for Chloride Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, N.; Kolts, J.; Flasche, L. H.

    1985-03-01

    This paper examines the effects of microstructural changes on the corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue resistance of a duplex stainless steel to chloride environments. The microstructural changes can be precipitation of phases such as sigma and carbides, or changes in the distribution of austenite and ferrite. The former can be important in hot forming operations while the latter is important in welding. The methods of minimizing these deleterious effects can sometimes be different from those used for austenitic stainless steel.

  5. Stainless steel recycle FY94 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, K.J.

    1994-10-28

    The Materials Technology Section (MTS) of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) was asked to demonstrate the practicality of recycling previously contaminated stainless steel components such as reactor heat exchanger heads, process water piping and slug buckets into 208 liters (55 gallon) drums and 2.8 cubic meter (100 ft{sup 3}) storage boxes. Radioactively contaminated stainless steel scrap will be sent to several industrial partners where it will be melted, decontaminated/cast into ingots, and rolled into plate and sheet and fabricated into the drums and boxes. As part of this recycle initiative, MTS was requested to demonstrate that radioactively contaminated Type 304L stainless steel could be remelted and cast to meet the applicable ASTM specification for fabrication of drums and boxes. In addition, MTS was requested to develop the technical basis of melt decontamination and establish practicality of using this approach for value added products. The findings presented in this investigation lead to the following conclusions: recycle of 18 wt% Cr-8 wt% Ni alloy can be achieved by melting Type 304 stainless steel in a air vacuum induction furnace; limited melt decontamination of the contaminated stainless steel was achieved, surface contamination was removed by standard decontamination techniques; carbon uptake in the as-cast ingots resulted from the graphite susceptor used in this experiment and is unavoidable with this furnace configuration. A new furnace optimized for melting stainless steel has been installed and is currently being tested for use in this program.

  6. The abrasion-wear resistance of arc sprayed stainless steel and composite stainless steel coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Dallaire, S.; Legoux, J.G.; Levert, H.

    1994-12-31

    Stainless steels are often used to palliate wear problems in various industries. Though they are not wear resistant, they have been used to a limited extent in applications involving both corrosive and abrasive/erosive environments. The protection of industrial components by arc sprayed stainless steel composite coatings could be considered very attractive provided these coatings offer a better wear protection than bulk stainless steel. The wear resistance of stainless steel and composite stainless steel-titanium boride coatings arc sprayed with air and argon was evaluated following the ASTM G-65 Abrasion Wear Test procedures. Wear volume loss measurements show that stainless steel coatings arc sprayed with air were slightly more resistant than bulk stainless steel while those sprayed with argon were slightly less resistant. The abrasion wear resistance of composite stainless steel-titanium diboride coatings is by two or four times beyond the wear resistance of bulk stainless steel depending upon the core wire constitution and the type of gas used for spraying. Microstructural analysis of coatings, microhardness measurements of sprayed lamellae and optical profilometry were used to characterize coatings and wear damages. Spraying with air instead of argon produced much more small particles. These particles, being removed from the metal sheath surface, are individually sprayed without diluting the concentration hard phases within cores. It results in coatings that contain large lamellae with hardnesses sufficient to withstand abrasion. By considering both the wire constitution and the spraying conditions, it was found possible to fabricate composite stainless steel coatings that show a 400% increase in wear resistance over bulk stainless steel.

  7. Cleaning, pickling, and passivation of stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, C.P. )

    1994-05-01

    Stainless steels (SS) are chosen for various services because of their appearance and corrosion resistance and for their freedom from contamination in storage and shipment. However, certain conditions in handling or fabrication may make these alloys susceptible to localized corrosion or unsatisfactory performance. A surface of cleanliness, uniformity, and corrosion resistance is desirable and, in some services, absolutely required. Definitions and procedures for cleaning, pickling, and passivating stainless steels are reviewed. Surface contamination and defects including grinding marks and smut are discussed, as are measures for preventing and correcting them. The cleaning and passivating sequence required for free-machining stainless grades is included.

  8. High Mn austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-13

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy includes, in weight percent: >4 to 15 Mn; 8 to 15 Ni; 14 to 16 Cr; 2.4 to 3 Al; 0.4 to 1 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; 0.05 to 0.2 C; 0.01 to 0.02 B; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1W; up to 3 Cu; up to 1 Si; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale including alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, the particles including at least one of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure that is essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  9. Forming "dynamic" membranes on stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, C. A.; Gaddis, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    "Dynamic" zirconium polyacrylic membrane is formed directly on stainless steel substrate without excessive corrosion of steel. Membrane is potentially useful in removal of contaminated chemicals from solution through reversed osmosis. Application includes use in filtration and desalination equipment, and in textile industry for separation of dyes from aqueous solvents.

  10. Corrosion behavior of sensitized duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Torres, F J; Panyayong, W; Rogers, W; Velasquez-Plata, D; Oshida, Y; Moore, B K

    1998-01-01

    The present work investigates the corrosion behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel in 0.9% NaCl solution after various heat-treatments, and compares it to that of 316L austenitic stainless steel. Both stainless steels were heat-treated at 500, 650, and 800 degrees C in air for 1 h, followed by furnace cooling. Each heat-treated sample was examined for their microstructures and Vickers micro-hardness, and subjected to the X-ray diffraction for the phase identification. Using potentiostatic polarization method, each heat-treated sample was corrosion-tested in 37 degrees C 0.9% NaCl solution to estimate its corrosion rate. It was found that simulated sensitization showed an adverse influence on both steels, indicating that corrosion rates increased by increasing the sensitization temperatures. PMID:9713683

  11. Weldable, age hardenable, austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Brooks, J.A.; Krenzer, R.W.

    1975-07-22

    An age hardenable, austenitic stainless steel having superior weldability properties as well as resistance to degradation of properties in a hydrogen atmosphere is described. It has a composition of from about 24.0 to about 34.0 weight percent (w/o) nickel, from about 13.5 to about 16.0 w/o chromium, from about 1.9 to about 2.3 w/o titanium, from about 1.0 to about 1.5 w/ o molybdenum, from about 0.01 to about 0.05 w/o carbon, from about 0 to about 0.25 w/o manganese, from about 0 to about 0.01 w/o phosphorous and preferably about 0.005 w/o maximum, from about 0 to about 0.010 w/o sulfur and preferably about 0.005 w/o maximum, from about 0 to about 0.25 w/o silicon, from about 0.1 to about 0.35 w/o aluminum, from about 0.10 to about 0.50 w/o vanadium, from about 0 to about 0.0015 w/o boron, and the balance essentially iron. (auth)

  12. Superplastic forming of stainless steel automotive components

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, B.; Elmer, J.; Carol, L.

    1997-02-06

    Exhaust emission standards are governmentally controlled standards, which are increasingly stringent, forcing alternate strategies to meet these standards. One approach to improve the efficiency of the exhaust emission equipment is to decrease the time required to get the catalytic converter to optimum operating temperature. To accomplish this, automotive manufacturers are using double wall stainless steel exhaust manifolds to reduce heat loss of the exhaust gases to the converter. The current method to manufacture double wall stainless steel exhaust components is to use a low-cost alloy with good forming properties and extensively form, cut, assemble, and weld the pieces. Superplastic forming (SPF) technology along with alloy improvements has potential at making this process more cost effective. Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and USCAR Low Emission Partnership (LEP) worked under a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) to evaluate material properties, SPF behavior, and welding behavior of duplex stainless steel alloy for automotive component manufacturing. Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has a separate CRADA with the LEP to use SPF technology to manufacture a double wall stainless steel exhaust component. As a team these CRADAs developed and demonstrated a technical plan to accomplish making double wall stainless steel exhaust manifolds.

  13. Casting Stainless-Steel Models Around Pressure Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Peter; Micol, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Survivability of thin-wall stainless-steel tubing increased to nearly 100 percent. Improves state of art in pressure-model castings and reduces cost associated with machining complete model from stainless-steel blank.

  14. Ultrasonic Spectroscopy of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgriff, Laura M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Hebsur, Mohan G.; Baaklini, George Y.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2003-01-01

    Enhanced, lightweight material systems, such as 17-4PH stainless steel sandwich panels are being developed for use as fan blades and fan containment material systems for next generation engines. In order to improve the production for these systems, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, such as ultrasonic spectroscopy, are being utilized to evaluate the brazing quality between the 17-4PH stainless steel face plates and the 17-4PH stainless steel foam core. Based on NDE data, shear tests are performed on sections representing various levels of brazing quality from an initial batch of these sandwich structures. Metallographic characterization of brazing is done to corroborate NDE findings and the observed shear failure mechanisms.

  15. Explosive Surface Hardening of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs-Coskun, T.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the effects of explosion hardening on the microstructure and the hardness of austenitic stainless steel have been studied. The optimum explosion hardening technology of austenitic stainless steel was researched. In case of the explosive hardening used new idea mean indirect hardening setup. Austenitic stainless steels have high plasticity and can be easily cold formed. However, during cold processing the hardening phenomena always occurs. Upon the explosion impact, the deformation mechanism indicates a plastic deformation and this deformation induces a phase transformation (martensite). The explosion hardening enhances the mechanical properties of the material, includes the wear resistance and hardness. In case of indirect hardening as function of the setup parameters specifically the flayer plate position the hardening increased differently. It was find a relationship between the explosion hardening setup and the hardening level.

  16. Stainless Steel Microstructure and Mechanical Properties Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, Nathan T

    2010-06-01

    A nitrogen strengthened 21-6-9 stainless steel plate was spinformed into hemispherical test shapes. A battery of laboratory tests was used to characterize the hemispheres. The laboratory tests show that near the pole (axis) of a spinformed hemisphere the yield strength is the lowest because this area endures the least “cold-work” strengthening, i.e., the least deformation. The characterization indicated that stress-relief annealing spinformed stainless steel hemispheres does not degrade mechanical properties. Stress-relief annealing reduces residual stresses while maintaining relatively high mechanical properties. Full annealing completely eliminates residual stresses, but reduces yield strength by about 30%.

  17. Measuring secondary phases in duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calliari, I.; Brunelli, K.; Dabalà, M.; Ramous, E.

    2009-01-01

    The use of duplex stainless steels is limited by their susceptibility to the formation of dangerous intermetallic phases resulting in detrimental effects on impact toughness and corrosion resistance. This precipitation and the quantitative determinations of the phases have received considerable attention and different precipitation sequences (σ phase, χ phase, and carbides) have been suggested. This study investigates the phase transformation during continuous cooling and isothermal treatments in commercial duplex stainless steel grades and the effects on alloy properties, and compares the most common techniques of analysis.

  18. Embrittlement of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Alexander, D.J.

    1995-06-01

    To prevent hot-cracking, austenitic stainless steel welds generally contain a small percent of delta ferrite. Although ferrite has been found to effectively prevent hot-cracking, it can lead to embrittlement of welds when exposed to elevated temperatures. The aging behavior of type-308 stainless steel weld has been examined over a range of temperatures 475--850 C for times up to 10,000 hrs. Upon aging, and depending on the temperature range, the unstable ferrite may undergo a variety of solid state transformations. These phase changes creep-rupture and Charpy impact properties.

  19. Dendritic inhomogeneity of stainless maraging steels

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnikova, S.I.; Drobot, A.V.; Shmelev, A.Y.; Vukelich, S.B.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigated dendritic inhomogeneity in industrial ingots 630 mm (steel I) in diameter and 500 mm (steel II) in diameter. The variation in the degree of dendritic inhomogeneity was investigated over the height of the ingots and across the sections on an MS-46 microprobe. It was established that the elements can be placed in the following order in accordance with the degree of reduction in the liquation factor: titanium, molybdenum, nickel, chromium, and cobalt. Titanium and molybdenum exhibit forward liquation in both steels, and chromium in steel II. The distribution of nickel and chromium in the steel I ingots and cobalt in the steel II ingots is unconventional. Dendritic inhomogeneity, which must be considered in assigning the heat treatment for finished articles, develops during the crystallization of stainless maraging steels.

  20. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  1. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  3. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture. (a) Identification. A stainless steel suture is a needled or unneedled nonabsorbable surgical suture composed of...

  4. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture. (a) Identification. A stainless steel suture is a needled or unneedled nonabsorbable surgical suture composed of...

  5. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture. (a) Identification. A stainless steel suture is a needled or unneedled nonabsorbable surgical suture composed of...

  6. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture. (a) Identification. A stainless steel suture is a needled or unneedled nonabsorbable surgical suture composed of...

  7. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture. (a) Identification. A stainless steel suture is a needled or unneedled nonabsorbable surgical suture composed of...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  10. Reducing corrosion in aluminum-steel joints

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This article examines how galvanic corrosion in aluminum-intensive steel structures can be controlled, without losing performance, by using transition materials. The topics of the article include the transition material concept, corrosion resistance, experimental conditions, and the results of the experiment including mass loss of lap joints, strength retention, joining methods. The results show how use of steel-clad aluminum transition material in joining aluminum and steel deals successfully addresses the problems of joining and durability associated with increasing use of aluminum on automobiles.

  11. Apparatus and process for ultrasonic seam welding stainless steel foils

    DOEpatents

    Leigh, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    An ultrasonic seam welding apparatus having a head which is rotated to form contact, preferably rolling contact, between a metallurgically inert coated surface of the head and an outside foil of a plurality of layered foils or work materials. The head is vibrated at an ultrasonic frequency, preferably along a longitudinal axis of the head. The head is constructed to transmit vibration through a contacting surface of the head into each of the layered foils. The contacting surface of the head is preferably coated with aluminum oxide to prevent the head from becoming welded to layered stainless steel foils.

  12. ASTM update for stainless steels II

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, R.M.

    1999-10-01

    Specifiers and users of stainless steel (SS) should be aware that the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) has revised several of its SS specifications. These changes affect grades commonly used in process and other industries. These changes are discussed.

  13. Proof Testing Of Stainless-Steel Bolts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Cheng H.; Hendrickson, James A.; Bamford, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes study of development of method for nondestructive proof testing of bolts made of A286 stainless steel. Based on concept that the higher load bolt survives, the smaller the largest flaw and, therefore, the longer its fatigue life after test. Calculations and experiments increase confidence in nondestructive proof tests.

  14. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Juhas, M.C.

    1985-09-19

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K.

  15. Materials data handbooks on stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    Two handbooks which summarize latest available data have been published. Two types of stainless steels, alloy A-286 and Type 301, are described. Each handbook is divided into twelve chapters. Scope of information presented includes physical- and mechanical-property data at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures.

  16. Materials data handbook: Stainless steel type 301

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information for stainless steel type 301 is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical properties at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and bonding is developed.

  17. Fabrication of stainless steel foil utilizing chromized steel strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loria, Edward A.

    1980-10-01

    Stainless steel foil has properties which are, in many respects, unmatched by alternative thin films. The high strength to weight ratio and resistance to corrosion and oxidation at elevated temperatures are generally advantageous. The aerospace and automotive industries have used Type 430 and 304 foil in turbine engine applications. Foil around 2 mils (5.1 × 10-3 cm) thick has been appropriate for the recuperator or heat exchanger and this product has also been used in honeycomb and truss-core structures. Further, such foil has been employed as a wrap to protect tool steel parts from contamination during heat treating. A large part of the high cost of producing stainless steel foil by rolling is due to the complicated and expensive rolling mill and annealing equipment involved. A method will be described which produces (solid) stainless steel foil from chromized (coated) steel which can be cheaper than the conventional processing stainless steel, such as Type 430, from ingot to foil. Also, the material is more ductile and less work hardenable during processing to foil and consequently intermediate annealing treatments are eliminated and scrap losses minimized.

  18. Corrosion Testing of Stainless Steel Fuel Cell Hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1998-11-01

    Metal hardware is gaining increasing interest in polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) development as a possible alternative to machined graphite hardware because of its potential for low-cost manufacturing combined with its intrinsic high conductivity, minimal permeability and advantageous mechanical properties. A major barrier to more widespread use of metal hardware has been the susceptibility of various metals to corrosion. Few pure metals can withstand the relatively aggressive environment of a fuel cell and thus the choices for hardware are quite limited. Precious metals such as platinum or gold are prohibitively expensive and so tend to be utilized as coatings on inexpensive substrates such as aluminum or stainless steel. The main challenge with coatings has been to achieve pin-hole free surfaces that will remain so after years of use. Titanium has been used to some extent and though it is very corrosion-resistant, it is also relatively expensive and often still requires some manner of surface coating to prevent the formation of a poorly conducting oxide layer. In contrast, metal alloys may hold promise as potentially low-cost, corrosion-resistant materials for bipolar plates. The dozens of commercially available stainless steel and nickel based alloys have been specifically formulated to offer a particular advantage depending upon their application. In the case of austenitic stainless steels, for example, 316 SS contains molybdenum and a higher chromium content than its more common counterpart, 304 SS, that makes it more noble and increases its corrosion resistance. Likewise, 316L SS contains less carbon than 316 SS to make it easier to weld. A number of promising corrosion-resistant, highly noble alloys such as Hastelloy{trademark} or Duplex{trademark} (a stainless steel developed for seawater service) are available commercially, but are expensive and difficult to obtain in various forms (i.e. wire screen, foil, etc.) or in small amounts for R and D

  19. Fatigue of stainless steel in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, G.; Altstetter, C.

    1983-10-01

    The fatigue crack growth rates of two austenitic stainless steel alloys, AISI 301 and 302, were compared in air, argon, and hydrogen environments at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. Under the stresses at the crack tip the austenite in type 301 steel transformed martensitically to a’ to a greater extent than in type 302 steel. The steels were also tested in the cold worked condition under hydrogen or argon. Hydrogen was found to have a deleterious effect on both steels, but the effect was stronger in the unstable than in the stable alloy. Cold work decreased fatigue crack growth rates in argon and hydrogen, but the decrease was less marked in hydrogen than in argon. Metallographic, fractographic, and microhardness surveys in the vicinity of the fatigue crack were used to try to understand the reasons for the observed fatigue behavior.

  20. Tensile-property characterization of thermally aged cast stainless steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, W. F.; Toben, P. T.; Soppet, W. K.; Chopra, O. K.; Energy Technology

    1994-03-03

    The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of cast stainless steels during service in light water reactors has been evaluated. Tensile data for several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steels are presented. Thermal aging increases the tensile strength of these steels. The high-C Mo-bearing CF-8M steels are more susceptible to thermal aging than the Mo-free CF-3 or CF-8 steels. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in tensile flow and yield stresses and engineering stress-vs.-strain curve of cast stainless steel as a function of time and temperature of service. The tensile properties of aged cast stainless steel are estimated from known material information, i.e., chemical composition and the initial tensile strength of the steel. The correlations described in this report may be used for assessing thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel components.

  1. Tensile-property characterization of thermally aged cast stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, W.F.; Toben, P.T.; Soppet, W.K.; Chopra, O.K.

    1994-02-01

    The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of cast stainless steels during service in light water reactors has been evaluated. Tensile data for several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steels are presented. Thermal aging increases the tensile strength of these steels. The high-C Mo-bearing CF-8M steels are more susceptible to thermal aging than the Mo-free CF-3 or CF-8 steels. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in tensile flow and yield stresses and engineering stress-vs.-strain curve of cast stainless steel as a function of time and temperature of service. The tensile properties of aged cast stainless steel are estimated from known material information, i.e., chemical composition and the initial tensile strength of the steel. The correlations described in this report may be used for assessing thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel components.

  2. Phase Transformation in Cast Superaustenitic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nathaniel Steven Lee Phillips

    2006-12-12

    Superaustenitic stainless steels constitute a group of Fe-based alloys that are compositionally balanced to have a purely austenitic matrix and exhibit favorable pitting and crevice corrosion resistant properties and mechanical strength. However, intermetallic precipitates such as sigma and Laves can form during casting or exposure to high-temperature processing, which degrade the corrosion and mechanical properties of the material. The goal of this study was to accurately characterize the solid-solid phase transformations seen in cast superaustenitic stainless steels. Heat treatments were performed to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formations in alloys CN3MN and CK3MCuN. Microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, WDS). The equilibrium microstructures, composed primarily of sigma and Laves within purely austenitic matrices, showed slow transformation kinetics. Factors that determine the extent of transformation, including diffusion, nucleation, and growth, are discussed.

  3. Formability of type 304 stainless steel sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Coubrough, G.J.; Matlock, D.K.; VanTyne, C.J.

    1992-09-01

    Punch-stretch tests to determine formability of type 304 stainless steel sheet were conducted using a hemispherical dome test. Sheets of 19.1 mm width and 177.8 mm width were stretched on a 101.6 mm diameter punch at punch rates between 0.042 to 2.12 mm/s with three lubricant systems: a mineral seal oil, thin polytetrafluoroethelyne sheet with mineral seal oil, and silicone rubber with mineral seal oil. The resulting strain distributions were measured and the amount of martensite was determined by magnetic means. Increasing lubricity resulted in more uniform strain distributions while increased punch rates tended to decrease both strain and transformation distributions. High forming limit values were related to the formation of high and uniformly distributed martensite volume fractions during deformation. The results of this study are interpreted with an analysis of the effects of strain and temperature on strain induced martensite formation in metastable austenitic stainless steels.

  4. Formability of type 304 stainless steel sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Coubrough, G.J. . Rocky Flats Plant); Matlock, D.K.; VanTyne, C.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Punch-stretch tests to determine formability of type 304 stainless steel sheet were conducted using a hemispherical dome test. Sheets of 19.1 mm width and 177.8 mm width were stretched on a 101.6 mm diameter punch at punch rates between 0.042 to 2.12 mm/s with three lubricant systems: a mineral seal oil, thin polytetrafluoroethelyne sheet with mineral seal oil, and silicone rubber with mineral seal oil. The resulting strain distributions were measured and the amount of martensite was determined by magnetic means. Increasing lubricity resulted in more uniform strain distributions while increased punch rates tended to decrease both strain and transformation distributions. High forming limit values were related to the formation of high and uniformly distributed martensite volume fractions during deformation. The results of this study are interpreted with an analysis of the effects of strain and temperature on strain induced martensite formation in metastable austenitic stainless steels.

  5. Tritium Depth Profiles in 316 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torikai, Yuji; Murata, Daiju; Penzhorn, Ralf-Dieter; Akaishi, Kenya; Watanabe, Kuniaki; Matsuyama, Masao

    To investigate the behavior of hydrogen uptake and release by 316 stainless steel (SS316), as-received and finely polished stainless steel specimens were exposed at 573 K to tritium gas diluted with hydrogen. Then tritium concentration in the exposed specimens was measured as a function of depth using a chemical etching method. All the tritium concentration profiles showed a sharp drop in the range of 10 μm from the top surface up to the bulk. The amount of tritium absorbed into the polished specimens was three times larger than that into the as-received specimen. However, the polishing effects disappeared by exposing to the air for a long time.

  6. Instabilities in stabilized austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayer, Raghavan; Klein, C. F.; Marzinsky, C. N.

    1992-09-01

    The effect of aging on the precipitation of grain boundary phases in three austenitic stainless steels (AISI 347, 347AP, and an experimental steel stabilized with hafnium) was investigated. Aging was performed both on bulk steels as well as on samples which were subjected to a thermal treatment to simulate the coarse grain region of the heat affected zone (HAZ) during welding. Aging of the bulk steels at 866 K for 8000 hours resulted in the precipitation of Cr23C6 carbides, σ, and Fe2Nb phases; the propensity for precipitation was least for the hafnium-stabilized steel. Weld simulation of the HAZ resulted in dissolution of the phases present in the as-received 347 and 347AP steels, leading to grain coarsening. Subsequent aging caused extensive grain boundary Cr23C6 carbides and inhomogeneous matrix precipitation. In addition, steel 347AP formed a precipitate free zone (PFZ) along the grain boundaries. The steel containing hafnium showed the best microstructural stability to aging and welding.

  7. Hydrogen induced plastic deformation of stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, V.J.; Keim, E.G.; Geijselaers, H.J.M.

    1998-12-31

    Hydrogen can influence the behavior of materials significantly. The effects of hydrogen are specially pronounced in high fugacities of hydrogen which can occur at the surface of steels in contact with certain aqueous environments. In this investigation the effect of high fugacity hydrogen on the surface of stainless steel was investigated using electrochemical cathodic charging. Microhardness was measured on the cross section. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the dislocation substructure just below the surface. Computer simulation using finite element method was carried out to estimate the extent and severity of the deformation. The significance of the results are discussed in relation to the loss of ductility due to hydrogen.

  8. Properties of cryogenically worked metals. [stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartzberg, F. R.; Kiefer, T. F.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to determine whether the mechanical properties of cryogenically worked 17-7PH stainless steel are suitable for service from ambient to cryogenic temperatures. It was determined that the stress corrosion resistance of the cryo-worked material is quite adequate for structural service. The tensile properties and fracture toughness at room temperature were comparable to titanium alloy 6Al-4V. However, at cryogenic temperatures, the properties were not sufficient to recommend consideration for structural service.

  9. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  10. Softened-Stainless-Steel O-Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marquis, G. A.; Waters, William I.

    1993-01-01

    In fabrication of O-ring of new type, tube of 304 stainless steel bent around mandril into circle and welded closed into ring. Ring annealed in furnace to make it soft and highly ductile. In this condition, used as crushable, deformable O-ring seal. O-ring replacements used in variety of atmospheres and temperatures, relatively inexpensive, fabricated with minimum amount of work, amenable to one-of-a-kind production, reusable, and environmentally benign.

  11. Effect of ferrite on cast stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nadezhdin, A.; Cooper, K. ); Timbers, G. . Kraft Pulp Division)

    1994-09-01

    Premature failure of stainless steel castings in bleach washing service is attributed to poor casting quality high porosity and to a high ferrite content, which makes the castings susceptible to corrosion by hot acid chloride solutions. A survey of the chemical compositions and ferrite contents of corrosion-resistant castings in bleach plants at three pulp mills found high [delta]-ferrite levels in the austenitic matrix due to the improper balance between austenite and ferrite stabilizers.

  12. Antimicrobial Cu-bearing stainless steel scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Ren, Ling; Li, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Shuyuan; Sercombe, Timothy B; Yang, Ke

    2016-11-01

    Copper-bearing stainless steel scaffolds with two different structures (Body Centered Cubic and Gyroid labyrinth) at two solid fractions (25% and 40%) were fabricated from both 316L powder and a mixture of 316L and elemental Cu powder using selective laser melting, and relative 316L scaffolds were served as control group. After processing, the antimicrobial testing demonstrated that the 316L-Cu scaffolds presented excellent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, and the cell viability assay indicated that there was no cytotoxic effect of 316L-Cu scaffolds on rat marrow mesenchymal stem cells. As such, these have the potential to reduce implant-associated infections. The Cu was also found to homogeneously distribute within the microstructure by scanning electronic microcopy. The addition of Cu would not significantly affect its strength and stiffness compared to 316L scaffold, and the stiffness of all the scaffolds (3-20GPa) is similar to that of bone and much less than that of bulk stainless steel. Consequently, fabrication of such low stiffness porous structures, especially coupled with the addition of antimicrobial Cu, may provide a new direction for medical stainless steels. PMID:27524049

  13. SRS stainless steel beneficial reuse program

    SciTech Connect

    Boettinger, W.L.

    1997-02-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) has thousands of tons of stainless steel radioactive scrap metal (RSNI). Much of the metal is volumetrically contaminated. There is no {open_quotes}de minimis{close_quotes} free release level for volumetric material, and therefore no way to recycle the metal into the normal commercial market. If declared waste, the metal would qualify as low level radioactive waste (LLW) and ultimately be dispositioned through shallow land buried at a cost of millions of dollars. The metal however could be recycled in a {open_quotes}controlled release{close_quote} manner, in the form of containers to hold other types of radioactive waste. This form of recycle is generally referred to as {open_quotes}Beneficial Reuse{close_quotes}. Beneficial reuse reduces the amount of disposal space needed and reduces the need for virgin containers which would themselves become contaminated. Stainless steel is particularly suited for long term storage because of its resistance to corrosion. To assess the practicality of stainless steel RSM recycle the SRS Benficial Reuse Program began a demonstration in 1994, funded by the DOE Office of Science and Technology. This paper discusses the experiences gained in this program.

  14. Cast Stainless Steel Ferrite and Grain Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, Clayton O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Mathews, Royce; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-09-01

    In-service inspection requirements dictate that piping welds in the primary pressure boundary of light-water reactors be subject to a volumetric examination based on the rules contained within the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI. The purpose of the inspection is the reliable detection and accurate sizing of service-induced degradation and/or material flaws introduced during fabrication. The volumetric inspection is usually carried out using ultrasonic testing (UT) methods. However, the varied metallurgical macrostructures and microstructures of cast austenitic stainless steel piping and fittings, including statically cast stainless steel and centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS), introduce significant variations in the propagation and attenuation of ultrasonic energy. These variations complicate interpretation of the UT responses and may compromise the reliability of UT inspection. A review of the literature indicated that a correlation may exist between the microstructure and the delta ferrite content of the casting alloy. This paper discusses the results of a recent study where the goal was to determine if a correlation existed between measured and/or calculated ferrite content and grain structure in CCSS pipe.

  15. Cold Spray Repair of Martensitic Stainless Steel Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccoli, M.; Cornacchia, G.; Maestrini, D.; Marconi, G. P.; Roberti, R.

    2014-12-01

    The possibility of using cold spray as repair technique of martensitic stainless steel components was evaluated through laboratory investigations. An austenitic stainless steel feedstock powder was chosen, instead of soft metals powders like nickel, copper, or aluminum, used for repairing components made in light alloy or cast iron. The present study directly compares the microstructure, the residual stresses, and the micro-hardness of repairs obtained by cold spray and by TIG welding, that is commonly used as repair technique in large steel components. XRD and optical metallographic analysis of the repairs showed that cold spray offers some advantages, inducing compressive residual stresses in the repair and avoiding alterations of the interface between repair and base material. For these reasons, a heat treatment after the cold spray repair is not required to restore the base material properties, whereas a post-weld heat treatment is needed after the welding repair. Cold spray repair also exhibits a higher micro-hardness than the welding repair. In addition, the cavitation erosion resistance of a cold spray coating was investigated through ultrasonic cavitation tests, and the samples worn surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy.

  16. Decontaminating and Melt Recycling Tritium Contaminated Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1995-04-03

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and several university and industrial partners are evaluating recycling radioactively contaminated stainless steel. The goal of this program is to recycle contaminated stainless steel scrap from US Department of Energy national defense facilities. There is a large quantity of stainless steel at the DOE Savannah River Site from retired heavy water moderated Nuclear material production reactors (for example heat exchangers and process water piping), that will be used in pilot studies of potential recycle processes. These parts are contaminated by fission products, activated species, and tritium generated by neutron irradiation of the primary reactor coolant, which is heavy (deuterated) water. This report reviews current understanding of tritium contamination of stainless steel and previous studies of decontaminating tritium exposed stainless steel. It also outlines stainless steel refining methods, and proposes recommendations based on this review.

  17. Amorphous stainless steel coatings prepared by reactive magnetron-sputtering from austenitic stainless steel targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusenza, Salvatore; Schaaf, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Stainless steel films were reactively magnetron sputtered in argon/methane gas flow onto oxidized silicon wafers using austenitic stainless-steel targets. The deposited films of about 200 nm thickness were characterized by conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, magneto-optical Kerr-effect, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, atomic force microscopy, corrosion resistance tests, and Raman spectroscopy. These complementary methods were used for a detailed examination of the carburization effects in the sputtered stainless-steel films. The formation of an amorphous and soft ferromagnetic phase in a wide range of the processing parameters was found. Further, the influence of the substrate temperature and of post vacuum-annealing were examined to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the carburization process and phase formation.

  18. 46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195 Section... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its... the aluminum cargo tank must meet the steel structural standards of the American Bureau of...

  19. 46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195 Section... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its... the aluminum cargo tank must meet the steel structural standards of the American Bureau of...

  20. 46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195 Section... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its... the aluminum cargo tank must meet the steel structural standards of the American Bureau of...

  1. 46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195 Section... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its... the aluminum cargo tank must meet the steel structural standards of the American Bureau of...

  2. 46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195 Section... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its... the aluminum cargo tank must meet the steel structural standards of the American Bureau of...

  3. Weldment for austenitic stainless steel and method

    DOEpatents

    Bagnall, Christopher; McBride, Marvin A.

    1985-01-01

    For making defect-free welds for joining two austenitic stainless steel mers, using gas tungsten-arc welding, a thin foil-like iron member is placed between the two steel members to be joined, prior to making the weld, with the foil-like iron member having a higher melting point than the stainless steel members. When the weld is formed, there results a weld nugget comprising melted and then solidified portions of the joined members with small portions of the foil-like iron member projecting into the solidified weld nugget. The portions of the weld nugget proximate the small portions of the foil-like iron member which project into the weld nugget are relatively rich in iron. This causes these iron-rich nugget portions to display substantial delta ferrite during solidification of the weld nugget which eliminates weld defects which could otherwise occur. This is especially useful for joining austenitic steel members which, when just below the solidus temperature, include at most only a very minor proportion of delta ferrite.

  4. Superhard Nanocrystalline Homometallic Stainless Steel on Steel for Seamless Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, Eric J.; Hafley, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to deposit nanocrystalline stainless steel onto steel substrates (homometallic) for enhanced wear and corrosion resistance. Homometallic coatings provide superior adhesion, and it has been shown that ultrafine-grained materials exhibit the increased hardness and decreased permeability desired for protective coatings. Nanocrystals will be produced by controlling nucleation and growth and use of an ion beam during deposition by e-beam evaporation or sputtering. Phase I is depositing 31 6L nanocrystalline stainless steel onto 31 6L stainless steel substrates. These coatings exhibit hardnesses comparable to those normally obtained for ceramic coatings such ZrO2, and possess the superior adhesion of seamless, homometallic coatings. Hardening the surface with a similar material also enhances adhesion, by avoiding problems associated with thermal and lattice mismatch. So far we have deposited nanocrystalline homometallic 316L stainless steel coatings by varying the ions and the current density of the ion beams. For all deposition conditions we have produced smooth, uniform, superhard coatings. All coatings exhibit hardness of at least 200% harder than that of bulk materials. Our measurements indicate that there is a direct relationship between nanohardness and the current density of the ion beam. Stress measurements indicate that stress in the films is increasingly proportional to current density of the ion beam. TEM, XPS, and XRD results indicate that the coated layers consist of FCC structure nanocrystallites with a dimension of about 10 to 20 nm. The Ni and Mo concentration of these coating are lower than those of bulk 316L but the concentration of Cr is higher.

  5. Stainless Steel Leaches Nickel and Chromium into Foods During Cooking

    PubMed Central

    Kamerud, Kristin L.; Hobbie, Kevin A.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel saucepan; cooking times of 2 to 20 hours, ten consecutive cooking cycles, and four commercial tomato sauces. After a simulated cooking process, samples were analyzed by ICP-MS for Ni and Cr. After six hours of cooking, Ni and Cr concentrations in tomato sauce increased up to 26- and 7-fold respectively, depending on the grade of stainless steel. Longer cooking durations resulted in additional increases in metal leaching, where Ni concentrations increased 34 fold and Cr increased approximately 35 fold from sauces cooked without stainless steel. Cooking with new stainless steel resulted in the largest increases. Metal leaching decreases with sequential cooking cycles and stabilized after the sixth cooking cycle, though significant metal contributions to foods were still observed. The tenth cooking cycle, resulted in an average of 88 μg of Ni and 86 μg of Cr leached per 126 g serving of tomato sauce. Stainless steel cookware can be an overlooked source of nickel and chromium, where the contribution is dependent on stainless steel grade, cooking time, and cookware usage. PMID:23984718

  6. 3. INTERIOR VIEW OF SMOKEHOUSE UNIT; NOTE STAINLESS STEEL NOZZLES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. INTERIOR VIEW OF SMOKEHOUSE UNIT; NOTE STAINLESS STEEL NOZZLES THAT INTRODUCED SMOKE INTO UNIT; FLOOR IS UNPAINTED STEEL - Rath Packing Company, Smokehouse-Hog Chilling Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  7. Nanostructured nickel-free austenitic stainless steel/hydroxyapatite composites.

    PubMed

    Tulinski, Maciej; Jurczyk, Mieczyslaw

    2012-11-01

    In this work Ni-free austenitic stainless steels with nanostructure and their nanocomposites with hydroxyapatite are presented and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction and optical profiling. The samples were synthesized by mechanical alloying, heat treatment and nitriding of elemental microcrystalline powders with addition of hydroxyapatite (HA). In our work we wanted to introduce into stainless steel hydroxyapatite ceramics that have been intensively studied for bone repair and replacement applications. Such applications were chosen because of their high biocompatibility and ability to bond to bone. Since nickel-free austenitic stainless steels seem to have better mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility compared to 316L stainless steels, it is possible that composite made of this steel and HA could improve properties, as well. Mechanical alloying and nitriding are very effective technologies to improve the corrosion resistance of stainless steel. Similar process in case of nanocomposites of stainless steel with hydroxyapatite helps achieve even better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Hence nanocrystalline nickel-free stainless steels and nickel-free stainless steel/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites could be promising bionanomaterials for use as a hard tissue replacement implants, e.g., orthopedic implants. In such application, the surface roughness and more specifically the surface topography influences the proliferation of cells (e.g., osteoblasts). PMID:23421285

  8. Corrosion study of bare and coated stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    A program was conducted at Kennedy Space Center from February 1968 to February 1971 to evaluate the performance of austenitic stainless steel alloys used in fluid systems lines. For several years, there had been numerous failures of stainless steel hardware caused by pitting and stress corrosion cracking. Several alloys were evaluated for effectiveness of certain sacrificial-type protective coverings in preventing corrosion failures. Samples were tested in specially designed racks placed 91 meters (100 yards) above high-tide line at Cape Kennedy. It is concluded that: (1) unprotected tubing samples showed evidence of pitting initiation after 2 weeks; (2) although some alloys develop larger pits than others, it is probable that the actual pitting rate is independent of alloy type; (3) the deepest pitting occurred in the sheltered part of the samples; and (4) zinc-rich coatings and an aluminum-filled coating have afforded sacrificial protection against pitting for at least 28 months. It is believed that a much longer effective coating life can be expected.

  9. Gas Atomization of Stainless Steel - Slow Motion

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Stainless steel liquid atomized by supersonic argon gas into a spray of droplets at ~1800ºC. Atomization of metal requires high pressure gas and specialized chambers for cooling and collecting the powders without contamination. The critical step for morphological control is the impingement of the gas on the melt stream. The video is a black and white high speed video of a liquid metal stream being atomized by high pressure gas. This material was atomized at the Ames Laboratory's Materials Preparation Center http://www.mpc.ameslab.gov

  10. Characterization of silane layers on modified stainless steel surfaces and related stainless steel-plastic hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honkanen, Mari; Hoikkanen, Maija; Vippola, Minnamari; Vuorinen, Jyrki; Lepistö, Toivo; Jussila, Petri; Ali-Löytty, Harri; Lampimäki, Markus; Valden, Mika

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize silane layers on the modified stainless steel surfaces and relate it to the adhesion in the injection-molded thermoplastic urethane-stainless steel hybrids. The silane layers were characterized with scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope, allowing the direct quantization of silane layer thickness and its variation. The surface topographies were characterized with atomic force microscope and chemical analyses were performed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The mechanical strength of the respective stainless steel-thermoplastic urethane hybrids was determined by peel test. Polishing and oxidation treatment of the steel surface improved the silane layer uniformity compared to the industrially pickled surface and increased the adhesion strength of the hybrids, resulting mainly cohesive failure in TPU. XPS analysis indicated that the improved silane bonding to the modified steel surface was due to clean Fe 2O 3-type surface oxide and stronger interaction with TPU was due to more amino species on the silane layer surface compared to the cleaned, industrially pickled surface. Silane layer thickness affected failure type of the hybrids, with a thick silane layer the hybrids failed mainly in the silane layer and with a thinner layer cohesively in plastic.

  11. 78 FR 21417 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ..., Washington, DC, and by publishing the notice in the Federal Register on October 22, 2012 (77 FR 64545). The... COMMISSION Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... drawn stainless steel sinks from China, provided for in subheading 7324.10.00 of the Harmonized...

