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Sample records for standard atomic weight

  1. How Good Are the Standard Atomic Weights?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peiser, H. Steffen

    1985-01-01

    This review of standard atomic weights is written chiefly for chemical analysts who may place too much confidence in the accuracy of these values. Topics considered include Frank Clarke's atomic weights, effects of radioactivity and other anomalies in isotopic abundance, atomic weight limitations from experimental uncertainties, and others. (JN)

  2. STANDARD ATOMIC WEIGHT VALUES FOR THE MONONUCLIDIC ELEMENTS - 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2001-06-29

    Atomic Mass Evaluations have had a major impact on the values of the atomic weights for the twenty mononuclidic elements plus two elements, Thorium and Protactinium, which have no stable nuclides but a characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition. This paper reviews the history of the atomic weight values of these elements in the years, since the reference mass standard changed from {sup 16}O to {sup 12}C. There is a problem for Thorium, which is considered to have an abundance value of 100%, but is not treated as such in the Standard Atomic Weights' Table. Recommendations for handling the Standard Atomic Weight values for 2001 are presented.

  3. STANDARD ATOMIC WEIGHT VALUES FOR THE MONONUCLIDIC ELEMENTS - 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-08-13

    When the policy for determining the atomic weight values for the mononuclidic elements was changed some decades ago, it was argued that new atomic mass tables would only be produced about once a decade. Since 1977, the average has been once every nine years, which is consistent with that early estimate. This report summarizes the changes over the years for the atomic weight values of the mononuclidic elements. It applies the Commission's technical rules to the latest atomic mass table and recommends changes in the values of the Standard Atomic Weights for eleven of the twenty-two for the TSAW.

  4. RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS IN THE STANDARD ATOMIC WEIGHTS TABLE

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.; Holden, N.; Holden,N.E.

    2011-07-27

    , from which an atomic weight value could be calculated to five or more figure accuracy, without prior knowledge of the sample involved. These elements were again listed in the Atomic Weights Table with no further information, i.e., with no mass number or atomic weight value. For the elements, which have no stable characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition, the data on the half-lives and the relative atomic masses for the nuclides of interest for those elements have been evaluated. The values of the half-lives with their uncertainties are listed in the table. The uncertainties are given for the last digit quoted of the half-life and are given in parentheses. A half-life entry for the Table having a value and an uncertainty of 7 {+-} 3 is listed in the half-life column as 7 (3). The criteria to include data in this Table, is to be the same as it has been for over sixty years. It is the same criteria, which are used for all data that are evaluated for inclusion in the Standard Table of Atomic Weights. If a report of data is published in a peer-reviewed journal, that data is evaluated and considered for inclusion in the appropriate table of the biennial report of the Atomic Weights Commission. As better data becomes available in the future, the information that is contained in either of the Tables of Standard Atomic Weights or in the Table of Radioactive Elements may be modified. It should be noted that the appearance of any datum in the Table of the Radioactive Elements is merely for the purposes of calculating an atomic mass value for any sample of a radioactive material, which might have a variety of isotopic compositions and it has no implication as to the priority for claiming discovery of a given element and is not intended to. The atomic mass values have been taken primarily from the 2003 Atomic Mass Table. Mass values for those radioisotopes that do not appear in the 2003 Atomic mass Table have been taken from preliminary data of the Atomic Mass Data Center

  5. Radioactive Elements in the Standard Atomic Weights Table.

    SciTech Connect

    Holden,N.E.

    2007-08-04

    In the 1949 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, a series of new elements were added to the Atomic Weights Table. Since these elements had been produced in the laboratory and were not discovered in nature, the atomic weight value of these artificial products would depend upon the production method. Since atomic weight is a property of an element as it occurs in nature, it would be incorrect to assign an atomic weight value to that element. As a result of that discussion, the Commission decided to provide only the mass number of the most stable (or longest-lived) known isotope as the number to be associated with these entries in the Atomic Weights Table. As a function of time, the mass number associated with various elements has changed as longer-lived isotopes of a particular element has been found in nature, or as improved half-life values of an element's isotopes might cause a shift in the longest-lived isotope from one mass to another. In the 1957 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, it was decided to discontinue the listing of the mass number in the Atomic Weights Table on the grounds that the kind of information supplied by the mass number is inconsistent with the primary purpose of the Table, i.e., to provide accurate values of 'these constants' for use in various chemical calculations. In addition to the Table of Atomic Weights, the Commission included an auxiliary Table of Radioactive Elements for the first time, where the entry would be the isotope of that element which was the most stable, i.e., the one with the longest known half-life. In their 1973 Report, the Commission noted that the users of the main Table of Atomic Weights were dissatisfied with the omission of values for some elements in that Table and it was decided to reintroduce the mass number for the radioactive elements into the main Table. In their 1983 Report, the Commission decided that radioactive elements were considered to lack a characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition

  6. STANDARD ATOMIC WEIGHTS TABLES 2007 ABRIDGED TO FOUR AND FIVE SIGNIFICANT FIGURES.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2007-08-01

    In response to a recommendation to the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights (CIAAW) that abridged versions of the Table on Standard Atomic Weights be prepared and published, this report has been prepared. A brief history is presented of such Atomic Weight tables that have been abridged to four significant figures and to five significant figures are noted. Tables of Standard Atomic Weight values abridged to four places and five places from the official 2007 Table of Atomic Weights approved by CIAAW are included.

  7. Forecast of Standard Atomic Weights for the Mononuclidic Elements – 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.; Holden, N.; Holden,N.E.

    2011-07-27

    In this short report, I will provide an early warning about potential changes to the standard atomic weight values for the twenty mononuclidic and the so-called pseudo-mononuclidic ({sup 232}Th and {sup 231}Pa) chemical elements due to the estimated changes in the mass values to be published in the next Atomic Mass Tables within the next two years. There have been many new measurements of atomic masses, since the last published Atomic Mass Table. The Atomic Mass Data Center has released an unpublished version of the present status of the atomic mass values as a private communication. We can not update the Standard Atomic Weight Table at this time based on these unpublished values but we can anticipate how many changes are probably going to be expected in the next few years on the basis of the forthcoming publication of the Atomic Mass Table. I will briefly discuss the procedures that the Atomic Weights Commission used in deriving the recommended Standard Atomic Weight values and their uncertainties from the atomic mass values. I will also discuss some concern raised about a proposed change in the definition of the mole. The definition of the mole is now connected directly to the mass of a {sup 12}C isotope (which is defined as 12 exactly) and to the kilogram. A change in the definition of the mole will probably impact the mass of {sup 12}C.

  8. Atomic weights in gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Veen, Adriaan M. H.; Hafner, Katarina

    2014-02-01

    The publication of the standard atomic weights of 2009 by IUPAC raised the question of to what extent these changes affect the calculated composition of reference and calibration gas mixtures and the associated measurement uncertainty. The smallest uncertainties are attainable in the gravimetric gas mixture preparation, so the assessment was made for this technique. For the first time, the uncertainty contributions to the overall budget due to weighing, molecular weights, and composition of the parent gases are reported separately. The calculations show that even with the standard atomic weights of 2007, the uncertainty contribution due to the molecular weights can be of the same order as that due to weighing. The standard atomic weights of 2009 and 2011, when used under the same assumptions, increase the uncertainties of the amount-of-substance fractions of the abundant components from high-purity parent gases sometimes appreciably. Based on these calculations and the fact that the atomic weight intervals include sources that are unlikely to be generally relevant for measurements supporting trade, commerce, health and safety, there is a need to make a more in-depth analysis of the atomic weights used in calculations, and to reflect the knowledge about the isotopic composition of relevant materials in the value assignment and uncertainty calculation.

  9. Correctly Expressing Atomic Weights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolini, Moreno; Cercignani, Giovanni; Bauer, Carlo

    2000-11-01

    Very often, atomic or molecular weights are expressed as dimensionless quantities, but although the historical importance of their definition as "pure numbers" is acknowledged, it is inconsistent with experimental formulas and with the theory of measure in general. Here, we propose on the basis of clear-cut formulas that, contrary to customary statements, atomic and molecular weights should be expressed as dimensional quantities (masses) in which the Dalton (= 1.663 x 10-24 g) is taken as the unit.

  10. Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 144 Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions (Web, free access)   The atomic weights are available for elements 1 through 111, and isotopic compositions or abundances are given when appropriate.

  11. Atomic weights of the elements 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.

    2001-01-01

    The biennial review of atomic-weight, Ar(E), determinations and other cognate data have resulted in changes for the standard atomic weights of the following elements: Presented are updated tables of the standard atomic weights and their uncertainties estimated by combining experimental uncertainties and terrestrial variabilities. In addition, this report again contains an updated table of relative atomic-mass values and half-lives of selected radioisotopes. Changes in the evaluated isotopic abundance values from those published in 1997 are so minor that an updated list will not be published for the year 1999. Many elements have a different isotopic composition in some nonterrestrial materials. Some recent data on parent nuclides that might affect isotopic abundances or atomic-weight values are included in this report for the information of the interested scientific community.

  12. Atomic weights: no longer constants of nature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Holden, Norman E.

    2011-01-01

    Many of us were taught that the standard atomic weights we found in the back of our chemistry textbooks or on the Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements hanging on the wall of our chemistry classroom are constants of nature. This was common knowledge for more than a century and a half, but not anymore. The following text explains how advances in chemical instrumentation and isotopic analysis have changed the way we view atomic weights and why they are no longer constants of nature

  13. Atomic Weights No Longer Constants of Nature

    SciTech Connect

    Coplen, T.B.; Holden, N.

    2011-03-01

    Many of us grew up being taught that the standard atomic weights we found in the back of our chemistry textbooks or on the Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements hanging on the wall of our chemistry classroom are constants of nature. This was common knowledge for more than a century and a half, but not anymore. The following text explains how advances in chemical instrumentation and isotopic analysis has changed the way we view atomic weights and why they are no longer constants of nature.

  14. Atomic weights of the elements 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.

    2001-01-01

    The biennial review of atomic-weight, Ar(E), determinations and other cognate data have resulted in changes for the standard atomic weights of the following elements: from to nitrogen 14.006 74??0.000 07 14.0067??0.0002 sulfur 32.066??0.006 32.065??0.005 chlorine 35.4527??0.0009 35.453??0.002 germanium 72.61??0.02 72.64??0.01 xenon 131.29??0.02 131.293??0.006 erbium 167.26??0.03 167.259??0.003 uranium 238.0289??0.0001 238.028 91??0.000 03 Presented are updated tables of the standard atomic weights and their uncertainties estimated by combining experimental uncertainties and terrestrial variabilities. In addition, this report again contains an updated table of relative atomic mass values and half-lives of selected radioisotopes. Changes in the evaluated isotopic abundance values from those published in 1997 are so minor that an updated list will not be published for the year 1999. Many elements have a different isotopic composition in some nonterrestrial materials. Some recent data on parent nuclides that might affect isotopic abundances or atomic-weight values are included in this report for the information of the interested scientific community. ?? 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Atomic Weights of the Elements 2005a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieser, M. E.

    2007-06-01

    The latest evaluation of atomic weight determinations and other cognate data has warranted 16 changes for the standard atomic weights of the elements, Ar(E), from those published previously in the Table of Atomic Weights 2001. The revised standard atomic weight are as follows: Ar(Al)=26.9815386(8), Ar(Bi)=208.98040(1), Ar(Cs)=132.9054519(2), Ar(Co)=58.933195(5), Ar(Au)=196.966569(4), Ar(La)=138.90547(7), Ar(Mn)=54.938045(5), Ar(Nd)=144.242(3), Ar(P)=30.973762(2), Ar(Pt)=195.084(9), Ar(Sm)=150.36(2), Ar(Sc)=44.955912(6), Ar(Na)=22.98976928(2), Ar(Ta)=180.94788(2), Ar(Tb)=158.92535(2), Ar(Th)=232.03806(2). A recommendation is made that δ13C values of all carbon-bearing materials be measured and expressed relative to Vienna-Pee Dee Belemnite on a scale normalized by assigning consensus values of -46.6‰ to L-SVEC lithium carbonate and +1.95‰ to NBS 19 calcium carbonate.

  16. Atomic weights of the elements 2011 (IUPAC Technical Report)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieser, Michael E.; Holden, Norman; Coplen, Tyler B.; Böhlke, John K.; Berglund, Michael; Brand, Willi A.; De Bièvre, Paul; Gröning, Manfred; Loss, Robert D.; Meija, Juris; Hirata, Takafumi; Prohaska, Thomas; Schoenberg, Ronny; O'Connor, Glenda; Walczyk, Thomas; Yoneda, Shige; Zhu, Xiang-Kun

    2013-01-01

    The biennial review of atomic-weight determinations and other cognate data has resulted in changes for the standard atomic weights of five elements. The atomic weight of bromine has changed from 79.904(1) to the interval [79.901, 79.907], germanium from 72.63(1) to 72.630(8), indium from 114.818(3) to 114.818(1), magnesium from 24.3050(6) to the interval [24.304, 24.307], and mercury from 200.59(2) to 200.592(3). For bromine and magnesium, assignment of intervals for the new standard atomic weights reflects the common occurrence of variations in the atomic weights of those elements in normal terrestrial materials.

  17. 7 CFR 51.1863 - Standard weight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Standard weight. 51.1863 Section 51.1863 Agriculture... Standards for Fresh Tomatoes 1 Standard Weight § 51.1863 Standard weight. (a) When packages are marked to a net weight of 15 pounds (6.80 kg) or more, the net weight of the contents shall not be less than...

  18. 7 CFR 51.1863 - Standard weight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Standard weight. 51.1863 Section 51.1863 Agriculture... Standards for Fresh Tomatoes 1 Standard Weight § 51.1863 Standard weight. (a) When packages are marked to a net weight of 15 pounds (6.80 kg) or more, the net weight of the contents shall not be less than...

  19. Atomic weights of the elements 2009 (IUPAC technical report)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieser, M.E.; Coplen, T.B.

    2011-01-01

    The biennial review of atomic-weight determinations and other cognate data has resulted in changes for the standard atomic weights of 11 elements. Many atomic weights are not constants of nature, but depend upon the physical, chemical, and nuclear history of the material. The standard atomic weights of 10 elements having two or more stable isotopes have been changed to reflect this variability of atomic-weight values in natural terrestrial materials. To emphasize the fact that these standard atomic weights are not constants of nature, each atomic-weight value is expressed as an interval. The interval is used together with the symbol [a; b] to denote the set of atomic-weight values, Ar(E), of element E in normal materials for which a ≤ Ar(E) ≤ b. The symbols a and b denote the bounds of the interval [a; b]. The revised atomic weight of hydrogen, Ar(H), is [1.007 84; 1.008 11] from 1.007 94(7); lithium, Ar(Li), is [6.938; 6.997] from 6.941(2); boron, Ar(B), is [10.806; 10.821] from 10.811(7); carbon, Ar(C), is [12.0096; 12.0116] from 12.0107(8); nitrogen, Ar(N), is [14.006 43; 14.007 28] from 14.0067(2); oxygen, Ar(O), is [15.999 03; 15.999 77] from 15.9994(3); silicon, Ar(Si), is [28.084; 28.086] from 28.0855(3); sulfur, Ar(S), is [32.059; 32.076] from 32.065(2); chlorine, Ar(Cl), is [35.446; 35.457] from 35.453(2); and thallium, Ar(Tl), is [204.382; 204.385] from 204.3833(2). This fundamental change in the presentation of the atomic weights represents an important advance in our knowledge of the natural world and underscores the significance and contributions of chemistry to the well-being of humankind in the International Year of Chemistry 2011. The standard atomic weight of germanium, Ar(Ge), was also changed to 72.63(1) from 72.64(1).

  20. Prospects for atomic frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audoin, C.

    1984-01-01

    The potentialities of different atomic frequency standards which are not yet into field operation, for most of them, but for which preliminary data, obtained in laboratory experiments, give confidence that they may improve greatly the present state of the art are described. The review will mainly cover the following devices: (1) cesium beam frequency standards with optical pumping and detection; (2) optically pumped rubidium cells; (3) magnesium beam; (4) cold hydrogen masers; and (5) traps with stored and cooled ions.

  1. Atomic frequency standards at NICT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ido, T.; Fujieda, M.; Hachisu, H.; Hayasaka, K.; Kajita, M.; Kojima, R.; Kumagai, M.; Locke, C.; Li, Y.; Matsubara, K.; Nogami, A.; Shiga, N.; Yamaguchi, A.; Koyama, Y.; Hosokawa, M.; Hanado, Y.

    2011-10-01

    Various activities of atomic frequency standards studied in National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) are briefly reviewed. After BIPM accepted the first cesium fountain clock in NICT as a reference to determine International Atomic Time (TAI), efforts to further reduce the uncertainty of collision shifts are ongoing. A second fountain clock using atomic molasses is being built to enable the operation with less atomic density. Single ion clock using calcium has been pursued for several years in NICT. The absolute frequency measured in 2008 has CIPM to adopt the Ca+ clock transition as a part of the list of radiation (LoR) to realize the meter. Sr lattice clock has started its operation last year. The absolute frequency agreed well with those obtained in other institutes. Study of stable cavities to stabilize clock lasers are also introduced.

  2. The role of mass spectrometry in atomic weight determinations.

    PubMed

    De Laeter, John R

    2009-01-01

    accurate isotopic measurements. Atomic weights can no longer be regarded as constants of nature, except for the monoisotopic elements whose atomic weights are determined solely by the relative atomic mass of that nuclide. Stable isotope geochemists developed mass spectrometric protocols by the adoption of internationally accepted reference materials for the light elements, to which measurements from various laboratories could be compared. Subsequently, a number of heavy elements such as iron, molybdenum and cadmium have been shown to exhibit isotope fractionation. The magnitude of such isotope fractionation in nature is less than for the light elements, but technological developments, such as multiple collector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, have enabled such fractionation effects to be determined. Measurements of the atomic weights of certain elements affect the determination of important fundamental constants such as the Avogadro Constant, the Faraday Constant and the Universal Gas Constant. Heroic efforts have been made to refine the accuracy of the atomic weight of silicon, with the objective of replacing the SI standard of mass--the kilogram--with the Avogadro Constant. Improvements in these fundamental constants in turn affect the set of self-consistent values of other basic constants through a least-squares adjustment methodology. Absolute isotope abundances also enable the Solar System abundances of the s-, r-, and p-process of nucleosynthesis to be accurately determined, thus placing constraints on theories of heavy element nucleosynthesis. Future developments in the science of atomic weight determinations are also examined. PMID:18785619

  3. Mean Atomic Weight of Chelyabinsk and Olivenza LL5 Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szurgot, M.

    2015-07-01

    Mean atomic weights (Amean) of Chelyabinsk and Olivenza LL5 chondrites have been determined and analysed. Relationship between Fe/Si atomic ratio and mean atomic weight of ordinary chondrites has been established which enables one to predict Amean values.

  4. Primary Atomic Frequency Standards at NIST

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, D. B.; Bergquist, J. C.; Bollinger, J. J.; Drullinger, R. E.; Itano, W. M.; Jefferts, S. R.; Lee, W. D.; Meekhof, D.; Parker, T. E.; Walls, F. L.; Wineland, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    The development of atomic frequency standards at NIST is discussed and three of the key frequency-standard technologies of the current era are described. For each of these technologies, the most recent NIST implementation of the particular type of standard is described in greater detail. The best relative standard uncertainty achieved to date for a NIST frequency standard is 1.5×10−15. The uncertainties of the most recent NIST standards are displayed relative to the uncertainties of atomic frequency standards of several other countries.

  5. Updated Atomic Weights: Time to Review Our Table

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tyler B. Coplen; Holden, Norman E.; Meyers, Fabienne

    2016-04-05

    Many readers might wonder what can be new about atomic weights and why such a subject deserves even a short paper in Chemistry Views magazine. However, despite common belief, atomic weights are not constants of nature. Scientists' ability to measure these values is regularly improving, so one would expect that the accuracy of these values should be improving with time.

  6. THE ATOMIC WEIGHTS COMMISSION AND ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO DETERMINATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-08-07

    Following Thomson's discovery of stable isotopes in non-radioactive chemical elements, the derivation of atomic weight values from mass spectrometric measurements of isotopic abundance ratios moved very slowly. Forty years later, only 3 1/2 % of the recommended values were based on mass spectrometric measurements and only 38% in the first half century. It might be noted that two chemical elements (tellurium and mercury) are still based on chemical measurements, where the atomic weight value calculated from the relative isotopic abundance measurement either agrees with the value from the chemical measurement or the atomic weight value calculated from the relative isotopic abundance measurement falls within the uncertainty of the chemical measurement of the atomic weight. Of the 19 chemical elements, whose atomic weight is based on non-corrected relative isotopic abundance measurements, five of these are two isotope systems (indium, iridium, lanthanum, lutetium and tantalum) and one is a three-isotope system (oxygen).

  7. Ultracold atoms and precise time standards.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Gretchen K; Phillips, William D

    2011-10-28

    Experimental techniques of laser cooling and trapping, along with other cooling techniques, have produced gaseous samples of atoms so cold that they are, for many practical purposes, in the quantum ground state of their centre-of-mass motion. Such low velocities have virtually eliminated effects such as Doppler shifts, relativistic time dilation and observation-time broadening that previously limited the performance of atomic frequency standards. Today, the best laser-cooled, caesium atomic fountain, microwave frequency standards realize the International System of Units (SI) definition of the second to a relative accuracy of ≈3×10(-16). Optical frequency standards, which do not realize the SI second, have even better performance: cold neutral atoms trapped in optical lattices now yield relative systematic uncertainties of ≈1×10(-16), whereas cold-trapped ions have systematic uncertainties of 9×10(-18). We will discuss the current limitations in the performance of neutral atom atomic frequency standards and prospects for the future. PMID:21930566

  8. Atomic frequency standard relativistic Doppler shift experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.; Reinhardt, V. S.

    1974-01-01

    An experiment has been performed to measure possible space anisotropy as it would effect the frequency of a cesium atomic beam standard clock in a laboratory on earth due to motion relative to external coordinate frames. The cesium frequency was measured as a function of orientation with respect to an atomic hydrogen maser standard. Over a period of 34 days 101 measurements were made. The results are consistent with a conclusion that no general orientation dependance attributable to spacial anisotropy was observed. It is shown that both the airplane clock results, and the null results for the atomic beam clock, are consistent with Einstein general or special relativity, or with the Lorentz transformations alone.

  9. NASA atomic hydrogen standards program - An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V. S.; Kaufmann, D. C.; Adams, W. A.; Deluca, J. J.; Soucy, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Some of the design features of NASA hydrogen masers are discussed including the large hydrogen source bulb, the palladium purified, the state selector, the replaceable pumps, the small entrance stem, magnetic shields, the elongated storage bulb, the aluminum cavity, the electronics package, and the autotuner. Attention is also given to the reliability and operating life of these hydrogen atomic standards.

  10. JPL Ultrastable Trapped Ion Atomic Frequency Standards.

    PubMed

    Burt, Eric A; Yi, Lin; Tucker, Blake; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    Recently, room temperature trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on three directions: 1) ultrastable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate stability performance and autonomous timekeeping; 2) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements; and 3) miniature clocks. In this paper, we concentrate on the first direction and present a design and the initial results from a new ultrastable clock referred to as L10 that achieves a short-term stability of 4.5 ×10(-14)/τ(1/2) and an initial measurement of no significant drift with an uncertainty of 2.4 ×10(-16) /day over a two-week period. PMID:27249827

  11. Optical Frequency Standards Based on Neutral Atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riehle, Fritz; Helmcke, Juergen

    The current status and prospects of optical frequency standards based on neutral atomic and molecular absorbers are reviewed. Special attention is given to an optical frequency standard based on cold Ca atoms which are interrogated with a pulsed excitation scheme leading to resolved line structures with a quality factor Q > 10^12. The optical frequency was measured by comparison with PTB's primary clock to be νCa = 455 986 240 494.13 kHz with a total relative uncertainty of 2.5 x10^-13. After a recent recommendation of the International Committee of Weights and Measures (CIPM), this frequency standard now represents one of the most accurate realizations of the length unit.

  12. Primary mass standard based on atomic masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Peter; Gläser, Michael

    2006-04-01

    The paper summarises the activities of several national and international Metrology Institutes in replacing the kilogram artefact, the unit of mass, by the mass of a certain number of atoms, in particular the atomic masses of silicon or bismuth. This task is based on two different experiments: a very accurate determination of the Avogadro constant, NA, measuring the density and lattice parameter of an enriched silicon-28 crystal, and the accumulation of decelerated bismuth-209 ions by using a mass separator. The relative measurement uncertainties reached so far are in the first case 2 parts in 107, and in the latter several part in 104. The bismuth experiment is still in an early state of the work. The ratios between the masses of 28Si or 209Bi, respectively, and the present atomic mass standard, the mass of 12C, can be determined with an accuracy now approaching 10-10 using high precision Penning traps mass spectrometers.

  13. STATUS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS IN THE ATOMIC WEIGHTS TABLE.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2003-08-08

    During discussions within the Inorganic Chemistry Division Committee, that dealt with the Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements and the official IUPAC position on its presentation, the following question was raised. When the various chemical elements are presented, each with their appropriate atomic weight value, how should the radioactive elements be presented? The Atomic Weights Commission has treated this question in a number of different ways during the past century, almost in a random manner. This report reviews the position that the Commission has taken as a function of time, as a prelude to a discussion in Ottawa about how the Commission should resolve this question for the future.

  14. Linear ion trap based atomic frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, Lute

    1991-01-01

    In order to develop a trapped ion-based fieldable frequency standard with stability 1 x 10 to the -13th/sq rt tau for averaging times tau greater than 10,000 s, a hybrid RF/DC linear ion trap was developed which permits storage of large numbers of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the RF confining fields. The authors have confined Hg-199(+) ions in this trap and have measured very high Q transitions with good SNRs. In preliminary measurements they obtained stabilities of 1.6 x 10 to the -13th/sq rt tau (tau between 50 and 800 s) with a 160-mHz wide atomic resonance linewidth and a signal-to-noise ratio of 40 for each measurement cycle. Atomic resonance lines as narrow as 30 mHz on the 40.5-GHz clock transition have been measured with no appreciable reduction in the ion signal. A stability of 7 x 10 to the -14th/sq rt tau is made possible by the signal-to-noise and line Q of this measured transition. Analysis of fundamental sources of frequency instability indicates that a long-term stability of 2 x 10 to the -16th is feasible for this device with existing technology for tau = 10 to the 6th s or more.

  15. Fit to WHO weight standard of European infants over time

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Daniel; Marryat, Louise; Cole, Tim J; McColl, John; Harjunmaa, Ulla; Ashorn, Per; Wright, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The 2006 WHO growth charts were created to provide an international standard for optimal growth, based on healthy, breastfed populations, but it has been suggested that Northern European children fit them poorly. This study uses infant weight data spanning 50 years to determine how well-nourished preschool children from different eras fit the WHO standard, and discuss the implications of deviations. Design Four longitudinal datasets from the UK and one from Finland were used comprising over 8000 children born between1959 and 2003. Weights from birth to 2 years were converted to age–sex-adjusted Z scores using the WHO standard and summarised using Generalized Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape. Results Weights showed a variable fit to the WHO standard. Mean weights for all cohorts were above the WHO median at birth, but dipped by up to 0.5 SD to a nadir at 8 weeks before rising again. Birth weights increased in successive cohorts and the initial dip became slightly shallower. By age 1 year, cohorts were up to 0.75 SD above the WHO median, but there was no consistent pattern by era. Conclusions The WHO standard shows an acceptable, but variable fit for Northern European infants. While birth weights increased over time, there was, unexpectedly, no consistent variation by cohort beyond this initial period. Discrepancies in weight from the standard may reflect differences in measurement protocol and trends in infant feeding practice. PMID:26883079

  16. Innovation and reliability of atomic standards for PTTI applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, R.

    1981-01-01

    Innovation and reliability in hyperfine frequency standards and clock systems are discussed. Hyperfine standards are defined as those precision frequency sources and clocks which use a hyperfine atomic transition for frequency control and which have realized significant commercial production and acceptance (cesium, hydrogen, and rubidium atoms). References to other systems such as thallium and ammonia are excluded since these atomic standards have not been commercially exploited in this country.

  17. Variation in the terrestrial isotopic composition and atomic weight of argon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, John Karl

    2014-01-01

    The isotopic composition and atomic weight of argon (Ar) are variable in terrestrial materials. Those variations are a source of uncertainty in the assignment of standard properties for Ar, but they provide useful information in many areas of science. Variations in the stable isotopic composition and atomic weight of Ar are caused by several different processes, including (1) isotope production from other elements by radioactive decay (radiogenic isotopes) or other nuclear transformations (e.g., nucleogenic isotopes), and (2) isotopic fractionation by physical-chemical processes such as diffusion or phase equilibria. Physical-chemical processes cause correlated mass-dependent variations in the Ar isotope-amount ratios (40Ar/36Ar, 38Ar/36Ar), whereas nuclear transformation processes cause non-mass-dependent variations. While atmospheric Ar can serve as an abundant and homogeneous isotopic reference, deviations from the atmospheric isotopic ratios in other Ar occurrences limit the precision with which a standard atomic weight can be given for Ar. Published data indicate variation of Ar atomic weights in normal terrestrial materials between about 39.7931 and 39.9624. The upper bound of this interval is given by the atomic mass of 40Ar, as some samples contain almost pure radiogenic 40Ar. The lower bound is derived from analyses of pitchblende (uranium mineral) containing large amounts of nucleogenic 36Ar and 38Ar. Within this interval, measurements of different isotope ratios (40Ar/36Ar or 38Ar/36Ar) at various levels of precision are widely used for studies in geochronology, water–rock interaction, atmospheric evolution, and other fields.

  18. Mercury Atomic Frequency Standards for Space Based Navigation and Timekeeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjoelker, R. L.; Burt, E. A.; Chung, S.; Hamell, R. L.; Prestage, J. D.; Tucker, B.; Cash, P.; Lutwak, R.

    2012-01-01

    A low power Mercury Atomic Frequency Standard (MAFS) has been developed and demonstrated on the path towards future space clock applications. A self contained mercury ion breadboard clock: emulating flight clock interfaces, steering a USO local oscillator, and consuming approx 40 Watts has been operating at JPL for more than a year. This complete, modular ion clock instrument demonstrates that key GNSS size, weight, and power (SWaP) requirements can be achieved while still maintaining short and long term performance demonstrated in previous ground ion clocks. The MAFS breadboard serves as a flexible platform for optimizing further space clock development and guides engineering model design trades towards fabrication of an ion clock for space flight.

  19. Magnetic state selection in atomic frequency and time standards. [hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    Atomic standards such as those based upon cesium and hydrogen rely upon magnetic state selection to obtain population inversion in the hyperfine transition levels. Use of new design approaches and improved magnetic materials has made it possible to fabricate improved state selectors of small size, and thus the efficiency of utilization of beam flux is greatly improved and the size and weight of the standard is reduced. The sensitivity to magnetic perturbations is also decreased, so that the accuracy and stability of the standard is improved. Several new state selector designs are illustrated and the application to standards utilizing different atomic species is analyzed.

  20. ISO/GUM UNCERTAINTIES AND CIAAW (UNCERTAINTY TREATMENT FOR RECOMMENDED ATOMIC WEIGHTS AND ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCES)

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2007-07-23

    The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has published a Guide to the expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM). The IUPAC Commission on Isotopic Abundance and Atomic Weight (CIAAW) began attaching uncertainty limits to their recommended values about forty years ago. CIAAW's method for determining and assigning uncertainties has evolved over time. We trace this evolution to their present method and their effort to incorporate the basic ISO/GUM procedures into evaluations of these uncertainties. We discuss some dilemma the CIAAW faces in their present method and whether it is consistent with the application of the ISO/GUM rules. We discuss the attempt to incorporate variations in measured isotope ratios, due to natural fractionation, into the ISO/GUM system. We make some observations about the inconsistent treatment in the incorporation of natural variations into recommended data and uncertainties. A recommendation for expressing atomic weight values using a tabulated range of values for various chemical elements is discussed.

  1. Proposed standard-weight equations for brook trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hyatt, M.W.; Hubert, W.A.

    2001-01-01

    Weight and length data were obtained for 113 populations of brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis across the species' geographic range in North America to estimate a standard-weight (Ws) equation for this species. Estimation was done by applying the regression-line-percentile technique to fish of 120-620 mm total length (TL). The proposed metric-unit (g and mm) equation is log10Ws = -5.186 + 3.103 log10TL; the English-unit (lb and in) equivalent is log10Ws = -3.483 + 3.103 log10TL. No systematic length bias was evident in the relative-weight values calculated from these equations.

  2. Atomic frequency standards for ultra-high-frequency stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.; Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    The general features of the Hg-199(+) trapped-ion frequency standard are outlined and compared to other atomic frequency standards, especially the hydrogen maser. The points discussed are those which make the trapped Hg-199(+) standard attractive: high line Q, reduced sensitivity to external magnetic fields, and simplicity of state selection, among others.

  3. Standard weight (Ws) equations for four rare desert fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Didenko, A.V.; Bonar, Scott A.; Matter, W.J.

    2004-01-01

    Standard weight (Ws) equations have been used extensively to examine body condition in sport fishes. However, development of these equations for nongame fishes has only recently been emphasized. We used the regression-line-percentile technique to develop standard weight equations for four rare desert fishes: flannelmouth sucker Catostomus latipinnis, razorback sucker Xyrauchen texanus, roundtail chub Gila robusta, and humpback chub G. cypha. The Ws equation for flannelmouth suckers of 100-690 mm total length (TL) was developed from 17 populations: log10Ws = -5.180 + 3.068 log10TL. The Ws equation for razorback suckers of 110-885 mm TL was developed from 12 populations: log 10Ws = -4.886 + 2.985 log10TL. The W s equation for roundtail chub of 100-525 mm TL was developed from 20 populations: log10Ws = -5.065 + 3.015 log10TL. The Ws equation for humpback chub of 120-495 mm TL was developed from 9 populations: log10Ws = -5.278 + 3.096 log 10TL. These equations meet criteria for acceptable standard weight indexes and can be used to calculate relative weight, an index of body condition.

  4. Atomic force microscopy studies of surface contamination on stainless steel weights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Högström, R.; Korpelainen, V.; Riski, K.; Heinonen, M.

    2010-12-01

    The SI unit of mass will probably be redefined within the next few years using an invariable natural constant. Nevertheless, dissemination of the kilogram will still be realized by weighing using physical weights prone to contamination. Published data on cleaning, humidity effects and long term stability of weights show large discrepancies, indicating that not all factors affecting adsorption characteristics of weights are known. In the work reported here, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to study surface effects of stainless steel weights at the nanometre scale. Effects of transfer between air and vacuum as well as effects of cleaning were studied by recording topography images of the surface before and after each procedure. An image processing method was developed for improving the sensitivity of detecting changes in images. Ultrasonic cleaning in ethanol removed contamination mainly from the grooves in the surface, while vacuum exposure caused contamination to build up in the grooves. The results show that the surface microstructure of stainless steel weights affects adsorption of contaminants in such a way that grooves seem to be preferential sites for adsorption. AFM has proven to be a valuable tool for studying surface effects of standard weights at ambient pressure with near nanometre resolution.

  5. The problem of frequency weighting functions and standards for birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooling, Robert; Brittan-Powell, Elizabeth; Lauer, Amanda; Dent, Micheal; Noirot, Isabelle

    2005-09-01

    Frequency weighting functions in humans are widely used as a single-figure guess to assess noise problems and aid in making decisions with regard to noise limitations when no other data exist. However, this use of frequency weightings invariably results in a loss of precision in assessing the likelihood of a sound to produce hearing damage or sound annoyance. There is a growing interest in developing frequency weighting functions in animals presumably to assist in judging the risk of hearing damage, interference with acoustic communication, or habitat suitability. Laboratory studies reveal many parallels between humans and animals on a variety of psychoacoustic measures, such as equal loudness contours. However, differences between humans and animals on specific tests argue against using standards developed for humans to gauge the effect of noise on animals. Here we review data which show this same problem exists among birds. That is, the differences in the effects of noise among bird species can be as large as the differences between humans and birds. These results suggest that whereas frequency weighting functions and acoustic standards for a specific species might be useful, generalizing across species is likely not practical.

  6. CAFS: A Cesium Atomic Frequency Standard for GPS block IIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisnia, Jeffry A.

    1993-01-01

    Kernco, Inc. was selected to design the Cesium Atomic Frequency Standards (CAFS) for the GPS Block IIR NAVSTAR satellites. These spacecraft are scheduled to be launched in the mid-1990's to replenish and upgrade the existing constellation of Global Positioning System satellites. The Block IIR CAFS output frequency is 13.4003378 MHz, the 686th submultiple of the cesium atomic resonance frequency. Using an integer submultiple simplifies the design of the atomic frequency standard's rf multiplier circuits, eliminating the secondary frequency synthesizer needed in previous designs. The GPS Block IIR CAFS design, particularly the improvements made on our earlier Block II design is described. Test results are included.

  7. The atomic weight and isotopic composition of boron and their variation in nature

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1993-08-01

    The boron isotopic composition and atomic weight value and their variation in nature are reviewed. Questions are raised about the previously recommended value and the uncertainty for the atomic weight. The problem of what constitutes an acceptable range for normal material and what should then be considered geologically exceptional is discussed. Recent measurements make some previous decisions in need of re-evaluation.

  8. Predicting the Atomic Weights of the Trans-Lawrencium Elements: A Novel Application of Dobereiner's Triads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Sami A.

    2005-01-01

    Johann Wolfgang Dobereiner, in 1829, made the first significant attempt to reveal a relation between the properties of the chemical elements and their atomic weights. His groupings remain useful for providing reasonable estimates for the properties and the atomic weights of the trans-lawrencium elements.

  9. Investigations of laser pumped gas cell atomic frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, C. H.; Camparo, J. C.; Fueholz, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a rubidium gas cell atomic frequency standard might be improved by replacing the standard rubidium discharge lamp with a single mode laser diode. Aspects of the laser pumped gas cell atomic clock studied include effects due to laser intensity, laser detuning, and the choice of the particular atomic absorption line. Results indicate that the performance of the gas cell clock may be improved by judicious choice of the operating parameters of the laser diode. The laser diode also proved to be a valuable tool in investigating the operation of the conventional gas cell clock. Results concerning linewidths, the light shift effect and the effect of isotopic spin exchange in the conventional gas cell clock are reported.

  10. Developing detection efficiency standards for atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosa, Ty J.; Geiser, Brian P.; Lawrence, Dan; Olson, David; Larson, David J.

    2014-08-01

    Atom Probe Tomography (APT) is a near-atomic-scale analytical technique which, due to recent advances in instrumentation and sample preparation techniques, is being used on a variety of 3D applications. Total system detection efficiency is a key parameter for obtaining accurate spatial reconstruction of atomic coordinates from detected ions, but experimental determination of efficiency can be difficult. This work explores new ways to measure total system detection efficiency as well as the specimen characteristics necessary for such measurements. Composite specimens composed of a nickel/chromium multilayer core, National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 2135c, encapsulated with silver, silicon, or nickel were used to demonstrate the suitability of this approach for providing a direct measurement of APT efficiency. Efficiency measurements based on this multilayer encapsulated in nickel are reported.

  11. Weighted data gravitation classification for standard and imbalanced data.

    PubMed

    Cano, Alberto; Zafra, Amelia; Ventura, Sebastián

    2013-12-01

    Gravitation is a fundamental interaction whose concept and effects applied to data classification become a novel data classification technique. The simple principle of data gravitation classification (DGC) is to classify data samples by comparing the gravitation between different classes. However, the calculation of gravitation is not a trivial problem due to the different relevance of data attributes for distance computation, the presence of noisy or irrelevant attributes, and the class imbalance problem. This paper presents a gravitation-based classification algorithm which improves previous gravitation models and overcomes some of their issues. The proposed algorithm, called DGC+, employs a matrix of weights to describe the importance of each attribute in the classification of each class, which is used to weight the distance between data samples. It improves the classification performance by considering both global and local data information, especially in decision boundaries. The proposal is evaluated and compared to other well-known instance-based classification techniques, on 35 standard and 44 imbalanced data sets. The results obtained from these experiments show the great performance of the proposed gravitation model, and they are validated using several nonparametric statistical tests. PMID:23757568

  12. Compact frequency standard using atoms trapped on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Martínez, F.; Lacroûte, C.; Rosenbusch, P.; Reinhard, F.; Deutsch, C.; Schneider, T.; Reichel, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a compact atomic frequency standard based on the interrogation of magnetically trapped 87Rb atoms. Two photons, in the microwave and radiofrequency domain excite the atomic transition. At a magnetic field of 3.23 G this transition from ∣F = 1, mF = -1> to ∣F = 2, mF = 1> is 1st order insensitive to magnetic field variations. Long Ramsey interrogation times can thus be achieved, leading to a projected stability in the low 10-13 at 1 s. This makes this device a viable alternative to LITE and HORACE as a good candidate for replacing or complementing the rubidium frequency standards and passive hydrogen masers already on board of the GPS, GLONASS, and GALILEO satellites. Here we present preliminary results. We use an atom chip to cool and trap the atoms. A coplanar waveguide is integrated to the chip to carry the Ramsey interrogation signal, making the physics package potentially as small as (5 cm)3. We describe the experimental apparatus and show preliminary Ramsey fringes of 1.25 Hz linewidth. We also show a preliminary frequency stability σy = 1.5 × 10-12τ-1/2 for 10 < τ < 103 s. This represents one order of magnitude improvement with respect to previous experiments.

  13. Charged Neutrinos and Atoms in the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takasugi, E.; Tanaka, M.

    1992-03-01

    The possibility of the charge quantization in the standard model is examined in the absence of the ``generation as copies'' rule. It is shown that neutrinos and atoms can have mini-charges, while neutron is neutral. If a triplet Higgs boson is introduced, neutrinos have masses. Two neutrinos form a Konopinski-Mahmoud Dirac particle and the other becomes a Majorana particle due to the hidden local anomaly free U(1) symmetry.

  14. Portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fan; Yang, Renfu; Nian, Feng; Zhang, Zhenwei; Cui, Yongshun; Zhao, Huan; Wang, Nuanrang; Feng, Keming

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping is designed and demonstrated. To achieve a portable prototype, in the system, a single transverse mode 795nm VCSEL modulated by a 3.4GHz RF source is used as a pump laser which generates coherent light fields. The pump beams pass through a vapor cell containing atom gas and buffer gas. This vapor cell is surrounded by a magnetic shield and placed inside a solenoid which applies a longitudinal magnetic field to lift the Zeeman energy levels' degeneracy and to separate the resonance signal, which has no first-order magnetic field dependence, from the field-dependent resonances. The electrical control system comprises two control loops. The first one locks the laser wavelength to the minimum of the absorption spectrum; the second one locks the modulation frequency and output standard frequency. Furthermore, we designed the micro physical package and realized the locking of a coherent population trapping atomic frequency standard portable prototype successfully. The short-term frequency stability of the whole system is measured to be 6×10-11 for averaging times of 1s, and reaches 5×10-12 at an averaging time of 1000s.

  15. Topics in atomic hydrogen standard research and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.

    1971-01-01

    Hydrogen maser based frequency and time standards have been in continuous use at NASA tracking stations since February 1970, while laboratory work at Goddard has continued in the further development and improvement of hydrogen masers. Concurrently, experimental work has been in progress with a new frequency standard based upon the hydrogen atom using the molecular beam magnetic resonance method. Much of the hydrogen maser technology is directly applicable to the new hydrogen beam standard, and calculations based upon realistic data indicate that the accuracy potential of the hydrogen atomic beam exceeds that of either the cesium beam tube or the hydrogen maser, possibly by several orders of magnitude. In addition, with successful development, the hydrogen beam standard will have several other performance advantages over other devices, particularly exceptional stability and long continuous operating life. Experimental work with a new laboratory hydrogen beam device has recently resulted in the first resonance transition curves, measurements of relative state populations, beam intensities, etc. The most important aspects of both the hydrogen maser and the hydrogen beam work are covered.

  16. Rubidium atomic frequency standards for GPS Block IIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, William J.

    1990-05-01

    The Rubidium Atomic Frequency Standards (RAFS) were provided for the GPS Block IIR NAVSTAR satellites. These satellites will replenish and upgrade the space segment of the Global Positioning System in the mid 1990s. The GPS RAFS Rb clocks are the latest generation of the high-performance rubidium frequency standards. They offer an aging rate in the low pp 10(exp 14)/day range and a drift-corrected 1-day stability in the low pp 10(exp 14) range. The Block IIR version of these devices will have improved performance, higher reliability, smaller size, and greater radiation hardness. The GPS Block IIR atomic clocks have a natural frequency configuration whereby they output a frequency of about 13.4 MHz that is a submultiple of the atomic resonance of Rb (or Cs). The RAFS operates at a low, fixed C-field for increased stability. The GPS Block IIR RAFS design, including the changes and improvements made, and the test results obtained are described.

  17. Rubidium atomic frequency standards for GPS Block IIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, William J.

