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Sample records for standard hydrogen monitoring

  1. Standard hydrogen monitoring system equipment installation instructions

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, T.C.

    1996-09-27

    This document provides the technical specifications for the equipment fabrication, installation, and sitework construction for the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System. The Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System is designed to remove gases from waste tank vapor space and exhaust headers for continual monitoring and remote sample analysis.

  2. Standard-E hydrogen monitoring system shop acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, T.C.

    1997-10-02

    The purpose of this report is to document that the Standard-E Hydrogen Monitoring Systems (SHMS-E), fabricated by Mid-Columbia Engineering (MCE) for installation on the Waste Tank Farms in the Hanford 200 Areas, are constructed as intended by the design. The ATP performance will verify proper system fabrication.

  3. Standard-D hydrogen monitoring system acceptance test

    SciTech Connect

    Lott, D.T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-24

    This document details the results of the field Acceptance Testing of the Standard-D Hydrogen Monitoring System on the waste tank exhaust stacks in 241-AW and 241-AN tank farm. The monitors will be used to measure hydrogen and ammonia from the exhaust stacks.

  4. Engineering Task Plan for Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System Operation

    SciTech Connect

    MCCAIN, D.J.

    1999-11-11

    Tanks that are known or suspected to retain and occasionally release flammable gases are equipped with Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) cabinets. These cabinets contain Whittaker{trademark} electrochemical cells and may also have a gas chromatograph (GC) and/or a Bruel and Kjaer infrared photo-acoustic multi-gas monitor (B&K). The GC and B&K will be referred to collectively as ''analytical instruments'' in this document. Using these instruments, a tank can be monitored for hydrogen, helium, ammonia, methane, and nitrous oxide. Air from the tank vent header (for actively ventilated tanks) or dome space (for passively ventilated tanks) is drawn continuously through the monitoring instruments via a sample pump. This monitoring is performed to track the gas release behavior of selected waste storage tanks and to help identify any potentially serious gas release behavior. Vapor grab samples may be obtained from the SHMS as well and analyzed with a mass spectrometer to obtain concentration data about hydrogen and other gases. This document describes the requirements for the operation, maintenance, calibration, and data collection for the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System. Additionally, this document defines who is responsible for the various tasks.

  5. Standard hydrogen monitoring system-B operation and maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, R.M.

    1995-01-25

    The purpose of this document is to provide information for the operation and maintenance of the Standards Hydrogen Monitoring System-B (SHMS-B) used in the 200E and 200W area tank farms on the Hanford site. This provides information specific to the mechanical operation of the system and is not intended to take the place of a Plant Operating Procedure. The primary function of the SHMS-B is to monitor specifically for hydrogen in the waste tank vapor space which may also contain unknown quantities of other gaseous constituents.

  6. Standard-C hydrogen monitoring system acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, T.C.

    1994-09-02

    The primary function of the standard-C hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS) is to monitor specifically for hydrogen in the waste tank atmosphere which may also contain (but not be limited to) unknown quantities of air, nitrous oxide, ammonia, water vapor, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and other gaseous constituents. The SHMS will consist of hydrogen specific monitors, a grab sampler to collect samples for laboratory analysis, a gas chromatograph, and the gas sample collection system necessary to support the operation of the instrumentation. This system will be located in a cabinet placed at the tank of interest. The purpose of this document is to demonstrate that the SHMS is constructed as intended by design.

  7. Standard-B hydrogen monitoring system acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T.T.

    1994-09-08

    Test Engineering was supported by Tank Waste Remediation System Safety Programs Engineering Support in the performance of an Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) to qualify the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) cabinet installed on waste tank 241-SY-103. The June 7, 1994 ATP performance was controlled by West Waste Tank Farms work package 2W-94-322. The ATP was conducted following the final installation of a second Whittaker electro-chemical hydrogen monitoring cell. The cabinet had been sited on the waste tank two years earlier, but never connected to the exhaust vent header to monitor Tank 241-SY-103 vent header exhaust gases. The cabinet was then modified, to remove two undesirable solid state hydrogen monitors and install a second Whittaker electro-chemical hydrogen monitoring sensor and signal conditioning. The ATP was used to assure that the cabinet wiring and components were properly installed and labeled and that the two years without operation had not seriously damaged the installed equipment. Electrical and pneumatic tests were performed to assure system integrity.

  8. Standard-D hydrogen monitoring system, system design description

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, T.C.

    1996-09-26

    During most of the year, it is assumed that the vapor space in the 177 radioactive waste tanks on the Hanford Project site contain a uniform mixture of gases. Several of these waste tanks (currently twenty-five, 6 Double Shell Tanks and 19 Single Shell Tanks) were identified as having the potential for the buildup of gasses to a flammable level. An active ventilation system in the Double Shell Tanks and a passive ventilation system in the Single Shell Tanks provides a method of expelling gasses from the tanks. A gas release from a tank causes a temporary rise in the tank pressure, and a potential for increased concentration of hydrogen gas in the vapor space. The gas is released via the ventilation systems until a uniform gas mixture in the vapor space is once again achieved. The Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) is designed to monitor and quantify the percent hydrogen concentration during these potential gas releases. This document describes the design of the Standard-D Hydrogen Monitoring System, (SHMS-D) and its components as it differs from the original SHMS.

  9. Engineering task plan for standard hydrogen monitoring system operation

    SciTech Connect

    MCCAIN, D.J.