  12. 77 FR 23752 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... the notice in the Federal Register of March 7, 2012 (77 FR 13631). The conference was held in... COMMISSION Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... (April 2012), entitled Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks from China: Investigation Nos. 701-TA-489 and...

  13. New Method For Joining Stainless Steel to Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emanuel, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    In new process, edge of stainless-steel sheet is perforated, and joined to titanium by resistance seam welding. Titanium flows into perforations, forming a strong interlocking joint. Process creates a quasi-metallurgical bond between the thin sheets of stainless steel and titanium.

  14. 6. DETAIL VIEW OF SPIN FORM FURNACE FOR STAINLESS STEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL VIEW OF SPIN FORM FURNACE FOR STAINLESS STEEL FABRICATION. STAINLESS STEEL WAS MACHINED IN SIDE A OF THE BUILDING, BEGINNING IN 1957. (4/24/78) - Rocky Flats Plant, Uranium Rolling & Forming Operations, Southeast section of plant, southeast quadrant of intersection of Central Avenue & Eighth Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  15. THE CLEANING OF 303 STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, T H

    2004-04-20

    The sulfur found on the surfaces of stainless steel 303 (SS303) after nitric acid passivation originated from the MnS inclusions in the steel. The nitric acid attacked and dissolved these MnS inclusions, and redeposited micron-sized elemental sulfur particles back to the surface. To develop an alternative passivation procedure for SS303, citric and phosphoric acids have been evaluated. The experimental results show neither acid causes a significant amount of sulfur deposit. Thus, these two acids can be used as alternatives to nitric acid passivation for NIF applications. For SS303 previously passivated by nitric acid, NaOH soak can be used as a remedial cleaning process to effectively remove the sulfur deposits.

  16. Corrosion of a stainless steel waste heat recuperator

    SciTech Connect

    Federer, J.I.; Tennery, V.J.

    1980-06-01

    Waste heat recuperation has significant potential for saving energy in fossil-fuel-fired industrial furnaces. Preheating the air used to burn the fuel can significantly reduce fuel consumption. The US Department of Energy is contracting several high-temperature waste heat recuperation demonstrations with the objective of using successful efforts to stimulate the industrial utilization of these devices. One of the recuperator demonstration contracts has as an objective the successful operation of a concentric-shell radiation recuperator of a new design on aluminum-scrap-remelting furnaces. The design employs type 309 stainless steel reradiant inserts within the type 309 stainless steel inner shell to increase heat radiation to the recuperator partition, thereby increasing the heat exhanger's effectiveness. The first demonstration recuperator in this program was installed on a furnace fired with No. 2 oil and melting about 60 Mg (66 tons) of aluminum per 24-h day. The unit operated for about 30 d and provided air to the burner at 540/sup 0/C. during this period, a burner control misoperation provided very fuel-rich gases to the base of the recuperator. This fuel combined with safety dilution air at the recuperator base and burned within the recuperator. Also, during this period, air flow loss was detected at the burner. An inspection revealed that this was caused by failure of the partition wall separating the primary and secondary sides of the recuperator. Extensive corrosion of the partition wall and reradiant inserts was also observed. The recuperator was removed from the furnace for an analysis of the failure.

  17. Citric Acid Passivation of Stainless Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasensky, David; Reali, John; Larson, Chris; Carl, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Passivation is a process for cleaning and providing corrosion protection for stainless steel. Currently, on Kennedy Space Center (KSC), only parts passivated with nitric acid are acceptable for use. KSC disposes of approximately 125gal of concentrated nitric acid per year, and receives many parts from vendors who must also dispose of used nitric acid. Unfortunately, nitric acid presents health and environmental hazards. As a result, several recent industry studies have examined citric acid as an alternative. Implementing a citric acid-based passivation procedure would improve the health and environmental safety aspects of passivation process. However although there is a lack of published studies that conclusively prove citric acid is a technically sound passivation agent. In 2007, NASA's KSC Materials Advisory Working Group requested the evaluation of citric acid in place of nitric acid for passivation of parts at KSC. United Space Alliance Materials & Processes engineers have developed a three-phase test plan to evaluate citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid on three stainless steels commonly used at KSC: UNS S30400, S41000, and S17400. Phases 1 and 2 will produce an optimized citric acid treatment based on results from atmospheric exposure at NASA's Beach Corrosion Facility. Phase 3 will compare the optimized solution(s) with nitric acid treatments. If the results indicate that citric acid passivates as well or better than nitric acid, NASA intends to approve this method for parts used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  18. Embrittlement of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    The microstructure of type-308 austenitic stainless steel weld metal containing {gamma} and {delta} and ferrite is shown. Typical composition of the weld metal is Cr-20.2, Ni-9.4, Mn-1.7, Si-0.5, C-0.05, N-0.06 and balance Fe (in wt %). Exposure of austenitic stainless steel welds to elevated temperatures can lead to extensive changes in the microstructural features of the weld metal. On exposure to elevated temperatures over a long period of time, a continuous network of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide forms at the austenite/ferrite interface. Upon aging at temperatures between 550--850 C, ferrite in the weld has been found to be unstable and transforms to sigma phase. These changes have been found to influence mechanical behavior of the weld metal, in particular the creep-rupture properties. For aging temperatures below 550 C the ferrite decomposes spinodally into {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} phases. In addition, precipitation of G-phase occurs within the decomposed ferrite. These transformations at temperatures below 550 C lead to embrittlement of the weld metal as revealed by the Charpy impact properties.

  19. Antibacterial polyelectrolyte micelles for coating stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Falentin-Daudré, Céline; Faure, Emilie; Svaldo-Lanero, Tiziana; Farina, Fabrice; Jérôme, Christine; Van De Weerdt, Cécile; Martial, Joseph; Duwez, Anne-Sophie; Detrembleur, Christophe

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we report on the original synthesis and characterization of novel antimicrobial coatings for stainless steel by alternating the deposition of aqueous solutions of positively charged polyelectrolyte micelles doped with silver-based nanoparticles with a polyanion. The micelles are formed by electrostatic interaction between two oppositely charged polymers: a polycation bearing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine units (DOPA, a major component of natural adhesives) and a polyanion (poly(styrene sulfonate), PSS) without using any block copolymer. DOPA units are exploited for their well-known ability to anchor to stainless steel and to form and stabilize biocidal silver nanoparticles (Ag(0)). The chlorine counteranion of the polycation forms and stabilizes biocidal silver chloride nanoparticles (AgCl). We demonstrate that two layers of micelles (alternated by PSS) doped with silver particles are enough to impart to the surface strong antibacterial activity against gram-negative E. coli. Moreover, micelles that are reservoirs of biocidal Ag(+) can be easily reactivated after depletion. This novel water-based approach is convenient, simple, and attractive for industrial applications. PMID:22506542

  20. Cast alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P

    2013-04-30

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy consisting essentially of, in terms of weight percent ranges 0.15-0.5C; 8-37Ni; 10-25Cr; 2.5-5Al; greater than 0.6, up to 2.5 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; up to 3Mo; up to 3Co; up to 1W; up to 3Cu; up to 15Mn; up to 2Si; up to 0.15B; up to 0.05P; up to 1 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; <0.3Ti+V; <0.03N; and, balance Fe, where the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure, the austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite free and essentially BCC-phase-free. A method of making austenitic stainless steel alloys is also disclosed.

  1. Microbial-Influenced Corrosion of Corten Steel Compared with Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel in Oily Wastewater by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansouri, Hamidreza; Alavi, Seyed Abolhasan; Fotovat, Meysam

    2015-07-01

    The microbial corrosion behavior of three important steels (carbon steel, stainless steel, and Corten steel) was investigated in semi petroleum medium. This work was done in modified nutrient broth (2 g nutrient broth in 1 L oily wastewater) in the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and mixed culture (as a biotic media) and an abiotic medium for 2 weeks. The behavior of corrosion was analyzed by spectrophotometric and electrochemical methods and at the end was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the degree of corrosion of Corten steel in mixed culture, unlike carbon steel and stainless steel, is less than P. aeruginosa inoculated medium because some bacteria affect Corten steel less than other steels. According to the experiments, carbon steel had less resistance than Corten steel and stainless steel. Furthermore, biofilm inhibits separated particles of those steels to spread to the medium; in other words, particles get trapped between biofilm and steel.

  2. In vivo behavior of a high performance duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Cigada, A; De Santis, G; Gatti, A M; Roos, A; Zaffe, D

    1993-01-01

    An in vivo investigation of a new high molybdenum and nitrogen duplex stainless steel (25Cr--7Ni--4Mo--0.3N) has been performed. Cylindrical pins and specially developed devices, to test in static conditions the in vivo localized corrosion resistance, made of this new duplex steel and of a common austenitic stainless steel were implanted in rabbit's femurs for 6 and 12 months. After sacrifice, SEM observations and EDS microanalyses to detect metallic ion release were carried out on the femur sections surrounding the pins. Morphologic observations with stereoscope and SEM were performed on the metallic surfaces of the special devices in order to detect the presence of localized corrosion. Both ion release and localized corrosion were observed for the specimens made of austenitic stainless steel, but not for those made of 25Cr--7Ni--4Mo--0.3N duplex stainless steel. PMID:10148344

  3. Utility chromium stainless steels in the transportation industry

    SciTech Connect

    Northart, J.F.

    1998-12-31

    The advantages of stainless steel in the Transportation Industry have been well documented over the last two decades. Benefits have been based on fractional maintenance costs, improved operational efficiency, and favorable life cycle cost. The bus and coach industry, as well as rail and trucking industry applications have all exhibited excellent histories utilizing stainless steels. The introduction of the new generation utility ferrilic stainless steels (11%--12% Chromium, or Cr 12) has led to a new and major benefit, which is driving the use of stainless steels in the transportation industry to new heights. Application of these corrosion resistant, utility steels in coal hopper cars, bus underframes, truck bodies and chassis, and even some European car chassis, has reshaped the thinking of those interested in excellent life cycle costing.

  4. A mortality study among mild steel and stainless steel welders.

    PubMed Central

    Moulin, J J; Wild, P; Haguenoer, J M; Faucon, D; De Gaudemaris, R; Mur, J M; Mereau, M; Gary, Y; Toamain, J P; Birembaut, Y

    1993-01-01

    A mortality study was carried out in conjunction with the European mortality study among welders coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The study was aimed at assessing risks for lung cancer in relation to exposure to asbestos, welding fumes containing chromium and nickel, and tobacco smoke. The study included a cohort of 2721 welders and an internal comparison group of 6683 manual workers employed in 13 factories in France. The mortality of the two cohorts was studied from 1975 to 1988 by the historical prospective method. Job histories of welders were traced including welding processes used, metals welded, and proportion of worktime spent in welding. Data on smoking habits were collected from medical records. The observed number of deaths were compared with those expected (standardised mortality ratio (SMR)) based on national rates with adjustments for age, sex, and calendar time. The smoking habits of 87% of the whole study population were known. The distribution of welders and controls according to smoking was not statistically different. The overall mortality was slightly higher for welders (SMR = 1.02, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.89-1.18) than for controls (SMR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.84-0.99). For lung cancer, the SMR was 1.24 (95% CI 0.75-1.94) for welders, whereas the corresponding value was lower for controls (SMR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.68-1.26). The SMR for lung cancer was 1.59 among non-shipyard mild steel welders (95% CI 0.73-3.02). This contrasted with the results for all stainless steel welders (SMR = 0.92, 95% CI 0.19-2.69), and for stainless steel welders predominantly exposed to chromium VI (SMR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.12-3.71). Moreover, SMRs for lung cancer for mild steel welders tended to increase with duration of exposure and time since first exposure, leading to significant excesses for duration > or = 20 years and latency > or = 20 years. Such a pattern was not found for stainless steel welders. PMID:8457490

  5. Stainless Steel Round Robin Test: Centrifugally cast stainless steel screening phase

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, D.J.; Doctor, S.R.; Heasler, P.G.; Burck, E.

    1987-10-01

    This report presents the results of the Centrifugally Cast Stainless Steel Round Robin Test (CCSSRRT). The CCSSRRT is the first phase of an effort to investigate and improve the capability and reliability of NDE inspections of light water reactor piping systems. This phase was a screening test to identify the most promising procedures presently available for CCSS. The next phase will be an in-depth program to evaluate the capability and reliability of inservice inspections (ISI) for piping. In the CCSSRRT, 15 centrifugally cast stainless steel pipe sections containing welds and laboratory-grown thermal fatigue cracks in both columnar and equiaxed base material were used. These pipe specimens were inspected by a total of 18 teams from Europe and the United States using a variety of NDE techniques, mostly ultrasonic (UT). The inspections were carried out at the team's facilities and included inspections from both sides of the weld and inspections restricted to one side of the weld. The results of the CCSSRRT make it apparent that a more detailed study on the capability and reliability of procedures to inspect stainless steel materials is needed to better understand the specific material and flaw properties and how they affect the outcome of an inspection.

  6. Nickel release from nickel-plated metals and stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Haudrechy, P; Foussereau, J; Mantout, B; Baroux, B

    1994-10-01

    Nickel release from nickel-plated metals often induces allergic contact dermatitis, but, for nickel-containing stainless steels, the effect is not well-known. In this paper, AISI 304, 316L, 303 and 430 type stainless steels, nickel and nickel-plated materials were investigated. 4 tests were performed: patch tests, leaching experiments, dimethylglyoxime (DMG) spot tests and electrochemical tests. Patch tests showed that 96% of the patients were intolerant to Ni-plated samples, and 14% to a high-sulfur stainless steel (303), while nickel-containing stainless steels with a low sulfur content elicited no reactions. Leaching experiments confirmed the patch tests: in acidic artificial sweat, Ni-plated samples released about 100 micrograms/cm2/week of nickel, while low-sulfur stainless steels released less than 0.03 microgram/cm2/week of nickel, and AISI 303 about 1.5 micrograms/cm2/week. Attention is drawn to the irrelevance of the DMG spot test, which reveals Ni present in the metal bulk but not its dissolution rate. Electrochemical experiments showed that 304 and 316 grades remain passive in the environments tested, while Ni-plated steels and AISI 303 can suffer significant cation dissolution. Thus, Ni-containing 304 and 316 steels should not induce contact dermatitis, while 303 should be avoided. A reliable nitric acid spot test is proposed to distinguish this grade from other stainless steels. PMID:7842681

  7. Automatic welding of stainless steel tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of automatic welding for making girth welds in stainless steel tubing was investigated as well as the reduction in fabrication costs resulting from the elimination of radiographic inspection. Test methodology, materials, and techniques are discussed, and data sheets for individual tests are included. Process variables studied include welding amperes, revolutions per minute, and shielding gas flow. Strip chart recordings, as a definitive method of insuring weld quality, are studied. Test results, determined by both radiographic and visual inspection, are presented and indicate that once optimum welding procedures for specific sizes of tubing are established, and the welding machine operations are certified, then the automatic tube welding process produces good quality welds repeatedly, with a high degree of reliability. Revised specifications for welding tubing using the automatic process and weld visual inspection requirements at the Kennedy Space Center are enumerated.

  8. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Braski, David N.; Rowcliffe, Arthur F.

    1989-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01% to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties.

  9. Magnetic characterisation of duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, I.

    2006-02-01

    Heat treatment-induced microstructural processes were studied by different non-destructive magnetic and mechanical material testing methods in the present work. A commercial SAF 2507 type superduplex stainless steel was investigated. This alloy contains about 40% metastable ferrite which can decompose to a sigma phase and secondary austenite due to heat treatment. All the mechanical, corrosion resistance and magnetic properties are strongly influenced by this microstructural changes. This study had two aims: to understand better the kinetics of the ferrite decomposition process and to study the application possibilities of the applied magnetic measurements. This paper presents an application possibility of the nonlinear harmonics analysis measurement and demonstrates the possibility to find a quantitative correlation between measured harmonics and mechanical properties obtained from destructive tests.

  10. Wear evaluation of high interstitial stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.C.; Tylczak, J.H.

    2008-07-01

    A new series of high nitrogen-carbon manganese stainless steel alloys are studied for their wear resistance. High nitrogen and carbon concentrations were obtained by melting elemental iron-chromium-manganese (several with minor alloy additions of nickel, silicon, and molybdenum) in a nitrogen atmosphere and adding elemental graphite. The improvement in material properties (hardness and strength) with increasing nitrogen and carbon interstitial concentration was consistent with previously reported improvements in similar material properties alloyed with nitrogen only. Wear tests included: scratch, pin-on-disk, sand-rubber-wheel, impeller, and jet erosion. Additions of interstitial nitrogen and carbon as well as interstitial nitrogen and carbide precipitates were found to greatly improve material properties. In general, with increasing nitrogen and carbon concentrations, strength, hardness, and wear resistance increased.

  11. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1987-02-11

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01 to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties. 4 figs.

  12. Automatic Welding of Stainless Steel Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    To determine if the use of automatic welding would allow reduction of the radiographic inspection requirement, and thereby reduce fabrication costs, a series of welding tests were performed. In these tests an automatic welder was used on stainless steel tubing of 1/2, 3/4, and 1/2 inch diameter size. The optimum parameters were investigated to determine how much variation from optimum in machine settings could be tolerate and still result in a good quality weld. The process variables studied were the welding amperes, the revolutions per minute as a function of the circumferential weld travel speed, and the shielding gas flow. The investigation showed that the close control of process variables in conjunction with a thorough visual inspection of welds can be relied upon as an acceptable quality assurance procedure, thus permitting the radiographic inspection to be reduced by a large percentage when using the automatic process.

  13. MOCVD deposition of YSZ on stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, S.; Kilo, M.; Borchardt, G.; Larpin, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    Yttria stabilized zirconia was deposited on stainless steel using the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, from β-diketonate precursors. The variation of the evaporation temperatures of yttrium and zirconium precursor allowed to control the level of Y within the film. Over the temperature range 125-150 °C, the Y content increased from 2.5 to 17.6 at.%. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses evidenced tetragonal phase of zirconia when the Y content was below 8 at.%, and cubic phase for higher concentration. Sputtered neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) profiles confirmed that the control and stability of Y precursor temperature were of major importance to guarantee the homogeneity of the deposited films.

  14. Hydrogen vibrations in austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilkin, S. A.; Delafosse, D.; Fuess, H.; Gavriljuk, V. G.; Ivanov, A.; Magnin, T.; Wipf, H.

    The vibrational modes of hydrogen in fcc Fe-25Cr-20Ni stainless steel with a hydrogen content of 0.33at.% were studied by neutron spectroscopy. Hydrogen doping was performed at 810K in a hydrogen-gas atmosphere of 190bar. Neutron spectra were taken at 2K and 77K with the spectrometer IN1-BeF (ILL, Grenoble). The spectra show the fundamental hydrogen vibration at 130 meV and the second harmonics at 260 meV. The frequencies are higher than in other fcc hydrides. In spite of the cubic symmetry of the octahedral hydrogen positions and the low hydrogen content, the inelastic hydrogen peak has a relatively large width and an asymmetric shape.

  15. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi[sub 5-x]Al[sub x] (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  16. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi{sub 5-x}Al{sub x} (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  17. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, E. A.

    1992-09-01

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi(5-x)Al(x) (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  18. A preliminary ferritic-martensitic stainless steel constitution diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Balmforth, M.C.; Lippold, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary research to develop a constitution diagram that will more accurately predict the microstructure of ferritic and martensitic stainless steel weld deposits. A button melting technique was used to produce a wide range of compositions using mixtures of conventional ferritic and martensitic stainless steels, including types 403, 409, 410, 430, 439 and 444. These samples were prepared metallographically, and the vol-% ferrite and martensite was determined quantitatively. In addition, the hardness and ferrite number (FN) were measured. Using this data, a preliminary constitution diagram is proposed that provides a more accurate method for predicting the microstructures of arc welds in ferritic and martensitic stainless steels.

  19. Stainless steel-zirconium alloy waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, S.M.; Abraham, D.P.; Keiser, D.D. Jr.; Park, J.Y.

    1996-07-01

    An electrometallurgical treatment process has been developed by Argonne National Laboratory to convert various types of spent nuclear fuels into stable storage forms and waste forms for repository disposal. The first application of this process will be to treat spent fuel alloys from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II. Three distinct product streams emanate from the electrorefining process: (1) refined uranium; (2) fission products and actinides extracted from the electrolyte salt that are processed into a mineral waste form; and (3) metallic wastes left behind at the completion of the electrorefining step. The third product stream (i.e., the metal waste stream) is the subject of this paper. The metal waste stream contains components of the chopped spent fuel that are unaffected by the electrorefining process because of their electrochemically ``noble`` nature; this includes the cladding hulls, noble metal fission products (NMFP), and, in specific cases, zirconium from metal fuel alloys. The selected method for the consolidation and stabilization of the metal waste stream is melting and casting into a uniform, corrosion-resistant alloy. The waste form casting process will be carried out in a controlled-atmosphere furnace at high temperatures with a molten salt flux. Spent fuels with both stainless steel and Zircaloy cladding are being evaluated for treatment; thus, stainless steel-rich and Zircaloy-rich waste forms are being developed. Although the primary disposition option for the actinides is the mineral waste form, the concept of incorporating the TRU-bearing product into the metal waste form has enough potential to warrant investigation.

  20. Stainless steel anodes for alkaline water electrolysis and methods of making

    DOEpatents

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2014-01-21

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel anodes for use in alkaline water electrolysis was increased by immersion of the stainless steel anode into a caustic solution prior to electrolysis. Also disclosed herein are electrolyzers employing the so-treated stainless steel anodes. The pre-treatment process provides a stainless steel anode that has a higher corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel anode of the same composition.

  1. Bacterial adhesion on ion-implanted stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Q.; Liu, Y.; Wang, C.; Wang, S.; Peng, N.; Jeynes, C.

    2007-08-01

    Stainless steel disks were implanted with N +, O + and SiF 3+, respectively at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. The surface properties of the implanted surfaces were analyzed, including surface chemical composition, surface topography, surface roughness and surface free energy. Bacterial adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, which frequently cause medical device-associated infections was evaluated under static condition and laminar flow condition. The effect of contact time, growth media and surface properties of the ion-implanted steels on bacterial adhesion was investigated. The experimental results showed that SiF 3+-implanted stainless steel performed much better than N +-implanted steel, O +-implanted steel and untreated stainless steel control on reducing bacterial attachment under identical experimental conditions.

  2. Phase transformations in cast duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoon-Jun

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as sigma (sigma) and chi (chi) can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase (sigma + chi) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities, a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, a was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and chi by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in

  3. Phase Transformations in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon-Jun Kim

    2004-12-19

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as {sigma} and {chi} can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase ({sigma} + {chi}) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (MA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities; a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, {sigma} was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and {chi} by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in

  4. Liquid Metal Corrosion of 316L Stainless Steel, 410 Stainless Steel, and 1015 Carbon Steel in a Molten Zinc Bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Bright, Mark A.; Liu, Xingbo; Barbero, Ever

    2007-11-01

    Corrosion tests of 1015 low-carbon steel and two stainless steels (410 and 316L) were conducted in a pure zinc bath (99.98 wt pct Zn) in order to better understand the reaction mechanisms that occur during the degradation of submerged hardware at industrial general (batch) galvanizing operations. Through this testing, it was found that, in general, 316L stainless steel showed the best dissolution resistance among these three alloys, while 1015 carbon steel provided a lower solubility than 410 stainless steel. Investigating the failure mechanisms, both metallurgical composition and lattice structure played important roles in the molten metal corrosion behaviors of these alloys. High contents of nickel combined with the influence of chromium improved the resistance to molten zinc corrosion. Moreover, a face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure was more corrosion resistant than body-centered-cubic (bcc) possibly due to the compactness of the atomic structure. Analogously, the body-centered-tetragonal (bct) martensite lattice structure possessed enhanced susceptibility to zinc corrosion as a result of the greater atomic spacing and high strain energy. Finally, an increased bath temperature played an important role in molten metal corrosion by accelerating the dissolution process and changing the nature of intermetallic layers.

  5. Ultrasonics permits brazing complex stainless steel assembly without flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W. H.

    1967-01-01

    Ultrasonic vibration of an assembly of stainless steel instrumentation tubes ensures brazing without flux. Vibration with an ultrasonic transducer permits the brazing material to flow down each tube in contact with a seal plug installed in a pressure vessel wall.

  6. Stainless-steel elbows formed by spin forging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Large seamless austenitic stainless steel elbows are fabricated by spin forging /rotary shear forming/. A specially designed spin forging tool for mounting on a hydrospin machine has been built for this purpose.

  7. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of precipitation-hardening stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1970-01-01

    Accelerated test program results show which precipitation hardening stainless steels are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. In certain cases stress corrosion susceptibility was found to be associated with the process procedure.

  8. Cavitation erosion of duplex and super duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, C.T.; Man, H.C.; Cheng, F.T.

    1998-10-05

    Owing to their excellent corrosion resistance, stainless steels are widely used both in the marine, urban water, chemical and food industries. In addition to the corrosive environment, high fluid flow speeds are always encountered for components used in these industries. The cavitation characteristics of S30400 and S31600 austenitic stainless steels and duplex stainless steels were studied in detail by a number of authors. It was generally agreed that S30400 has higher cavitation erosion resistance than that of S31600 due to higher tendency of strain induced martensitic transformation under high impulse of stress. A considerable number of results on stress corrosion cracking characteristics of SDSS and duplex stainless steels have been published but data concerning their cavitation erosion property are extremely rare.

  9. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Martensitic PH Stainless Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T.; Nelson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation-hardening alloys evaluated in marine environment tests. Report describes marine-environment stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of three martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless-steel alloys.

  10. 27. STAINLESS STEEL FERMENTING CASKS MADE BY ZERO MANG OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. STAINLESS STEEL FERMENTING CASKS MADE BY ZERO MANG OF WASHINGTON, MISSOURI. VIEW LOOKING NORTH TOWARD VAULT OF THE TWELVE APOSTLES - Stone Hill Winery, 401 West Twelfth Street, Hermann, Gasconade County, MO

  11. Nafion coated stainless steel for anti-biofilm application.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Li Juan; Pang, Li Qing; Che, Li Ming; Wu, Xue E; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2013-11-01

    Biofilms can adhere to most surfaces and have caused a wide range of problems in various industrial processes as well as daily life activities. In this work, the anti-biofilm ability of Nafion-coated stainless steel surface was investigated and our results showed that stainless steel discs coated with 1% Nafion can significantly reduce E. coli adhesion. Nafion has a large amount of negatively charged sulphonate groups, and the findings of this study suggest that the negative surface charge can greatly reduce bacterial adhesion through increasing the electrostatic repulsion between negatively charged bacterial cells and Nafion coated stainless steel surface. The roughness of coated and uncoated stainless steel discs made no significant differences while the hydrophobic of the discs increased after coated with Nafion. PMID:23831592

  12. Hafnium stainless steel absorber rod for control rod

    SciTech Connect

    Charnley, J.E.; Cearley, J.E.; Dixon, R.C.; Izzo, K.R.; Aiello, L.L.

    1989-08-01

    This patent describes an improvement in a control rod having a stainless steel body for enclosing a neutron absorbing poison, the control rod having movement along an axial direction for insertion into and out of a nuclear reactor for controlling a nuclear reaction. The improvement comprising: a piece of hafnium; a piece of stainless steel joined to the hafnium by a thin diffusion interface created by friction welding. The hafnium and the stainless steel oriented serially in the axial direction with the thin diffusion interface disposed normal to the axial direction of the control rod movement; means for confining the hafnium to movement along the axial direction with the control rod; and means for attaching the piece of stainless steel to the remaining portion of the control rod to load the weld therebetween under compression or tension during the control rod movement. Whereby the thin diffusion interface is loaded in tension or compression only upon dynamic movement of the control rod.

  13. Compressive Strength of Stainless-Steel Sandwiches at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathauser, Eldon E.; Pride, Richard A.

    1959-01-01

    Experimental results are presented from crippling tests of stainless-steel sandwich specimens in the temperature range from 80 F to 1,200 F. The specimens included resistance-welded 17-7 PH stainless-steel sandwiches with single-corrugated cores, type 301 stainless-steel sandwiches with double-corrugated cores, and brazed 17-7 PH stainless-steel sandwiches with honeycomb cores. The experimental strengths are compared with predicted buckling and crippling strengths. The crippling strengths were predicted from the calculated maximum strength of the individual plate elements of the sandwiches and from a correlation procedure which gives the elevated-temperature crippling strength when the experimental room-temperature crippling strengths are known. Photographs of some of the tested specimens are included to show the modes of failure.

  14. Eddy sensors for small diameter stainless steel tubes.

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Jack L.; Morales, Alfredo Martin; Grant, J. Brian; Korellis, Henry James; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth; Van Blarigan, Benjamin; Andersen, Lisa E.

    2011-08-01

    The goal of this project was to develop non-destructive, minimally disruptive eddy sensors to inspect small diameter stainless steel metal tubes. Modifications to Sandia's Emphasis/EIGER code allowed for the modeling of eddy current bobbin sensors near or around 1/8-inch outer diameter stainless steel tubing. Modeling results indicated that an eddy sensor based on a single axial coil could effectively detect changes in the inner diameter of a stainless steel tubing. Based on the modeling results, sensor coils capable of detecting small changes in the inner diameter of a stainless steel tube were designed, built and tested. The observed sensor response agreed with the results of the modeling and with eddy sensor theory. A separate limited distribution SAND report is being issued demonstrating the application of this sensor.

  15. 77 FR 64545 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... respect to electronic filing have been amended. The amendments took effect on November 7, 2011. See 76 FR... COMMISSION Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China Scheduling of the final phase of countervailing duty and... retarded, by reason of subsidized and less-than-fair-value imports from China of drawn stainless...

  16. Measurement of intergranular attack in stainless steel using ultrasonic energy

    DOEpatents

    Mott, Gerry; Attaar, Mustan; Rishel, Rick D.

    1989-08-08

    Ultrasonic test methods are used to measure the depth of intergranular attack (IGA) in a stainless steel specimen. The ultrasonic test methods include a pitch-catch surface wave technique and a through-wall pulse-echo technique. When used in combination, these techniques can establish the extent of IGA on both the front and back surfaces of a stainless steel specimen from measurements made on only one surface.

  17. Probing the duplex stainless steel phases via magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheno, S. M.; Santos, F. S.; Kuri, S. E.

    2008-03-01

    Duplex stainless steels are austenitic-ferritic alloys used in many applications, thanks to their excellent mechanical properties and high corrosion resistance. In this work, chemical analyses, x-ray diffraction, and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) were employed to characterize the solution annealed and aged duplex stainless steel. The samples exhibited no changes in lattice parameters and the MFM technique proved successful in clearly imaging the magnetic domain structure of the ferrite phase.

  18. Procedure for flaw detection in cast stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.

    1988-01-01

    A method of ultrasonic flaw detection in cast stainless steel components incorporating the steps of determining the nature of the microstructure of the cast stainless steel at the site of the flaw detection measurements by ultrasonic elements independent of the component thickness at the site; choosing from a plurality of flaw detection techniques, one such technique appropriate to the nature of the microstructure as determined and detecting flaws by use of the chosen technique.

  19. Automobile bodies: Can aluminum be an economical alternative to steel?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Richard; Clark, Joel; Kelkar, Ashish

    2001-08-01

    Although the use of aluminum in cars has been increasing for the past two decades, progress has been limited in developing aluminum auto bodies. In fact, most aluminum substitution has come in the form of castings and forgings in the transmission, wheels, etc. Car manufacturers have developed all-aluminum cars with two competing designs: conventional unibody and the spaceframe. However, aluminum is far from being a material of choice for auto bodies. The substitution of aluminum for steel is partly influenced by regulatory pressures to meet fuel efficiency standards by reducing vehicle weight, and to meet recycling standards. The key obstacles are the high cost of primary aluminum as compared to steel and added fabrication costs of aluminum panels. Both the aluminum and the automotive industries have attempted to make aluminum a cost-effective alternative to steel. This paper analyzes the cost of fabrication and assembly of four different aluminum car body designs, making comparisons with conventional steel designs at current aluminum prices and using current aluminum fabrication technology. It then attempts to determine if aluminum can be an alternative to steel at lower primary aluminum prices, and improved fabrication processes.

  20. Solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel filler metals

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Goodwin, G.M.; Braski, D.N.

    1980-02-01

    Thermal analysis and interrupted solidification experiments on selected austenitic stainless steel filler metals provided an understanding of the solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel welds. The sequences of phase separations found were for type 308 stainless steel filler metal, L + L + delta + L + delta + ..gamma.. ..-->.. ..gamma.. + delta, and for type 310 stainless steel filler metal, L ..-->.. L + ..gamma.. ..-->.. ..gamma... In type 308 stainless steel filler metal, ferrite at room temperature was identified as either the untransformed primary delta-ferrite formed during the initial stages of solidification or the residual ferrite after Widmanstaetten austenite precipitation. Microprobe and scanning transmission electron microscope microanalyses revealed that solute extensively redistributes during the transformation of primary delta-ferrite to austenite, leading to enrichment and stabilization of ferrite by chromium. The type 310 stainless steel filler metal investigated solidifies by the primary crystallization of austenite, with the transformation going to completion at the solidus temperature. In our samples residual ferrite resulting from solute segregation was absent at the intercellular or interdendritic regions.

  1. X-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lily L; Berry, Phillip C

    2009-01-01

    Stainless steel vessels are used to enclose solid materials for studying x-ray radiolysis that involves gas release from the materials. Commercially available stainless steel components are easily adapted to form a static or a dynamic condition to monitor the gas evolved from the solid materials during and after the x-ray irradiation. Experimental data published on the x-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel, however, are very scarce, especially over a wide range of x-ray energies. The objective of this work was to obtain experimental data that will be used to determine how a poly-energetic x-ray beam is attenuated by the stainless steel container wall. The data will also be used in conjunction with MCNP (Monte Carlos Nuclear Particle) modeling to develop an accurate method for determining energy absorbed in known solid samples contained in stainless steel vessels. In this study, experiments to measure the attenuation properties of stainless steel were performed for a range of bremsstrahlung x-ray beams with a maximum energy ranging from 150 keV to 10 MeV. Bremsstrahlung x-ray beams of these energies are commonly used in radiography of engineering and weapon components. The weapon surveillance community has a great interest in understanding how the x-rays in radiography affect short-term and long-term properties of weapon materials.

  2. Interfacial interactions between an alkali-free borosilicate viscous sealing glass and aluminized ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jen-Hsien; Kim, Cheol-Woon; Brow, Richard K.

    2014-03-01

    An alkali-free, alkaline earth borosilicate glass (designated G73) has been developed as a viscous sealant for use with solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). In this work, the interfacial interactions that occur between this viscous sealant and aluminized ferritic stainless steel (SS441) under SOFC operational conditions are described. YSZ/glass/aluminized SS441 sandwich seals were held at 800 °C in air for up to 1000 h, and the interfaces were analyzed using analytical scanning electron microscopy (ASEM). Interfacial reactions were also characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses of heat-treated mixtures of glass and alumina powders. The results show that the glass reacted with aluminum from the steel to form BaAl2Si2O8 crystals at the glass/metal interface and that the aluminum concentration in the aluminized steel was significantly depleted with time.

  3. Fabrication of stainless steel clad tubing. [gas pressure bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of producing stainless steel clad carbon steel tubing by a gas pressure bonding process was evaluated. Such a tube product could provide substantial chromium savings over monolithic stainless tubing in the event of a serious chromium shortage. The process consists of the initial assembly of three component tubesets from conventionally produced tubing, the formation of a strong metallurgical bond between the three components by gas pressure bonding, and conventional cold draw and anneal processing to final size. The quality of the tubes produced was excellent from the standpoint of bond strength, mechanical, and forming properties. The only significant quality problem encountered was carburization of the stainless clad by the carbon steel core which can be overcome by further refinement through at least three different approaches. The estimated cost of clad tubing produced by this process is greater than that for monolithic stainless tubing, but not so high as to make the process impractical as a chromium conservation method.

  4. Austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Gerald D.; Powell, Roger W.

    1985-01-01

    This invention describes a composition for an austenitic stainless steel which has been found to exhibit improved high temperature stress rupture properties. The composition of this alloy is about (in wt. %): 12.5 to 14.5 Cr; 14.5 to 16.5 Ni; 1.5 to 2.5 Mo; 1.5 to 2.5 Mn; 0.1 to 0.4 Ti; 0.02 to 0.08 C; 0.5 to 1.0 Si; 0.01 maximum, N; 0.02 to 0.08 P; 0.002 to 0.008 B; 0.004-0.010 S; 0.02-0.05 Nb; 0.01-0.05 V; 0.005-0.02 Ta; 0.02-0.05 Al; 0.01-0.04 Cu; 0.02-0.05 Co; 0.03 maximum, As; 0.01 maximum, O; 0.01 maximum, Zr; and with the balance of the alloy being essentially iron. The carbon content of the alloy is adjusted such that wt. % Ti/(wt. % C+wt. % N) is between 4 and 6, and most preferably about 5. In addition the sum of the wt. % P+wt. % B+wt. % S is at least 0.03 wt. %. This alloy is believed to be particularly well suited for use as fast breeder reactor fuel element cladding.

  5. New Economical 19Cr Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Zixing; Chen, Hong; Xiao, Xueshan; Zhao, Junliang; Jiang, Laizhu

    2012-02-01

    New economical duplex stainless steels (DSSs) containing 19Cr-6Mn- xNi-1.0Mo-0.5W-0.5Cu-0.2N ( x = 0.5 to 2.0) were developed, and the microstructure, impact property, and corrosion resistance of the alloys were studied. The ferrite content increases with the solution treatment temperature, but decreases with an increase in nickel. The sigma phase is not found precipitating in the alloys treated with solution from 1023 K to 1523 K (750 °C to 1250 °C). The low-temperature impact energy of the experimental alloys increases first and then decreases rapidly with an increase in nickel, which is mainly due to the martensite transformation with an increase in austenite. The alloys have a better mechanical property and pitting corrosion resistance than AISI 304. Among the designed DSS alloys, 19Cr-6Mn-1.3Ni-1.0Mo-0.5W-0.5Cu-0.2N is found to be an optimum alloy with proper phase proportion, a better combination of mechanical strength and elongation, and higher pitting corrosion resistance compared with those of the other alloys.

  6. NanoComposite Stainless Steel Powder Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    DeHoff, R.; Glasgow, C.

    2012-07-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been investigating a new class of Fe-based amorphous material stemming from a DARPA, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency initiative in structural amorphous metals. Further engineering of the original SAM materials such as chemistry modifications and manufacturing processes, has led to the development of a class of Fe based amorphous materials that upon processing, devitrify into a nearly homogeneous distribution of nano sized complex metal carbides and borides. The powder material is produced through the gas atomization process and subsequently utilized by several methods; laser fusing as a coating to existing components or bulk consolidated into new components through various powder metallurgy techniques (vacuum hot pressing, Dynaforge, and hot isostatic pressing). The unique fine scale distribution of microstructural features yields a material with high hardness and wear resistance compared to material produced through conventional processing techniques such as casting while maintaining adequate fracture toughness. Several compositions have been examined including those specifically designed for high hardness and wear resistance and a composition specifically tailored to devitrify into an austenitic matrix (similar to a stainless steel) which poses improved corrosion behavior.

  7. Weldability of neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Kyoichi; Nishimura, Seiji; Saito, Yoshiaki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yuji; Kato, Takahiko; Hashimoto, Tsuneyuki

    1999-01-01

    Degradation of weldability in neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steel is an important issue to be addressed in the planning of proactive maintenance of light water reactor core internals. In this work, samples selected from reactor internal components which had been irradiated to fluence from 8.5 × 10 22 to 1.4 × 10 26 n/m 2 ( E > 1 MeV) corresponding to helium content from 0.11 to 103 appm, respectively, were subjected to tungsten inert gas arc (TIG) welding with heat input ranged 0.6-16 kJ/cm. The weld defects were characterized by penetrant test and cross-sectional metallography. The integrity of the weld was better when there were less helium and at lower heat input. Tensile properties of weld joint containing 0.6 appm of helium fulfilled the requirement for unirradiated base metal. Repeated thermal cycles were found to be very hazardous. The results showed the combination of material helium content and weld heat input where materials can be welded with little concern to invite cracking. Also, the importance of using properly selected welding procedures to minimize thermal cycling was recognized.