    1990-01-01

    The Rubidium Atomic Frequency Standards (RAFS) were provided for the GPS Block IIR NAVSTAR satellites. These satellites will replenish and upgrade the space segment of the Global Positioning System in the mid 1990s. The GPS RAFS Rb clocks are the latest generation of the high-performance rubidium frequency standards. They offer an aging rate in the low pp 10(exp 14)/day range and a drift-corrected 1-day stability in the low pp 10(exp 14) range. The Block IIR version of these devices will have improved performance, higher reliability, smaller size, and greater radiation hardness. The GPS Block IIR atomic clocks have a natural frequency configuration whereby they output a frequency of about 13.4 MHz that is a submultiple of the atomic resonance of Rb (or Cs). The RAFS operates at a low, fixed C-field for increased stability. The GPS Block IIR RAFS design, including the changes and improvements made, and the test results obtained are described.

  18. Rubidium atomic frequency standards for GPS block 2R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, William K., Jr.

    1992-06-01

    The design, improvements, test results, and progress of the Rubinium Atomic Frequency Standards (RAFS) for the GPS (Global Positioning System) Block 2R Navstar satellites are described. These satellites will replenish and upgrade the space segment of the GPS in the mid 1990's. The RAFS offer an aging rate in the low pp 10 to the 14th power/day range and a drift corrected 1 day stability in the low pp 10 to the 14th power range. The Block 2R version of these devices will have improved performance, higher reliability, smaller size, and greater radiation hardness. The GPS Block 2R atomic clocks have a 'natural frequency' configuration whereby they output a frequency of about 13.4 MHz that is a submultiple of the atomic resonance. The RAFS operate at a low fixed C field for increased stability. The unit was repackaged into a smaller 4.6 by 8.5 by 5.8 inch outline, but is somewhat heavier (12 lbs.) because of additional radiation shielding. Elimination of the ground tuning logic and the secondary loop synthesizer (with its ovenized crystal oscillator) reduced the RAFS complexity and improved its reliability to 0.80 for the 7.5 year mission. The RAFS power consumption is only 13 W at +20 C in vacuum.

  19. History of the recommended atomic-weight values from 1882 to 1997: A comparision of differences from current values to the estimated uncertainties of earlier values.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Peiser, H.S.

    1998-01-01

    International commissions and national committees for atomic weights (mean relative atomic masses) have recommended regularly updated, best values for these atomic weights as applicable to terrestrial sources of the chemical elements. Presented here is a historically complete listing starting with the values in F. W. Clarke's 1882 recalculation, followed by the recommended values in the annual reports of the American Chemical Society's Atomic Weights Commission. From 1903, an International Commission published such reports and its values (scaled to an atomic weight of 16 for oxygen) are here used in preference to those of national committees of Britain, Germany, Spain, Switzerland, and the U.S.A. We have, however, made scaling adjustments from Ar(16O) to Ar(12C) where not negligible. From 1920, this International Commission constituted itself under the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). Since then, IUPAC has published reports (mostly biennially) listing the recommended atomic weights, which are reproduced here. Since 1979, these values have been called the "standard atomic weights" and, since 1969, all values have been published, with their estimated uncertainties. Few of the earlier values were published with uncertainties. Nevertheless, we assessed such uncertainties on the basis of our understanding of the likely contemporary judgement of the values' reliability. While neglecting remaining uncertainties of 1997 values, we derive "differences" and a retrospective index of reliability of atomic-weight values in relation to assessments of uncertainties at the time of their publication. A striking improvement in reliability appears to have been achieved since the commissions have imposed upon themselves the rule of recording estimated uncertainties from all recognized sources of error.

  20. 76 FR 28998 - Implementation of Revised Passenger Weight Standards for Existing Passenger Vessels

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... FR 78064, December 14, 2010), which updated the AAWPP for new and existing inspected passenger... SECURITY Coast Guard Implementation of Revised Passenger Weight Standards for Existing Passenger Vessels... Passenger Weight Standards for Existing Passenger Vessels.'' This policy letter provides guidance on how...

  1. Cycle Time Reduction in Trapped Mercury Ion Atomic Frequency Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric A.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Taghavi, Shervin

    2011-01-01

    The use of the mercury ion isotope (201)Hg(+) was examined for an atomic clock. Taking advantage of the faster optical pumping time in (201)Hg(+) reduces both the state preparation and the state readout times, thereby decreasing the overall cycle time of the clock and reducing the impact of medium-term LO noise on the performance of the frequency standard. The spectral overlap between the plasma discharge lamp used for (201)Hg(+) state preparation and readout is much larger than that of the lamp used for the more conventional (199)Hg(+). There has been little study of (201)Hg(+) for clock applications (in fact, all trapped ion clock work in mercury has been with (199)Hg(+); however, recently the optical pumping time in (201)Hg(+) has been measured and found to be 0.45 second, or about three times faster than in (199)Hg(+) due largely to the better spectral overlap. This can be used to reduce the overall clock cycle time by over 2 seconds, or up to a factor of 2 improvement. The use of the (201)Hg(+) for an atomic clock is totally new. Most attempts to reduce the impact of LO noise have focused on reducing the interrogation time. In the trapped ion frequency standards built so far at JPL, the optical pumping time is already at its minimum so that no enhancement can be had by shortening it. However, by using (201)Hg(+), this is no longer the case. Furthermore, integrity monitoring, the mechanism that determines whether the clock is functioning normally, cannot happen faster than the clock cycle time. Therefore, a shorter cycle time will enable quicker detection of failure modes and recovery from them.

  2. Determination of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron numbers for heavy-weight and normal-weight concretes.

    PubMed

    Un, Adem; Demir, Faruk

    2013-10-01

    Total mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron numbers values for different 16 heavy-weight and normal-weight concretes are calculated in the energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV. The values of mass attenuation coefficients used in calculations are taken from the WinXCom computer program. The obtained results for heavy-weight concretes are compared with the results for normal-weight concretes. The results of heavy-weight concretes fairly differ from results for normal-weight concretes. PMID:23838359

  3. Sex differences in weight in infancy and the British 1990 national growth standards.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, C. M.; Corbett, S. S.; Drewett, R. F.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine if there is a sex difference in infancy in the new British national standards for weight (based on data from 1990). DESIGN: Weight data in a birth cohort were compared with the 1990 standards and Tanner and Whitehouse (1966) standards up to age 12 months. SETTING: Newcastle upon Tyne. SUBJECTS: 3418 term infants. RESULTS: Our cohort showed a mean difference in standard deviation scores of 0.42 between boys and girls (P < 0.0001) when compared with the 1990 standards. Two and a half times as many girls as boys had weights below the 3rd centile during the first year, with an equivalent excess of boys above the 97th centile (P < 0.0001). Similar results were found with Tanner and Whitehouse standards. CONCLUSIONS: These differences could result in substantial sex bias in the identification of poor growth in early childhood. The standards need modification. PMID:8789973

  4. Theodore William Richards: apostle of atomic weights and Nobel Prize winner in 1914.

    PubMed

    Herschbach, Dudley R

    2014-12-15

    In recognition of his exact determinations of the atomic weights of a large number of the chemical elements, T. W. Richards received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1914. His meticulous techniques resulted in "a degree of accuracy never before attained". This Essay follows Richards from his precocious youth to becoming a celebrated chemist and emphasizes his dedication to forseeing likely sources of error and how to avoid them. PMID:25323411

  5. Improved atomic resonance gas cell for use in frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggett, G. R.

    1968-01-01

    Atomic resonance gas cell maintains a stable operating frequency in the presence of pressure fluctuations in the ambient atmosphere. The new cell includes an envelope which is transparent to radiation in the optical region and to microwave energy at the atomic resonance frequency of the alkali-metal vapor within the envelope.

  6. Proposed standard weight (W(s)) equations for interior cutthroat trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kruse, C.G.; Hubert, W.A.

    1997-01-01

    We developed standard weight (W(s); length-specific standard weight for the species) equations for inland cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki using the regression-line-percentile technique. Length and weight data from samples of 117 cutthroat trout populations (48 lentic and 69 lotic) over the interior range of the species were used. Separate W(s) equations were developed for lentic and lotic populations, as well as an overall equation. Relative weight (W(r); individual weight/W(s)) values did not change systematically with increasing fish length. No significant differences in mean W(r) were found among subspecies of cutthroat trout. Differences between lotic and lentic populations suggested the need for two separate equations.

  7. An alternative to body mass index for standardizing body weight for stature.

    PubMed

    Bagust, A; Walley, T

    2000-09-01

    Although body mass index (BMI) has been adopted by WHO as an international measure of obesity, it lacks a theoretical basis, and empirical evidence suggests it is not valid for all populations. We determined standard weight-for-height using a model calibrated by multivariate analysis of observational data on body dimensions and health status in the USA (NHANES III). A multiple linear regression model based on a simple mathematical formulation accurately described the observed weight variations in this normal adult population. A standardized reference model using just two measurements (upper arm length and sitting height), readily applied in both clinical and research settings using lookup tables, improved explanatory power substantially compared to the best BMI formulation (r(2) increased 16.3% for males, 21.1% for females). Physical dysfunction and self-reported poor health showed strong trends with excess body weight. These findings need confirmation from larger population samples. PMID:10984553

  8. A subsurface add-on for standard atomic force microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Verbiest, G. J.; Zalm, D. J. van der; Oosterkamp, T. H.; Rost, M. J.

    2015-03-15

    The application of ultrasound in an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) gives access to subsurface information. However, no commercially AFM exists that is equipped with this technique. The main problems are the electronic crosstalk in the AFM setup and the insufficiently strong excitation of the cantilever at ultrasonic (MHz) frequencies. In this paper, we describe the development of an add-on that provides a solution to these problems by using a special piezo element with a lowest resonance frequency of 2.5 MHz and by separating the electronic connection for this high frequency piezo element from all other connections. In this sense, we support researches with the possibility to perform subsurface measurements with their existing AFMs and hopefully pave also the way for the development of a commercial AFM that is capable of imaging subsurface features with nanometer resolution.

  9. Proposed standard-weight (Ws) equation and length-categorization standards for brown trout (Salmo trutta) in lentic habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hyatt, M.W.; Hubert, W.A.

    2001-01-01

    We developed a standard-weight (Ws) equation for brown trout (Salmo trutta) in lentic habitats by applying the regression-line-percentile technique to samples from 49 populations in North America. The proposed Ws equation is log10 Ws = -5.422 + 3.194 log10 TL, when Ws is in grams and TL is total length in millimeters. The English-unit equivalent is log10 Ws = -3.592 + 3.194 log10 TL, when Ws is in pounds and TL is total length in inches. The equation is applicable for fish of 140-750 mm TL. Proposed length-category standards to evaluate fish within populations are: stock, 200 mm (8 in); quality, 300 mm (12 in); preferred, 400 mm (16 in); memorable, 500 mm (20 in); and trophy, 600 mm (24 in).

  10. Oscillating signal components of a dead-weight force-standard machine and reduction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yon-Kyu; Kang, Dae-Im

    1999-08-01

    This paper describes the dynamic behaviour of a dead-weight force-standard machine at the Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS). When a build-up system is set into a dead-weight machine, the signals from the force transducers in the build-up system consist of a dc component and oscillating signal components. The dominant oscillating components are due to pendulum motions of the dead weights and bounce-mode oscillation. The oscillation frequencies are about 0.19-0.23 Hz for the pendulum motions and 0.67-1.42 Hz for the bounce-mode oscillation. The frequencies decrease as the weights loaded are increased. The time-averaging technique is the simplest method for reducing the ac components. However, it has some limitations in that the averaging time must be re-adjusted according to the loading conditions. Other methods of reducing the ac components are therefore required. We introduced an infinite-impulse-response (IIR) low-pass filter, which reduced the oscillating components dramatically for all loading conditions. The results obtained by using IIR filtering were compared with those of time averaging and shown to be better.

  11. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: standards of practice and standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists (competent, proficient, and expert) in adult weight management.

    PubMed

    Jortberg, Bonnie; Myers, Eileen; Gigliotti, Linda; Ivens, Barbara J; Lebre, Monica; Burke March, Susan; Nogueira, Isadora; Nwankwo, Robin; Parkinson, Meredith R; Paulsen, Barbara; Turner, Tonya

    2015-04-01

    Weight management encompasses the inter-relationship of nutrition, physical activity, and health behavior change. Nutrition is key for the prevention and treatment of obesity and chronic disease and maintenance of overall health. Thus, the Weight Management Dietetic Practice Group, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, has developed Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs) in Adult Weight Management as a resource for RDNs working in weight management. This document allows RDNs to assess their current skill levels and to identify areas for further professional development in this expanding practice area. This document describes the current standards for weight management practice for RDNs. The Standards of Practice represent the four steps in the Nutrition Care Process as applied to the care of patients/clients. The Standards of Professional Performance consist of six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. Within each standard, specific indicators provide measurable action statements that illustrate how the standard can be applied to practice. The indicators describe three skill levels (competent, proficient, and expert) for RDNs working in weight management. The Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance are complementary resources for the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist in weight management. PMID:25819519

  12. A new method to compute standard-weight equations that reduces length-related bias

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerow, K.G.; Anderson-Sprecher, R. C.; Hubert, W.A.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a new method for developing standard-weight (Ws) equations for use in the computation of relative weight (Wr) because the regression line-percentile (RLP) method often leads to length-related biases in Ws equations. We studied the structural properties of W s equations developed by the RLP method through simulations, identified reasons for biases, and compared Ws equations computed by the RLP method and the new method. The new method is similar to the RLP method but is based on means of measured weights rather than on means of weights predicted from regression models. The new method also models curvilinear W s relationships not accounted for by the RLP method. For some length-classes in some species, the relative weights computed from Ws equations developed by the new method were more than 20 Wr units different from those using Ws equations developed by the RLP method. We recommend assessment of published Ws equations developed by the RLP method for length-related bias and use of the new method for computing new Ws equations when bias is identified. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  13. A method for assessing age-standardized weight-for-height in children seen cross-sectionally.

    PubMed

    Cole, T J

    1979-01-01

    Weight-for-height standards in children are usually constructed on the basis that the expected weight for a given height does not depend on age, an assumption which is unjustified. The present paper investigates regression standards of age-standardized weight for age-standardized height, the standardization being achieved by expressing weight and height as fractions of the 50th centile for age from a suitable growth standard. The precise choice of standard is not critical. Data on 4631 children from five different countries, exhibiting a wide spectrum of growth status, show that throughout childhood until puberty, the following ratio is appropriate as a simple and convenient index of weight-for-height: age-standardized weight/(age-standardized height)2. During puberty a larger power than 2 is required, so the index as specified is inappropriate. Approximate values for the distribution centiles of the index are suggested. The index may be used to assess degree of malnutrition or obesity, for individuals or groups seen on a single occasion. A slide-rule is described which calculates the index directly, given the child's sex, age, height and weight. PMID:496386

  14. Determination of the absolute isotopic composition and Atomic Weight of a reference sample of natural iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P. D. P.; Maeck, R.; de Bièvre, P.

    1992-11-01

    Absolute values have been obtained by means of thermal ionisation mass spectrometry for the iron isotope abundance ratios of a sample of metallic iron of natural isotopic composition. This was achieved by calibrating the mass spectrometric measurement procedure using five different synthetic isotope mixtures, prepared from carefully characterised enriched isotope carrier compounds, viz. 54Fe2O3 and 56Fe2O3. These mixtures were made up at three different n(54Fe)/n(56Fe) ratios, covering a ratio range of more than two orders of magnitude, in order to determine the extent of the isotope fractionation in the ion source. Two mixtures bracket the natural ratio, two mixtures have ratio values approximating to unity, and one mixture has a ratio of about 10. The total relative uncertainty on the ratio values of the mixtures varies between 2 and 7 × 10-4 (2s). Three different mass spectrometric measurement procedures were developed, all using a silica-gel/boric acid ionisation enhancer. Measurements were carried out on two different instruments. The n(54Fe)/n(56Fe) ratio of the synthetic mixtures and of the natural iron isotopic reference material (IRM) were measured using a mass spectrometer with Faraday detector. Both the n(57Fe)/n(56Fe) and n(58Fe)/n(56Fe) ratios of the natural iron IRM were determined using the same instrument but operated at a higher ionisation temperature (1430°C instead of 1350°C) and using an internal normalisation procedure. For the determination of the abundances of the minor isotopes in the enriched isotope carrier compounds, an instrument equipped with a calibrated ion counting device was used and the ionisation temperature was 1150°C. Using the latter instrument and method, the n(54Fe)/n(56Fe) ratio of the IRM was found to a gree within 4 × 10-5 with the calibrated value of the Faraday measurements, indicating that experimental conditions were well controlled in both cases. Compared to the current IUPAC data (Atomic Weights of the Elements

  15. Development of standard weight equations for Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico amphidromous fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooney, Patrick B.; Kwak, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    We collected and compiled length and weight information from four countries and one commonwealth to develop standard weight (Ws) equations for three amphidromous fish species native to the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico regions: mountain mullet Agonostomus monticola (N = 9,768 individuals, 52 populations), river goby Awaous banana (N = 1,847 individuals, 62 populations), and bigmouth sleeper Gobiomorus dormitor (N = 2,983 individuals, 53 populations). Linear and quadratic Ws equations for three quartiles (25%, median, 75%) are presented for these three species. The length-weight relationship from eight lentic bigmouth sleeper populations was significantly different from that of lotic populations, reflecting higher weights of juvenile fish (< 70 mm total length) in lentic environments. Thus, independent W(s) equations were developed for lotic populations of bigmouth sleepers. W(s) equations were not developed from lentic bigmouth sleeper populations alone due to the low number of applicable populations caused by life history constraints; the equation from combined lentic and lotic populations is suggested for application to lentic bigmouth sleeper populations. These morphometric relationships for amphidromous fishes may improve the ability to assess existing and potential sport fisheries and allow ecological assessment based on fish condition.

  16. A two-year history of atomic frequency standards syntonization in the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, S. C.

    1983-01-01

    The frequency and timing system (FTS) of the Deep Space Network (DSN) consists of a collection of three sets of clocks driven by independent atomic oscillators. The synchronization of the output frequencies (syntonization) of these oscillators (reference frequency standards) is reported. There is an implied specification of a + or - 5.5 X 10 to the 12th power related to the DSN time synchronization specification of a + or - 100 microseconds. Both the syntonization within the three sets and the syntonization of the sets to the international standard (International Atomic Time) are considered.

  17. Possible applications of atomic frequency standards with an internal high resolution digital synthesizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detoma, E.; Stern, A.

    1993-06-01

    The applications of Atomic Frequency Standards with an internal synthesizer (thereafter referred as 'Synthesized Frequency Standards or Oscillators') with a special emphasis on the Rb oscillator are reviewed. A fractional frequency synthesizer, developed by SEPA, was incorporated in the Frequency Locked Loop of a TFL Rubidium Frequency Standard. This combination allows a frequency settability in steps of 1.5 x 10(exp -12) (optional 1 x 10(exp -13) over a range of 6 x 10(exp -9) without having to resort to change the C-field to tune the output frequency of the device. This capability, coupled to the excellent short term stability of the Rb frequency standard, opens new possibilities for time and frequency users in the various fields (time metrology, navigation, communication, etc.) in which stable frequency standards find their application.

  18. Possible applications of atomic frequency standards with an internal high resolution digital synthesizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detoma, E.; Stern, A.

    1993-01-01

    The applications of Atomic Frequency Standards with an internal synthesizer (thereafter referred as 'Synthesized Frequency Standards or Oscillators') with a special emphasis on the Rb oscillator are reviewed. A fractional frequency synthesizer, developed by SEPA, was incorporated in the Frequency Locked Loop of a TFL Rubidium Frequency Standard. This combination allows a frequency settability in steps of 1.5 x 10(exp -12) (optional 1 x 10(exp -13) over a range of 6 x 10(exp -9) without having to resort to change the C-field to tune the output frequency of the device. This capability, coupled to the excellent short term stability of the Rb frequency standard, opens new possibilities for time and frequency users in the various fields (time metrology, navigation, communication, etc.) in which stable frequency standards find their application.

  19. From old weights and measures to the SI as a numerical standard for the world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debarbat, S.; Passeron, I.; Launay, F.

    2011-10-01

    After the efforts made by Charlemagne to unify weights on the one hand, and measures on the other hand, Picard was most probably the first in France to submit a proposal for a new system based on a unit linking up length and time through the second-pendulum. Despite further proposals, it was not before the end of the 18th century, one century after Picard, that the Système métrique décimal was adopted, with the Mètre as a fundamental standard. Almost one more century later, by 1960, the SI was decided at the international level and, by 1983, a new definition of the metre was decided, eventually linking up length and time.

  20. An alternative approach to detection of length-related biases in standard weight equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerow, K.G.; Hubert, W.A.; Anderson-Sprecher, R. C.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a new method for assessing length-related biases in standard weight (Ws) equations computed by the regression-line-percentile method. We evaluated the performance of the new method relative to two previous methods for assessing length-related biases using 15 data sets from which W s equations have been computed. The new method detected potentially serious length-related biases in 10 Ws equations, whereas one of the previously used methods failed to detect any biologically significant biases and the other method detected biases in only one equation. The new method can detect curvilinear relationships between Ws and length, so it provides insight that is not available from previous methods.

  1. Accuracy of Nanoscale Pitch Standards Fabricated by Laser-Focused Atomic Deposition

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Jabez J.; Anderson, William R.; Bradley, Curtis C.; Walkiewicz, Mirek; Celotta, Robert J.; Jurdik, Erich; Deslattes, Richard D.

    2003-01-01

    The pitch accuracy of a grating formed by laser-focused atomic deposition is evaluated from the point of view of fabricating nanoscale pitch standard artifacts. The average pitch obtained by the process, nominally half the laser wavelength, is simply traceable with small uncertainty to an atomic frequency and hence can be known with very high accuracy. An error budget is presented for a Cr on sapphire sample, showing that a combined standard uncertainty of 0.0049 nm, or a relative uncertainty of 2.3 × 10−5, is readily obtained, provided the substrate temperature does not change. Precision measurements of the diffraction of the 351.1 nm argon ion laser line from such an artifact are also presented. These yield an average pitch of (212.7777 ± 0.0069) nm, which agrees well with the expected value, as corrected for thermal contraction, of (212.7705 ± 0.0049) nm.

  2. METALLURGICAL PROGRAMS: CALCULATION OF MASS FROM VOLUME, DENSITY OF MIXTURES, AND CONVERSION OF ATOMIC TO WEIGHT PERCENT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroh, H.

    1994-01-01

    The Metallurgical Programs include three simple programs which calculate solutions to problems common to metallurgical engineers and persons making metal castings. The first program calculates the mass of a binary ideal (alloy) given the weight fractions and densities of the pure components and the total volume. The second program calculates the densities of a binary ideal mixture. The third program converts the atomic percentages of a binary mixture to weight percentages. The programs use simple equations to assist the materials staff with routine calculations. The Metallurgical Programs are written in Microsoft QuickBASIC for interactive execution and have been implemented on an IBM PC-XT/AT operating MS-DOS 2.1 or higher with 256K bytes of memory. All instructions needed by the user appear as prompts as the software is used. Data is input using the keyboard only and output is via the monitor. The Metallurgical programs were written in 1987.

  3. Short-term stability improvements of an optical frequency standard based on free Ca atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Jeff; Oates, Chris

    2010-03-01

    Compared to optical frequency standards featuring trapped ions or atoms in optical lattices, the strength of a standard using freely expanding neutral calcium atoms is not ultimate accuracy but rather short-term stability and experimental simplicity. Recently, a fractional frequency instability of 4 x10-15 at 1 second was demonstrated for the Ca standard at 657 nm [1]. The short cycle time (˜2 ms) combined with only a moderate interrogation duty cycle (˜15 %) is thought to introduce excess, and potentially critically limiting technical noise due to the Dick effect---high-frequency noise on the laser oscillator is not averaged away but is instead down-sampled by aliasing. We will present results of two strategies employed to minimize this effect: the reduction of clock laser noise by filtering the master clock oscillator through a high-finesse optical cavity [2], and an optimization of the interrogation cycle to match our laser's noise spectrum.[4pt] [1] Oates et al., Optics Letters, 25(21), 1603--5 (2000)[0pt] [2] Nazarova et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. B, 5(10), 1632--8 (2008)

  4. Stability of low concentration calibration standards for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, D A; TenKate, L B

    1993-11-01

    Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry (GFAAS) is used for determination of ultra-trace metals in environmentally important samples. In the generation of GFAAS calibration curves for many environmental applications, low concentration calibration standards must be prepared dally, as required by the Statement of Work (SOW) for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Contract Laboratory Program (CLP). This results in significant time and work for the analyst and significant cost to the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) for chemicals and waste management. While EPA SW 846 is less prescriptive than the CLP SOW, ACL has been following the CLP guidelines because in-house criteria regarding the stability of GFAAS standards have not been established. A study was conducted to determine the stability of GFAAS standards for analytes commonly used in the ACL (single and mixed) as a function of time. Data were collected over nine months. The results show that GFAAS standards for Sb, Pb, Se, Ag, and TI are stable for a longer period of time than currently assumed by the CLP SOW. Reducing the frequency of preparing these standards will increase efficiency, decrease the handling of hazardous the quantity of hazardous waste generated, and decrease the quantity of hazardous substances to be ordered and stocked by the laboratory. These benefits will improve GFAAS analysis quality, reduce costs, enhance safety, and lower environmental concerns.

  5. Direct frequency comb optical frequency standard based on two-photon transitions of thermal atoms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S Y; Wu, J T; Zhang, Y L; Leng, J X; Yang, W P; Zhang, Z G; Zhao, J Y

    2015-01-01

    Optical clocks have been the focus of science and technology research areas due to their capability to provide highest frequency accuracy and stability to date. Their superior frequency performance promises significant advances in the fields of fundamental research as well as practical applications including satellite-based navigation and ranging. In traditional optical clocks, ultrastable optical cavities, laser cooling and particle (atoms or a single ion) trapping techniques are employed to guarantee high stability and accuracy. However, on the other hand, they make optical clocks an entire optical tableful of equipment, and cannot work continuously for a long time; as a result, they restrict optical clocks used as very convenient and compact time-keeping clocks. In this article, we proposed, and experimentally demonstrated, a novel scheme of optical frequency standard based on comb-directly-excited atomic two-photon transitions. By taking advantage of the natural properties of the comb and two-photon transitions, this frequency standard achieves a simplified structure, high robustness as well as decent frequency stability, which promise widespread applications in various scenarios. PMID:26459877

  6. Direct frequency comb optical frequency standard based on two-photon transitions of thermal atoms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S. Y.; Wu, J. T.; Zhang, Y. L.; Leng, J. X.; Yang, W. P.; Zhang, Z. G.; Zhao, J. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Optical clocks have been the focus of science and technology research areas due to their capability to provide highest frequency accuracy and stability to date. Their superior frequency performance promises significant advances in the fields of fundamental research as well as practical applications including satellite-based navigation and ranging. In traditional optical clocks, ultrastable optical cavities, laser cooling and particle (atoms or a single ion) trapping techniques are employed to guarantee high stability and accuracy. However, on the other hand, they make optical clocks an entire optical tableful of equipment, and cannot work continuously for a long time; as a result, they restrict optical clocks used as very convenient and compact time-keeping clocks. In this article, we proposed, and experimentally demonstrated, a novel scheme of optical frequency standard based on comb-directly-excited atomic two-photon transitions. By taking advantage of the natural properties of the comb and two-photon transitions, this frequency standard achieves a simplified structure, high robustness as well as decent frequency stability, which promise widespread applications in various scenarios. PMID:26459877

  7. Differences in Weight Loss Between Persons on Standard Balanced vs Nutrigenetic Diets in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Mandy L.; Rutledge, Thomas R.; Liao, Patricia S.; Gupta, Samir; Herbst, Karen L.; Zarrinpar, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Many companies provide genetic tests for obesity-related polymorphisms (nutrigenetics) and make dietary recommendations for weight loss based on the results. We performed a randomized controlled trial to determine whether more participants who followed a nutrigenetic-guided diet lost ≥5% of their body weight than participants on a standard balanced diet, for 8 and 24 weeks. Methods We performed a prospective study of 51 obese or overweight US veterans on an established weight management program at the Veterans Administration San Diego Healthcare System (the MOVE! Program). Participants were randomly assigned to groups placed on a nutrigenetic-guided diet (balanced, low-carbohydrate, low-fat, or Mediterranean; n=30) or a standard balanced diet (n=21). Nutrigenetic diets were selected based on results from the Pathway FIT test (Pathway Genomics; San Diego, CA). Results There was no significant difference in the percentage of participants on the balanced diet vs the nutrigenetic-guided diet who lost 5% of their body weight at 8 weeks (35.0%±20.9% vs 26.9%±17.1%, respectively; P=.28) or at 24 weeks. Both groups had difficulty adhering to the diets. However, adherence to the nutrigenetic-guided diet correlated with weight loss (r=0.74; P= 4.0 × 10−5), but not adherence to standard therapy (r=0.34; P=.23). Participants who had low-risk polymorphisms for obesity lost more weight than all other participants at 8 weeks (5.0% vs 2.9%, respectively; P=.02), and had significantly greater reductions in body mass index (6.4% vs 3.6% respectively; P=.03) and waist circumference (6.5% vs 2.6% respectively; P=.02) at 24 weeks. Conclusions In a prospective study, a nutrigenetic-based diet did not increase weight loss compared with a standard balanced diet. However, genetic features can identify individuals most likely to benefit from a balanced diet weight loss strategy; these findings require further investigation. ClincialTrials.gov number: NCT01859403

  8. Calcium optical frequency standard with ultracold atoms: Approaching 10{sup -15} relative uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Degenhardt, Carsten; Stoehr, Hardo; Lisdat, Christian; Wilpers, Guido; Schnatz, Harald; Lipphardt, Burghard; Nazarova, Tatiana; Pottie, Paul-Eric; Sterr, Uwe; Helmcke, Juergen; Riehle, Fritz

    2005-12-15

    An optical frequency standard based on an ensemble of neutral calcium atoms laser-cooled to 12 {mu}K has been realized. By using ultracold atoms, one major previous source of uncertainty, the residual Doppler effect, was reduced. We show that cold collisions contribute a negligible amount to the uncertainty. The influence of a temporal evolution of the phase of the laser pulses used to interrogate the clock transition was measured and corrected for. The frequency of the clock transition at 657 nm was referenced to the caesium fountain clock of PTB utilizing a femtosecond comb generator with a fractional uncertainty of 1.2x10{sup -14}. The transition frequency was determined to be (455 986 240 494 144{+-}5.3) Hz, making the calcium clock transition one of the most accurately known optical transitions. A frequency stability of 3x10{sup -15} at 100 s averaging time was achieved and the noise contributions that limit to the observed stability were analyzed in detail. Additionally, the natural linewidth of the clock transition has been determined.

  9. Birth weight and physical stature in St. Petersburg: living standards of women in Russia, 1980-2005.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Boris

    2007-03-01

    We analyze data on the height and weight of mothers and newborn babies between 1980 and 2005 in St. Petersburg, Russia. We find that women's living standards, as measured by their height, improved steadily from the end of World War II through those born in 1972, hence reached adulthood in 1990. Thereafter, heights declined. Evidence on both the length and weight of babies corroborates this pattern. Their values trace a "U" shaped curve with troughs near the mid-1990s. Thus, the anthropometric results on newborn as well as for their mother point to the strains and challenges to living standards experienced during the restructuring of the post-Soviet economy. This is a general result that has become a recurring pattern: economic transitions are almost always accompanied by biological strains. PMID:17289449

  10. 77 FR 52887 - Regulatory Capital Rules: Standardized Approach for Risk-Weighted Assets; Market Discipline and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ..., DC 20219. Board: Anna Lee Hewko, Assistant Director, (202) 530-6260, Thomas Boemio, Manager, (202... risk weight categories, including cash and gold bullion held by a banking organization. C. Off-balance..., gold bullion, certain mortgage servicing assets (MSAs) and deferred tax assets (DTAs)). Generally,...

  11. Univariate and Default Standard Unit Biases in Estimation of Body Weight and Caloric Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geier, Andrew B.; Rozin, Paul

    2009-01-01

    College students estimated the weight of adult women from either photographs or a live presentation by a set of models and estimated the calories in 1 of 2 actual meals. The 2 meals had the same items, but 1 had larger portion sizes than the other. The results suggest: (a) Judgments are biased toward transforming the example in question to the…

  12. Weighting Factors for the Commercial Building Prototypes Used in the Development of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2010

    SciTech Connect

    Jarnagin, Ronald E.; Bandyopadhyay, Gopal K.

    2010-01-21

    Detailed construction data from the McGraw Hill Construction Database was used to develop construction weights by climate zones for use with DOE Benchmark Buildings and for the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 development. These construction weights were applied to energy savings estimates from simulation of the benchmark buildings to establish weighted national energy savings.

  13. Beller Lectureship: From Artefacts to Atoms: The Origins and Early Years of the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Terry

    2012-02-01

    The BIPM was founded by the Metre Convention in 1875. Its main task was to maintain and disseminate the units of length and mass using the new International Prototypes of the Metre and Kilogram. My talk will be based on the opening chapters of my book ``From Artefacts to Atoms'' which recount the story of the Metre Convention and the creation of the BIPM at the Pavillon de Breteuil in Sèvres on the outskirts of Paris, as the first international scientific institute. I shall include a brief outline of the sometimes acrimonious discussions at the Diplomatic Conference of the Metre, which opened on 1 March 1875 and concluded with the signing of the Convention on 20 May, of the construction of a new laboratory building, recruitment of staff, purchase of instruments and equipment and the beginning of scientific work. There was no precedent for any of this, success was due to the wisdom and foresight of those who drafted the Convention and to the founder Members of the International Committee for Weights and Measures overseeing the BIPM and to the high quality of the original scientific staff. However, success came at a price, the decision to define the Metre at 0 ^oC, for example, led to much ill health in the early years among the staff from working in cold damp laboratories, an aspect of metrology that is easy to forget these days.

  14. Can you be large and not obese? The distinction between body weight, body fat, and abdominal fat in occupational standards.

    PubMed

    Friedl, Karl E

    2004-10-01

    Weight control is an important early intervention in diabetes, but the nature of the association between weight and disordered metabolism has been confused because fat mass and its distribution are only partly associated with increasing body size. Weight, fat, and regional fat placement, specifically in the abdominal site, may each have distinctly different associations with diabetes risk. Abdominal circumference may be the common marker of poor fitness habits and of increased risk for metabolic diseases such as diabetes. This is an important question for public health policy as well as for occupational standards such as those of the military, which are intended to promote fitness for military missions and include strength and aerobic capacity, as well as military appearance considerations. U.S. soldiers are heavier than ever before, reflecting both increased muscle and fat components. They also have better health care than ever before and are required to exercise regularly, and even the oldest soldiers are required to remain below body fat limits that are more stringent than the current median values of the U.S. population over age 40. The body fat standards assessed by circumference-based equations are 20-26% and 30-36%, for various age groups of men and women, respectively, and the upper limits align with threshold values of waist circumference recommended in national health goals. The basis and effects of the Army standards are presented in this paper. U.S. Army body fat standards may offer practical and reasonable health guidelines suitable for all active Americans that might help stem the increasing prevalence of obesity that is predicted to increase the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes. PMID:15628823

  15. Injury Rates in Age-Only Versus Age-and-Weight Playing Standard Conditions in American Youth Football

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Zachary Y.; Marshall, Stephen W.; Simon, Janet E.; Hayden, Ross; Snook, Erin M.; Dodge, Thomas; Gallo, Joseph A.; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C.; Mensch, James; Murphy, Joseph M.; Nittoli, Vincent C.; Dompier, Thomas P.; Ragan, Brian; Yeargin, Susan W.; Parsons, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: American youth football leagues are typically structured using either age-only (AO) or age-and-weight (AW) playing standard conditions. These playing standard conditions group players by age in the former condition and by a combination of age and weight in the latter condition. However, no study has systematically compared injury risk between these 2 playing standards. Purpose: To compare injury rates between youth tackle football players in the AO and AW playing standard conditions. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: Athletic trainers evaluated and recorded injuries at each practice and game during the 2012 and 2013 football seasons. Players (age, 5-14 years) were drawn from 13 recreational leagues across 6 states. The sample included 4092 athlete-seasons (AW, 2065; AO, 2027) from 210 teams (AW, 106; O, 104). Injury rate ratios (RRs) with 95% CIs were used to compare the playing standard conditions. Multivariate Poisson regression was used to estimate RRs adjusted for residual effects of age and clustering by team and league. There were 4 endpoints of interest: (1) any injury, (2) non–time loss (NTL) injuries only, (3) time loss (TL) injuries only, and (4) concussions only. Results: Over 2 seasons, the cohort accumulated 1475 injuries and 142,536 athlete-exposures (AEs). The most common injuries were contusions (34.4%), ligament sprains (16.3%), concussions (9.6%), and muscle strains (7.8%). The overall injury rate for both playing standard conditions combined was 10.3 per 1000 AEs (95% CI, 9.8-10.9). The TL injury, NTL injury, and concussion rates in both playing standard conditions combined were 3.1, 7.2, and 1.0 per 1000 AEs, respectively. In multivariate Poisson regression models controlling for age, team, and league, no differences were found between playing standard conditions in the overall injury rate (RRoverall, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.4-2.6). Rates for the other 3 endpoints were also similar (RRNTL, 1.1 [95% CI, 0

  16. New Homogeneous Standards by Atomic Layer Deposition for Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopies.

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, A.L.; Becker, N.; Gainsforth, Z.; Lanzirotti, A.; Newville, M.; Proslier, T.; Stodolna, J.; Sutton, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Westphal, A.J.; Zasadzinski, J.

    2012-03-13

    Quantification of synchrotron XRF analyses is typically done through comparisons with measurements on the NIST SRM 1832/1833 thin film standards. Unfortunately, these standards are inhomogeneous on small scales at the tens of percent level. We are synthesizing new homogeneous multilayer standards using the Atomic Layer Deposition technique and characterizing them using multiple analytical methods, including ellipsometry, Rutherford Back Scattering at Evans Analytical, Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (SXRF) at Advanced Photon Source (APS) Beamline 13-ID, Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) at Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamlines 11.0.2 and 5.3.2.1 and by electron microscopy techniques. Our motivation for developing much-needed cross-calibration of synchrotron techniques is borne from coordinated analyses of particles captured in the aerogel of the NASA Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC). The Stardust Interstellar Dust Preliminary Examination (ISPE) team have characterized three sub-nanogram, {approx}1{micro}m-sized fragments considered as candidates to be the first contemporary interstellar dust ever collected, based on their chemistries and trajectories. The candidates were analyzed in small wedges of aerogel in which they were extracted from the larger collector, using high sensitivity, high spatial resolution >3 keV synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SXRF) and <2 keV synchrotron x-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) during Stardust ISPE. The ISPE synchrotron techniques have complementary capabilities. Hard X-ray SXRF is sensitive to sub-fg mass of elements Z {ge} 20 (calcium) and has a spatial resolution as low as 90nm. X-ray Diffraction data were collected simultaneously with SXRF data. Soft X-ray STXM at ALS beamline 11.0.2 can detect fg-mass of most elements, including cosmochemically important oxygen, magnesium, aluminum and silicon, which are invisible to SXRF in this application. ALS beamline 11.0.2 has spatial resolution

  17. Correcting bias from the standard linear adjustment of weaning weight to an age-constant basis for beef calves.

    PubMed

    Rossi, D J; Kress, D D; Tess, M W; Burfening, P J

    1992-05-01

    Standard linear adjustment of weaning weight to a constant age has been shown to introduce bias in the adjusted weight due to nonlinear growth from birth to weaning of beef calves. Ten years of field records from the five strains of Beefbooster Cattle Alberta Ltd. seed stock herds were used to investigate the use of correction factors to adjust standard 180-d weight (WT180) for this bias. Statistical analyses were performed within strain and followed three steps: 1) the full data set was split into an estimation set (ES) and a validation set (VS), 2) WT180 from the ES was used to develop estimates of correction factors using a model including herd (H), year (YR), age of dam (DA), sex of calf (S), all two and three-way interactions, and any significant linear and quadratic covariates of calf age at weaning deviated from 180 d (DEVCA) and interactions between DEVCA and DA, S or DA x S, and 3) significant DEVCA coefficients were used to correct WT180 from the VS, then WT180 and the corrected weight (WTCOR) from the VS were analyzed with the same model as in Step 2 and significance of DEVCA terms were compared. Two types of data splitting were used. Adjusted R2 was calculated to describe the proportion of total variation of DEVCA terms explained for WT180 from the ES. The DEVCA terms explained .08 to 1.54% of the total variation for the five strains. Linear and quadratic correction factors were both positive and negative. Bias in WT180 from the ES within 180 +/- 35 d of age ranged from 2.8 to 21.7 kg.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1526901

  18. Surpassing the standard quantum limit in an atom interferometer with four-mode entanglement produced from four-wave mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Haine, S. A.; Ferris, A. J.

    2011-10-15

    We theoretically investigate a scheme for atom interferometry that surpasses the standard quantum limit. A four-wave mixing scheme similar to the recent experiment performed by Pertot et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 200402 (2010)] is used to generate subshotnoise correlations between two modes. These two modes are then interfered with the remaining two modes in such a way as to surpass the standard quantum limit, whilst utilizing all of the available atoms. Our scheme can be viewed as using two correlated interferometers. That is, the signal from each interferometer when looked at individually is classical, but there are correlations between the two interferometers that allow for the standard quantum limit to be surpassed.

  19. Testing Lorentz Invariance with Laser-Cooled Cesium Atomic Frequency Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, William M.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Lorentz invariance testing during the proposed PARCS experiment. It includes information on the primary atomic reference clock in space (PARCS), cesium, laser cooling, and the vision for the future.

  20. THE STANDARD CALIBRATION INSTRUMENT AUTOMATION SYSTEM FOR THE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETER. PART III: PROGRAM DOCUMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report contains complete documentation for the 15 programs and 11 data files of the EPA Atomic Absorption Instrument Automation System. The system incorporates the following major features: (1) multipoint calibration using first, second, or third degree regression or linear ...

  1. Mesoscopic atomic entanglement for precision measurements beyond the standard quantum limit

    PubMed Central

    Appel, J.; Windpassinger, P. J.; Oblak, D.; Hoff, U. B.; Kjærgaard, N.; Polzik, E. S.

    2009-01-01

    Squeezing of quantum fluctuations by means of entanglement is a well-recognized goal in the field of quantum information science and precision measurements. In particular, squeezing the fluctuations via entanglement between 2-level atoms can improve the precision of sensing, clocks, metrology, and spectroscopy. Here, we demonstrate 3.4 dB of metrologically relevant squeezing and entanglement for ≳ 105 cold caesium atoms via a quantum nondemolition (QND) measurement on the atom clock levels. We show that there is an optimal degree of decoherence induced by the quantum measurement which maximizes the generated entanglement. A 2-color QND scheme used in this paper is shown to have a number of advantages for entanglement generation as compared with a single-color QND measurement. PMID:19541646

  2. THE STANDARD CALIBRATION INSTRUMENT AUTOMATION SYSTEM FOR THE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETER. PART I: FUNCTIONAL SPECIFICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document contains a project definition, a set of functional requirements, and a functional design for the automation of flameless atomic absorption (AA) spectrophotometers. The system is a real-time data acquisition system with 'on line' data reduction, quality control and r...

  3. Assignment of Weight-Based Antibody Units for Seven Additional Serotypes to a Human Pneumococcal Standard Reference Serum, 007sp

    PubMed Central

    Tan, C. Y.; Burbidge, P.; McElhiney, S.; McLaughlin, L.; Tucker, R.; Rauh, M.; Sidhu, M.; Giardina, P. C.

    2015-01-01

    The pneumococcal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) reference standard serum, lot 89SF, has been in use since 1990 and was replaced in 2013 with a new reference standard, 007sp, that is projected to be available for the next 25 years. 007sp was generated under an FDA-approved clinical protocol; 278 adult volunteers were immunized with the 23-valent unconjugated polysaccharide vaccine Pneumovax II, and a unit of blood was obtained twice from each immunized subject within 120 days following immunization. Pooled serum was prepared from the plasma of 262 subjects, filled at 6 ml per vial, and lyophilized. Five independent laboratories participated in bridging the serotype-specific IgG assignments for 89SF to the new reference standard, 007sp, to establish equivalent reference values for 13 pneumococcal capsular serotypes (1,3, 4, 5, 6A, 6B, 7F, 9V, 14, 18C, 19A, 19F, and 23F) by using the WHO reference ELISA. In a second study involving three laboratories, a similar protocol was used to assign weight-based IgG concentrations in micrograms per ml to 007sp of seven serotypes (8, 10A, 11A, 12F, 15B, 22F, and 33F) also present in the 23-valent pneumococcal unconjugated polysaccharide vaccine. In addition, the IgG assignments for a 12-member WHO quality control (QC) serum panel were also extended to cover these seven serotypes. Agreement was excellent, with a concordance correlation coefficient (rc) of >0.996 when each laboratory was compared to the assigned values for the 12 WHO QC serum samples. There are four remaining pneumococcal serotypes (2, 9N, 17F, and 20) found in Pneumovax II for which IgG assignments exist for 89SF and remain to be bridged. PMID:26354860

  4. A breadboard of optically-pumped atomic-beam frequency standard for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthoud, P.; Ruffieux, R.; Affolderbach, C.; Thomann, P.