  8. Welding Behavior of Free Machining Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    BROOKS,JOHN A.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.; HEADLEY,THOMAS J.; MICHAEL,JOSEPH R.

    2000-07-24

    The weld solidification and cracking behavior of sulfur bearing free machining austenitic stainless steel was investigated for both gas-tungsten arc (GTA) and pulsed laser beam weld processes. The GTA weld solidification was consistent with those predicted with existing solidification diagrams and the cracking response was controlled primarily by solidification mode. The solidification behavior of the pulsed laser welds was complex, and often contained regions of primary ferrite and primary austenite solidification, although in all cases the welds were found to be completely austenite at room temperature. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) pattern analysis indicated that the nature of the base metal at the time of solidification plays a primary role in initial solidification. The solid state transformation of austenite to ferrite at the fusion zone boundary, and ferrite to austenite on cooling may both be massive in nature. A range of alloy compositions that exhibited good resistance to solidification cracking and was compatible with both welding processes was identified. The compositional range is bounded by laser weldability at lower Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} ratios and by the GTA weldability at higher ratios. It was found with both processes that the limiting ratios were somewhat dependent upon sulfur content.

  9. Investigation of the diffusion kinetics of borided stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayali, Yusuf

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the kinetics of borides formed on AISI 420, AISI 304 and AISI 304L stainless steels was investigated. Boronizing treatment was carried out using Ekabor-II powders at the processing temperatures of 1123, 1173 and 1223 K for 2, 4 and 6 h. The phases of the boride layers of borided AISI 420, AISI 304 and AISI 304L stainless steels were FeB, Fe2B, CrB and NiB, respectively. The thickness of the boride layer formed on the borided steels ranged from 4.6 to 64 μm depending on the boriding temperature, boriding time and alloying elements of the stainless steels. Depending on the chemical composition, temperature and layer thickness, the activation energies of boron in AISI 420, AISI 304 and AISI 304L stainless steels were found to be 206.161, 234.641 and 222.818 kJ/mol, respectively. The kinetics of growth of the boride layers formed on the AISI 420, AISI 304 and AISI 304L stainless steels and the thickness of the boride layers were investigated.

  10. From flint to stainless steel: observations on surgical instrument composition.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkup, J.

    1993-01-01

    Man's failure to extract deeply embedded thorns and arrowheads, with bare hands and teeth, stimulated 'instrument substitutes' mimicking these appendages. Evidence from primitive communities suggest animal, plant and mineral items were employed, both before and after metal became the standard material of today's armamentarium. Changing surgical instrument composition has mirrored concurrent technology and manufacturing methods both of which are reviewed. Particular significance is accorded flint, bronze, crucible steel, thermal sterilisation, nickel-plate, stainless steel and disposable plastics. The paper is based on an exhibition From Flint to Stainless Steel on display at the College. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8215156

  11. Stainless steel tube-based cell cryopreservation containers.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wei-Hung; Yu, Zong-Yan; Wu, Wei-Te

    2013-12-01

    This study focused on increasing the freezing rate in cell vitrification cryopreservation by using a cryopreservation container possessing rigid mechanical properties and high heat-transfer efficiency. Applying a fast freezing rate in vitrification cryopreservation causes a rapid temperature change in the cryopreservation container and has a substantial impact on mechanical properties; therefore, a highly rigid cryopreservation container that possesses a fast freezing rate must be developed. To produce a highly rigid cryopreservation container possessing superior heat transfer efficiency, this study applies an electrochemical machining (ECM) method to an ANSI 316L stainless steel tube to treat the surface material by polishing and roughening, thereby increasing the freezing rate and reducing the probability of ice crystal formation. The results indicated that the ECM method provided high-quality surface treatment of the stainless steel tube. This method can reduce internal surface roughness in the stainless steel tube, thereby reducing the probability of ice crystal formation, and increase external surface roughness, consequently raising convection heat-transfer efficiency. In addition, by thinning the stainless steel tube, this method reduces heat capacity and thermal resistance, thereby increasing the freezing rate. The freezing rate (3399 ± 197 °C/min) of a stainless steel tube after interior and exterior polishing and exterior etching by applying ECM compared with the freezing rate (1818 ± 54 °C/min) of an original stainless steel tube was increased by 87%, which also exceeds the freezing rate (2015 ± 49 °C/min) of an original quartz tube that has a 20% lower heat capacity. However, the results indicated that increasing heat-transferring surface areas and reducing heat capacities cannot effectively increase the freezing rate of a stainless steel tube if only one method is applied; instead, both techniques must be implemented concurrently to improve the

  12. Corrosion in lithium-stainless steel thermal-convection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.; Selle, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    The corrosion of types 304L and 316 austenitic stainless steel by flowing lithium was studied in thermal-convection loops operated at 500 to 650/sup 0/C. Both weight and compositional changes were measured on specimens distributed throughout each loop and were combined with metallographic examinations to evaluate the corrosion processes. The corrosion rate and mass transfer characteristics did not significantly differ between the two austenitic stainless steels. Addition of 500 or 1700 wt ppM N to purified lithium did not increase the dissolution rate or change the attack mode of type 316 stainless steel. Adding 5 wt % Al to the lithium reduced the weight loss of this steel by a factor of 5 relative to a pure lithium-thermal-convection loop.

  13. Machinability of a Stainless Steel by Electrochemical Discharge Microdrilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coteaţǎ, Margareta; Schulze, Hans-Peter; Pop, Nicolae; Beşliu, Irina; Slǎtineanu, Laurenţiu

    2011-05-01

    Due to the chemical elements included in their structure for ensuring an increased resistance to the environment action, the stainless steels are characterized by a low machinability when classical machining methods are applied. For this reason, sometimes non-traditional machining methods are applied, one of these being the electrochemical discharge machining. To obtain microholes and to evaluate the machinability by electrochemical discharge microdrilling, test pieces of stainless steel were used for experimental research. The electrolyte was an aqueous solution of sodium silicate with different densities. A complete factorial plan was designed to highlight the influence of some input variables on the sizes of the considered machinability indexes (electrode tool wear, material removal rate, depth of the machined hole). By mathematically processing of experimental data, empirical functions were established both for stainless steel and carbon steel. Graphical representations were used to obtain more suggestive vision concerning the influence exerted by the considered input variables on the size of the machinability indexes.

  14. Machinability of a Stainless Steel by Electrochemical Discharge Microdrilling

    SciTech Connect

    Coteata, Margareta; Pop, Nicolae; Slatineanu, Laurentiu; Schulze, Hans-Peter; Besliu, Irina

    2011-05-04

    Due to the chemical elements included in their structure for ensuring an increased resistance to the environment action, the stainless steels are characterized by a low machinability when classical machining methods are applied. For this reason, sometimes non-traditional machining methods are applied, one of these being the electrochemical discharge machining. To obtain microholes and to evaluate the machinability by electrochemical discharge microdrilling, test pieces of stainless steel were used for experimental research. The electrolyte was an aqueous solution of sodium silicate with different densities. A complete factorial plan was designed to highlight the influence of some input variables on the sizes of the considered machinability indexes (electrode tool wear, material removal rate, depth of the machined hole). By mathematically processing of experimental data, empirical functions were established both for stainless steel and carbon steel. Graphical representations were used to obtain more suggestive vision concerning the influence exerted by the considered input variables on the size of the machinability indexes.

  15. Evaluation of Oxidation and Hydrogen Permeation of Al Containing Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Thad M.; Korinko, Paul; Duncan, Andrew

    2005-06-17

    As the National Hydrogen Economy continues to develop and evolve the need for structural materials that can resist hydrogen assisted degradation will become critical. To date austenitic stainless steel materials have been shown to be mildly susceptible to hydrogen attack which results in lower mechanical and fracture strengths. As a result, hydrogen permeation barrier coatings are typically applied to these steel to retard hydrogen ingress. The focal point of the reported work was to evaluate the potential for intentional alloying of commercial 300-series stainless steels to promote hydrogen permeation resistant oxide scales. Previous research on the Cr- and Fe-oxide scales inherent to 300-series stainless steels has proven to be inconsistent in effecting permeation resistance. The approach undertaken in this research was to add aluminum to the 300-series stainless steels in an attempt to promote a pure Al-oxide or and Al-rich oxide scale. Aloxide had been previously demonstrated to be an effective hydrogen permeation barrier. Results for 304L and 347H alloys doped with Al in concentration from 0.5-3.0 wt% with respect to oxidation kinetic studies, cyclic oxidation and characterization of the oxide scale chemistry are reported herein. Gaseous hydrogen permeation testing of the Al-doped alloys in both the unoxidized and oxidized (600 C, 30 mins) conditions are reported. A critical finding from this work is that at concentration as low as 0.5 wt% Al, the Al stabilizes the ferrite phase in these steels thus producing duplex austenitic-ferritic microstructures. As the Al-content increases the amount of measured ferrite increases thus resulting in hydrogen permeabilities more closely resembling ferritic steels.

  16. Plasma decontamination of uranium oxide from stainless steel surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Veilleux, J.M.; El-Genk, M.S.; Chamberlin, E.P.

    1997-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is expected to have 845000 m{sup 3} of transuranic (TRU) waste by the year 2000 that has accumulated during the development and assembly of the nation`s nuclear stockpile. The TRU disposal costs alone range up to $28000/m{sup 3}, which could be reduced to $1800/m{sup 3} or less by treating and converting the material to low-level waste. Plasma-based processes have been shown to remove plutonium and uranium surface contaminants from metallic components and could be used to treat TRU with significant cost avoidance, estimated at over $1.0 billion. Martz and Hess conducted the initial work of plutonium etching in low-power radio-frequency (rf) plasma with etch rates ranging from 0.007 to 0.025 kg/m{sup 2}{center_dot}h. Veilleux et al. reported that plasma decontamination of uranium from the interior of aluminum objects results in etch rates an order of magnitude greater. The current work reports on removal rates of uranium from stainless steel surfaces and includes estimates of the etch rates and characteristic times for removal.

  17. Antibacterial effect of silver nanofilm modified stainless steel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, F.; Kennedy, J.; Dhillon, M.; Flint, S.

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria can attach to stainless steel surfaces, resulting in the colonization of the surface known as biofilms. The release of bacteria from biofilms can cause contamination of food such as dairy products in manufacturing plants. This study aimed to modify stainless steel surfaces with silver nanofilms and to examine the antibacterial effectiveness of the modified surface. Ion implantation was applied to produce silver nanofilms on stainless steel surfaces. 35 keV Ag ions were implanted with various fluences of 1 × 1015 to 1 × 1017 ions•cm-2 at room temperature. Representative atomic force microscopy characterizations of the modified stainless steel are presented. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry spectra revealed the implanted atoms were located in the near-surface region. Both unmodified and modified stainless steel coupons were then exposed to two types of bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Streptococcus thermophilus, to determine the effect of the surface modification on bacterial attachment and biofilm development. The silver modified coupon surface fluoresced red over most of the surface area implying that most bacteria on coupon surface were dead. This study indicates that the silver nanofilm fabricated by the ion implantation method is a promising way of reducing the attachment of bacteria and delay biofilm formation.

  18. Work of adhesion of dairy products on stainless steel surface

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes, Patrícia Campos; Araújo, Emiliane Andrade; dos Santos Pires, Ana Clarissa; Queiroz Fialho Júnior, José Felício; Lelis, Carini Aparecida; de Andrade, Nélio José

    2012-01-01

    The adhesion of the solids presents in food can difficult the process of surface cleaning and promotes the bacterial adhesion process and can trigger health problems. In our study, we used UHT whole milk, chocolate based milk and infant formula to evaluate the adhesion of Enterobacter sakazakii on stainless steel coupons, and we determine the work of adhesion by measuring the contact angle as well as measured the interfacial tension of the samples. In addition we evaluated the hydrophobicity of stainless steel after pre-conditioning with milk samples mentioned. E. sakazakii was able to adhere to stainless steel in large numbers in the presence of dairy products. The chocolate based milk obtained the lower contact angle with stainless steel surface, higher interfacial tension and consequently higher adhesion work. It was verified a tendency of decreasing the interfacial tension as a function of the increasing of protein content. The preconditioning of the stainless steel coupons with milk samples changed the hydrophobic characteristics of the surfaces and became them hydrophilic. Therefore, variations in the composition of the milk products affect parameters important that can influence the procedure of hygiene in surface used in food industry. PMID:24031951

  19. A stainless steel bracket for orthodontic application.

    PubMed

    Oh, Keun-Taek; Choo, Sung-Uk; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2005-06-01

    Aesthetics has become an essential element when choosing orthodontic fixed appliances. Most metallic brackets used in orthodontic therapy are made from stainless steel (SS) with the appropriate physical properties and good corrosion resistance, and are available as types 304, 316 and 17-4 PH SS. However, localized corrosion of these materials can frequently occur in the oral environment. This study was undertaken to evaluate the accuracy of sizing, microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance, frictional resistance and cytotoxicity of commercially available Mini-diamond (S17400), Archist (S30403) and experimentally manufactured SR-50A (S32050) brackets. The size accuracy of Mini-diamond was the highest at all locations except for the external horizontal width of the tie wing (P < 0.05). Micrographs of the Mini-diamond and Archist showed precipitates in the grains and around their boundaries. SR-50A showed the only austenitic phase and the highest polarization resistance of the tested samples. SR-50A also had the highest corrosion resistance [SR-50A, Mini-diamond and Archist were 0.9 x 10(-3), 3.7 x 10(-3), and 7.4 x 10(-3) mm per year (mpy), respectively], in the artificial saliva. The frictional force of SR-50A decreased over time, but that of Mini-diamond and Archist increased. Therefore, SR-50A is believed to have better frictional properties to orthodontic wire than Mini-diamond and Archist. Cytotoxic results showed that the response index of SR-50A was 0/1 (mild), Mini-diamond 1/1 (mild+), and Archist 1/2 (mild+). SR-50A showed greater biocompatibility than either Mini-diamond or Archist. It is concluded that the SR-50A bracket has good frictional property, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility with a lower probability of allergic reaction, compared with conventionally used SS brackets. PMID:15947222

  20. 49 CFR 178.512 - Standards for steel or aluminum boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for steel or aluminum boxes. 178.512... aluminum boxes. (a) The following are identification codes for steel or aluminum boxes: (1) 4A for a steel box; and (2) 4B for an aluminum box. (b) Construction requirements for steel or aluminum boxes are...

  1. Tensile and fatigue data for irradiated and unirradiated AISI 310 stainless steel and titanium - 5 percent aluminum - 2.5 percent tin: Application of the method of universal slopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debogdan, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    Irradiated and unirradiated tensile and fatigue specimens of AISI 310 stainless steel and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn were tested in the range of 100 to 10,000 cycles to failure to determine the applicability of the method of universal slopes to irradiated materials. Tensile data for both materials showed a decrease in ductility and increase in ultimate tensile strength due to irradiation. Irradiation caused a maximum change in fatigue life of only 15 to 20 percent for both materials. The method of universal slopes predicted all the fatigue data for the 310 SS (irradiated as well as unirradiated) within a life factor of 2. For the titanium alloy, 95 percent of the data was predicted within a life factor of 3.

  2. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabruri, Efendi; Anwar, Moch. Syaiful; Prifiharni, Siska; Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  3. DETECTION OF BACTERIAL BIOFILM ON STAINLESS STEEL BY HYPERSPECTRAL FLUORESCENCE IMAGING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, hyperspectral fluorescence imaging techniques were investigated for detection of microbial biofilm on stainless steel plates typically used to manufacture food processing equipment. Stainless steel coupons were immersed in bacterium cultures consisting of nonpathogenic E. coli, Pseudo...

  4. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  5. Borated stainless steel application in spent-fuel storage racks

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.J.; Loomis, G.W.; Deltete, C.P.

    1992-06-01

    EPRI is continuing to investigate the application of borated stainless steel products within the commercial nuclear power industry through participation in code development and material testing. This effort provides documentation of the material properties of interest in design applications utilizing the borated stainless steel products as structural elements as well as serving as neutron absorbers. The properties of most concern in the design of spent fuel storage racks, shipping casks, and other containment type applications are the materials' ductility, tensile strength, corrosion resistance and resistance to degradation due to radiation and temperature. The data presented in this report indicate that practical designs can be achieved utilizing borated stainless steels and that the materials can be cost effectively applied.

  6. Highly robust stainless steel tips as microelectrospray emitters.

    PubMed

    Ishihama, Yasushi; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Asakawa, Naoki; Oda, Yoshiya

    2002-01-01

    Tapered stainless steel spray tips for sheathless microelectrospray ionization (microESI) have been developed. The fabrication procedure for the tapered stainless steel tips was optimized using an electropolishing technique followed by removal of the burr. Using the tip as the microESI emitter, a stable ESI spray was obtained at a flow rate of 20 nL/min. The sensitivity of the microESI system was almost two orders greater than that of the conventional ion spray system. The tip was highly stable, and was successfully used for over 1000 h. Moreover, these stainless steel tips were suitable for use with sheathless capillary electrophoresis/mass spectrometry (CE/MS) and capillary liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) for routine analysis in proteomic and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:11968120

  7. Microstructure and texture of Nb + Ti stabilized ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Haitao Bi Hongyun; Li Xin; Xu Zhou

    2008-12-15

    The microstructure, texture and grain boundary character distribution of Nb + Ti stabilized ferritic stainless steel were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The addition of alloying elements such as Ti and Nb to ferritic stainless steel causes the formation of TiN, NbC and Fe{sub 2}Nb. The textures of cold rolled samples were dominated by the {alpha}-fiber, while the textures of annealed samples exhibit a very strong {gamma}-fiber. The changes in texture are closely related to the grain boundary characteristics.

  8. Transmission electron microscopy of undermined passive films on stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, H.S.; Zhu, Y.; Sabatini, R.L.; Ryan, M.P.

    1999-06-01

    A study has been made of the passive film remaining over pits on stainless steel using a high resolution transmission electron microscope. Type 305 stainless steel was passivated in a borate buffer solution and pitted in ferric chloride. Passive films formed at 0.2 V relative to a saturated calomel electrode were found to be amorphous. Films formed at higher potentials showed only broad diffraction rings. The passive film was found to cover a remnant lacy structure formed over pits passivated at 0.8 V. The metallic strands of the lace were roughly hemitubular in shape with the curved surface facing the center of the pit.

  9. Corrosion evaluation of stainless steel root weld shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Gorog, M.; Sawyer, L.A.

    1999-07-01

    The effect of five shielding methods for gas tungsten arc root pass welds, on the corrosion resistance of stainless steel was evaluated in two laboratory solutions. The first experiment was performed in 6% ferric chloride solution, a test designed to corrode stainless steel. The second experiment was performed in a simulated paper machine white water solution that contained hydrogen peroxide. Argon shielding produced excellent results by maintaining corrosion resistance in both solutions. Nitrogen purging and flux coated TIG rod techniques produced variable results. Paste fluxes and welding without shielding are not recommended for root protection. They performed very poorly with the welds corroding in both tests.

  10. Comparison of carbon fiber and stainless steel root canal posts.

    PubMed

    Purton, D G; Payne, J A

    1996-02-01

    This in vitro study compared physical properties of root canal posts made of carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy resin with those of stainless steel posts. Three-point bending tests were used to derive the transverse modulus of elasticity of the posts. Resin composite cores on the posts were subjected to tensile forces to test the bonds between the cores and posts. Carbon fiber posts appeared to have adequate rigidity for their designed purpose. The bond strength of the resin composite cores to the carbon fiber posts was significantly less than that to the stainless steel posts. PMID:9063218

  11. Corrosion induced by cathodic hydrogen in 2205 duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalska, J.

    2011-05-01

    In this work new results about the influence of cathodic hydrogen on passivity and corrosion resistance of 2205 duplex stainless steel are described. The results were discussed by taking into account hydrogen charged samples and without hydrogen. The corrosion resistance to pitting was qualified with the polarization curves. The conclusion is that, hydrogen deteriorated the passive film stability and corrosion resistance to pitting of 2205 duplex stainless steel. The presence of hydrogen in passive films increases corrosion current density and decreases the potential of the film breakdown. It was also found that degree of susceptibility to hydrogen action was dependent on the hydrogen charging conditions.

  12. Ozone decay on stainless steel and sugarcane bagasse surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza-Corrêa, Jorge A.; Oliveira, Carlos; Amorim, Jayr

    2013-07-01

    Ozone was generated using dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure to treat sugarcane bagasse for bioethanol production. It was shown that interaction of ozone molecules with the pretreatment reactor wall (stainless steel) needs to be considered during bagasse oxidation in order to evaluate the pretreatment efficiency. The decomposition coefficients for ozone on both materials were determined to be (3.3 ± 0.2) × 10-8 for stainless steel and (2.0 ± 0.3) × 10-7 for bagasse. The results have indicated that ozone decomposition has occurred more efficiently on the biomass material.

  13. Characterizing pre-polished Type 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, R.H.; Summer, M.E.; Rankin, W.N.

    1994-10-01

    Prepolished Type 304L stainless steel surfaces are being specified for replacement of some equipment in the 221-H Canyon Building at the Savannah River Site. A prepolished stainless steel surface picks up less contamination than a hot-rolled and pickled surface and is easier to decontaminate; therefore, less waste is generated. Surface-characterization techniques and specification for a prepolished surface were developed to ensure that prepolished items being obtained were properly electropolished. The use of this technology has resulted in obtaining prepolished items with an improved surface finish.

  14. Advanced Cast Austenitic Stainless Steels for High Temperature Components

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Shingledecker, J.P.; Evans, N.D.; Pollard, M.J.

    2008-10-09

    In July of 2002, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Caterpillar, Inc. (Caterpillar Technical Center) to develop and commercialize new cast stainless steels invented and initially tested on a prior CRADA. This CRADA is a direct follow-on project to CRADA ORNL-99-0533 for diesel engine exhaust component and gas turbine engine structural component applications. The goal of this new CRADA was to develop and commercialize the newly discovered cast stainless steels (primarily CF8C-Plus) with improved performance and reliability, as lower-cost upgrade alternatives to more costly cast Ni-based superalloys.

  15. Susceptibility of stainless steel weldments to microbiologically influenced corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Borenstein, S.W.

    1993-12-31

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is the term used for the phenomenon where corrosion is initiated or accelerated by microorganisms. Biofilms of bacteria form on metal surfaces when exposed to natural waters. The activity of these biofilms and how they attach themselves to metal surfaces directly influence corrosion mechanisms. This paper describes the mechanisms for MIC and the factors which influence the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steel weldments to MIC. The metallurgical, microbiological and electrochemical factors that influence MIC are discussed. Case histories of MIC-related failures and field test results of austenitic stainless steel weldments in various welded conditions are presented.

  16. 49 CFR 178.47 - Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.47 Specification 4DS welded stainless steel... stainless steel sphere (two seamless hemispheres) or circumferentially welded cylinder both with a...

  17. 49 CFR 178.47 - Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.47 Specification 4DS welded stainless steel... stainless steel sphere (two seamless hemispheres) or circumferentially welded cylinder both with a...

  18. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. Revision 4 updates...

  19. 76 FR 31585 - Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India: Notice of Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... International Trade Administration Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India: Notice of Rescission of... stainless steel flanges from India. The period of review is February 1, 2010, through January 22, 2011... stainless steel flanges from India. See Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or...

  20. 76 FR 1599 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-11

    ... Less Than Fair Value: Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil, 59 FR 66914 (December 28, 1994). These deposit... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Final Results of Antidumping Duty... results of its administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar from Brazil....

  1. 77 FR 60673 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Antidumping Duty Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... International Trade Administration Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Antidumping...'') preliminarily determines that drawn stainless steel sinks (``drawn sinks'') from the People's Republic of China... unfinished, regardless of type of finish, gauge, or grade of stainless steel. Mounting clips,...

  2. 75 FR 67689 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... Brazil. See Antidumping Duty Orders: Stainless Steel Bar from Brazil, India and Japan, 60 FR 9661... Less Than Fair Value: Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil, 59 FR 66914 (December 28, 1994). These deposit... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping...

  3. 77 FR 13270 - Stainless Steel Bar From India: Preliminary Results and Partial Rescission of the Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... Duty Orders: Stainless Steel Bar from Brazil, India and Japan, 60 FR 9661 (February 21, 1995) (the... Less Than Fair Value: Stainless Steel Bar from India, 59 FR 66915 (December 28, 1994). These deposit... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From India: Preliminary Results and Partial Rescission...

  4. 75 FR 12514 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-16

    ... Brazil. See Antidumping Duty Orders: Stainless Steel Bar from Brazil, India and Japan, 60 FR 9661... Review, 73 FR 75398, 75399 (December 11, 2008) (SSPC from Belgium), and Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping...

  5. Accelerated corrosion of stainless steel in thiocyanate-containing solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pistorius, P Chris; Li, Wen

    2012-09-19

    It is known that reduced sulfur compounds (such as thiocyanate and thiosulfate) can accelerate active corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in acid solutions, but before we started this project the mechanism of acceleration was largely unclear. This work combined electrochemical measurements and analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS), which provided a comprehensive understanding of the catalytic effect of reduced sulfur species on the active corrosion of stainless steel. Both the behavior of the pure elements and the steel were studied and the work focused on the interaction between the pure elements of the steel, which is the least understood area. Upon completion of this work, several aspects are now much clearer. The main results from this work can be summarized as follows: The presence of low concentrations (around 0.1 mM) of thiocyanate or tetrathionate in dilute sulfuric acid greatly accelerates the anodic dissolution of chromium and nickel, but has an even stronger effect on stainless steels (iron-chromium-nickel alloys). Electrochemical measurements and surface analyses are in agreement with the suggestion that accelerated dissolution really results from suppressed passivation. Even well below the passivation potential, the electrochemical signature of passivation is evident in the electrode impedance; the electrode impedance shows clearly that this pre-passivation is suppressed in the presence of thiocyanate. For the stainless steels, remarkable changes in the morphology of the corroded metal surface and in the surface concentration of chromium support the suggestion that pre-passivation of stainless steels is suppressed because dissolution of chromium is accelerated. Surface analysis confirmed that adsorbed sulfur / sulfide forms on the metal surfaces upon exposure to solutions containing thiocyanate or thiosulfate. For pure nickel, and steels containing nickel (and residual copper), bulk sulfide

  6. Comparison of photodesorption yields from aluminum stainless and Cu-plated beam tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Halama, H.J.; Foerster, C.L.

    1989-01-01

    Photon Stimulated Desorption (PSD) from the walls of beam ducts constitutes the most serious gas load in storage rings and therefore exerts a great influence on both beam quality and lifetime. With the exception of the SSC which plans to use a Cu-plated beam tube, all existing and proposed machines use either aluminum or stainless steel beam tubes. In order to develop techniques for producing surfaces with the lowest PSD, we have studied the above materials using a dedicated beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Three meter long tubes were exposed to white light beams having critical energy of 500 eV and the desorption yields were measured as a function of beam dose. Several treatments commonly used for cleaning surfaces (prebaked, baked, fired, chemically cleaned and dc glow discharged) were investigated, and their relative merits are discussed. The results from sample tube measurements are compared with those from the X-rya ring Al beam tube during operation. The agreement is found to be quite good. Glow discharge cleaned stainless steel exhibited the lowest desorption yield. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Electrochemically induced annealing of stainless-steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Burstein, G T; Hutchings, I M; Sasaki, K

    2000-10-19

    Modification of the surface properties of metals without affecting their bulk properties is of technological interest in demanding applications where surface stability and hardness are important. When austenitic stainless steel is heavily plastically deformed by grinding or rolling, a martensitic phase transformation occurs that causes significant changes in the bulk and surface mechanical properties of the alloy. This martensitic phase can also be generated in stainless-steel surfaces by cathodic charging, as a consequence of lattice strain generated by absorbed hydrogen. Heat treatment of the steel to temperatures of several hundred degrees can result in loss of the martensitic structure, but this alters the bulk properties of the alloy. Here we show that martensitic structures in stainless steel can be removed by appropriate electrochemical treatment in aqueous solutions at much lower temperature than conventional annealing treatments. This electrochemically induced annealing process allows the hardness of cold-worked stainless steels to be maintained, while eliminating the brittle martensitic phase from the surface. Using this approach, we are able to anneal the surface and near-surface regions of specimens that contain rolling-induced martensite throughout their bulk, as well as those containing surface martensite induced by grinding. Although the origin of the electrochemical annealing process still needs further clarification, we expect that this treatment will lead to further development in enhancing the surface properties of metals. PMID:11057662

  8. Bactericidal behavior of Cu-containing stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Huang, Xiaobo; Ma, Yong; Lin, Naiming; Fan, Ailan; Tang, Bin

    2012-10-01

    Stainless steels are one of the most common materials used in health care environments. However, the lack of antibacterial advantage has limited their use in practical application. In this paper, antibacterial stainless steel surfaces with different Cu contents have been prepared by plasma surface alloying technology (PSAT). The steel surface with Cu content 90 wt.% (Cu-SS) exhibits strong bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) within 3 h. Although the Cu-containing surface with Cu content 2.5 wt.% (CuNi-SS) can also kill all tested bacteria, this process needs 12 h. SEM observation of the bacterial morphology and an agarose gel electrophoresis were performed to study the antibacterial mechanism of Cu-containing stainless steel surfaces against E. coli. The results indicated that Cu ions are released when the Cu-containing surfaces are in contact with bacterial and disrupt the cell membranes, killing the bacteria. The toxicity of Cu-alloyed surfaces does not cause damage to the bacterial DNA. These results provide a scientific explanation for the antimicrobial applications of Cu-containing stainless steel. The surfaces with different antibacterial abilities could be used as hygienic surfaces in healthcare-associated settings according to the diverse requirement of bactericidal activities.

  9. High-temperature brazing of stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Heisman, R. M.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Prevention of iron contamination of platens is eliminated by placing alumina/silica ceramic-fiber blankets between platens and carbon-steel plate. Carbon-steel plates provide rigidity and improve heat transfer.

  10. Using stainless steels as long-lasting rebar material

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.N.; Tullmin, M.

    1999-05-01

    Corrosion of carbon steel (CS) reinforcing bars (rebars) is a major cause of damage and failure in reinforced concrete structures. A more corrosion resistant rebar material is needed to replace CS in the critical parts of these structures. Stainless steels (SS) have shown considerable promise in terms of the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties required to fulfill this role. Although SS rebars are more expensive, their use can be justified on a life-cycle cost basis.

  11. 37. REDUCTION PLANT DRYER Stainless steel screen cylinder, encased ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. REDUCTION PLANT - DRYER Stainless steel screen cylinder, encased within an outer steel shell (top half missing). As fish were tumbled by the rotating screen, they were cooked and dried by live steam piped into the dryer through overhead pipes. The dryer is mounted on a slight angle, aiding the process by moving the drying fish towards the exhaust end of the dryer. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  12. Mechanical properties of low-nickel stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montano, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Demand for improved corrosion-resistant steels, coupled with increased emphasis on conserving strategic metals, has led to development of family of stainless steels in which manganese and nitrogen are substituted for portion of usual nickel content. Advantages are approximately-doubled yield strength in annealed condition, better resistance to stress-corrosion cracking, retention of low magnetic permeability even after severe cold working, excellent strength and ductility at cryogenic temperatures, superior resistance to wear and galling, and excellent high-temperature properties.

  13. Stainless steels with improved strength for service at 760 C and above

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1998-03-01

    An evaluation was undertaken of modified 25Cr-20Ni stainless steels and a modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel for advanced energy applications at 760 C (1,400 F) and higher. It was found that good fabricability, strength, and ductility could be produced in the modified steels. Stress rupture data to beyond 10,000 h showed that the strengths of the modified steels were more than double that for type 310H stainless steel.

  14. Properties of super stainless steels for orthodontic applications.

    PubMed

    Oh, Keun-Taek; Kim, Young-Sik; Park, Yong-Soo; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2004-05-15

    Orthodontic stainless-steel appliances are considered to be corrosion resistant, but localized corrosion can occur in the oral cavity. This study was undertaken to evaluate the properties of super stainless steels in orthodontic applications. Accordingly, the metallurgical properties, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, amount of the released nickel, cytotoxicity, and characteristics of the passive film were investigated. Corrosion resistances of the specimens were high and in the following order: super austenitic stainless steel (SR-50A) > super ferritic stainless steel (SFSS) = super duplex stainless steel (SR-6DX) > 316L SS > super martensitic stainless steel (SR-3Mo) in artificial saliva, 37 degrees C. At 500 mV (SCE), current densities of SR-50A, SFSS, SR-6DX, 316L SS, and SR-3Mo were 5.96 microA/cm(2), 20.3 microA/cm(2), 31.9 microA/cm(2), 805 microA/cm(2), and 5.36 mA/cm(2), respectively. Open circuit potentials of SR-50A, 316L SS, SR-6DX, SR-3Mo, and SFSS were - 0.2, - 0.22, - 0.24, - 0.43, and - 0.46 V (SCE), respectively. SR-50A, SFSS, and SR-6DX released below 3 ng/ml nickel for 8 weeks, and increased a little with immersion time, and 316L SS released about 3.5 ng/ml nickel, but SR-3Mo released a large amount of nickel, which increased with immersion time. The study demonstrated that SR-50A, SR-6DX, and SFSS have high corrosion resistance and mild or no cytotoxicity, due to the passive film enhanced by synergistic effect of Mo + N or by high addition effect of Cr + W. All super stainless steels showed very low cytotoxicity regardless of their nickel contents, although SR-3Mo was found to be relatively cytotoxic. From these studies, these steels are considered suitable for orthodontic applications. PMID:15116408

  15. Diode laser welding of aluminum to steel

    SciTech Connect

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Trovalusci, Federica

    2011-05-04

    Laser welding of dissimilar materials was carried out by using a high power diode laser to join aluminum to steel in a butt-joint configuration. During testing, the laser scan rate was changed as well as the laser power: at low values of fluence (i.e. the ratio between laser power and scan rate), poor joining was observed; instead at high values of fluence, an excess in the material melting affected the joint integrity. Between these limiting values, a good aesthetics was obtained; further investigations were carried out by means of tensile tests and SEM analyses. Unfortunately, a brittle behavior was observed for all the joints and a maximum rupture stress about 40 MPa was measured. Apart from the formation of intermeltallic phases, poor mechanical performances also depended on the chosen joining configuration, particularly because of the thickness reduction of the seam in comparison with the base material.

  16. 77 FR 1504 - Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... Commission instituted this review on July 1, 2011 (76 FR 38686) and determined on October 4, 2011, that it would conduct an expedited review (76 FR 64105, October 17, 2011). The Commission transmitted its... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in...

  17. Gas Leak from Vinyl Taped Stainless Steel Dressing Jars

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Hayes

    1999-03-01

    The leak rates of nitrogen gas from stainless steel dressing jars taped with 2 inch vinyl tape were measured. These results were used to calculate hydrogen leak rates from the same jars. The calculations show that the maximum concentration of hydrogen buildup in this type of container configuration will beat least 3 orders of magnitude below the lower explosion limit for hydrogen in air.

  18. Battery and fuel cell electrodes containing stainless steel charging additive

    DOEpatents

    Zuckerbrod, David; Gibney, Ann

    1984-01-01

    An electrode for use in electrochemical energy cells is made, comprising a hydrophilic layer and a hydrophobic layer, where the hydrophilic layer comprises a hydrophilic composite which includes: (i) carbon particles; (ii) stainless steel particles; (iii) a nonwetting agent; and (iv) a catalyst, where at least one current collector contacts said composite.

  19. Stainless steel 301 and Inconel 718 hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgeier, R. K.; Forman, R.

    1970-01-01

    Conditions and results of tensile tests of 26 Inconel 718 and four cryoformed stainless steel specimens are presented. Conclusions determine maximum safe hydrogen operating pressure for cryogenic pressure vessels and provide definitive information concerning flaw growth characteristics under the most severe temperature and pressure conditions

  20. Behavior of stainless steels in pressurized water reactor primary circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Féron, D.; Herms, E.; Tanguy, B.

    2012-08-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in primary circuits of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Operating experience with the various grades of stainless steels over several decades of years has generally been excellent. Nevertheless, stress corrosion failures have been reported in few cases. Two main factors contributing to SCC susceptibility enhancement are investigated in this study: cold work and irradiation. Irradiation is involved in the stress corrosion cracking and corrosion of in-core reactor components in PWR environment. Irradiated assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a complex and multi-physics phenomenon for which a predictive modeling able to describe initiation and/or propagation is not yet achieved. Experimentally, development of initiation smart tests and of in situ instrumentation, also in nuclear reactors, is an important axis in order to gain a better understanding of IASCC kinetics. A strong susceptibility for SCC of heavily cold worked austenitic stainless steels is evidenced in hydrogenated primary water typical of PWRs. It is shown that for a given cold-working procedure, SCC susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels materials increases with increasing cold-work. Results have shown also strong influences of the cold work on the oxide layer composition and of the maximum stress on the time to fracture.

  1. Metal release from stainless steel in biological environments: A review.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2016-03-01

    Due to its beneficial corrosion resistance, stainless steel is widely used in, e.g., biomedical applications, as surfaces in food contact, and for products intended to come into skin contact. Low levels of metals can be released from the stainless steel surface into solution, even for these highly corrosion resistant alloys. This needs to be considered in risk assessment and management. This review aims to compile the different metal release mechanisms that are relevant for stainless steel when used in different biological settings. These mechanisms include corrosion-induced metal release, dissolution of the surface oxide, friction-induced metal release, and their combinations. The influence of important physicochemical surface properties, different organic species and proteins in solution, and of biofilm formation on corrosion-induced metal release is discussed. Chemical and electrochemical dissolution mechanisms of the surface oxides of stainless steel are presented with a focus on protonation, complexation/ligand-induced dissolution, and reductive dissolution by applying a perspective on surface adsorption of complexing or reducing ligands and proteins. The influence of alloy composition, microstructure, route of manufacture, and surface finish on the metal release process is furthermore discussed as well as the chemical speciation of released metals. Typical metal release patterns are summarized. PMID:26514345

  2. 304L stainless steel resistance to cesium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, C.E.

    1998-08-27

    B and W Hanford Company have two Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Type 4 canisters filled with cesium chloride (CsCl) originally produced at WESF (Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility). These canisters are constructed of 304L stainless steel per drawing ORNL 970-294. Instead of removing the CsCl from the Type 4 canisters and repacking into an Inner Capsule, it is intended (for ALARA, schedule and cost purposes) that the Type 4 canisters be decontaminated (scrubbed) and placed [whole] inside a Type ``W`` overpack. The overpack is constructed from 316L stainless steel. Several tests have been run by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) over the. years documenting the corrosion compatibility of 316L SS with CsCl (Bryan 1989 and Fullam 1972). However, no information for 304L SS compatibility is readily available. This document estimates the corrosion resistance of 304L stainless steel in a WESF CsCl environment as it compares with that of 316L stainless steel.

  3. [The question of nickel release from stainless steel cooking pots].