    2004-06-01

    Observatoire de Neuchâtel (ON) has recently started breadboarding activities for an Optically-pumped Space Cesium-beam Atomic Resonator in the frame of an ESA-ARTES 5 project. The goal is to demonstrate a frequency stability approaching σy = 1×10-12 τ-1/2 with the simplest optical scheme (a single optical frequency for both the atomic pumping and detection processes). This development constitutes a fundamental step in the general effort to reduce the mass of the on-board clocks, while keeping or even improving its performances. It will take advantage of previous activities at ON in the late '80 and of the latest progresses in the field of tunable and narrow-band laser diodes.

  5. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR SAMPLING WEIGHT CALCULATION (IIT-A-9.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the procedures undertaken to calculate sampling weights. The sampling weights are needed to obtain weighted statistics of the NHEXAS data. This SOP uses data that have been properly coded and certified with appropriate QA/QC procedures by t...

  6. Studies on Temperature Dependence of Rubidium Lamp for Atomic Frequency Standard

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosal, Bikash; Banik, Alak; Vats, Vaibhav; Pal, Sukamal; Bahl, R. K

    2011-10-20

    Rb lamp is a very critical component of the Rb atomic clock's Physics Package. The Rb lamp's performance is very sensitive to temperature and its stability. In this paper we discuss the behaviors of Rb Lamp with temperature. The Rb lamp exciter power and temperature of Rb bulb are very important parameters in controlling the performance of the Rb Lamp. It is observed that at temperatures beyond 110 deg. C, the lamp mode changes from the ring to red mode resulting in abnormal broadening of emission lines and self reversal. The results of our studies on spectral analysis of Rb lamp under various operating conditions are reported in the paper.

  7. Recent progress in the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center atomic hydrogen standards program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V. S.

    1981-01-01

    At NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and through associated contractors, a broad spectrum of work is being carried out to develop improved hydrogen maser frequency standards for field use, improved experimental hydrogen maser frequency standards, and improved frequency and time distribution and measurement systems for hydrogen maser use. Recent progress in the following areas is reported: results on the Nr masers built by the Applied Physics Laboratory of Johns Hopkins University, the development of a low cost hydrogen maser at Goddard Space Flight Center, and work on a low noise phase comparison system and digitally phase locked crystal oscillator called the distribution and measurement system.

  8. Absolute frequency measurement of the neutral 40Ca optical frequency standard at 657 nm based on microkelvin atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilpers, G.; Oates, C. W.; Diddams, S. A.; Bartels, A.; Fortier, T. M.; Oskay, W. H.; Bergquist, J. C.; Jefferts, S. R.; Heavner, T. P.; Parker, T. E.; Hollberg, L.

    2007-04-01

    We report an absolute frequency measurement of the optical clock transition at 657 nm in 40Ca with a relative uncertainty of 7.5 × 10-15, one of the most accurate frequency measurements of a neutral atom optical transition to date. The frequency (455 986 240 494 135.8 ± 3.4) Hz was measured by stabilizing a diode laser system to a spectroscopic signal derived from an ensemble of 106 atoms cooled in two stages to a temperature of 10 µK. The measurement used a femtosecond-laser-based frequency comb to compare the Ca transition frequency with that of the single-ion 199Hg+ optical frequency standard at NIST. The Hg+ frequency was simultaneously calibrated relative to the NIST Cs fountain via the NIST time scale to yield an absolute value for the Ca transition frequency. The relative fractional instability between the two optical standards was 2 × 10-15 for 10 s of averaging time and 2 × 10-16 for 2000 s.

  9. High-speed imaging upgrade for a standard sample scanning atomic force microscope using small cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Jonathan D.; Nievergelt, Adrian; Erickson, Blake W.; Yang, Chen; Dukic, Maja; Fantner, Georg E.

    2014-09-01

    We present an atomic force microscope (AFM) head for optical beam deflection on small cantilevers. Our AFM head is designed to be small in size, easily integrated into a commercial AFM system, and has a modular architecture facilitating exchange of the optical and electronic assemblies. We present two different designs for both the optical beam deflection and the electronic readout systems, and evaluate their performance. Using small cantilevers with our AFM head on an otherwise unmodified commercial AFM system, we are able to take tapping mode images approximately 5-10 times faster compared to the same AFM system using large cantilevers. By using additional scanner turnaround resonance compensation and a controller designed for high-speed AFM imaging, we show tapping mode imaging of lipid bilayers at line scan rates of 100-500 Hz for scan areas of several micrometers in size.

  10. High-speed imaging upgrade for a standard sample scanning atomic force microscope using small cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Jonathan D.; Nievergelt, Adrian; Erickson, Blake W.; Yang, Chen; Dukic, Maja; Fantner, Georg E.

    2014-09-15

    We present an atomic force microscope (AFM) head for optical beam deflection on small cantilevers. Our AFM head is designed to be small in size, easily integrated into a commercial AFM system, and has a modular architecture facilitating exchange of the optical and electronic assemblies. We present two different designs for both the optical beam deflection and the electronic readout systems, and evaluate their performance. Using small cantilevers with our AFM head on an otherwise unmodified commercial AFM system, we are able to take tapping mode images approximately 5–10 times faster compared to the same AFM system using large cantilevers. By using additional scanner turnaround resonance compensation and a controller designed for high-speed AFM imaging, we show tapping mode imaging of lipid bilayers at line scan rates of 100–500 Hz for scan areas of several micrometers in size.

  11. Evidence of radiation-induced reduction of height and body weight from repeated measurements of adults exposed in childhood to the atomic bombs

    SciTech Connect

    Otake, Masanori; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Fujikoshi, Yasunori; Schull, W.J.

    1994-10-01

    Reduction of growth from exposure to atomic bomb radiation has been examined using individuals under 10 years old at the time of the bombing (ATB) and a growth curve analysis based on measurements of height and weight made in the course of the 4th-7th cycles of the Adult Health Study examinations (1964-1972). As expected, the largest difference in growth to emerge is between males and females. However, a highly significant reduction of growth associated with dose (DS86) was observed among those survivors for whom four repeated measurements of height and weight were available. Longitudinal analysis of a more extended data set (n = 821), using expected values based on simple linear regression models fitted to the three available sets of measurements of height and weight on the 254 individuals with a missing measurement, also indicates a significant radiation-related growth reduction. The possible contribution of such factors as poor nutrition and disruption of normal family life in the years immediately after the war is difficult to evaluate, but the effects of socioeconomic factors on the analysis of these data are discussed. 33 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. The physics of the environmental sensitivity of rubidium gas cell atomic frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, William J.

    1990-01-01

    Environmental sensitivity is often the most significant limitation to the practical stability of rubidium frequency standards (RFS). For example, temperature sensitivity can cause a rapid frequency change of several parts in 10(exp 10) for a tactical RFS that has an aging of only 1 times 10(exp -11)/month. Other important environmental factors are barometric pressure, vibration, magnetic field, and nuclear radiation. The physical mechanisms that lie behind these environmental sensitivities are considered. These physical mechanisms are related to the performance of actual rubidium frequency standards. For the user of these devices, a better knowledge of the causes for Rb clock instability will aid in their testing and proper application. For the time frequency specialist, a review of these factors may prove useful toward improving RFS design. Some of the RFS environmental sensitivities are due to simple physical mechanisms like the effect of dc magnetic field on the Rb hyperfine resonance frequency. For these, an analysis can be based on physical principles and straightforward design factors. Other environment factors, like temperature sensitivity, are more complex combinations of many effects, both physical and practical, and the analysis often takes the form of an error budget with large unit-to-unit variations. Today's rubidium frequency standards span a wide performance range from small, inexpensive units with pp 10(exp 10) error budgets to larger, higher performance versions offering pp 10(exp 10) stabilities. For both extremes, however, environmental sensitivity can be the most significant performance limitation. Why this is the case and how to make improvements are discussed.

  13. Theoretical study of heavy-atom molecules to search for physics beyond the Standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, A. N.; Skripnikov, L. V.; Kudashov, A. D.; Mosyagin, N. S.; Titov, A. V.

    2015-05-01

    The goal of the report is to review our latest studies for heavy-atom diatomics - ThO, RaO, RaF, PbF - which are of practical interest to search the T, P-odd effects. Particular attention is devoted to the H3Δ1 state of ThO. Combination of the spin precession measurement of ThO with the calculated Eeff (ThO) leads to the most rigid limit on eEDM:, |de|<8.7 × 10-29e .cm. This is more than one order of magnitude better than other limits obtained. The knowledge of the g-factor dependence on electric fields is important for understanding possible systematic effects. Our study of the g-factors for H3Δ1 has shown that the J = 2 rotational state should be even more robust against a number of systematic errors compared to J = 1. This work is supported by the SPbU Fundamental Science Research grant from Federal Budget No. 0.38.652.2013, RFBR Grant No. 13-02-01406. L.S. is also grateful to the President of RF grant no MK-5877.2014.2.

  14. UTC(OP) based on LNE-SYRTE atomic fountain primary frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovera, G. D.; Bize, S.; Chupin, B.; Guéna, J.; Laurent, Ph; Rosenbusch, P.; Uhrich, P.; Abgrall, M.

    2016-06-01

    UTC(OP), the French national realization of the international coordinated universal time, was redesigned and rebuilt. The first step was the implementation in October 2012 of a new algorithm based on a H-maser and on atomic fountain data. Thanks to the new implementation, the stability of UTC(OP) was dramatically improved and UTC(OP) competes with the best time scales available today. Then the hardware generation and distribution of the UTC(OP) physical signals were replaced. Part of the new hardware is composed of commercial devices, but the key elements were specifically developed. One of them is a special switch that allows the UTC(OP) signals to be derived from one of two time scales, based on two different H-masers, which are generated simultaneously. This insures the continuity of the UTC(OP) signal even when a change of the reference H-maser is required. With the new hardware implementation, UTC(OP) is made available through three coherent signals: 100 MHz, 10 MHz and 1 PPS. For more than 3 years, UTC(OP) remained well below 10 ns close to UTC, with a difference even less than 5 ns if we except a short period around MJD 56650.

  15. Randomized trial of human milk cream as a supplement to standard fortification of an exclusive human milk-based diet in infants 750-1250 g birth weight

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to evaluate whether premature infants who received an exclusive human milk (HM)-based diet and a HM-derived cream supplement (cream) would have weight gain (g/kg/d) at least as good as infants receiving a standard feeding regimen (control). In a prospective noninferiority, randomiz...

  16. Atomic and Molecular Complex Resonances from Real Eigenvalues Using Standard (Hermitian) Electronic Structure Calculations.

    PubMed

    Landau, Arie; Haritan, Idan; Kaprálová-Žd'ánská, Petra Ruth; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2016-05-19

    Complex eigenvalues, resonances, play an important role in a large variety of fields in physics and chemistry. For example, in cold molecular collision experiments and electron scattering experiments, autoionizing and predissociative metastable resonances are generated. However, the computation of complex resonance requires modifications of standard electronic structure codes and methods, which are not always straightforward, in addition, application of complex codes requires more computational efforts. Here we show how resonance eigenvalues, positions and widths, can be calculated using the standard, widely used, electronic-structure packages. Our method enables the calculations of the complex resonance eigenvalues by using analytical continuation procedures (such as Padé). The key point in our approach is the existence of narrow analytical passages from the real axis to the complex energy plane. In fact, the existence of these analytical passages relies on using finite basis sets. These passages become narrower as the basis set becomes more complete, whereas in the exact limit, these passages to the complex plane are closed. As illustrative numerical examples we calculated the autoionization Feshbach resonances of helium, hydrogen anion, and hydrogen molecule. We show that our results are in an excellent agreement with the results obtained by other theoretical methods and with available experimental results. PMID:26677725

  17. Ultratrace determination of mercury in water following EN and EPA standards using atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Labatzke, Thomas; Schlemmer, Gerhard

    2004-02-01

    Chemical vapour generation has been used in combination with atomic fluorescence spectrometry to determine mercury at ultratrace concentrations down to 0.1 ng L(-1). A time-based injection of 1 mL of solution for measurement was sufficient to generate a steady-state detector response in the direct mode of measurement. The detection limit calculated from a ten-point calibration curve according to DIN 32645 was 0.26 ng L(-1). Instrument noise is limited by reflected radiation from the light source rather than by the dark current of the photomultiplier. The detection limit is directly influenced by the reagent blank which was 2 ng L(-1) in the experiments described. Focusing by amalgamation and subsequent thermal desorption generates a detector response which is about eight times higher in peak intensity and about twice as large in integrated intensity. The detection limit under these conditions is 0.09 ng L(-1) which can be further improved by preconcentration of larger volumes of solution for measurement. The cycle time for one individual reading is about 40 s without amalgamation and 125 s with amalgamation. The linear dynamic range of the system is five orders of magnitude with a single photomultiplier gain setting. The carry-over is less than 0.3% in direct measurement mode. Reference water samples and a surface water containing approximately 5 ng L(-1) were used to prove the validity of the method for real samples. Good accuracy and recoveries of 103% were calculated using the fast direct determination technique. PMID:14673566

  18. Semi-exact concentric atomic density fitting: reduced cost and increased accuracy compared to standard density fitting.

    PubMed

    Hollman, David S; Schaefer, Henry F; Valeev, Edward F

    2014-02-14

    A local density fitting scheme is considered in which atomic orbital (AO) products are approximated using only auxiliary AOs located on one of the nuclei in that product. The possibility of variational collapse to an unphysical "attractive electron" state that can affect such density fitting [P. Merlot, T. Kjærgaard, T. Helgaker, R. Lindh, F. Aquilante, S. Reine, and T. B. Pedersen, J. Comput. Chem. 34, 1486 (2013)] is alleviated by including atom-wise semidiagonal integrals exactly. Our approach leads to a significant decrease in the computational cost of density fitting for Hartree-Fock theory while still producing results with errors 2-5 times smaller than standard, nonlocal density fitting. Our method allows for large Hartree-Fock and density functional theory computations with exact exchange to be carried out efficiently on large molecules, which we demonstrate by benchmarking our method on 200 of the most widely used prescription drug molecules. Our new fitting scheme leads to smooth and artifact-free potential energy surfaces and the possibility of relatively simple analytic gradients. PMID:24527902

  19. Laser induced asymmetry and inhomogeneous broadening of the microwave lineshape of a gas cell atomic frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camparo, J. C.; Freuholz, R. P.; Volk, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    The possibility of replacing the RF discharge lamp in a rubidium gas cell clock with a single mode laser diode is addressed. Since the short term stability of the rubidium frequency standard is limited by the shot noise of the photodetector, an increased signal-to-noise ratio due to more efficient laser diode optical pumping might improve the short term performance. Because the emission wavelength of the laser diode can be tuned, improved long term performance could be gained through the control of the light shift effect. However, due to the nature of the gas cell frequency standard, various physical phenomena are strongly coupled in their effect on the frequency output, and thus careful consideration must be given to any change in one parameter because of its interrelation with other parameters. Some investigations concerning the coupled effect of the optical and microwave fields in the rubidium atomic clock are reported. It is shown that this type of coupling is an important consideration for any attempt to incorporate a laser diode into a gas cell clock.

  20. Impact of body weight and missed doses on lopinavir concentrations with standard and increased lopinavir/ritonavir doses during late pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Cressey, Tim R.; Urien, Saik; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Best, Brookie M.; Buranabanjasatean, Sudanee; Limtrakul, Aram; Rawangban, Boonsong; Sabsanong, Prapan; Treluyer, Jean-Marc; Jourdain, Gonzague; Stek, Alice; Lallemant, Marc; Mirochnick, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the influence of body weight and missed doses on lopinavir pharmacokinetics with standard and increased doses of lopinavir/ritonavir melt extrusion tablets during late pregnancy. Patients and methods Lopinavir concentration data during the third trimester of pregnancy were pooled from clinical trials in Thailand (NCT00409591) and the USA (NCT00042289). A total of 154 HIV-infected pregnant women receiving either 400/100 mg (standard) or 600/150 mg (increased) twice daily had lopinavir plasma concentration data available. Population parameters were estimated using non-linear mixed-effects regression models. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to estimate the probability of achieving target lopinavir trough concentrations (>1.0 mg/L) with standard and increased doses of lopinavir/ritonavir during pregnancy. Results The median (range) age, weight and gestational age were 28 years (18–43), 62 kg (45–123) and 33 weeks (29–38), respectively. Body weight influenced lopinavir oral clearance (CL/F) and volume of distribution (V/F). Population estimates of lopinavir CL/F and V/F were 6.21 L/h/70 kg and 52.6 L/70 kg, respectively. Based on simulations, the highest risk of subtherapeutic trough concentrations was for women weighing >100 kg using the standard dose (∼7%), while the risk was <2% with the 600/150 mg dose for women weighing 40–130 kg. After a missed dose, 61% of women have lopinavir concentrations below target prior to the next dose with the standard dose compared with 42% with the increased dose. Conclusions Standard dosing provides adequate lopinavir trough concentrations for the majority of pregnant women but increased doses may be preferable for women weighing >100 kg and with a history of lopinavir/ritonavir use and/or adherence issues. PMID:25261418

  1. Does the type of weight loss diet affect who participates in a behavioral weight loss intervention? A comparison of participants for a plant-based diet versus a standard diet trial.

    PubMed

    Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M; Davidson, Charis R; Wilcox, Sara

    2014-02-01

    Studies have found that people following plant-based eating styles, such as vegan or vegetarian diets, often have different demographic characteristics, eating styles, and physical activity (PA) levels than individuals following an omnivorous dietary pattern. There has been no research examining if there are differences in these characteristics among people who are willing to participate in a weight loss intervention using plant-based dietary approaches as compared to a standard reduced calorie approach, which does not exclude food groups. The present study compared baseline characteristics (demographics, dietary intake, eating behaviors (Eating Behavior Inventory), and PA (Paffenbarger Physical Activity Questionnaire)) of participants enrolling in two different 6-month behavioral weight loss studies: the mobile Pounds Off Digitally (mPOD) study, which used a standard reduced calorie dietary approach and the New Dietary Interventions to Enhance the Treatments for weight loss (New DIETs) study, which randomized participants to follow one of five different dietary approaches (vegan, vegetarian, pesco-vegetarian, semi-vegetarian, or omnivorous diets). There were no differences in baseline demographics with the exception of New DIETs participants being older (48.5±8.3years versus 42.9±11.2, P=0.001) and having a higher Body Mass Index (BMI, 35.2±5.3kg/m(2) versus 32.6±4.7kg/m(2), P=0.001) than mPOD participants. In age- and BMI-adjusted models, there were no differences in EBI scores or in any dietary variables, with the exception of vitamin C (85.6±5.9mg/d mPOD versus 63.4±7.4mg/d New DIETs, P=0.02). New DIETs participants reported higher levels of intentional PA/day (180.0±18.1kcal/d) than mPOD participants (108.8±14.4kcal/d, P=0.003), which may have been the result of New DIETs study recommendations to avoid increasing or decreasing PA during the study. The findings of this study demonstrate that using plant-based dietary approaches for weight loss

  2. Does the type of weight loss diet affect who participates in a behavioral weight loss intervention? A comparison of participants for a plant-based diet versus a standard diet trial

    PubMed Central

    Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M.; Davidson, Charis R.; Wilcox, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Studies have found that people following plant-based eating styles, such as vegan or vegetarian diets, often have different demographic characteristics, eating styles, and physical activity (PA) levels than individuals following an omnivorous dietary pattern. There has been no research examining if there are differences in these characteristics among people who are willing to participate in a weight loss intervention using plant-based dietary approaches as compared to a standard reduced calorie approach, which doesn’t exclude food groups. The present study compared baseline characteristics (demographics, dietary intake, eating behaviors (Eating Behavior Inventory), and PA (Paffenbarger Physical Activity Questionnaire)) of participants enrolling in two different 6-month behavioral weight loss studies: the mobile Pounds Off Digitally (mPOD) study, which used a standard reduced calorie dietary approach and the New Dietary Interventions to Enhance the Treatments for weight loss (New DIETs) study, which randomized participants to follow one of five different dietary approaches (vegan, vegetarian, pesco-vegetarian, semi-vegetarian, or omnivorous diets). There were no differences in baseline demographics with the exception of New DIETs participants being older (48.5 ± 8.3 years vs. 42.9 ± 11.2, P=0.001) and having a higher Body Mass Index (BMI, 35.2 ± 5.3 kg/m2 vs. 32.6 ± 4.7 kg/m2, P=0.001) than mPOD participants. In age- and BMI-adjusted models, there were no differences in EBI scores or in any dietary variables, with the exception of vitamin C (85.6 ± 5.9 mg/d mPOD vs. 63.4 ± 7.4 mg/d New DIETs, P=0.02). New DIETs participants reported higher levels of intentional PA/day (180.0 ± 18.1 kcal/d) than mPOD participants (108.8 ± 14.4 kcal/d, P=0.003), which may have been the result of New DIETs study recommendations to avoid increasing or decreasing PA during the study. The findings of this study demonstrate that using plant-based dietary approaches for weight

  3. Passive atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping in {sup 87}Rb using injection-locked lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Han Seb; Park, Sang Eon; Park, Young-Ho; Lee, Lim; Kim, Jung Bog

    2006-11-15

    We present a microwave frequency standard based on coherent population trapping (CPT) in the {sup 87}Rb D{sub 1} line. The CPT spectrum is obtained using two Raman lasers with a 6.8 GHz frequency offset by injection locking of a master laser to a slave laser. We have constructed an atomic clock employing a 5 cm long Rb vapor cell confined with 6.67 kPa neon buffer gas at 70 degree sign C. Using this system, we improve the CPT contrast through the elimination of undesired off-resonant fields created by the direct modulation method. We measured the frequency shift of the CPT signal as a function of the temperature of the Rb cell and estimated it to be approximately 1.3x10{sup -9}/K. The frequency of a 10 MHz crystal oscillator has been stabilized to the CPT spectrum between the two ground states in {sup 87}Rb. The relative frequency stability is approximately 2.3x10{sup -12} for an average time of 68 s.

  4. Aligning School Finance with Academic Standards: A Weighted-Student Formula Based on a Survey of Practitioners. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonstelie, Jon

    2007-01-01

    This report contains estimates of the cost to California's public schools of meeting the state's achievement standards. In the aggregate, the cost is about 40 percent greater than the expenditures of California schools in 2003-04. The bulk of these additional costs are for resources needed to boost achievement in schools primarily serving students…

  5. Foundations of Metrology: Important Early Works on Weights and Measures in the Library of the National Bureau of Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terner, Janet R.

    The purpose of this project was to survey the National Bureau of Standards library holdings of pre-1900 works on metrology and from these, to assemble a special collection of historically important documents. The 265 imprints selected for the collection are listed in this report. Each entry includes the main author, title, imprint, and collation…

  6. Cost-effectiveness of primary care referral to a commercial provider for weight loss treatment, relative to standard care–a modelled lifetime analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Nicholas R; Carter, Hannah; Schofield, Deborah; Hauner, Hans; Jebb, Susan A; Colagiuri, Stephen; Caterson, Ian D

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to the high prevalence of overweight and obesity there is a need to identify cost-effective approaches for weight loss in primary care and community settings. Objective To evaluate the long-term cost-effectiveness of a commercial weight loss programme (Weight Watchers) (CP) compared with standard care (SC), as defined by national guidelines. Methods A Markov model was developed to calculate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), expressed as the cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) over the lifetime. The probabilities and quality-of-life utilities of outcomes were extrapolated from trial data using estimates from the published literature. A health sector perspective was adopted. Results Over a patient’s lifetime, the CP resulted in an incremental cost saving of AUD 70 per patient, and an incremental 0.03 QALYs gained per patient. As such, the CP was found to be the dominant treatment, being more effective and less costly than SC (95% confidence interval: dominant to 6 225 per QALY). Despite the CP delaying the onset of diabetes by approximately 10 months, there was no significant difference in the incidence of type 2 diabetes, with the CP achieving less than 0.1% fewer cases than SC over the lifetime. Conclusion The modelled results suggest that referral to community based interventions may provide a highly cost-effective approach for those at high risk of weight-related co-morbidities. PMID:24301133

  7. Accurate physical laws can permit new standard units: The two laws F→=ma→ and the proportionality of weight to mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saslow, Wayne M.

    2014-04-01

    Three common approaches to F→=ma→ are: (1) as an exactly true definition of force F→ in terms of measured inertial mass m and measured acceleration a→; (2) as an exactly true axiom relating measured values of a→, F→ and m; and (3) as an imperfect but accurately true physical law relating measured a→ to measured F→, with m an experimentally determined, matter-dependent constant, in the spirit of the resistance R in Ohm's law. In the third case, the natural units are those of a→ and F→, where a→ is normally specified using distance and time as standard units, and F→ from a spring scale as a standard unit; thus mass units are derived from force, distance, and time units such as newtons, meters, and seconds. The present work develops the third approach when one includes a second physical law (again, imperfect but accurate)—that balance-scale weight W is proportional to m—and the fact that balance-scale measurements of relative weight are more accurate than those of absolute force. When distance and time also are more accurately measurable than absolute force, this second physical law permits a shift to standards of mass, distance, and time units, such as kilograms, meters, and seconds, with the unit of force—the newton—a derived unit. However, were force and distance more accurately measurable than time (e.g., time measured with an hourglass), this second physical law would permit a shift to standards of force, mass, and distance units such as newtons, kilograms, and meters, with the unit of time—the second—a derived unit. Therefore, the choice of the most accurate standard units depends both on what is most accurately measurable and on the accuracy of physical law.

  8. Weight-for-age standard score - distribution and effect on in-hospital mortality: A retrospective analysis in pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    George, Antony; Jagannath, Pushpa; Joshi, Shreedhar S.; Jagadeesh, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the distribution of weight for age standard score (Z score) in pediatric cardiac surgery and its effect on in-hospital mortality. Introduction: WHO recommends Standard Score (Z score) to quantify and describe anthropometric data. The distribution of weight for age Z score and its effect on mortality in congenital heart surgery has not been studied. Methods: All patients of younger than 5 years who underwent cardiac surgery from July 2007 to June 2013, under single surgical unit at our institute were enrolled. Z score for weight for age was calculated. Patients were classified according to Z score and mortality across the classes was compared. Discrimination and calibration of the for Z score model was assessed. Improvement in predictability of mortality after addition of Z score to Aristotle Comprehensive Complexity (ACC) score was analyzed. Results: The median Z score was -3.2 (Interquartile range -4.24 to -1.91] with weight (mean±SD) of 8.4 ± 3.38 kg. Overall mortality was 11.5%. 71% and 52.59% of patients had Z score < -2 and < -3 respectively. Lower Z score classes were associated with progressively increasing mortality. Z score as continuous variable was associated with O.R. of 0.622 (95% CI- 0.527 to 0.733, P < 0.0001) for in-hospital mortality and remained significant predictor even after adjusting for age, gender, bypass duration and ACC score. Addition of Z score to ACC score improved its predictability for in-hosptial mortality (δC - 0.0661 [95% CI - 0.017 to 0.0595, P = 0.0169], IDI- 3.83% [95% CI - 0.017 to 0.0595, P = 0.00042]). Conclusion: Z scores were lower in our cohort and were associated with in-hospital mortality. Addition of Z score to ACC score significantly improves predictive ability for in-hospital mortality. PMID:26139742

  9. Internal quality control system for non-stationary, non-ergodic analytical processes based upon exponentially weighted estimation of process means and process standard deviation.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Rob T P; Laeven, Mark; Kardol, Wim

    2002-06-01

    The analytical processes in clinical laboratories should be considered to be non-stationary, non-ergodic and probably non-stochastic processes. Both the process mean and the process standard deviation vary. The variation can be different at different levels of concentration. This behavior is shown in five examples of different analytical systems: alkaline phosphatase on the Hitachi 911 analyzer (Roche), vitamin B12 on the Access analyzer (Beckman), prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time on the STA Compact analyzer (Roche) and PO2 on the ABL 520 analyzer (Radiometer). A model is proposed to assess the status of a process. An exponentially weighted moving average and standard deviation was used to estimate process mean and standard deviation. Process means were estimated overall and for each control level. The process standard deviation was estimated in terms of within-run standard deviation. Limits were defined in accordance with state of the art- or biological variance-derived cut-offs. The examples given are real, not simulated, data. Individual control sample results were normalized to a target value and target standard deviation. The normalized values were used in the exponentially weighted algorithm. The weighting factor was based on a process time constant, which was estimated from the period between two calibration or maintenance procedures. The proposed system was compared with Westgard rules. The Westgard rules perform well, despite the underlying presumption of ergodicity. This is mainly caused by the introduction of the starting rule of 12s, which proves essential to prevent a large number of rule violations. The probability of reporting a test result with an analytical error that exceeds the total allowable error was calculated for the proposed system as well as for the Westgard rules. The proposed method performed better. The proposed algorithm was implemented in a computer program running on computers to which the analyzers were

  10. Gestational weight gain standards based on women enrolled in the Fetal Growth Longitudinal Study of the INTERGROWTH-21st Project: a prospective longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Deborah C; Pang, Ruyan; Ohuma, Eric O; Kac, Gilberto; Abrams, Barbara; Rasmussen, Kathleen; Barros, Fernando C; Hirst, Jane E; Lambert, Ann; Papageorghiou, Aris T; Stones, William; Jaffer, Yasmin A; Altman, Douglas G; Noble, J Alison; Giolito, Maria Rosa; Gravett, Michael G; Purwar, Manorama; Kennedy, Stephen H; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Villar, José

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe patterns in maternal gestational weight gain (GWG) in healthy pregnancies with good maternal and perinatal outcomes. Design Prospective longitudinal observational study. Setting Eight geographically diverse urban regions in Brazil, China, India, Italy, Kenya, Oman, United Kingdom, and United States, April 2009 to March 2014. Participants Healthy, well nourished, and educated women enrolled in the Fetal Growth Longitudinal Study component of the INTERGROWTH-21st Project, who had a body mass index (BMI) of 18.50-24.99 in the first trimester of pregnancy. Main outcome measures Maternal weight measured with standardised methods and identical equipment every five weeks (plus/minus one week) from the first antenatal visit (<14 weeks’ gestation) to delivery. After confirmation that data from the study sites could be pooled, a multilevel, linear regression analysis accounting for repeated measures, adjusted for gestational age, was applied to produce the GWG values. Results 13 108 pregnant women at <14 weeks’ gestation were screened, and 4607 met the eligibility criteria, provided consent, and were enrolled. The variance within sites (59.6%) was six times higher than the variance between sites (9.6%). The mean GWGs were 1.64 kg, 2.86 kg, 2.86 kg, 2.59 kg, and 2.56 kg for the gestational age windows 14-18+6 weeks, 19-23+6 weeks, 24-28+6 weeks, 29-33+6 weeks, and 34-40+0 weeks, respectively. Total mean weight gain at 40 weeks’ gestation was 13.7 (SD 4.5) kg for 3097 eligible women with a normal BMI in the first trimester. Of all the weight measurements, 71.7% (10 639/14 846) and 94.9% (14 085/14 846) fell within the expected 1 SD and 2 SD thresholds, respectively. Data were used to determine fitted 3rd, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 97th smoothed GWG centiles by exact week of gestation, with equations for the mean and standard deviation to calculate any desired centiles according to gestational age in exact weeks. Conclusions Weight

  11. Calibrated sulfur isotope abundance ratios of three IAEA sulfur isotope reference materials and V-CDT with a reassessment of the atomic weight of sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, T.; Valkiers, S.; Kipphardt, H.; De Bièvre, P.; Taylor, P. D. P.; Gonfiantini, R.; Krouse, R.

    2001-09-01

    Calibrated values have been obtained for sulfur isotope abundance ratios of sulfur isotope reference materials distributed by the IAEA (Vienna). For the calibration of the measurements, a set of synthetic isotope mixtures were prepared gravimetrically from high purity Ag 2S materials enriched in 32S, 33S, and 34S. All materials were converted into SF 6 gas and subsequently, their sulfur isotope ratios were measured on the SF 5+ species using a special gas source mass spectrometer equipped with a molecular flow inlet system (IRMM's Avogadro II amount comparator). Values for the 32S/ 34S abundance ratios are 22.650 4(20), 22.142 4(20), and 23.393 3(17) for IAEA-S-1, IAEA-S-2, and IAEA-S-3, respectively. The calculated 32S/ 34S abundance ratio for V-CDT is 22.643 6(20), which is very close to the calibrated ratio obtained by Ding et al. (1999). In this way, the zero point of the VCDT scale is anchored firmly to the international system of units SI. The 32S/ 33S abundance ratios are 126.942(47), 125.473(55), 129.072(32), and 126.948(47) for IAEA-S-1, IAEA-S-2, IAEA-S-3, and V-CDT, respectively. In this way, the linearity of the V-CDT scale is improved over this range. The values of the sulfur molar mass for IAEA-S-1 and V-CDT were calculated to be 32.063 877(56) and 32.063 911(56), respectively, the values with the smallest combined uncertainty ever reported for the sulfur molar masses (atomic weights).

  12. Efficacy of Standard Versus Enhanced Features in a Web-Based Commercial Weight-Loss Program for Obese Adults, Part 2: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Philip J; Hutchesson, Melinda J; Callister, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Background Commercial Web-based weight-loss programs are becoming more popular and increasingly refined through the addition of enhanced features, yet few randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have independently and rigorously evaluated the efficacy of these commercial programs or additional features. Objective To determine whether overweight and obese adults randomized to an online weight-loss program with additional support features (enhanced) experienced a greater reduction in body mass index (BMI) and increased usage of program features after 12 and 24 weeks compared to those randomized to a standard online version (basic). Methods An assessor-blinded RCT comparing 301 adults (male: n=125, 41.5%; mean age: 41.9 years, SD 10.2; mean BMI: 32.2 kg/m2, SD 3.9) who were recruited and enrolled offline, and randomly allocated to basic or enhanced versions of a commercially available Web-based weight-loss program for 24 weeks. Results Retention at 24 weeks was greater in the enhanced group versus the basic group (basic 68.5%, enhanced 81.0%; P=.01). In the intention-to-treat analysis of covariance with imputation using last observation carried forward, after 24 weeks both intervention groups had reductions in key outcomes with no difference between groups: BMI (basic mean –1.1 kg/m2, SD 1.5; enhanced mean –1.3 kg/m2, SD 2.0; P=.29), weight (basic mean –3.3 kg, SD 4.7; enhanced mean –4.0 kg, SD 6.2; P=.27), waist circumference (basic mean –3.1 cm, SD 4.6; enhanced mean –4.0 cm, SD 6.2; P=.15), and waist-to-height ratio (basic mean –0.02, SD 0.03; enhanced mean –0.02, SD 0.04, P=.21). The enhanced group logged in more often at both 12 and 24 weeks, respectively (enhanced 12-week mean 34.1, SD 28.1 and 24-week mean 43.1, SD 34.0 vs basic 12-week mean 24.6, SD 25.5 and 24-week mean 31.8, SD 33.9; P=.002). Conclusions The addition of personalized e-feedback in the enhanced program provided limited additional benefits compared to a standard commercial Web

  13. Intratumoral application of standardized mistletoe extracts down regulates tumor weight via decreased cell proliferation, increased apoptosis and necrosis in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Beuth, J; Ko, H L; Schneider, H; Tawadros, S; Kasper, H U; Zimst, H; Schierholz, J M

    2006-01-01

    The cytotoxic in vitro activity of standardized mistletoe extracts (ME) was examined by established assays towards the human ductal breast carcinoma cell line BT474. A dose-dependent (optimum 25 mg/mL medium) and significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced cytotoxic activity towards the BT474 cells was demonstrated. In vivo experiments on the antitumor activity of ME-A and ME-M were performed in a BALB/c-mouse / BT474 ductal breast carcinoma model. ME-A and ME-M were intratumorally administered according to an application schedule which was found to be optimal concerning dosage and time of administration. Standardized intratumoral application of ME-A and ME-M induced a significantly (p < 0.05) decreased tumor weight in experimental mice. Histological investigations were performed comprising analysis of mitosis and proliferation rates (Ki67 expression), as well as necrosis and apoptosis induction (ssDNA detection). As compared to tumors of control mice with intratumoral phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) injections, tumors of the ME-A and ME-M treated groups showed a decreased cell proliferation rate, as well as an increased cell necrosis and apoptosis rate. Standardized mistletoe extracts, interfering with defined tumor cell functions, e.g., proliferation, necrosis and apoptosis, may have an impact on local cancer treatment. PMID:17201168

  14. 75 FR 6070 - Notice of Public Meeting on the International Atomic Energy Agency Basic Safety Standards Version...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ...The Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS) is hosting an open forum with the public and other stakeholders on a revision to the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation and the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS). The forum is expected to yield information useful to inform the development of U.S. Government comments on this......

  15. A Derivation of the Long-Term Degradation of a Pulsed Atomic Frequency Standard from a Control-Loop Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    The phase of a frequency standard that uses periodic interrogation and control of a local oscillator (LO) is degraded by a long-term random-walk component induced by downconversion of LO noise into the loop passband. The Dick formula for the noise level of this degradation is derived from an explicit solution of an LO control-loop model.

  16. PREPARATION OF BLOCK COPOLYMERS OF POLY(STYRENE) AND POLY(T-BUTYL ACRYLATE) OF VARIOUS MOLECULAR WEIGHTS AND ARCHITECTURES BY ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION. (R826735)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Block copolymers of polystyrene and poly(t-butyl acrylate) were prepared using atom transfer radical polymerization techniques. These polymers were synthesized with a CuBr/N,N,N,NU.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR SAMPLING WEIGHT CALCULATION (IIT-A-9.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the procedures undertaken to calculate sampling weights. The sampling weights are needed to obtain weighted statistics of the study data. This SOP uses data that have been properly coded and certified with appropriate QA/QC procedures by th...

  17. Direct comparison of two cold-atom-based optical frequency standards by using a femtosecond-laser comb.

    PubMed

    Vogel, K R; Diddams, S A; Oates, C W; Curtis, E A; Rafac, R J; Itano, W M; Bergquist, J C; Fox, R W; Lee, W D; Wells, J S; Hollberg, L

    2001-01-15

    With a fiber-broadened, femtosecond-laser frequency comb, the 76-THz interval between two laser-cooled optical frequency standards was measured with a statistical uncertainty of 2x10(-13) in 5 s , to our knowledge the best short-term instability thus far reported for an optical frequency measurement. One standard is based on the calcium intercombination line at 657 nm, and the other, on the mercury ion electric-quadrupole transition at 282 nm. By linking this measurement to the known Ca frequency, we report a new frequency value for the Hg(+) clock transition with an improvement in accuracy of ~10(5) compared with its best previous measurement. PMID:18033520

  18. Atomic Calligraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imboden, Matthias; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cristian; Han, Han; Tareen, Ammar; Chang, Jackson; Christopher, Jason; Corman, Benjamin; Bishop, David

    2013-03-01

    Here we present a MEMS based method to fabricate devices with a small number of atoms. In standard semiconductor fabrication, a large amount of material is deposited, after which etching removes what is not wanted. This technique breaks down for structures that approach the single atom limit, as it is inconceivable to etch away all but one atom. What is needed is a bottom up method with single or near single atom precision. We demonstrate a MEMS device that enables nanometer position controlled deposition of gold atoms. A digitally driven plate is swept as a flux of gold atoms passes through an aperture. Appling voltages on four comb capacitors connected to the central plate by tethers enable nanometer lateral precision in the xy plane over 15x15 sq. microns. Typical MEMS structures have manufacturing resolutions on the order of a micron. Using a FIB it is possible to mill apertures as small as 10 nm in diameter. Assuming a low incident atomic flux, as well as an integrated MEMS based shutter with microsecond response time, it becomes possible to deposit single atoms. Due to their small size and low power consumption, such nano-printers can be mounted directly in a cryogenic system at ultrahigh vacuum to deposit clean quench condensed metallic structures.

  19. An expanded calibration study of the explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12b method using large basis set standard CCSD(T) atomization energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, David; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2013-08-01

    The effectiveness of the recently developed, explicitly correlated coupled cluster method CCSD(T)-F12b is examined in terms of its ability to reproduce atomization energies derived from complete basis set extrapolations of standard CCSD(T). Most of the standard method findings were obtained with aug-cc-pV7Z or aug-cc-pV8Z basis sets. For a few homonuclear diatomic molecules it was possible to push the basis set to the aug-cc-pV9Z level. F12b calculations were performed with the cc-pVnZ-F12 (n = D, T, Q) basis set sequence and were also extrapolated to the basis set limit using a Schwenke-style, parameterized formula. A systematic bias was observed in the F12b method with the (VTZ-F12/VQZ-F12) basis set combination. This bias resulted in the underestimation of reference values associated with small molecules (valence correlation energies <0.5 Eh) and an even larger overestimation of atomization energies for bigger systems. Consequently, caution should be exercised in the use of F12b for high accuracy studies. Root mean square and mean absolute deviation error metrics for this basis set combination were comparable to complete basis set values obtained with standard CCSD(T) and the aug-cc-pVDZ through aug-cc-pVQZ basis set sequence. However, the mean signed deviation was an order of magnitude larger. Problems partially due to basis set superposition error were identified with second row compounds which resulted in a weak performance for the smaller VDZ-F12/VTZ-F12 combination of basis sets.

  1. Material discrimination using scattering and stopping of cosmic ray muons and electrons: Differentiating heavier from lighter metals as well as low-atomic weight materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanpied, Gary; Kumar, Sankaran; Dorroh, Dustin; Morgan, Craig; Blanpied, Isabelle; Sossong, Michael; McKenney, Shawn; Nelson, Beth

    2015-06-01

    Reported is a new method to apply cosmic-ray tomography in a manner that can detect and characterize not only dense assemblages of heavy nuclei (like Special Nuclear Materials, SNM) but also assemblages of medium- and light-atomic-mass materials (such as metal parts, conventional explosives, and organic materials). Characterization may enable discrimination between permitted contents in commerce and contraband (explosives, illegal drugs, and the like). Our Multi-Mode Passive Detection System (MMPDS) relies primarily on the muon component of cosmic rays to interrogate Volumes of Interest (VOI). Muons, highly energetic and massive, pass essentially un-scattered through materials of light atomic mass and are only weakly scattered by conventional metals used in industry. Substantial scattering and absorption only occur when muons encounter sufficient thicknesses of heavy elements characteristic of lead and SNM. Electrons are appreciably scattered by light elements and stopped by sufficient thicknesses of materials containing medium-atomic-mass elements (mostly metals). Data include simulations based upon GEANT and measurements in the HMT (Half Muon Tracker) detector in Poway, CA and a package scanner in both Poway and Socorro NM. A key aspect of the present work is development of a useful parameter, designated the "stopping power" of a sample. The low-density regime, comprising organic materials up to aluminum, is characterized using very little scattering but a strong variation in stopping power. The medium-to-high density regime shows a larger variation in scattering than in stopping power. The detection of emitted gamma rays is another useful signature of some materials.

  2. Probing viscoelastic surfaces with bimodal tapping-mode atomic force microscopy: Underlying physics and observables for a standard linear solid model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary This paper presents computational simulations of single-mode and bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM) with particular focus on the viscoelastic interactions occurring during tip–sample impact. The surface is modeled by using a standard linear solid model, which is the simplest system that can reproduce creep compliance and stress relaxation, which are fundamental behaviors exhibited by viscoelastic surfaces. The relaxation of the surface in combination with the complexities of bimodal tip–sample impacts gives rise to unique dynamic behaviors that have important consequences with regards to the acquisition of quantitative relationships between the sample properties and the AFM observables. The physics of the tip–sample interactions and its effect on the observables are illustrated and discussed, and a brief research outlook on viscoelasticity measurement with intermittent-contact AFM is provided. PMID:25383277

  3. Short-Term Influence of Revised Provincial Accreditation Standards on Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, and Weight Status in Alberta, Canada Child Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Valerie; Clark, Dawne; Ogden, Nancy; Harber, Vicki; Kuzik, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    In December, 2013, revised Alberta child care accreditation standards were released by the Alberta Government in Canada that included a new standard for physical activity and sedentary behavior in accredited child care settings. The main purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the new accreditation standard in increasing physical…

  4. Weighted aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The use of a weighted aggregation technique to improve the precision of the overall LACIE estimate is considered. The manner in which a weighted aggregation technique is implemented given a set of weights is described. The problem of variance estimation is discussed and the question of how to obtain the weights in an operational environment is addressed.

  5. Frequency Standards and Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Lute

    2009-04-01

    over 172 KM of installed fiber / S. Crane -- pt. X. Miniature systems. Chip-scale atomic devices: precision atomic instruments based on MEMS (Invited) / J. Kitching ... [et al.]. CSAC - the chip-scale atomic clock (Invited) / R. Lutwak ... [et al.]. Reaching a few 10[symbol] stability level with a compact cold atom clock / F. X. Esnault ... [et al.]. Evaluation of Lin||Lin CPT for compact and high performance frequency standard / E. Breschi ... [et al.] -- pt. XI. Time scales. Atomic time scales TAI and TI(BIPM): present status and prospects (Invited) / G. Petit. Weight functions for biases in atomic frequency standards / J. H. Shirley -- pt. XII. Interferometers. Definition and construction of noise budget in atom interferometry (Invited) / E. D'Ambriosio. Characterization of a cold atom gyroscope (Invited) / A. Landragin ... [et al.]. A mobile atom interferometer for high precision measurements of local gravity / M. Schmidt ... [et al.]. Demonstration of atom interferometer comprised of geometric beam splitters / Hiromitsu Imai and Atsuo Morinaga -- pt. XIII. New directions. Active optical clocks (Invited) / J. Chen. Prospects for a nuclear optical frequency standard based on Thorium-229 (Invited) / E. Peik ... [et al.]. Whispering gallery mode oscillators and optical comb generators (Invited) / A. B. Matsko ... [et al.]. Frequency comparison using energy-time entangled photons / A. Stefanov -- List of participants.

  6. Body Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart failure, and kidney disease. Good nutrition and exercise can help in losing weight. Eating extra calories within a well-balanced diet and treating any underlying medical problems can help to add weight.

  7. Weight Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... obese. Achieving a healthy weight can help you control your cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar. It ... use more calories than you eat. A weight-control strategy might include Choosing low-fat, low-calorie ...

  8. Body Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... to medicines, thyroid problems, heart failure, and kidney disease. Good nutrition and exercise can help in losing weight. Eating extra calories within a well-balanced diet and treating any underlying medical problems can help to add weight.

  9. Noble metals as permanent chemical modifiers for the determination of mercury in environmental reference materials using solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and calibration against aqueous standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Alessandra Furtado; Welz, Bernhard; Curtius, Adilson J.

    2002-12-01

    Iridium, palladium, rhodium and ruthenium, thermally deposited on the platform, were investigated as permanent modifiers for the determination of mercury in ash, sludge, marine and river sediment reference materials, ground to a particle size of 50 μm, using solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. A total mass of 250 μg of each modifier was applied using 25 injections of 20 μl of modifier solution (500 mg l -1), and executing a temperature program for modifier conditioning after each injection. The performance of palladium was found to be most consistent, taking the characteristic mass as the major criterion, resulting in an excellent correlation between the measured integrated absorbance values and the certified mercury contents. Mercury was found to be lost in part from aqueous solutions during the drying stage in the presence of all the investigated permanent modifiers, as well as in the presence of the palladium and magnesium nitrates modifier added in solution. A loss-free determination of mercury in aqueous solutions could be reached only after the addition of potassium permanganate, which finally made possible the use of aqueous standards for the direct analysis of solid samples. A characteristic mass of 55-60 pg Hg was obtained for the solid samples, using Pd as a permanent modifier, and also in aqueous solutions after the addition of permanganate. The results obtained for mercury in ash, sludge and sediment reference materials, using direct solid sapling and calibration against aqueous standards, as well as the detection limit of 0.2 mg kg -1 were satisfactory for a routine procedure.

  10. Next Generation JPL Ultra-Stable Trapped Ion Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric; Tucker, Blake; Larsen, Kameron; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on two directions: 1) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements, and 2) ultra-stable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate performance. In this paper we present a new ultra-stable trapped ion clock designed, built, and tested in the second category. The first new standard, L10, will be delivered to the Naval Research Laboratory for use in characterizing DoD space clocks.

  11. Rice by Weight, Other Produce by Bulk, and Snared Iguanas at So Much Per One. A Talk on Measurement Standards and on Metric Conversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Harold Don

    This script for a short radio broadcast on measurement standards and metric conversion begins by tracing the rise of the metric system in the international marketplace. Metric units are identified and briefly explained. Arguments for conversion to metric measures are presented. The history of the development and acceptance of the metric system is…

  12. Weight Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quit Smoking Benefits of Quitting Health Effects of Smoking Secondhand Smoke Withdrawal Ways to Quit QuitGuide Pregnancy & Motherhood Pregnancy & Motherhood Before Your Baby is Born From Birth to 2 Years Quitting for Two SmokefreeMom Healthy Kids Parenting & ... Weight Management Weight Management ...

  13. Milk yield and estrous behavior during eight consecutive estruses in Holstein cows fed standardized or high energy diets and grouped according to live weight changes in early lactation.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, C; Barbu, H; Sørensen, M T; Sehested, J; Callesen, H; Vestergaard, M

    2016-04-01

    Cows managed for extended lactation go through several estruses before rebreeding. The aims of this study were (1) to quantify the effect of the first 8 estruses after calving on milk yield, milking frequency, and estrous behavioral activity, and (2) to determine the effects of early lactation live weight gain (LWG) as an indication of energy balance on milk yield, plasma insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) concentration, estrous behavioral activity, interval from calving to first estrus, between-estrus intervals, and pregnancy risk. Milk yield, live weight, and estrous behavioral activity were measured daily in 62 Holstein cows, 17 primiparous and 45 multiparous, managed for an 18-mo calving interval. Blood plasma obtained at wk 3, 5, 12, and 24 after calving was analyzed for IGF-1. Estrus was detected by use of milk progesterone profiles combined with visual observations (i.e., mounting behavior and other). The cows were divided into 2 groups: the cows having a negative LWG in each of the first 5wk postpartum and the cows having a positive LWG in at least 1 of the first 5wk after calving. The results indicate a similar decrease of 0.56kg of milk per day of estrus during each of the 8 consecutive estruses. The activity level was 17±1 movements per hour higher during the 8 estruses compared with the basic activity level. More cows expressed mounting behavior at estrus 8 than at estrus 2 (63.3 and 45.9%, respectively). The negative LWG cows had lower IGF-1 and higher milk production than the positive LWG cows. Both LWG groups had similar interval from calving to first estrus, on average 55 d. To conclude, the decrease in milk yield during estrus is marginal and similar in consecutive estruses. Moreover, estrous behavior is more highly expressed in the later estruses compared with the earlier estruses. Reproductive parameters (frequency of mounting, pregnancy risk, interval to first estrus, and between-estrus intervals) were not influenced by the live weight change

  14. Weight-based Synthesized Standards Preparation for Correction-free Calibration in X-ray Fluorescence Determination of Tungsten in High-speed Steel.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Kenichi; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2015-01-01

    This paper suggests a correction-free calibration method in wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis in order to determine tungsten as a major alloyed element in high-speed steels accurately. Matrix effects on fluorescent X-ray intensity of tungsten Lα line were minimized by borate fusion, and the total amount of tungsten in the glassy matrix could be quantified. Glass bead specimens were prepared with 10 to 12 mg of the steel sample and 4.0 g of lithium tetraborate as a flux agent. Without untraceable X-ray intensity correction, a linear calibration curve was obtained by measuring synthesized calibration standards prepared by using standard solutions. As compared with fundamental parameter calculations, the present method gave more accurate results of tungsten in certified reference materials of high-speed steel. PMID:26256612

  15. 14 CFR 29.25 - Weight limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Weight limits. 29.25 Section 29.25... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 29.25 Weight limits. (a) Maximum weight. The maximum weight (the highest weight at which compliance with each applicable requirement of this part...

  16. 14 CFR 27.25 - Weight limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Weight limits. 27.25 Section 27.25... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 27.25 Weight limits. (a) Maximum weight. The maximum weight (the highest weight at which compliance with each applicable requirement of this part is...

  17. 14 CFR 29.25 - Weight limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Weight limits. 29.25 Section 29.25... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 29.25 Weight limits. (a) Maximum weight. The maximum weight (the highest weight at which compliance with each applicable requirement of this part...

  18. 14 CFR 29.25 - Weight limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Weight limits. 29.25 Section 29.25... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 29.25 Weight limits. (a) Maximum weight. The maximum weight (the highest weight at which compliance with each applicable requirement of this part...

  19. 14 CFR 29.25 - Weight limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Weight limits. 29.25 Section 29.25... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 29.25 Weight limits. (a) Maximum weight. The maximum weight (the highest weight at which compliance with each applicable requirement of this part...

  20. 14 CFR 27.25 - Weight limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Weight limits. 27.25 Section 27.25... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 27.25 Weight limits. (a) Maximum weight. The maximum weight (the highest weight at which compliance with each applicable requirement of this part is...

  1. 14 CFR 27.25 - Weight limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Weight limits. 27.25 Section 27.25... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 27.25 Weight limits. (a) Maximum weight. The maximum weight (the highest weight at which compliance with each applicable requirement of this part is...

  2. 14 CFR 27.25 - Weight limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Weight limits. 27.25 Section 27.25... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 27.25 Weight limits. (a) Maximum weight. The maximum weight (the highest weight at which compliance with each applicable requirement of this part is...

  3. 14 CFR 27.25 - Weight limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Weight limits. 27.25 Section 27.25... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 27.25 Weight limits. (a) Maximum weight. The maximum weight (the highest weight at which compliance with each applicable requirement of this part is...

  4. 14 CFR 29.25 - Weight limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Weight limits. 29.25 Section 29.25... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 29.25 Weight limits. (a) Maximum weight. The maximum weight (the highest weight at which compliance with each applicable requirement of this part...

  5. 14 CFR 31.14 - Weight limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Weight limits. 31.14 Section 31.14... STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Flight Requirements § 31.14 Weight limits. (a) The range of weights over which the balloon may be safely operated must be established. (b) Maximum weight. The maximum weight...

  6. 14 CFR 23.25 - Weight limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Weight limits. 23.25 Section 23.25... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 23.25 Weight limits. (a) Maximum weight. The maximum weight is the highest weight at which compliance with each...

  7. 14 CFR 23.25 - Weight limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Weight limits. 23.25 Section 23.25... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 23.25 Weight limits. (a) Maximum weight. The maximum weight is the highest weight at which compliance with each...

  8. A within-trial cost-effectiveness analysis of primary care referral to a commercial provider for weight loss treatment, relative to standard care—an international randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, N R; Colagiuri, S; Schofield, D; Olson, A D; Shrestha, R; Holzapfel, C; Wolfenstetter, S B; Holle, R; Ahern, A L; Hauner, H; Jebb, S A; Caterson, I D

    2013-01-01

    Background: Due to the high prevalence of overweight and obesity there is a need to identify cost-effective approaches for weight loss in primary care and community settings. Objective: We evaluated the cost effectiveness of two weight loss programmes of 1-year duration, either standard care (SC) as defined by national guidelines, or a commercial provider (Weight Watchers) (CP). Design: This analysis was based on a randomised controlled trial of 772 adults (87% female; age 47.4±12.9 years; body mass index 31.4±2.6 kg m−2) recruited by health professionals in primary care in Australia, United Kingdom and Germany. Both a health sector and societal perspective were adopted to calculate the cost per kilogram of weight loss and the ICER, expressed as the cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY). Results: The cost per kilogram of weight loss was USD122, 90 and 180 for the CP in Australia, the United Kingdom and Germany, respectively. For SC the cost was USD138, 151 and 133, respectively. From a health-sector perspective, the ICER for the CP relative to SC was USD18 266, 12 100 and 40 933 for Australia, the United Kingdom and Germany, respectively. Corresponding societal ICER figures were USD31 663, 24 996 and 51 571. Conclusion: The CP was a cost-effective approach from a health funder and societal perspective. Despite participants in the CP group attending two to three times more meetings than the SC group, the CP was still cost effective even including these added patient travel costs. This study indicates that it is cost effective for general practitioners (GPs) to refer overweight and obese patients to a CP, which may be better value than expending public funds on GP visits to manage this problem. PMID:22929209

  9. The weight of mass or the mass of weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gat, U.

    1987-06-01

    This paper explores the cause of confusion associated with the words mass and weight, and offers suggestions to correct the problem. It is recommended that in technical and scientific use, weight shall be restricted to mean force of gravity. Technical standards, ASTM and others, and terminology shall clearly reflect and define weight to be force of gravity. Weight should be avoided in technical context because of its imprecision. Legal, formal, and official language shall use weight to mean force only. Under no circumstances should the SI units of mass, the kilogram, or its derivatives, be associated with weight. The term weight should be avoided in any language and wording that intends to convey a precise or important meaning. ASTM should revise all standards and terminology accordingly.

  10. Weight simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. H.; Young, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    Device applies compressive force to bone to minimize loss of bone calcium during weightlessness or bedrest. Force is applied through weights, or hydraulic, pneumatic or electrically actuated devices. Device is lightweight and easy to maintain and operate.

  11. Assessment in the Weight Room

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Tim; Jenkins, Jayne

    2006-01-01

    Physical educators continually investigate purposeful, meaningful, and authentic means to assess student learning in relationship to the national standards. Here, the authors describe a means of assessing several of the national standards for physical education in a high school weight training class. Adopting the North Dakota Standards for…

  12. Serial weighting of micro-objects with resonant microchanneled cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Ossola, Dario; Dörig, Pablo; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vassalli, Massimo

    2016-10-14

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers have proven to be very effective mass sensors. The attachment of a small mass to a vibrating cantilever produces a resonance frequency shift that can be monitored, providing the ability to measure mass changes down to a few molecules resolution. Nevertheless, the lack of a practical method to handle the catch and release process required for dynamic weighting of microobjects strongly hindered the application of the technology beyond proof of concept measurements. Here, a method is proposed in which FluidFM hollow cantilevers are exploited to overcome the standard limitations of AFM-based mass sensors, providing high throughput single object weighting with picogram accuracy. The extension of the dynamic models of AFM cantilevers to hollow cantilevers was discussed and the effectiveness of mass weighting in air was validated on test samples. PMID:27608651

  13. 14 CFR 25.25 - Weight limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Weight limits. 25.25 Section 25.25 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.25 Weight limits. (a) Maximum weights. Maximum weights corresponding to the...

  14. 14 CFR 25.25 - Weight limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Weight limits. 25.25 Section 25.25... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.25 Weight limits. (a) Maximum weights. Maximum weights corresponding to the airplane operating conditions (such as ramp, ground or water taxi,...

  15. 14 CFR 25.25 - Weight limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Weight limits. 25.25 Section 25.25... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.25 Weight limits. (a) Maximum weights. Maximum weights corresponding to the airplane operating conditions (such as ramp, ground or water taxi,...

  16. Scuba Weights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Attitude Adjuster is a system for weight repositioning corresponding to a SCUBA diver's changing positions. Compact tubes on the diver's air tank permit controlled movement of lead balls within the Adjuster, automatically repositioning when the diver changes position. Manufactured by Think Tank Technologies, the system is light and small, reducing drag and energy requirements and contributing to lower air consumption. The Mid-Continent Technology Transfer Center helped the company with both technical and business information and arranged for the testing at Marshall Space Flight Center's Weightlessness Environmental Training Facility for astronauts.

  17. Liquid atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayvel, L.; Orzechowski, Z.

    The present text defines the physical processes of liquid atomization, the primary types of atomizers and their design, and ways of measuring spray characteristics; it also presents experimental investigation results on atomizers and illustrative applications for them. Attention is given to the macrostructural and microstructural parameters of atomized liquids; swirl, pneumatic, and rotary atomizers; and optical drop sizing methods, with emphasis on nonintrusive optical methods.

  18. Implications of Research on Children's Learning for Standards and Assessment: A Proposed Learning Progression for Matter and the Atomic-Molecular Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carol L.; Wiser, Marianne; Anderson, Charles W.; Krajcik, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to suggest ways of using research on children's reasoning and learning to elaborate on existing national standards and to improve large-scale and classroom assessments. The authors suggest that "learning progressions"--descriptions of successively more sophisticated ways of reasoning within a content domain based on…

  19. Atomic branching in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Ernesto; Rodríguez-Velázquez, Juan A.; Randić, Milan

    A graph theoretic measure of extended atomic branching is defined that accounts for the effects of all atoms in the molecule, giving higher weight to the nearest neighbors. It is based on the counting of all substructures in which an atom takes part in a molecule. We prove a theorem that permits the exact calculation of this measure based on the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the adjacency matrix of the graph representing a molecule. The definition of this measure within the context of the Hückel molecular orbital (HMO) and its calculation for benzenoid hydrocarbons are also studied. We show that the extended atomic branching can be defined using any real symmetric matrix, as well as any Hermitian (self-adjoint) matrix, which permits its calculation in topological, geometrical, and quantum chemical contexts.

  20. Evaluation of Bi as internal standard to minimize matrix effects on the direct determination of Pb in vinegar by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using Ru permanent modifier with co-injection of Pd/Mg(NO 3) 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Silvana Ruella; Neto, José Anchieta Gomes

    2007-09-01

    Bismuth was evaluated as an internal standard for the direct determination of Pb in vinegar by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using Ru as a permanent modifier with co-injection of Pd/Mg(NO 3) 2. The correlation coefficient of the graph plotted from the normalized absorbance signals of Bi versus Pb was r = 0.989. Matrix effects were evaluated by analyzing the slope ratios between the analytical curve obtained from reference solutions prepared in 0.2% (v/v) HNO 3 and analytical curves obtained from Pb additions in red and white wine vinegar samples. The calculated ratios were around 1.04 and 1.02 for analytical curves established applying an internal standard and 1.3 and 1.5 for analytical curves without. Analytical curves in the 2.5-15 μg L - 1 Pb concentration interval were established using the ratio Pb absorbance to Bi absorbance versus analyte concentration, and typical linear correlations of r = 0.999 were obtained. The proposed method was applied for direct determination of Pb in 18 commercial vinegar samples and the Pb concentration varied from 2.6 to 31 μg L - 1 . Results were in agreement at a 95% confidence level (paired t-test) with those obtained for digested samples. Recoveries of Pb added to vinegars varied from 96 to 108% with and from 72 to 86% without an internal standard. Two water standard reference materials diluted in vinegar sample were also analyzed and results were in agreement with certified values at a 95% confidence level. The characteristic mass was 40 pg Pb and the useful lifetime of the tube was around 1600 firings. The limit of detection was 0.3 μg L - 1 and the relative standard deviation was ≤ 3.8% and ≤ 8.3% ( n = 12) for a sample containing 10 μg L - 1 Pb with and without internal standard, respectively.

  1. Rapid weight loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... loss-rapid weight loss; Overweight-rapid weight loss; Obesity-rapid weight loss; Diet-rapid weight loss ... for people who have health problems because of obesity. For these people, losing a lot of weight ...

  2. Pregnancy Weight Gain Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsroom Dietary Guidelines Communicator’s Guide Pregnancy Weight Gain Calculator You are here Home / Online Tools Pregnancy Weight Gain Calculator Print Share Pregnancy Weight Gain Calculator Pregnancy Weight Gain Calculator Pregnancy Weight Gain Intro ...

  3. AtomEye: an efficient atomistic configuration viewer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ju

    2003-03-01

    AtomEye is free atomistic visualization software for all major UNIX platforms. It is based on a newly developed graphics core library of higher quality than the X-window standard, with area-weighted anti-aliasing. An order-N neighbourlist algorithm is used to compute the bond connectivity. The functionalities of AtomEye include: parallel and perspective projections with full three-dimensional navigation; customizable bond and coordination number calculation; colour-encoding of arbitrary user-defined quantities; local atomic strain invariant; coloured atom tiling and tracing; up to 16 cutting planes; periodic boundary condition translations; high-quality JPEG, PNG and EPS screenshots; and animation scripting. The program is efficient compared to OpenGL hardware acceleration by employing special algorithms to treat spheres (atoms) and cylinders (bonds), in which they are rendered as primitive objects rather than as composites of polygons. AtomEye can handle more than one million atoms on a PC with 1 GB memory. It is a robust, low-cost tool for surveying nanostructures and following their evolutions.

  4. Simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnly, James M.; Miller-Ihli, Nancy J.; O'Haver, Thomas C.

    The extended analytical range capability of a simultaneous multielement atomic absorption continuum source spectrometer (SIMAAC) was tested for furnace atomization with respect to the signal measurement mode (peak height and area), the atomization mode (from the wall or from a platform), and the temperature program mode (stepped or ramped atomization). These parameters were evaluated with respect to the shapes of the analytical curves, the detection limits, carry-over contamination and accuracy. Peak area measurements gave more linear calibration curves. Methods for slowing the atomization step heating rate, the use of a ramped temperature program or a platform, produced similar calibration curves and longer linear ranges than atomization with a stepped temperature program. Peak height detection limits were best using stepped atomization from the wall. Peak area detection limits for all atomization modes were similar. Carry-over contamination was worse for peak area than peak height, worse for ramped atomization than stepped atomization, and worse for atomization from a platform than from the wall. Accurate determinations (100 ± 12% for Ca, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn in National Bureau of Standards' Standard Reference Materials Bovine Liver 1577 and Rice Flour 1568 were obtained using peak area measurements with ramped atomization from the wall and stepped atomization from a platform. Only stepped atomization from a platform gave accurate recoveries for K. Accurate recoveries, 100 ± 10%, with precisions ranging from 1 to 36 % (standard deviation), were obtained for the determination of Al, Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni. Pb, V and Zn in Acidified Waters (NBS SRM 1643 and 1643a) using stepped atomization from a platform.

  5. Atomic polarizabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, M. S.; Mitroy, J.; Clark, Charles W.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  6. Cobalt internal standard for Ni to assist the simultaneous determination of Mo and Ni in plant materials by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry employing direct solid sample analysis.

    PubMed

    de Babos, Diego Victor; Bechlin, Marcos André; Barros, Ariane Isis; Ferreira, Edilene Cristina; Gomes Neto, José Anchieta; de Oliveira, Silvana Ruella

    2016-05-15

    A new method is proposed for the simultaneous determination of Mo and Ni in plant materials by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GFAAS), employing direct solid sample analysis (DSS) and internal standardization (IS). Cobalt was used as internal standard to minimize matrix effects during Ni determinations, enabling the use of aqueous standards for calibration. Correlation coefficients for the calibration curves were typically better than 0.9937. The performance of the method was checked by analysis of six plant certified reference materials, and the results for Mo and Ni were in agreement with the certified values (95% confidence level, t-test). Analysis was made of different types of plant materials used as renewable sources of energy, including sugarcane leaves, banana tree fiber, soybean straw, coffee pods, orange bagasse, peanut hulls, and sugarcane bagasse. The concentrations found for Mo and Ni ranged from 0.08 to 0.63 ng mg(-1) and from 0.41 to 6.92 ng mg(-1), respectively. Precision (RSD) varied from 2.1% to 11% for Mo and from 3.7% to 10% for Ni. Limits of quantification of 0.055 and 0.074 ng were obtained for Mo and Ni, respectively. PMID:26992542

  7. 12 CFR 3.32 - General risk weights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General risk weights. 3.32 Section 3.32 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CAPITAL ADEQUACY STANDARDS Risk-Weighted Assets-Standardized Approach Risk-Weighted Assets for General Credit Risk § 3.32 General risk weights. (a) Sovereign exposures—(1)...

  8. 14 CFR 31.16 - Empty weight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Empty weight. 31.16 Section 31.16... STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Flight Requirements § 31.16 Empty weight. The empty weight must be determined by weighing the balloon with installed equipment but without lifting gas or heater fuel....

  9. 14 CFR 31.16 - Empty weight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Empty weight. 31.16 Section 31.16... STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Flight Requirements § 31.16 Empty weight. The empty weight must be determined by weighing the balloon with installed equipment but without lifting gas or heater fuel....

  10. 14 CFR 31.16 - Empty weight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Empty weight. 31.16 Section 31.16... STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Flight Requirements § 31.16 Empty weight. The empty weight must be determined by weighing the balloon with installed equipment but without lifting gas or heater fuel....

  11. 14 CFR 31.16 - Empty weight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Empty weight. 31.16 Section 31.16 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Flight Requirements § 31.16 Empty weight. The empty weight must...

  12. 14 CFR 31.16 - Empty weight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Empty weight. 31.16 Section 31.16 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Flight Requirements § 31.16 Empty weight. The empty weight must...

  13. 14 CFR 31.14 - Weight limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Weight limits. 31.14 Section 31.14 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Flight Requirements § 31.14 Weight limits. (a) The range of weights...

  14. Energy partitioning for ``fuzzy'' atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, P.; Mayer, I.

    2004-03-01

    The total energy of a molecule is presented as a sum of one- and two-atomic energy components in terms of "fuzzy" atoms, i.e., such divisions of the three-dimensional physical space into atomic regions in which the regions assigned to the individual atoms have no sharp boundaries but exhibit a continuous transition from one to another. By proper definitions the energy components are on the chemical energy scale. The method is realized by using Becke's integration scheme and weight function permitting very effective numerical integrations.

  15. High Discrepancy in Abdominal Obesity Prevalence According to Different Waist Circumference Cut-Offs and Measurement Methods in Children: Need for Age-Risk-Weighted Standardized Cut-Offs?

    PubMed Central

    Prodam, Flavia; Fuiano, Nicola; Diddi, Giuliana; Petri, Antonella; Bellone, Simonetta; Bona, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Background Waist circumference (WC) is a good proxy measure of central adiposity. Due to the multiplicity of existing WC cut-offs and different measurement methods, the decision to use one rather than another WC chart may lead to different prevalence estimates of abdominal obesity in the same population. Aim of our study was to assess how much the prevalence of abdominal obesity varies in Italian schoolchildren using the different available WC cut-offs. Methods We measured WC at just above the uppermost lateral border of the right ilium in 1062 Italian schoolchildren aged 7–14 years, 499 living in Northern Italy and 563 in Southern Italy. Abdominal obesity was defined as WC ≥90th percentile for gender and age according to nine WC charts. Results We found an extremely high variability in the prevalence of abdominal obesity detected in our study-populations according to the different WC charts, ranging in the overall group from 9.1% to 61.4%. In Northern Italy children it varied from 2.4% to 35.7%, and in Southern ones from 15.1% to 84.2%. Conclusions On the basis of the chosen WC cut-offs the prevalence of abdominal obesity varies widely, because percentile-charts are strongly influenced by the population status in a particular moment. A further rate of variability may lay on the site of WC measurement and on the statistical method used to calculate WC cut-offs. Risk-weighted WC cut-offs measured in a standardized anatomic site and calculated by the appropriate method are needed to simply identify by WC measurement those children at high risk of cardio-metabolic complications to whom specific and prompt health interventions should be addressed. PMID:26745148

  16. VCSELs for atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkland, Darwin K.; Peake, Gregory M.; Geib, Kent M.; Lutwak, Robert; Garvey, R. Michael; Varghese, Mathew; Mescher, Mark

    2006-02-01

    The spectroscopic technique of coherent population trapping (CPT) enables an all-optical interrogation of the groundstate hyperfine splitting of cesium (or rubidium), compared to the optical-microwave double resonance technique conventionally employed in atomic frequency standards. All-optical interrogation enables the reduction of the size and power consumption of an atomic clock by two orders of magnitude, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are preferred optical sources due to their low power consumption and circular output beam. Several research teams are currently using VCSELs for DARPA's chip-scale atomic clock (CSAC) program with the goal of producing an atomic clock having a volume < 1 cm^3, a power consumption < 30 mW, and an instability (Allan deviation) < 1x10^-11 during a 1-hour averaging interval. This paper describes the VCSEL requirements for CPT-based atomic clocks, which include single mode operation, single polarization operation, modulation bandwidth > 4 GHz, low power consumption (for the CSAC), narrow linewidth, and low relative intensity noise (RIN). A significant manufacturing challenge is to reproducibly obtain the required wavelength at the specified VCSEL operating temperature and drive current. Data are presented that show the advantage of operating at the D1 (rather than D2) resonance of the alkali atoms. Measurements of VCSEL linewidth will be discussed in particular, since atomic clock performance is especially sensitive to this parameter.

  17. Establishment of 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray calibration fields produced using the 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator at the Facility of Radiation Standards, Japan Atomic Energy Agency.

    PubMed

    Kowatari, Munehiko; Tanimura, Yoshihiko

    2016-03-01

    A 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray field, produced by the nuclear reaction of (19)F(p, αγ)(16)O, has been established at the Facility of Radiation Standards (FRS) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency for calibration purposes. Basic dosimetric quantities (i.e. averaged gamma-ray energy, air-kerma-to-dose equivalent conversion coefficients and air kerma rates at the point of test) have been precisely determined through a series of measurements using the NaI(Tl) spectrometer and an ionisation chamber coupled with an appropriate build-up material. The measurements obtained comply with values recommended by the International Organization for Standardization for an 'R-F field'. The neutron contamination component for the field has also been measured by means of a conventional neutron dose equivalent meter (the so-called neutron rem-counter) and determined to be ∼ 0.5 % of the total dose equivalent. PMID:26012483

  18. Atomic supersymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostelecky, V. Alan

    1993-01-01

    Atomic supersymmetry is a quantum-mechanical supersymmetry connecting the properties of different atoms and ions. A short description of some established results in the subject are provided and a few recent developments are discussed including the extension to parabolic coordinates and the calculation of Stark maps using supersymmetry-based models.

  19. Liquid atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Walzel, P. )

    1993-01-01

    A systematic review of different liquid atomizers is presented, accompanied by a discussion of various mechanisms of droplet formation in a gas atmosphere as a function of the liquid flow-regime and the geometry of the atomizer. Equations are presented for the calculation of the mean droplet-diameter. In many applications, details of the droplet size distribution are, also, important, e.g., approximate values of the breadth of the droplet formation are given. The efficiency of utilization of mechanical energy in droplet formation is indicated for the different types of atomizers. Atomization is used, in particular, for the following purposes: (1) atomization of fuels; (2) making granular products; (3) carrying out mass-transfer operations; and (4) coating of surfaces.

  20. Keynote address: The past, present, and future of atomic time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Norman F.

    1990-01-01

    The early history of atomic time and frequency standards is reviewed. The most accurate and stable present standards are described. Prospective future improvements are discussed, particularly those with laser cooling and with trapped ions and atoms.

  1. Building and analyzing models from data by stirred tank experiments for investigation of matrix effects caused by inorganic matrices and selection of internal standards in Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotti, Marco; Paredes, Eduardo; Maestre, Salvador; Todolí, José Luis

    2008-05-01

    Interfering effects caused by inorganic matrices (inorganic acids as well as easily ionized elements) in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy have been modeled by regression analysis of experimental data obtained using the "stirred tank method". The main components of the experimental set-up were a magnetically-stirred container and two peristaltic pumps. In this way the matrix composition was gradually and automatically varied, while the analyte concentration remained unchanged throughout the experiment. An inductively coupled plasma spectrometer with multichannel detection based on coupled charge device was used to simultaneously measure the emission signal at several wavelengths when the matrix concentration was modified. Up to 50 different concentrations were evaluated in a period of time of 10 min. Both single interfering species (nitric, hydrochloric and sulphuric acids, sodium and calcium) and different mixtures (aqua regia, sulfonitric mixture, sodium-calcium mixture and sodium-nitric acid mixture) were investigated. The dependence of the emission signal on acid concentration was well-fitted by logarithmic models. Conversely, for the easily ionized elements, 3-order polynomial models were more suitable to describe the trends. Then, the coefficients of these models were used as "signatures" of the matrix-related signal variations and analyzed by principal component analysis. Similarities and differences among the emission lines were highlighted and discussed, providing a new insight into the interference phenomena, mainly with regards to the combined effect of concomitants. The combination of the huge amount of data obtained by the stirred tank method in a short period of time and the speed of analysis of principal component analysis provided a judicious means for the selection of the optimal internal standard in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy.

  2. Effect of clothing weight on body weight

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: In clinical settings, it is common to measure weight of clothed patients and estimate a correction for the weight of clothing, but we can find no papers in the medical literature regarding the variability in clothing weight with weather, season, and gender. Methods: Fifty adults (35 wom...

  3. Informed Test Component Weighting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence M.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies and evaluates alternative methods for weighting tests. Presents formulas for composite reliability and validity as a function of component weights and suggests a rational process that identifies and considers trade-offs in determining weights. Discusses drawbacks to implicit weighting and explicit weighting and the difficulty of…

  4. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  5. Kinetic Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  6. Newton's Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaney, Andrea; Espinosa, James; Espinosa, James

    2006-10-01

    At the turn of the twentieth century, physicists and chemists were developing atomic models. Some of the phenomena that they had to explain were the periodic table, the stability of the atom, and the emission spectra. Niels Bohr is known as making the first modern picture that accounted for these. Unknown to much of the physics community is the work of Walter Ritz. His model explained more emission spectra and predates Bohr's work. We will fit several spectra using Ritz's magnetic model for the atom. The problems of stability and chemical periodicity will be shown to be challenges that this model has difficulty solving, but we will present some potentially useful adaptations to the Ritzian atom that can account for them.

  7. Determination of cadmium in the livers and kidneys of puffins by carbon furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ottaway, J M; Campbell, W C

    1976-01-01

    A carbon furnace atomic absorption procedure is described for the determination of cadmium in the livers and kidneys of puffins, fratercula arctica. Samples are dried and weighed and 2 to 100 mg are dissolved in sulphuric and nitric acids. These solutions are analysed directly in the carbon furnace against aqueous standards and provide accurate results in the range 0-1 to 100 micrograms/g dry weight. The method is simple and rapid and requires much less of the small total sample than would be required for flame atomic absorption. PMID:1030692

  8. Cold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellac, Michel Le

    2014-11-01

    This chapter and the following one address collective effects of quantum particles, that is, the effects which are observed when we put together a large number of identical particles, for example, electrons, helium-4 or rubidium-85 atoms. We shall see that quantum particles can be classified into two categories, bosons and fermions, whose collective behavior is radically different. Bosons have a tendency to pile up in the same quantum state, while fermions have a tendency to avoid each other. We say that bosons and fermions obey two different quantum statistics, the Bose-Einstein and the Fermi-Dirac statistics, respectively. Temperature is a collective effect, and in Section 5.1 we shall explain the concept of absolute temperature and its relation to the average kinetic energy of molecules. We shall describe in Section 5.2 how we can cool atoms down thanks to the Doppler effect, and explain how cold atoms can be used to improve the accuracy of atomic clocks by a factor of about 100. The effects of quantum statistics are prominent at low temperatures, and atom cooling will be used to obtain Bose-Einstein condensates at low enough temperatures, when the atoms are bosons.

  9. Molecular weight determinations of biosolubilized coals

    SciTech Connect

    Linehan, J.C.; Clauss, S.; Bean, R.; Campbell, J.

    1991-05-01

    We have compared several different methods for determining the molecular weight of biosolubilized coals: Aqueous gel permeation Chromatography (GPC), organic GPC, preparative GPC, dynamic laser light scattering (LLS), static LLS, static LLS, mass spectrometry, vapor phase osmometry (VPO) and ultrafiltration. We have found that careful consideration must be given to the molecular weight result obtained from each method. The average molecular weight and the molecular weight distribution were found to be dependent upon many factors, including the technique used; molecular weight standards, pH, and the percentage of sample analyzed. Weight average molecular weights, M{sub w}, obtained for biosolubilized leonardite range from 800,000 daltons for neutral pH aqueous GPC based on polyethylene glycol molecular weight standards to 570 daltons for pH 11.5 buffered aqueous GPC based on a fulvic acid standard. It is clear that the state of association of the biocoal analyte, as well as the interactions of sample with the separation matrix, can have large influence of the observed result, and these must be understood before reliable GPC measurements can be made. Furthermore, a uniform set of molecular weight standards for biodegraded coals is needed. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  10. RADIOACTIVE CHEMICAL ELEMENTS IN THE ATOMIC TABLE.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-08-13

    In the 1949 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, a series of new elements were added to the Atomic Weights Table. Since these elements had been produced in the laboratory and were not discovered in nature, the atomic weight value of these artificial products would depend upon the production method. Since atomic weight is a property of an element as it occurs in nature, it would be incorrect to assign an atomic weight value to that element. As a result of that discussion, the Commission decided to provide only the mass number of the most stable (longest-lived) known isotope as the number to be associated with these entries in the Atomic Weights Table. As a function of time, the mass number associated with various elements has changed as longer-lived isotopes of a particular elements has been found in nature, or as improved half-life values of an element's isotopes might cause a shift in the longest-lived isotope from one mass number to another. In the 1957 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, it was decided to discontinue the listing of the mass number in the Atomic Weights Table on the grounds that the kind of information supplied by the mass number is inconsistent with the primary purpose of the Table, i.e., to provide accurate values of ''these constants'' for use in chemical calculations. In addition to the Table of Atomic Weights, the Commission included an auxiliary Table of Radioactive Elements for the first time, where the entry would be the isotope of that element which was most stable, i.e., it had the longest known half-life. In their 1973 report, the Commission noted that the users of the Atomic Weights Table were dissatisfied with the omission of values in the Table for some elements and it was decided to reintroduce the mass number for elements. In their 1983 report, the Commission decided that radioactive elements were considered to lack a characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition, from which an atomic weight value could be calculated to

  11. Assessing Your Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... Measure and Interpret Weight Status Adult Body Mass Index or BMI Body Mass Index (BMI) is a person's weight in kilograms divided ... finding your height and weight in this BMI Index Chart 1 . If your BMI is less than ...

  12. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip–sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surface as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young’s modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single- and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip–sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. A multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information. PMID:27335746

  13. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: Coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2016-04-15

    Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip-sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surfacemore » as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young's modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single-and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip-sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. As a result, a multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information.« less

  14. Primary Atomic Clock Reference System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    An artist's concept of the Primary Atomic Clock Reference System (PARCS) plarned to fly on the International Space Station (ISS). PARCS will make even more accurate atomic time available to everyone, from physicists testing Einstein's Theory of Relativity, to hikers using the Global Positioning System to find their way. In ground-based atomic clocks, lasers are used to cool and nearly stop atoms of cesium whose vibrations are used as the time base. The microgravity of space will allow the atoms to be suspended in the clock rather than circulated in an atomic fountain, as required on Earth. PARCS is being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with principal investigators at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado, Boulder. See also No. 0103191

  15. Primary Atomic Clock Reference System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    An artist's concept of the Primary Atomic Clock Reference System (PARCS) plarned to fly on the International Space Station (ISS). PARCS will make even more accurate atomic time available to everyone, from physicists testing Einstein's Theory of Relativity, to hikers using the Global Positioning System to find their way. In ground-based atomic clocks, lasers are used to cool and nearly stop atoms of cesium whose vibrations are used as the time base. The microgravity of space will allow the atoms to be suspended in the clock rather than circulated in an atomic fountain, as required on Earth. PARCS is being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with principal investigators at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado, Boulder. See also No. 0100120.

  16. A Simple Relativistic Bohr Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzis, Andreas F.

    2008-01-01

    A simple concise relativistic modification of the standard Bohr model for hydrogen-like atoms with circular orbits is presented. As the derivation requires basic knowledge of classical and relativistic mechanics, it can be taught in standard courses in modern physics and introductory quantum mechanics. In addition, it can be shown in a class that…

  17. Atomic research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Connatser, Robert; Cothren, Bobby; Johnson, R. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work performed by the University of Alabama in Huntsville's (UAH) Center for Applied Optics (CAO) entitled Atomic Research is documented. Atomic oxygen (AO) effects on materials have long been a critical concern in designing spacecraft to withstand exposure to the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. The objective of this research effort was to provide technical expertise in the design of instrumentation and experimental techniques for analyzing materials exposed to atomic oxygen in accelerated testing at NASA/MSFC. Such testing was required to answer fundamental questions concerning Space Station Freedom (SSF) candidate materials and materials exposed to atomic oxygen aboard the Long-Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The primary UAH task was to provide technical design, review, and analysis to MSFC in the development of a state-of-the-art 5eV atomic oxygen beam facility required to simulate the RAM-induced low earth orbit (LEO) AO environment. This development was to be accomplished primarily at NASA/MSFC. In support of this task, contamination effects and ultraviolet (UV) simulation testing was also to be carried out using NASA/MSFC facilities. Any materials analysis of LDEF samples was to be accomplished at UAH.

  18. Actuated atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, Charles (Inventor); Weiler, Jeff (Inventor); Palmer, Randall (Inventor); Appel, Philip (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An actuated atomizer is adapted for spray cooling or other applications wherein a well-developed, homogeneous and generally conical spray mist is required. The actuated atomizer includes an outer shell formed by an inner ring; an outer ring; an actuator insert and a cap. A nozzle framework is positioned within the actuator insert. A base of the nozzle framework defines swirl inlets, a swirl chamber and a swirl chamber. A nozzle insert defines a center inlet and feed ports. A spool is positioned within the coil housing, and carries the coil windings having a number of turns calculated to result in a magnetic field of sufficient strength to overcome the bias of the spring. A plunger moves in response to the magnetic field of the windings. A stop prevents the pintle from being withdrawn excessively. A pintle, positioned by the plunger, moves between first and second positions. In the first position, the head of the pintle blocks the discharge passage of the nozzle framework, thereby preventing the atomizer from discharging fluid. In the second position, the pintle is withdrawn from the swirl chamber, allowing the atomizer to release atomized fluid. A spring biases the pintle to block the discharge passage. The strength of the spring is overcome, however, by the magnetic field created by the windings positioned on the spool, which withdraws the plunger into the spool and further compresses the spring.

  19. Atomic resolution crystal structure of VcLMWPTP-1 from Vibrio cholerae O395: Insights into a novel mode of dimerization in the low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase family

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, Seema; Banerjee, Ramanuj; Sen, Udayaditya

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • VcLMWPTP-1 forms dimer in solution. • The dimer is catalytically active unlike other reported dimeric LMWPTPs. • The formation of extended dimeric surface excludes the active site pocket. • The surface bears closer resemblance to eukaryotic LMWPTPs. - Abstract: Low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMWPTP) is a group of phosphotyrosine phosphatase ubiquitously found in a wide range of organisms ranging from bacteria to mammals. Dimerization in the LMWPTP family has been reported earlier which follows a common mechanism involving active site residues leading to an enzymatically inactive species. Here we report a novel form of dimerization in a LMWPTP from Vibrio cholera 0395 (VcLMWPTP-1). Studies in solution reveal the existence of the dimer in solution while kinetic study depicts the active form of the enzyme. This indicates that the mode of dimerization in VcLMWPTP-1 is different from others where active site residues are not involved in the process. A high resolution (1.45 Å) crystal structure of VcLMWPTP-1 confirms a different mode of dimerization where the active site is catalytically accessible as evident by a tightly bound substrate mimicking ligand, MOPS at the active site pocket. Although being a member of a prokaryotic protein family, VcLMWPTP-1 structure resembles very closely to LMWPTP from a eukaryote, Entamoeba histolytica. It also delineates the diverse surface properties around the active site of the enzyme.

  20. Body Weight Relationships in Early Marriage: Weight Relevance, Weight Comparisons, and Weight Talk

    PubMed Central

    Bove, Caron F.; Sobal, Jeffery

    2011-01-01

    This investigation uncovered processes underlying the dynamics of body weight and body image among individuals involved in nascent heterosexual marital relationships in Upstate New York. In-depth, semi-structured qualitative interviews conducted with 34 informants, 20 women and 14 men, just prior to marriage and again one year later were used to explore continuity and change in cognitive, affective, and behavioral factors relating to body weight and body image at the time of marriage, an important transition in the life course. Three major conceptual themes operated in the process of developing and enacting informants’ body weight relationships with their partner: weight relevance, weight comparisons, and weight talk. Weight relevance encompassed the changing significance of weight during early marriage and included attracting and capturing a mate, relaxing about weight, living healthily, and concentrating on weight. Weight comparisons between partners involved weight relativism, weight competition, weight envy, and weight role models. Weight talk employed pragmatic talk, active and passive reassurance, and complaining and critiquing criticism. Concepts emerging from this investigation may be useful in designing future studies of and approaches to managing body weight in adulthood. PMID:21864601

  1. 12 CFR 3.152 - Simple risk weight approach (SRWA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Simple risk weight approach (SRWA). 3.152... STANDARDS Risk-Weighted Assets-Internal Ratings-Based and Advanced Measurement Approaches Risk-Weighted Assets for Equity Exposures § 3.152 Simple risk weight approach (SRWA). (a) General. Under the SRWA,...

  2. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kasevich, Mark

    2008-05-08

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton's constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gyroscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be used to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  3. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Kasevich

    2008-05-07

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  4. Atom Interferometry

    ScienceCinema

    Mark Kasevich

    2010-01-08

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton?s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  5. 7 CFR 29.111 - Weight determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Weight determinations. 29.111 Section 29.111 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Regulations Inspectors, Samplers, and Weighers § 29.111 Weight...

  6. Iterative methods for weighted least-squares

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrovnikova, E.Y.; Vavasis, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    A weighted least-squares problem with a very ill-conditioned weight matrix arises in many applications. Because of round-off errors, the standard conjugate gradient method for solving this system does not give the correct answer even after n iterations. In this paper we propose an iterative algorithm based on a new type of reorthogonalization that converges to the solution.

  7. Proven Weight Loss Methods

    MedlinePlus

    Fact Sheet Proven Weight Loss Methods What can weight loss do for you? Losing weight can improve your health in a number of ways. It can lower ... at www.hormone.org/Spanish . Proven Weight Loss Methods Fact Sheet www.hormone.org

  8. Weight Loss Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Weight loss surgery helps people with extreme obesity to lose weight. It may be an option if you cannot lose weight through diet and exercise or have serious health problems caused by obesity. There are different types of weight loss surgery. They often limit the ...