    PubMed

    Vrochte, H; Schätzke, M; Dringenberg, E; Wölwer-Rieck, U; Büning-Pfaue, H

    1991-09-01

    For three items of foods (rhubarb, spinach, sauerkraut) the possible release of nickel (by means of AAS) was analysed, a release which may be caused by a possible corrosive effect of the concerned (oxalic-, milk-, vinegar-) acids (as well as common salt) within a normal domestic food-preparation. For this analysis stainless steel cooking pots of different manufacturers, various types and in a representative selection and quantity were taken into consideration; the detailed analyses were extended so far that clear statistical evaluations were possible. This method complies regulations for accuracy to determine traces of heavy metal. For all three analysed food-stuffs an identical result was reached that no nickel release from the stainless steel cooking pots into the food was found. Differences of the various stainless steel cooking pots with regard to their surfaces' quality or their origin (manufacturers) were not yielded, either. All detected concentrations of nickel are within the reach of the natural nickel content of the analysed food-stuffs and their amount is even much lower than other food's content of nickel. This leads up to the conclusion that the former view of a possible nickel release of stainless steel cooking pots has to be revised because these assumptions were not confirmed in the presented results of this analysis and therefore have to be regarded as not correct. PMID:1763555

  4. 2. GENERAL VIEW OF STAINLESS STEEL SMOKEHOUSES ON LEVEL 6, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GENERAL VIEW OF STAINLESS STEEL SMOKEHOUSES ON LEVEL 6, LOOKING EAST; SMOKEHOUSE UNITS WERE BUILT BY DRYING SYSTEMS COMPANY, DIVISION OF MICHIGAN OVEN COMPANY, MORTON GROVE, ILLINOIS - Rath Packing Company, Smokehouse-Hog Chilling Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  5. 6. DETAIL OF STAINLESS STEEL VISCERA CHUTE IN SOUTHEAST CORNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF STAINLESS STEEL VISCERA CHUTE IN SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LEVEL4; ENTRAILS WERE DROPPED INTO CHUTE, THEN PASSED THROUGH THE FLOOR TO THE GUT SHANTY ON LEVEL 3 TO BE SORTED AND CLEANED - Rath Packing Company, Hog Dressing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  6. Lithium wetting of stainless steel for plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Roszell, J. P.; Koel, B. E.

    2014-10-01

    Ensuring continuous wetting of a solid container by the liquid metal is a critical issue in the design of liquid metal plasma facing components foreseen for NSTX-U and FNSF. Ultrathin wetting layers may form on metallic surfaces under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions if material reservoirs are present from which spreading and wetting can start. The combined scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and ion beam etching capabilities of a Scanning Auger Microprobe (SAM) have been used to study the spreading of lithium films on stainless steel substrates. A small (mm-scale) amount of metallic lithium was applied to a stainless steel surface in an argon glove box and transferred to the SAM. Native impurities on the stainless steel and lithium surfaces were removed by Ar+ ion sputtering. Elemental mapping of Li and Li-O showed that surface diffusion of Li had taken place at room temperature, well below the 181°C Li melting temperature. The influence of temperature and surface oxidation on the rate of Li spreading on stainless steel will be reported. Support was provided through DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  7. Graphene Nanoplatelets Based Protective and Functionalizing Coating for Stainless Steel.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Jayanta; Kozlova, Jekaterina; Sammelselg, Väino

    2015-09-01

    Stainless steel is the most widely used alloy for many industrial and everyday applications, and protection of this alloy substrate against corrosion is an important industrial issue. Here we report a promising application of graphene oxide and graphene nanoplatelets as effective corrosion inhibitors for AISI type 304 stainless steel alloy. The graphene oxide and graphene coatings on the stainless steel substrates were prepared using spin coating techniques. Homogeneous and complete surface coverage by the graphene oxide and graphene nanoplatelets were observed with a high-resolution scanning electron microscope. The corrosion inhibition ability of these materials was investigated through measurement of open circuit potential and followed by potentiodymamic polarization analysis in aqueous sodium chloride solution before and after a month of immersion. Analyzed result exhibits effective corrosion inhibition for both substrates coated with graphene oxide or graphene nanoplatelets by increasing corrosion potential, pitting potential and decreasing passive current density. The corrosion inhibition ability of the coated substrates has not changed even after the long-term immersion. The result showed both graphene materials can be used as an effective corrosion inhibitor for the stainless steel substrates, which would certainly increase lifetime the substrate. However, long-term protection ability of the graphene coated susbtsrate showed somewhat better inhibition performance than the ones coated with graphene oxide. PMID:26716239

  8. Reactor Material Program Fracture Toughness of Type 304 Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Awadalla, N.G.

    2001-03-28

    This report describes the experimental procedure for Type 304 Stainless Steel fracture toughness measurements and the application of results. Typical toughness values are given based on the completed test program for the Reactor Materials Program (RMP). Test specimen size effects and limitations of the applicability in the fracture mechanics methodology are outlined as well as a brief discussion on irradiation effects.

  9. 73. View of line of stainless steel coolant storage tanks ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. View of line of stainless steel coolant storage tanks for bi-sodium sulfate/water coolant solution at first floor of transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  10. Materials data handbook: Stainless steel alloy A-286

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information for stainless steel alloy A-286 is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical properties at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and bonding is developed.

  11. Method of forming dynamic membrane on stainless steel support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddis, Joseph L. (Inventor); Brandon, Craig A. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A suitable member formed from sintered, powdered, stainless steel is contacted with a nitrate solution of a soluble alkali metal nitrate and a metal such as zirconium in a pH range and for a time sufficient to effect the formation of a membrane of zirconium oxide preferably including an organic polymeric material such as polyacrylic acid.

  12. Failure Assessment Diagram for Brazed 304 Stainless Steel Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yory

    2011-01-01

    Interaction equations were proposed earlier to predict failure in Albemet 162 brazed joints. Present study demonstrates that the same interaction equations can be used for lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in 304 stainless steel joints brazed with silver-based filler metals as well as for construction of the Failure Assessment Diagrams (FAD).

  13. Alternative to Nitric Acid for Passivation of Stainless Steel Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L.; Kolody, Mark; Curran, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the Department of Defense (DoD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. Consequently, it is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The DoD and NASA have numerous structures and equipment that are fabricated from stainless steel. The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits including increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational cost. DoD and NASA agreed to collaborate to validate citric acid as an acceptable passivating agent for stainless steel. This paper details our investigation of prior work developing the citric acid passivation process, development of the test plan, optimization of the process for specific stainless steel alloys, ongoing and planned testing to elucidate the process' resistance to corrosion in comparison to nitric acid, and preliminary results.

  14. Effect of ultrafine grain on tensile behaviour and corrosion resistance of the duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang; Limin, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel was obtained by cold rolling and annealing. The tensile properties were investigated at room temperature. Comparing with coarse grained stainless steel, ultrafine grained sample showed higher strength and plasticity. In addition, grain size changed deformation orientation. The strain induced α'-martensite was observed in coarse grained 2205 duplex stainless steel with large strain. However, the grain refinement inhibited the transformation of α'-martensite;nevertheless, more deformation twins improved the strength and plasticity of ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel. In addition, the grain refinement improved corrosion resistance of the 2205 duplex stainless steel in sodium chloride solution. PMID:26952459

  15. Natural clinoptilolite composite membranes on tubular stainless steel supports for water softening.

    PubMed

    Adamaref, Solmaz; An, Weizhu; Jarligo, Maria Ophelia; Kuznicki, Tetyana; Kuznicki, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    Disk membranes generated from high-purity natural clinoptilolite mineral rock have shown promising water desalination and de-oiling performance. In order to scale up production of these types of membranes for industrial wastewater treatment applications, a coating strategy was devised. A composite mixture of natural clinoptilolite from St. Cloud (Winston, NM, USA) and aluminum phosphate was deposited on the inner surface of porous stainless steel tubes by the slip casting technique. The commercial porous stainless steel tubes were pre-coated with a TiO2 layer of about 10 μm. Phase composition and morphology of the coating materials were investigated using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Water softening performance of the fabricated membranes was evaluated using Edmonton (Alberta, Canada) municipal tap water as feed source. Preliminary experimental results show a high water flux of 7.7 kg/(m(2) h) and 75% reduction of hardness and conductivity in a once-through membrane process at 95 °C and feed pressure of 780 kPa. These results show that natural zeolite coated, stainless steel tubular membranes have high potential for large-scale purification of oil sands steam-assisted gravity drainage water at high temperature and pressure requirements. PMID:25353948

  16. Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Gas Metal Arc Welded AISI 409 Grade Ferritic Stainless Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Shanmugam, K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2009-10-01

    The effect of filler metals such as austenitic stainless steel, ferritic stainless steel, and duplex stainless steel on fatigue crack growth behavior of the gas metal arc welded ferritic stainless steel joints was investigated. Rolled plates of 4 mm thickness were used as the base material for preparing single ‘V’ butt welded joints. Center cracked tensile specimens were prepared to evaluate fatigue crack growth behavior. Servo hydraulic controlled fatigue testing machine with a capacity of 100 kN was used to evaluate the fatigue crack growth behavior of the welded joints. From this investigation, it was found that the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal showed superior fatigue crack growth resistance compared to the joints fabricated by austenitic and ferritic stainless steel filler metals. Higher yield strength and relatively higher toughness may be the reasons for superior fatigue performance of the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal.

  17. Low Temperature Surface Carburization of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Sunniva R; Heuer, Arthur H; Sikka, Vinod K

    2007-12-07

    Low-temperature colossal supersaturation (LTCSS) is a novel surface hardening method for carburization of austenitic stainless steels (SS) without the precipitation of carbides. The formation of carbides is kinetically suppressed, enabling extremely high or colossal carbon supersaturation. As a result, surface carbon concentrations in excess of 12 at. % are routinely achieved. This treatment increases the surface hardness by a factor of four to five, improving resistance to wear, corrosion, and fatigue, with significant retained ductility. LTCSS is a diffusional surface hardening process that provides a uniform and conformal hardened gradient surface with no risk of delamination or peeling. The treatment retains the austenitic phase and is completely non-magnetic. In addition, because parts are treated at low temperature, they do not distort or change dimensions. During this treatment, carbon diffusion proceeds into the metal at temperatures that constrain substitutional diffusion or mobility between the metal alloy elements. Though immobilized and unable to assemble to form carbides, chromium and similar alloying elements nonetheless draw enormous amounts of carbon into their interstitial spaces. The carbon in the interstitial spaces of the alloy crystals makes the surface harder than ever achieved before by more conventional heat treating or diffusion process. The carbon solid solution manifests a Vickers hardness often exceeding 1000 HV (equivalent to 70 HRC). This project objective was to extend the LTCSS treatment to other austenitic alloys, and to quantify improvements in fatigue, corrosion, and wear resistance. Highlights from the research include the following: • Extension of the applicability of the LTCSS process to a broad range of austenitic and duplex grades of steels • Demonstration of LTCSS ability for a variety of different component shapes and sizes • Detailed microstructural characterization of LTCSS-treated samples of 316L and other alloys

  18. Cavitation Erosion of Sensitized UNS S31803 Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitelea, Ion; Micu, Lavinia Mădălina; Bordeaşu, Ilare; Crăciunescu, Corneliu Marius

    2016-05-01

    During processing or use, duplex steels can be subjected to heating at high temperatures that can affect their behavior. This work aims to correlate the influence of the sensitization treatment on the ultrasonic cavitation erosion behavior of a UNS S31803 (X2CrNiMoN22-5-3) duplex stainless steel. Duplex stainless steels, formed as a result of rapid cooling after solution annealing, are sensitized at temperatures of 475 and 850 °C, respectively, leading to hardening and embrittlement due to the spinodal decomposition of the ferrite and the precipitation of secondary phases. The ultrasonic cavitation erosion experiments showed that the sensitization at 850 °C reduced the mean depth of erosion by about 11% and the mean depth of erosion rate by 28%. By contrast, the sensitization at 475 °C deteriorates the cavitation erosion resistance, increasing the erosion parameters by up to 22%, compared to the solution annealed state.

  19. Cavitation Erosion of Sensitized UNS S31803 Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitelea, Ion; Micu, Lavinia Mădălina; Bordeaşu, Ilare; Crăciunescu, Corneliu Marius

    2016-04-01

    During processing or use, duplex steels can be subjected to heating at high temperatures that can affect their behavior. This work aims to correlate the influence of the sensitization treatment on the ultrasonic cavitation erosion behavior of a UNS S31803 (X2CrNiMoN22-5-3) duplex stainless steel. Duplex stainless steels, formed as a result of rapid cooling after solution annealing, are sensitized at temperatures of 475 and 850 °C, respectively, leading to hardening and embrittlement due to the spinodal decomposition of the ferrite and the precipitation of secondary phases. The ultrasonic cavitation erosion experiments showed that the sensitization at 850 °C reduced the mean depth of erosion by about 11% and the mean depth of erosion rate by 28%. By contrast, the sensitization at 475 °C deteriorates the cavitation erosion resistance, increasing the erosion parameters by up to 22%, compared to the solution annealed state.

  20. Evaluation of the wear properties of high interstitial stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tylczak, J.H.; Rawers, J.C.; Alman, D.E.

    2007-04-01

    Adding carbon to high nitrogen steels increases interstitial concentrations over what can be obtained with nitrogen addition alone. This can results in an increase in hardness, strength, and wear resistance. The alloys produced for this study were all based on commercially available high-nitrogen Fe-18Cr-18Mn stainless steel. This study is the first significant wear study of these new high interstitial nitrogen-carbon stainless steel alloys. Wear tests included: scratch, pin-on-disk abrasion, dry sand/rubber wheel abrasion, impeller impact, and jet erosion. Increasing interstitial concentration increased strength and hardness and improved wear resistance under all test conditions. The results are discussed in terms of overall interstitial alloy concentration.

  1. Achievement of a superpolish on bare stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.; Casstevens, J.

    1997-08-01

    We report the achievement of a superpolished surface, suitable for x-ray reflection, on bare stainless steel. The rms roughness obtained on various samples varied from 2.2 to 4.2 {angstrom}, as measured by an optical profiler with a bandwidth 0.29-100 mm{sup -1}. The type 17-4 PH precipitation-hardening stainless steel used to make the mirrors is also capable of ultrastability and has good manufactureability. This combination of properties makes it an excellent candidate material for mirror substrates. We describe the successful utilization of this type of steel in making elliptical-cylinder mirrors for a soft-x-ray microprobe system at the Advanced Light Source, and discuss possible for its unusual stability and polishability.

  2. Formation Mechanism of Spinel-Type Inclusions in High-Alloyed Stainless Steel Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joo Hyun

    2007-08-01

    Fundamental thermodynamics of the relationship between high-alloyed stainless steel melts (Fe-20 mass pct Cr-13 mass pct Ni-3 mass pct Si) and the inclusions were investigated. The formation mechanism of the inclusions containing the spinel crystals was developed based on the experimental results and from the compositions of the inclusions in the steel samples taken during plant operations. The molar content of alumina in the inclusions was found to be linearly proportional to the increase of aluminum content, indicating that the inclusions could contain alumina even with less than about 200 ppm aluminum in the steel melt, e.g., steel melts that were mainly deoxidized by silicon. Furthermore, the composition of the inclusions is shown to be a function of the activity of the deoxidizers such as aluminum and silicon in the steel melt. From the analysis of the plant samples, it was found that the contents of MgO and Al2O3 in the calcium silicate type inclusions increased continuously as the steel melt transfers from the argon oxygen decarburization (AOD) converter to the tundish. This composition change in the inclusions originated from the reduction of MgO and Al2O3 in the slags or refractories by silicon in the steel melt. Increases of MgO and Al2O3 contents were prominent in tundish samples, and thus, the spinel phase could be crystallized in the calcium silicate inclusion matrix in the tundish; and finally the spinel crystals grew during cooling of the steel melt through the continuous casting (CC) mold and in the slabs. On the other hand, manganese silicate type inclusions containing chromium oxide were observed after tapping of the molten steel to the ladle. The MnO and Cr2O3 in these inclusions was initially reduced by silicon in the steel melt in the ladle treatment (LT) process, followed by further reduction by aluminum through the LT to the CC mold. The fractions of inclusions containing spinel crystals in cast slabs were negligible at the alumina content of

  3. 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS - TRITIUM AGING STUDIES ON STAINLESS STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.

    2013-01-31

    This report summarizes the research and development accomplishments during FY12 for the tritium effects on materials program. The tritium effects on materials program is designed to measure the long-term effects of tritium and its radioactive decay product, helium-3, on the structural properties of forged stainless steels which are used as the materials of construction for tritium reservoirs. The FY12 R&D accomplishments include: (1) Fabricated and Thermally-Charged 150 Forged Stainless Steel Samples with Tritium for Future Aging Studies; (2) Developed an Experimental Plan for Measuring Cracking Thresholds of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Steels in High Pressure Hydrogen Gas; (3) Calculated Sample Tritium Contents For Laboratory Inventory Requirements and Environmental Release Estimates; (4) Published report on “Cracking Thresholds and Fracture Toughness Properties of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Stainless Steels”; and, (5) Published report on “The Effects of Hydrogen, Tritium, and Heat Treatment on the Deformation and Fracture Toughness Properties of Stainless Steels”. These accomplishments are highlighted here and references given to additional reports for more detailed information.

  4. Aluminum/steel wire composite plates exhibit high tensile strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Composite plate of fine steel wires imbedded in an aluminum alloy matrix results in a lightweight material with high tensile strength. Plates have been prepared having the strength of titanium with only 85 percent of its density.

  5. The effect of dose rate on the response of austenitic stainless steels to neutron radiaiton

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T. R.; Cole, J I.; Trybus, Carole L.; Porter, D. L.; Tsai, Hanchung; Garner, Francis A.; Kenik, E A.; Yoshitake, T.; Ohta, Joji

    2006-01-01

    Depending on reactor design and component location, austenitic stainless steels may experience significantly different irradiation dose rates in the same reactor. Understanding the effect of dose rate on radiation performance is important to predicting component lifetime. This study examined the effect of dose rate on swelling, grain boundary segregation, and tensile properties in austenitic stainless steels through the examination of components retrieved from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) following its shutdown. Annealed 304 stainless steel, stress-relieved 304 stainless steel, 12% cold-worked 316 stainless steel, and 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel were irradiated over a dose range of 1-56 dpa at temperatures from 371 to 440 C and dose rates from 0.5 to 5.8 ? 10*7 dpa/s. Density and tensile properties were measured for 304 and 316 stainless steel. Changes in grain boundary composition were examined for 304 stainless steel. Swelling appears to increase at lower dose rates in both 304 and 316 stainless steel, although the effect was not always statistically significant. Grain boundary segregation also appears to increase at lower dose rate in 304 stainless steel. For the range of dose rates examined, no measurable dose rate effect on tensile properties was noted for any of the steels.

  6. Neutron irradiation creep in stainless steel alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüle, Wolfgang; Hausen, Hermann

    1994-09-01

    Irradiation creep elongations were measured in the HFR at Petten on AMCR steels, on 316 CE-reference steels, and on US-316 and US-PCA steels varying the irradiation temperature between 300°C and 500°C and the stress between 25 and 300 MPa. At the beginning of an irradiation a type of "primary" creep stage is observed for doses up to 3-5 dpa after which dose the "secondary" creep stage begins. The "primary" creep strain decreases in cold-worked steel materials with decreasing stress and decreasing irradiation temperature achieving also negative creep strains depending also on the pre-treatment of the materials. These "primary" creep strains are mainly attributed to volume changes due to the formation of radiation-induced phases, e.g. to the formation of α-ferrite below about 400°C and of carbides below about 700°C, and not to irradiation creep. The "secondary" creep stage is found for doses larger than 3 to 5 dpa and is attributed mainly to irradiation creep. The irradiation creep rate is almost independent of the irradiation temperature ( Qirr = 0.132 eV) and linearly dependent on the stress. The total creep elongations normalized to about 8 dpa are equal for almost every type of steel irradiated in the HFR at Petten or in ORR or in EBR II. The negative creep elongations are more pronounced in PCA- and in AMCR-steels and for this reason the total creep elongation is slightly smaller at 8 dpa for these two steels than for the other steels.

  7. The study of corrosion behavior of laser induced surface improvement (LISI) on steel and aluminum substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, N.; Vasanth, K.L.

    1999-07-01

    Laser Induced Surface Improvement (LISI) is a new process developed by University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) which employs lasers to melt precursor coatings and portions of the substrate to form a durable corrosion resistant surface. The LISI surface can be tailored to yield a composition that provides minimum impact to the base substrate material while giving good corrosion characteristics. The LISI surface treatment of tungsten carbide was applied on 7075 and 6061 aluminum alloys. The LISI treatment uses a chromium/nickel mixture and a stainless steel type mixture (pseudo stainless steel of 18 wt% chromium, 8 wt% nickel and a trace amount of manganese and silicon) on steel alloy 1010. The corrosion characteristics of these samples were determined in 3.5 wt% NaCl aqueous solution using linear polarization resistance technique. Potentiodynamic scans were run to determine the corrosion rates and optical microscopy was used to examine pitting characteristics of the different surface coatings. The effectiveness of the LISI modified surfaces to protect both steel and aluminum substrates is discussed.

  8. Development of corrosion-resistant improved Al-doped austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Keietsu; Miwa, Yukio; Okubo, Nariaki; Kaji, Yoshiyuki; Tsukada, Takashi

    2011-10-01

    Aluminum-doped type 316L SS (316L/Al) has been developed for the purpose of suppressing the degradation of corrosion resistance induced by irradiation in austenitic stainless steels (SSs). The electrochemical corrosion properties of this material were estimated after Ni-ion irradiation at a temperature range from 330 °C to 550 °C. When irradiated at 550 °C up to 12 dpa, 316L/Al showed high corrosion resistance in the vicinity of grain boundaries (GBs) and in grains, while severe GB etching and local corrosion in grains were observed in irradiated 316L and 316 SS. It is supposed that aluminum enrichment was enhanced by high-temperature irradiation at GBs and in grains, to compensate for lost corrosion resistance induced by chromium depletion.

  9. Reducing tool wear when machining austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, J.H.; Kosa, T.

    1998-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are considered more difficult to machine than carbon steels due to their high work hardening rate, large spread between yield and ultimate tensile strength, high toughness and ductility, and low thermal conductivity. These characteristics can result in a built-up edge or excessive tool wear during machining, especially when the cutting speed is too high. The practical solution is to lower the cutting speed until tool life reaches an acceptable level. However, lower machining speed negatively impacts productivity. Thus, in order to overcome tool wear at relatively high machining speeds for these alloys, on-going research is being performed to improve cutting fluids, develop more wear-resistant tools, and to modify stainless steels to make them less likely to cause tool wear. This paper discusses compositional modifications to the two most commonly machined austenitic stainless steels (Type 303 and 304) which reduced their susceptibility to tool wear, and allowed these grades to be machined at higher cutting speeds.

  10. Ultrasonic characterization of centrifugally cast stainless steel: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, P.

    1987-06-01

    Ultrasonic wave propagation in centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS) was investigated. The difficulties of inspecting CCSS material stem from elastic anisotropy that hampers defect location and severe attenuation caused by coarse grains within the structure that makes defect detection difficult. During this investigation, grain effects on ultrasonic wave propagation were investigated, techniques for identifying different grain structures were developed, and compensation methods for grain effects were addressed. Each step is explained analytically based on relevant theory and proven experimentally. Experiments were conducted on specially designed test specimens: angled blocks, polygonal blocks, wedge blocks, and calibration blocks. Wave parameters such as phase velocity, skew angle, energy velocity, attenuation, beam width, amplitude variation patterns, and frequency dependence on grain structures were all measured with these specimens. CCSS grain structures investigated were equiaxed-fine grains, columnar-dendritic grains, and coarse grains. For comparison purposes, additional types of material such as static-cast stainless steel, forged stainless steel, and carbon steel materials were also investigated. Longitudinal wave, horizontally and vertically polarized shear wave modes were all considered in experiments. The use of an automated ultrasonic system was also demonstrated for grain structure identification.

  11. Market Opportunities for Austenitic Stainless Steels in SO2 Scrubbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michels, Harold T.

    1980-10-01

    Recent U.S. federal legislation has created new opportunities for SO2 scrubbers because all coals, even low-sulfur western coals, will probably require scrubbing to remove SO2 from gaseous combustion products. Scrubbing, the chemical absorption of SO2 by vigorous contact with a slurry—usually lime or limestone—creates an aggressive acid-chloride solution. This presents a promising market for pitting-resistant austenitic stainless steels, but there is active competition from rubber and fiberglass-lined carbon steel. Since the latter are favored on a first-cost basis, stainless steels must be justified on a cost/performance or life-cost basis. Nickel-containing austenitic alloys are favored because of superior field fabricability. Ferritic stainless steels have little utility in this application because of limitations in weldability and resulting poor corrosion resistance. Inco corrosion test spools indicate that molybdenum-containing austenitic alloys are needed. The leanest alloys for this application are 316L and 317L. Low-carbon grades of stainless steel are specified to minimize corrosion in the vicinity of welds. More highly alloyed materials may be required in critical areas. At present, 16,000 MW of scrubber capacity is operational and 17,000 MW is under construction. Another 29,000 MW is planned, bringing the total to 62,000 MW. Some 160,000 MW of scrubber capacity is expected to be placed in service over the next 10 years. This could translate into a total potential market of 80,000 tons of alloy plate for new power industry construction in the next decade. Retrofitting of existing power plants plus scrubbers for other applications such as inert gas generators for oil tankers, smelters, municipal incinerators, coke ovens, the pulp and paper industry, sulfuric acid plants, and fluoride control in phosphoric acid plants will add to this large market.

  12. A Comparative Study on Nd:YAG Laser Cutting of Steel and Stainless Steel Using Continuous, Square, and Sine Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, K. H.

    2012-06-01

    Laser cutting with the sine waveform is seldom reported. This article is a comparative study on Nd:YAG laser cutting using the continuous (CW), square, and sine waveforms. The materials used in this study were steel and stainless steel. It has been found that the cutting capability, in descending order, is: CW > sine > square. The cutting of steel (C ~0.3 wt.%) and AISI304 austenitic stainless steel may be satisfactorily described by the Steen model, irrespective of waveform. Steel is slightly easier to cut than stainless steel. Limitations of the present study are discussed and suggestions for future work are made.

  13. Effect of Different Treatment on Corrosion Resistance of Sputtered Al Coating on Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guangyan; Qi, Zeyan; Su, Yong; Liu, Qun; Guo, Xingxing

    2014-12-01

    Aluminum coating on 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel was prepared by magnetron sputtering method. The specimens were treated with pre-oxidation (PO) or vacuum diffusion annealing (VA). Hot corrosion resistance of the coatings beneath the deposits of Na2SO4 at 1050 °C was investigated. Corrosion products were analyzed by XRD and SEM. Results show that the presence of coating could improve the corrosion resistance of stainless steel. FeAl phase appeared after VA at 600 °C, which enhanced cohesive force between the coating and the substrate, and reduced the oxidation and sulfidation rate. PO treatment can protect the substrate more effectively than VA treatment for metastable Al2O3 formed during PO treatment can be translated to stable Al2O3 more quickly at high temperatures. The corrosion products of the two kinds of specimens with aluminum coating were both composed of Al2O3, a little amount of FeS and Fe2O3 after 24 h corrosion. Al2O3 was formed mainly in the coatings, FeS was mainly distributed in the interface between coating and substrate of the specimens, and a small amount of FeS was distributed in the substrate. Al2O3 film remained intact after 24 h corrosion, and kept its protective effect on the substrate.

  14. Hydrogen transport through stainless steel under plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Kaplevsky, A. S.; Sadovskiy, Ya A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigation of gas exchange through stainless steel surface of the plasma chamber under irradiation with hydrogen atoms in oxygen atmosphere or oxygen contaminated hydrogen plasma. Dependence of this process on various irradiation parameters, such as the metal temperature, energy of irradiating ions, gas composition of plasma are studied. It is shown, that desorption from stainless steel is activated with the increase of the plasma chamber walls temperature and energy of irradiating ions. Hydrogen release occurs also under irradiation of the walls by helium and argon plasmas added with oxygen, however the amount of released hydrogen is several times lower than in the case of irradiation with oxygen contaminated deuterium plasma.

  15. Failure Assessment of Stainless Steel and Titanium Brazed Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury A.

    2012-01-01

    Following successful application of Coulomb-Mohr and interaction equations for evaluation of safety margins in Albemet 162 brazed joints, two additional base metal/filler metal systems were investigated. Specimens consisting of stainless steel brazed with silver-base filler metal and titanium brazed with 1100 Al alloy were tested to failure under combined action of tensile, shear, bending and torsion loads. Finite Element Analysis (FEA), hand calculations and digital image comparison (DIC) techniques were used to estimate failure stresses and construct Failure Assessment Diagrams (FAD). This study confirms that interaction equation R(sub sigma) + R(sub tau) = 1, where R(sub sigma) and R(sub t u) are normal and shear stress ratios, can be used as conservative lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in stainless steel and titanium brazed joints.

  16. Inhibition of Sodium Benzoate on Stainless Steel in Tropical Seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Seoh, S. Y.; Senin, H. B.; Nik, W. N. Wan; Amin, M. M.

    2007-05-09

    The inhibition of sodium benzoate for stainless steel controlling corrosion was studied in seawater at room temperature. Three sets of sample have been immersed in seawater containing sodium benzoate with the concentrations of 0.3M, 0.6M and 1.0M respectively. One set of sample has been immersed in seawater without adding any sodium benzoate. It was found that the highest corrosion rate was observed for the stainless steel with no inhibitor was added to the seawater. As the concentration of sodium benzoate being increased, the corrosion rate is decreases. Results show that by the addition of 1.0M of sodium benzoate in seawater samples, it giving {>=} 90% efficiencies.

  17. STAINLESS STEEL INTERACTIONS WITH SALT CONTAINING PLUTONIUM OXIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Z.; Chandler, G.; Dunn, K.; Stefek, T.; Summer, M.

    2010-02-01

    Salt containing plutonium oxide materials are treated, packaged and stored within nested, stainless steel containers based on requirements established in the DOE 3013 Standard. The moisture limit for the stored materials is less than 0.5 weight %. Surveillance activities which are conducted to assess the condition of the containers and assure continuing 3013 container integrity include the destructive examination of a select number of containers to determine whether corrosion attack has occurred as a result of stainless steel interactions with salt containing plutonium oxides. To date, some corrosion has been observed on the innermost containers, however, no corrosion has been noted on the outer containers and the integrity of the 3013 container systems is not expected to be compromised over a 50 year storage lifetime.

  18. Milling and Drilling Evaluation of Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, L.J.

    2001-12-10

    Near-net-shape components can be made with powder metallurgy (PM) processes. Only secondary operations such as milling and drilling are required to complete these components. In the past and currently production components are made from powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steel alloys. process engineers are unfamiliar with the difference in machining properties of wrought versus PM alloys and have had to make parts to develop the machining parameters. Design engineers are not generally aware that some PM alloy variations can be furnished with machining additives that greatly increase tool life. Specimens from a MANTEC PM alloy property study were made available. This study was undertaken to determine the machining properties of a number of stainless steel wrought and PM alloys under the same conditions so that comparisons of their machining properties could be made and relative tool life determined.

  19. Technique to eliminate helium induced weld cracking in stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chin-An Wang; Chin, B.A.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1992-12-31

    Experiments have shown that Type 316 stainless steel is susceptible to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) cracking upon cooling when welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) process under lateral constraint. The cracking has been hypothesized to be caused by stress-assisted helium bubble growth and rupture at grain boundaries. This study utilized an experimental welding setup which enabled different compressive stresses to be applied to the plates during welding. Autogenous GTA welds were produced in Type 316 stainless steel doped with 256 appm helium. The application of a compressive stress, 55 Mpa, during welding suppressed the previously observed catastrophic cracking. Detailed examinations conducted after welding showed a dramatic change in helium bubble morphology. Grain boundary bubble growth along directions parallel to the weld was suppressed. Results suggest that stress-modified welding techniques may be used to suppress or eliminate helium-induced cracking during joining of irradiated materials.

  20. Lifetest investigations with stainless steel/water heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muenzel, W. D.; Kraehling, H.

    Life tests were conducted on water heat pipes, made from four different alloys of stainless steel, at operation temperatures of 120, 160, 220, and 320 C in a reflux boiler mode for more than 20,000 hr. Other parameters varied during the tests included capillary structure, pretreatment and cleaning of the components, additional oxidation of the inner surface, filling procedures, amoung of liquid change, the number of ventings, and the duration of the reaction runs. The best results were obtained with pipes containing stainless steels with molybdenum alloy additions and with carbon contents of greater than 0.03%; with components which formed a protective surface layer; with the use of double-distilled water that had been ultrasonically degassed; with repeated ventings during the initial reaction run of 500 hr minimum duration; and with the addition of gaseous oxygen into the heat pipe during the reaction run with subsequent venting.

  1. New hermetic sealing material for vacuum brazing of stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, S.; Wiehl, G.; Silze, F.

    2016-03-01

    For vacuum brazing applications such as in vacuum interrupter industry Hermetic Sealing Materials (HSM) with low partial pressure are widely used. AgCu28 dominates the hermetic sealing market, as it has a very good wetting behavior on copper and metallized ceramics. Within recent decades wetting on stainless steel has become more and more important. However, today the silver content of HSMs is more in focus than in the past decades, because it has the biggest impact on the material prices. Umicore Technical Materials has developed a new copper based HSM, CuAg40Ga10. The wettability on stainless steel is significantly improved compared to AgCu28 and the total silver content is reduced by almost 44%. In this article the physical properties of the alloy and its brazed joints will be presented compared to AgCu28.

  2. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Borated Stainless Steel Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    lister, tedd e; Mizia, Ronald E

    2007-05-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has specified borated stainless steel manufactured to the requirements of ASTM A 887-89, Grade A, UNS S30464, to be the material used for the fabrication of the fuel basket internals of the preliminary transportation, aging, and disposal canister system preliminary design. The long-term corrosion resistance performance of this class of borated materials must be verified when exposed to expected YMP repository conditions after a waste package breach. Electrochemical corrosion tests were performed on crevice corrosion coupons of Type 304 B4 and Type 304 B5 borated stainless steels exposed to single postulated in-package chemistry at 60°C. The results show low corrosion rates for the test period

  3. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Borated Stainless Steel Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    lister, tedd e; Mizia, Ronald E

    2007-09-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has specified borated stainless steel manufactured to the requirements of ASTM A 887-89, Grade A, UNS S30464, to be the material used for the fabrication of the fuel basket internals of the preliminary transportation, aging, and disposal canister system preliminary design. The long-term corrosion resistance performance of this class of borated materials must be verified when exposed to expected YMP repository conditions after a waste package breach. Electrochemical corrosion tests were performed on crevice corrosion coupons of Type 304 B4 and Type 304 B5 borated stainless steels exposed to single postulated in-package chemistry at 60°C. The results show low corrosion rates for the test period

  4. Glow discharge cleaning of carbon fiber composite and stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetov, A.; Begrambekov, L.; Brémond, S.; Douai, D.; Kuzmin, A.; Sadovsky, Ya.; Shigin, P.; Vergasov, S.

    2011-08-01

    The paper experimentally investigates and analyses the features and mechanisms of both of oxygen removal by deuterium glow discharge from CFC, pyrolytic graphite and stainless steel subjected to irradiation in oxygen contaminated plasma. It is shown that oxygen implanted in pyrolytic graphite (PG) perpendicular to basal plates is removed after sputtering the layer slightly thicker than oxygen stopping zone (≈2 nm). Fast deuterium ions penetrating into CFC during GDC transfer the trapped oxygen atoms into the bulk. Thus, much thicker surface layer has to be removed (500-1000 nm) for oxygen release. Irradiation of stainless steel in plasma leads to formation of a barrier layer with thickness (2-4 nm) equal, or slightly higher than stopping range of oxygen ions. The layer accumulates the main fraction of implanted oxygen and prevents its penetration into the bulk. After barrier layer sputtering oxygen spreads into the bulk. Parameters and conditions of optimum GDC are discussed.

  5. The technology of chromium oxide passivation on stainless steel surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmi, Tadahiro; Ohki, Atsushi; Nakamura, Masakazu; Kawada, Koji; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Nakagawa, Yoshinori; Miyoshi, Shinji; Takahashi, Shinji; Chen, M.S.K. . Dept. of Electronics)

    1993-06-01

    A complete chromium oxide (Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3]) passivation technology has been developed for stainless steel surfaces for use in high purity gas-delivery systems and process chambers. Starting with an electrochemical buffing (ECB) to add to electro-polished (EP) SUS316L stainless steel material, an optimal thermal treatment was found by using a gas mixture of 10% hydrogen, 1--10 ppm oxygen and argon balance gas at 500C for 1 h. Five-day corrosion tests with HCl gas (containing 1.4 ppm moisture) at 5 kg/cm[sup 2] and 100C showed no sign of corrosion on the chromium oxide passivated surface. Chemical stability tests on this surface with silane specialty gas thermal decomposition also showed a remarkable noncatalytic activity compared with conventional surfaces.

  6. Duplex stainless steels for the pulp and paper industry

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonsson, E.; Olsson, J.

    1999-07-01

    The metallurgy and corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel, particularly with regards to applications in the pulp and paper industry, are described. Practical experiences from pressure vessel installations in cooking plants and bleach plants as well as from non-pressurized items in different parts along the fiber line, are given. The paper also reviews corrosion test results presented previously and compares these with recent test data and the practical experiences. Though most of the installations have been successful, some cases of corrosion attacks on duplex stainless steel have been reported, although these are very limited in number: one digester, one calorifier, two pulp storage towers, and two bleach plant filter washers, of a total of more than 700 identified installations.

  7. Investigation of Laser Peening Effects on Hydrogen Charged Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleski, Tania M.

    2008-10-30

    Hydrogen-rich environments such as fuel cell reactors can exhibit damage caused by hydrogen permeation in the form of corrosion cracking by lowering tensile strength and decreasing material ductility. Coatings and liners have been investigated, but there were few shot-peening or laser peening studies referenced in the literature with respect to preventing hydrogen embrittlement. The surface compressive residual stress induced by laser peening had shown success in preventing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for stainless steels in power plants. The question arose if the residual stresses induced by laser peening could delay the effects of hydrogen in a material. This study investigated the effect of laser peening on hydrogen penetration into metal alloys. Three areas were studied: laser peening, hydrogenation, and hydrogen detection. This study demonstrated that laser peening does not reduce the hydrogen permeation into a stainless steel surface nor does it prevent hydrogen embrittlement. The effect of laser peening to reduce hydrogen-assisted fatigue was unclear.

  8. Sensitization and IGSCC susceptibility prediction in stainless steel pipe weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Atteridge, D.G.; Simmons, J.W.; Li, Ming; Bruemmer, S.M.

    1991-11-01

    An analytical model, based on prediction of chromium depletion, has been developed for predicting thermomechanical effects on austenitic stainless steel intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibility. Model development and validation is based on sensitization development analysis of over 30 Type 316 and 304 stainless steel heats. The data base included analysis of deformation effects on resultant sensitization development. Continuous Cooling sensitization behavior is examined and modelled with and without strain. Gas tungsten are (GTA) girth pipe weldments are also characterized by experimental measurements of heat affected zone (HAZ) temperatures, strains and sensitization during/after each pass; pass by pass thermal histories are also predicted. The model is then used to assess pipe chemistry changes on IGSCC resistance.

  9. Emissivity of sodium wetted and oxidized Type 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, N.L.; Craig, R.E.; Forsyth, D.R.; Novendstern, E.H.

    1980-01-01

    The emissivity of sodium wetted and oxidized Type 304 stainless steel was determined to provide data for calculating the heat flow through Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) reflector plates, located above the sodium pool, to the reactor closure head. An emissivity experiment using a Type 304 stainless steel specimen was performed in an inerted glovebox. Relatively high oxygen concentrations of 10,000 and 50 vppm were used in the argon/oxygen mixtures to reduce reaction time. Following wetting and oxidation, the specimen was heated to a maximum temperature of 450/sup 0/C and the emissivity of the oxidized coating was calculated. Results indicate that the emissivity of the coating ranged from 0.55 to 0.92.

  10. Long-Term Underground Corrosion of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    M. K. Adler Flitton; T. S. Yoder

    2007-03-01

    In 1970, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) implemented the most ambitious and comprehensive long-term corrosion behavior test to date for stainless steels in soil environments. Over thirty years later, one of the six test sites was targeted to research subsurface contamination and transport processes in the vadose and saturated zones. This research directly applies to environmental management operational corrosion issues and long term stewardship scientific needs for understanding the behavior of waste forms and their near-field contaminant transport of chemical and radiological contaminants at nuclear disposal sites. This paper briefly describes the ongoing research and the corrosion analysis results of the stainless steel plate specimens recovered from the partial recovery of the first test site.

  11. 49 CFR 178.512 - Standards for steel, aluminum or other metal boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standards for steel, aluminum or other metal boxes..., aluminum or other metal boxes. (a) The following are identification codes for steel, aluminum, or other metal boxes: (1) 4A for a steel box; (2) 4B for an aluminum box; and (3) 4N for an other metal box....

  12. 49 CFR 178.512 - Standards for steel, aluminum or other metal boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standards for steel, aluminum or other metal boxes..., aluminum or other metal boxes. (a) The following are identification codes for steel, aluminum, or other metal boxes: (1) 4A for a steel box; (2) 4B for an aluminum box; and (3) 4N for an other metal box....

  13. SELECTIVE SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM FERRITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    DOEpatents

    Beaver, R.J.; Cherubini, J.H.

    1963-05-14

    A process is described for separating uranium from a nuclear fuel element comprising a uranium-containing core and a ferritic stainless steel clad by heating said element in a non-carburizing atmosphere at a temperature in the range 850-1050 un. Concent 85% C, rapidly cooling the heated element through the temperature range 815 un. Concent 85% to 650 EC to avoid annealing said steel, and then contacting the cooled element with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to selectively dissolve the uranium. (AEC)

  14. Surface nanocrystallization of stainless steel for reduced biofilm adherence.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bin; Davis, Elisabeth M; Hodges, Robert S; Irvin, Randall T; Li, D Y

    2008-08-20

    Stainless steel is one of the most common metallic biomedical materials. For medical applications, its resistance to the adherence of biofilms is of importance to the elimination or minimization of bacterial infections. In this study, we demonstrate the effectiveness of a process combining surface nanocrystallization and thermal oxidation (or a recovery heat treatment in air) for reducing the biofilm's adherence to stainless steel. During this treatment, a target surface was sandblasted and the resultant dislocation cells in the surface layer were turned into nanosized grains by a subsequent recovery treatment in air. This process generated a more protective oxide film that blocked the electron exchange or reduced the surface activity more effectively. As a result, the biofilm's adherence to the treated surface was markedly minimized. A synthetic peptide was utilized as a substitute of biofilms to evaluate the adhesion between a treated steel surface and biofilms using an atomic force microscope (AFM) through measuring the adhesive force between the target surface and a peptide-coated AFM tip. It was shown that the adhesive force decreased with a decrease in the grain size of the steel. The corresponding surface electron work function (EWF) of the steel was also measured, which showed a trend of variation in EWF with the grain size, consistent with corresponding changes in the adhesive force. PMID:21730615

  15. Surface nanocrystallization of stainless steel for reduced biofilm adherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bin; Davis, Elisabeth M.; Hodges, Robert S.; Irvin, Randall T.; Li, D. Y.

    2008-08-01

    Stainless steel is one of the most common metallic biomedical materials. For medical applications, its resistance to the adherence of biofilms is of importance to the elimination or minimization of bacterial infections. In this study, we demonstrate the effectiveness of a process combining surface nanocrystallization and thermal oxidation (or a recovery heat treatment in air) for reducing the biofilm's adherence to stainless steel. During this treatment, a target surface was sandblasted and the resultant dislocation cells in the surface layer were turned into nanosized grains by a subsequent recovery treatment in air. This process generated a more protective oxide film that blocked the electron exchange or reduced the surface activity more effectively. As a result, the biofilm's adherence to the treated surface was markedly minimized. A synthetic peptide was utilized as a substitute of biofilms to evaluate the adhesion between a treated steel surface and biofilms using an atomic force microscope (AFM) through measuring the adhesive force between the target surface and a peptide-coated AFM tip. It was shown that the adhesive force decreased with a decrease in the grain size of the steel. The corresponding surface electron work function (EWF) of the steel was also measured, which showed a trend of variation in EWF with the grain size, consistent with corresponding changes in the adhesive force.

  16. Ion beam nitriding of single and polycrystalline austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Abrasonis, G.; Riviere, J.P.; Templier, C.; Declemy, A.; Pranevicius, L.; Milhet, X.

    2005-04-15

    Polycrystalline and single crystalline [orientations (001) and (011)] AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel was implanted at 400 deg. C with 1.2 keV nitrogen ions using a high current density of 0.5 mA cm{sup -2}. The nitrogen distribution profiles were determined using nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). The structure of nitrided polycrystalline stainless steel samples was analyzed using glancing incidence and symmetric x-ray diffraction (XRD) while the structure of the nitrided single crystalline stainless steel samples was analyzed using x-ray diffraction mapping of the reciprocal space. For identical treatment conditions, it is observed that the nitrogen penetration depth is larger for the polycrystalline samples than for the single crystalline ones. The nitrogen penetration depth depends on the orientation, the <001> being more preferential for nitrogen diffusion than <011>. In both type of samples, XRD analysis shows the presence of the phase usually called 'expanded' austenite or {gamma}{sub N} phase. The lattice expansion depends on the crystallographic plane family, the (001) planes showing an anomalously large expansion. The reciprocal lattice maps of the nitrided single crystalline stainless steel demonstrate that during nitriding lattice rotation takes place simultaneously with lattice expansion. The analysis of the results based on the presence of stacking faults, residual compressive stress induced by the lattice expansion, and nitrogen concentration gradient indicates that the average lattice parameter increases with the nitrided layer depth. A possible explanation of the anomalous expansion of the (001) planes is presented, which is based on the combination of faster nitriding rate in the (001) oriented grains and the role of stacking faults and compressive stress.

  17. Manganese-stabilized austenitic stainless steels for fusion applications

    DOEpatents

    Klueh, Ronald L.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    1990-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel that is comprised of Fe, Cr, Mn, C but no Ni or Nb and minimum N. To enhance strength and fabricability minor alloying additions of Ti, W, V, B and P are made. The resulting alloy is one that can be used in fusion reactor environments because the half-lives of the elements are sufficiently short to allow for handling and disposal.

  18. Manganese-stabilized austenitic stainless steels for fusion applications

    DOEpatents

    Klueh, Ronald L.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    1990-08-07

    An austenitic stainless steel that is comprised of Fe, Cr, Mn, C but no Ni or Nb and minimum N. To enhance strength and fabricability minor alloying additions of Ti, W, V, B and P are made. The resulting alloy is one that can be used in fusion reactor environments because the half-lives of the elements are sufficiently short to allow for handling and disposal.

  19. Growth and adherence on stainless steel by Enterococcus faecium cells.

    PubMed

    Andrade, N J; Ajao, D B; Zottola, E A

    1998-11-01

    Enterococcus faecium isolated from Brazilian raw milk was used in this study. For growth studies, E. faecium was inoculated into 10% RSM (reconstituted skim milk) and MRS both, incubated at 6.5 and 9 degrees C for 10 days and at 30, 42, and 45 degrees C for 48 h. Cells were enumerated after spread-plating onto MRS agar and incubating at 30 degrees C for 48 h. The ability of E. faecium cells to adhere to stainless-steel chips (6 by 6 by 1 mm, AISI 304, finish #4) was investigated. MRS broth containing stainless steel chips was inoculated to an initial concentration of 10(3) or 10(6) CFU/ml of E. faecium. Adherent cells were stained with acridine orange and enumerated by epifluorescence microscopy. E. faecium grew between 6.5 and 42 degrees C in MRS and between 9 and 40 degrees C in RSM. In MRS broth with 10(6) or 10(3) CFU/ml, the g (generation time) values were 0.62 and 0.42 h and R (growth rate) values were 1.6 and 2.4 h-1. Values of R = 2.3 h-1 and g = 0.43 h were determined for E. faecium growing in RSM with 10(3) CFU/ml. In MRS broth, for samples with a starting concentration of 10(6) cells per ml, adherence to stainless-steel chips was first observed at 2 h. However, adherence was first observed at 4 h in samples with an initial concentration of 10(3) cells per ml. After 10 h of exposure the number of adherent cells was similar for all samples regardless of initial inoculum. These results indicate that E. faecium readily adheres to stainless steel. It also underscores the need to control E. faecium by using appropriate low storage temperatures and adequate sanitizing practices in the dairy industry. PMID:9829184

  20. Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Buono, Donald P.

    1983-01-01

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  1. Method of polishing nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Buono, Donald P.

    1981-01-01

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  2. Fatigue crack propagation behavior of stainless steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusko, Chad S.

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of austenitic and duplex stainless steel base and weld metals has been investigated using various fatigue crack growth test procedures, ferrite measurement techniques, light optical microscopy, stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical profilometry. The compliance offset method has been incorporated to measure crack closure during testing in order to determine a stress ratio at which such closure is overcome. Based on this method, an empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been shown to be very successful in overcoming crack closure for all da/dN for gas metal arc and laser welds. This empirically-determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been applied to testing of stainless steel base metal and weld metal to understand the influence of microstructure. Regarding the base metal investigation, for 316L and AL6XN base metals, grain size and grain plus twin size have been shown to influence resulting crack growth behavior. The cyclic plastic zone size model has been applied to accurately model crack growth behavior for austenitic stainless steels when the average grain plus twin size is considered. Additionally, the effect of the tortuous crack paths observed for the larger grain size base metals can be explained by a literature model for crack deflection. Constant Delta K testing has been used to characterize the crack growth behavior across various regions of the gas metal arc and laser welds at the empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60. Despite an extensive range of stainless steel weld metal FN and delta-ferrite morphologies, neither delta-ferrite morphology significantly influence the room temperature crack growth behavior. However, variations in weld metal da/dN can be explained by local surface roughness resulting from large columnar grains and tortuous crack paths in the weld metal.

  3. Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-05-28

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels is described. The chemical attack polich comprises FeNO/sub 3/, concentrated CH/sub 3/COOH, concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  4. 46 CFR 148.04-13 - Ferrous metal borings, shavings, turnings, or cuttings (excluding stainless steel).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (excluding stainless steel). 148.04-13 Section 148.04-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... stainless steel). (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of hazardous materials... steel). However, unmanned barges on which the article is stowed for or transported on a voyage...

  5. 75 FR 39663 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-12

    ... Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 73 FR 75398, 75399 (December 11, 2008), and Stainless Steel Sheet and... Steel Bar From Brazil, 59 FR 66914 (December 28, 1994). These deposit requirements shall remain in... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Final Results of Antidumping...

  6. 75 FR 54090 - Stainless Steel Bar From India: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... Steel Bar from India, 59 FR 66915 (December 28, 1994). These cash deposit requirements, when imposed... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From India: Final Results of Antidumping Duty... results of the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar (``SSB'')...

  7. Recrystallization and Grain Growth of 316L Stainless Steel Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiuyun; Liu, Yong; Wang, Yan; Feng, Ping; Tang, Huiping

    2014-07-01

    Recrystallization and grain growth behaviors of 316L stainless steel wires with a diameter of 12 µm were investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction techniques. Heavily cold-drawn wires were isothermally held at temperatures from 1073 K to 1223 K (800 °C to 950 °C) for various holding times. Optical microscopy and TEM observations showed that recrystallization grains have irregular shape and that twins exist. The texture formed during drawing and annealing processes of the wires, as measured by X-ray methods, showed a fiber texture approximated by a <111> and a <100> component. The value of the grain growth exponent n was calculated, and the kinetic rates were plotted using the Arrhenius equation. Results show that the activation energy of the grain growth for 316L stainless steel wire was determined to be 407 kJ/mol, which was much higher than that of the bulk 316L stainless steel. The small wire diameter and the existence of texture played important roles in the increase of the activation energy for grain growth of the wire.

  8. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands. PMID:26601037

  9. Surface interactions of cesium and boric acid with stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman-Canfield, N.

    1995-08-01

    In this report, the effects of cesium hydroxide and boric acid on oxidized stainless steel surfaces at high temperatures and near one atmosphere of pressure are investigated. This is the first experimental investigation of this chemical system. The experimental investigations were performed using a mass spectrometer and a mass electrobalance. Surfaces from the different experiments were examined using a scanning electron microscope to identify the presence of deposited species, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis to identify the species deposited on the surface. A better understanding of the equilibrium thermodynamics, the kinetics of the steam-accelerated volatilizations, and the release kinetics are gained by these experiments. The release rate is characterized by bulk vaporization/gas-phase mass transfer data. The analysis couples vaporization, deposition, and desorption of the compounds formed by cesium hydroxide and boric acid under conditions similar to what is expected during certain nuclear reactor accidents. This study shows that cesium deposits on an oxidized stainless steel surface at temperatures between 1000 and 1200 Kelvin. Cesium also deposits on stainless steel surfaces coated with boric oxide in the same temperature ranges. The mechanism for cesium deposition onto the oxide layer was found to involve the chemical reaction between cesium and chromate. Some revaporization in the cesium hydroxide-boric acid system was observed. It has been found that under the conditions given, boric acid will react with cesium hydroxide to form cesium metaborate. A model is proposed for this chemical reaction.

  10. Thermal Aging Phenomena in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, T. S.; Yang, Y.; Overman, N. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2016-02-01

    Cast stainless steels (CASSs) have been extensively used for the large components of light water reactor (LWR) power plants such as primary coolant piping and pump casing. The thermal embrittlement of CASS components is one of the most serious concerns related to the extended-term operation of nuclear power plants. Many past researches have concluded that the formation of Cr-rich α'-phase by Spinodal decomposition of δ-ferrite phase is the primary mechanism for the thermal embrittlement. Cracking mechanism in the thermally-embrittled duplex stainless steels consists of the formation of cleavage at ferrite and its propagation via separation of ferrite-austenite interphase. This article intends to provide an introductory overview on the thermal aging phenomena in LWR-relevant conditions. Firstly, the thermal aging effect on toughness is discussed in terms of the cause of embrittlement and influential parameters. An approximate analysis of thermal reaction using Arrhenius equation was carried out to scope the aging temperatures for the accelerated aging experiments to simulate the 60 and 80 years of services. Further, an equilibrium precipitation calculation was performed for model CASS alloys using the CALPHAD program, and the results are used to describe the precipitation behaviors in duplex stainless steels. These results are also to be used to guide an on-going research aiming to provide knowledge-based conclusive prediction for the integrity of the CASS components of LWR power plants during the service life extended up to and beyond 60 years.

  11. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Material at Cold Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer D. Snow; D. Keith Morton; Robert K. Blandford

    2008-07-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. However, a previous paper [1] reported on impact testing and analysis results performed at the Idaho National Laboratory using 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel base material specimens at room and elevated temperatures. The goal of the work presented herein is to add recently completed impact tensile testing results at -20 degrees F conditions for dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens (hereafter referred to as 304L and 316L, respectively). Recently completed welded material impact testing at -20 degrees F, room, 300 degrees F, and 600 degrees F is also reported. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch thick dog-bone shaped test specimens, the impact tests achieved strain rates in the 4 to 40 per second range, depending upon the material temperature. Elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials reflecting varying strain rates and temperatures are presented herein.

  12. Iodine susceptibility of pseudomonads grown attached to stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pyle, B. H.; McFeters, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonads were adapted to grow in phosphate-buffered water and on stainless steel surfaces to study the iodine sensitivity of attached and planktonic cells. Cultures adapted to low nutrient growth were incubated at room temperature in a circulating reactor system with stainless steel coupons to allow biofilm formation on the metal surfaces. In some experiments, the reactor was partially emptied and refilled with buffer at each sampling time to simulate a "fill-and-draw" water system. Biofilms of attached bacteria, resuspended biofilm bacteria, and reactor suspension, were exposed to 1 mg l-1 iodine for 2 min. Attached bacterial populations which established on coupons within 3 to 5 days displayed a significant increase in resistance to iodine. Increased resistance was also observed for resuspended cells from the biofilm and planktonic bacteria in the system suspension. Generally, intact biofilms and resuspended biofilm cells were most resistant, followed by planktonic bacteria and phosphate buffer cultures. Thus, biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces within water systems can result in significantly increased disinfection resistance of commonly-occurring water-borne bacteria that may enhance their ability to colonise water treatment and distribution systems.

  13. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The resistance of the martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels PH13-8Mo, 15-5PH, and 17-4PH to stress corrosion cracking was investigated. Round tensile and c-ring type specimens taken from several heats of the three alloys were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, to salt spray, and to a seacoast environment. The results indicate that 15-5PH is highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking in conditions H1000 and H1050 and is moderately resistant in condition H900. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of PH13-8Mo and 17-4PH stainless steels in conditions H1000 and H1050 was sensitive to mill heats and ranged from low to high among the several heats included in the tests. Based on a comparison with data from seacoast environmental tests, it is apparent that alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water is not a suitable medium for accelerated stress corrosion testing of these pH stainless steels.

  14. Corrosion Performance of Stainless Steels in a Simulated Launch Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Vinje, Rubiela D.; MacDowell, Louis

    2004-01-01

    At the Kennedy Space Center, NASA relies on stainless steel (SS) tubing to supply the gases and fluids required to launch the Space Shuttle. 300 series SS tubing has been used for decades but the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad has proven to be detrimental to these alloys. An upgrade with higher alloy content materials has become necessary in order to provide a safer and long lasting launch facility. In the effort to find the most suitable material to replace the existing AISI 304L SS ([iNS S30403) and AISI 316L SS (UNS S31603) shuttle tubing, a study involving atmospheric exposure at the corrosion test site near the launch pads and electrochemical measurements is being conducted. This paper presents the results of an investigation in which stainless steels of the 300 series, 304L, 316L, and AISI 317L SS (UNS S31703) as well as highly alloyed stainless steels 254-SMO (UNS S32154), AL-6XN (N08367) and AL29-4C ([iNS S44735) were evaluated using direct current (DC) electrochemical techniques under conditions designed to simulate those found at the Space Shuttle Launch pad. The electrochemical results were compared to the atmospheric exposure data and evaluated for their ability to predict the long-term corrosion performance of the alloys.

  15. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands. PMID:26601037

  16. Thermo-mechanical behavior of stainless steel knitted structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdani, Syed Talha Ali; Fernando, Anura; Maqsood, Muhammad

    2015-11-01

    Heating fabric is an advanced textile material that is extensively researched by the industrialists and the scientists alike. Ability to create highly flexible and drapeable heating fabrics has many applications in everyday life. This paper presents a study conducted on the comparison of heatability of knitted fabric made of stainless steel yarn. The purpose of the study is to find a suitable material for protective clothing against cold environments. In the current research the ampacity of stainless steel yarn is observed in order to prevent the overheating of the heating fabrics. The behavior of the knitted structure is studied for different levels of supply voltage. Infrared temperature sensing is used to measure the heat generated from the fabrics in order to measure the temperature of the fabrics without physical contact. It is concluded that interlock structure is one of the most suited structures for knitted heating fabrics. As learnt through this research, fabrics made of stainless steel yarn are capable of producing a higher level of heating compared to that of knitted fabric made using silver coated polymeric yarn at the same supply voltage.

  17. Recombination coefficients of O and N radicals on stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harmeet; Coburn, J. W.; Graves, David B.

    2000-09-01

    Surface recombination coefficients of O and N radicals in pure O2 and N2 plasmas, respectively, have been estimated on the stainless steel walls of a low-pressure inductively coupled plasma reactor. The recombination coefficients are estimated using a steady state plasma model describing the balance between the volume generation of the radicals from electron-impact dissociation of the parent molecules, and the loss of the radicals due to surface recombination. The model uses radical and parent molecule number densities and the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) as input parameters. We have measured the radical number density using appearance potential mass spectrometry. The parent neutral number density is measured using mass spectrometry. The EEDF is measured using a Langmuir probe. The recombination coefficient of O radicals on stainless steel walls at approximately 330 K is estimated to be 0.17±0.02, and agrees well with previous measurements. The recombination coefficient of N radicals is estimated to be 0.07±0.02 on stainless steel at 330 K.

  18. Compatibility Assessment of Advanced Stainless Steels in Sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Type 316L stainless steel capsules containing commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS (austenitic, 14Cr-16Ni), NF-616 (ferritic/martensitic, 9Cr-2W-0.5Mo), or 316L (austenitic, 17Cr-10Ni-2Mo) stainless steel were exposed at 600 or 700 C for 100 and 400 h as a screening test for compatibility. Using weight change, tensile testing, and metallographic analysis, HT-UPS and 316L were found to be largely immune to changes resulting from sodium exposure, but NF-616 was found susceptible to substantial decarburization at 700 C. Subsequently, two thermal convection loops (TCLs) constructed of 316L and loaded with commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS and 316L were operated for 2000 h each one between 500 and 650 C, the other between 565 and 725 C at a flow rate of about 1.5 cm/s. Changes in specimen appearance, weight, and tensile properties were observed to be very minor in all cases, and there was no metallographic evidence of microstructure changes, composition gradients, or mass transfer resulting from prolonged exposure in a TCL. Thus, it appears that HT-UPS and 316L stainless steels are similarly compatible with commercially pure sodium under these exposure conditions.

  19. Corrosion of stainless steel for HLW containers under gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Osada, K.; Muraoka, S.

    1993-12-31

    The corrosion behavior of type 304 stainless steel was studied under gamma irradiation as part of the evaluation for the long-term durability of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal containers. Gamma rays, generated from fission products in high-level radioactive waste, are considered to change the environment around the canisters and overpacks. The redox potentials for NaCl solutions and corrosion potentials of stainless steel were measured to consider the effects of gamma irradiation, by using an electrochemical method. The pitting potentials of stainless steel for NaCl solutions were also measured to examine the pitting corrosion under gamma irradiation. As a result of this experiment, it is concluded that the oxidizing properties as a result of the formation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and H{sub 2} produced by gamma irradiation depended on the concentration of Cl{sup -}, and that the strength of oxidizing properties of 1M (mol{center_dot}dm{sup -3}) NaCl solution was particularly high, and the pitting corrosion as found for 1M NaCl solution under gamma irradiation at the dose rate of 2.6{times}10{sup 2} C/kg{center_dot}h (1.0{times}10{sup 6} R/h) at 60{degrees}C, by using an electrochemical method.

  20. Adsorption of ammonia on treated stainless steel and polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaittinen, O.; Metsälä, M.; Persijn, S.; Vainio, M.; Halonen, L.

    2014-05-01

    Adsorption of dynamically diluted ammonia at part-per-billion to low part-per-million concentrations in dry nitrogen was studied with treated and non-treated stainless steel and polymer test tubes. The treatments included electropolishing and two types of coatings based on amorphous silicon. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy with an external cavity diode laser operating in the near-infrared wavelength range was used to monitor the adsorption process in real time in continuous-flow conditions to obtain quantitative assessment of the adsorptive properties of the studied surfaces. The investigated polymers were all less adsorptive than any of the treated or non-treated stainless steel surfaces. Some of the commercial coatings reduced the adsorption loss of stainless steel by a factor of ten or more. Polyvinylidene fluoride was found to be superior (less adsorption) to the four other studied polymer coatings. The number of adsorbed ammonia molecules per surface area obtained at different ammonia gas phase concentrations was modeled with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The time behavior of the adsorption-desorption process occurring in the time scale of seconds and minutes was simulated with a simple kinetic model.

  1. Thermal Aging Phenomena in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, T. S.; Yang, Y.; Overman, N. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2015-11-12

    We used cast stainless steels (CASSs)for the large components of light water reactor (LWR) power plants such as primary coolant piping and pump casing. The thermal embrittlement of CASS components is one of the most serious concerns related to the extended-term operation of nuclear power plants. Many past researches have concluded that the formation of Cr-rich alpha-phase by Spinodal decomposition of delta-ferrite phase is the primary mechanism for the thermal embrittlement. Cracking mechanism in the thermally-embrittled duplex stainless steels consists of the formation of cleavage at ferrite and its propagation via separation of ferrite-austenite interphase. This article intends to provide an introductory overview on the thermal aging phenomena in LWR-relevant conditions. Firstly, the thermal aging effect on toughness is discussed in terms of the cause of embrittlement and influential parameters. Moreover, an approximate analysis of thermal reaction using Arrhenius equation was carried out to scope the aging temperatures for the accelerated aging experiments to simulate the 60 and 80 years of services. Further, an equilibrium precipitation calculation was performed for model CASS alloys using the CALPHAD program, and the results are used to describe the precipitation behaviors in duplex stainless steels. Our results are also to be used to guide an on-going research aiming to provide knowledge-based conclusive prediction for the integrity of the CASS components of LWR power plants during the service life extended up to and beyond 60 years.

  2. Evaluation of manual ultrasonic inspection of cast stainless steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, T.T.

    1984-05-01

    Two studies have attempted to determine the degree of inspectability of centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS) pipe. In one study, Westinghouse examined the reliability of ultrasonic test methods in the detection of mechanical fatigue cracks. The second study was an NRC-sponsored Pipe Inspection Round Robin (PIRR) test conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The Westinghouse study reported that 80% detection was achieved for mechanical fatigue cracks having 20% throughwall depth. The PNL study reported that less than 30% detection was achieved for thermal fatigue cracks ranging from 5% to 50% through-wall. A cooperative program between PNL and Westinghouse was conducted to resolve the differences between the two studies. The program was designed as a limited round robin. Detection experiments were performed on samples from both the PNL and Westinghouse studies. The data reported here indicate that flaw type (thermal fatigue versus mechanical fatigue) was a significant factor in detection. Mechanical fatigue cracks were more easily detected than thermal fatigue cracks. The data conclusively show that manual ultrasonic inspection cannot size flaws in cast stainless steel material. The study recommends that ultrasonic inspection of cast stainless steel pipe be continued because cracks caused by some failure mechanisms (i.e., mechanical fatigue cracks) have proven to be detectable.

  3. Influence of a doping by Al stainless steel on kinetics and character of interaction with the metallic nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, S. N.; Shornikov, D. P.; Tarasov, B. A.; Baranov, V. G.

    2016-04-01

    Metallic nuclear fuel is a perspective kind of fuel for fast reactors. In this paper we conducted a study of the interaction between uranium-molybdenum alloy and ferritic- martensitic steels with additions of aluminum at a temperature of 700 ° C for 25 hours. The rate constants of the interaction layer growth at 700 °C is about 2.8.10-14 m2/s. It is established that doping Al stainless steel leads to decrease in interaction with uranium-molybdenum alloys. The phase composition of the interaction layer is determined.

  4. Microstructural characterization in dissimilar friction stir welding between 304 stainless steel and st37 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Jafarzadegan, M.; Feng, A.H.; Abdollah-zadeh, A.; Saeid, T.; Shen, J.; Assadi, H.

    2012-12-15

    In the present study, 3 mm-thick plates of 304 stainless steel and st37 steel were welded together by friction stir welding at a welding speed of 50 mm/min and tool rotational speed of 400 and 800 rpm. X-ray diffraction test was carried out to study the phases which might be formed in the welds. Metallographic examinations, and tensile and microhardness tests were used to analyze the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joint. Four different zones were found in the weld area except the base metals. In the stir zone of the 304 stainless steel, a refined grain structure with some features of dynamic recrystallization was evidenced. A thermomechanically-affected zone was characterized on the 304 steel side with features of dynamic recovery. In the other side of the stir zone, the hot deformation of the st37 steel in the austenite region produced small austenite grains and these grains transformed to fine ferrite and pearlite and some products of displacive transformations such as Widmanstatten ferrite and martensite by cooling the material after friction stir welding. The heat-affected zone in the st37 steel side showed partially and fully refined microstructures like fusion welding processes. The recrystallization in the 304 steel and the transformations in the st37 steel enhanced the hardness of the weld area and therefore, improved the tensile properties of the joint. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FSW produced sound welds between st37 low carbon steel and 304 stainless steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SZ of the st37 steel contained some products of allotropic transformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The material in the SZ of the 304 steel showed features of dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The finer microstructure in the SZ increased the hardness and tensile strength.

  5. 49 CFR 178.512 - Standards for steel or aluminum boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standards for steel or aluminum boxes. 178.512... PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Performance-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.512 Standards for steel or aluminum boxes. (a) The following are identification codes for steel or aluminum boxes: (1) 4A for a steel box;...

  6. 49 CFR 178.512 - Standards for steel or aluminum boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standards for steel or aluminum boxes. 178.512... PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Performance-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.512 Standards for steel or aluminum boxes. (a) The following are identification codes for steel or aluminum boxes: (1) 4A for a steel box;...

  7. Mechanical Behavior and Fractography of 304 Stainless Steel with High Hydrogen Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Au, M.

    2003-02-05

    Hydrogen embrittlement of 304 stainless steel with different hydrogen concentrations has been investigated. An electrochemical technique was used to effectively charge the high level of hydrogen into 304 stainless steel in a short period of time. At 25 ppm of hydrogen, 304 stainless steel loses 10 percent of its original mechanical strength and 20 percent plasticity. Although the ductile feature dominates the fractography, the brittle crown area near the outer surface shows the intergranular rupture effected by hydrogen. At 60 ppm of hydrogen, 304 stainless steel loses 23 percent of its strength and 38 percent plasticity, where the brittle mode dominates the fracture of the materials. Experimental results show that hydrogen damage to the performance of 304 stainless steel is significant even at very low levels. The fractograph analysis indicates the high penetration ability of hydrogen in 304 stainless steel. This work also demonstrates the advantages of the electrochemical charging technique in the study of hydrogen embrittlement.

  8. Effect of alloying elements and residuals on corrosion resistance of type 444 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Dowling, N.J.E.; Kim, Y.H.; Ahn, S.K.; Lee, Y.D.

    1999-02-01

    The principal criteria for the corrosion resistance of intermediate-grade ferritic stainless steels (SS) were examined in a neutral chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}) solution. The effect of increasing quantities of chromium and molybdenum was estimated for several heats in terms of the breakdown potential (E{sub b}). The effect of inclusions (particularly the oxide-sulfide type) in type 444 SS ([UNS S44400] 19% Cr-2% Mo-Nb or 19% Cr-2% Mo alloy), combined with the alloying element trend, permitted derivation of an expression that integrated both phenomena. The expression represents the mutually opposing effects of the chromium/molybdenum passive film reinforcement as represented by the pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN), as well as incorporating the deleterious contribution of the inclusion density ({Psi}/mm{sup 2}). Aluminum reduced the total inclusion content, which was associated with an increase in E{sub b}. Since no aluminum was detected in the passive film of high aluminum steels, it appeared likely that the prime effect of this element on corrosion resistance was via inclusion suppression. Corrosion studies of welded type 444 SS demonstrated that dual stabilization with low individual concentrations of titanium and niobium provided optimum corrosion resistance. This apparent synergism of niobium and titanium was independent of the surface of the welded materials, which were examined in the as-received, pickled, or polished states. The effect of the surface state in all cases was shown to exercise a critical effect on passive behavior.

  9. Pack Cementation Coatings for High-Temperature Oxidation Resistance of AISI 304 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandrahimi, Morteza; Vatandoost, Javad; Ebrahimifar, Hadi

    2012-10-01

    Aluminum and titanium are deposited on the surface of steel by the pack cementation method to improve its hot-corrosion and high-temperature oxidation resistance. In this research, coatings of aluminum and titanium and a two-step coating of aluminum and titanium were applied on an AISI 304 stainless steel substrate. The coating layers were examined by carrying out scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The SEM results showed that the aluminized coating consisted of two layers with a thickness of 450 μm each, the titanized coating consisted of two layers with a thickness of 100 μm each, and the two-step coatings of Al and Ti consisted of three layers with a thickness of 200 μm each. The XRD investigation of the coatings showed that the aluminized coating consisted of Al2O3, AlCr2, FeAl, and Fe3Al phases; the titanized layers contained TiO2, Ni3Ti, FeNi, and Fe2TiO5 phases; and the two-step coating contained AlNi, Ti3Al, and FeAl phases. The uncoated and coated specimens were subjected to isothermal oxidation at 1050 °C for 100 h. The oxidation results revealed that the application of a coating layer increased the oxidation resistance of the coated AISI 304 samples as opposed to the uncoated ones.

  10. Thermal conductivity of commercially available 21-6-9 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Yuecel, A.; Maddocks, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Thermal conductivity values of 21-6-9 stainless steel over the temperature range of 5 K to 120 K are reported. Thermal conductivity integrals are measured using a steady-state heat flux method. The resulting data are fit with a polynomial and differentiated to obtain the conductivity. The derived conductivity is compared to published data for high-manganese stainless steels and to data for other stainless steels. A discussion of the methodology and its accuracy is included.

  11. Particle Impact Ignition Test Data on a Stainless Steel Hand Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the particle impact ignition test of a stainless steel hand valve. The impact of particles is a real fire hazard with stainless steel hand valves, however 100 mg of particulate can be tolerated. Since it is unlikely that 100 mg of stainless steel contaminant particles can be simultaneously released into this type of valve in the WSTF configuration, this is acceptable and within statistical confidence as demonstrated by testing.

  12. Tensile behavior of irradiated manganese-stabilized stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.

    1996-10-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on seven experimental, high-manganese austenitic stainless steels after irradiation up to 44 dpa in the FFTF. An Fe-20Mn-12Cr-0.25C base composition was used, to which various combinations of Ti, W, V, B, and P were added to improve strength. Nominal amounts added were 0.1% Ti, 1% W, 0.1% V, 0.005% B, and 0.03% P. Irradiation was carried out at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C on the steels in the solution-annealed and 20% cold-worked conditions. Tensile tests were conducted at the irradiation temperature. Results were compared with type 316 SS. Neutron irradiation hardened all of the solution-annealed steels at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C, as measured by the increase in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength. The steel to which all five elements were added to the base composition showed the least amount of hardening. It also showed a smaller loss of ductility (uniform and total elongation) than the other steels. The total and uniform elongations of this steel after irradiation at 420{degrees}C was over four times that of the other manganese-stabilized steels and 316 SS. There was much less difference in strength and ductility at the two higher irradiation temperatures, where there was considerably less hardening, and thus, less loss of ductility. In the cold-worked condition, hardening occured only after irradiation at 420{degrees}C, and there was much less difference in the properties of the steels after irradiation. At the 420{degrees}C irradiation temperature, most of the manganese-stabilized steels maintained more ductility than the 316 SS. After irradiation at 420{degrees}C, the temperature of maximum hardening, the steel to which all five of the elements were added had the best uniform elongation.

  13. High temperature properties of an austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulin, I.; Kaibyshev, R.; Skorobogatykh, V.

    2010-07-01

    Tensile properties of the 18Cr-9Ni-W-Nb-V-N austenitic stainless steel were studied at strain rates ranging from 6.7×10-6 to 1.3×10-2 s-1 in the temperature interval 20-740°C. It was found that this steel exhibits jerky flow at temperatures ranging from 530 to 680°C and an initial strain rate of 1.3×10-3 s-1. This phenomenon was interpreted in terms of Portevin-Le Chatelier (PLC) effect occurring due to dynamic strain aging (DSA). PLC yields significant increase in high temperature strength of this steel due to extending of plateau on temperature dependence of yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) to higher temperatures. As a result, YS and UTS remain virtually unchanged with increasing temperature from 350 to 740°C. Role of additives of tungsten and vanadium in DSA and high temperatures strength of the austenitic stainless steel is discussed.

  14. Defect microstructures in neutron-irradiated copper and stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1987-09-01

    The defect microstructures of copper and type 304L austenitic stainless steel have been examined following neutron irradiation under widely different conditions. Less than 0.2% of the defect clusters in steel irradiated at 120/sup 0/C with moderated fission neutrons were resolvable as stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT). The fraction of defect clusters identified as SFT in copper varied from approx.10% for a low-dose 14-MeV neutron irradiation at 25/sup 0/C to approx.50% for copper irradiated to 1.3 dpa in a moderated fission spectrum at 182/sup 0/C. The mean cluster size in copper was about 2.6 nm for both cases, despite the large differences in irradiation conditions. The mean defect cluster size in the irradiated steel was about 1.8 nm. The absence of SFT in stainless steel may be due to the generation of 35 appm He during the irradiation, which caused the vacancies to form helium-filled cavities instead of SFT. 20 refs.

  15. Superplastic Forming of Duplex Stainless Steel for Aerospace Part

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ho-Sung; Yoon, Jong-Hoon; Yoo, Joon-Tae; Yi, Young-Moo

    2011-08-22

    In this study, the high temperature forming behavior of duplex stainless steel has been characterized and the outer shell of a combustion chamber was fabricated with pressure difference of hot gas. It consists of two parts which are the outer skin made of stainless steel to sustain the internal pressure and the inner shell made of copper alloy for regenerative cooling channels. Two outer skins partitioned to half with respect to the symmetric axis was prepared by hot gas forming process with a maximum pressure of 7 MPa following to FEM analysis. For inner layer, copper alloy was machined for cooling channels and then placed in the gas pressure welding fixture. It is shown that the optimum condition of gas pressure welding is 7 MPa at 890 deg. C, for one hour. EDX analysis and scanning electron microscope micrograph confirm the atomic diffusion process is observed at the interface and copper atoms diffuse into steel, while iron and chrome atoms diffuse into copper. The result shows that the manufacturing method with superplastic forming and gas pressure welding of steel and copper alloy has been successful for near net shape manufacturing of scaled combustion chamber of launch vehicle.

  16. Hydrogen-related phase transformations in austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, N.; Altstetter, C. J.; Birnbaum, H. K.

    1982-08-01

    The effect of hydrogen and stress (strain) on the stability of the austenite phase in stainless steels was investigated. Hydrogen was introduced by severe cathodic charging and by elevated temperature equilibration with high pressure H2 gas. Using X-ray diffraction and magnetic techniques, the behavior of two “stable” type AISI310 steels and an “unstable” type AISI304 steel was studied during charging and during the outgassing period following charging. Transformation from the fcc γ phase to an expanded fcc phase, γ*, and to the hcp ɛ phase occurred during cathodic charging. Reversion of the γ* and e phases to the original γ structure and formation of the bcc α structure were examined, and the kinetics of these processes was studied. The γ* phase was shown to be ferromagnetic with a subambient Curie temperature. The γ⇆ɛ phase transition was studied after hydrogen charging in high pressure gas, as was the formation of a during outgassing. These results are interpreted as effects of hydrogen and stress (strain) on the stability of the various phases. A proposed psuedo-binary phase diagram for the metal-hydrogen system was proposed to account for the formation of the γ* phase. The relation of these phase changes to hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel is discussed.

  17. Correlation Between Shear Punch and Tensile Strength for Low-Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmudi, R.; Sadeghi, M.

    2013-02-01

    The deformation behavior of AISI 1015 low-carbon steel, and AISI 304 stainless steel sheets was investigated by uniaxial tension and the shear punch test (SPT). Both materials were cold rolled to an 80% thickness reduction and subsequently annealed in the temperature range 25-850 °C to produce a wide range of yield and ultimate strength levels. The correlations between shear punch and tensile yield and ultimate stresses were established empirically. Different linear relationships having different slopes and intercepts were found for the low-carbon and stainless steel sheets, and the possible parameters affecting the correlation were discussed. It was shown that, within limits, yield and tensile strength of thin steel sheets can be predicted from the shear data obtained by the easy-to-perform SPT.

  18. Electrochemical and passivation behavior investigation of ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete pore media.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-12-01

    The applications of stainless steel are one of the most reliable solutions in concrete structures to reduce chloride-induced corrosion problems and increase the structures service life, however, due to high prices of nickel, especially in many civil engineering projects, the austenitic stainless steel is replaced by the ferritic stainless steels. Compared with austenite stainless steel, the ferritic stainless steel is known to be extremely resistant of stress corrosion cracking and other properties. The good corrosion resistance of the stainless steel is due to the formation of passive film. While, there is little literature about the electrochemical and passive behavior of ferritic stainless steel in the concrete environments. So, here, we present the several corrosion testing methods, such as the potentiodynamic measurements, EIS and Mott-Schottky approach, and the surface analysis methods like XPS and AES to display the passivation behavior of 430 ferritic stainless steel in alkaline solution with the presence of chloride ions. These research results illustrated a simple and facile approach for studying the electrochemical and passivation behavior of stainless steel in the concrete pore environments. PMID:26501086

  19. Electrochemical and passivation behavior investigation of ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete pore media

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    The applications of stainless steel are one of the most reliable solutions in concrete structures to reduce chloride-induced corrosion problems and increase the structures service life, however, due to high prices of nickel, especially in many civil engineering projects, the austenitic stainless steel is replaced by the ferritic stainless steels. Compared with austenite stainless steel, the ferritic stainless steel is known to be extremely resistant of stress corrosion cracking and other properties. The good corrosion resistance of the stainless steel is due to the formation of passive film. While, there is little literature about the electrochemical and passive behavior of ferritic stainless steel in the concrete environments. So, here, we present the several corrosion testing methods, such as the potentiodynamic measurements, EIS and Mott–Schottky approach, and the surface analysis methods like XPS and AES to display the passivation behavior of 430 ferritic stainless steel in alkaline solution with the presence of chloride ions. These research results illustrated a simple and facile approach for studying the electrochemical and passivation behavior of stainless steel in the concrete pore environments. PMID:26501086

  20. Improved corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel by nanocrystalline and electrochemical nitridation in artificial saliva solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jinlong; Liang, Tongxiang

    2015-12-01

    The fluoride ion in artificial saliva significantly changed semiconductor characteristic of the passive film formed on the surface of 316L stainless steels. The electrochemical results showed that nanocrystalline α‧-martensite improved corrosion resistance of the stainless steel in a typical artificial saliva compared with coarse grained stainless steel. Moreover, comparing with nitrided coarse grained stainless steel, corrosion resistance of the nitrided nanocrystalline stainless steel was also improved significantly, even in artificial saliva solution containing fluoride ion. The present study showed that the cryogenic cold rolling and electrochemical nitridation improved corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel for the dental application.