  9. PREVENTING WEIGHT REGAIN AFTER WEIGHT LOSS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For most dieters, a regaining of lost weight is an all too common experience. Indeed, virtually all interventions for weight loss show limited or even poor long-term effectiveness. This sobering reality was reflected in a comprehensive review of nonsurgical treatments of obesity conducted by the Ins...

  10. Standardization versus Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Deborah

    2002-01-01

    Examines differences between old state-designed norm-referenced tests and new tests aligned with the curriculum. Concludes that new state tests are very similar to old ones. Discusses impact of new high-stakes standardized tests on students and teachers. Argues the new wave of standardized testing is not the answer to improving student…

  11. Standards not that standard.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, Cristina; Tanner, Kristie; Dorado-Morales, Pedro; Villaescusa, Paula; Chugani, Divya; Frías, Alba; Segredo, Ernesto; Molero, Xavier; Fritschi, Marco; Morales, Lucas; Ramón, Daniel; Peña, Carlos; Peretó, Juli; Porcar, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    There is a general assent on the key role of standards in Synthetic Biology. In two consecutive letters to this journal, suggestions on the assembly methods for the Registry of standard biological parts have been described. We fully agree with those authors on the need of a more flexible building strategy and we highlight in the present work two major functional challenges standardization efforts have to deal with: the need of both universal and orthogonal behaviors. We provide experimental data that clearly indicate that such engineering requirements should not be taken for granted in Synthetic Biology. PMID:26435739

  12. Optical atomic clocks and metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludlow, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    The atomic clock has long demonstrated the capability to measure time or frequency with very high precision. Consequently, these clocks are used extensively in technological applications such as advanced synchronization or communication and navigation networks. Optical atomic clocks are next- generation timekeepers which reference narrowband optical transitions between suitable atomic states. Many optical time/frequency standards utilize state-of-the-art quantum control and precision measurement. Combined with the ultrahigh quality factors of the atomic resonances at their heart, optical atomic clocks have promised new levels of timekeeping precision, orders of magnitude higher than conventional atomic clocks based on microwave transitions. Such measurement capability enables and/or enhances many of the most exciting applications of these clocks, including the study of fundamental laws of physics through the measurement of time evolution. Here, I will highlight optical atomic clocks and their utility, as well as review recent advances in their development and performance. In particular, I will describe in detail the optical lattice clock and the realization of frequency measurement at the level of one part in 1018. To push the performance of these atomic timekeepers to such a level and beyond, several key advances are being explored worldwide. These will be discussed generally, with particular emphasis on our recent efforts at NIST in developing the optical lattice clock based on atomic ytterbium.

  13. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR OPERATION, CALIBRATION, AND MAINTENANCE OF THE PERKIN-ELMER ZEEMAN/5000 SYSTEM ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETER (BCO-L-6.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to outline the start-up, calibration, operation, and maintenance procedures for the Perkin-Elmer 5000 atomic absorption spectrophotometer (PE 5000 AA), and the Perkin Elmer 5000 Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer (PE 5000Z GFAA)...

  14. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR OPERATION, CALIBRATION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE PERKIN-ELMER ZEEMAN/5000 SYSTEM ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER (BCO-L-6.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to outline the start-up, calibration, operation, and maintenance procedures for the Perkin-Elmer 5000 atomic absorption spectrophotometer (PE 5000 AA), and the Perkin Elmer 5000 Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer (PE 5000Z GFAA)...

  15. Atomic rivals

    SciTech Connect

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a memoir of rivalries among the Allies over the bomb, by a participant and observer. Nuclear proliferation began in the uneasy wartime collaboration of the United States, England, Canada, and Free France to produce the atom bomb. Through the changes of history, a young French chemist had a role in almost every act of this international drama. This memoir is based on Goldschmidt's own recollections, interviews with other leading figures, and 3,000 pages of newly declassified documents in Allied archives. From his own start as Marie Curie's lab assistant, Goldschmidt's career was closely intertwined with Frances complicated rise to membership in the nuclear club. As a refugee from the Nazis, he became part of the wartime nuclear energy project in Canada and found himself the only French scientist to work (although briefly) on the American atom bomb project.

  16. Atomic arias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    The American composer John Adams uses opera to dramatize controversial current events. His 1987 work Nixon in China was about the landmark meeting in 1972 between US President Richard Nixon and Chairman Mao Zedong of China; The Death of Klinghoffer (1991) was a musical re-enactment of an incident in 1985 when Palestinian terrorists kidnapped and murdered a wheelchair-bound Jewish tourist on a cruise ship. Adams's latest opera, Doctor Atomic, is also tied to a controversial event: the first atomic-bomb test in Alamogordo, New Mexico, on 16 June 1945. The opera premièred in San Francisco in 2005, had a highly publicized debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York in 2008, and will have another debut on 25 February - with essentially the same cast - at the English National Opera in London.

  17. Atomic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, A.E.; Kukla, K.; Cheng, S.

    1995-08-01

    In a collaboration with the Atomic Physics group at Argonne and the University of Toledo, the Atomic Physics group at the University of Notre Dame is measuring the fine structure transition energies in highly-charged lithium-like and helium-like ions using beam-foil spectroscopy. Precise measurements of 2s-2p transition energies in simple (few-electron) atomic systems provide stringent tests of several classes of current atomic- structure calculations. Analyses of measurements in helium-like Ar{sup 16+} have been completed, and the results submitted for publication. A current goal is to measure the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} - 1s2p{sup 3}P{sub 0} transition wavelength in helium-like Ni{sup 26+}. Measurements of the 1s2s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} - 1s2p{sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2} transition wavelengths in lithium-like Kr{sup 33+} is planned. Wavelength and lifetime measurements in copper-like U{sup 63+} are also expected to be initiated. The group is also participating in measurements of forbidden transitions in helium-like ions. A measurement of the lifetime of the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} state in Kr{sup 34+} was published recently. In a collaboration including P. Mokler of GSI, Darmstadt, measurements have been made of the spectral distribution of the 2E1 decay continuum in helium-like Kr{sup 34+}. Initial results have been reported and further measurements are planned.

  18. Two-Photon Spectroscopy in Rb for an Optical Frequency Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Kyle; Phelps, Gretchen; Lemke, Nathan; Blakley, Daniel; Erickson, Christopher; Burke, John; Applied Technology Associates Team; Space Dynamics Laboratory Team; Air Force Research Laboratory Team

    2016-05-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory is pursuing optical atomic clocks for navigation and timing applications. Optical clocks are of particular interest owing to their very high oscillation frequencies. We present an optical rubidium atomic frequency standard (O-RAFS), based upon a two-photon transition at 778 nm, that utilizes readily available commercial off-the-shelf components. Compared to existing GPS clocks, O-RAFS offers reduced short-term instability (7 ×10-13 /√{ τ}), improved manufacturability, and competitive size, weight, and power, making it an attractive candidate for future space operation.

  19. Weight-loss medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000346.htm Weight-loss medicines To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Several weight-loss medicines are available. Ask your health care provider ...

  20. Weight Loss & Acute Porphyria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sale You are here Home Diet and Nutrition Weight loss & acute Porphyria Being overweight is a particular problem ... one of these diseases before they enter a weight-loss program. Also, they should not participate in a ...

  1. Losing weight after pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... below the minimum number of calories you need. Breastfeeding If you are breastfeeding, you will want to lose weight slowly. Weight ... not affect your milk supply or your health. Breastfeeding makes your body burn calories. It helps you ...

  2. Weighted network modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, Illés; Ábel, Dániel; Palla, Gergely; Vicsek, Tamás

    2007-06-01

    The inclusion of link weights into the analysis of network properties allows a deeper insight into the (often overlapping) modular structure of real-world webs. We introduce a clustering algorithm clique percolation method with weights (CPMw) for weighted networks based on the concept of percolating k-cliques with high enough intensity. The algorithm allows overlaps between the modules. First, we give detailed analytical and numerical results about the critical point of weighted k-clique percolation on (weighted) Erdos Rényi graphs. Then, for a scientist collaboration web and a stock correlation graph we compute three-link weight correlations and with the CPMw the weighted modules. After reshuffling link weights in both networks and computing the same quantities for the randomized control graphs as well, we show that groups of three or more strong links prefer to cluster together in both original graphs.

  3. Pregnancy and Healthy Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... Division (HMD) of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine released updated guidelines for weight gain ... Division (HMD) of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine: Weight Gain During Pregnancy: Reexamining the ...

  4. Watching Your Weight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Doug

    1993-01-01

    Describes an activity shared at an inservice teacher workshop and suitable for middle school in which students predict their ideal weight in kilograms based on tables giving ideal weights for given heights. (MDH)

  5. Atomic collisions, inelastic indeed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercegol, Herve; Ferrando, Gwenael; Lehoucq, Roland

    At the turn of the twentieth century, a hot controversy raged about the ability of Boltzmann's framework to take care of irreversibility. The so-called Loschmidt's paradox progressively faded with time during the last hundred years, due to the predictive efficiency of statistical mechanics. However, one detail at the origin of the controversy - the elasticity of atomic collisions - was not completely challenged. A semi-classical treatment of two atoms interacting with the vacuum zero-point field permits to predict a friction force acting against the rotation of the pair of atoms. By its form and its level, the calculated torque is a candidate as a physical cause for diffusion of energy and angular momentum, and consequently for entropy growth. It opens the way to a revision of the standard vision of irreversibility. This presentation will focus on two points. First we will discuss the recent result in a broader context of electromagnetic interactions during microscopic collisions. The predicted friction phenomenon can be compared to and distinguished from Collision-Induced Emission and other types of inelastic collisions. Second we will investigate the consequences of the friction torque on calculated trajectories of colliding atoms, quantifying the generation of dimers linked by dispersion forces.

  6. Gradient Weight in Phonology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Kevin Michael

    2011-01-01

    Research on syllable weight in generative phonology has focused almost exclusively on systems in which weight is treated as an ordinal hierarchy of clearly delineated categories (e.g. light and heavy). As I discuss, canonical weight-sensitive phenomena in phonology, including quantitative meter and quantity-sensitive stress, can also treat weight…

  7. 40 CFR 1065.790 - Mass standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mass standards. 1065.790 Section 1065... § 1065.790 Mass standards. (a) PM balance calibration weights. Use PM balance calibration weights that... ten times the mass of an unused PM-sample medium. (b) Dynamometer calibration weights....

  8. 40 CFR 1065.790 - Mass standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mass standards. 1065.790 Section 1065... § 1065.790 Mass standards. (a) PM balance calibration weights. Use PM balance calibration weights that... than ten times the mass of an unused PM-sample medium. (b) Dynamometer calibration weights....

  9. 40 CFR 1065.790 - Mass standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mass standards. 1065.790 Section 1065... § 1065.790 Mass standards. (a) PM balance calibration weights. Use PM balance calibration weights that... than ten times the mass of an unused PM-sample medium. (b) Dynamometer calibration weights....

  10. 40 CFR 1065.790 - Mass standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mass standards. 1065.790 Section 1065... § 1065.790 Mass standards. (a) PM balance calibration weights. Use PM balance calibration weights that... than ten times the mass of an unused PM-sample medium. (b) Dynamometer calibration weights....

  11. 40 CFR 1065.790 - Mass standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mass standards. 1065.790 Section 1065... § 1065.790 Mass standards. (a) PM balance calibration weights. Use PM balance calibration weights that... ten times the mass of an unused PM-sample medium. (b) Dynamometer calibration weights....

  12. Hirshfeld atom refinement

    PubMed Central

    Capelli, Silvia C.; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Dittrich, Birger; Grabowsky, Simon; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2014-01-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly–l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree–Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are freely refined without constraints or restraints – even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu’s), all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu’s. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules), the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å2 as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements – an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å. PMID:25295177

  13. Optical atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, N.; Oates, C. W.; Gill, P.; Tino, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the last ten years extraordinary results in time and frequency metrology have been demonstrated. Frequency-stabilization techniques for continuous-wave lasers and femtosecond optical frequency combs have enabled a rapid development of frequency standards based on optical transitions in ultra-cold neutral atoms and trapped ions. As a result, today's best performing atomic clocks tick at an optical rate and allow scientists to perform high-resolution measurements with a precision approaching a few parts in 1018. This paper reviews the history and the state of the art in optical-clock research and addresses the implementation of optical clocks in a possible future redefinition of the SI second as well as in tests of fundamental physics.

  14. Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynands, Robert

    Time is a strange thing. On the one hand it is arguably the most inaccessible physical phenomenon of all: both in that it is impossible to manipulate or modify—for all we know—and in that even after thousands of years mankind's philosophers still have not found a fully satisfying way to understand it. On the other hand, no other quantity can be measured with greater precision. Today's atomic clocks allow us to reproduce the length of the second as the SI unit of time with an uncertainty of a few parts in 1016—orders of magnitude better than any other quantity. In a sense, one can say [1

  15. Kriging without negative weights

    SciTech Connect

    Szidarovszky, F.; Baafi, E.Y.; Kim, Y.C.

    1987-08-01

    Under a constant drift, the linear kriging estimator is considered as a weighted average of n available sample values. Kriging weights are determined such that the estimator is unbiased and optimal. To meet these requirements, negative kriging weights are sometimes found. Use of negative weights can produce negative block grades, which makes no practical sense. In some applications, all kriging weights may be required to be nonnegative. In this paper, a derivation of a set of nonlinear equations with the nonnegative constraint is presented. A numerical algorithm also is developed for the solution of the new set of kriging equations.

  16. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR THE CALIBRATION OF PERKIN ELMER (PE) MODEL 5100 ZL ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER: GRAPHITE FURNACE (NHX/SOP-171-005)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This procedure describes the calibration procedures and performance checks required to ensure the consistent performance of the Perkin Elmer (PE) Model 5100 zl atomic absorption spectrometer with graphite furnace unit as a whole. Separate calibration procedures were not required ...

  17. Cosmology of atomic dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; Sigurdson, Kris

    2013-05-01

    While, to ensure successful cosmology, dark matter (DM) must kinematically decouple from the standard model plasma very early in the history of the Universe, it can remain coupled to a bath of “dark radiation” until a relatively late epoch. One minimal theory that realizes such a scenario is the atomic dark matter model, in which two fermions oppositely charged under a new U(1) dark force are initially coupled to a thermal bath of “dark photons” but eventually recombine into neutral atomlike bound states and begin forming gravitationally bound structures. As dark atoms have (dark) atom-sized geometric cross sections, this model also provides an example of self-interacting DM with a velocity-dependent cross section. Delayed kinetic decoupling in this scenario predicts novel DM properties on small scales but retains the success of cold DM on larger scales. We calculate the atomic physics necessary to capture the thermal history of this dark sector and show significant improvements over the standard atomic hydrogen calculation are needed. We solve the Boltzmann equations that govern the evolution of cosmological fluctuations in this model and find in detail the impact of the atomic DM scenario on the matter power spectrum and the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This scenario imprints a new length scale, the dark-acoustic-oscillation scale, on the matter density field. This dark-acoustic-oscillation scale shapes the small-scale matter power spectrum and determines the minimal DM halo mass at late times, which may be many orders of magnitude larger than in a typical weakly interacting-massive-particle scenario. This model necessarily includes an extra dark radiation component, which may be favored by current CMB experiments, and we quantify CMB signatures that distinguish an atomic DM scenario from a standard ΛCDM model containing extra free-streaming particles. We finally discuss the impacts of atomic DM on galactic dynamics and show that these provide the

  18. Effects of hydrogen atom spin exchange collisions on atomic hydrogen maser oscillation frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crampton, S. B.

    1979-01-01

    Frequency shifts due to collisions between hydrogen atoms in an atomic hydrogen maser frequency standard are studied. Investigations of frequency shifts proportional to the spin exchange frequency shift cross section and those proportional to the duration of exchange collisions are discussed. The feasibility of operating a hydrogen frequency standard at liquid helium temperatures is examined.

  19. Comparison of two fat-suppressed magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequences to standard t2-weighted images for brain parenchymal contrast and lesion detection in dogs with inflammatory intracranial disease.

    PubMed

    Young, Benjamin D; Mankin, Joseph M; Griffin, John F; Fosgate, Geoffrey T; Fowler, Jennifer L; Levine, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    T2-weighted (T2w) sequences are commonly relied upon in magnetic resonance imaging protocols for the detection of brain lesions in dogs. Previously, the effect of fluid suppression via fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) has been compared to T2-weighting with mixed results. Short tau inversion recovery (STIR) has been reported to increase the detection of some CNS lesions in people. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effect of fat suppression on brain parenchymal contrast resolution and lesion detection in dogs. We compared three sequences: T2w images, STIR, and T2w FLAIR with chemical fat suppression (T2-FLAIR-FS) in dogs with meningoencephalitis. Dogs with meningoencephalitis and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy were retrospectively identified and anonymized. Evaluators recorded the presence or absence of lesions within 12 predetermined brain regions on randomized sequences, viewing and scoring each sequence individually. Additionally, signal-to-noise ratios, contrast-to-noise ratios, and relative contrast (RC) were measured in a reference population. Short tau inversion recovery sequences had the highest RC between gray and white matter. While descriptively more lesions were identified by evaluators on T2-FLAIR-FS images, there was no statistical difference in the relative sensitivity of lesion detection between the sequences. Nor was there a statistical difference in false lesion detection within our reference population. Short tau inversion recovery may be favored for enhanced anatomic contrast depiction in brain imaging. No benefit of the inclusion of a fat-suppressed T2-FLAIR sequence was found. PMID:25395066

  20. Frequency Standards and Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Lute

    2009-04-01

    Preface / Lute Maleki -- Symposium history / Jacques Vanier -- Symposium photos -- pt. I. Fundamental physics. Variation of fundamental constants from the big bang to atomic clocks: theory and observations (Invited) / V. V. Flambaum and J. C. Berengut. Alpha-dot or not: comparison of two single atom optical clocks (Invited) / T. Rosenband ... [et al.]. Variation of the fine-structure constant and laser cooling of atomic dysprosium (Invited) / N. A. Leefer ... [et al.]. Measurement of short range forces using cold atoms (Invited) / F. Pereira Dos Santos ... [et al.]. Atom interferometry experiments in fundamental physics (Invited) / S. W. Chiow ... [et al.]. Space science applications of frequency standards and metrology (Invited) / M. Tinto -- pt. II. Frequency & metrology. Quantum metrology with lattice-confined ultracold Sr atoms (Invited) / A. D. Ludlow ... [et al.]. LNE-SYRTE clock ensemble: new [symbol]Rb hyperfine frequency measurement - spectroscopy of [symbol]Hg optical clock transition (Invited) / M. Petersen ... [et al.]. Precise measurements of S-wave scattering phase shifts with a juggling atomic clock (Invited) / S. Gensemer ... [et al.]. Absolute frequency measurement of the [symbol] clock transition (Invited) / M. Chwalla ... [et al.]. The semiclassical stochastic-field/atom interaction problem (Invited) / J. Camparo. Phase and frequency noise metrology (Invited) / E. Rubiola ... [et al.]. Optical spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen for an improved determination of the Rydberg constant / J. L. Flowers ... [et al.] -- pt. III. Clock applications in space. Recent progress on the ACES mission (Invited) / L. Cacciapuoti and C. Salomon. The SAGAS mission (Invited) / P. Wolf. Small mercury microwave ion clock for navigation and radioScience (Invited) / J. D. Prestage ... [et al.]. Astro-comb: revolutionizing precision spectroscopy in astrophysics (Invited) / C. E. Kramer ... [et al.]. High frequency very long baseline interferometry: frequency standards and

  1. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  2. Viewing minerals, atom by atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    With state-of-the-art technology supported by scissors and bungy cords, Earth scientists are beginning to look at mineral surfaces and mineral-fluid interactions on an atomic scale.The instrument that can provide such a detailed view is the scanning tunneling microscope (STM), which made a great theoretical and practical splash when it was introduced in 1981 by Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer, physicists at IBM's laboratory in Zurich. They won a Nobel Prize in Physics for their work 5 years later.

  3. Atomic magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Schwindt, Peter; Johnson, Cort N.

    2012-07-03

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

  4. Atom and Bond Fukui Functions and Matrices: A Hirshfeld-I Atoms-in-Molecule Approach.

    PubMed

    Oña, Ofelia B; De Clercq, Olivier; Alcoba, Diego R; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Van Neck, Dimitri; Bultinck, Patrick

    2016-09-19

    The Fukui function is often used in its atom-condensed form by isolating it from the molecular Fukui function using a chosen weight function for the atom in the molecule. Recently, Fukui functions and matrices for both atoms and bonds separately were introduced for semiempirical and ab initio levels of theory using Hückel and Mulliken atoms-in-molecule models. In this work, a double partitioning method of the Fukui matrix is proposed within the Hirshfeld-I atoms-in-molecule framework. Diagonalizing the resulting atomic and bond matrices gives eigenvalues and eigenvectors (Fukui orbitals) describing the reactivity of atoms and bonds. The Fukui function is the diagonal element of the Fukui matrix and may be resolved in atom and bond contributions. The extra information contained in the atom and bond resolution of the Fukui matrices and functions is highlighted. The effect of the choice of weight function arising from the Hirshfeld-I approach to obtain atom- and bond-condensed Fukui functions is studied. A comparison of the results with those generated by using the Mulliken atoms-in-molecule approach shows low correlation between the two partitioning schemes. PMID:27381271

  5. The Effect of the Weight Scheme on DFT Vibrational Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles; Ricca, Alessandra

    1999-01-01

    All-electron B3LYP harmonic frequencies of Ge2H5 and Ge2H6 are computed for several choices of grid and using both the Becke and the Stratmann, Scuseria, and Frisch atomic partition functions (weight scheme). For large grids, the results are independent of the weighting scheme. The lowest frequency mode is much more stable with respect to the number of grid points when the Stratmann, Scuseria, and Frisch weights are used.

  6. 12 CFR 3.52 - Simple risk-weight approach (SRWA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Simple risk-weight approach (SRWA). 3.52... STANDARDS Risk-Weighted Assets-Standardized Approach Risk-Weighted Assets for Equity Exposures § 3.52 Simple risk-weight approach (SRWA). (a) General. Under the SRWA, a national bank's or Federal...

  7. 12 CFR 324.32 - General risk weights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General risk weights. 324.32 Section 324.32 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY CAPITAL ADEQUACY OF FDIC-SUPERVISED INSTITUTIONS Risk-Weighted Assets-Standardized Approach Risk-Weighted Assets for General Credit Risk §...

  8. Gendered perceptions of own and partner weight-level.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Vibeke Tornhøj

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates gender differences in perceptions of body weight. Previous research has found significant gender differences in perceived weight-level, but less is known about weight perceptions of the opposite gender. Based on Danish survey data (859 women and 160 men), the discrepancy between BMI weight-level and self-perceived weight-level is estimated as well as the perception of one's partner's weight-level. Two main empirical conclusions emerge. First, there are significant gender differences in weight assessment. Whereas women assess weight according to the standardized BMI weight-levels for both genders, men assess weight according to gender. The weight-level of men is often underestimated by men themselves, but both men and women tend to overestimate the weight-level of women in the lower BMI deciles compared to standardized BMI weight-levels. Second, there is greater underestimation of weight-levels for individuals in the higher BMI--especially regarding weight perceptions of the opposite gender. These findings are discussed within a framework of socio-cultural theory of body image and gendered relations. PMID:22067916

  9. Characteristics of advanced hydrogen maser frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    In house research and development at Goddard Space Flight Center to provide advanced frequency and time standards for the most demanding applications is concentrated primarily in field operable atomic hydrogen masers. Some of the most important goals for the new maser designs have been improved long and short term stability, elimination of the need for auto tuning, increased maser oscillation level, improved hydrogen economy, increased operational life, minimization of operator control or monitoring, improvement in magnetic isolation or sensitivity, and reduction in size and weight. New design concepts which have been incorporated in these masers to achieve these goals are described. The basic maser assemblies and control systems have recently been completed; the masers are oscillating; and operational testing has begun. Data illustrating the improvements in maser performance was available and presented.

  10. Atomism from Newton to Dalton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, Robert E.

    1981-03-01

    Newton's achievements, both in the Principia and the Opticks, were firmly rooted in an atomistic theory of matter, resembling aspects of modern nuclear physics in its emphasis on fundamental particles held in differing arrays by short and long-range forces. Marred by premature sophistication, its parameters of particle size and shape and interparticulate forces could not be quantified. Although it inspired many scientists of the eighteenth century and was further developed into a qualitative theory which intrigued scientists into the twentieth century, Newtonian unitary corpuscular (or atomistic) matter theory was replaced for most investigators by a variety of substances for which the particulate nature was of less concern than the character of their gross behavior. It was on this basis that Dalton developed his new (chemical) atomism, reifying the multiplicity of substances with separate atoms for each, distinguished by operational differences in their chemical atomic weights.

  11. A linear atomic quantum coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Orany, Faisal A. A.; Wahiddin, M. R. B.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we develop the notion of the linear atomic quantum coupler. This device consists of two modes propagating into two waveguides, each of which includes a localized atom. These waveguides are placed close enough to allow exchange of energy between them via evanescent waves. Each mode interacts with the atom in the same waveguide in the standard way as the Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM) and with the atom-mode system in the second waveguide via the evanescent wave. We present the Hamiltonian for this system and deduce its wavefunction. We investigate the atomic inversions and the second-order correlation function. In contrast to the conventional coupler the atomic quantum coupler is able to generate nonclassical effects. The atomic inversions can exhibit a long revival-collapse phenomenon as well as subsidiary revivals based on the competition among the switching mechanisms in the system. Finally, under certain conditions the system can yield the results of the two-mode JCM.

  12. Light-weight ceramic insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Ultra-high temperature, light-weight, ceramic insulation such as ceramic tile is obtained by pyrolyzing a siloxane gel derived from the reaction of at least one organo dialkoxy silane and at least one tetralkoxy silane in an acid or base liquid medium. The reaction mixture of the tetra- and dialkoxy silanes may contain also an effective amount of a mono- or trialkoxy silane to obtain the siloxane gel. The siloxane gel is dried at ambient pressures to form a siloxane ceramic precursor without significant shrinkage. The siloxane ceramic precursor is subsequently pyrolyzed, in an inert atmosphere, to form the black ceramic insulation comprising atoms of silicon, carbon and oxygen. The ceramic insulation, can be characterized as a porous, uniform ceramic tile resistant to oxidation at temperatures ranging as high as 1700.degree. C. and is particularly useful as lightweight tiles for spacecraft and other high-temperature insulation applications.

  13. Weight gain - unintentional

    MedlinePlus

    ... trying to do so can have many causes. Metabolism slows down as you age . This can cause weight gain if you eat too much, eat the wrong foods, or do not get enough exercise. Drugs that can cause weight gain include: Birth control ...

  14. Weight loss and alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... weight gain in a couple of ways. First, alcohol is high in calories. Some mixed drinks can contain as many calories as a meal, but without the nutrients. You also may make poor food choices ... to cut out all alcohol if you are trying to lose weight, you ...

  15. Marijuana and body weight.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

    2014-07-01

    Acute marijuana use is classically associated with snacking behavior (colloquially referred to as "the munchies"). In support of these acute appetite-enhancing effects, several authorities report that marijuana may increase body mass index in patients suffering from human immunodeficiency virus and cancer. However, for these medical conditions, while appetite may be stimulated, some studies indicate that weight gain is not always clinically meaningful. In addition, in a study of cancer patients in which weight gain did occur, it was less than the comparator drug (megestrol). However, data generally suggest that acute marijuana use stimulates appetite, and that marijuana use may stimulate appetite in low-weight individuals. As for large epidemiological studies in the general population, findings consistently indicate that users of marijuana tend to have lower body mass indices than nonusers. While paradoxical and somewhat perplexing, these findings may be explained by various study confounds, such as potential differences between acute versus chronic marijuana use; the tendency for marijuana use to be associated with other types of drug use; and/or the possible competition between food and drugs for the same reward sites in the brain. Likewise, perhaps the effects of marijuana are a function of initial weight status-i.e., maybe marijuana is a metabolic regulatory substance that increases body weight in low-weight individuals but not in normal-weight or overweight individuals. Only further research will clarify the complex relationships between marijuana and body weight. PMID:25337447

  16. Exercise and Weight Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katch, Victor L.

    This paper describes a number of factors which go into determining weight. The paper describes what calories are, how caloric expenditure is measured, and why caloric expenditure is different for different people. The paper then outlines the way the body tends to adjust food intake and exercise to maintain a constant body weight. It is speculated…

  17. Anthocyanins and weight loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review evaluated the available scientific literature relative to anthocyanins and weight loss and/or obesity with mention of other effects of anthocyanins on pathologies that are closely related to obesity. Although there is considerable popular press concerning anthocyanins and weight loss, th...

  18. Mathematics in Weighting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    Presents the template method developed by Galileo for calculating areas of geometric shapes constructed of uniform density and thickness. The method compares the weight of a shape of known area to the weight of a shape of unknown area. Applies this hands-on method to problems involving calculus, Pythagorean's theorem, and cycloids. (MDH)

  19. Weight and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a person's diabetes management plan. Weight and Type 1 Diabetes If a person has type 1 diabetes but hasn't been treated yet, he or she often loses weight. In type 1 diabetes, the body can't use glucose (pronounced: GLOO- ...

  20. Labor Supply and Weight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakdawalla, Darius; Philipson, Tomas

    2007-01-01

    We use panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to investigate on-the-job exercise and weight. For male workers, job-related exercise has causal effects on weight, but for female workers, the effects seem primarily selective. A man who spends 18 years in the most physical fitness-demanding occupation is about 25 pounds (14…

  1. Rapid weight loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... 22990030 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22990030 . Weight-control Information NetworkNational Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and ... www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/weight-control/very-low-calorie-diets/Pages/very-low-calorie- ...

  2. Weight discrimination and bullying.

    PubMed

    Puhl, Rebecca M; King, Kelly M

    2013-04-01

    Despite significant attention to the medical impacts of obesity, often ignored are the negative outcomes that obese children and adults experience as a result of stigma, bias, and discrimination. Obese individuals are frequently stigmatized because of their weight in many domains of daily life. Research spanning several decades has documented consistent weight bias and stigmatization in employment, health care, schools, the media, and interpersonal relationships. For overweight and obese youth, weight stigmatization translates into pervasive victimization, teasing, and bullying. Multiple adverse outcomes are associated with exposure to weight stigmatization, including depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, body dissatisfaction, suicidal ideation, poor academic performance, lower physical activity, maladaptive eating behaviors, and avoidance of health care. This review summarizes the nature and extent of weight stigmatization against overweight and obese individuals, as well as the resulting consequences that these experiences create for social, psychological, and physical health for children and adults who are targeted. PMID:23731874

  3. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR MAINTENANCE OF PERKIN ELMER (PE) MODEL ZL5100 PC ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER: GRAPHITE FURNACE (NHX/SOP-171-006)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This procedure describes maintenance practices for the Perkin Elmer (PE) Model ZL5100 PC atomic absorption spectrometer with graphite furnace. It was required that the procedure be performed daily by the instrument operator during periods of analysis and recorded in the instrumen...

  4. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR OPERATION, CALIBRATION, AND MAINTENANCE OF THE JOBIN-YVON MODEL 70 INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROMETER (BCO-L-7.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to detail the operation and maintenance of an Instruments, SA Inc., Jobin-Yvon Model 70 (JY-70) inductively coupled plasma atomic emissions spectrometry (ICP-AES). This procedure was followed to ensure consistent data retrieval during the Arizona NHEXA...

  5. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR OPERATION, CALIBRATION, AND MAINTENANCE OF THE PERKIN-ELMER 5100 PC ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER (BCO-L-5.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to outline the start-up, calibration, operation, and maintenance procedures for the Perkin-Elmer 5100 PC Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (PE 5100). These procedures are used for the determination of the target trace metal, as in soil, house dust, f...

  6. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR OPERATION, CALIBRATION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE JOBIN-YVON MODEL 70 INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER (BCO-L-7.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to detail the operation and maintenance of an Instruments, SA Inc., Jobin-Yvon Model 70 (JY-70) inductively coupled plasma atomic emissions spectrometry (ICP-AES). This procedure was followed to ensure consistent data retrieval during the Arizona NHEXA...

  7. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR OPERATION, CALIBRATION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE PERKIN-ELMER 1100B ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER (BCO-L-5.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to outline the start-up, calibration, operation, and maintenance procedures for the Perkin-Elmer 5100 PC Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (PE 5100). These procedures are used for the determination of the target trace metal, as in soil, house dust, f...

  8. A Light-Weight Instrumentation System Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kidner, Ronald

    1999-06-02

    To meet challenging constraints on telemetry system weight and volume, a custom Light-Weight Instrumentation System was developed to collect vehicle environment and dynamics on a short-duration exo-atmospheric flight test vehicle. The total telemetry system, including electronics, sensors, batteries, and a 1 watt transmitter weighs about 1 kg. Over 80 channels of measurement, housekeeping, and telemetry system diagnostic data are transmitted at 128 kbps. The microcontroller-based design uses the automotive industry standard Controller Area Network to interface with and support in-flight control fimctions. Operational parameters are downloaded via a standard asynchronous serial communications intefiace. The basic design philosophy and functionality is described here.

  9. Upper Limit of Weights in TAI Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Claudine; Azoubib, Jacques

    1996-01-01

    The international reference time scale International Atomic Time (TAI) computed by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) relies on a weighted average of data from a large number of atomic clocks. In it, the weight attributed to a given clock depends on its long-term stability. In this paper the TAI algorithm is used as the basis for a discussion of how to implement an upper limit of weight for clocks contributing to the ensemble time. This problem is approached through the comparison of two different techniques. In one case, a maximum relative weight is fixed: no individual clock can contribute more than a given fraction to the resulting time scale. The weight of each clock is then adjusted according to the qualities of the whole set of contributing elements. In the other case, a parameter characteristic of frequency stability is chosen: no individual clock can appear more stable than the stated limit. This is equivalent to choosing an absolute limit of weight and attributing this to to the most stable clocks independently of the other elements of the ensemble. The first technique is more robust than the second and automatically optimizes the stability of the resulting time scale, but leads to a more complicated computatio. The second technique has been used in the TAI algorithm since the very beginning. Careful analysis of tests on real clock data shows that improvement of the stability of the time scale requires revision from time to time of the fixed value chosen for the upper limit of absolute weight. In particular, we present results which confirm the decision of the CCDS Working Group on TAI to increase the absolute upper limit by a factor of 2.5. We also show that the use of an upper relative contribution further helps to improve the stability and may be a useful step towards better use of the massive ensemble of HP 507IA clocks now contributing to TAI.

  10. Self-perception of body weight status and weight control practices among adolescents in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Zainuddin, Ahmad Ali; Manickam, Mala A; Baharudin, Azli; Omar, Azahadi; Cheong, Siew Man; Ambak, Rashidah; Ahmad, Mohamad Hasnan; Ghaffar, Suhaila Abdul

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity among adolescents is rising rapidly in many countries, including Malaysia. This article aims to present the associations between body mass index-based body weight status, body weight perception, and weight control practices among adolescents in Malaysia. The Malaysia School Based Nutrition Survey 2012, which included a body weight perception questionnaire and anthropometric measurements, was conducted on a representative sample of 40 011 students from Standard 4 until Form 5, with a 90.5% response rate. Comparing actual and perceived body weight status, the findings show that 13.8% of adolescents underestimated their weight, 35.0% overestimated, and 51.2% correctly judged their own weight. Significantly more normal weight girls felt they were overweight, whereas significantly more overweight boys perceived themselves as underweight. The overall appropriateness of weight control practices to body weight was 72.6%. Adolescents attempting to lose or gain weight need to have better understanding toward desirable behavioral changes. PMID:25070695

  11. Calculation of Hugoniot values from atomic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, F.E.; Walker, F.G.; Walker, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    A relatively simple equation is presented for use in calculating the Hugoniot values of any condensed element from its atomic weight, atomic radius, and density. Calculations from the equation are compared with data for many elements, and a discussion of the development and utility of the equation is included. The equation also appears to be useful for the gaseous elements when they are in condensed phases. 19 refs., 12 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. Light-weight plastination.

    PubMed

    Steinke, Hanno; Rabi, Suganthy; Saito, Toshiyuki; Sawutti, Alimjan; Miyaki, Takayoshi; Itoh, Masahiro; Spanel-Borowski, Katharina

    2008-11-20

    Plastination is an excellent technique which helps to keep the anatomical specimens in a dry, odourless state. Since the invention of plastination technique by von Hagens, research has been done to improve the quality of plastinated specimens. In this paper, we have described a method of producing light-weight plastinated specimens using xylene along with silicone and in the final step, substitute xylene with air. The finished plastinated specimens were light-weight, dry, odourless and robust. This method requires less use of resin thus making the plastination technique more cost-effective. The light-weight specimens are easy to carry and can easily be used for teaching. PMID:18752934

  13. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  14. Using graphs to interrogate the atomic structure of polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodo, Olga; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2015-03-01

    The nanomorphology of polymer blend thin films critically affects performance especially in electronic devices. However, many aspects of the underlying physics linking morphology to performance are still poorly understood. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that atomic organization can hold the key to efficient charge transport within organic electronic devices. In this work, we take advantage of recent advances in molecular dynamic simulations and quantify atomic-scale morphological aspects of the thin films. Specifically, we present a graph-based technique that allows quantifying the point-cloud data. In our approach, we first convert the point cloud data from atomistic simulation into a labelled, weighted, undirected graph and then use standard graph-based algorithms to calculate and quantify morphology features. The conversion of the CGMD-data into a graph preserves all the topological and geometric information about the internal structure, and local connectivity between individual atoms/beads (along and across the polymer chains). Our method provides hierarchical information about the charge paths that a hole/electron needs to take to reach the electrode (path length, fraction of intra-molecular hops, path balance). We showcase capabilities of our approach by analyzing coarse grained molecular simulations, and quantifying effect of various thermal treatment as well as electrode materials on the P3HT:PCBM blend.

  15. Prizes for weight loss.

    PubMed Central

    Englberger, L.

    1999-01-01

    A programme of weight loss competitions and associated activities in Tonga, intended to combat obesity and the noncommunicable diseases linked to it, has popular support and the potential to effect significant improvements in health. PMID:10063662

  16. Thyroid and Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... Differences in BMRs are associated with changes in energy balance. Energy balance reflects the difference between the amount of ... such as amphetamines, animals often have a negative energy balance which leads to weight loss. Based on ...

  17. Losing weight after pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... behavioral guidelines for post-partum weight control. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth . 2014;14. Accessed Nov. 24, 2014. Mottola MF. Exercise prescription for overweight and obese women: pregnancy and ...

  18. Weight loss - unintentional

    MedlinePlus

    ... of laxatives Other causes such as: Eating disorders, anorexia nervosa that have not been diagnosed yet Diabetes that ... do not know the reason. You have other symptoms along with the weight loss.

  19. Weight Gain during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Global Map Premature birth report card Careers Archives Pregnancy Before or between pregnancies Nutrition, weight & fitness Prenatal ... Zika virus and pregnancy Microcephaly Medicine safety and pregnancy Birth defects prevention Learn how to help reduce ...

  20. Preventing Weight Gain

    MedlinePlus

    ... If this is the case, preventing further weight gain is a worthy goal. As people age, their body composition gradually shifts — the proportion of muscle decreases and the proportion of fat increases. This ...

  1. Your Child's Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... spurts in height and weight gain in both boys and girls. Once these changes start, they continue for several ... or obese . Different BMI charts are used for boys and girls under the age of 20 because the amount ...

  2. Atomic Energy Basics, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atomic Energy Commission, Oak Ridge, TN. Div. of Technical Information.

    This booklet is part of the "Understanding the Atom Series," though it is a later edition and not included in the original set of 51 booklets. A basic survey of the principles of nuclear energy and most important applications are provided. These major topics are examined: matter has molecules and atoms, the atom has electrons, the nucleus,…

  3. Vulnerability of weighted networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Asta, Luca; Barrat, Alain; Barthélemy, Marc; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2006-04-01

    In real networks complex topological features are often associated with a diversity of interactions as measured by the weights of the links. Moreover, spatial constraints may also play an important role, resulting in a complex interplay between topology, weight, and geography. In order to study the vulnerability of such networks to intentional attacks, these attributes must therefore be considered along with the topological quantities. In order to tackle this issue, we consider the case of the worldwide airport network, which is a weighted heterogeneous network whose evolution and structure are influenced by traffic and geographical constraints. We first characterize relevant topological and weighted centrality measures and then use these quantities as selection criteria for the removal of vertices. We consider different attack strategies and different measures of the damage achieved in the network. The analysis of weighted properties shows that centrality driven attacks are capable of shattering the network's communication or transport properties even at a very low level of damage in the connectivity pattern. The inclusion of weight and traffic therefore provides evidence for the extreme vulnerability of complex networks to any targeted strategy and the need for them to be considered as key features in the finding and development of defensive strategies.

  4. Limitations on long-term stability and accuracy in atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wineland, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    The limits to accuracy and long term stability in present atomic clocks are examined. Recent proposals for new frequency standards are discussed along with the advantages and disadvantages of frequency standards based on such ideas as laser transitions, single atoms, and atom cooling. The applicability of some of these new techniques to existing standards is examined.

  5. Weight Loss Nutritional Supplements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckerson, Joan M.

    Obesity has reached what may be considered epidemic proportions in the United States, not only for adults but for children. Because of the medical implications and health care costs associated with obesity, as well as the negative social and psychological impacts, many individuals turn to nonprescription nutritional weight loss supplements hoping for a quick fix, and the weight loss industry has responded by offering a variety of products that generates billions of dollars each year in sales. Most nutritional weight loss supplements are purported to work by increasing energy expenditure, modulating carbohydrate or fat metabolism, increasing satiety, inducing diuresis, or blocking fat absorption. To review the literally hundreds of nutritional weight loss supplements available on the market today is well beyond the scope of this chapter. Therefore, several of the most commonly used supplements were selected for critical review, and practical recommendations are provided based on the findings of well controlled, randomized clinical trials that examined their efficacy. In most cases, the nutritional supplements reviewed either elicited no meaningful effect or resulted in changes in body weight and composition that are similar to what occurs through a restricted diet and exercise program. Although there is some evidence to suggest that herbal forms of ephedrine, such as ma huang, combined with caffeine or caffeine and aspirin (i.e., ECA stack) is effective for inducing moderate weight loss in overweight adults, because of the recent ban on ephedra manufacturers must now use ephedra-free ingredients, such as bitter orange, which do not appear to be as effective. The dietary fiber, glucomannan, also appears to hold some promise as a possible treatment for weight loss, but other related forms of dietary fiber, including guar gum and psyllium, are ineffective.

  6. Atom lithography with metastable helium

    SciTech Connect

    Allred, Claire S.; Reeves, Jason; Corder, Christopher; Metcalf, Harold

    2010-02-15

    A bright metastable helium (He*) beam is collimated sequentially with the bichromatic force and three optical molasses velocity compression stages. Each He* atom in the beam has 20 eV of internal energy that can destroy a molecular resist assembled on a gold coated silicon wafer. Patterns in the resist are imprinted onto the gold layer with a standard selective etch. Patterning of the wafer with the He{sup *} was demonstrated with two methods. First, a mesh was used to protect parts of the wafer making an array of grid lines. Second, a standing wave of {lambda}=1083 nm light was used to channel and focus the He* atoms into lines separated by {lambda}/2. The patterns were measured with an atomic force microscope establishing an edge resolution of 80 nm. Our results are reliable and repeatable.

  7. Popular weight reduction diets.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Stella Lucia

    2006-01-01

    The percentage of people who are overweight and obese has increased tremendously over the last 30 years. It has become a worldwide epidemic. This is evident by the number of children are being diagnosed with a body mass index >85th percentile, and the number of children begin diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus, a disease previously reserved for adults. The weight loss industry has also gained from this epidemic; it is a billion dollar industry. People pay large sums of money on diet pills, remedies, and books, with the hope of losing weight permanently. Despite these efforts, the number of individuals who are overweight or obese continues to increase. Obesity is a complex, multifactorial disorder. It would be impossible to address all aspects of diet, exercise, and weight loss in this review. Therefore, this article will review popular weight loss diets, with particular attention given to comparing low fat diets with low carbohydrate diets. In addition, the role that the environment plays on both diet and exercise and how they impact obesity will be addressed. Finally, the National Weight Control Registry will be discussed. PMID:16407735

  8. Lorcaserin for weight management

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, James R; Dietrich, Eric; Powell, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes and obesity commonly occur together. Obesity contributes to insulin resistance, a main cause of type 2 diabetes. Modest weight loss reduces glucose, lipids, blood pressure, need for medications, and cardiovascular risk. A number of approaches can be used to achieve weight loss, including lifestyle modification, surgery, and medication. Lorcaserin, a novel antiobesity agent, affects central serotonin subtype 2A receptors, resulting in decreased food intake and increased satiety. It has been studied in obese patients with type 2 diabetes and results in an approximately 5.5 kg weight loss, on average, when used for one year. Headache, back pain, nasopharyngitis, and nausea were the most common adverse effects noted with lorcaserin. Hypoglycemia was more common in the lorcaserin groups in the clinical trials, but none of the episodes were categorized as severe. Based on the results of these studies, lorcaserin was approved at a dose of 10 mg twice daily in patients with a body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 or ≥27 kg/m2 with at least one weight-related comorbidity, such as hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, or dyslipidemia, in addition to a reduced calorie diet and increased physical activity. Lorcaserin is effective for weight loss in obese patients with and without type 2 diabetes, although its specific role in the management of obesity is unclear at this time. This paper reviews the clinical trials of lorcaserin, its use from the patient perspective, and its potential role in the treatment of obesity. PMID:23788837

  9. Line splitting and modified atomic decay of atoms coupled with N quantized cavity modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yifu

    1992-05-01

    We study the interaction of a two-level atom with N non-degenerate quantized cavity modes including dissipations from atomic decay and cavity damps. In the strong coupling regime, the absorption or emission spectrum of weakly excited atom-cavity system possesses N + 1 spectral peaks whose linewidths are the weighted averages of atomic and cavity linewidths. The coupled system shows subnatural (supernatural) atomic decay behavior if the photon loss rates from the N cavity modes are smaller (larger) than the atomic decay rate. If N cavity modes are degenerate, they can be treated effectively as a single mode. In addition, we present numerical calculations for N = 2 to characterize the system evolution from the weak coupling to strong coupling limits.

  10. The weight of air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley-Hutchison, Doug

    2014-11-01

    Once a controversial idea, the fact that gases like air have weight can easily be demonstrated using reasonably precise scales in the modern teaching laboratory. But unlike a liquid, where a mechanical model suggests a pile of hard spheres resting on each other, gas molecules are in continual motion and can have minimal interaction. How should we think about the effect these molecules have on the scale? And more importantly, how should we explain it to students? Several models of gas behavior are employed to answer these questions and it is shown how the weight of a gas is, like electric current, an emergent phenomena in contrast to the weight of a liquid which is direct or causal.

  11. Weight management in Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Bipin Kumar; Nagesh, V Sri

    2015-05-01

    Ramadan fasting is associated with significant weight loss in both men and women. Reduction in blood pressure, lipids, blood glucose, body mass index and waist and hip circumference may also occur. However, benefits accrued during this month often reverse within a few weeks of cessation of fasting, with most people returning back to their pre-Ramadan body weights and body composition. To ensure maintenance of this fasting induced weight loss, health care professionals should encourage continuation of healthy dietary habits, moderate physical activity and behaviour modification, even after conclusion of fasting. It should be realized that Ramadan is an ideal platform to target year long lifestyle modification, to ensure that whatever health care benefits have been gained during this month, are perpetuated. PMID:26013789

  12. Generalized constructive tree weights

    SciTech Connect

    Rivasseau, Vincent E-mail: adrian.tanasa@ens-lyon.org; Tanasa, Adrian E-mail: adrian.tanasa@ens-lyon.org

    2014-04-15

    The Loop Vertex Expansion (LVE) is a quantum field theory (QFT) method which explicitly computes the Borel sum of Feynman perturbation series. This LVE relies in a crucial way on symmetric tree weights which define a measure on the set of spanning trees of any connected graph. In this paper we generalize this method by defining new tree weights. They depend on the choice of a partition of a set of vertices of the graph, and when the partition is non-trivial, they are no longer symmetric under permutation of vertices. Nevertheless we prove they have the required positivity property to lead to a convergent LVE; in fact we formulate this positivity property precisely for the first time. Our generalized tree weights are inspired by the Brydges-Battle-Federbush work on cluster expansions and could be particularly suited to the computation of connected functions in QFT. Several concrete examples are explicitly given.

  13. Weight for Stephen Finlay.

    PubMed

    Evers, Daan

    2013-04-01

    According to Stephen Finlay, 'A ought to X' means that X-ing is more conducive to contextually salient ends than relevant alternatives. This in turn is analysed in terms of probability. I show why this theory of 'ought' is hard to square with a theory of a reason's weight which could explain why 'A ought to X' logically entails that the balance of reasons favours that A X-es. I develop two theories of weight to illustrate my point. I first look at the prospects of a theory of weight based on expected utility theory. I then suggest a simpler theory. Although neither allows that 'A ought to X' logically entails that the balance of reasons favours that A X-es, this price may be accepted. For there remains a strong pragmatic relation between these claims. PMID:23576822

  14. Light weight phosphate cements

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Natarajan, Ramkumar,; Kahn, David

    2010-03-09

    A sealant having a specific gravity in the range of from about 0.7 to about 1.6 for heavy oil and/or coal bed methane fields is disclosed. The sealant has a binder including an oxide or hydroxide of Al or of Fe and a phosphoric acid solution. The binder may have MgO or an oxide of Fe and/or an acid phosphate. The binder is present from about 20 to about 50% by weight of the sealant with a lightweight additive present in the range of from about 1 to about 10% by weight of said sealant, a filler, and water sufficient to provide chemically bound water present in the range of from about 9 to about 36% by weight of the sealant when set. A porous ceramic is also disclosed.

  15. Average Weighted Receiving Time of Weighted Tetrahedron Koch Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Meifeng; Zhang, Danping; Ye, Dandan; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Lei

    2015-07-01

    We introduce weighted tetrahedron Koch networks with infinite weight factors, which are generalization of finite ones. The term of weighted time is firstly defined in this literature. The mean weighted first-passing time (MWFPT) and the average weighted receiving time (AWRT) are defined by weighted time accordingly. We study the AWRT with weight-dependent walk. Results show that the AWRT for a nontrivial weight factor sequence grows sublinearly with the network order. To investigate the reason of sublinearity, the average receiving time (ART) for four cases are discussed.

  16. Weighted Uncertainty Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yunlong; Jing, Naihuan; Li-Jost, Xianqing; Fei, Shao-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Recently, Maccone and Pati have given two stronger uncertainty relations based on the sum of variances and one of them is nontrivial when the quantum state is not an eigenstate of the sum of the observables. We derive a family of weighted uncertainty relations to provide an optimal lower bound for all situations and remove the restriction on the quantum state. Generalization to multi-observable cases is also given and an optimal lower bound for the weighted sum of the variances is obtained in general quantum situation.

  17. Weighted Uncertainty Relations

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yunlong; Jing, Naihuan; Li-Jost, Xianqing; Fei, Shao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Recently, Maccone and Pati have given two stronger uncertainty relations based on the sum of variances and one of them is nontrivial when the quantum state is not an eigenstate of the sum of the observables. We derive a family of weighted uncertainty relations to provide an optimal lower bound for all situations and remove the restriction on the quantum state. Generalization to multi-observable cases is also given and an optimal lower bound for the weighted sum of the variances is obtained in general quantum situation. PMID:26984295

  18. Temperature measurement of cold atoms using single-atom transits and Monte Carlo simulation in a strongly coupled atom-cavity system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wenfang; Du, Jinjin; Wen, Ruijuan; Yang, Pengfei; Li, Gang; Zhang, Tiancai; Liang, Junjun

    2014-03-17

    We investigate the transmission of single-atom transits based on a strongly coupled cavity quantum electrodynamics system. By superposing the transit transmissions of a considerable number of atoms, we obtain the absorption spectra of the cavity induced by single atoms and obtain the temperature of the cold atom. The number of atoms passing through the microcavity for each release is also counted, and this number changes exponentially along with the atom temperature. Monte Carlo simulations agree closely with the experimental results, and the initial temperature of the cold atom is determined. Compared with the conventional time-of-flight (TOF) method, this approach avoids some uncertainties in the standard TOF and sheds new light on determining temperature of cold atoms by counting atoms individually in a confined space.

  19. Stochastic models for atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. A.; Jones, R. H.; Tryon, P. V.; Allan, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    For the atomic clocks used in the National Bureau of Standards Time Scales, an adequate model is the superposition of white FM, random walk FM, and linear frequency drift for times longer than about one minute. The model was tested on several clocks using maximum likelihood techniques for parameter estimation and the residuals were acceptably random. Conventional diagnostics indicate that additional model elements contribute no significant improvement to the model even at the expense of the added model complexity.

  20. Ultracold-Atom Accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed class of accelerometers and related motion sensors based on use of ultracold atoms as inertial components of motion transducers. Ultracold atoms supplant spring-and-mass components of older accelerometers. As used here, "ultracold atoms" means atoms with kinetic energies equivalent to temperatures equal to or less than 20 mK. Acclerometers essentially frictionless. Primary advantage high sensitivity.

  1. Trapping Rydberg Atoms in an Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Sarah E.

    2012-06-01

    Optical lattice traps for Rydberg atoms are of interest in advanced science and in practical applications. After a brief discussion of these areas of interest, I will review some basics of optical Rydberg-atom trapping. The trapping potential experienced by a Rydberg atom in an optical lattice is given by the spatial average of the free-electron ponderomotive energy weighted by the Rydberg electron's probability distribution. I will then present experimental results on the trapping of ^85Rb Rydberg atoms in a one-dimensional ponderomotive optical lattice (wavelength 1064 nm). The principal methods employed to study the lattice performance are microwave spectroscopy, which is used to measure the lattice's trapping efficiency, and photo-ionization, which is used to measure the dwell time of the atoms in the lattice. I have achieved a 90% trapping efficiency for ^85Rb 50S atoms by inverting the lattice immediately after laser excitation of ground-state atoms into Rydberg states. I have characterized the dwell time of the atoms in the lattice using photo-ionization of 50D5/2 atoms. In continued work, I have explored the dependence of the Rydberg-atom trapping potential on the angular portion of the atomic wavefunction. Distinct angular states exhibit different trapping behavior in the optical lattice, depending on how their wavefunctions are oriented relative to the lattice planes. Specifically, I have measured the lattice potential depth of sublevels of ^85Rb nD atoms (50<=n<=65) in a one-dimensional optical lattice with a transverse DC electric field. The trapping behavior varies substantially for the various angular sublevels, in agreement with theory. The talk will conclude with an outlook into planned experiments.

  2. The Tracking Study: Description of a randomized controlled trial of variations on weight tracking frequency in a behavioral weight loss program

    PubMed Central

    Linde, Jennifer A.; Jeffery, Robert W.; Crow, Scott J.; Brelje, Kerrin L.; Pacanowski, Carly R.; Gavin, Kara L.; Smolenski, Derek J.

    2014-01-01

    Observational evidence from behavioral weight control trials and community studies suggests that greater frequency of weighing oneself, or tracking weight, is associated with better weight outcomes. Conversely, it has also been suggested that frequent weight tracking may have a negative impact on mental health and outcomes during weight loss, but there are minimal experimental data that address this concern in the context of an active weight loss program. To achieve the long-term goal of strengthening behavioral weight loss programs, the purpose of this randomized controlled trial (the Tracking Study) is to test variations on frequency of self-weighing during a behavioral weight loss program, and to examine psychosocial and mental health correlates of weight tracking and weight loss outcomes. Three hundred thirty-nine overweight and obese adults were recruited and randomized to one of three variations on weight tracking frequency during a 12-month weight loss program with a 12-month follow-up: daily weight tracking, weekly weight tracking, or no weight tracking. The primary outcome is weight in kilograms at 24 months. The weight loss program integrates each weight tracking instruction with standard behavioral weight loss techniques (goal setting, self-monitoring, stimulus control, dietary and physical activity enhancements, lifestyle modifications); participants in weight tracking conditions were provided with wireless Internet technology (Wi-Fi-enabled digital scales and touchscreen personal devices) to facilitate weight tracking during the study. This paper describes the study design, intervention features, recruitment, and baseline characteristics of participants enrolled in the Tracking Study. PMID:25533727

  3. Aim For a Healthy Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... oxygen into energy), and behavior or habits. Energy Balance Energy balance is important for maintaining a healthy weight. The ... OUT over time = weight stays the same (energy balance) More energy IN than OUT over time = weight ...

  4. MedlinePlus: Weight Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Therapy and Weight Management (Nemours Foundation) Also in Spanish Weight Loss: Ready to Change Your Habits? (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Weight-Loss and Nutrition Myths (National ...

  5. Weight and Diabetes (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Weight and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Parents > Weight and Diabetes Print A ... or type 2 diabetes. Weight and Type 1 Diabetes Undiagnosed or untreated, type 1 diabetes can make ...

  6. Brief report: Weight dissatisfaction, weight status, and weight loss in Mexican-American children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study objectives were to assess the association between weight dissatisfaction, weight status, and weight loss in Mexican-American children participating in a weight management program. Participants included 265 Mexican American children recruited for a school-based weight management program. Al...

  7. International Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havard-Williams, Peter

    1982-01-01

    Discussion of standardization on an international scale for resource sharing--cooperation, coordination, interlibrary loans, cooperative acquisition and cataloging--focuses on a definition of standards; the development of standards for cataloging; public, school, and university libraries; and library education. A 60-item bibliography is included.…

  8. Implicit Bias about Weight and Weight Loss Treatment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Carels, Robert A; Hinman, Nova G; Hoffmann, Debra A; Burmeister, Jacob M; Borushok, Jessica E.; Marx, Jenna M; Ashrafioun, Lisham

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The goal of the current study was to examine the impact of a weight loss intervention on implicit bias toward weight, as well as the relationship among implicit bias, weight loss behaviors, and weight loss outcomes. Additionally, of interest was the relationship among these variables when implicit weight bias was measured with a novel assessment that portrays individuals who are thin and obese engaged in both stereotypical and nonstereotypical health-related behaviors. Methods Implicit weight bias (stereotype consistent and stereotype inconsistent), binge eating, self-monitoring, and body weight were assessed among weight loss participants at baseline and post-treatment (N=44) participating in two weight loss programs. Results Stereotype consistent bias significantly decreased from baseline to post-treatment. Greater baseline stereotype consistent bias was associated with lower binge eating and greater self-monitoring. Greater post-treatment stereotype consistent bias was associated with greater percent weight loss. Stereotype inconsistent bias did not change from baseline to post-treatment and was generally unrelated to outcomes. Conclusion Weight loss treatment may reduce implicit bias toward overweight individuals among weight loss participants. Higher post-treatment stereotype consistent bias was associated with a higher percent weight loss, possibly suggesting that losing weight may serve to maintain implicit weight bias. Alternatively, great implicit weight bias may identify individuals motivated to make changes necessary for weight loss. PMID:25261809

  9. Weight Training Adds Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutter, June

    1995-01-01

    Secondary level physical education teachers can have their students use math concepts while working out on the weight-room equipment. The article explains how students can reinforce math skills while weightlifting by estimating their strength, estimating their power, or calculating other formulas. (SM)

  10. Neutral atom traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  11. Atomic Force Microscopy on Its Way to Adolescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessibl, Franz J.

    2003-12-01

    When the atomic force microscope (AFM) was introduced in 1986, its potential to resolve surfaces with true atomic resolution was already proposed. However, substantial problems had to be overcome before atomic resolution became possible by AFM. Today, true atomic resolution by AFM is standard practice. This article discusses the influence of the cantilever stiffness and — amplitude on noise and short-range force sensitivity and introduces a sensor operating at near optimal conditions (qPlus sensor). The data achieved with this optimized sensing technology show substructures within single atom images, attributed to atomic orbitals.

  12. Renyi complexities and information planes: Atomic structure in conjugated spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolín, J.; López-Rosa, S.; Angulo, J. C.

    2009-05-01

    Generalized Renyi complexity measures are defined and numerically analyzed for atomic one-particle densities in both conjugated spaces. These complexities provide, as particular cases, the previously known statistical and Fisher-Shannon complexities. The generalized complexities provide information on the atomic shell structure and shell-filling patterns, allowing to appropriately weight different regions of the electronic cloud.

  13. Spreadsheet-Based Program for Simulating Atomic Emission Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannigan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    A simple Excel spreadsheet-based program for simulating atomic emission spectra from the properties of neutral atoms (e.g., energies and statistical weights of the electronic states, electronic partition functions, transition probabilities, etc.) is described. The contents of the spreadsheet (i.e., input parameters, formulas for calculating…

  14. Ideal Weight and Weight Satisfaction: Association With Health Practices

    PubMed Central

    Ardern, Chris I.; Church, Timothy S.; Hebert, James R.; Sui, Xuemei; Blair, Steven N.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence suggests that individuals have become more tolerant of higher body weights over time. To investigate this issue further, the authors examined cross-sectional associations among ideal weight, examination year, and obesity as well as the association of ideal weight and body weight satisfaction with health practices among 15,221 men and 4,126 women in the United States. Participants in 1987 reported higher ideal weights than participants in 2001, an effect particularly pronounced from 1987 to 2001 for younger and obese men (85.5 kg to 94.9 kg) and women (62.2 kg to 70.5 kg). For a given body mass index, higher ideal body weights were associated with greater weight satisfaction but lower intentions to lose weight. Body weight satisfaction was subsequently associated with greater walking/jogging, better diet, and lower lifetime weight loss but with less intention to change physical activity and diet or lose weight (P < 0.01). Conversely, body mass index was negatively associated with weight satisfaction (P < 0.01) and was associated with less walking/jogging, poorer diet, and greater lifetime weight loss but with greater intention to change physical activity and diet or lose weight. Although the health implications of these findings are somewhat unclear, increased weight satisfaction, in conjunction with increases in societal overweight/obesity, may result in decreased motivation to lose weight and/or adopt healthier lifestyle behaviors. PMID:19546153

  15. Pulsed optically pumped frequency standard

    SciTech Connect

    Godone, Aldo; Micalizio, Salvatore; Levi, Filippo

    2004-08-01

    We reconsider the idea of a pulsed optically pumped frequency standard conceived in the early 1960s to eliminate the light-shift effect. The development of semiconductor lasers and of pulsed electronic techniques for atomic fountains and new theoretical findings allow an implementation of this idea which may lead to a frequency standard whose frequency stability is limited only by the thermal noise in the short term and by the temperature drift in the long term. We shall also show both theoretically and experimentally the possibility of doubling the atomic quality factor with respect to the classical Ramsey technique approach.

  16. Parametric study of transport aircraft systems cost and weight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beltramo, M. N.; Trapp, D. L.; Kimoto, B. W.; Marsh, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a NASA study to develop production cost estimating relationships (CERs) and weight estimating relationships (WERs) for commercial and military transport aircraft at the system level are presented. The systems considered correspond to the standard weight groups defined in Military Standard 1374 and are listed. These systems make up a complete aircraft exclusive of engines. The CER for each system (or CERs in several cases) utilize weight as the key parameter. Weights may be determined from detailed weight statements, if available, or by using the WERs developed, which are based on technical and performance characteristics generally available during preliminary design. The CERs that were developed provide a very useful tool for making preliminary estimates of the production cost of an aircraft. Likewise, the WERs provide a very useful tool for making preliminary estimates of the weight of aircraft based on conceptual design information.

  17. Polymeric Materials Resistant to Erosion by Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard L.; Thibeault, Sheila A.

    2004-01-01

    Polymer-matrix composites are ideally suited for space vehicles because of high strength to weight ratios. The principal component of the low earth orbit (LEO) is atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen causes surface erosion to polymeric materials. Polymer films with an organometallic additive showed greater resistance to atomic oxygen than the pure polymer in laboratory experiments and in the OPM/MIR experiment. In MISSE, the film with the organometallic additive was still intact after the pure film had completely eroded.

  18. 12 CFR 324.42 - Risk-weighted assets for securitization exposures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Risk-weighted assets for securitization... STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY CAPITAL ADEQUACY OF FDIC-SUPERVISED INSTITUTIONS Risk-Weighted Assets-Standardized Approach Risk-Weighted Assets for Securitization Exposures § 324.42 Risk-weighted assets...

  19. Combining forecast weights: Why and how?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yip Chee; Kok-Haur, Ng; Hock-Eam, Lim

    2012-09-01

    This paper proposes a procedure called forecast weight averaging which is a specific combination of forecast weights obtained from different methods of constructing forecast weights for the purpose of improving the accuracy of pseudo out of sample forecasting. It is found that under certain specified conditions, forecast weight averaging can lower the mean squared forecast error obtained from model averaging. In addition, we show that in a linear and homoskedastic environment, this superior predictive ability of forecast weight averaging holds true irrespective whether the coefficients are tested by t statistic or z statistic provided the significant level is within the 10% range. By theoretical proofs and simulation study, we have shown that model averaging like, variance model averaging, simple model averaging and standard error model averaging, each produces mean squared forecast error larger than that of forecast weight averaging. Finally, this result also holds true marginally when applied to business and economic empirical data sets, Gross Domestic Product (GDP growth rate), Consumer Price Index (CPI) and Average Lending Rate (ALR) of Malaysia.

  20. Atomic Fuel, Understanding the Atom Series. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogerton, John F.

    This publication is part of the "Understanding the Atom" series. Complete sets of the series are available free to teachers, schools, and public librarians who can make them available for reference or use by groups. Among the topics discussed are: What Atomic Fuel Is; The Odyssey of Uranium; Production of Uranium; Fabrication of Reactor Fuel…

  1. Atomic Fisher information versus atomic number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Á.; Sen, K. D.

    2006-12-01

    It is shown that the Thomas Fermi Fisher information is negative. A slightly more sophisticated model proposed by Gáspár provides a qualitatively correct expression for the Fisher information: Gáspár's Fisher information is proportional to the two-third power of the atomic number. Accurate numerical calculations show an almost linear dependence on the atomic number.

  2. Atomic Particle Detection, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the booklets in the "Understanding the Atom Series" published by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission for high school science teachers and their students. The instruments used to detect both particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerge from the nucleus are described. The counters reviewed include ionization chambers,…

  3. Gain weighted eigenspace assignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, John B.; Andrisani, Dominick, II

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the development of the gain weighted eigenspace assignment methodology. This provides a designer with a systematic methodology for trading off eigenvector placement versus gain magnitudes, while still maintaining desired closed-loop eigenvalue locations. This is accomplished by forming a cost function composed of a scalar measure of error between desired and achievable eigenvectors and a scalar measure of gain magnitude, determining analytical expressions for the gradients, and solving for the optimal solution by numerical iteration. For this development the scalar measure of gain magnitude is chosen to be a weighted sum of the squares of all the individual elements of the feedback gain matrix. An example is presented to demonstrate the method. In this example, solutions yielding achievable eigenvectors close to the desired eigenvectors are obtained with significant reductions in gain magnitude compared to a solution obtained using a previously developed eigenspace (eigenstructure) assignment method.

  4. Reducing rotor weight

    SciTech Connect

    Cheney, M.C.

    1997-12-31

    The cost of energy for renewables has gained greater significance in recent years due to the drop in price in some competing energy sources, particularly natural gas. In pursuit of lower manufacturing costs for wind turbine systems, work was conducted to explore an innovative rotor designed to reduce weight and cost over conventional rotor systems. Trade-off studies were conducted to measure the influence of number of blades, stiffness, and manufacturing method on COE. The study showed that increasing number of blades at constant solidity significantly reduced rotor weight and that manufacturing the blades using pultrusion technology produced the lowest cost per pound. Under contracts with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Energy Commission, a 400 kW (33m diameter) turbine was designed employing this technology. The project included tests of an 80 kW (15.5m diameter) dynamically scaled rotor which demonstrated the viability of the design.

  5. Determination of nanogram amounts of bismuth in rocks by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    Bismuth concentrations as low as 10 ng g-1 in 100-mg samples of geological materials can be determined by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization. After HF-HClO4 decomposition of the sample, bismuth is extracted as the iodide into methyl isobutyl ketone and is then stripped with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid into the aqueous phase. Aliquots of this solution are pipetted into the graphite furnace and dried, charred, and atomized in an automated sequence. Atomic absorbance at the Bi 223.1-nm line provides a measure of the amount of bismuth present. Results are presented for 14 U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks. ?? 1979.

  6. Weighted Configuration Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, M. Ángeles; Boguñá, Marián

    2005-06-01

    The configuration model is one of the most successful models for generating uncorrelated random networks. We analyze its behavior when the expected degree sequence follows a power law with exponent smaller than two. In this situation, the resulting network can be viewed as a weighted network with non trivial correlations between strength and degree. Our results are tested against large scale numerical simulations, finding excellent agreement.

  7. Light weight aluminum optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catura, R. C.; Vieira, J. R.

    1985-09-01

    Light weight mirror blanks were fabricated by dip-brazing a core of low mass aluminum foam material to thin face sheets of solid aluminum. The blanks weigh 40% of an equivalent size solid mirror and were diamond turned to provide reflective surfaces. Optical interferometry was used to assess their dimensional stability over 7 months. No changes in flatness are observed (to the sensitivity of the measurements of a half wavelength of red light).

  8. (Bessel-) weighted asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard Musch, Alexey Prokudin

    2011-11-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering experiments allow us to probe the motion of quarks inside the proton in terms of so-called transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMD PDFs), but the information is convoluted with fragmentation functions (TMD FFs) and soft factors. It has long been known that weighting the measured event counts with powers of the hadron momentum before forming angular asymmetries de-convolutes TMD PDFs and TMD FFs in an elegant way, but this also entails an undesirable sensitivity to high momentum contributions. Using Bessel functions as weights, we find a natural generalization of weighted asymmetries that preserves the de-convolution property and features soft-factor cancellation, yet allows us to be less sensitive to high transverse momenta. The formalism also relates to TMD quantities studied in lattice QCD. We briefly show preliminary lattice results from an exploratory calculation of the Boer-Mulders shift using lattices generated by the MILC and LHP collaborations at a pion mass of 500 MeV.

  9. Evaluation of ultrafiltration for determining molecular weight of fulvic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, G.R.

    1984-01-01

    Two commonly used ultrafiltration membranes are evaluated for the determination of molecular weights of humic substances. Polyacrylic acids of Mr 2000 and 5000 and two well-characterized fulvic acids are used as standards. Molecular size characteristics of standards, as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering, are presented. Great care in evaluating molecular weight data obtained by ultrafiltration is needed because of broad nominal cutoffs and membrane-solute interactions.

  10. Optimization of electrothermal atomization parameters for simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harnly, J.M.; Kane, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of the acid matrix, the measurement mode (height or area), the atomizer surface (unpyrolyzed and pyrolyzed graphite), the atomization mode (from the wall or from a platform), and the atomization temperature on the simultaneous electrothermal atomization of Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, V, and Zn was examined. The 5% HNO3 matrix gave rise to severe irreproducibility using a pyrolyzed tube unless the tube was properly "prepared". The 5% HCl matrix did not exhibit this problem, and no problems were observed with either matrix using an unpyrolized tube or a pyrolyzed platform. The 5% HCl matrix gave better sensitivities with a pyrolyzed tube but the two matrices were comparable for atomization from a platform. If Mo and V are to be analyzed with the other seven elements, a high atomization temperature (2700??C or greater) is necessary regardless of the matrix, the measurement mode, the atomization mode, or the atomizer surface. Simultaneous detection limits (peak height with pyrolyzed tube atomization) were comparable to those of conventional atomic absorption spectrometry using electrothermal atomization above 280 nm. Accuracies and precisions of ??10-15% were found in the 10 to 120 ng mL-1 range for the analysis of NBS acidified water standards.

  11. Tight Binding Models in Cold Atoms Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrzewski, J.

    2007-05-01

    Cold atomic gases placed in optical lattice potentials offer a unique tool to study simple tight binding models. Both the standard cases known from the condensed matter theory as well as novel situations may be addressed. Cold atoms setting allows for a precise control of parameters of the systems discussed, stimulating new questions and problems. The attempts to treat disorder in a controlled fashion are addressed in detail.

  12. Flame-in-gas-shield and miniature diffusion flame hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: optimization and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschner, Karel; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří

    2015-07-01

    A detailed optimization of relevant experimental parameters of two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: flame-in-gas-shield atomizer with a two-channel shielding unit and a standard atomizer for atomic fluorescence spectrometry, miniature diffusion flame, was performed. Arsine, generated by the reaction with NaBH4 in a flow injection arrangement, was chosen as the model hydride. Analytical characteristics of both the atomizers (sensitivity, noise, limits of detection) were compared. Under optimum conditions sensitivity obtained with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer was approximately twice higher than with miniature diffusion flame. The additional advantage of flame-in-gas-shield atomizer is significantly lower flame emission resulting in a better signal to noise ratio. The resulting arsenic limits of detection for miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were 3.8 ng l- 1 and 1.0 ng l- 1, respectively.

  13. Presenting the Bohr Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haendler, Blanca L.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching the Bohr atom at both freshman and advanced levels. Focuses on the development of Bohr's ideas, derivation of the energies of the stationary states, and the Bohr atom in the chemistry curriculum. (SK)

  14. The atomic strain tensor

    SciTech Connect

    Mott, P.H.; Argon, A.S. ); Suter, U.W. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA )

    1992-07-01

    A definition of the local atomic strain increments in three dimensions and an algorithm for computing them is presented. An arbitrary arrangement of atoms is tessellated in to Delaunay tetrahedra, identifying interstices, and Voronoi polyhedra, identifying atomic domains. The deformation gradient increment tensor for interstitial space is obtained from the displacement increments of the corner atoms of Delaunay tetrahedra. The atomic site strain increment tensor is then obtained by finding the intersection of the Delaunay tetrahedra with the Voronoi polyhedra, accumulating the individual deformation gradient contributions of the intersected Delaunay tetrahedra into the Voronoi polyhedra. An example application is discussed, showing how the atomic strain clarifies the relative local atomic movement for a polymeric glass treated at the atomic level. 6 refs. 10 figs.

  15. Signals for Lorentz violation in atomic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Arnaldo J.; Kostelecký, V. Alan

    2015-05-01

    A breakdown of Lorentz and CPT symmetry has been proposed as a possible signal in several candidate theories of quantum gravity. This talk discusses the prospects for detecting Lorentz and CPT violation via atomic spectroscopy, using the effective field theory known as the Standard-Model Extension and including operators of both renormalizable and nonrenormalizable mass dimensions. The discussion targets commonly measured atomic transitions in experiments with conventional matter and with more exotic atoms such as antihydrogen, muonium, and muonic hydrogen. Potential signals are identified and constraints from existing data are obtained.

  16. Atomic CP-violating polarizability

    SciTech Connect

    Ravaine, Boris; Derevianko, Andrei; Kozlov, M.G.

    2005-07-15

    Searches for CP-violating effects in atoms and molecules provide important constrains on competing extensions to the standard model of elementary particles. In particular, CP violation in an atom leads to the CP-odd (T,P-odd) polarizability {beta}{sup CP}: a magnetic moment {mu}{sup CP} is induced by an electric field E{sub 0} applied to an atom, {mu}{sup CP}={beta}{sup CP}E{sub 0}. We estimate the CP-violating polarizability for rare-gas (diamagnetic) atoms He through Rn. We relate {beta}{sup CP} to the permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron and to the scalar constant of the CP-odd electron-nucleus interaction. The analysis is carried out using the third-order perturbation theory and the Dirac-Hartree-Fock formalism. We find that, as a function of nuclear charge Z, {beta}{sup CP} scales steeply as Z{sup 5}R(Z), where slowly varying R(Z) is a relativistic enhancement factor. Finally, we evaluate the feasibility of setting a limit on electron EDM by measuring CP-violating magnetization of liquid Xe. We find that such an experiment could provide competitive bounds on electron EDM only if the present level of experimental sensitivity to ultraweak magnetic fields [Kominis et al., Nature 422, 596 (2003)] is improved by several orders of magnitude.

  17. Atoms in Action

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    This movie produced with Berkeley Lab's TEAM 0.5 microscope shows the growth of a hole and the atomic edge reconstruction in a graphene sheet. An electron beam focused to a spot on the sheet blows out the exposed carbon atoms to make the hole. The carbon atoms then reposition themselves to find a stable configuration. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2009/03/26/atoms-in-action/

  18. Atomizing nozzle and process

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Figliola, Richard S.; Molnar, Holly M.

    1993-07-20

    High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

  19. Atomizing nozzle and process

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Figliola, Richard S.; Molnar, Holly M.

    1992-06-30

    High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

  20. Adaptive atom-optics in atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marable, M. L.; Savard, T. A.; Thomas, J. E.

    1997-02-01

    We suggest a general technique for creating virtual atom-optical elements which are adaptive. The shape and position of these elements is determined by the frequency distribution for optical fields which induce transitions in a high gradient potential. This adaptive method is demonstrated in an all-optical atom interferometer, by creating either a variable optical slit or a variable optical grating which is scanned across the atomic spatial patterns to measure the fringes. This method renders mechanical motion of the interferometer elements unnecessary.

  1. CHEMILUMINESCENCE MEASUREMENT OF REACTIVITY WEIGHTED ETHYLENE-EQUIVALENT HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A reactive hydrocarbon analyzer (RHA), based on the chemiluminescent reaction of hydrocarbons with oxygen atoms, is used to provide a rapid indication of reactivity weighted hydrocarbon mass in automobile exhaust. Samples are reported by their ethylene-equivalent concentration--t...

  2. Anabolic steroid boosts weight.

    PubMed

    1996-09-01

    A randomized study of nandrolone decanoate (Deca-Durabolin) showed that the anabolic steroid can increase weight in people with HIV infections. The group receiving nandrolone experienced a greater increase both in fat-free mass and body cell mass (although the latter measure did not reach statistical significance) than those on placebo. Deca-Durabolin had little to do with two occurrences of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) in the study group, but until further studies are completed, caution is advised when using this steroid in patients with KS. A new study comparing nandrolone to growth hormone in patients with wasting is slated to begin in the next 3 or 4 months. PMID:11363845

  3. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  4. Images of Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Tony

    2003-01-01

    Recommends using a simple image, such as the fuzzy atom ball to help students develop a useful understanding of the molecular world. Explains that the image helps students easily grasp ideas about atoms and molecules and leads naturally to more advanced ideas of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and quantum physics. (Author/NB)

  5. The Nature of Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Alan

    This monograph was written for the purpose of presenting physics to college students who are not preparing for careers in physics. It deals with the nature of atoms, and treats the following topics: (1) the atomic hypothesis, (2) the chemical elements, (3) models of an atom, (4) a particle in a one-dimensional well, (5) a particle in a central…

  6. Atomic Clock Based On Linear Ion Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Dick, G. John

    1992-01-01

    Highly stable atomic clock based on excitation and measurement of hyperfine transition in 199Hg+ ions confined in linear quadrupole trap by radio-frequency and static electric fields. Configuration increases stability of clock by enabling use of enough ions to obtain adequate signal while reducing non-thermal component of motion of ions in trapping field, reducing second-order Doppler shift of hyperfine transition. Features described in NPO-17758 "Linear Ion Trap for Atomic Clock." Frequency standard based on hyperfine transition described in NPO-17456, "Trapped-Mercury-Ion Frequency Standard."

  7. Portable compact cold atoms clock topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechoneri, R. D.; Müller, S. T.; Bueno, C.; Bagnato, V. S.; Magalhães, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    The compact frequency standard under development at USP Sao Carlos is a cold atoms system that works with a distributed hardware system principle and temporal configuration of the interrogation method of the atomic sample, in which the different operation steps happen in one place: inside the microwave cavity. This type of operation allows us to design a standard much more compact than a conventional one, where different interactions occur in the same region of the apparatus. In this sense, it is necessary to redefine all the instrumentation associated with the experiment. This work gives an overview of the topology we are adopting for the new system.

  8. Weighted triangulation adjustment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Walter L.

    1969-01-01

    The variation of coordinates method is employed to perform a weighted least squares adjustment of horizontal survey networks. Geodetic coordinates are required for each fixed and adjustable station. A preliminary inverse geodetic position computation is made for each observed line. Weights associated with each observed equation for direction, azimuth, and distance are applied in the formation of the normal equations in-the least squares adjustment. The number of normal equations that may be solved is twice the number of new stations and less than 150. When the normal equations are solved, shifts are produced at adjustable stations. Previously computed correction factors are applied to the shifts and a most probable geodetic position is found for each adjustable station. Pinal azimuths and distances are computed. These may be written onto magnetic tape for subsequent computation of state plane or grid coordinates. Input consists of punch cards containing project identification, program options, and position and observation information. Results listed include preliminary and final positions, residuals, observation equations, solution of the normal equations showing magnitudes of shifts, and a plot of each adjusted and fixed station. During processing, data sets containing irrecoverable errors are rejected and the type of error is listed. The computer resumes processing of additional data sets.. Other conditions cause warning-errors to be issued, and processing continues with the current data set.

  9. Single atom electrochemical and atomic analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Rama

    In the past decade, advances in electron and scanning-probe based microscopies have led to a wealth of imaging and spectroscopic data with atomic resolution, yielding substantial insight into local physics and chemistry in a diverse range of systems such as oxide catalysts, multiferroics, manganites, and 2D materials. However, typical analysis of atomically resolved images is limited, despite the fact that image intensities and distortions of the atoms from their idealized positions contain unique information on the physical and chemical properties inherent to the system. Here, we present approaches to data mine atomically resolved images in oxides, specifically in the hole-doped manganite La5/8Ca3/8MnO3, on epitaxial films studied by in-situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). Through application of bias to the STM tip, atomic-scale electrochemistry is demonstrated on the manganite surface. STM images are then further analyzed through a suite of algorithms including 2D autocorrelations, sliding window Fourier transforms, and others, and can be combined with basic thermodynamic modelling to reveal relevant physical and chemical descriptors including segregation energies, existence and strength of atomic-scale diffusion barriers, surface energies and sub-surface chemical species identification. These approaches promise to provide tremendous insights from atomically resolved functional imaging, can provide relevant thermodynamic parameters, and auger well for use with first-principles calculations to yield quantitative atomic-level chemical identification and structure-property relations. This research was sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, BES, DOE. Research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which also provided support and is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  10. Grappling with Weight Cutting. The Wisconsin Wrestling Minimum Weight Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppliger, Robert A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    In response to a new state rule, the Wisconsin Minimum Weight Project curtails weight cutting among high school wrestlers. The project uses skinfold testing to determine a minimum competitive weight and nutrition education to help the wrestler diet safety. It serves as a model for other states and other sports. (Author/SM)

  11. Modeling operating weight and axle weight distributions for highway vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.L.; Liang, J.C.

    1988-07-01

    The estimation of highway cost responsibility requires detailed information on vehicle operating weights and axle weights by type of vehicle. Typically, 10--20 vehicle types must be cross-classified by 10--20 registered weight classes and again by 20 or more operating weight categories, resulting in 100--400 relative frequencies to be determined for each vehicle type. For each of these, gross operating weight must be distributed to each axle or axle unit. Given the rarity of many of the heaviest vehicle types, direct estimation of these frequencies and axle weights from traffic classification count statistics and truck weight data may exceed the reliability of even the largest (e.g., 250,000 record) data sources. An alternative is to estimate statistical models of operating weight distributions as functions of registered weight, and models of axle weight shares as functions of operating weight. This paper describes the estimation of such functions using the multinomial logit model (a log-linear model) and the implementation of the modeling framework as a PC-based FORTRAN program. Areas for further research include the addition of highway class and region as explanatory variables in operating weight distribution models, and the development of theory for including registration costs and costs of operating overweight in the modeling framework. 14 refs., 45 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. EOS standards

    SciTech Connect

    Greeff, Carl W

    2011-01-12

    An approach to creating accurate EOS for pressure standards is described. Applications to Cu, Au, and Ta are shown. Extension of the method to high compressions using DFT is illustrated. Comparisons with modern functionals show promise.

  13. Multilevel Atomic Coherent States and Atomic Holomorphic Representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Chang-Qi; Haake, Fritz

    1996-01-01

    The notion of atomic coherent states is extended to the case of multilevel atom collective. Based on atomic coherent states, a holomorphic representation for atom collective states and operators is defined. An example is given to illustrate its application.

  14. Networking standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Mark

    1991-01-01

    The enterprise network is currently a multivendor environment consisting of many defacto and proprietary standards. During the 1990s, these networks will evolve towards networks which are based on international standards in both Local Area Network (LAN) and Wide Area Network (WAN) space. Also, you can expect to see the higher level functions and applications begin the same transition. Additional information is given in viewgraph form.

  15. The Future of Atomic Energy

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fermi, E.

    1946-05-27

    There is definitely a technical possibility that atomic power may gradually develop into one of the principal sources of useful power. If this expectation will prove correct, great advantages can be expected to come from the fact that the weight of the fuel is almost negligible. This feature may be particularly valuable for making power available to regions of difficult access and far from deposits of coal. It also may prove a great asset in mobile power units for example in a power plant for ship propulsion. On the negative side there are some technical limitations to be applicability of atomic power of which perhaps the most serious is the impossibility of constructing light power units; also there will be some peculiar difficulties in operating atomic plants, as for example the necessity of handling highly radioactive substances which will necessitate, at least for some considerable period, the use of specially skilled personnel for the operation. But the chief obstacle in the way of developing atomic power will be the difficulty of organizing a large scale industrial development in an internationally safe way. This presents actually problems much more difficult to solve than any of the technical developments that are necessary, It will require an unusual amount of statesmanship to balance properly the necessity of allaying the international suspicion that arises from withholding technical secrets against the obvious danger of dumping the details of the procedures for an extremely dangerous new method of warfare on a world that may not yet be prepared to renounce war. Furthermore, the proper balance should be found in the relatively short time that will elapse before the 'secrets' will naturally become open knowledge by rediscovery on part of the scientists and engineers of other countries.

  16. (Terminology standardization)

    SciTech Connect

    Strehlow, R.A.

    1990-10-19

    Terminological requirements in information management was but one of the principal themes of the 2nd Congress on Terminology and Knowledge Engineering. The traveler represented the American Society for Testing and Materials' Committee on Terminology, of which he is the Chair. The traveler's invited workshop emphasized terminology standardization requirements in databases of material properties as well as practical terminology standardizing methods. The congress included six workshops in addition to approximately 82 lectures and papers from terminologists, artificial intelligence practitioners, and subject specialists from 18 countries. There were approximately 292 registrants from 33 countries who participated in the congress. The congress topics were broad. Examples were the increasing use of International Standards Organization (ISO) Standards in legislated systems such as the USSR Automated Data Bank of Standardized Terminology, the enhanced Physics Training Program based on terminology standardization in Physics in the Chinese province of Inner Mongolia, and the technical concept dictionary being developed at the Japan Electronic Dictionary Research Institute, which is considered to be the key to advanced artificial intelligence applications. The more usual roles of terminology work in the areas of machine translation. indexing protocols, knowledge theory, and data transfer in several subject specialties were also addressed, along with numerous special language terminology areas.

  17. A Simple Model Predicting Individual Weight Change in Humans.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Diana M; Martin, Corby K; Heymsfield, Steven; Redman, Leanne M; Schoeller, Dale A; Levine, James A

    2011-11-01

    Excessive weight in adults is a national concern with over 2/3 of the US population deemed overweight. Because being overweight has been correlated to numerous diseases such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes, there is a need to understand mechanisms and predict outcomes of weight change and weight maintenance. A simple mathematical model that accurately predicts individual weight change offers opportunities to understand how individuals lose and gain weight and can be used to foster patient adherence to diets in clinical settings. For this purpose, we developed a one dimensional differential equation model of weight change based on the energy balance equation is paired to an algebraic relationship between fat free mass and fat mass derived from a large nationally representative sample of recently released data collected by the Centers for Disease Control. We validate the model's ability to predict individual participants' weight change by comparing model estimates of final weight data from two recent underfeeding studies and one overfeeding study. Mean absolute error and standard deviation between model predictions and observed measurements of final weights are less than 1.8 ± 1.3 kg for the underfeeding studies and 2.5 ± 1.6 kg for the overfeeding study. Comparison of the model predictions to other one dimensional models of weight change shows improvement in mean absolute error, standard deviation of mean absolute error, and group mean predictions. The maximum absolute individual error decreased by approximately 60% substantiating reliability in individual weight change predictions. The model provides a viable method for estimating individual weight change as a result of changes in intake and determining individual dietary adherence during weight change studies. PMID:24707319

  18. A Simple Model Predicting Individual Weight Change in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Diana M.; Martin, Corby K.; Heymsfield, Steven; Redman, Leanne M.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Levine, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Excessive weight in adults is a national concern with over 2/3 of the US population deemed overweight. Because being overweight has been correlated to numerous diseases such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes, there is a need to understand mechanisms and predict outcomes of weight change and weight maintenance. A simple mathematical model that accurately predicts individual weight change offers opportunities to understand how individuals lose and gain weight and can be used to foster patient adherence to diets in clinical settings. For this purpose, we developed a one dimensional differential equation model of weight change based on the energy balance equation is paired to an algebraic relationship between fat free mass and fat mass derived from a large nationally representative sample of recently released data collected by the Centers for Disease Control. We validate the model's ability to predict individual participants’ weight change by comparing model estimates of final weight data from two recent underfeeding studies and one overfeeding study. Mean absolute error and standard deviation between model predictions and observed measurements of final weights are less than 1.8 ± 1.3 kg for the underfeeding studies and 2.5 ± 1.6 kg for the overfeeding study. Comparison of the model predictions to other one dimensional models of weight change shows improvement in mean absolute error, standard deviation of mean absolute error, and group mean predictions. The maximum absolute individual error decreased by approximately 60% substantiating reliability in individual weight change predictions. The model provides a viable method for estimating individual weight change as a result of changes in intake and determining individual dietary adherence during weight change studies. PMID:24707319

  19. Weight-Control Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for students, postdocs, and faculty Research at NIDDK Labs, faculty, and ... full list of resources . Alternate Language URL Weight-control Information Network (WIN) Page Content The Weight-control ...