  1. Formation of Inclusions in Ti-Stabilized 17Cr Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xue; Sun, Yanhui; Yang, Yindong; Bai, Xuefeng; Barati, Mansoor; Mclean, Alex

    2016-04-01

    The behavior and formation mechanisms of inclusions in Ti-stabilized, 17Cr Austenitic Stainless Steel produced by the ingot casting route were investigated through systematic sampling of liquid steel and rolled products. Analysis methods included total oxygen and nitrogen contents, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results indicate that the composition of inclusions was strongly dependent on the types of added alloying agents. During the AOD refining process, after the addition of ferrosilicon alloy and electrolytic manganese, followed by aluminum, the composition of inclusions changed from manganese silicate-rich inclusions to alumina-rich inclusions. After tapping and titanium wire feeding, pure TiN particles and complex inclusions with Al2O3-MgO-TiO x cores containing TiN were found to be the dominant inclusions when [pct Ti] was 0.307 mass pct in the molten steel. These findings were confirmed by thermodynamic calculations which indicated that there was a driving force for TiN inclusions to be formed in the liquid phase due to the high contents of [Ti] and [N] in the molten steel. From the start of casting through to the rolled bar, there was no further change in the composition of inclusions compared to the titanium addition stage. Stringer-shaped TiN inclusions were observed in the rolled bar. These inclusions were elongated along the rolling direction with lengths varying from 17 to 84 µm and could have a detrimental impact on the corrosion resistance as well as the mechanical properties of the stainless steel products.

  2. The interaction between nitride uranium and stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shornikov, D. P.; Nikitin, S. N.; Tarasov, B. A.; Baranov, V. G.; Yurlova, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    Uranium nitride is most popular nuclear fuel for Fast Breeder Reactor New Generation. In-pile experiments at reactor BOR-60 was shown an interaction between nitride fuel and stainless steel in the range of 8-11% burn up (HA). In order to investigate this interaction has been done diffusion tests of 200 h and has been shown that the reaction occurs in the temperature range 1000-1100 ° C. UN interacted with steel in case of high pollution oxygen (1000-2000 ppm). Also has been shown to increase interaction UN with EP-823 steel in the presence of cesium. In this case the interaction layer had a thickness about 2-3 μm. Has been shown minimal interaction with new ODS steel EP-450. The interaction layer had a thickness less then 2 μm. Did not reveal the influence of tellurium and iodine increased interaction. It was show compatibility at 1000 °C between UN and EP-450 ODS steel, chrome steel, alloying aluminium and silicium.

  3. Semen quality and sex hormones among mild steel and stainless steel welders: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed Central

    Bonde, J P

    1990-01-01

    Welding may be detrimental to the male reproductive system. To test this hypothesis, semen quality was examined in 35 stainless steel welders, 46 mild steel welders, and 54 non-welding metal workers and electricians. These figures represent a participation rate of 37.1% in welders and 36.7% in non-welding subjects. The mean exposure to welding fume particulates was 1.3 mg/m3 (SD 0.8) in stainless steel welders using tungsten inert gas, 3.2 mg/m3 (SD 1.0) in low exposed mild steel welders using manual metal arc or metal active gas (n = 31), and 4.7 mg/m3 (SD 2.1) in high exposed mild steel welders (n = 15). The semen quality of each participant was defined in terms of the mean values of the particular semen parameters in three semen samples delivered at monthly intervals in a period with occupational exposure in a steady state. The sperm concentration was not reduced in either mild steel or stainless steel welders. The sperm count per ejaculate, the proportion of normal sperm forms, the degree of sperm motility, and the linear penetration rate of the sperm were significantly decreased and the sperm concentration of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) was non-significantly increased in mild steel welders. A dose response relation between exposure to welding fumes and these semen parameters (sperm count excepted) was found. Semen quality decreased and FSH concentrations increased with increasing exposure. Significant deteriorations in some semen parameters were also observed in stainless steel welders. An analysis of information from questionnaires obtained from the whole population including subjects who declined to participate indicated an underestimation of effects due to selection bias. Potential confounding was treated by restriction and statistical analysis. The results support the hypothesis that mild steel welding and to a lesser extent stainless steel welding with tungsten inert gas is associated with reduced semen quality at exposure in the range of the

  4. Synergistic Computational and Microstructural Design of Next- Generation High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Karaman, Ibrahim; Arroyave, Raymundo

    2015-07-31

    -forming austenitic stainless steel, is fully austenitic, but possesses carbides that were not dissolvable and could not be controlled. This alloy also did not show deformation twinning. Alloy 2 was designed based on alloy 1, but was not fully austenitic and had significant traces of uncontrollable precipitates as well. Alloy 3, also designed based on alloy 1, was mainly austenitic with evolution of a second phase along the grain boundaries, but also had precipitates that were not controllable. Based on the knowledge gained from the first generation of the designed steels, two more steels, called PGAA1 and PGAA2, were proposed using genetic algorithms that, based on the modelling, were supposed to exhibit alumina-scale formation. PGAA1, however, did not demonstrate a fully austenitic structure. PGAA2 could achieve a mostly austenitic structure through thermo-mechanical processing, and was then used for oxidation tests. The oxidation tests of PGAA2, with and without nitrogen impurities, along with alloy 1, suggested that PGAA2 can form alumina-scale similar to alloy 1, but N impurity will prevent formation of such a scale, probably through formation of aluminum nitrides. For the above mentioned genetic algorithm framework of alloy design, separate models were developed for specific design criteria. For prediction of alumina formation in stainless steels, a model was constructed based off of two criteria – effective valence and third element effect. These criteria capture the thermodynamics and kinetics of alumina formation in steels. To test the efficacy and robustness of this model, they were tested against alloys in the literature which had been experimentally verified to exhibit alumina formation and the predictions were in excellent agreement with the experiments. Another meta-model for prediction of twinning in unknown steel compositions was developed by an informatics based machine learning/data mining approach. Stacking Fault Energy data was captured from the literature for a

  5. Aluminum electroplating on steel from a fused bromide electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhat K. Tripathy; Laura A. Wurth; Eric J. Dufek; Toni Y. Gutknecht; Natalie J. Gese; Paula Hahn; Steven M. Frank; Guy L. Frederickson; J. Stephen Herring

    2014-08-01

    A quaternary bromide bath (LiBr–KBr–CsBr–AlBr3) was used to electro-coat aluminum on steel substrates. The electrolytewas prepared by the addition of AlBr3 into the eutectic LiBr–KBr–CsBr melt. A smooth, thick, adherent and shiny aluminum coating could be obtained with 80 wt.% AlBr3 in the ternary melt. The SEM photographs of the coated surfaces suggest the formation of thick and dense coatings with good aluminum coverage. Both salt immersion and open circuit potential measurement suggested that the coatings did display a good corrosionresistance behavior. Annealing of the coated surfaces, prior to corrosion tests, suggested the robustness of the metallic aluminum coating in preventing the corrosion of the steel surfaces. Studies also indicated that the quaternary bromide plating bath can potentially provide a better aluminumcoating on both ferrous and non-ferrous metals, including complex surfaces/geometries.

  6. Transition material improves spot welding of aluminum to steel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    Weight is one of the primary enemies of improved fuel economy in automobiles. To help address this problem, a simple yet highly effective clad metal transition material has been developed. It allows automotive engineers to spot weld aluminum to steel using existing conventional production equipment and practices, thereby enabling them to use aluminum in place of heavier steel without expensive changes in production methods. The idea of the new materials technology is to permit the joining of aluminum to steel using conventional spot welding techniques. Numerous welding and corrosion studies have been conducted on the clad transition material approach by auto manufacturers, industry suppliers and various independent organizations. The success of these tests has prompted manufacturers in the US, Europe and Japan to accelerate production and field testing of clad transition materials on cars with an eye toward volume application.

  7. Strength comparison of allogenic bone screws, bioabsorbable screws, and stainless steel screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Rano, James A; Savoy-Moore, Ruth T; Fallat, Lawrence M

    2002-01-01

    Allogenic bone screws are new to the fixation market and have yet to be tested against current fixation materials. An in vitro comparison of the same sizes of stainless steel, bioabsorbable, and allogenic bone screws was undertaken to assess screw resistance to the forces of bending, pullout, and shear. Using aluminum plates to support the screws, forces up to 1000 Newtons were applied to six to eight samples of each type of screw. During each test, stainless steel screws withstood the maximum force that could be exerted by the testing apparatus without failing (bending, 113.9 +/- 11.8 N mean +/- SE; pullout 999.1 +/- 33.7 N; and shear, 997.5 +/- 108.8 N). In each test, compared to bioabsorbable screws, allogenic bone screws failed faster (pullout, allogenic: 12.4 +/- 1.1 seconds vs. bioabsorbable, 120.6 +/- 13.8 seconds; p = .001; bending, allogenic: 53.4 +/- 4.8 seconds vs. bioabsorbable, 201.9 +/- 11.1 seconds; p = .001; shear, allogenic 13.5 +/- 1.4 seconds vs. bioabsorbable, 43.8 +/- 0.9 seconds; p = .001) under equivalent (pullout: bioabsorbable, 385.0 +/- 18.4 N vs. allogenic, 401.0 +/- 35.9 N; p = .001) or lower (bending, allogenic: 4.7 +/- 0.2 N vs. bioabsorbable, 11.0 +/- 0.9 N; p = .675; shear, allogenic: 312.1 +/- 15.5 N vs. bioabsorbable 680.9 +/- 8.5 N; p = .001) loads, and in a highly variable fashion. Overall, the bioabsorbable screws withstood the forces of bending, pullout, and shear better than the allogenic screws, and stainless steel screws outperformed both bioabsorbable and allogenic screws. Despite these results, allogenic screws could still be useful in compliant patients who would benefit from their osteoconductive properties. PMID:11858609

  8. High-pressure stainless steel active membrane microvalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, G.; Svensson, S.; Ogden, S.; Klintberg, L.; Hjort, K.

    2011-07-01

    In this work, high-pressure membrane microvalves have been designed, manufactured and evaluated. The valves were able to withstand back-pressures of 200 bar with a response time of less than 0.6 s. These stainless steel valves, manufactured with back-end batch production, utilize the large volume expansion coupled to the solid-liquid phase transition in paraffin wax. When membrane materials were evaluated, parylene coated stainless steel was found to be the best choice as compared to polydimethylsiloxane and polyimide. Also, the influence of the orifice placement and diameter is included in this work. If the orifice is placed too close to the rim of the membrane, the valve can stay sealed even after turning the power off, and the valve will not open until the pressure in the system is released. The developed steel valves, evaluated for both water and air, provide excellent properties in terms of mechanical stability, ease of fabrication, and low cost. Possible applications include sampling at high pressures, chemical microreactors, high performance liquid chromatography, pneumatics, and hydraulics.

  9. Sensitization of Laser-beam Welded Martensitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Rajendran, Kousika Dhasanur; Lindner, Stefan

    Ferritic and martensitic stainless steels are an attractive alternative in vehicle production due to their inherent corrosion resistance. By the opportunity of press hardening, their strength can be increased to up to 2000 MPa, making them competitors for unalloyed ultra-high strength steels. Welding, nevertheless, requires special care, especially when it comes to joining of high strength heat treated materials. With an adopted in-line heat treatment of the welds in as-rolled as well as press hardened condition, materials with sufficient fatigue strength and acceptable structural behavior can be produced. Because of microstructural transformations in the base material such as grain coarsening and forced carbide precipitation, the corrosion resistance of the weld zone may be locally impaired. Typically the material in the heat-affected zone becomes sensitive to intergranular cracking in the form of knife-edge corrosion besides the fusion line. The current study comprises of two text scenarios. By an alternating climate test, general response in a corroding environment is screened. In order to understand the corrosion mechanisms and to localize the sensitive zones, sensitisation tests were undertaken. Furthermore, the applicability of a standard test according to ASTM 763-83 was examined. It was found that the alternative climate test does not reveal any corrosion effects. Testing by the oxalic acid test revealed clearly the effect of welding, weld heat treatment and state of thermal processing. Also application of the standard which originally suited for testing ferritic stainless steels could have been justified.

  10. A review on nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Talha, Mohd; Behera, C K; Sinha, O P

    2013-10-01

    The field of biomaterials has become a vital area, as these materials can enhance the quality and longevity of human life. Metallic materials are often used as biomaterials to replace structural components of the human body. Stainless steels, cobalt-chromium alloys, commercially pure titanium and its alloys are typical metallic biomaterials that are being used for implant devices. Stainless steels have been widely used as biomaterials because of their very low cost as compared to other metallic materials, good mechanical and corrosion resistant properties and adequate biocompatibility. However, the adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have promoted the development of "nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels" for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel and emphatically the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steel, as well as the development of nickel-free nitrogen containing stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength, better corrosion and wear resistance and superior biocompatibility in comparison to the currently used austenitic stainless steel (e.g. 316L), the newly developed nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventionally used medical stainless steels. PMID:23910251

  11. Investigation of aluminum-steel joint formed by explosion welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs-Coskun, T.; Volgyi, B.; Sikari-Nagl, I.

    2015-04-01

    Explosion welding is a solid state welding process that is used for the metallurgical joining of metals. Explosion cladding can be used to join a wide variety of dissimilar or similar metals [1]. This process uses the controlled detonation of explosives to accelerate one or both of the constituent metals into each other in such a manner as to cause the collision to fuse them together [2]. In this study, bonding ability of aluminum and steel with explosion welding was investigated. Experimental studies, microscopy, microhardness, tensile and bend test showed out that, aluminum and steel could be bonded with a good quality of bonding properties with explosion welding.

  12. Vapor aluminum diffused steels for high-temperature corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Bayer, G.T.

    1995-08-01

    Steel products and fabrications that are vapor aluminum diffused by the pack cementation process offer greatly enhanced corrosion resistance in high-temperature oxidizing, sulfidizing, carburizing, and hydrogen-containing environments. Pipes and tubing are most frequently diffused with aluminum for use as transfer lines, heat exchangers, reactors, or in process furnaces handling corrosive materials. Vapor aluminum diffusion by the pack cementation process is the only practical way of providing this form of high-temperature corrosion resistance on the inside of pipes and tubes.

  13. Joining dissimilar stainless steels for pressure vessel components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zheng; Han, Huai-Yue

    1994-03-01

    A series of studies was carried out to examine the weldability and properties of dissimilar steel joints between martensitic and austenitic stainless steels - F6NM (OCr13Ni4Mo) and AISI 347, respectively. Such joints are important parts in, e.g. the primary circuit of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). This kind of joint requires both good mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and a stable magnetic permeability besides good weldability. The weldability tests included weld thermal simulation of the martensitic steel for investigating the influence of weld thermal cycles and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the mechanical properties of the heat-affected zone (HAZ); implant testing for examining the tendency for cold cracking of martensitic steel; rigid restraint testing for determining hot crack susceptibility of the multi-pass dissimilar steel joints. The joints were subjected to various mechanical tests including a tensile test, bending test and impact test at various temperatures, as well as slow strain-rate test for examining the stress corrosion cracking tendency in the simulated environment of a primary circuit of a PWR. The results of various tests indicated that the quality of the tube/tube joints is satisfactory for meeting all the design requirements.

  14. Cryogenic coefficient of thermal expansion measurements of type 440 and 630 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cease, H.; Alvarez, M.; Flaugher, B.; Montes, J.

    2014-01-01

    The Dark Energy Camera is now installed on the Blanco 4m telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. The camera is cooled to 170K using a closed loop two-phase liquid nitrogen system. A submerged centrifugal pump is used to circulate the liquid from the base of the telescope to the camera in the prime focus cage. As part of the pump maintenance schedule, the rotor shaft bearings are periodically replaced. Common bearing and shaft materials are type 440 and 630 (17-4 PH) stainless steel. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials used is needed to predict the shaft and bearing housing dimensional changes at the 77K pump operating temperature. The thermal expansion from room temperature to 77K of type 440 and 630 stainless steel is presented . Measurements are performed using the ASTM E228 standard with a quartz push-rod dilatometer test stand. Aluminum 6061-T6 is used to calibrate the test stand.

  15. Development of a compact laminar flow heat exchanger with stainless steel micro-tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saji, N.; Nagai, S.; Tsuchiya, K.; Asakura, H.; Obata, M.

    2001-05-01

    The present paper describes the design concept and manufacturing of a new compact laminar flow heat exchanger with stainless-steel micro-tubes for helium refrigerators. In the temperature range of less than 20 K, aluminum plate fin type heat exchangers exhibit a remarkable fall of performance characteristics as a compact heat exchanger. We presented in a previous paper that some compact heat exchangers with good performance in the temperature range of less than 4 K are required for a subcooled He II refrigerator cycle to be worked with 3He turbo-compressors (F. Doty, et al., A new look at the closed brayton cycle, Proceedings, IECEC-90 Reno, NV, 1991, p. 116). For this requirement, we developed a micro-tube strip counter flow type heat exchanger, which consists of 12 elements with a total of 4800 stainless steel micro-tubes. Each element is formed with 400 tubes and a newly developed vacuum brazing method was applied for the bonding to the side plate. Each tube has an inner diameter of 0.5 mm, an outer diameter of 0.7 mm and is 310 mm long. We developed a cladding plate with two layers of gold brazing sheet sandwiched inside. In aerodynamic and thermal design of the element, the laminar flow conditions were adopted for the flows of inner and outer tubes to keep a high heat transfer rate and a low pressure loss.

  16. Biomonitoring of genotoxic exposure among stainless steel welders.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, L E; Boisen, T; Christensen, J M; Jelnes, J E; Jensen, G E; Jensen, J C; Lundgren, K; Lundsteen, C; Pedersen, B; Wassermann, K

    1992-05-16

    A biosurvey in the Danish metal industry measured the genotoxic exposure from stainless steel welding. The study comprised measurements of chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE), unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in peripheral lymphocytes and serum immunoglobulin G. Environmental monitoring of welding fumes and selected metal oxides, biomonitoring of chromium and nickel in serum and urine and mutagenic activity in urine, and evaluation of semen quality were also done. Manual metal arc (MMA) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding were the dominant welding processes. A higher frequency of chromosomal aberrations, classified as translocations, double minutes, exchanges and rings, was observed in stainless steel welders than in non-welders. SCE was lower in welders working with both MMA and TIG welding than in reference persons. N-Acetoxy-N-acetylaminofluorene (NA-AAF)-induced UDS was lower in 23 never-smoking welders than in 19 unexposed never-smokers. Smoking was a confounding factor resulting in significantly higher CA, SCE, NA-AAF binding to DNA and mutagenic activity in urine. Age was also a confounder: CA, SCE, NA-AAF binding to DNA and UDS increased significantly with age. No significant correlation between SCE and CA or between CA and UDS was found. UDS decreased significantly with increasing lymphocyte count and a higher lymphocyte count was seen in MMA welders than in reference persons and in smokers than in non-smokers. Differences in the composition among lymphocytes in exposed persons compared with non-exposed are suggested. MMA welding gave the highest exposure to chromium, an increased number of chromosomal aberrations and a decrease in SCE when compared with TIG welding. Consequently improvements in the occupational practice of stainless steel welding with MMA is recommended. PMID:1375338

  17. Aging and Embrittlement of High Fluence Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Was, gary; Jiao, Zhijie; der ven, Anton Van; Bruemmer, Stephen; Edwards, Dan

    2012-12-31

    Irradiation of austenitic stainless steels results in the formation of dislocation loops, stacking fault tetrahedral, Ni-Si clusters and radiation-induced segregation (RIS). Of these features, it is the formation of precipitates which is most likely to impact the mechanical integrity at high dose. Unlike dislocation loops and RIS, precipitates exhibit an incubation period that can extend from 10 to 46 dpa, above which the cluster composition changes and a separate phase, (G-phase) forms. Both neutron and heavy ion irradiation showed that these clusters develop slowly and continue to evolve beyond 100 dpa. Overall, this work shows that the irradiated microstructure features produced by heavy ion irradiation are remarkably comparable in nature to those produced by neutron irradiation at much lower dose rates. The use of a temperature shift to account for the higher damage rate in heavy ion irradiation results in a fairly good match in the dislocation loop microstructure and the precipitate microstructure in austenitic stainless steels. Both irradiations also show segregation of the same elements and in the same directions, but to achieve comparable magnitudes, heavy ion irradiation must be conducted at a much higher temperature than that which produces a match with loops and precipitates. First-principles modeling has confirmed that the formation of Ni-Si precipitates under irradiation is likely caused by supersaturation of solute to defect sinks caused by highly correlated diffusion of Ni and Si. Thus, the formation and evolution of Ni-Si precipitates at high dose in austenitic stainless steels containing Si is inevitable.

  18. Systems design of high-performance stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Carelyn Elizabeth

    A systems approach has been applied to the design of high performance stainless steels. Quantitative property objectives were addressed integrating processing/structure/property relations with mechanistic models. Martensitic transformation behavior was described using the Olson-Cohen model for heterogeneous nucleation and the Ghosh-Olson solid-solution strengthening model for interfacial mobility, and incorporating an improved description of Fe-Co-Cr thermodynamic interaction. Coherent Msb2C precipitation in a BCC matrix was described, taking into account initial paraequilibrium with cementite. Using available SANS data, a composition dependent strain energy was calibrated and a composition independent interfacial energy was evaluated to predict the critical particle size versus the fraction of the reaction completed as input to strengthening theory. Multicomponent Pourbaix diagrams provided an effective tool for evaluating oxide stability; constrained equilibrium calculations correlated oxide stability to Cr enrichment in the oxide film to allow more efficient use of alloy Cr content. Multicomponent solidification simulations provided composition constraints to improve castability. Using the Thermo-Calc and DICTRA software packages, the models were integrated to design a carburizing, secondary-hardening martensitic stainless steel. Initial characterization of the prototype showed good agreement with the design models and achievement of the desired property objectives. Prototype evaluation confirmed the predicted martensitic transformation temperature and the desired carburizing response, achieving a case hardness of Rsb{c} 64 in the secondary-hardened condition without case primary carbides. Decarburization experiments suggest that the design core toughness objective (Ksb{IC} = 65 MPasurdm) can be achieved by reducing the core carbon level to 0.05 weight percent. To achieve the core toughness objective at high core strength levels requires further analysis of an

  19. Thermal Aging Phenomena in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Byun, T. S.; Yang, Y.; Overman, N. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2015-11-12

    We used cast stainless steels (CASSs)for the large components of light water reactor (LWR) power plants such as primary coolant piping and pump casing. The thermal embrittlement of CASS components is one of the most serious concerns related to the extended-term operation of nuclear power plants. Many past researches have concluded that the formation of Cr-rich alpha-phase by Spinodal decomposition of delta-ferrite phase is the primary mechanism for the thermal embrittlement. Cracking mechanism in the thermally-embrittled duplex stainless steels consists of the formation of cleavage at ferrite and its propagation via separation of ferrite-austenite interphase. This article intends to providemore » an introductory overview on the thermal aging phenomena in LWR-relevant conditions. Firstly, the thermal aging effect on toughness is discussed in terms of the cause of embrittlement and influential parameters. Moreover, an approximate analysis of thermal reaction using Arrhenius equation was carried out to scope the aging temperatures for the accelerated aging experiments to simulate the 60 and 80 years of services. Further, an equilibrium precipitation calculation was performed for model CASS alloys using the CALPHAD program, and the results are used to describe the precipitation behaviors in duplex stainless steels. Our results are also to be used to guide an on-going research aiming to provide knowledge-based conclusive prediction for the integrity of the CASS components of LWR power plants during the service life extended up to and beyond 60 years.« less

  20. Influence of fretting on flexural fatigue of 304 stainless steel and mild steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Rohn, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    Fretting fatigue experiments conducted on 304 stainless steel using a flexural fatigue test arrangement with bolted on fretting pads demonstrated that fatigue life is reduced by at least a factor of 10 in the 265 to 334 MPa (38,500 - to 48,500 psi) nominal flexural fatigue stress range. In addition, experiments in which the fretting pads were removed after selected numbers of cycles, followed by continued flexural fatigue without fretting show that continued fretting beyond 50,000 cycles does not significantly further reduce fatigue life of 304 stainless steel at 317 MPa (46,000 psi). Microscopic examination of the fretted contact areas revealed fracture initiation sites as well as numerous cracks that did not propagate to failure. Flexural fretting fatigue experiments performed on mild steel showed an insensitivity of fatigue life to the incidence of fretting under flexural stress conditions of from 162 to 217 MPa (23,500 to 31,500 psi).

  1. Cytotoxicity study of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating on high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Ossa, C P O; Rogero, S O; Tschiptschin, A P

    2006-11-01

    Stainless steel has been frequently used for temporary implants but its use as permanent implants is restricted due to its low pitting corrosion resistance. Nitrogen additions to these steels improve both mechanical properties and corrosion resistance, particularly the pitting and crevice corrosion resistance. Many reports concerning allergic reactions caused by nickel led to the development of nickel free stainless steel; it has excellent mechanical properties and very high corrosion resistance. On the other hand, stainless steels are biologically tolerated and no chemical bonds are formed between the steel and the bone tissue. Hydroxyapatite coatings deposited on stainless steels improve osseointegration, due their capacity to form chemical bonds (bioactive fixation) with the bone tissue. In this work hydroxyapatite coatings were plasma-sprayed on three austenitic stainless steels: ASTM-F138, ASTM-F1586 and the nickel-free Böhler-P558. The coatings were analyzed by SEM and XDR. The cytotoxicity of the coatings/steels was studied using the neutral red uptake method by quantitative evaluation of cell viability. The three uncoated stainless steels and the hydroxyapatite coated Böhler-P558 did not have any toxic effect on the cell culture. The hydroxyapatite coated ASTM-F138 and ASTM-F1586 stainless steels presented cytotoxicity indexes (IC50%) lower than 50% and high nickel contents in the extracts. PMID:17122924

  2. Shrinkage Prediction for the Investment Casting of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine in order to obtain the actual tooling allowances. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. The numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were compared with experimental results.

  3. Use of duplex stainless steel castings in control valves

    SciTech Connect

    Gossett, J.L.

    1996-07-01

    Duplex stainless steels have enjoyed rapidly increasing popularity in recent years. For numerous reasons the availability of these alloys in the cast form has lagged behind the availability of the wrought form. Commercial demand for control valves in these alloys has driven development of needed information to move into production. A systematic approach was used to develop specifications, suppliers and weld procedures. Corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), sulfide stress cracking (SSC) and hardness results are also presented for several alloys including; CD3MN (UNS J92205), CD4MCu (UNS J93370) and CD7MCuN (cast UNS S32550).

  4. Oxidation resistant high creep strength austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P.; Pint, Bruce A.; Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Maziasz, Philip J.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao P.

    2010-06-29

    An austenitic stainless steel displaying high temperature oxidation and creep resistance has a composition that includes in weight percent 15 to 21 Ni, 10 to 15 Cr, 2 to 3.5 Al, 0.1 to 1 Nb, and 0.05 to 0.15 C, and that is free of or has very low levels of N, Ti and V. The alloy forms an external continuous alumina protective scale to provide a high oxidation resistance at temperatures of 700 to 800.degree. C. and forms NbC nanocarbides and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure to give high strength and high creep resistance at these temperatures.

  5. Portable probe to measure sensitization of stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jang Y.

    1979-01-01

    An electrochemical cell for making field measurements of metals such as stainless steel comprises a cylinder containing a reservoir of an electrolyte, a reference electrode, a capillary tube connecting the electrolyte to the surface of the metal to be measured and another electrode in electrical contact with the electrolyte. External connections from the reference electrode, the other electrode, and the sample to a measuring device provide means for maintaining the potential of the electrolyte while sweeping the potential difference between the electrolyte and the metal. Such a sweep enables the determination of a current-voltage characteristic that is a measure of sensitization in the metal.

  6. Surface characterization of adsorbed asphaltene on a stainless steel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, W. A.; Taylor, S. D.

    2007-05-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize a single layer of adsorbed asphaltene on a metallic surface. The deposits were created by immersing a stainless steel disc into a dilute asphaltene solution with either toluene or dichloromethane as the solvent, although the toluene solution allowed for better control of the adsorbed asphaltene layer and less atmospheric oxygen contamination. The analyses for C 1s, S 2p3/2, N 1s and O 1s photoemission peaks indicated that different functional groups are present in the asphaltene layer including carboxylic, pyrrolic, pyridininc, thiophenic and sulfite, with slight differences in their binding energies.

  7. General and Localized Corrosion of Borated Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    T.E. Lister; Ronald E. Mizia; A.W. Erickson; T.L. Trowbridge; B. S. Matteson

    2008-03-01

    The Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system is being proposed to transport and store spent nuclear fuel at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The preliminary design of this system identifies borated stainless steel as the neutron absorber material that will be used to fabricate fuel basket inserts for nuclear criticality control. This paper discusses corrosion test results for verifying the performance of this material manufactured to the requirements of ASTM A887, Grade A, under the expected repository conditions.

  8. Modeling of Linear Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maran, P.; Sornakumar, T.; Sundararajan, T.

    2008-08-01

    A heat and fluid flow model has been developed to solve the gas tungsten arc (GTA) linear welding problem for austenitic stainless steel. The moving heat source problem associated with the electrode traverse has been simplified into an equivalent two-dimensional (2-D) transient problem. The torch residence time has been calculated from the arc diameter and torch speed. The mathematical formulation considers buoyancy, electromagnetic induction, and surface tension forces. The governing equations have been solved by the finite volume method. The temperature and velocity fields have been determined. The theoretical predictions for weld bead geometry are in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  9. Hardening of aged duplex stainless steels by spinodal decomposition.

    PubMed

    Danoix, F; Auger, P; Blavette, D

    2004-06-01

    Mechanical properties, such as hardness and impact toughness, of ferrite-containing stainless steels are greatly affected by long-term aging at intermediate temperatures. It is known that the alpha-alpha' spinodal decomposition occurring in the iron-chromium-based ferrite is responsible for this aging susceptibility. This decomposition can be characterized unambiguously by atom probe analysis, allowing comparison both with the existing theories of spinodal decomposition and the evolution of some mechanical properties. It is then possible to predict the evolution of hardness of industrial components during service, based on the detailed knowledge of the involved aging process. PMID:15233853

  10. Fiber laser micro-cutting of stainless steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumeister, M.; Dickmann, K.; Hoult, T.

    2006-11-01

    The authors report on laser micro-cutting results for stainless steel foils with the aid of a 100 W fiber laser. This novel laser source combines a high output power in relation to conventional laser sources for micro-processing applications with an excellent beam quality (M2=1.1). Different material thicknesses were evaluated (100 μm to 300 μm). Processing was carried out with cw operation of the laser source, and with nitrogen and oxygen as assisting gases. Besides the high processing rate of oxygen assisted cutting, a better cutting performance in terms of a lower kerf width was obtained.

  11. Equation of state and electrical conductivity of stainless steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene

    2004-11-01

    Warm dense matter is the region in phase space of density and temperature where the thermal, Fermi, and Coulomb energies are approximately equal. The lack of a dominating scale and physical behavior makes it challenging to model the physics to high fidelity. For Sandia, a fundamental understanding of the region is of importance because of the needs of our experimental HEDP programs for high fidelity descriptive and predictive modeling. We show that multi-scale simulations of macroscopic physical phenomena now have predictive capability also for difficult but ubiquitous materials such as stainless steel, a transition metal alloy.

  12. Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen ion implantation of stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Gavrilov, N.V.; Emlin, D.

    1995-12-31

    Ion implantation experiments of C, N, and O into stainless steel have been performed, with beam-line and plasma source ion implantation methods. Acceleration voltages were varied between 27 and 50 kV, with pulsed ion current densities between 1 and 10 mA/cm{sup 2}. Implanted doses ranged from 0.5 to 3 {times} 10{sup 18}cm{sup -2}, while workpiece temperatures were maintained between 25 and 800 C. Implant concentration profiles, microstructure, and surface mechanical properties of the implanted materials are reported.

  13. Laser-induced color marking of stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonczak, Arkadiusz J.; Nowak, Maciej; Koziol, Pawel; Kaczmarek, Pawel R.; Waz, Adam T.; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of the impact of selected process parameters on the resulting laser color marking. The study was conducted for AISI 304 multipurpose stainless steel using a commercially available industrial fiber laser. It was determined how various process parameters, such as laser power, scanning speed of the laser beam, temperature of the material, location of the sample relative to the focal plane, affect the repeatability of the colors obtained. For objective assessment of color changes, an optical spectrometer and the CIE color difference parameter ΔEab * were used.

  14. Laser Welding of Large Scale Stainless Steel Aircraft Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitemeyer, D.; Schultz, V.; Syassen, F.; Seefeld, T.; Vollertsen, F.

    In this paper a welding process for large scale stainless steel structures is presented. The process was developed according to the requirements of an aircraft application. Therefore, stringers are welded on a skin sheet in a t-joint configuration. The 0.6 mm thickness parts are welded with a thin disc laser, seam length up to 1920 mm are demonstrated. The welding process causes angular distortions of the skin sheet which are compensated by a subsequent laser straightening process. Based on a model straightening process parameters matching the induced welding distortion are predicted. The process combination is successfully applied to stringer stiffened specimens.

  15. Microstructures of laser deposited 304L austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    BROOKS,JOHN A.; HEADLEY,THOMAS J.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.

    2000-05-22

    Laser deposits fabricated from two different compositions of 304L stainless steel powder were characterized to determine the nature of the solidification and solid state transformations. One of the goals of this work was to determine to what extent novel microstructure consisting of single-phase austenite could be achieved with the thermal conditions of the LENS [Laser Engineered Net Shape] process. Although ferrite-free deposits were not obtained, structures with very low ferrite content were achieved. It appeared that, with slight changes in alloy composition, this goal could be met via two different solidification and transformation mechanisms.

  16. Iron contamination causes stress corrosion cracking in stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Khatak, H.S.; Bharasi, N.S.; Gnanamoorthy, J.B. . Metallurgy Div.)

    1994-06-01

    Iron-contaminated U-bend samples of types 316 and 304 stainless steels (SS) were exposed to a sodium chloride solution in the laboratory at room temperature. Two of the four samples of 304 SS and one of the four samples of 316 SS showed cracking. The cracks initiated in the iron-contaminated regions. Based on the results of these tests, the failure of many components in industries can be explained and the importance of carrying out pickling and passivation immediately after fabrication to remove possible iron contamination is highlighted.

  17. High Strength Stainless Steel Properties that Affect Resistance Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R.

    2001-08-01

    This report discusses results of a study on selected high strength stainless steel alloy properties that affect resistance welding. The austenitic alloys A-286, JBK-75 (Modified A-286), 21-6-9, 22-13-5, 316 and 304L were investigated and compared. The former two are age hardenable, and the latter four obtain their strength through work hardening. Properties investigated include corrosion and its relationship to chemical cleaning, the effects of heat treatment on strength and surface condition, and the effect of mechanical properties on strength and weldability.

  18. Controlled powder morphology experiments in megabar 304 stainless steel compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Staudhammer, K.P.; Johnson, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments with controlled morphology including shape, size, and size distribution were made on 304L stainless steel powders. These experiments involved not only the powder variables but pressure variables of 0.08 to 1.0 Mbar. Also included are measured container strain on the material ranging from 1.5% to 26%. Using a new strain controllable design it was possible to seperate and control, independently, strain and pressure. Results indicate that powder morphology, size distribution, packing density are among the pertinent parameters in predicting compaction of these powders.

  19. Evaluation of tantalum 316 stainless steel transition joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    Tubular transition joints providing a metallurgically bonded connection between tantalum and 316 stainless steel pipe sections were comparatively evaluated for durability under thermal cycling conditions approximating the operation of a SNAP-8 mercury boiler. Both coextruded and vacuum brazed transition joints of 50mm (2 inch) diameter were tested by thermal cycling 100 times between 730 C and 120 C(1350 F and 250 F) in a high vacuum environment. The twelve evaluated transition joints survived the full test sequence without developing leaks, although liquid penetrant bond line indications eventually developed in all specimens. The brazed transition joints exhibited the best dimensional stability and bond line durability.

  20. 49 CFR 178.511 - Standards for aluminum and steel jerricans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standards for aluminum and steel jerricans. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Performance-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.511 Standards for aluminum and steel jerricans. (a) The following are identification codes for aluminum and steel jerricans: (1)...

  1. 49 CFR 178.511 - Standards for aluminum and steel jerricans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standards for aluminum and steel jerricans. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Performance-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.511 Standards for aluminum and steel jerricans. (a) The following are identification codes for aluminum and steel jerricans: (1)...

  2. 49 CFR 178.511 - Standards for aluminum and steel jerricans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standards for aluminum and steel jerricans. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Performance-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.511 Standards for aluminum and steel jerricans. (a) The following are identification codes for aluminum and steel jerricans: (1)...

  3. 49 CFR 178.511 - Standards for aluminum and steel jerricans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standards for aluminum and steel jerricans. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Performance-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.511 Standards for aluminum and steel jerricans. (a) The following are identification codes for aluminum and steel jerricans: (1)...

  4. 49 CFR 178.511 - Standards for aluminum and steel jerricans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for aluminum and steel jerricans. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Performance-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.511 Standards for aluminum and steel jerricans. (a) The following are identification codes for aluminum and steel jerricans: (1)...

  5. 75 FR 67110 - Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-01

    ... stainless steel flanges from India and Taiwan (65 FR 49964). Following second five-year reviews by Commerce... duty orders on imports of forged stainless steel flanges from India and Taiwan (71 FR 3457, January 23... part 201), and part 207, subparts A, D, E, and F (19 CFR part 207), as most recently amended at 74...

  6. 77 FR 41754 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Postponement of Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-16

    ...'s Republic of China: Initiation of Antidumping Duty Investigation, 77 FR 18207 (March 27, 2012). On... International Trade Administration Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Postponement...'') initiated an antidumping duty investigation on drawn stainless steel sinks from the People's Republic...

  7. 78 FR 21596 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Countervailing Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ... Countervailing Duty Determination, 78 FR 13017 (February 26, 2013). \\2\\ See Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks from... From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Affirmative Countervailing Duty Determination, 77 FR... International Trade Administration Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of...

  8. 78 FR 45271 - Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... Commission, Washington, DC, and by publishing the notice in the Federal Register of May 24, 2013 (78 FR 31574... COMMISSION Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam Determination On the... injured by reason of imports from Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam of welded stainless steel pressure...

  9. 75 FR 53714 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... imports of stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan (53 FR 9787). On February 23, 1993, Commerce... on imports of stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, Korea, and Taiwan (65 FR 11766... Japan, Korea, and Taiwan (70 FR 61119). The Commission is now conducting third reviews to...

  10. 77 FR 41969 - Stainless Steel Bar From Japan: Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-17

    ... Revocation in Part, and Deferral of Administrative Review, 77 FR 19179, 19181 (March 30, 2012). Based on a... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From Japan: Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative...) initiated an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar from Japan...

  11. 75 FR 59744 - Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... group response to its notice of institution (75 FR 30437, June 1, 2010) was adequate and that the... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Taiwan AGENCY... Korea and the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel sheet and strip from Germany, Italy,...

  12. 75 FR 76025 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... party responded to the sunset review notice of initiation by the applicable deadline * * *'' (75 FR... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan AGENCY: United States... stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, Korea, and Taiwan would be likely to lead...