  20. Effect of altered 'weight' upon animal tolerance to restraint.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. R.; Smith, A. H.; Beljan, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    The effect of altered weight upon animal tolerance to restraint was determined by simulating various accelerative forces with directed lead weights using restrained and nonrestrained domestic fowl (chickens). Weighting (increased weight) and conterweighting (reduced weight) produced a stressed condition - reduced relative lymphocyte counts, loss of body mass, and/or the development of a disorientation syndrome - in both restrained and nonrestrained (caged only) birds. The animal's tolerance to altered weight appeared to be a function of its body weight. Unrestrained birds were stressed by counterweighting (mean plus or minus standard error) 58.3 plus or minus 41% of their body weight, whereas restrained birds tolerated only 32.2 plus or minus 2.6% reduction in body weight. A training regimen for restrained birds was not effective in improving their tolerance to a reduced weight environment. It was concluded that domestic fowl living in a weightless (space) environment should be restrained minimally and supported by ventrally directed tension equivalent to approximately 50% of their body mass (their weight in a 1 G environment).

  1. Geophysical weight loss diet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatten, Kenneth

    1984-04-01

    Having for numerous reasons acquired a three digit kilogram mass, the author is experienced at the painful struggles that the gourmand must suffer to reduce weight, particularly if he/she enjoys reasonably large amounts of good food. To the avant-garde geophysicist, utilizing the following approach could be pleasurable, rewarding, and may even enable the accomplishment of what Ghengis Khan, Alexander the Great, Napolean, and Hitler could not!The basic approach is the full utilization of Newton's formula for the attraction of two massive bodies: F=GM1M2/r2, where G, is the gravitational constant; r, the distance between the two bodies; and M1 and M2, the masses of the two bodies. Although one usually chooses M1 to be the earth's mass ME and M2 to be the mass of a small object, this unnecessarily restricts the realm of phenomena. The less restrictive assumption is M1 + M2 = ME.

  2. [Nutrition and body weight].

    PubMed

    Gohlke, H

    2002-01-01

    Certain dietary components play a key role for the development of coronary artery disease (CAD). Complex carbohydrates lower the prevalence of CAD. Protein should provide 15% of daily calories. Populations with a high consumption of soy protein have a low coronary event rate and a high life expectancy. Soy protein has a favorable effect on LDL cholesterol, triglycerides and HDL cholesterol. Dietary cholesterol correlates with an increased incidence of CAD. Saturated fats increase cholesterol levels as well as the activity of clotting factor VII and promote progression of CAD. Mono-(MUFA) and poly-unsaturated fatty acids lower LDL-cholesterol to a similar extent. MUFA are contained in rape seed oil, olive oil and pea nut oil, but also in avocados and almonds. Omega-3-fatty acids are in fatty fish like salmon, tuna and herring and improve survival after myocardial infarction. They improve among others endothelial function (adhesion molecules). Eating 1-2 fish meals per week has a preventive effect on CAD and stroke. Dietary fiber decreases the risk for CAD up to 30% and favorably influences carbohydrate metabolism. Antioxidants have a favorable effect in their natural form (fruits and fresh vegetables). The secondary preventive effect of a mediterranean diet after myocardial infarction (probably by a combination of the above effects) has been validated. Body weight correlates with coronary risk, diabetes and use of health care resources. A reduction of body weight is best achieved by calory reduction plus an increase of physical activity. A calory-adjusted diet, low in total fat with a significant proportion of unsaturated fats and omega-3-fatty acids and rich in fiber is of great importance for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Fruits, vegetables and whole grain products are important components of this diet, which lowers the coronary event rate, increases longevity and is associated with a low rate of malignancies and osteoporosis. PMID

  3. Human biology of weight maintenance after weight loss.

    PubMed

    Mariman, Edwin C M

    2012-01-01

    One year after losing weight, most people have regained a significant part of the lost weight. As such, weight regain after weight loss has a negative impact on human health. The risk for weight regain is determined by psychosocial and behavioral factors as well as by various physiological and molecular parameters. Here, the latter intrinsic factors are reviewed and assembled into four functional modules, two related to the energy balance and two related to resistance against weight loss. Reported genetic factors do not reveal additional functional processes. The modules form nodes in a network describing the complex interactions of intrinsically determined weight maintenance. This network indicates that after an initial weight loss persons with a high baseline fat mass will most easily succeed in maintaining weight, because they can lose fat without raising stress in adipocytes and at the same time spare fat-free mass. However, continued weight loss and weight maintenance requires extra measures like increased physical activity, limited energy intake and a fat-free sparing composition of the diet. Eventually, this network may help to design novel therapeutic measures based on preventing the return effect of specific plasma factors or by preventing the accumulation of adipocyte cellular stress. PMID:22472972

  4. Successful habits of weight losers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the availability of the US Dietary Guidelines for Americans, the prevalence of obesity in adults has increased by 200% since 1980. Although few people have lost weight and maintained weight loss long term, some have and are tracked by the National Weight Control Registry. Results from these ...

  5. Fungible Weights in Multiple Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Niels G.

    2008-01-01

    Every set of alternate weights (i.e., nonleast squares weights) in a multiple regression analysis with three or more predictors is associated with an infinite class of weights. All members of a given class can be deemed "fungible" because they yield identical "SSE" (sum of squared errors) and R[superscript 2] values. Equations for generating…

  6. Correlation Weights in Multiple Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Niels G.; Jones, Jeff A.

    2010-01-01

    A general theory on the use of correlation weights in linear prediction has yet to be proposed. In this paper we take initial steps in developing such a theory by describing the conditions under which correlation weights perform well in population regression models. Using OLS weights as a comparison, we define cases in which the two weighting…

  7. Hypnotherapy in Weight Loss Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Gordon; Friesen, John

    1986-01-01

    Investigated effects of hypnosis as a treatment for weight loss among women. The primary hypothesis that hypnosis is an effective treatment for weight loss was confirmed, but seven concomitant variables and the use of audiotapes were not significant contributors to weight loss. (Author/ABB)

  8. Weight Training for Wheelchair Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Practical Pointers, 1978

    1978-01-01

    The article examines weight lifting training procedures for persons involved in wheelchair sports. Popular myths about weight training are countered, and guidelines for a safe and sound weight or resistance training program are given. Diagrams and descriptions follow for specific weightlifting activities: regular or standing press, military press,…

  9. Physiological adaptations to weight loss and factors favouring weight regain

    PubMed Central

    Greenway, F L

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major global health problem and predisposes individuals to several comorbidities that can affect life expectancy. Interventions based on lifestyle modification (for example, improved diet and exercise) are integral components in the management of obesity. However, although weight loss can be achieved through dietary restriction and/or increased physical activity, over the long term many individuals regain weight. The aim of this article is to review the research into the processes and mechanisms that underpin weight regain after weight loss and comment on future strategies to address them. Maintenance of body weight is regulated by the interaction of a number of processes, encompassing homoeostatic, environmental and behavioural factors. In homoeostatic regulation, the hypothalamus has a central role in integrating signals regarding food intake, energy balance and body weight, while an ‘obesogenic' environment and behavioural patterns exert effects on the amount and type of food intake and physical activity. The roles of other environmental factors are also now being considered, including sleep debt and iatrogenic effects of medications, many of which warrant further investigation. Unfortunately, physiological adaptations to weight loss favour weight regain. These changes include perturbations in the levels of circulating appetite-related hormones and energy homoeostasis, in addition to alterations in nutrient metabolism and subjective appetite. To maintain weight loss, individuals must adhere to behaviours that counteract physiological adaptations and other factors favouring weight regain. It is difficult to overcome physiology with behaviour. Weight loss medications and surgery change the physiology of body weight regulation and are the best chance for long-term success. An increased understanding of the physiology of weight loss and regain will underpin the development of future strategies to support overweight and obese individuals in their

  10. Physiological adaptations to weight loss and factors favouring weight regain.

    PubMed

    Greenway, F L

    2015-08-01

    Obesity is a major global health problem and predisposes individuals to several comorbidities that can affect life expectancy. Interventions based on lifestyle modification (for example, improved diet and exercise) are integral components in the management of obesity. However, although weight loss can be achieved through dietary restriction and/or increased physical activity, over the long term many individuals regain weight. The aim of this article is to review the research into the processes and mechanisms that underpin weight regain after weight loss and comment on future strategies to address them. Maintenance of body weight is regulated by the interaction of a number of processes, encompassing homoeostatic, environmental and behavioural factors. In homoeostatic regulation, the hypothalamus has a central role in integrating signals regarding food intake, energy balance and body weight, while an 'obesogenic' environment and behavioural patterns exert effects on the amount and type of food intake and physical activity. The roles of other environmental factors are also now being considered, including sleep debt and iatrogenic effects of medications, many of which warrant further investigation. Unfortunately, physiological adaptations to weight loss favour weight regain. These changes include perturbations in the levels of circulating appetite-related hormones and energy homoeostasis, in addition to alterations in nutrient metabolism and subjective appetite. To maintain weight loss, individuals must adhere to behaviours that counteract physiological adaptations and other factors favouring weight regain. It is difficult to overcome physiology with behaviour. Weight loss medications and surgery change the physiology of body weight regulation and are the best chance for long-term success. An increased understanding of the physiology of weight loss and regain will underpin the development of future strategies to support overweight and obese individuals in their efforts

  11. Mandatory weight loss during the wait for bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Nicole M; Raine, Kim D; Spence, John C

    2015-01-01

    Mandatory presurgical, behavior-induced weight loss, although not standard, is a relatively common practice among bariatric surgical clinics. We explore the patient's experience of this practice using phenomenology. We gathered experiential accounts from 7 individuals waiting to have the procedure at a large publically funded clinic in western Canada. In writing this article, we focused on four phenomenological themes: "just nod your head and carry on"-silencing through the ideal; waiting and weighing-promoting weight consciousness to the weight conscious; paying for surgical approval through weight loss; and presurgical weight loss and questioning the need for weight loss surgery altogether. We contrast the experiential findings with the clinical literature to question the impact and possible (unintended or unexpected) effects the practice might have, particularly on patients' lives. We situate this article within a larger discussion about the possible contribution of experiential knowledge to clinical guidelines, practices, and pedagogies. PMID:25185162

  12. Mother-reported parental weight talk and adolescent girls’ emotional health, weight control attempts, and disordered eating behaviors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this paper is to explore the relationships between mothers’ report of parental weight talk about her daughter, herself, and others, and adolescent girls’ weight-related behaviors and cognitions among a socio-demographically diverse population of mothers and their adolescent daughters. Methods Data were drawn from the baseline assessment of 218 mother/adolescent daughter dyads. Mothers completed survey items regarding the frequency of weight talk by parents, and girls completed survey items assessing outcomes including body dissatisfaction, depressive symptomology, use of extreme weight control methods, and binge eating. Results More frequent comments to daughters about their weight were associated with higher depressive symptomology (p = 0.041), greater prevalence of extreme weight control behaviors (p = 0.040), and greater prevalence of binge eating (p = 0.048) among girls after adjustment for socio-demographic characteristics and girls’ standardized body mass index (BMI). For example, among girls whose parents never commented on their weight, 4.2% reported use of any extreme weight control behaviors, while 23.2% of girls whose parents frequently commented on their weight reported use of any of these behaviors. Mothers’ more frequent talk about their own weight, shape, or size was associated with lower self-worth (p = 0.007) and higher depressive symptomology (p = 0.004) among girls. Conclusions Frequent parental weight talk as perceived by mothers was associated with adolescent girls’ use of harmful weight control methods and poor psychological health, while no associations were found between weight talk and girls’ use of healthful weight control strategies. Interventions that help parents create a family environment that supports healthful activities while reducing weight-related talk may be particularly effective in decreasing the prevalence of harmful outcomes among adolescent girls. PMID:24999423

  13. Direct analysis of solids by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using a second surface atomizer

    SciTech Connect

    Rettberg, T.M.; Holcombe, J.A.

    1986-06-01

    The direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric analysis of solids using the second surface atomizer has been investigated. The atomizer features a gas-cooled Ta insert within the graphite furnace onto which the analyte can be condensed, after which atomization is performed by raising the furnace to a higher temperature and shutting off the coolant gas. The analyses were conducted on standard reference material fly ash, river sediment, and citrus leaves, in addition to filter paper samples. All analyses were conducted without sample pretreatment or use of matrix modifiers. Quantitation was done by using simple aqueous standards. By use of peak heights, the recoveries varied from 81% to 127%, although several determinations were within the certified concentration range. The procedures typically gave low background absorbances and peak shapes that were relatively independent of the original sample matrix.

  14. Solid Hydrogen Formed for Atomic Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    2000-01-01

    Several experiments on the formation of solid hydrogen particles in liquid helium were recently conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The solid hydrogen experiments are the first step toward seeing these particles and determining their shape and size. The particles will ultimately store atoms of boron, carbon, or hydrogen, forming an atomic propellant. Atomic propellants will allow rocket vehicles to carry payloads many times heavier than possible with existing rockets or allow them to be much smaller and lighter. Solid hydrogen particles are preferred for storing atoms. Hydrogen is generally an excellent fuel with a low molecular weight. Very low temperature hydrogen particles (T < 4 K) can prevent the atoms from recombining, making it possible for their lifetime to be controlled. Also, particles that are less than 1 mm in diameter are preferred because they can flow easily into a pipe when suspended in liquid helium. The particles and atoms must remain at this low temperature until the fuel is introduced into the engine combustion (or recombination) chamber. Experiments were, therefore, planned to look at the particles and observe their formation and any changes while in liquid helium.

  15. Atomic hydrogen as a launch vehicle propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of several atomic hydrogen launch vehicles was conducted. A discussion of the facilities and the technologies that would be needed for these vehicles is also presented. The Gross Liftoff Weights (GLOW) for two systems were estimated; their specific impulses (I sub sp) were 750 and 1500 lb (sub f)/s/lb(sub m). The atomic hydrogen launch vehicles were also compared to the currently planned Advanced Launch System design concepts. Very significant GLOW reductions of 52 to 58 percent are possible over the Advanced Launch System designs. Applying atomic hydrogen propellants to upper stages was also considered. Very high I(sub sp) (greater than 750 1b(sub f)/s/lb(sub m) is needed to enable a mass savings over advanced oxygen/hydrogen propulsion. Associated with the potential benefits of high I(sub sp) atomic hydrogen are several challenging problems. Very high magnetic fields are required to maintain the atomic hydrogen in a solid kilogauss (3 Tesla). Also the storage temperature of the propellant is 4 K. This very low temperature will require a large refrigeration facility for the launch vehicle. The design considerations for a very high recombination rate for the propellant are also discussed. A recombination rate of 210 cm/s is predicted for atomic hydrogen. This high recombination rate can produce very high acceleration for the launch vehicle. Unique insulation or segmentation to inhibit the propellant may be needed to reduce its recombination rate.

  16. Holiday Weight Management by Successful Weight Losers and Normal Weight Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelan, Suzanne; Wing, Rena R.; Raynor, Hollie A.; Dibello, Julia; Nedeau, Kim; Peng, Wanfeng

    2008-01-01

    This study compared weight control strategies during the winter holidays among successful weight losers (SWL) in the National Weight Control Registry and normal weight individuals (NW) with no history of obesity. SWL (n = 178) had lost a mean of 34.9 kg and had kept greater than or equal to 13.6 kg off for a mean of 5.9 years. NW (n = 101) had a…

  17. Graphite filter atomizer in atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katskov, Dmitri A.

    2007-09-01

    Graphite filter atomizers (GFA) for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) show substantial advantages over commonly employed electrothermal vaporizers and atomizers, tube and platform furnaces, for direct determination of high and medium volatility elements in matrices associated with strong spectral and chemical interferences. Two factors provide lower limits of detection and shorter determination cycles with the GFA: the vaporization area in the GFA is separated from the absorption volume by a porous graphite partition; the sample is distributed over a large surface of a collector in the vaporization area. These factors convert the GFA into an efficient chemical reactor. The research concerning the GFA concept, technique and analytical methodology, carried out mainly in the author's laboratory in Russia and South Africa, is reviewed. Examples of analytical applications of the GFA in AAS for analysis of organic liquids and slurries, bio-samples and food products are given. Future prospects for the GFA are discussed in connection with analyses by fast multi-element AAS.

  18. Active Faraday optical frequency standard.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2014-11-01

    We propose the mechanism of an active Faraday optical clock, and experimentally demonstrate an active Faraday optical frequency standard based on narrow bandwidth Faraday atomic filter by the method of velocity-selective optical pumping of cesium vapor. The center frequency of the active Faraday optical frequency standard is determined by the cesium 6 (2)S(1/2) F=4 to 6 (2)P(3/2) F'=4 and 5 crossover transition line. The optical heterodyne beat between two similar independent setups shows that the frequency linewidth reaches 281(23) Hz, which is 1.9×10(4) times smaller than the natural linewidth of the cesium 852-nm transition line. The maximum emitted light power reaches 75 μW. The active Faraday optical frequency standard reported here has advantages of narrow linewidth and reduced cavity pulling, which can readily be extended to other atomic transition lines of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms trapped in optical lattices at magic wavelengths, making it useful for new generation of optical atomic clocks. PMID:25361349

  19. Advances in atomic physics

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbini, Tharwat M.

    2013-01-01

    In this review article, important developments in the field of atomic physics are highlighted and linked to research works the author was involved in himself as a leader of the Cairo University – Atomic Physics Group. Starting from the late 1960s – when the author first engaged in research – an overview is provided of the milestones in the fascinating landscape of atomic physics. PMID:26425356

  20. Atomic Oxygen Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sharon K. R.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic oxygen, which is the most predominant species in low Earth orbit, is highly reactive and can break chemical bonds on the surface of a wide variety of materials leading to volatilization or surface oxidation which can result in failure of spacecraft materials and components. This presentation will give an overview of how atomic oxygen reacts with spacecraft materials, results of space exposure testing of a variety of materials, and examples of failures caused by atomic oxygen.

  1. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides.

  2. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

  3. Solar Spectroscopy: Atomic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, H.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A Greek philosopher called DEMOCRITUS (c. 460-370 BC) first introduced the concept of atoms (which means indivisible). His atoms do not precisely correspond to our atoms of today, which are not indivisible, but made up of a nucleus (protons with positive charge and neutrons which have no charge) and orbiting electrons (with negative charge). Indeed, in the solar atmosphere, the temperature is suc...

  4. Atom trap loss, elastic collisions, and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, James

    2012-10-01

    The study of collisions and scattering has been one of the most productive approaches for modern physics, illuminating the fundamental structure of crystals, surfaces, atoms, and sub-atomic particles. In the field of cold atoms, this is no less true: studies of cold atom collisions were essential to the production of quantum degenerate matter, the formation of cold molecules, and so on. Over the past few years it has been my delight to investigate elastic collisions between cold atoms trapped in either a magneto-optical trap (MOT) or a magnetic trap with hot, background gas in the vacuum environment through the measurement of the loss of atoms from the trap. Motivated by the goal of creating cold atom-based technology, we are deciphering what the trapped atoms are communicating about their environment through the observed loss rate. These measurements have the advantages of being straightforward to implement and they provide information about the underlying, fundamental inter-atomic processes. In this talk I will present some of our recent work, including the observation of the trap depth dependence on loss rate for argon-rubidium collisions. The data follow the computed loss rate curve based on the long-range Van der Waals interaction between the two species. The implications of these findings are exciting: trap depths can be determined from the trap loss measurement under controlled background density conditions; observation of trap loss rate in comparison to models for elastic, inelastic, and chemical processes can lead to improved understanding and characterization of these fundamental interactions; finally the marriage of cold atoms with collision modeling offers the promise of creating a novel pressure sensor and pressure standard for the high and ultra-high vacuum regime.

  5. TOPICAL REVIEW: Theory and applications of atomic and ionic polarizabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitroy, J.; Safronova, M. S.; Clark, Charles W.

    2010-10-01

    Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics. The dielectric constant and refractive index of any gas are examples of macroscopic properties that are largely determined by the dipole polarizability. When it comes to microscopic phenomena, the existence of alkaline-earth anions and the recently discovered ability of positrons to bind to many atoms are predominantly due to the polarization interaction. An imperfect knowledge of atomic polarizabilities is presently looming as the largest source of uncertainty in the new generation of optical frequency standards. Accurate polarizabilities for the group I and II atoms and ions of the periodic table have recently become available by a variety of techniques. These include refined many-body perturbation theory and coupled-cluster calculations sometimes combined with precise experimental data for selected transitions, microwave spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms and ions, refractive index measurements in microwave cavities, ab initio calculations of atomic structures using explicitly correlated wavefunctions, interferometry with atom beams and velocity changes of laser cooled atoms induced by an electric field. This review examines existing theoretical methods of determining atomic and ionic polarizabilities, and discusses their relevance to various applications with particular emphasis on cold-atom physics and the metrology of atomic frequency standards.

  6. Nano-soldering to single atomic layer

    DOEpatents

    Girit, Caglar O.; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2011-10-11

    A simple technique to solder submicron sized, ohmic contacts to nanostructures has been disclosed. The technique has several advantages over standard electron beam lithography methods, which are complex, costly, and can contaminate samples. To demonstrate the soldering technique graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon, has been contacted, and low- and high-field electronic transport properties have been measured.

  7. Visualization of atom's orbits.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byungwhan

    2014-02-01

    High-resolution imaging techniques have been used to obtain views of internal shapes of single atoms or columns of atoms. This review article focuses on the visualization of internal atomic structures such as the configurations of electron orbits confined to atoms. This is accomplished by applying visualization techniques to the reported images of atoms or molecules as well as static and dynamic ions in a plasma. It was found that the photon and electron energies provide macroscopic and microscopic views of the orbit structures of atoms, respectively. The laser-imaged atoms showed a rugged orbit structure, containing alternating dark and bright orbits believed to be the pathways for an externally supplied laser energy and internally excited electron energy, respectively. By contrast, the atoms taken by the electron microscopy provided a structure of fine electron orbits, systematically formed in increasing order of grayscale representing the energy state of an orbit. This structure was identical to those of the plasma ions. The visualized electronic structures played a critical role in clarifying vague postulates made in the Bohr model. Main features proposed in the atomic model are the dynamic orbits absorbing an externally supplied electromagnetic energy, electron emission from them while accompanying light radiation, and frequency of electron waves not light. The light-accompanying electrons and ionic speckles induced by laser light signify that light is composed of electrons and ions. PMID:24749452

  8. Improved graphite furnace atomizer

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, D.D.

    1983-05-18

    A graphite furnace atomizer for use in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy is described wherein the heating elements are affixed near the optical path and away from the point of sample deposition, so that when the sample is volatilized the spectroscopic temperature at the optical path is at least that of the volatilization temperature, whereby analyteconcomitant complex formation is advantageously reduced. The atomizer may be elongated along its axis to increase the distance between the optical path and the sample deposition point. Also, the atomizer may be elongated along the axis of the optical path, whereby its analytical sensitivity is greatly increased.

  9. Magnetic measurements with atomic-plane resolution.

    PubMed

    Rusz, Ján; Muto, Shunsuke; Spiegelberg, Jakob; Adam, Roman; Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi; Bürgler, Daniel E; Oppeneer, Peter M; Schneider, Claus M

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development of magnetic nanotechnologies calls for experimental techniques capable of providing magnetic information with subnanometre spatial resolution. Available probes of magnetism either detect only surface properties, such as spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy, magnetic force microscopy or spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy, or they are bulk probes with limited spatial resolution or quantitativeness, such as X-ray magnetic circular dichroism or classical electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD). Atomic resolution EMCD methods have been proposed, although not yet experimentally realized. Here, we demonstrate an EMCD technique with an atomic size electron probe utilizing a probe-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope in its standard operation mode. The crucial element of the method is a ramp in the phase of the electron beam wavefunction, introduced by a controlled beam displacement. We detect EMCD signals with atomic-plane resolution, thereby bringing near-atomic resolution magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy to hundreds of laboratories worldwide. PMID:27578421

  10. Error estimates of protein structure coordinates and deviations from standard geometry by full-matrix refinement of gammaB- and betaB2-crystallin.

    PubMed

    Tickle, I J; Laskowski, R A; Moss, D S

    1998-03-01

    Faster workstations with larger memories are making error estimation from full-matrix least-squares refinement a more practicable technique in protein crystallography. Using minimum variance weighting, estimated standard deviations of atomic positions have been calculated for two eye lens proteins from the inverse of a least-squares normal matrix which was full with respect to the coordinate parameters. gammaB-crystallin, refined at 1.49 A yielded average errors in atomic positions which ranged from 0.05 A for main-chain atoms to 0.27 A for unrestrained water molecules. The second structure used in this work was that of betaB2-crystallin refined at 2.1 A resolution where the corresponding average errors were 0.08 and 0.35 A, respectively. The relative errors in atomic positions are dependent on the number and kinds of restraints used in the refinements. It is also shown that minimum variance weighting leads to mean-square deviations from target geometry in the refined structures which are smaller than the variances used in the distance weighting. PMID:9761889

  11. Telemetry standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-05-01

    The Telemetry Group (TG) of the Range Commanders Council (RCC) has prepared this document to foster the compatibility of telemetry transmitting, receiving, and signal processing equipment at all of the Test and Evaluation (T&E) ranges under the cognizance of the RCC. The Range Commanders highly recommend that telemetry equipment operated at the T&E ranges and telemetry equipment used by the range personnel in programs that require test range support, conform to these standards. These standards do not necessarily define the existing capability of any test range, but constitute a guide for the orderly implementation and application of telemetry systems for both the ranges and range users. The scope of capabilities attainable with the utilization of these standards requires a careful consideration of trade-offs. Guidance concerning these trade-offs is provided in the text. These standards provide the necessary criteria on which to base equipment design and modification. The ultimate purpose is to ensure an efficient spectrum and an interference-free operation of the radio link for telemetry systems at the RCC member ranges. etry systems at the RCC member ranges.

  12. Nonlinear atom interferometer surpasses classical precision limit.

    PubMed

    Gross, C; Zibold, T; Nicklas, E; Estève, J; Oberthaler, M K

    2010-04-22

    Interference is fundamental to wave dynamics and quantum mechanics. The quantum wave properties of particles are exploited in metrology using atom interferometers, allowing for high-precision inertia measurements. Furthermore, the state-of-the-art time standard is based on an interferometric technique known as Ramsey spectroscopy. However, the precision of an interferometer is limited by classical statistics owing to the finite number of atoms used to deduce the quantity of interest. Here we show experimentally that the classical precision limit can be surpassed using nonlinear atom interferometry with a Bose-Einstein condensate. Controlled interactions between the atoms lead to non-classical entangled states within the interferometer; this represents an alternative approach to the use of non-classical input states. Extending quantum interferometry to the regime of large atom number, we find that phase sensitivity is enhanced by 15 per cent relative to that in an ideal classical measurement. Our nonlinear atomic beam splitter follows the 'one-axis-twisting' scheme and implements interaction control using a narrow Feshbach resonance. We perform noise tomography of the quantum state within the interferometer and detect coherent spin squeezing with a squeezing factor of -8.2 dB (refs 11-15). The results provide information on the many-particle quantum state, and imply the entanglement of 170 atoms. PMID:20357767

  13. Information filtering via weighted heat conduction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, by taking into account effects of the user and object correlations on a heat conduction (HC) algorithm, a weighted heat conduction (WHC) algorithm is presented. We argue that the edge weight of the user-object bipartite network should be embedded into the HC algorithm to measure the object similarity. The numerical results indicate that both the accuracy and diversity could be improved greatly compared with the standard HC algorithm and the optimal values reached simultaneously. On the Movielens and Netflix datasets, the algorithmic accuracy, measured by the average ranking score, can be improved by 39.7% and 56.1% in the optimal case, respectively, and the diversity could reach 0.9587 and 0.9317 when the recommendation list equals to 5. Further statistical analysis indicates that, in the optimal case, the distributions of the edge weight are changed to the Poisson form, which may be the reason why HC algorithm performance could be improved. This work highlights the effect of edge weight on a personalized recommendation study, which maybe an important factor affecting personalized recommendation performance.

  14. Atomic Oxygen Fluence Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    This innovation enables a means for actively measuring atomic oxygen fluence (accumulated atoms of atomic oxygen per area) that has impinged upon spacecraft surfaces. Telemetered data from the device provides spacecraft designers, researchers, and mission managers with real-time measurement of atomic oxygen fluence, which is useful for prediction of the durability of spacecraft materials and components. The innovation is a compact fluence measuring device that allows in-space measurement and transmittance of measured atomic oxygen fluence as a function of time based on atomic oxygen erosion yields (the erosion yield of a material is the volume of material that is oxidized per incident oxygen atom) of materials that have been measured in low Earth orbit. It has a linear electrical response to atomic oxygen fluence, and is capable of measuring high atomic oxygen fluences (up to >10(exp 22) atoms/sq cm), which are representative of multi-year low-Earth orbital missions (such as the International Space Station). The durability or remaining structural lifetime of solar arrays that consist of polymer blankets on which the solar cells are attached can be predicted if one knows the atomic oxygen fluence that the solar array blanket has been exposed to. In addition, numerous organizations that launch space experiments into low-Earth orbit want to know the accumulated atomic oxygen fluence that their materials or components have been exposed to. The device is based on the erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite. It uses two 12deg inclined wedges of graphite that are over a grit-blasted fused silica window covering a photodiode. As the wedges erode, a greater area of solar illumination reaches the photodiode. A reference photodiode is also used that receives unobstructed solar illumination and is oriented in the same direction as the pyrolytic graphite covered photodiode. The short-circuit current from the photodiodes is measured and either sent to an onboard data logger, or

  15. Evanescent Wave Atomic Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezali, S.; Taleb, A.

    2008-09-01

    A research project at the "Laboratoire d'électronique quantique" consists in a theoretical study of the reflection and diffraction phenomena via an atomic mirror. This poster presents the principle of an atomic mirror. Many groups in the world have constructed this type of atom optics experiments such as in Paris-Orsay-Villetaneuse (France), Stanford-Gaithersburg (USA), Munich-Heidelberg (Germany), etc. A laser beam goes into a prism with an incidence bigger than the critical incidence. It undergoes a total reflection on the plane face of the prism and then exits. The transmitted resulting wave out of the prism is evanescent and repulsive as the frequency detuning of the laser beam compared to the atomic transition δ = ωL-ω0 is positive. The cold atomic sample interacts with this evanescent wave and undergoes one or more elastic bounces by passing into backward points in its trajectory because the atoms' kinetic energy (of the order of the μeV) is less than the maximum of the dipolar potential barrier ℏΩ2/Δ where Ω is the Rabi frequency [1]. In fact, the atoms are cooled and captured in a magneto-optical trap placed at a distance of the order of the cm above the prism surface. The dipolar potential with which interact the slow atoms is obtained for a two level atom in a case of a dipolar electric transition (D2 Rubidium transition at a wavelength of 780nm delivered by a Titane-Saphir laser between a fundamental state Jf = l/2 and an excited state Je = 3/2). This potential is corrected by an attractive Van der Waals term which varies as 1/z3 in the Lennard-Jones approximation (typical atomic distance of the order of λ0/2π where λ0 is the laser wavelength) and in 1/z4 if the distance between the atom and its image in the dielectric is big in front of λ0/2π. This last case is obtained in a quantum electrodynamic calculation by taking into account an orthornormal base [2]. We'll examine the role of spontaneous emission for which the rate is inversely

  16. Drug-induced weight gain.

    PubMed

    Ness-Abramof, Rosane; Apovian, Caroline M

    2005-01-01

    Drug-induced weight gain is a serious side effect of many commonly used drugs leading to noncompliance with therapy and to exacerbation of comorbid conditions related to obesity. Improved glycemic control achieved by insulin, insulin secretagogues or thiazolidinedione therapy is generally accompanied by weight gain. It is a problematic side effect of therapy due to the known deleterious effect of weight gain on glucose control, increased blood pressure and worsening lipid profile. Weight gain may be lessened or prevented by adherence to diet and exercise or combination therapy with metformin. Weight gain is also common in psychotropic therapy. The atypical antipsychotic drugs (clozapine, olanzepine, risperidone and quetiapine) are known to cause marked weight gain. Antidepressants such as amitriptyline, mirtazapine and some serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) also may promote appreciable weight gain that cannot be explained solely by improvement in depressive symptoms. The same phenomenon is observed with mood stabilizers such as lithium, valproic acid and carbamazepine. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) that promote weight gain include valproate, carbamazepine and gabapentin. Lamotrigine is an AED that is weight-neutral, while topiramate and zonisamide may induce weight loss. PMID:16341287

  17. Drug-induced weight gain.

    PubMed

    Ness-Abramof, Rosane; Apovian, Caroline M

    2005-08-01

    Drug-induced weight gain is a serious side effect of many commonly used drugs leading to noncompliance with therapy and to exacerbation of comorbid conditions related to obesity. Improved glycemic control achieved by insulin, insulin secretagogues or thiazolidinedione therapy is generally accompanied by weight gain. It is a problematic side effect of therapy due to the known deleterious effect of weight gain on glucose control, increased blood pressure and worsening lipid profile. Weight gain may be lessened or prevented by adherence to diet and exercise or combination therapy with metformin. Weight gain is also common in psychotropic therapy. The atypical antipsychotic drugs (clozapine, olanzepine, risperidone and quetiapine) are known to cause marked weight gain. Antidepressants such as amitriptyline, mirtazapine and some serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) also may promote appreciable weight gain that cannot be explained solely by improvement in depressive symptoms. The same phenomenon is observed with mood stabilizers such as lithium, valproic acid and carbamazepine. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) that promote weight gain include valproate, carbamazepine and gabapentin. Lamotrigine is an AED that is weight-neutral, while topiramate and zonisamide may induce weight loss. PMID:16234878

  18. Handling Dynamic Weights in Weighted Frequent Pattern Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Chowdhury Farhan; Tanbeer, Syed Khairuzzaman; Jeong, Byeong-Soo; Lee, Young-Koo

    Even though weighted frequent pattern (WFP) mining is more effective than traditional frequent pattern mining because it can consider different semantic significances (weights) of items, existing WFP algorithms assume that each item has a fixed weight. But in real world scenarios, the weight (price or significance) of an item can vary with time. Reflecting these changes in item weight is necessary in several mining applications, such as retail market data analysis and web click stream analysis. In this paper, we introduce the concept of a dynamic weight for each item, and propose an algorithm, DWFPM (dynamic weighted frequent pattern mining), that makes use of this concept. Our algorithm can address situations where the weight (price or significance) of an item varies dynamically. It exploits a pattern growth mining technique to avoid the level-wise candidate set generation-and-test methodology. Furthermore, it requires only one database scan, so it is eligible for use in stream data mining. An extensive performance analysis shows that our algorithm is efficient and scalable for WFP mining using dynamic weights.

  19. Two Dimensional Non-commutative Space and Rydberg Atom Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Won Sang

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we consider the case of only space-space non-commutativity in two dimension. We also discuss the Rydberg atom model in this space and use the linear realization of the coordinate and momentum operators to solve the Schrödinger equation for the Rydberg atom through the standard perturbation method. Finally, the thermodynamics for the Rydberg atom model is discussed.

  20. Quantum Teleportation of High-dimensional Atomic Momenta State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qurban, Misbah; Abbas, Tasawar; Rameez-ul-Islam; Ikram, Manzoor

    2016-06-01

    Atomic momenta states of the neutral atoms are known to be decoherence resistant and therefore present a viable solution for most of the quantum information tasks including the quantum teleportation. We present a systematic protocol for the teleportation of high-dimensional quantized momenta atomic states to the field state inside the cavities by applying standard cavity QED techniques. The proposal can be executed under prevailing experimental scenario.

  1. Weight reduction, fertility and contraception.

    PubMed

    Van Der Spuy, Z M; Jacobs, H S

    1983-10-01

    The significance of weight and body composition with regard to the fertile menstrual cycle has excited much interest. There is global imbalance of resources and problems of widespread chronic malnutrition in many 3rd world countries. This emphasizes the great importance of the possible effects of diet, body weight, and body composition on fecundity (ability to reproduce), fertility (reproductive performance), and pregnancy outcome. Frisch and Revelle suggested that a critical body weight is required for a girl to progress through puberty, menstruate, and finally develop ovulatory cycles. They postulated a direct relationship between weight and menarche and suggested that before menarche will occur at least 17% of the body weight needs to be made up of fat. The Frisch hypothesis is not universally accepted, and it seems highly unlikely that a single age unrelated body weight is always the trigger for menarche. Many of the data used in Frische's original studies were derived rather than directly observed. It seems likely that both body weight and composition are important and that the peripheral conversion of androgens to estrogens in fat plays a role in pubertal development, but the actual signal whcih triggers the hypothalamic events leading eventually through puberty to menstruation and ovulation remains unkown. Acute malnutrition, as seen during famine, is assoicated with a dramatic decrease in fertility. It is usually secondary to amenorrhea and annovulation. In developing countries weight related amenorrhea and delayed menarche are largely the result of nutritonal deprivation and the demands of lactation on women of boderline body weight, but a different pattern is seen in Western countries. The outstanding example of weight reduction resulting in infertility is seen in patients with anorexia nervosa. These women have extreme self imposed weight loss, a distorted perception of their body image, and disturbance in their attitude towards their feelings of hunger

  2. Modified Embedded Atom Method

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-08-01

    Interatomic force and energy calculation subroutine to be used with the molecular dynamics simulation code LAMMPS (Ref a.). The code evaluated the total energy and atomic forces (energy gradient) according to a cubic spline-based variant (Ref b.) of the Modified Embedded Atom Method (MEAM) with a additional Stillinger-Weber (SW) contribution.

  3. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch.

    PubMed

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Pedersen, Andreas; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2016-01-13

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore's law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or, at most, a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ratio of 9.2 dB and operation at room temperature up to MHz with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of an integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the atomic level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully integrated and highly scalable chip platform, a platform where optics, electronics, and memory may be controlled at the single-atom level. PMID:26670551

  4. Greek Atomic Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roller, Duane H. D.

    1981-01-01

    Focusing on history of physics, which began about 600 B.C. with the Ionian Greeks and reaching full development within three centuries, suggests that the creation of the concept of the atom is understandable within the context of Greek physical theory; so is the rejection of the atomic theory by the Greek physicists. (Author/SK)

  5. Atomic and Molecular Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Anand K.

    2005-01-01

    A symposium on atomic and molecular physics was held on November 18, 2005 at Goddard Space Flight Center. There were a number of talks through the day on various topics such as threshold law of ionization, scattering of electrons from atoms and molecules, muonic physics, positron physics, Rydberg states etc. The conference was attended by a number of physicists from all over the world.

  6. When Atoms Want

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  7. Neutrino-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouzakov, Konstantin A.; Studenikin, Alexander I.

    2016-05-01

    Neutrino-atom scattering provides a sensitive tool for probing nonstandard interactions of massive neutrinos in laboratory measurements. The ionization channel of this collision process plays an important role in experiments searching for neutrino magnetic moments. We discuss some theoretical aspects of atomic ionization by massive neutrinos. We also outline possible manifestations of neutrino electromagnetic properties in coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  8. Greek atomic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roller, Duane H. D.

    1981-03-01

    Physics began about 600 B.C. with the Ionian Greeks and reached full development within three centuries. The creation of the concept of the atom is understandable within the context of Greek physical theory; so is the rejection of the atomic theory by the Greek physicists.

  9. Atomic Power Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogerton, John F.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by The United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: What is Atomic Power?; What Does Safety Depend On?; Control of Radioactive Material During Operation; Accident Prevention; Containment in the Event of an Accident; Licensing and…

  10. Optical resonance shifts in thermal and cold Rb atomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruostekoski, Janne; Jenkins, S. D.; Javanainen, J.; Bourgain, R.; Jennewein, S.; Sortais, Y. R. P.; Browaeys, A.; University of Southampton Collaboration; University of Connecticut Collaboration; Institut d'Optique, CNRS, Univ Paris Sud Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We show that the resonance shifts in fluorescence of a cold gas of rubidium atoms substantially differ from those of thermal atomic ensembles that obey the standard continuous medium electrodynamics. The analysis is based on large-scale microscopic numerical simulations and experimental measurements of the resonance shifts in light propagation.

  11. Asymmetric network connectivity using weighted harmonic averages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Greg; Mahadevan, L.

    2011-02-01

    We propose a non-metric measure of the "closeness" felt between two nodes in an undirected, weighted graph using a simple weighted harmonic average of connectivity, that is a real-valued Generalized Erdös Number (GEN). While our measure is developed with a collaborative network in mind, the approach can be of use in a variety of artificial and real-world networks. We are able to distinguish between network topologies that standard distance metrics view as identical, and use our measure to study some simple analytically tractable networks. We show how this might be used to look at asymmetry in authorship networks such as those that inspired the integer Erdös numbers in mathematical coauthorships. We also show the utility of our approach to devise a ratings scheme that we apply to the data from the NetFlix prize, and find a significant improvement using our method over a baseline.

  12. Dietary adherence during weight loss predicts weight regain.

    PubMed

    Del Corral, Pedro; Bryan, David R; Garvey, W Timothy; Gower, Barbara A; Hunter, Gary R

    2011-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between previous dietary adherence during a low-calorie diet weight loss intervention and subsequent weight change during a 2-year follow-up for weight maintenance. One hundred and sixteen healthy, recently weight reduced (lost ~12 kg, BMI 22-25 kg/m2) premenopausal women were studied. Dietary adherence was assessed by doubly labeled water (DLW) and body composition change. Comparisons were made between the upper and lower tertiles for previous dietary adherence and subsequent weight change at 1- and 2-year follow-up. Percent weight regained was significantly lower (30.9 ± 6.7% vs. 66.7 ± 9.4%; P < 0.05) in the upper compared to the lower adherence tertile for previous weight loss dietary adherence (49.9 ± 8.8% vs. 96.8 ± 12.8% P < 0.05) at 1- and 2-year follow-up, respectively. This difference was partly explained by increases in daily activity-related energy expenditure (AEE) (+95 ± 45 kcal/day vs. -44 ± 42 kcal/day, P < 0.05) and lower daily energy intake (2,066 ± 71 kcal/day vs. 2,289 ± 62 kcal/day, P < 0.05) in the higher tertile for previous dietary adherence, compared to the lower. These findings suggest that higher adherence (i.e., higher tertile) to the previous low-calorie diet predicts lower weight regain over 2-year follow-up for weight maintenance, which is explained by lower energy intake and higher physical activity. Finally, how well an individual adheres to a low-calorie diet intervention during weight loss may be a useful tool for identifying individuals who are particularly vulnerable to subsequent weight regain. PMID:21164500

  13. The weighted random graph model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garlaschelli, Diego

    2009-07-01

    We introduce the weighted random graph (WRG) model, which represents the weighted counterpart of the Erdos-Renyi random graph and provides fundamental insights into more complicated weighted networks. We find analytically that the WRG is characterized by a geometric weight distribution, a binomial degree distribution and a negative binomial strength distribution. We also characterize exactly the percolation phase transitions associated with edge removal and with the appearance of weighted subgraphs of any order and intensity. We find that even this completely null model displays a percolation behaviour similar to what is observed in real weighted networks, implying that edge removal cannot be used to detect community structure empirically. By contrast, the analysis of clustering successfully reveals different patterns between the WRG and real networks.

  14. Laser-Atomic Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2008-05-01

    We report a newly developed technique, laser-atomic oscillator, for simultaneously generating stable optical and electrical modulations with a very few components. It requires only a semiconductor laser, a vapor cell, and a few optical components. No photodetector and electronic feedback are needed. In this new system, the ground-state hyperfine coherence of alkali-metal atoms is spontaneously generated. The modulated laser light with a spectrum of a small optical comb is automatically produced, and the spacing between the comb peaks is photonically locked to the hyperfine frequency. The charge carriers in the semiconductor laser are also modulated at the hyperfine frequency. Laser-atomic oscillator is purely optical. Its simple structure allows the system to be very compact. We believe this new technique will bring some advantages in the applications of atomic chronometry, atomic magnetometry, and generation of multi-coherent light.

  15. Moving Single Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Dustin

    2016-05-01

    Single neutral atoms are promising candidates for qubits, the fundamental unit of quantum information. We have built a set of optical tweezers for trapping and moving single Rubidium atoms. The tweezers are based on a far off-resonant dipole trapping laser focussed to a 1 μm spot with a single aspheric lens. We use a digital micromirror device (DMD) to generate dynamic holograms of the desired arrangement of traps. The DMD has a frame rate of 20 kHz which, when combined with fast algorithms, allows for rapid reconfiguration of the traps. We demonstrate trapping of up to 20 atoms in arbitrary arrangements, and the transport of a single-atom over a distance of 14 μm with continuous laser cooling, and 5 μm without. In the meantime, we are developing high-finesse fibre-tip cavities, which we plan to use to couple pairs of single atoms to form a quantum network.