  13. 78 FR 63517 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... Information The NRC published DG-1279 in the Federal Register on October 3, 2012 (77 FR 60479), for a 60-day... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... revision to Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.31, ``Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.''...

  14. Corrosion characteristics of ferric and austenitic stainless steels for dental magnetic attachment.

    PubMed

    Endo, K; Suzuki, M; Ohno, H

    2000-03-01

    The corrosion behaviors of four ferric stainless steels and two austenitic stainless steels were examined in a simulated physiological environment (0.9% NaCl solution) to obtain basic data for evaluating the appropriate composition of stainless steels for dental magnetic attachments. The corrosion resistance was evaluated by electrochemical techniques and the analysis of released metal ions by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The surface of the stainless steels was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The breakdown potential of ferric stainless steels increased and the total amount of released metal ions decreased linearly with increases in the sum of the Cr and Mo contents. The corrosion rate of the ferric stainless steels increased 2 to 6 times when they were galvanically coupled with noble metal alloys but decreased when coupled with commercially pure Ti. For austenitic stainless steels, the breakdown potential of high N-bearing stainless steel was approximately 500 mV higher than that of SUS316L, which is currently used as a component in dental magnetic attachments. The enriched nitrogen at the alloy/passive film interface may be effective in improving the localized corrosion resistance. PMID:11219089

  15. 77 FR 3231 - Certain Stainless Steel Wire Rods From India: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ... [Federal Register Volume 77, Number 14 (Monday, January 23, 2012)] [Notices] [Pages 3231-3232] [FR... (``Sunset'') Review, 76 FR 38613 (July 1, 2011); see also Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India; Institution..., 76 FR 38686 (July 1, 2011). \\1\\ Antidumping Duty Order: Certain Stainless Steel Wire Rods from...

  16. 76 FR 31588 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Rescission of Countervailing Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Rescission of Countervailing... countervailing duty (``CVD'') order on stainless steel plate in coils from Belgium. See Antidumping or... FR 23236 (May 3, 2010). On May 28, 2010, we received a request for revocation of this order from...

  17. 75 FR 64709 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Notice of Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Notice of Rescission of... ``Opportunity to Request Administrative Review'' of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel plate in coils... Administrative Review, 75 FR 23236, (May 3, 2010). On June 1, 2009, in accordance with 19 CFR 351.213(b),...

  18. 77 FR 13631 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China; Institution and Scheduling of Preliminary Phase...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... COMMISSION Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China; Institution and Scheduling of Preliminary Phase... the United States is materially retarded, by reason of imports from China of drawn stainless steel... amended. The amendments took effect on November 7, 2011. See 76 FR 61937 (Oct. 6, 2011) and the...

  19. 77 FR 58355 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Countervailing Duty Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... Countervailing Duty Determination: Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China, 77 FR 46717...: Initiation of Countervailing Duty Investigation, 77 FR 18211 (March 27, 2012), and, also, see Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Initiation of Antidumping Duty Investigation, 77...

  20. Assessment of bacterial biofilm on stainless steel by hyperspectral fluorescence imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging techniques were investigated for detection of two genera of microbial biofilms on stainless steel material which is commonly used to manufacture food processing equipment. Stainless steel coupons were deposited in nonpathogenic E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella cultu...

  1. 76 FR 69292 - Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    .... ML100920158), for which a notice of availability was published in the Federal Register on June 22, 2010 (75 FR... COMMISSION Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water AGENCY... Staff Guidance (LR-ISG), LR- ISG-2011-01, ``Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures...

  2. Beneficially reusing LLRW the Savannah River Site Stainless Steel Program

    SciTech Connect

    Boettinger, W.L.

    1993-09-09

    With 68 radioactively contaminated excess Process Water Heat Exchangers the Savannah River Site launched its program to turn potential LLRW metal liabilities into assets. Each Heat Exchanger contains approximately 100 tons of 304 Stainless Steel and could be disposed as LLRW by land burial. Instead the 7000 tons of metal will be recycled into LLRW, HLW, and TRU waste containers thereby eliminating the need for near term land disposal and also eliminating the need to add more clean metal to the waste stream. Aspects of the partnership between DOE and Private Industry necessary to accomplish this new mission are described. A life cycle cost analysis associated with past practices of using carbon steel containers to indefinitely store material (contributing to the creation of today`s legacy waste problems) is presented. The avoided cost calculations needed to support the economics of the ``Indifference`` decision process in assessing the Beneficial Reuse option relative to the Burial option are described.

  3. Stainless Steels with Improved Oxidation Resistance for Recuperators

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A

    2006-01-01

    New materials are being evaluated to replace type 347 stainless steel in microturbine recuperators operating at higher temperatures in order to increase the efficiency of the microturbine. Commercial alloys 120 and 625 are being tested along with potentially lower cost substitutes, such as Fe-20Cr-25Ni and Fe-20Cr-20Ni. Long-term testing of these materials at 650--700 C shows excellent corrosion resistance to a simulated exhaust gas environment. Testing at 800 C has been used to further differentiate the performance of the various materials. The depletion of Cr from foils of these materials is being used to evaluate the rate of attack. Although those alloys with the highest Ni and Cr contents have longer lives in this environment, lower alloyed steels may have sufficient protection at a lower cost.

  4. Stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) with roughly equal amount of austenite and ferrite phases are being used in industries such as petrochemical, nuclear, pulp and paper mills, de-salination plants, marine environments, and others. However, many DSS grades have been reported to undergo corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in some aggressive environments such as chlorides and sulfide-containing caustic solutions. Although stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in chloride solution has been investigated and well documented in the literature but the SCC mechanisms for DSS in caustic solutions were not known. Microstructural changes during fabrication processes affect the overall SCC susceptibility of these steels in caustic solutions. Other environmental factors, like pH of the solution, temperature, and resulting electrochemical potential also influence the SCC susceptibility of duplex stainless steels. In this study, the role of material and environmental parameters on corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions were investigated. Changes in the DSS microstructure by different annealing and aging treatments were characterized in terms of changes in the ratio of austenite and ferrite phases, phase morphology and intermetallic precipitation using optical micrography, SEM, EDS, XRD, nano-indentation and microhardness methods. These samples were then tested for general and localized corrosion susceptibility and SCC to understand the underlying mechanisms of crack initiation and propagation in DSS in the above-mentioned environments. Results showed that the austenite phase in the DSS is more susceptible to crack initiation and propagation in caustic solutions, which is different from that in the low pH chloride environment where the ferrite phase is the more susceptible phase. This study also showed that microstructural changes in duplex stainless steels due to different heat treatments could affect their SCC

  5. The retention of iodine in stainless steel sample lines

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, G.J.; Deir, C.; Ball, J.M.

    1995-02-01

    Following an accident in a multi-unit CANDU nuclear generating station, decontamination of air vented from containment would play a critical role in minimizing the release of iodine to the environment. The concentration of gas phase iodine in containment air would be measured using the post accident radiation monitoring system, requiring that air samples be passed through a considerable length of tubing to a remote location where the desired measurements could safely be made. A significant loss of iodine, due to adsorption on the sample line surfaces, could greatly distort the measurement. In this study, the retention of I{sub 2}(g) on stainless steel was evaluated in bench scale experiments in order to evaluate, and if possible minimise, the extent of any such line losses. Experiments at the University of Toronto were performed using 6 inch lengths of 1/4 inch stainless steel tubing. Air, containing I-131 labelled I{sub 2}(g), ranging in concentration from 10{sup {minus}10} to 10{sup {minus}6} mol/dm{sup 3} and relative humidity (:RH) from 20 to 90 %, was passed through tubing samples maintained at temperatures ranging from 25 to 90{degrees}C. Adsorption at low gas phase iodine concentrations differed substantially from that at higher concentrations. The rate of deposition was proportional to the gas phase concentration, giving support to the concept of a first order deposition velocity. The surface loading increased with increasing relative humidity, particularly at low RH values, while the deposition rate decreased with increasing temperature. Surface water on the steel may play an important role in the deposition process. The chemisorbed iodine was located primarily in areas of corrosion. Furthermore, water used to wash the steel contained Fe, Mn and iodine in the form of iodide, suggesting that I{sub 2} reacted to form metal iodides. The deposition of I{sub 2} was also found to depend on the initial surface condition.

  6. Study on tempering behaviour of AISI 410 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Gopa; Das, C.R.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Thomas Paul, V.; Panneerselvam, G.; Dasgupta, Arup

    2015-02-15

    Martensitic stainless steels find extensive applications due to their optimum combination of strength, hardness and wear-resistance in tempered condition. However, this class of steels is susceptible to embrittlement during tempering if it is carried out in a specific temperature range resulting in significant reduction in toughness. Embrittlement of as-normalised AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel, subjected to tempering treatment in the temperature range of 673–923 K was studied using Charpy impact tests followed by metallurgical investigations using field emission scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes. Carbides precipitated during tempering were extracted by electrochemical dissolution of the matrix and identified by X-ray diffraction. Studies indicated that temper embrittlement is highest when the steel is tempered at 823 K. Mostly iron rich carbides are present in the steel subjected to tempering at low temperatures of around 723 K, whereas chromium rich carbides (M{sub 23}C{sub 6}) dominate precipitation at high temperature tempering. The range 773–823 K is the transition temperature range for the precipitates, with both Fe{sub 2}C and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} types of carbides coexisting in the material. The nucleation of Fe{sub 2}C within the martensite lath, during low temperature tempering, has a definite role in the embrittlement of this steel. Embrittlement is not observed at high temperature tempering because of precipitation of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides, instead of Fe{sub 2}C, preferentially along the lath and prior austenite boundaries. Segregation of S and P, which is widely reported as one of the causes for temper embrittlement, could not be detected in the material even through Auger electron spectroscopy studies. - Highlights: • Tempering behaviour of AISI 410 steel is studied within 673–923 K temperature range. • Temperature regime of maximum embrittlement is identified as 773–848 K. • Results show that type of

  7. Applications and experiences with super duplex stainless steel in wet FGD scrubber systems

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, R.; Byrne, G.; Warburton, G.; Hebdon, S.

    1998-12-31

    The paper presents the properties of the author`s company`s proprietary super duplex stainless steel. Work is presented showing the development of a more realistic laboratory solution representing typical limestone slurries found in real flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The importance of additions of metal ions such as Fe{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} as well as partially oxidized sulfur species is demonstrated. Results are presented comparing the crevice corrosion resistance of super duplex stainless steel in these slurries with other commonly used wrought and cast stainless steels, for both simulated anthracite and lignite type slurries. Data from loop tests on the erosion resistance of a range of alloys in simulated FGD slurries is presented. The results clearly show the superior resistance of super duplex stainless steel to both crevice corrosion and erosion in FGD slurries. Finally the experiences in UK FGD systems with both cast and wrought super duplex stainless steel are presented.

  8. Biocompatibility of 17-4 PH stainless steel foam for implant applications.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Ilven; Oktay, Enver

    2011-01-01

    In this study, biocompatibility of 17-4 PH stainless steel foam for biomedical implant applications was investigated. 17-4 PH stainless steel foams having porosities in the range of 40-82% with an average pore size of around 600 μm were produced by space holder-sintering technique. Sintered foams were precipitation hardened for times of 1-6 h at temperatures between 450-570 °C. Compressive yield strength and Young's modulus of aged stainless steel foams were observed to vary between 80-130 MPa and 0.73-1.54 GPa, respectively. Pore morphology, pore size and the mechanical properties of the 17-4 PH stainless steel foams were close to cancellous bone. In vitro evaluations of cytotoxicity of the foams were investigated by XTT and MTT assays and showed sufficient biocompatibility. Surface roughness parameters of the stainless steel foams were also determined to characterize the foams. PMID:22182790

  9. Type 304L stainless steel surface microstructure: Performance in hydride storage and acid cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1994-07-01

    The performance of stainless steel as the container in hydride storage bed systems has been evaluated, primarily using scanning electron microscopy. No adverse reaction between Type 304L stainless steel and either LaNi{sub 5{minus}x},Al{sub x}, or palladium supported on Kieselguhr granules (silica) during exposure in hydrogen was found in examination of retired prototype storage bed containers and special compatibility test samples. Intergranular surface ditching, observed on many of the stainless steel surfaces examined, was shown to result from air annealing and acid cleaning of stainless steel during normal fabrication. The ditched air annealed and acid cleaned stainless steel samples were more resistant to subsequent acid attack than vacuum annealed or polished samples without ditches.

  10. 76 FR 38686 - Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... on imports of stainless steel wire rod from India (58 FR 63335). Following first five-year reviews by... duty order on imports of stainless steel wire rod from India (65 FR 47403). Following second five-year... antidumping duty order on imports of stainless steel wire rod from India (71 FR 45023). The Commission is...

  11. 76 FR 64106 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan; Scheduling of Expedited Five-Year...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... COMMISSION Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan; Scheduling of Expedited Five-Year Reviews Concerning the Antidumping Duty Orders on Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and... duty orders on certain welded stainless steel pipe (specifically ASTM A-312 pipe) from Korea and...

  12. 75 FR 27987 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ... Antidumping Duty Order: Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea, 60 FR 10064, 10065... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea: Final... welded stainless steel pipes (WSSP) from the Republic of Korea (Korea). This review covers one...

  13. 77 FR 24459 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy: Final Results of... stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings (SSBW pipe fittings) from Italy.\\1\\ This review covers two... results remain unchanged from the preliminary results of review. \\1\\ See Stainless Steel Butt-Weld...

  14. 78 FR 22227 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2011-2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ...: Stainless Steel Bar from Brazil, India and Japan, 60 FR 9661 (February 21, 1995). Changes Since the... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Final Results of Antidumping Duty... preliminary results of the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar...

  15. 76 FR 13357 - Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip in Coils From Mexico; Correction Notice to Amended Final Results...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip in Coils From Mexico; Correction Notice to... administrative review for stainless steel sheet and strip in coils from Mexico. See Stainless Steel Sheet and..., 76 FR 9542 (February 18, 2011) (Amended Final Results). The Amended Final Results states...

  16. 76 FR 67672 - Certain Stainless Steel Wire Rods From India: Final Results of the Expedited Sunset Review of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ...\\ Antidumping Duty Order: Certain Stainless Steel Wire Rods from India, 58 FR 63335 (December 1, 1993). The... International Trade Administration Certain Stainless Steel Wire Rods From India: Final Results of the Expedited...) initiated the third sunset review of the antidumping duty order on certain stainless steel wire rods...

  17. 76 FR 56401 - Stainless Steel Bar from India: Final Results of the Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ...: Stainless Steel Bar from India, 59 FR 66915 (December 28, 1994). These cash deposit requirements, when... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar from India: Final Results of the Antidumping Duty.... Finally, we are announcing our revocation of the order on stainless steel bar from India, in part,...

  18. 76 FR 38688 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan; Institution of a Five-Year Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... ASTM A-312 stainless steel pipe from Korea (57 FR 62301) and Taiwan (57 FR 62300). Following first five... ASTM A-312 stainless steel pipe from Korea and Taiwan (71 FR 53412, September 11, 2006). The Commission... as all welded stainless steel pipes and pressure tubes, excluding grade 409 tubes and...

  19. Stainless steel corrosion by molten nitrates : analysis and lessons learned.

    SciTech Connect

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael

    2011-09-01

    A secondary containment vessel, made of stainless 316, failed due to severe nitrate salt corrosion. Corrosion was in the form of pitting was observed during high temperature, chemical stability experiments. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were all used to diagnose the cause of the failure. Failure was caused by potassium oxide that crept into the gap between the primary vessel (alumina) and the stainless steel vessel. Molten nitrate solar salt (89% KNO{sub 3}, 11% NaNO{sub 3} by weight) was used during chemical stability experiments, with an oxygen cover gas, at a salt temperature of 350-700 C. Nitrate salt was primarily contained in an alumina vessel; however salt crept into the gap between the alumina and 316 stainless steel. Corrosion occurred over a period of approximately 2000 hours, with the end result of full wall penetration through the stainless steel vessel; see Figures 1 and 2 for images of the corrosion damage to the vessel. Wall thickness was 0.0625 inches, which, based on previous data, should have been adequate to avoid corrosion-induced failure while in direct contact with salt temperature at 677 C (0.081-inch/year). Salt temperatures exceeding 650 C lasted for approximately 14 days. However, previous corrosion data was performed with air as the cover gas. High temperature combined with an oxygen cover gas obviously drove corrosion rates to a much higher value. Corrosion resulted in the form of uniform pitting. Based on SEM and EDS data, pits contained primarily potassium oxide and potassium chromate, reinforcing the link between oxides and severe corrosion. In addition to the pitting corrosion, a large blister formed on the side wall, which was mainly composed of potassium, chromium and oxygen. All data indicated that corrosion initiated internally and moved outward. There was no evidence of intergranular corrosion nor were there any indication of fast pathways along grain boundaries. Much of the

  20. Development of cryogenic thermal control heat pipes. [of stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The development of thermal control heat pipes that are applicable to the low temperature to cryogenic range was investigated. A previous effort demonstrated that stainless steel axially grooved tubing which met performance requirements could be fabricated. Three heat pipe designs utilizing stainless steel axially grooved tubing were fabricated and tested. One is a liquid trap diode heat pipe which conforms to the configuration and performance requirements of the Heat Pipe Experiment Package (HEPP). The HEPP is scheduled for flight aboard the Long Duration Flight Exposure Facility (LDEF). Another is a thermal switch heat pipe which is designed to permit energy transfer at the cooler of the two identical legs. The third thermal component is a hybrid variable conductance heat pipe (VCHP). The design incorporates both a conventional VCHP system and a liquid trap diode. The design, fabrication and thermal testing of these heat pipes is described. The demonstrated heat pipe behavior including start-up, forward mode transport, recovery after evaporator dry-out, diode performance and variable conductance control are discussed.

  1. Intergranular stress distributions in polycrystalline aggregates of irradiated stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hure, J.; El Shawish, S.; Cizelj, L.; Tanguy, B.

    2016-08-01

    In order to predict InterGranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) of post-irradiated austenitic stainless steel in Light Water Reactor (LWR) environment, reliable predictions of intergranular stresses are required. Finite elements simulations have been performed on realistic polycrystalline aggregate with recently proposed physically-based crystal plasticity constitutive equations validated for neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steel. Intergranular normal stress probability density functions are found with respect to plastic strain and irradiation level, for uniaxial loading conditions. In addition, plastic slip activity jumps at grain boundaries are also presented. Intergranular normal stress distributions describe, from a statistical point of view, the potential increase of intergranular stress with respect to the macroscopic stress due to grain-grain interactions. The distributions are shown to be well described by a master curve once rescaled by the macroscopic stress, in the range of irradiation level and strain considered in this study. The upper tail of this master curve is shown to be insensitive to free surface effect, which is relevant for IGSCC predictions, and also relatively insensitive to small perturbations in crystallographic texture, but sensitive to grain shapes.

  2. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel: status and program

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Ayrault, G.

    1983-10-01

    A program has been initiated to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. The existing data are reviewed to determine the critical parameters that control the aging behavior and to define the objectives and scope of the investigation. The test matrices for microstructural studies and mechanical property measurements are presented. The initial experimental effort is focussed on characterizing the microstructure of long-term, low-temperature aged material. Specimens from three heats of cast CF-8 and CF-8M stainless steel aged for up to 70,000 h at 300, 350, and 400/sup 0/C were obtained from George Fisher Ltd., of Switzerland. Initial analyses reveal the formation of three different types of precipitates which are not ..cap alpha..'. An FCC phase, similar to the M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ precipitates, was present in all the long-term aged material. 15 references, 10 figures, 2 tables.

  3. IN-SITU MEASUREMENT OF TRITIUM PERMEATION THROUGH STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Clayton, Kevin; Longhurst, Glen R.

    2013-06-01

    The TMIST-2 irradiation experiment was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory to evaluate tritium permeation through Type 316 stainless steel (316 SS). The interior of a 316 SS seamless tube specimen was exposed to a 4He carrier gas mixed with a specified quantity of tritium (T2) to yield partial pressures of 0.1, 5, and 50 Pa at 292° and 330°C. In-situ tritium permeation measurements were made by passing a He-Ne sweep gas over the outer surface of the specimen to carry the permeated tritium to a bubbler column for liquid scintillation counting. An irradiation enhancement factor (IEF) was determined by comparing in-situ permeation data with a correlation for ex-reactor hydrogen permeation through austenitic stainless steel developed from literature data and reported by Le Claire. Nominal values for the IEF ranged between 3 and 5 for 316 SS. In-situ permeation data were also used to derive an in-reactor permeation correlation as a function of temperature and pressure. In addition, the triton recoil contribution to tritium permeation, which results from the transmutation of 3He to T, was also evaluated by introducing a 4He carrier gas mixed with 3He at a partial pressure of 1013 Pa at 330°C. Less than 3% of the tritium resulting from 3He transmutation contributed to tritium permeation.

  4. In Situ Measurement of Tritium Permeation Through Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Clayton, Kevin; Longhurst, Glen

    2013-06-01

    The TMIST-2 irradiation experiment was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory to evaluate tritium permeation through Type 316 stainless steel (316 SS). The interior of a 316 SS seamless tube specimen was exposed to a 4He carrier gas mixed with a specified quantity of tritium (T2) to yield partial pressures of 0.1, 5, and 50 Pa at 292° and 330°C. In-situ tritium permeation measurements were made by passing a He-Ne sweep gas over the outer surface of the specimen to carry the permeated tritium to a bubbler column for liquid scintillation counting. An irradiation enhancement factor (IEF) was determined by comparing in-situ permeation data with a correlation for ex-reactor hydrogen permeation through austenitic stainless steel developed from literature data and reported by Le Claire. Nominal values for the IEF ranged between 3 and 5 for 316 SS. In-situ permeation data were also used to derive an in-reactor permeation correlation as a function of temperature and pressure. In addition, the triton recoil contribution to tritium permeation, which results from the transmutation of 3He to T, was also evaluated by introducing a 4He carrier gas mixed with 3He at a partial pressure of 1013 Pa at 330°C. Less than 3% of the tritium resulting from 3He transmutation contributed to tritium permeation.

  5. Processing fine stainless-steel slag using spiral concentration.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Eric R; Klima, Mark S

    2008-04-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of spiral concentration to process a fine (-1 mm) stainless-steel slag was evaluated. Specifically, testing was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing a high metal content stainless steel product and a low metal content aggregate product. This involved investigating a key operating variable for both five-and seven-turn spiral concentrators. The raw slag and spiral products were characterized to determine their respective size and metal distributions. Separation testing was carried out using the two full-scale spiral concentrators to evaluate the effects of feed solids concentration on spiral performance at solids feed rates ranging from 15 to 30 kg/min. The results indicated that under certain conditions, a high-quality metal fraction could be produced. For example, using the five-turn spiral, a product containing 95% metal was obtained at a low metal recovery. Both spirals were ineffective at concentrating the aggregate fraction. Overall, the feed solids concentration did not significantly affect the quality or recoveries of the products, particularly for feed solids concentrations less than 35% by weight. In order to improve the metal recoveries and to produce a low-metal aggregate material, reprocessing of the product streams and/or additional liberation of the raw slag would be required. PMID:18324536

  6. Water Lubrication of Stainless Steel using Reduced Graphene Oxide Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hae-Jin; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2015-11-01

    Lubrication of mechanical systems using water instead of conventional oil lubricants is extremely attractive from the view of resource conservation and environmental protection. However, insufficient film thickness of water due to low viscosity and chemical reaction of water with metallic materials have been a great obstacle in utilization of water as an effective lubricant. Herein, the friction between a 440 C stainless steel (SS) ball and a 440 C stainless steel (SS) plate in water lubrication could be reduced by as much as 6-times by coating the ball with reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The friction coefficient with rGO coated ball in water lubrication was comparable to the value obtained with the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. Moreover, the wear rate of the SS plate slid against the rGO coated ball in water lubrication was 3-times lower than that of the SS plate slid against the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. These results clearly demonstrated that water can be effectively utilized as a lubricant instead of oil to lower the friction and wear of SS components by coating one side with rGO. Implementation of this technology in mechanical systems is expected to aid in significant reduction of environmental pollution caused by the extensive use of oil lubricants.

  7. Water Lubrication of Stainless Steel using Reduced Graphene Oxide Coating

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hae-Jin; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2015-01-01

    Lubrication of mechanical systems using water instead of conventional oil lubricants is extremely attractive from the view of resource conservation and environmental protection. However, insufficient film thickness of water due to low viscosity and chemical reaction of water with metallic materials have been a great obstacle in utilization of water as an effective lubricant. Herein, the friction between a 440 C stainless steel (SS) ball and a 440 C stainless steel (SS) plate in water lubrication could be reduced by as much as 6-times by coating the ball with reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The friction coefficient with rGO coated ball in water lubrication was comparable to the value obtained with the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. Moreover, the wear rate of the SS plate slid against the rGO coated ball in water lubrication was 3-times lower than that of the SS plate slid against the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. These results clearly demonstrated that water can be effectively utilized as a lubricant instead of oil to lower the friction and wear of SS components by coating one side with rGO. Implementation of this technology in mechanical systems is expected to aid in significant reduction of environmental pollution caused by the extensive use of oil lubricants. PMID:26593645

  8. Thermal treatment effects on laser surface remelting duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, Alex M.; Ierardi, Maria Clara F.; Aparecida Pinto, M.; Tavares, Sérgio S. M.

    2008-10-01

    In this paper the microstructural changes and effects on corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels UNS S32304 and UNS S32205, commonly used by the petroleum industry, were studied, following the execution of laser surface remelting (LSM) and post-thermal treatments (TT). In this way, data was obtained, which could then be compared with the starting condition of the alloys. In order to analyze the corrosion behaviour of the alloys in the as-received conditions, treated with laser and after post-thermal treatments, cyclic polarization tests were carried out. A solution of 3.5% NaCl (artificial sea water) was used, as duplex stainless steels are regularly used by the petroleum industry in offshore locations. The results obtained showed that when laser surface treated, due to rapid resolidification, the alloys became almost ferritic, and since the level of nitrogen in the composition of both alloys is superior to their solubility limit in ferrite, a precipitation of Cr2N (chromium nitrides) occurred in the ferritic matrix, causing loss of corrosion resistance, thus resulting in an increase in surface hardness. However, after the post-thermal treatment the alloys corrosion resistance was restored to values close to those of the as-received condition.

  9. Nitrogen containing shielding gases for GTAW duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Creffield, G.K.; Cole, M.H.; Paciej, R.; Huang, W.; Urmston, S.

    1993-12-31

    The duplex stainless steel are alloys characterized as consisting of two phases; austenite and ferrite. As such, they combine the benefits of both phases i.e. good ductility and general corrosion resistance of austenite, but with improved stress corrosion cracking resistance and strength associate with ferrite. Carefully controlled manufacturing techniques are employed to produce this combination in roughly equal proportions to ensure optimum properties. The range of duplex alloys studied in this work covered both the standard grade (2205) and the latest generation of super duplex (2507) alloys; typical compositions are shown in Table 1. Although the standard duplex is the most commonly available and widely used, super duplexes, which are characterized by higher chromium, nickel, molybdenum and nitrogen contents, have even better corrosion properties and are finding increasing applications in the offshore industry. To benefit from the superior properties of duplex, it is vital that these alloys can be welded effectively and that the properties of the welded joint match those of the parent weld. The objective of the current investigation was to study the effect of nitrogen, in both the shielding and purge gas, on the weld metal nitrogen content, microstructure and corrosion resistance, with the eventual aim of recommending an effective shielding gas mixture for duplex stainless steels.

  10. Fusion welding of a modern borated stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Robino, C.V.; Cieslak, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments designed to assess the fabrication and service weldability of 304B4A borated stainless steel were conducted. Welding procedures and parameters for manual gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding, autogenous electron beam (EB) welding and filler-added EB welding were developed and found to be similar to those for austenitic stainless steels. Following the procedure development, four test welds were produced and evaluated by microstructural analysis and Charpy impact testing. Further samples were used for determination of the postweld heat treatment (PWHT) response of the welds. The fusion zone structure of welds in this alloy consists of primary austenite dendrites with an interdendritic eutectic-like austenite/boride constituent. Welds also show an appreciable partially molten zone that consists of the austenite/boride eutectic surrounding unmelted austenite islands. The microstructure of the EB welds was substantially finer than that of the GTA welds, and boride coarsening was not observed in the solid state heat-affected zone (HAZ) of either weld type. The impact toughness of as-welded samples was found to be relatively poor, averaging less than 10 J for both GTA and EB welds. For fusion zone notched GTA and EB samples and centerline notched EB samples, fracture generally occurred along the boundary between the partially molten and solid-state regions of the HAZ. The results of the PWHT study were very encouraging, with typical values of the impact energy for HAZ notched samples approaching 40 J, or twice the minimum code-acceptable value.

  11. A porous stainless steel membrane system for extraterrestrial crop production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, H. V.; Prince, R. P.; Berry, W. L.; Knott, W. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    A system was developed in which nutrient flow to plant roots is controlled by a thin (0.98 or 1.18 mm) porous (0.2 or 0.5 microns) stainless steel sheet membrane. The flow of nutrient solution through the membrane is controlled by adjusting the relative negative pressure on the nutrient solution side of the membrane. Thus, the nutrient solution is contained by the membrane and cannot escape from the compartment even under microgravity conditions if the appropriate pressure gradient across the membrane is maintained. Plant roots grow directly on the top surface of the membrane and pull the nutrient solution through this membrane interface. The volume of nutrient solution required by this system for plant growth is relatively small, since the plenum, which contains the nutrient solution in contact with the membrane, needs only to be of sufficient size to provide for uniform flow to all parts of the membrane. Solution not passing through the membrane to the root zone is recirculated through a reservoir where pH and nutrient levels are controlled. The size of the solution reservoir depends on the sophistication of the replenishment system. The roots on the surface of the membrane are covered with a polyethylene film (white on top, black on bottom) to maintain a high relative humidity and also limit light to prevent algal growth. Seeds are sown directly on the stainless steel membrane under the holes in the polyethylene film that allow a pathway for the shoots.

  12. The diffusivity of hydrogen in Nb stabilized stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Outlaw, R. A.; Peterson, D. T.

    1983-01-01

    The evolution of hydrogen from 347 stainless steel has been studied by using a real time dynamic technique under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to determine the surface composition as a function of time and temperature. The surface film on the electropolished samples was found to be approximately 15 A thick and consisted of a carbon-oxygen complex and a metal oxide (FexOy). Upon heating to 400 C, the carbon-oxygen complex desorbed as CO and the remaining oxygen and carbon began to incorporate. Also at this temperature sulfur began to diffuse out of the bulk to the surface and at approximately 800 C formed a complete monolayer. At 900 C, carbon and oxygen virtually disappeared, leaving the monolayer of sulfur as the only surface contaminant. The hydrogen diffusivity was found to follow closely the equation D = 7.01 x 10 to the -7th exp(-48.0/RT) sq m per second over the entire temperature range studied, thus indicating that hydrogen evolution is not significantly affected by the changing surface composition. The somewhat higher value of the diffusivity obtained in this work compared to past measurements in austenitic stainless steels may indicate the importance of sample preprocessing and ultrahigh vacuum conditions in minimizing the effects of surface layers.

  13. Investigating electrochemical removal of bacterial biofilms from stainless steel substrates.

    PubMed

    Dargahi, Mahdi; Hosseinidoust, Zeinab; Tufenkji, Nathalie; Omanovic, Sasha

    2014-05-01

    Electrochemical removal of biofilms deserves attention because of its ease of use and environmentally friendly nature. We investigated the influence of electrode potential and treatment time on the removal of a 10-day old Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formed on stainless steel 316 L substrates. At electrode potentials more positive than -1.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl, lower removal rates were observed and only partial removal of the biofilm was achieved during a 1-min time interval. Electrostatic repulsion between the film and electrode surface is believed to drive biofilm detachment under these conditions. However, when the biofilm-coated substrates were treated at potentials negative of -1.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl, complete removal of a biofilm was achieved within seconds. Under these conditions, vigorous evolution of hydrogen gas is believed to be responsible for the film removal, mechanically detaching the bacteria and extracellular polymeric matrix from the substrate. Stainless steel substrates were also subjected to repeated cycles of biofilm formation and electrochemical removal. High removal efficiencies were maintained throughout this process suggesting the potential of the proposed technology for application on conductive surfaces in various industrial settings. PMID:24681392

  14. Deuterium retention in ITER-grade austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemanič, Vincenc; Žumer, Marko; Zajec, Bojan

    2008-11-01

    In view of the construction of ITER, it is essential to confirm that the retention of tritium by the large interior surface area of stainless steel will not become an issue for safety or operating inventory reasons. Retention of deuterium in ITER-grade austenitic stainless steel samples was studied during t = 24 h exposures to pure gaseous deuterium at p = 0.01 mbar and 0.1 mbar and T = 100 °C, 250 °C and 400 °C, respectively. The required high sensitivity for distinguishing hydrogen isotopes involved in the process (H2, HD and D2) was gained after suppression of the native hydrogen concentration by a thermal treatment at T = 400 °C for t = 200 h. The quantity of retained deuterium was determined by measuring the absolute pressure change during the deuterium exposure and subsequent mass spectrometry revealing an intense isotope exchange reaction. The retained amount of 2.6 × 1016 D cm-2 was the highest at T = 400 °C and p = 0.1 mbar and noticeably less at lower deuterium pressure and temperature. Our results, when compared with similar tritium exposures, do not exceed the limits set in the generic safety analysis for the ITER. They manifest that an extremely high sensitivity for deuterium absorption and release can be gained with a precise pressure measuring technique, otherwise attributed exclusively to tritium scintillation methods.

  15. Localized weld metal corrosion in stainless steel water tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Strum, M.J.

    1995-05-25

    The rapidly developed leaks within the TFC and TFD tanks (LLNL groundwater treatment facilities) were caused by localized corrosion within the resolidified weld metal. The corrosion was initiated by the severe oxidation of the backsides of the welds which left the exposed surfaces in a condition highly susceptible to aqueous corrosion. The propagation of surface corrosion through the thickness of the welds occurred by localized corrosive attack. This localized attack was promoted by the presence of shielded aqueous environments provided by crevices at the root of the partial penetration welds. In addition to rapid corrosion of oxidized surfaces, calcium carbonate precipitation provided an additional source of physical shielding from the bulk tank environment. Qualification testing of alternate weld procedures showed that corrosion damage can be prevented in 304L stainless steel GTA welds by welding from both sides while preventing oxidation of the tank interior through the use of an inert backing gas such as argon. Corrosion resistance was also satisfactory in GMA welds in which oxidized surfaces were postweld cleaned by wire brushing and chemically passivated in nitric acid. Further improvements in corrosion resistance are expected from a Mo-containing grade of stainless steel such as type 316L, although test results were similar for type 304L sheet welded with type 308L filler metal and type 316L sheet welded with type 316L filler metal.

  16. Abnormal grain growth in AISI 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Shirdel, M.; Mirzadeh, H.; Parsa, M.H.

    2014-11-15

    The microstructural evolution during abnormal grain growth (secondary recrystallization) in 304L stainless steel was studied in a wide range of annealing temperatures and times. At relatively low temperatures, the grain growth mode was identified as normal. However, at homologous temperatures between 0.65 (850 °C) and 0.7 (900 °C), the observed transition in grain growth mode from normal to abnormal, which was also evident from the bimodality in grain size distribution histograms, was detected to be caused by the dissolution/coarsening of carbides. The microstructural features such as dispersed carbides were characterized by optical metallography, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and microhardness. Continued annealing to a long time led to the completion of secondary recrystallization and the subsequent reappearance of normal growth mode. Another instance of abnormal grain growth was observed at homologous temperatures higher than 0.8, which may be attributed to the grain boundary faceting/defaceting phenomenon. It was also found that when the size of abnormal grains reached a critical value, their size will not change too much and the grain growth behavior becomes practically stagnant. - Highlights: • Abnormal grain growth (secondary recrystallization) in AISI 304L stainless steel • Exaggerated grain growth due to dissolution/coarsening of carbides • The enrichment of carbide particles by titanium • Abnormal grain growth due to grain boundary faceting at very high temperatures • The stagnancy of abnormal grain growth by annealing beyond a critical time.

  17. Characterization and Evaluation of Aged Chromium Nickel Niobium Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewar, Matthew

    20Cr-32Ni-1Nb stainless steel alloys are commonly used in hydrogen reformer manifolds for transporting hot hydrogen by-products at 750-950°C. After long periods of exposure, embrittling secondary carbides and intermetallic phases can precipitate at the grain boundaries which can drastically reduce the ductility, and the repair weldability of the alloy. The intermetallic silicide, G-phase, is commonly observed in 20Cr-32Ni-1Nb stainless steels, and is prone to liquation cracking during welding operations. G-phase is deleterious to the material, where a high degree of G-phase coarsening will render the material unweldable. The present work will investigate various methods in mitigating G-phase precipitation. Variations in casting methods, wall thickness, homogenization treatments, and alloy chemistry will be examined by evaluating their microstructure after periodically aging the samples. Thermodynamic equilibrium modeling using computational thermodynamic tools will be used to optimize the 20Cr-32Ni-1Nb chemistry following ASTM specifications.

  18. Ultrasonic Butt Welding of Aluminum, Copper and Steel Plate Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujino, Jiromaru; Ueoka, Tetsugi; Fujita, Yuki; Watanabe, Ichiro

    1994-05-01

    Characteristics of ultrasonic butt welding of the same and of different metal plates are studied. The ultrasonic vibration source used has eight 15-kHz bolt-clamped Langevin-type lead-zircon-titanate (PZT) transducers of 60 mm diameter and is driven by a 50-kW static induction thyristor power amplifier. Welding specimens of aluminum, copper and steel plates of 6 mm thickness are successfully joined end-to-end with weld strength almost equal to that of an aluminum specimen. The input power required for aluminum, aluminum and copper, and aluminum and steel plates are about 5 kW/cm2, 5.5 kW/cm2 and 3.5 kW/cm2, respectively. The measured temperature rise at the specimen side surface and elongation of the welded specimen during a tensile test correspond to weld strength. The hardness distributions along the weldment of welded specimens are measured and the maximum temperature rise in an aluminum welding specimen is estimated to be over 480°C from the reduction of hardness at a welding specimen surface.

  19. Characterization of particle exposure in ferrochromium and stainless steel production.

    PubMed

    Järvelä, Merja; Huvinen, Markku; Viitanen, Anna-Kaisa; Kanerva, Tomi; Vanhala, Esa; Uitti, Jukka; Koivisto, Antti J; Junttila, Sakari; Luukkonen, Ritva; Tuomi, Timo

    2016-07-01

    This study describes workers' exposure to fine and ultrafine particles in the production chain of ferrochromium and stainless steel during sintering, ferrochromium smelting, stainless steel melting, and hot and cold rolling operations. Workers' personal exposure to inhalable dust was assessed using IOM sampler with a cellulose acetate filter (AAWP, diameter 25 mm; Millipore, Bedford, MA). Filter sampling methods were used to measure particle mass concentrations in fixed locations. Particle number concentrations and size distributions were examined using an SMPS+C sequential mobile particle sizer and counter (series 5.400, Grimm Aerosol Technik, Ainring, Germany), and a hand-held condensation particle counter (CPC, model 3007, TSI Incorporated, MN). The structure and elemental composition of particles were analyzed using TEM-EDXA (TEM: JEM-1220, JEOL, Tokyo, Japan; EDXA: Noran System Six, Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., Madison,WI). Workers' personal exposure to inhalable dust averaged 1.87, 1.40, 2.34, 0.30, and 0.17 mg m(-3) in sintering plant, ferrochromium smelter, stainless steel melting shop, hot rolling mill, and the cold rolling mill, respectively. Particle number concentrations measured using SMPS+C varied from 58 × 10(3) to 662 × 10(3) cm(-3) in the production areas, whereas concentrations measured using SMPS+C and CPC3007 in control rooms ranged from 24 × 10(3) to 243 × 10(3) cm(-3) and 5.1 × 10(3) to 97 × 10(3) cm(-3), respectively. The elemental composition and the structure of particles in different production phases varied. In the cold-rolling mill non-process particles were abundant. In other sites, chromium and iron originating from ore and recycled steel scrap were the most common elements in the particles studied. Particle mass concentrations were at the same level as that reported earlier. However, particle number measurements showed a high amount of ultrafine particles, especially in sintering, alloy smelting and melting, and tapping

  20. European developments in the application of structural austenitic and duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    Stainless steel is increasingly being specified for structural applications. Principally, this is due to the aesthetic appeal of the material, no need for surface protection, durability, and the growing awareness, and use, of Life Cycle Cost analysis for assessing costs over the longer term, However, use of stainless steel in the U.K. offshore oil and gas platforms for fire and blast walls, has highlighted valuable properties of stainless steel that may be unfamiliar to structural designers. It is the purpose of this paper to demonstrate these properties. Additionally, new design guidance has become available in Europe as a result of a 4 year research program into the structural use of stainless steel. The ``Design Manual for Structural Stainless Steel`` was issued by Euro Inox and the Nickel Development Institute in 1994. This new manual will be outlined in this paper together with its influence on new European Building Standards and new European material standards for structural stainless steel. Currently in preparation, these include high strength grades with significantly higher strength than structural carbon steels. Finally, this paper will address the use of stainless steel for the reinforcement of concrete structures.