  16. Coaxial airblast atomizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardalupas, Y.; Whitelaw, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to quantify the characteristics of the sprays of coaxial injectors with particular emphasis on those aspects relevant to the performance of rocket engines. Measurements for coaxial air blast atomizers were obtained using air to represent the gaseous stream and water to represent the liquid stream. A wide range of flow conditions were examined for sprays with and without swirl for gaseous streams. The parameters varied include Weber number, gas flow rate, liquid flow rate, swirl, and nozzle geometry. Measurements were made with a phase Doppler velocimeter. Major conclusions of the study focused upon droplet size as a function of Weber number, effect of gas flow rate on atomization and spray spread, effect of nozzle geometry on atomization and spread, effect of swirl on atomization, spread, jet recirculation and breakup, and secondary atomization.

  17. Atomic Oxygen Textured Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Hunt, Jason D.; Drobotij, Erin; Cales, Michael R.; Cantrell, Gidget

    1995-01-01

    Atomic oxygen can be used to microscopically alter the surface morphology of polymeric materials in space or in ground laboratory facilities. For polymeric materials whose sole oxidation products are volatile species, directed atomic oxygen reactions produce surfaces of microscopic cones. However, isotropic atomic oxygen exposure results in polymer surfaces covered with lower aspect ratio sharp-edged craters. Isotropic atomic oxygen plasma exposure of polymers typically causes a significant decrease in water contact angle as well as altered coefficient of static friction. Such surface alterations may be of benefit for industrial and biomedical applications. The results of atomic oxygen plasma exposure of thirty-three (33) different polymers are presented, including typical morphology changes, effects on water contact angle, and coefficient of static friction.

  18. Optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy of Rare Earth Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiatlowski, Jerlyn; Palm, Christopher; Joshi, Trinity; Montcrieffe, Caitlin; Jackson Kimball, Derek

    2013-05-01

    We discuss progress in our experimental program to employ optical-frequency-comb-based spectroscopy to understand the complex spectra of rare-earth atoms. We plan to carry out systematic measurements of atomic transitions in rare-earth atoms to elucidate the energy level structure and term assignment and determine presently unknown atomic state parameters. This spectroscopic information is important in view of the increasing interest in rare-earth atoms for atomic frequency standards, in astrophysical investigations of chemically peculiar stars, and in tests of fundamental physics (tests of parity and time-reversal invariance, searches for time variation of fundamental constants, etc.). We are presently studying the use of hollow cathode lamps as atomic sources for two-photon frequency comb spectroscopy. Supported by the National Science Foundation under grant PHY-0958749.

  19. Behavior Change; Weight Loss, and Physiological Improvements in Type II Diabetic Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wing, Rena R.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Investigated whether behavior modification would improve short- and long-term results of weight control programs for obese patients (N=53) with Type II diabetes. The behavior modification group lost more weight than the nutrition education or standard-care condition during the 16-week treatment, but at 16-month follow-up, weight loss differences…

  20. Atom Probe Tomography of Geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parman, S. W.; Diercks, D.; Gorman, B.; Cooper, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    From the electron microprobe to the secondary ion microprobe to laser-ablation ICP-MS, steady improvements in the spatial resolution and detection limits of geochemical micro-analysis have been central to generating new discoveries. Atom probe tomography (APT) is a relatively new technology that promises nm-scale spatial resolution (in three dimensions) with ppm level detection limits. The method is substantially different from traditional beam-based (electron, ion, laser) methods. In APT, the sample is shaped (usually with a dual-beam FIB) into a needle with typical dimensions of 1-2 μm height and 100-200 nm diameter. Within the atom probe, the needle is evaporated one atom (ideally) at a time by a high electric field (ten's of V per square nm at the needle tip). A femtosecond laser (12 ps pulse width) is used to assist in evaporating non-conducting samples. The two-dimensional detector locates where the atom was released from the needle's surface and so can reconstruct the positions of all detected atoms in three dimensions. It also records the time of flight of the ion, which is used to calculate the mass/charge ratio of the ion. We will discuss our results analyzing a range of geologic materials. In one case, naturally occurring platinum group alloys (PGA) from the Josephine Ophiolite have been imaged. Such alloys are of interest as recorders of the Os heterogeneity of the mantle [1,2]. Optimal ablation was achieved with a laser power of 120-240 pJ and laser pulse rates 500 kHz. Runs were stopped after 10 million atoms were imaged. An example analysis is: Pt 61(1), Fe 26.1(9), Rh 1.20(4), Ir 7.0(7), Ni 2.65(8), Ru 0.20(9), Cu 1.22(8), Co 0.00029(5). Values are in atomic %; values in parentheses are one-sigma standard deviations on five separate needles from the same FIB lift-out, which was 30 μm long. Assuming the sample is homogenous over the 30 μm from which the needle was extracted, the analyses suggest relative errors for major elements below 5% and for

  1. Socioeconomic Disparities in Emerging Adult Weight and Weight Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanKim, Nicole A.; Laska, Melissa N.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To explore weight, weight behaviors, and tobacco and alcohol use among emerging adults by parental education and financial strain. Methods: Cross-sectional analyses of 2010 survey data from an urban Minnesota public 4-year university and 2-year community college (n=1201). Results: Low parental education was associated with lower…

  2. Link Prediction in Weighted Networks: A Weighted Mutual Information Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Boyao; Xia, Yongxiang

    2016-01-01

    The link-prediction problem is an open issue in data mining and knowledge discovery, which attracts researchers from disparate scientific communities. A wealth of methods have been proposed to deal with this problem. Among these approaches, most are applied in unweighted networks, with only a few taking the weights of links into consideration. In this paper, we present a weighted model for undirected and weighted networks based on the mutual information of local network structures, where link weights are applied to further enhance the distinguishable extent of candidate links. Empirical experiments are conducted on four weighted networks, and results show that the proposed method can provide more accurate predictions than not only traditional unweighted indices but also typical weighted indices. Furthermore, some in-depth discussions on the effects of weak ties in link prediction as well as the potential to predict link weights are also given. This work may shed light on the design of algorithms for link prediction in weighted networks. PMID:26849659

  3. Molecular Weight and Molecular Weight Distributions in Synthetic Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Thomas Carl

    1981-01-01

    Focuses on molecular weight and molecular weight distributions (MWD) and models for predicting MWD in a pedagogical way. In addition, instrumental methods used to characterize MWD are reviewed with emphasis on physical chemistry of each, including end-group determination, osmometry, light scattering, solution viscosity, fractionation, and…

  4. Link Prediction in Weighted Networks: A Weighted Mutual Information Model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Boyao; Xia, Yongxiang

    2016-01-01

    The link-prediction problem is an open issue in data mining and knowledge discovery, which attracts researchers from disparate scientific communities. A wealth of methods have been proposed to deal with this problem. Among these approaches, most are applied in unweighted networks, with only a few taking the weights of links into consideration. In this paper, we present a weighted model for undirected and weighted networks based on the mutual information of local network structures, where link weights are applied to further enhance the distinguishable extent of candidate links. Empirical experiments are conducted on four weighted networks, and results show that the proposed method can provide more accurate predictions than not only traditional unweighted indices but also typical weighted indices. Furthermore, some in-depth discussions on the effects of weak ties in link prediction as well as the potential to predict link weights are also given. This work may shed light on the design of algorithms for link prediction in weighted networks. PMID:26849659

  5. Hg(+) Frequency Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we review the development of Hg(+) microwave frequency standards for use in high reliability and continuous operation applications. In recent work we have demonstrated short-term frequency stability of 3 x 10(exp -14)/nu(sub tau) when a cryogenic oscillator of stability 2-3 x 10(exp 15) was used a the local oscillator. The trapped ion frequency standard employs a Hg-202 discharge lamp to optically pump the trapped Hg(+)-199 clock ions and a helium buffer gas to cool the ions to near room temperature. We describe a small Hg(+) ion trap based frequency standard with an extended linear ion trap (LITE) architecture which separates the optical state selection region from the clock resonance region. This separation allows the use of novel trap configurations in the resonance region since no optical pumping is carried out there. A method for measuring the size of an ion cloud inside a linear trap with a 12-rod trap is currently being investigated. At approx. 10(exp -12), the 2nd order Doppler shift for trapped mercury ion frequency standards is one of the largest frequency offsets and its measurement to the 1% level would represent an advance in insuring the very long-term stability of these standards to the 10(exp -14) or better level. Finally, we describe atomic clock comparison experiments that can probe for a time variation of the fine structure constant, alpha = e(exp 2)/2(pi)hc, at the level of 10(exp -20)/year as predicted in some Grand Unified String Theories.

  6. Weight Change in a Commercial Web-Based Weight Loss Program and its Association With Website Use: Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Philip J; Collins, Clare E

    2011-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of information in the scientific literature on the effectiveness of commercial weight loss programs, including Web-based programs. The potential of Web-based weight loss programs has been acknowledged, but their ability to achieve significant weight loss has not been proven. Objective The objectives were to evaluate the weight change achieved within a large cohort of individuals enrolled in a commercial Web-based weight loss program for 12 or 52 weeks and to describe participants’ program use in relation to weight change. Method Participants enrolled in an Australian commercial Web-based weight loss program from August 15, 2007, through May 31, 2008. Self-reported weekly weight records were used to determine weight change after 12- and 52-week subscriptions. The primary analysis estimated weight change using generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs) for all participants who subscribed for 12 weeks and also for those who subscribed for 52 weeks. A sensitivity analysis was conducted using the last observation carried forward (LOCF) method. Website use (ie, the number of days participants logged on, made food or exercise entries to the Web-based diary, or posted to the discussion forum) was described from program enrollment to 12 and 52 weeks, and differences in website use by percentage weight change category were tested using Kruskal-Wallis test for equality of populations. Results Participants (n = 9599) had a mean (standard deviation [SD]) age of 35.7 (9.5) years and were predominantly female (86% or 8279/9599) and obese (61% or 5866/9599). Results from the primary GLMM analysis including all enrollees found the mean percentage weight change was −6.2% among 12-week subscribers (n = 6943) and −6.9% among 52-week subscribers (n = 2656). Sensitivity analysis using LOCF revealed an average weight change of −3.0% and −3.5% after 12 and 52 weeks respectively. The use of all website features increased significantly (P < .01) as

  7. The Healthy Weight Collaborative: quality improvement methods promoting healthy weight.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Marianne E; Vanderkruik, Rachel; Reims, Kathy; Coulouris, Natasha; Anand, Shikha; Linde-Feucht, Sarah; Homer, Charles J

    2012-08-01

    Promoting healthy weight requires innovative approaches and a concerted response across all sectors of society. This commentary features the framework guiding the Healthy Weight Collaborative, a two-phased quality improvement (QI) learning collaborative and key activity of the Collaborate for Healthy Weight initiative. Multi-sector teams from primary care, public health, and community-based organizations use QI to identify, test, and implement program and policy changes in their communities related to promoting healthy weight. We describe the Collaborative's overall design based on the Action Model to Achieve Healthy People 2020 Goals and our approach of applying QI methods to advance implementation of sustainable ways to promote healthy weight and healthy equity. We provide specifics on measurement and change strategies as well as examples of Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles from teams participating in Phase 1 of the Collaborative. These teams will serve as leaders for sustainable, positive change in their communities. PMID:22864485

  8. Weighted order statistic classifiers with large rank-order margin.

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, R. B.; Hush, D. R.; Theiler, J. P.; Gokhale, M.

    2003-01-01

    We describe how Stack Filters and Weighted Order Statistic function classes can be used for classification problems. This leads to a new design criteria for linear classifiers when inputs are binary-valued and weights are positive . We present a rank-based measure of margin that can be directly optimized as a standard linear program and investigate its effect on generalization error with experiment. Our approach can robustly combine large numbers of base hypothesis and easily implement known priors through regularization.

  9. The Weighted Super Bergman Kernels Over the Supermatrix Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhiming

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is threefold. Firstly, using Howe duality for , we obtain integral formulas of the super Schur functions with respect to the super standard Gaussian distributions. Secondly, we give explicit expressions of the super Szegö kernels and the weighted super Bergman kernels for the Cartan superdomains of type I. Thirdly, combining these results, we obtain duality relations of integrals over the unitary groups and the Cartan superdomains, and the marginal distributions of the weighted measure.

  10. A Family and Community Focused Lifestyle Program Prevents Weight Regain in Pacific Islanders: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaholokula, Joseph Keawe'aimoku; Mau, Marjorie K.; Efird, Jimmy T.; Leake, Anne; West, Margaret; Palakiko, Donna-Marie; Yoshimura, Sheryl R.; Kekauoha, B. Puni; Rose, Charles; Gomes, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Preventing weight regain after the loss of excess weight is challenging for people, especially for ethnic minorities in the United States. A 6-month weight loss maintenance intervention designed for Pacific Islanders, called the PILI Lifestyle Program (PLP), was compared with a 6-month standard behavioral weight loss maintenance program (SBP) in a…

  11. Tracing Poly(ethylene-oxide) Crystallization using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaldi, Xavier; Amanuel, Samuel

    The early stages of nucleation and crystallization of Poly(ethylene-oxide) have been studied using Atomic Force Microscopy equipped with a heating and cooling stage. Effects of molecular weight and sample preparation techniques were studied using amplitude and frequency modulation. Mapping the viscoelastic behavior at different temperatures and has enabled the development of a relatively new technique for following the evolution of crystallization and melting of a semi-crystalline polymer. Tracing Poly(ethylene-oxide) Crystallization using Atomic Force Microscopy.

  12. New ion trap for atomic frequency standard applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, L.

    1989-01-01

    A novel linear ion trap that permits storage of a large number of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the radio frequency (RF) confining fields has been designed and built. This new trap should store about 20 times the number of ions a conventional RF trap stores with no corresponding increase in second-order Doppler shift from the confining field. In addition, the sensitivity of this shift to trapping parameters, i.e., RF voltage, RF frequency, and trap size, is greatly reduced.

  13. Intelligent Quality Prediction Using Weighted Least Square Support Vector Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yaojun

    A novel quality prediction method with mobile time window is proposed for small-batch producing process based on weighted least squares support vector regression (LS-SVR). The design steps and learning algorithm are also addressed. In the method, weighted LS-SVR is taken as the intelligent kernel, with which the small-batch learning is solved well and the nearer sample is set a larger weight, while the farther is set the smaller weight in the history data. A typical machining process of cutting bearing outer race is carried out and the real measured data are used to contrast experiment. The experimental results demonstrate that the prediction accuracy of the weighted LS-SVR based model is only 20%-30% that of the standard LS-SVR based one in the same condition. It provides a better candidate for quality prediction of small-batch producing process.

  14. Atom trap trace analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O'Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  15. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.

    1997-12-01

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  16. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Weihong

    1997-01-01

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  17. Atomic mass evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Audi, G.; Kondev, F. G.; Xu, X.; Pfeiffer, B.

    2012-11-12

    The atomic masses are important input parameters for nuclear astrophysics calculations. The Atomic Mass Evaluation (AME) is the most reliable source for comprehensive information related to atomic masses. The latest AME was published in 2003. A new version, which will include the impact of a wealth of new, high-precision experimental data, will be published in December 2012. In this paper we will give the current status of AME2012. The mass surface has been changed significantly compared to AME2003, and the impact on astrophysics calculations is discussed.

  18. Trapping deuterium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederkehr, A. W.; Hogan, S. D.; Lambillotte, B.; Andrist, M.; Schmutz, H.; Agner, J.; Salathe, Y.; Merkt, F.

    2010-02-15

    Cold deuterium atoms in a supersonic beam have been decelerated from an initial velocity of 475 m/s to zero velocity in the laboratory frame using a 24-stage Zeeman decelerator. The atoms have been loaded in a magnetic quadrupole trap at a temperature of {approx}100 mK and an initial density of {approx}10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}. Efficient deceleration was achieved by pulsing the magnetic fields in the decelerator solenoids using irregular sequences of phase angles. Trap loading was optimized by monitoring and suppressing the observed reflection of the atoms by the field gradient of the back solenoid of the trap.

  19. Nutrition, Weight Control, and Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katch, Frank I.; McArdle, William D.

    This book contains information on nutrition, weight control, and exercise. Some basic information from the biological sciences is included but a specialized background is not necessary to understand the text. The content is appropriate for nutrition, weight control, exercise, and physical fitness courses at the university level, for the various…

  20. Predictors of successful weight loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The identification of variables in the early stages of treatment that are related to successful weight loss provides practitioners with important information. These factors may be assessed to determine the likelihood of future success. Weight loss at the beginning of treatment, depressive symptomato...

  1. Two photon excitation of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindzola, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    A standard perturbation expansion in the atom-radiation field interaction is used to calculate the two photon excitation cross section for 1s(2) 2s(2) 2p(4) p3 to 1s(2) 2s(2) 2p(3) (s4) 3p p3 transition in atomic oxygen. The summation over bound and continuum intermediate states is handled by solving the equivalent inhomogeneous differential equation. Exact summation results differ by a factor of 2 from a rough estimate obtained by limiting the intermediate state summation to one bound state. Higher order electron correlation effects are also examined.

  2. Precisely detecting atomic position of atomic intensity images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhijun; Guo, Yaolin; Tang, Sai; Li, Junjie; Wang, Jincheng; Zhou, Yaohe

    2015-03-01

    We proposed a quantitative method to detect atomic position in atomic intensity images from experiments such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and simulation such as phase field crystal modeling. The evaluation of detection accuracy proves the excellent performance of the method. This method provides a chance to precisely determine atomic interactions based on the detected atomic positions from the atomic intensity image, and hence to investigate the related physical, chemical and electrical properties. PMID:25544105

  3. BOOK REVIEW: Computational Atomic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, Douglass E.

    1998-02-01

    The primary purpose of `Computational Atomic Structure' is to give a potential user of the Multi-Configuration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) Atomic Structure Package an outline of the physics and computational methods in the package, guidance on how to use the package, and information on how to interpret and use the computational results. The book is successful in all three aspects. In addition, the book provides a good overview and review of the physics of atomic structure that would be useful to the plasma physicist interested in refreshing his knowledge of atomic structure and quantum mechanics. While most of the subjects are covered in greater detail in other sources, the book is reasonably self-contained, and, in most cases, the reader can understand the basic material without recourse to other sources. The MCHF package is the standard package for computing atomic structure and wavefunctions for single or multielectron ions and atoms. It is available from a number of ftp sites. When the code was originally written in FORTRAN 77, it could only be run on large mainframes. With the advances in computer technology, the suite of codes can now be compiled and run on present day workstations and personal computers and is thus available for use by any physicist, even those with extremely modest computing resources. Sample calculations in interactive mode are included in the book to illustrate the input needed for the code, what types of results and information the code can produce, and whether the user has installed the code correctly. The user can also specify the calculational level, from simple Hartree-Fock to multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock. The MCHF method begins by finding approximate wavefunctions for the bound states of an atomic system. This involves minimizing the energy of the bound state using a variational technique. Once the wavefunctions have been determined, other atomic properties, such as the transition rates, can be determined. The book begins with an

  4. A compact transportable Josephson voltage standard

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, C.A.; Burroughs, C.J.; Kupferman, S.L.

    1996-06-01

    The development of a compact, portable 10 V Josephson calibration system is described. Its accuracy is the same as typical laboratory systems and its weight and volume are reduced by more than a factor of three. The new system will replace travelling voltage standards used within several NASA and DOE standards laboratories.

  5. 49 CFR 535.5 - Standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 40 CFR 1037.150(m). A manufacturer's engines are deemed to have fuel consumption target values and... test weight in accordance with 40 CFR 1037.150(m). The fuel consumption subconfiguration standard for a... the provisions in 40 CFR 1037.150(g). (3) Regulatory subcategory standards. The fuel...

  6. Handover standards.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    An important part of discharge communication is the timely handover of information about diagnostic tests, as breakdown in this aspect of communication can contribute to unsafe patient care. NHS England has produced a set of standards to underpin the development of robust systems of care, policies and practice for the safe and high quality transfer of information about diagnostic tests and test results at discharge. The standards are governed by three overarching principles that have implications for nurses. They are that: ■ Clinicians who order tests are responsible for reviewing, acting on and communicating results and actions taken to GPs and patients, even if patients have been discharged. ■ Results received by GP practices should be reviewed and acted on by a responsible clinician even if they did not order the tests. ■ Reasonable adjustments should be made for people with learning disabilities and mental health problems and, where appropriate, families, carers, care co-ordinators and key workers should be invited to participate in handover processes and decisions about patients at discharge. PMID:27138516

  7. [Controlled weight bearing after osteosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Perren, T; Matter, P

    1993-01-01

    Patient compliance with postoperative partial weight bearing can be a difficult management problem. The problem may be intentional or unintentional. There is no objective way to assess the amount of weight placed on the lower extremity by the patient. It is our clinical suspicion that patients place more weight than is desirable on the effected limb. There are few reports in the literature on this topic. One study has confirmed our suspicion of poor patient compliance with postoperative weight bearing. Our goal is to develop a system to accurately assess weight bearing and to improve this aspect of postoperative fracture care. Through an active feedback device we hope to improve patient education and understanding. We plan to study the clinical applications of using a pressure sensitive shoe insert device. Our ultimate goal is to improve upon the present device and to study the clinical application of there use. PMID:8123330

  8. Fungible weights in logistic regression.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeff A; Waller, Niels G

    2016-06-01

    In this article we develop methods for assessing parameter sensitivity in logistic regression models. To set the stage for this work, we first review Waller's (2008) equations for computing fungible weights in linear regression. Next, we describe 2 methods for computing fungible weights in logistic regression. To demonstrate the utility of these methods, we compute fungible logistic regression weights using data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (2010) Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey, and we illustrate how these alternate weights can be used to evaluate parameter sensitivity. To make our work accessible to the research community, we provide R code (R Core Team, 2015) that will generate both kinds of fungible logistic regression weights. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26651981

  9. Frequency weighting filter design for automotive ride comfort evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Few study gives guidance to design weighting filters according to the frequency weighting factors, and the additional evaluation method of automotive ride comfort is not made good use of in some countries. Based on the regularities of the weighting factors, a method is proposed and the vertical and horizontal weighting filters are developed. The whole frequency range is divided several times into two parts with respective regularity. For each division, a parallel filter constituted by a low- and a high-pass filter with the same cutoff frequency and the quality factor is utilized to achieve section factors. The cascading of these parallel filters obtains entire factors. These filters own a high order. But, low order filters are preferred in some applications. The bilinear transformation method and the least P-norm optimal infinite impulse response(IIR) filter design method are employed to develop low order filters to approximate the weightings in the standard. In addition, with the window method, the linear phase finite impulse response(FIR) filter is designed to keep the signal from distorting and to obtain the staircase weighting. For the same case, the traditional method produces 0.330 7 m • s-2 weighted root mean square(r.m.s.) acceleration and the filtering method gives 0.311 9 m • s-2 r.m.s. The fourth order filter for approximation of vertical weighting obtains 0.313 9 m • s-2 r.m.s. Crest factors of the acceleration signal weighted by the weighting filter and the fourth order filter are 3.002 7 and 3.011 1, respectively. This paper proposes several methods to design frequency weighting filters for automotive ride comfort evaluation, and these developed weighting filters are effective.

  10. Factors influencing weight changes in callitrichids at the Bronx Zoo.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Elena; Shelmidine, Nichole

    2010-01-01

    Callitrichids are small monkeys with high metabolic rates who appear to be susceptible to spontaneous diseases and possibly to environmental changes creating challenges in maintaining them in captivity. This study investigates whether life events (i.e. medical, social and housing changes) can influence weight. In previous research, body mass has been shown to be correlated with periods of illness, group composition changes and stress. Weights of 56 individual callitrichid monkeys (20 marmosets, 26 tamarins and 11 lion tamarins) at the WCS's Bronx Zoo were examined over approximately 2½ years. Weight fluctuations were scored based on 5%, 10% and 1 standard deviation criteria during periods of medical (illness and injury), social (introductions and separations), housing (movement within or between buildings) events and during periods when no-events occurred. Additionally, weights were examined for 3 months before and after periods of illness to look for trends in weight changes for 47 medical events (14 marmosets, 21 tamarins and 12 lion tamarins). Moreover, in five alloparenting males (four tamarins and one lion tamarin), weights were examined to determine if weight loss occurred after births as observed in earlier studies. The results show that a 5% and 1SD criterion may be too sensitive a criterion. We therefore deemed that a 10% weight loss may be the best criterion. For marmosets, a 10% weight loss occurred in association with all events. For tamarins, weight loss occurred with housing events. In lion tamarins, weight loss was observed with medical events. No significant weight loss was observed in alloparenting males. PMID:19890903

  11. Perceived Weight Discrimination and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Sutin, Angelina R.; Terracciano, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Weight discrimination is prevalent in American society. Although associated consistently with psychological and economic outcomes, less is known about whether weight discrimination is associated with longitudinal changes in obesity. The objectives of this research are (1) to test whether weight discrimination is associated with risk of becoming obese (Body Mass Index≥30; BMI) by follow-up among those not obese at baseline, and (2) to test whether weight discrimination is associated with risk of remaining obese at follow-up among those already obese at baseline. Participants were drawn from the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative longitudinal survey of community-dwelling US residents. A total of 6,157 participants (58.6% female) completed the discrimination measure and had weight and height available from the 2006 and 2010 assessments. Participants who experienced weight discrimination were approximately 2.5 times more likely to become obese by follow-up (OR = 2.54, 95% CI = 1.58–4.08) and participants who were obese at baseline were three times more likely to remain obese at follow up (OR = 3.20, 95% CI = 2.06–4.97) than those who had not experienced such discrimination. These effects held when controlling for demographic factors (age, sex, ethnicity, education) and when baseline BMI was included as a covariate. These effects were also specific to weight discrimination; other forms of discrimination (e.g., sex, race) were unrelated to risk of obesity at follow-up. The present research demonstrates that, in addition to poorer mental health outcomes, weight discrimination has implications for obesity. Rather than motivating individuals to lose weight, weight discrimination increases risk for obesity. PMID:23894586

  12. Microfabricated ion frequency standard

    DOEpatents

    Schwindt, Peter; Biedermann, Grant; Blain, Matthew G.; Stick, Daniel L.; Serkland, Darwin K.; Olsson, III, Roy H.

    2010-12-28

    A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

  13. The standard model and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1989-05-01

    The field of elementary particle, or high energy, physics seeks to identify the most elementary constituents of nature and to study the forces that govern their interactions. Increasing the energy of a probe in a laboratory experiment increases its power as an effective microscope for discerning increasingly smaller structures of matter. Thus we have learned that matter is composed of molecules that are in turn composed of atoms, that the atom consists of a nucleus surrounded by a cloud of electrons, and that the atomic nucleus is a collection of protons and neutrons. The more powerful probes provided by high energy particle accelerators have taught us that a nucleon is itself made of objects called quarks. The forces among quarks and electrons are understood within a general theoretical framework called the ''standard model,'' that accounts for all interactions observed in high energy laboratory experiments to date. These are commonly categorized as the ''strong,'' ''weak'' and ''electromagnetic'' interactions. In this lecture I will describe the standard model, and point out some of its limitations. Probing for deeper structures in quarks and electrons defines the present frontier of particle physics. I will discuss some speculative ideas about extensions of the standard model and/or yet more fundamental forces that may underlie our present picture. 11 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Atomic Chain Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Adatom chains, precise structures artificially created on an atomically regulated surface, are the smallest possible candidates for future nanoelectronics. Since all the devices are created by combining adatom chains precisely prepared with atomic precision, device characteristics are predictable, and free from deviations due to accidental structural defects. In this atomic dimension, however, an analogy to the current semiconductor devices may not work. For example, Si structures are not always semiconducting. Adatom states do not always localize at the substrate surface when adatoms form chemical bonds to the substrate atoms. Transport properties are often determined for the entire system of the chain and electrodes, and not for chains only. These fundamental issues are discussed, which will be useful for future device considerations.

  15. Conceptual atomism rethought.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Susan

    2010-06-01

    Focusing on Machery's claim that concepts play entirely different roles in philosophy and psychology, I explain how one well-known philosophical theory of concepts, Conceptual Atomism (CA), when properly understood, takes into account both kinds of roles. PMID:20584416

  16. Anti-atoms: Gotcha!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surko, Clifford M.

    2011-07-01

    Refined techniques to mix cold antiprotons and positrons in a magnetic bottle show that antihydrogen atoms can be trapped for 15 minutes -- an improvement of four orders of magnitude over previous experiments.

  17. Atomic Bomb Health Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Luckey, T. D.

    2008-01-01

    Media reports of deaths and devastation produced by atomic bombs convinced people around the world that all ionizing radiation is harmful. This concentrated attention on fear of miniscule doses of radiation. Soon the linear no threshold (LNT) paradigm was converted into laws. Scientifically valid information about the health benefits from low dose irradiation was ignored. Here are studies which show increased health in Japanese survivors of atomic bombs. Parameters include decreased mutation, leukemia and solid tissue cancer mortality rates, and increased average lifespan. Each study exhibits a threshold that repudiates the LNT dogma. The average threshold for acute exposures to atomic bombs is about 100 cSv. Conclusions from these studies of atomic bomb survivors are: One burst of low dose irradiation elicits a lifetime of improved health.Improved health from low dose irradiation negates the LNT paradigm.Effective triage should include radiation hormesis for survivor treatment. PMID:19088902

  18. The Atomic Dating Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummo, Evelyn; Matthews, Catherine E.

    2002-01-01

    Presents an activity designed to provide students with opportunities to practice drawing atomic models and discover the logical pairings of whole families on the periodic table. Follows the format of a television game show. (DDR)

  19. The CHIANTI atomic database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, P. R.; Dere, K. P.; Landi, E.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.

    2016-04-01

    The freely available CHIANTI atomic database was first released in 1996 and has had a huge impact on the analysis and modeling of emissions from astrophysical plasmas. It contains data and software for modeling optically thin atom and positive ion emission from low density (≲1013 cm-3) plasmas from x-ray to infrared wavelengths. A key feature is that the data are assessed and regularly updated, with version 8 released in 2015. Atomic data for modeling the emissivities of 246 ions and neutrals are contained in CHIANTI, together with data for deriving the ionization fractions of all elements up to zinc. The different types of atomic data are summarized here and their formats discussed. Statistics on the impact of CHIANTI to the astrophysical community are given and examples of the diverse range of applications are presented.

  20. Atomic & Molecular Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    2002-07-12

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Atomic & Molecular Interactions was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  1. Atom chip gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Gebbe, Martina; Gersemann, Matthias; Ahlers, Holger; Müntinga, Hauke; Matthias, Jonas; Sahelgozin, Maral; Herr, Waldemar; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2016-04-01

    Atom interferometry has developed into a tool for measuring rotations [1], accelerations [2], and testing fundamental physics [3]. Gravimeters based on laser cooled atoms demonstrated residual uncertainties of few microgal [2,4] and were simplified for field applications [5]. Atomic gravimeters rely on the interference of matter waves which are coherently manipulated by laser light fields. The latter can be interpreted as rulers to which the position of the atoms is compared. At three points in time separated by a free evolution, the light fields are pulsed onto the atoms. First, a coherent superposition of two momentum states is produced, then the momentum is inverted, and finally the two trajectories are recombined. Depending on the acceleration the atoms experienced, the number of atoms detected in the output ports will change. Consequently, the acceleration can be determined from the output signal. The laser cooled atoms with microkelvin temperatures used in state-of-the-art gravimeters impose limits on the accuracy [4]. Therefore, ultra-cold atoms generated by Bose-Einstein condensation and delta-kick collimation [6,7] are expected to be the key for further improvements. These sources suffered from a low flux implying an incompatible noise floor, but a competitive performance was demonstrated recently with atom chips [8]. In the compact and robust setup constructed for operation in the drop tower [6] we demonstrated all steps necessary for an atom chip gravimeter with Bose-Einstein condensates in a ground based operation. We will discuss the principle of operation, the current performance, and the perspectives to supersede the state of the art. The authors thank the QUANTUS cooperation for contributions to the drop tower project in the earlier stages. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50WM

  2. Improved Atomizer Resists Clogging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dea, J. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Improved constant-output atomizer has conical orifice that permits air to sweep out all liquid thoroughly and prevent any buildup of liquid or dissolved solids. Capillary groove guides liquid to gas jet. Simple new design eliminates clogging.

  3. A concentrated radioactive beam source for atom cooling and trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Maddi, J.; Dinneen, T.; Ghiorso, A.; Gould, H.

    1996-05-01

    The authors describe a novel oven to obtain concentrated beams of radioactive atoms. The Orthotropic oven works by ionizing atoms on its interior walls and electrostatically concentrating them on a neutralizer. Once neutralized the atoms can escape from the oven and form a narrow beam. Atoms that fail to escape become ionized again and repeat the cycle. The authors demonstrate the operation of this oven using {sup 221}Fr and compare both the theoretical and experimental efficiency of this source with standard effusive and channeled ovens.

  4. 38 CFR 4.112 - Weight loss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... individual's baseline weight, sustained for three months or longer; and the term “minor weight loss” means a weight loss of 10 to 20 percent of the individual's baseline weight, sustained for three months or...

  5. Selecting a Weight-Loss Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... Weight Tip Choose weight-loss programs that encourage healthy behaviors that help you lose weight gradually and maintain your weight over time. Looking for easy-to-use information for eating healthy on the go? The Maintaining a Healthy ...

  6. Randomized trial of tapas acupressure technique for weight loss maintenance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Obesity is an urgent public health problem, yet only a few clinical trials have systematically tested the efficacy of long-term weight-loss maintenance interventions. This randomized clinical trial tested the efficacy of a novel mind and body technique for weight-loss maintenance. Methods Participants were obese adults who had completed a six-month behavioral weight-loss program prior to randomization. Those who successfully lost weight were randomized into either an experimental weight-loss maintenance intervention, Tapas Acupressure Technique (TAT®), or a control intervention comprised of social-support group meetings (SS) led by professional facilitators. TAT combines self-applied light pressure to specific acupressure points accompanied by a prescribed sequence of mental steps. Participants in both maintenance conditions attended eight group sessions over six months of active weight loss maintenance intervention, followed by an additional 6 months of no intervention. The main outcome measure was change in weight from the beginning of the weight loss maintenance intervention to 12 months later. Secondary outcomes were change in depression, stress, insomnia, and quality of life. We used analysis of covariance as the primary analysis method. Missing values were replaced using multiple imputation. Results Among 285 randomized participants, 79% were female, mean age was 56 (standard deviation (sd) = 11), mean BMI at randomization was 34 (sd = 5), and mean initial weight loss was 9.8 kg (sd = 5). In the primary outcome model, there was no significant difference in weight regain between the two arms (1.72 kg (se 0.85) weight regain for TAT and 2.96 kg (se 0.96) weight regain for SS, p < 0.097) Tests of between- arm differences for secondary outcomes were also not significant. A secondary analysis showed a significant interaction between treatment and initial weight loss (p < .036), with exploratory post hoc tests showing that greater initial weight loss

  7. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, Theodore J.

    1993-01-01

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal.

  8. Optical atomic magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P

    2013-11-19

    An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

  9. Atomizing nozzle and method

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, Jason; Anderson, Iver E.; Terpstra, Robert L.

    2000-03-16

    A high pressure close-coupled gas atomizing nozzle includes multiple discrete gas jet discharge orifices having aerodynamically designed convergent-divergent geometry with an first converging section communicated to a gas supply manifold and to a diverging section by a constricted throat section to increase atomizing gas velocity. The gas jet orifices are oriented at gas jet apex angle selected relative to the melt supply tip apex angle to establish a melt aspiration condition at the melt supply tip.

  10. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, T.J.

    1993-11-16

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

  11. Sharing the atom bomb

    SciTech Connect

    Chace, J.

    1996-01-01

    Shaken by the devastation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and fearful that the American atomic monopoly would spark an arms race, Dean Acheson led a push in 1946 to place the bomb-indeed, all atomic energy-under international control. But as the memories of wartime collaboration faded, relations between the superpowers grew increasingly tense, and the confrontational atmosphere undid his proposal. Had Acheson succeeded, the Cold War might not have been. 2 figs.

  12. Atomic mass compilation 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, B.; Venkataramaniah, K.; Czok, U.; Scheidenberger, C.

    2014-03-15

    Atomic mass reflects the total binding energy of all nucleons in an atomic nucleus. Compilations and evaluations of atomic masses and derived quantities, such as neutron or proton separation energies, are indispensable tools for research and applications. In the last decade, the field has evolved rapidly after the advent of new production and measuring techniques for stable and unstable nuclei resulting in substantial ameliorations concerning the body of data and their precision. Here, we present a compilation of atomic masses comprising the data from the evaluation of 2003 as well as the results of new measurements performed. The relevant literature in refereed journals and reports as far as available, was scanned for the period beginning 2003 up to and including April 2012. Overall, 5750 new data points have been collected. Recommended values for the relative atomic masses have been derived and a comparison with the 2003 Atomic Mass Evaluation has been performed. This work has been carried out in collaboration with and as a contribution to the European Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network of Evaluations.

  13. Atomic charges, dipole moments, and Fukui functions using the Hirshfeld partitioning of the electron density.

    PubMed

    De Proft, F; Van Alsenoy, C; Peeters, A; Langenaeker, W; Geerlings, P

    2002-09-01

    In the Hirshfeld partitioning of the electron density, the molecular electron density is decomposed in atomic contributions, proportional to the weight of the isolated atom density in the promolecule density, constructed by superimposing the isolated atom electron densities placed on the positions the atoms have in the molecule. A maximal conservation of the information of the isolated atoms in the atoms-in-molecules is thereby secured. Atomic charges, atomic dipole moments, and Fukui functions resulting from the Hirshfeld partitioning of the electron density are computed for a large series of molecules. In a representative set of organic and hypervalent molecules, they are compared with other commonly used population analysis methods. The expected bond polarities are recovered, but the charges are much smaller compared to other methods. Condensed Fukui functions for a large number of molecules, undergoing an electrophilic or a nucleophilic attack, are computed and compared with the HOMO and LUMO densities, integrated over the Hirshfeld atoms in molecules. PMID:12116389

  14. Low frequency mechanical modes of viruses with atomic detail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykeman, Eric; Sankey, Otto

    2008-03-01

    The low frequency mechanical modes of viruses can provide important insights into the large global motions that a virus may exhibit. Recently it has been proposed that these large global motions may be excited using impulsive stimulated Raman scattering producing permanent damage to the virus. In order to understand the coupling of external probes to the capsid, vibrational modes with atomic detail are essential. The standard approach to find the atomic modes of a molecule with N atoms requires the formation and diagonlization of a 3Nx3N matrix. As viruses have 10^5 or more atoms, the standard approach is difficult. Using ideas from electronic structure theory, we have developed a method to construct the mechanical modes of large molecules such as viruses with atomic detail. Application to viruses such as the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus, satellite tobacco necrosis virus, and M13 bacteriophage show a fairly complicated picture of the mechanical modes.

  15. A correlation analysis of Broselow™ Pediatric Emergency Tape-determined pediatric weight with actual pediatric weight in India

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Deepak Geetaprasad; Kole, Tamorish; Nagpal, Rahul; Smith, Jeffery Paul

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Broselow™ Pediatric Emergency Tape indicates standardized, pre-calculated medication doses, dose delivery volumes, and equipment sizes using color-coded zones based on height-weight correlations. The present study attempted to provide more evidence on the effectiveness of the Broselow™ Pediatric Emergency Tape by comparing the tape-estimated weights with actual weights. We hypothesized that the Broselow™ Pediatric Emergency Tape would overestimate weights in Indian children aged<10 years, leading to inaccurate dosing and equipment sizing in the emergency setting. METHODS: This prospective study of pediatric patients aged <10 years who were divided into three groups based on actual body weight: <10 kg, 10–18 kg, and >18 kg. We calculated the percentage difference between the Broselow-predicted weight and the measured weight as a measure of tape bias. Concordant results were those with a mean percent difference within 3%. Standard deviation was measured to determine precision. Accuracy was determined as color-coded zone prediction and measured weight concordance, including the percentage overestimation by 1–2 zones. RESULTS: The male-to-female ratio of the patients was 1.3:1. Total agreement between color-coding was 63.18% (κ=0.582). The Broselow™ color-coded zone agreement was 74.8% in the <10 kg group, 61.24% in the 10–18 kg group, and 53.42% in the >18 kg group. CONCLUSIONS: The Broselow™ Pediatric Emergency Tape showed good evidence for being more reliable in children of the <10 kg and 10–18 kg groups. However, as pediatric weight increased, predictive reliability decreased. This raises concerns over the use of the Broselow™ Pediatric Emergency Tape in Indian children because body weight was overestimated in those weighing >18 kg. PMID:27006737

  16. Comparison of weight loss by weight classification in a commercial, community-based weight loss program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of our study was to determine the impact of grade of obesity on weight-loss outcomes of a community-based, intensive behavioral counseling program (Weight Watchers Points-Plus). Previous studies have shown that individuals with a higher body mass index (BMI) at the beginning of treatme...

  17. Rapid Weight Loss in Sports with Weight Classes.

    PubMed

    Khodaee, Morteza; Olewinski, Lucianne; Shadgan, Babak; Kiningham, Robert R

    2015-01-01

    Weight-sensitive sports are popular among elite and nonelite athletes. Rapid weight loss (RWL) practice has been an essential part of many of these sports for many decades. Due to the limited epidemiological studies on the prevalence of RWL, its true prevalence is unknown. It is estimated that more than half of athletes in weight-class sports have practiced RWL during the competitive periods. As RWL can have significant physical, physiological, and psychological negative effects on athletes, its practice has been discouraged for many years. It seems that appropriate rule changes have had the biggest impact on the practice of RWL in sports like wrestling. An individualized and well-planned gradual and safe weight loss program under the supervision of a team of coaching staff, athletic trainers, sports nutritionists, and sports physicians is recommended. PMID:26561763

  18. The grasp2K relativistic atomic structure package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jönsson, P.; He, X.; Froese Fischer, C.; Grant, I. P.

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes grasp2K, a general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package. It is a modification and extension of the GRASP92 package by [F.A. Parpia, C. Froese Fischer, I.P. Grant, Comput. Phys. Comm. 94 (1996) 249]. For the sake of continuity, two versions are included. Version 1 retains the GRASP92 formats for wave functions and expansion coefficients, but no longer requires preprocessing and more default options have been introduced. Modifications have eliminated some errors, improved the stability, and simplified interactive use. The transition code has been extended to cases where the initial and final states have different orbital sets. Several utility programs have been added. Whereas Version 1 constructs a single interaction matrix for all the J's and parities, Version 2 treats each J and parity as a separate matrix. This block structure results in a reduction of memory use and considerably shorter eigenvectors. Additional tools have been developed for this format. The CPU intensive parts of Version 2 have been parallelized using MPI. The package includes a "make" facility that relies on environment variables. These make it easier to port the application to different platforms. The present version supports the 32-bit Linux and ibmSP environments where the former is compatible with many Unix systems. Descriptions of the features and the program/data flow of the package will be given in some detail in this report. Program summaryProgram title: grasp2K Catalogue identifier: ADZL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADZL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 213 524 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 328 588 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran and C Computer: Intel

  19. Correlates of Low Birth Weight

    PubMed Central

    Hazarika, Jayant; Dutta, Sudip

    2014-01-01

    Background. Low birth weight is the single most important factor that determines the chances of child survival. A recent annual estimation indicated that nearly 8 million infants are born with low birth weight in India. The infant mortality rate is about 20 times greater for all low birth weight babies. Methods. A matched case–control study was conducted on 130 low birth weight babies and 130 controls for 12 months (from August 1, 2007, to July 31, 2008) at the Central Referral Hospital, Tadong, East District of Sikkim, India. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences, version 10.0 for Windows. Chi-square test and multiple logistic regression were applied. A P value less than .05 was considered as significant. Results. In the first phase of this study, 711 newborn babies, borne by 680 mothers, were screened at the Central Referral Hospital of Sikkim during the 1-year study period, and the proportion of low birth weight babies was determined to be 130 (18.3%). Conclusion. Multiple logistic regression analysis, conducted in the second phase, revealed that low or middle socioeconomic status, maternal underweight, twin pregnancy, previous history of delivery of low birth weight babies, smoking and consumption of alcohol during pregnancy, and congenital anomalies had independent significant association with low birth weight in this study population.

  20. [Postnatal skeletal and body weight in beagles].

    PubMed

    Salomon, F V; Schulze, A; Böhme, U; Arnold, U; Gericke, A; Gille, U

    1999-08-01

    Growth of beagles is described on the basis of body weight and 14 bone measures. Eighteen male and 19 female dogs were investigated at 14 different ages from birth to the 13th month of life. Characteristics of the growth curves were evaluated using the modified Janoschek growth curve. For the classification into dwarfish, low, normal, big and gigantic growth, the growth curves are presented with percentiles. The arithmetic means and standard deviations for both sexes are presented in tables. Additionally, the degrees of maturity at birth (relative proportion of final weight or bone measure), the point of inflection for the growth curve, the times to grow to 50 and 95% of the final measures, and the asymptotic measures are also presented in tables. Sex differences in growth for the body weight and bone measures are discussed. Growth differences between large and small dog breeds are considered. The conclusion is drawn that the feeding of dogs has to be adapted to the growth course. PMID:10488625