  1. Studies on Stress Corrosion Cracking of Super 304H Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabha, B.; Sundaramoorthy, P.; Suresh, S.; Manimozhi, S.; Ravishankar, B.

    2009-12-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a common mode of failure encountered in boiler components especially in austenitic stainless steel tubes at high temperature and in chloride-rich water environment. Recently, a new type of austenitic stainless steels called Super304H stainless steel, containing 3% copper is being adopted for super critical boiler applications. The SCC behavior of this Super 304H stainless steel has not been widely reported in the literature. Many researchers have studied the SCC behavior of steels as per various standards. Among them, the ASTM standard G36 has been widely used for evaluation of SCC behavior of stainless steels. In this present work, the SCC behavior of austenitic Fe-Cr-Mn-Cu-N stainless steel, subjected to chloride environments at varying strain conditions as per ASTM standard G36 has been studied. The environments employed boiling solution of 45 wt.% of MgCl2 at 155 °C, for various strain conditions. The study reveals that the crack width increases with increase in strain level in Super 304H stainless steels.

  2. Attenuation of shock waves in copper and stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, W.B.

    1986-06-01

    By using shock pins, data were gathered on the trajectories of shock waves in stainless steel (SS-304L) and oxygen-free-high-conductivity copper (OFHC-Cu). Shock pressures were generated in these materials by impacting the appropriate target with thin (approx.1.5 mm) flying plates. The flying plates in these experiments were accelerated to high velocities (approx.4 km/s) by high explosives. Six experiments were conducted, three using SS-304L as the target material and three experiments using OFHC-Cu as the target material. Peak shock pressures generated in the steel experiments were approximately 109, 130, and 147 GPa and in the copper experiments, the peak shock pressures were approximately 111, 132, and 143 GPa. In each experiment, an attenuation of the shock wave by a following release wave was clearly observed. An extensive effort using two characteristic codes (described in this work) to theoretically calculate the attenuation of the shock waves was made. The efficacy of several different constitutive equations to successfully model the experiments was studied by comparing the calculated shock trajectories to the experimental data. Based on such comparisons, the conclusion can be drawn that OFHC-Cu enters a melt phase at about 130 GPa on the principal Hugoniot. There was no sign of phase changes in the stainless-steel experiments. In order to match the observed attenuation of the shock waves in the SS-304L experiments, it was necessary to include strength effects in the calculations. It was found that the values for the parameters in the strength equations were dependent on the equation of state used in the modeling of the experiments. 66 refs., 194 figs., 77 tabs.

  3. The Effects of Cold Work on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Intermetallic Strengthened Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, B.; Trotter, G.; Baker, Ian; Miller, M. K.; Yao, L.; Chen, S.; Cai, Z.

    2015-08-01

    In order to achieve energy conversion efficiencies of >50 pct for steam turbines/boilers in power generation systems, materials are required that are both strong and corrosion-resistant at >973 K (700 °C), and economically viable. Austenitic steels strengthened with Laves phase, NiAl and Ni3Al precipitates, and alloyed with aluminum to improve oxidation resistance, are potential candidate materials for these applications. The microstructure and microchemistry of recently developed alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Different thermo-mechanical treatments were performed on these steels to improve their mechanical performance. These reduced the grain size significantly to the nanoscale (~100 nm) and the room temperature yield strength to above 1000 MPa. A solutionizing anneal at 1473 K (1200 °C) was found to be effective for uniformly redistributing the Laves phase precipitates that form upon casting.

  4. Dissimilar Friction Stir Welding Between UNS S31603 Austenitic Stainless Steel and UNS S32750 Superduplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodoro, Maria Claudia; Pereira, Victor Ferrinho; Mei, Paulo Roberto; Ramirez, Antonio Jose

    2015-02-01

    In order to verify the viability of dissimilar UNS S31603 austenitic and UNS S32750 superduplex stainless steels joined by friction stir welding, 6-mm-thick plates were welded using a PCBN-WRe tool. The welded joints were performed in position control mode at rotational speeds of 100 to 300 rpm and a feed rate of 100 mm/min. The joints performed with 150 and 200 rpm showed good appearance and no defects. The metallographic analysis of both joints showed no internal defects and that the material flow pattern is visible only in the stirred zone (SZ) of the superduplex steel. On the SZ top, these patterns are made of regions of different phases (ferrite and austenite), and on the bottom and central part of the SZ, these patterns are formed by alternated regions of different grain sizes. The ferrite grains in the superduplex steel are larger than those in the austenitic ones along the SZ and thermo-mechanically affected zone, explained by the difference between austenite and ferrite recrystallization kinetics. The amount of ferrite islands present on the austenitic steel base metal decreased near the SZ interface, caused by the dissolving of the ferrite in austenitic matrix. No other phases were found in both joints. The best weld parameters were found to be 200 rpm rotation speed, 100 mm/min feed rate, and tool position control.

  5. Microstructural Evolution During Friction Surfacing of Austenitic Stainless Steel AISI 304 on Low Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid Rafi, H.; Kishore Babu, N.; Phanikumar, G.; Prasad Rao, K.

    2013-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 coating was deposited over low carbon steel substrate by means of friction surfacing and the microstructural evolution was studied. The microstructural characterization of the coating was carried out by optical microscopy (OM), electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The coating exhibited refined grains (average size of 5 μm) as compared to the coarse grains (average size of 40 μm) in as-received consumable rod. The results from the microstructural characterization studies show that discontinuous dynamic recrystallization (DDRX) is the responsible mechanism for grain evolution as a consequence of severe plastic deformation.

  6. Hydrogen Damage in Superaustenitic 904L Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalska, J.; Chmiela, B.; Łabanowski, J.; Simka, W.

    2014-08-01

    In this work, results on the influence of hydrogen on corrosion resistance and of hydrogen embrittlement of 904L superaustenitic stainless steel were investigated. The cracking behavior was studied by performing a slow strain rate test in synthetic seawater under varying cathodic polarization conditions. The results showed that the steel's plasticity varied with the applied cathodic current density. Significant reductions in ductility were found, indicating its susceptibility to hydrogen-assisted fracture at current density of 20 mA/cm2. Fractographical examinations showed that an increase in hydrogenation current density causes a stepwise decrease in ductility on the fracture surface. The effect of hydrogen on passivity and on pitting corrosion resistance was qualified with the polarization curves registered in synthetic seawater. The conclusion is that hydrogen may affect the passive film stability and thus may decrease the corrosion resistance of the studied steel. The presence of hydrogen increases corrosion current density and decreases the potential of the film breakdown. It was also found that the degree of the susceptibility to hydrogen degradation was dependent on the hydrogen charging conditions.

  7. Accurate modelling of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Nowers, O. D.; Duxbury, D. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2014-02-18

    The ultrasonic inspection of austenitic steel welds is challenging due to the formation of highly anisotropic and heterogeneous structures post-welding. This is due to the intrinsic crystallographic structure of austenitic steel, driving the formation of dendritic grain structures on cooling. The anisotropy is manifested as both a ‘steering’ of the ultrasonic beam and the back-scatter of energy due to the macroscopic granular structure of the weld. However, the quantitative effects and relative impacts of these phenomena are not well-understood. A semi-analytical simulation framework has been developed to allow the study of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds. Frequency-dependent scatterers are allocated to a weld-region to approximate the coarse grain-structures observed within austenitic welds and imaged using a simulated array. The simulated A-scans are compared against an equivalent experimental setup demonstrating excellent agreement of the Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio. Comparison of images of the simulated and experimental data generated using the Total Focusing Method (TFM) indicate a prominent layered effect in the simulated data. A superior grain allocation routine is required to improve upon this.

  8. Accurate modelling of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowers, O. D.; Duxbury, D. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2014-02-01

    The ultrasonic inspection of austenitic steel welds is challenging due to the formation of highly anisotropic and heterogeneous structures post-welding. This is due to the intrinsic crystallographic structure of austenitic steel, driving the formation of dendritic grain structures on cooling. The anisotropy is manifested as both a `steering' of the ultrasonic beam and the back-scatter of energy due to the macroscopic granular structure of the weld. However, the quantitative effects and relative impacts of these phenomena are not well-understood. A semi-analytical simulation framework has been developed to allow the study of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds. Frequency-dependent scatterers are allocated to a weld-region to approximate the coarse grain-structures observed within austenitic welds and imaged using a simulated array. The simulated A-scans are compared against an equivalent experimental setup demonstrating excellent agreement of the Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio. Comparison of images of the simulated and experimental data generated using the Total Focusing Method (TFM) indicate a prominent layered effect in the simulated data. A superior grain allocation routine is required to improve upon this.

  9. Laser beam surface melting of high alloy austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Woollin, P.

    1996-12-31

    The welding of high alloy austenitic stainless steels is generally accompanied by a substantial reduction in pitting corrosion resistance relative to the parent, due to microsegregation of Mo and Cr. This prevents the exploitation of the full potential of these steels. Processing to achieve remelting and rapid solidification offers a means of reducing microsegregation levels and improving corrosion resistance. Surface melting of parent UNS S31254 steel by laser beam has been demonstrated as a successful means of producing fine, as-solidified structures with pitting resistance similar to that of the parent, provided that an appropriate minimum beam travel speed is exceeded. The use of N{sub 2} laser trail gas increased the pitting resistance of the surface melted layer. Application of the technique to gas tungsten arc (GTA) melt runs has shown the ability to raise the pitting resistance significantly. Indeed, the use of optimized beam conditions, N{sub 2} trail gas and appropriate surface preparation prior to laser treatment increased the pitting resistance of GTA melt runs to a level approaching that of the parent material.

  10. Modified Monkman-Grant relationship for austenitic stainless steel foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman Ali, Hassan; Tamin, Mohd Nasir

    2013-02-01

    Characteristics of creep deformation for austenitic stainless steel foils are examined using the modified Monkman-Grant equation. A series of creep tests are conducted on AISI 347 steel foils at 700 °C and different stress levels ranging from 54 to 221 MPa. Results showed that at lower stress levels below 110 MPa, the creep life parameters ɛ, ɛr, tr can be expressed using the modified Monkman-Grant equation with exponent m'= 0.513. This indicates significant deviation of the creep behavior from the first order reaction kinetics theory for creep (m' = 1.0). The true tertiary creep damage in AISI 347 steel foil begins after 65.9% of the creep life of the foil has elapsed at stress levels above 150 MPa. At this high stress levels, Monkman-Grant ductility factor λ' saturates to a value of 1.3 with dislocation-controlled deformation mechanisms operating. At low stress levels, λ' increases drastically (λ'=190 at 54 MPa) when slow diffusion-controlled creep is dominant.

  11. A new constitutive model for nitrogen austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fréchard, S.; Lichtenberger, A.; Rondot, F.; Faderl, N.; Redjaïmia, A.; Adoum, M.

    2003-09-01

    Quasi-static, quasi-dynamic and dynamic compression tests have been performed on a nitrogen alloyed austenitic stainless steel. For all strain rates, a high strain hardening rate and a good ductility have been achieved. In addition, this steel owns a great strain rate sensitivity. The temperature sensitivity bas been determined between 20°C and 400°C. Microstructural analysis has been performed after different loading conditions in relation to the behaviour of the material. Johnson-Cook and Zerilli-Armstrong models have been selected to fit the experimental data into constitutive equations. These models do not reproduce properly the behaviour of this type of steel over the complete range. A new constitutive model that fits very well all the experimental data at different strain, strain rate and temperature has been determined. The model is based on empirical considerations on the separated influence of the main parameters. Single Taylor tests have been realized to validate the models. Live observations of the specimen during impact have been achieved using a special CCD camera set-up. The overall profile at different times are compared to numerical predictions using LS-DYNA code.

  12. Welding techniques for high alloy austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Gooch, T.G.; Woollin, P.

    1996-11-01

    Factors controlling corrosion resistance of weldments in high alloy austenitic stainless steel are described, with emphasis on microsegregation, intermetallic phase precipitation and nitrogen loss from the molten pool. The application is considered of a range of welding processes, both fusion and solid state. Autogenous fusion weldments have corrosion resistance below that of the parent, but low arc energy, high travel speed and use of N{sub 2}-bearing shielding gas are recommended for best properties. Conventional fusion welding practice is to use an overalloyed nickel-base filler metal to avoid preferential weld metal corrosion, and attention is given to the effects of consumable composition and level of weldpool dilution by base steel. With non-matching consumables, overall joint corrosion resistance may be limited by the presence of a fusion boundary unmixed zone: better performance may be obtained using solid state friction welding, given appropriate component geometry. Overall, the effects of welding on superaustenitic steels are understood, and the materials have given excellent service in welded fabrications. The paper summarizes recommendations on preferred welding procedure.

  13. [Effects of skeletal muscle proteins on corrosion of stainless steels].

    PubMed

    Rojas, Christian; Lago, María E

    2002-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of AISI 304 and AISI 316 stainless steels and a steel that matches the requirements of the ASTM Standard F-138 of possible use in traumatology, was studied in the presence of skeletal muscle proteins. The investigation was carried out using potentiodynamics polarization measurements and cyclic polarization, using a fluid of the same protein and salt composition than skeletal muscle. To evaluate the effect of the proteins, the tests were performed with and without the addition of proteins to the cellular fluid at 37 degrees C. The electrochemical assays revealed a negative effect of proteins on pitting corrosion, according to the quality of the steel used to carry out the assays; the most resistant being the AISI 316L and the F-138. In the presence of proteins scanning electron microscopy (SEM) carried out after cyclic polarization revealed a mixed layer, formed by oxides and proteins stuck to the metal surface. This layer seems to be a more unstable passive layer than the corresponding one formed in the absence of proteins. The Tafel plot in the presence of proteins revealed that the corrosion mechanism was controlled by diffusional process. The results with respect to pitting corrosion were similar to those obtained in marine environments. PMID:12516369

  14. Pitting inhibition of stainless steel by surfactants: an electrochemical and surface chemical approach.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhenqiang; Duby, Paul; Somasundaran, P

    2003-03-01

    Pitting corrosion of stainless steels causes tremendous damage in terms of material loss and resulting accidents. Organic surfactants have been tried as pitting inhibitors but the understanding of the inhibition mechanisms is mainly speculative. In the present study the inhibition of the pitting corrosion of 304 stainless steel by N-lauroylsarcosine sodium salt (NLS) in 0.1 M NaCl solutions at neutral pH was studied using an approach that combines surface chemical techniques with electrochemical ones. It was found that NLS increases the pitting resistance of 304 stainless steel, with possible complete inhibition at high NLS concentration (30 mM). Adsorption of NLS on 304 stainless steel particles was directly measured. NLS adsorbs significantly on 304 stainless steel with maximum adsorption density close to bilayer coverage. Electrophoretic mobility data for 304 stainless steel particles show that the surface of 304 stainless steel is negative in NaCl solution at neutral pH. The adsorption of NLS makes the interfacial charge even more negative. The relationship between pitting inhibition and adsorption density of NLS suggests that NLS does not adsorb preferentially on the pit nucleation sites and complete inhibition requires that the whole surface be covered completely by NLS. The inhibition mechanism of NLS is proposed to be due mainly to the blocking effect of a negatively charged NLS adsorption layer. This study shows that in addition to the adsorption amount of surfactant, interfacial charge also plays an important role in pitting inhibition. PMID:12651137

  15. Effect of Nanosize Yittria and Tungsten Addition to Duplex Stainless Steel During High Energy Planetary Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, A. K.; Shashanka, R.; Chaira, D.

    2016-02-01

    In this present investigation, elemental powders of duplex stainless steel composition (Fe-18Cr-13Ni) with 1 wt. % nano yittria and tungsten were milled separately in dual drive planetary mill (DDPM) for 10 h to fabricate yittria dispersed and tungsten dispersed duplex stainless steel powders. The milled powder samples were characterized by X-Ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study the size, morphology and phase evolution during milling. The gradual transformation from ferrite to austenite is evident from XRD spectra during milling. The crystallite size and lattice strain of yittria dispersed duplex stainless steel after 10 h milling were found to be 7 nm and 1.1% respectively. The crystallite size of tungsten dispersed duplex stainless steel was 5 nm. It has been observed from SEM analysis that particles size has been reduced from 40 to 5 μm in both cases. Annealing of 10 h milled powder was performed at 750°C for 1 h under argon atmosphere to study phase transformation in both yittria and tungsten dispersed duplex stainless steel. The XRD analysis of annealed stainless steel depicts the phase transformation from α-Fe to γ-Fe with the formation of oxides of Y,Fe and Cr. The differential scanning calorimetry analysis was conducted by heating the milled powder from room temperature to 1200°C under argon atmosphere to investigate the thermal analysis of both the stainless steel powders.

  16. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Hot Isostatically Pressed-Produced Stainless Steel/High Alloy Tool Steel Compound Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindwall, Greta; Flyg, Jesper; Frisk, Karin; Sandberg, Odd

    2011-05-01

    Consolidation of tool steel powders and simultaneous joining to a stainless 316L steel are performed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Two tool steel grades are considered: a high vanadium alloyed carbon tool steel, and a high vanadium and chromium alloyed nitrogen tool steel. The boundary layer arising during diffusion bonding is in focus and, in particular, the diffusion of carbon and nitrogen over the joint. Measurements of the elemental concentration profiles and corrosion tests by the double loop-electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) method are performed. Comparative calculations with the DICTRA software are performed and are found to be in agreement with the experimental results. It is found that the carbon tool steel grade has a more critical influence on the corrosion resistance of the stainless 316L steel in comparison to the nitrogen tool steel grade.

  17. Effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue lives of austenitic stainless steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.

    1998-01-13

    Fatigue tests have been conducted on Types 304 and 316NG stainless steels to evaluate the effects of various material and loading variables, e.g., steel type, strain rate, dissolved oxygen (DO) in water, and strain range, on the fatigue lives of these steels. The results confirm significant decreases in fatigue life in water. Unlike the situation with ferritic steels, environmental effects on Types 304 and 316NG stainless steel are more pronounced in low-DO than in high-DO water. Experimental results have been compared with estimates of fatigue life based on a statistical model. The formation and growth of fatigue cracks in air and water environments are discussed.

  18. A historical prospective study of European stainless steel, mild steel, and shipyard welders.

    PubMed Central

    Simonato, L; Fletcher, A C; Andersen, A; Anderson, K; Becker, N; Chang-Claude, J; Ferro, G; Gérin, M; Gray, C N; Hansen, K S

    1991-01-01

    A multicentre cohort of 11,092 male welders from 135 companies located in nine European countries has been assembled with the aim of investigating the relation of potential cancer risk, lung cancer in particular, with occupational exposure. The observation period and the criteria for inclusion of welders varied from country to country. Follow up was successful for 96.9% of the cohort and observed numbers of deaths (and for some countries incident cancer cases) were compared with expected numbers calculated from national reference rates. Mortality and cancer incidence ratios were analysed by cause category, time since first exposure, duration of employment, and estimated cumulative dose to total fumes, chromium (Cr), Cr VI, and nickel (Ni). Overall a statistically significant excess was reported for mortality from lung cancer (116 observed v 86.81 expected deaths, SMR = 134). When analysed by type of welding an increasing pattern with time since first exposure was present for both mild steel and stainless steel welders, which was more noticeable for the subcohort of predominantly stainless steel welders. No clear relation was apparent between mortality from lung cancer and duration of exposure to or estimated cumulative dose of Ni or Cr. Whereas the patterns of lung cancer mortality in these results suggest that the risk of lung cancer is higher for stainless steel than mild steel welders the different level of risk for these two categories of welding exposure cannot be quantified with precision. The report of five deaths from pleural mesothelioma unrelated to the type of welding draws attention to the risk of exposure to asbestos in welding activities. PMID:2015204

  19. Assessment of hydrophobicity and roughness of stainless steel adhered by an isolate of Bacillus cereus from a dairy plant

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes, Patrícia Campos; de Andrade, Nélio José; Ferreira, Sukarno Olavo; de Sá, João Paulo Natalino; Araújo, Emiliane Andrade; Delatorre, Deyse Maria Zanom; Luiz, Lívia Maria Pinheiro

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between the surface of stainless steel and Bacillus cereus was studied in terms of the characteristics of interfacial interaction determined from the measurement of the contact angle of the surface of B. cereus and stainless steel in the presence or absence of B. cereus adherence. The microtopographies and the roughness of the surface of stainless steel and stainless steel adhered by B. cereus were evaluated with the help of atomic force microscopy and perfilometry. The strain of B. cereus studied was considered hydrophilic, whereas the stainless steel was considered hydrophobic. The adhesion was not thermodynamically favorable (ΔGadhesion > 0) between the stainless steel and the strain of B. cereus studied. Thus, the interaction between them was not favored by the thermodynamic aspect of adhesion. There was no difference (p > 0.05) in the roughness of the surfaces of stainless steel adhered by B. cereus when analyzed by atomic force microscope and perfilometry. PMID:24031578

  20. Martensitic stainless steel seamless linepipe with superior weldability and CO{sub 2} corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Y.; Kimura, M.; Koseki, T.; Toyooka, T.; Murase, F.

    1997-08-01

    Two types of new martensitic stainless steel with good weldability and superior corrosion resistance have been developed for line pipe application. Both steels are suitable for welding without preheating owing to lowering C and N contents, and they show good low temperature toughness in welds without PWHT. One is applied to sweet environments. It gives better resistance to CO{sub 2} corrosion than the 13Cr martensitic stainless steel for OCTG. Lowering C and addition of Ni contribute to reduction of general corrosion rate in the CO{sub 2} environment. The addition of Cu improves the pitting resistance. The other is applied to light sour environments. It gives good SSC resistance in welds owing to the improvement of the pitting resistance due to Mo addition. The seamless pipes of these martensitic stainless steels are applicable as substitutes for a part of duplex stainless steel flow lines.

  1. Mechanical and Microstructural Characterization of an Aluminum Bearing Trip Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsalve, Alberto; Guzmán, Alexis; De Barbieri, Flavio; Artigas, Alfredo; Carvajal, Linton; Bustos, Oscar; Garza-Montes-de Oca, Nelson F.; Colás, Rafael

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of a steel able to sustain the TRIP-effect were studied. The material was prepared by taking in mind the partial substitution of silicon by aluminum following a processing route that included hot forging, hot and cold rolling, intercritical annealing, and a final bainitic isothermal treatment. The mechanical properties that were obtained resulted to be above those of commercial a 780 TRIP steel. The TRIP phenomenon was confirmed by the change in retained austenite before and after deforming the steel; X-ray diffraction was used to evaluate the volume content of retained austenite. Formability of the steel under study can be rationalized in terms of the texture developed in the material.

  2. The effect of a tin barrier layer on the permeability of hydrogen through mild steel and ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bowker, J.; Piercy, G.R.

    1984-11-01

    Experiments were performed to measure the effectiveness of a commercially electroplated tin layer as a barrier to hydrogen, and to see how this altered when the tin layer was converted to FeSn. The authors measured the permeability of hydrogen through AISI 410 ferritic stainless steel and determined the effectiveness of tin as a surface barrier on it. The measured values for the permeability of hydrogen in iron and ferritic stainless steel are shown.

  3. 76 FR 12044 - Stainless Steel Bar From India: Preliminary Results of, and Partial Rescission of, the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ...The Department of Commerce (``Department'') is conducting an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar (``SS Bar'') from India for the period of review (``POR'') February 1, 2009, through January 31, 2010. The Department initiated this review of Facor Steels Ltd./Ferro Alloys Corporation, Ltd. (``Facor''); Mukand, Ltd. (``Mukand''); India Steel Works, Limited......

  4. Study of biocompatibility of medical grade high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Menghua; Yin, Tieying; Wang, Yazhou; Du, Feifei; Zou, Xingzheng; Gregersen, Hans; Wang, Guixue

    2014-10-01

    Adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the living organism have resulted in development of high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also improves steel properties. The cell cytocompatibility, blood compatibility and cell response of high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel were studied in vitro. The mechanical properties and microstructure of this stainless steel were compared to the currently used 316L stainless steel. It was shown that the new steel material had comparable basic mechanical properties to 316L stainless steel and preserved the single austenite organization. The cell toxicity test showed no significant toxic side effects for MC3T3-E1 cells compared to nitinol alloy. Cell adhesion testing showed that the number of MC3T3-E1 cells was more than that on nitinol alloy and the cells grew in good condition. The hemolysis rate was lower than the national standard of 5% without influence on platelets. The total intracellular protein content and ALP activity and quantification of mineralization showed good cell response. We conclude that the high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel is a promising new biomedical material for coronary stent development. PMID:25175259

  5. Strain oxidation cracking of austenitic stainless steels at 610 C

    SciTech Connect

    Calvar, M. Le; Scott, P.M.; Magnin, T.; Rieux, P.

    1998-02-01

    Strain oxidation cracking of both forged and welded austenitic stainless steels (SS) was studied. Creep and slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were performed in vacuum, air, and a gas furnace environment (air + carbon dioxide [CO{sub 2}] + water [H{sub 2}O]). Results showed cracking was environmentally dependent. Almost no cracking was observed in vacuum, whereas intergranular cracking was observed with increasing severity in passing from an air to a gas furnace environment. The most severe cracking was associated with formation of a less protective film formed in the gas furnace environment (air: haematite-like M{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide; gas furnace environment: spinel M{sub 3}O{sub 4} oxide). Cracking depended strongly on the carbon content and the sensitization susceptibility of the material: the higher the carbon content, the more susceptible the alloy. This cracking was believed to be similar to other oxidation-induced cracking phenomena.

  6. Surface analysis of stainless steel outer race bearing specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, D. K.; Hand, H. M.

    1991-10-01

    The results of analysis of R-4 stainless steel instrument bearings, subjected to various wear cycles, are reported to describe the fate of a synthetic Schiff base lubricant additive at the bearing wear track surfaces. The surfaces were monitored by x-ray, photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to characterize all lubricant (and grease) species of interest. The data indicate a general modification or degradation of both the lubricant and ubiquitous fluorinated grease ('Kryto-x') additive during the wear stages. Chemical and structural compositions are described for residual derivatives at the bearing track surfaces. Further studies are recommended that will enable confirmation of both the chemical fate and the molecular mechanism of lubricant additives candidates.

  7. Acid neutralisation capacity of accelerated carbonated stainless steel slag.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D C; MacLeod, C L; Hills, C D

    2003-05-01

    The acid neutralisation capacity test is widely used to assess the long-term performance of waste materials prior to disposal. Samples of fixed mass are exposed to increasing additions of nitric add in sealed containers and the resultant pH is plotted as a titration curve. In this work, the add neutralisation capacity test was used in the assessment of an accelerated carbonated stainless steel slag. Difficulties arose in applying the test procedure to this material. This was largely because of the raised pressure from significant volumes of released carbon dioxide trapped in the sealed sample containers, causing an alteration to leachate pH values. Consequently, the add neutralisation capacity test was modified to enable testing of samples in equilibrium with the atmosphere. No adverse effects on the results from testing of a carbonate free material were recorded. PMID:12803247

  8. Fracture properties evaluation of stainless steel piping for LBB applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.J.; Seok, C.S.; Chang, Y.S.

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the material properties of SA312 TP316 and SA312 TP304 stainless steels and their associated welds manufactured for shutdown cooling line and safety injection line of nuclear generating stations. A total of 82 tensile tests and 58 fracture toughness tests on specimens taken from actual pipes were performed and the effect of various parameters such as the pipe size, the specimen orientation, the test temperature and the welding procedure on the material properties are discussed. Test results show that the effect of the test temperature on the fracture toughness was significant while the effects of the pipe size and the specimen orientation on the fracture toughness were negligible. The material properties of the GTAW weld metal was in general higher than those of the base metal.

  9. Laser surface modification of stainless steels for cavitation erosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Chi Tat

    1999-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steel UNS S31603 (Fe -17.6Cr -11.2Ni -2.5Mo -1.4Mn -0.4Si -0.03C) has higher pitting corrosion resistance but lower cavitation erosion resistance than that of UNS S30400. This is because of its lower tendency for strain induced martensitic transformation and higher stacking fault energy as compared with those of UNS S30400. In order to improve its cavitation erosion resistance, surface modification of S31603 was performed by laser surface melting and laser surface alloying using a 2-kW CW Nd-YAG laser and a 3-kW CW CO2 laser. For laser surface melting, austenitic stainless steel UNS S30400, super duplex stainless steel UNS S32760 and martensitic stainless steel UNS S42000 were also investigated for comparison purpose. For laser surface alloying, alloying materials including various elements (Co, Cr, Ni, Mo, Mn, Si & C), alloys (AlSiFe & NiCrSiB), ceramics (Si3N 4, SiC, Cr3C2, TiC, CrB & Cr2O 3) and alloys-ceramics (Co-WC, Ni-WC, Ni-Al2O3, Ni-Cr2C3) were used to modify the surface of S31603. The alloyed surface was achieved first by flame spraying or pre-placing of the alloy powder on the S31603 surface and then followed by laser surface remelting. The cavitation erosion characteristics of laser surface modified specimens in 3.5% NaCl solution at 23°C were studied by means of a 20-kHz ultrasonic vibrator at a peak-to-peak amplitude of 30 mum. In addition, their pitting corrosion behaviour was evaluated by electrochemical techniques. The microstructures, compositions, phase changes and damage mechanisms under cavitation erosion were investigated by optical microscopy, SEM, EDAX and X-ray diffractometry. Mechanical properties such as microhardness profile were also examined. The cavitation erosion resistance Re (reciprocal of the mean depth of penetration rate) of laser surface melted S31603 was found to be improved by 22% and was attributed to the existence of tensile residual stress. Improvement on the Re of S42000 was found to be 8.5 times

  10. Hydrogen effects in duplex stainless steel welded joints - electrochemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalska, J.; Łabanowski, J.; Ćwiek, J.

    2012-05-01

    In this work results on the influence of hydrogen on passivity and corrosion resistance of 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) welded joints are described. The results were discussed by taking into account three different areas on the welded joint: weld metal (WM), heat-affected zone (HAZ) and parent metal. The corrosion resistance was qualified with the polarization curves registered in a synthetic sea water. The conclusion is that, hydrogen may seriously deteriorate the passive film stability and corrosion resistance to pitting of 2205 DSS welded joints. The presence of hydrogen in passive films increases corrosion current density and decreases the potential of the film breakdown. It was also found that degree of susceptibility to hydrogen degradation was dependent on the hydrogen charging conditions. WM region has been revealed as the most sensitive to hydrogen action.

  11. Electromagnetic non-destructive technique for duplex stainless steel characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, João Vicente; Camerini, Cesar; Pereira, Gabriela

    2016-02-01

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) is a two-phase (ferrite and austenite) material, which exhibits an attractive combination of mechanical properties and high corrosion resistance, being commonly employed for equipment of petrochemical plants, refining units and oil & gas platforms. The best properties of DSS are achieved when the phases are in equal proportions. However, exposition to high temperatures (e.g. welding process) may entail undesired consequences, such as deleterious phases precipitation (e.g. sigma, chi) and different proportion of the original phases, impairing dramatically the mechanical and corrosion properties of the material. A detailed study of the magnetic behavior of DSS microstructure with different ferrite austenite ratios and deleterious phases content was accomplished. The non destructive method evaluates the electromagnetic properties changes in the material and is capable to identify the presence of deleterious phases into DSS microstructure.

  12. Crevice and pitting corrosion behavior of stainless steels in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Zaragoza-Ayala, A.E.; Orozco-Cruz, R.

    1999-11-01

    Pitting and crevice corrosion tests in natural seawater were performed on a series of stainless steels (i.e., S31603, N08904, S32304, S31803, S32520, N08925 and S31266) in order to determine their resistance to these types of localized corrosion. Open circuit potential (OCP) measurements for these alloys show for short exposure times an ennoblement in the OCP. After a certain time, occasional fall and rise in the OCP values was observed, which can be related to nucleation and repassivation of pits and/or crevices on the metal surface. Analysis of the electrochemical behavior and microscopic observations shows that only S31603 and S32304 alloys were susceptible to crevice and pitting corrosion, whereas the remaining alloys exhibited good resistance. Pitting potentials determined by the potentiodynamic technique also show S3 1603 and S32304 are susceptible to pitting corrosion under the experimental conditions used in this work.

  13. Formability analysis of austenitic stainless steel-304 under warm conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lade, Jayahari; Singh, Swadesh Kumar; Banoth, Balu Naik; Gupta, Amit Kumar

    2013-12-01

    A warm deep drawing process of austenitic stainless steel-304 (ASS-304) of circular blanks with coupled ther mal analysis is studied in this article. 65 mm blanks were deep drawn at different temperatures and thickness distribution is experimentally measured after cutting the drawn component into two halves. The process is simulated using explicit fin ite element code LS-DYNA. A Barlat 3 parameter model is used in the simulation, as the material is anisotropic up to 30 0°C. Material properties for the simulation are determined at different temperatures using a 5 T UTM coupled with a furn ace. In this analysis constant punch speed and variable blank holder force (BHF) is applied to draw cups without wrinkle.

  14. Temporal stability of polar organic compounds in stainless steel canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Pate, B.; Jayanty, R.K.M.; Peterson, M.R. ); Evans, G.F. )

    1992-04-01

    Because of considerable interest at US EPA for the collection of polar organic compounds in stainless steel canisters, particularly for the Toxic Air Monitoring Site (TAMS) study, the stability of 10 selected polar organics in canisters was investigated and the results are described in this paper. The polar organic compounds selected for this stability study were: methanol, acetone, isoprene, acrylonitrile, vinyl acetate, methyl ethyl ketone, t-butyl methyl ether, ethyl acetate, n-butanol, and ethyl acrylate. Two nonpolar compounds, methyl chloroform and toluene, shown to be stable in previous work were included in the stability study as controls. The compounds were loaded in unpolished and Summa-polished canisters at parts-per-billion (ppb) levels under dry and humid conditions. The canister samples were analyzed on Days 0, 1, 3, 4, 14, and 31 after loading. The experimental procedures and stability results are summarized briefly.

  15. Evaluation of Alternate Stainless Steel Surface Passivation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Elliot A.

    2005-05-31

    Stainless steel containers were assembled from parts passivated by four commercial vendors using three passivation methods. The performance of these containers in storing hydrogen isotope mixtures was evaluated by monitoring the composition of initially 50% H{sub 2} 50% D{sub 2} gas with time using mass spectroscopy. Commercial passivation by electropolishing appears to result in surfaces that do not catalyze hydrogen isotope exchange. This method of surface passivation shows promise for tritium service, and should be studied further and considered for use. On the other hand, nitric acid passivation and citric acid passivation may not result in surfaces that do not catalyze the isotope exchange reaction H{sub 2} + D{sub 2} {yields} 2HD. These methods should not be considered to replace the proprietary passivation processes of the two current vendors used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facility.

  16. Decontamination of actinides and fission products from stainless steel surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mertz, C.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Chen, L.; Conner, C.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Drockelman, D.; Kaminski, M.; Landsberger, S.; Stubbins, J.

    1996-04-01

    Seven in situ decontamination processes were evaluated as possible candidates to reduce radioactivity levels in nuclear facilities throughout the DOE complex. These processes were tested using stainless steel coupons (Type 304) contaminated with actinides (Pu and Am) or fission products (a mixture of Cs, Sr, and Gd). The seven processes were decontamination with nitric acid, nitric acid plus hydrofluoric acid, fluoboric acid, silver(II) persulfate, hydrogen peroxide plus oxalic acid plus hydrofluoric acid, alkaline persulfate followed by citric acid plus oxalic acid, and electropolishing using nitric acid electrolyte. Of the seven processes, the nitric acid plus hydrofluoric acid and fluoboric acid solutions gave the best results; the decontamination factors for 3- to 6-h contacts at 80{degree}C were as high as 600 for plutonium, 5500 for americium, 700 for cesium, 15000 for strontium, and 1100 for gadolinium.

  17. Outgassing characteristics and microstructure of an electropolished stainless steel surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, N.; Sato, T.; Adachi, S.; Kanazawa, T. )

    1990-03-01

    Outgassing characteristics of an electropolished stainless steel (304) pipe wall were investigated by an isolation method. The free outgassing rate after an {ital in} {ital situ} bakeout (150 {degree}C, 20 h) was estimated as low as 1.6{times}10{sup {minus}12} Pa l s{sup {minus}1}cm{sup {minus}2}. After the {ital in} {ital situ} bakeout, H{sub 2} molecules were steadily evolved from the pipe wall, whereas most of CO, C, CH{sub 4}, and CO{sub 2} molecules were emitted from the operating mass spectrometer and Bayard--Alpert gauge with incandescent filaments. Auger depth profile analysis revealed that the oxide layer of an electropolished surface was cleaner, thinner, and finer in microstructure than that of a buff-polished surface. This is the reason why an electropolished surface showed a very low outgassing rate.

  18. Fibrinogen adsorption onto 316L stainless steel, Nitinol and titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhijun; Filiaggi, M. J.; Dahn, J. R.

    2009-03-01

    Fibrinogen adsorption onto mechanically polished biomedical grade 316L stainless steel (316LSS), nickel titanium alloy (Nitinol) and commercially pure titanium (CpTi) surfaces were studied by measurements of adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics using an ex-situ wavelength dispersive spectroscopy technique (WDS). Surface composition, roughness and wettability of these materials were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle (WCA) measurements. Adsorption isotherm results showed that surface protein concentration on these materials increased with increasing concentration of fibrinogen in phosphate buffer solution. The fibrinogen adsorption isotherms were modeled by both the monolayer Langmuir isotherm and the multilayer Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) isotherm. The results strongly suggest that fibrinogen forms multilayer structures on these materials when the concentration in solution is high. Complementary measurements on the absorbed fibrinogen films by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) support this view.

  19. Cryogenic testing of fluoropolymer-coated stainless steel tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, J.B.

    1989-11-01

    Stainless steel tubing coated internally with two different types of fluorinated polymers were subjected to microscopic examination after a welding operation had been performed on the tubing. The welded assemblies were photographed and subjected to repeated cycles between liquid helium and room temperature. The green tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) coating peeled back in the area subjected to welding heat and displayed cracking all over its surface without regard to proximity to the weld area. The dark fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) coating showed a tendency to char or burn away progressively in the weld area. The dark (FEP) coating did not crack as extensively as the green TFE coating, but did show a few areas of crazing'' or cracking of the topmost surface after cryogenic exposure. 12 figs.

  20. Plastic anisotropy in a superplastic duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.L.; Bate, P.S.

    1997-07-01

    Measurements of the plastic anisotropy in uniaxial tension of the duplex stainless steel, SAF2304, have been made at room temperature and under conditions where the material was superplastic. There was significant plastic anisotropy in both types of deformation and there were some similarities between the low and high temperature variations with tensile axis orientation. Although it was possible to model the high temperature anisotropy using a grain boundary sliding model, the assumed distribution of sliding boundaries was considered to be unrealistic. This, together with aspects of microstructural and textural development, indicated that deformation was principally occurring by intragranular slip with a significant contribution caused by mechanical inhomogeneity in the two-phase material.