    1999-06-02

    Tanks that are known or suspected to retain and occasionally release flammable gases are equipped with Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) cabinets. These cabinets contain Whittaker{trademark} electrochemical cells and may also have a gas chromatograph (GC) and/or a Bruel and Kjaer infrared photo-acoustic multi-gas monitor (B and K). The GC and B and K will be referred to collectively as ''analytical instruments'' in this document. Using these instruments, a tank can be monitored for hydrogen, ammonia, methane, and nitrous oxide. Air from the tank vent header (for actively ventilated tanks) or dome space (for passively ventilated tanks) is drawn continuously through the monitoring instruments via a sample pump. This monitoring is performed to track the gas release behavior of selected waste storage tanks and to help identify any potentially serious gas release behavior. Vapor grab samples are obtained from the SHMS as well and are analyzed with a mass spectrometer to obtain concentration data about hydrogen and other gases.

  10. Standard hydrogen monitoring system - E operation and maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, T.C.

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide information for the operation and maintenance of the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System- E (SHMS-E) used in the 200E and 20OW area tank farms on the Hanford Site. This provides information specific to the mechanical operation of the system and is not intended to take the place of a Plant Operating Procedure. However, it does provide more information on the system than a Plant Operating Procedure. The intent here is that the system is started up by a technician or engineer who has completed tank farms training course for SHMS, and then the only actions performed by Operations will be routine log taking. If any problems not addressed by the operating procedure are encountered with the unit, engineering should be contacted.

  11. Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System-D operation and maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, T.C.

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide information for the operation and maintenance of the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System-D (SHMS-D) used in the 200E and 200W area tank farms on the Hanford Site. This provides information specific to the mechanical operation of the system and is not intended to take the place of a Plant Operating Procedure. However, it does provide more information on the system than a Plant Operating Procedure. The intent here is that the system is started up by a technician or engineer who has completed tank farms training course No. 351405, and then the only actions performed by Operations will be routine log taking. If any problems not addressed by the operating procedure are encountered with the unit, engineering should be contacted.

  12. Standard-B Hydrogen Monitoring System, system design description

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, T.C.

    1995-01-16

    During most of the year, it is assumed that the vapor in the 177 radioactive waste tanks on the Hanford Project site contain a uniform mixture of gases. Several of these waste tanks (currently twenty five, 6 Double Shell Tanks and 19 Single Shell Tanks) were identified as having the potential for the buildup of gases to a flammable level. An active ventilation system in the Double Shell Tanks and a passive ventilation system in the Single Shell Tanks provides a method of expelling gases from the tanks. A gas release from a tank causes a temporary rise in the tank pressure, and a potential for increased concentration of hydrogen gas in the vapor space. The gas is released via the ventilation systems until a uniform gas mixture in the vapor space is once again achieved. This document describes the design of the Standard-B Hydrogen Monitoring System, (SHMS) and its components as it differs from the original SHMS. The differences are derived from changes made to improve the system performance but not implemented in all the installed enclosures.

  13. Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System-C operation and maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, T.C.

    1997-05-01

    The primary function of the SHMS-C is to monitor specifically for hydrogen in the waste tank vapor space which may also contain (but not be limited to) unknown quantities of air, nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), water vapor, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO) and other gaseous constituents. An electronically controlled grab sampler has replaced the manually operated sample system that was used in the original SHMS enclosure. Samples can now be operator or automatically initiated. Automatic initiation occurs based on the high hydrogen alarm level. Once a sample is obtained it is removed from the sampler and transported to a laboratory for analysis. This system is used to identify other gaseous constituents which are not measured by the hydrogen monitor. The design does not include any remote data acquisition or remote data logging equipment but provides a 4--20 mA dc process signals, and discrete alarm contacts, that can be utilized for remote data logging and alarming when desired. The SHMS-C arrangement consists of design modifications (piping, valves, filters, supports) to the SHMS-B arrangement necessary for the installation of a dual column gas chromatograph and associated sample and calibration gas lines. The gas chromatograph will provide real time, analytical quality, specific hydrogen measurements in low and medium range concentrations. The system is designed to sample process gases that are classified by NEC code as Class 1, Division 1, Group B.

  14. Computer systems and software description for Standard-E+ Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS-E+)

    SciTech Connect

    Tate, D.D.

    1997-05-01

    The primary function of the Standard-E+ Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS-E+) is to determine tank vapor space gas composition and gas release rate, and to detect gas release events. Characterization of the gas composition is needed for safety analyses. The lower flammability limit, as well as the peak burn temperature and pressure, are dependent upon the gas composition. If there is little or no knowledge about the gas composition, safety analyses utilize compositions that yield the worst case in a deflagration or detonation. Knowledge of the true composition could lead to reductions in the assumptions and therefore there may be a potential for a reduction in controls and work restrictions. Also, knowledge of the actual composition will be required information for the analysis that is needed to remove tanks from the Watch List. Similarly, the rate of generation and release of gases is required information for performing safety analyses, developing controls, designing equipment, and closing safety issues. This report outlines the computer system design layout description for the Standard-E+ Hydrogen Monitoring System.

  15. TWRS hydrogen mitigation portable standard hydrogen monitoring system platform design and fabrication engineering task plan

    SciTech Connect

    Philipp, B.L.

    1997-03-01

    The primary function of portable gas monitoring is to quickly determine tank vapor space gas composition and gas release rate, and to detect gas release events. Characterization of the gas composition is needed for safety analysis. The lower flammability limit, as well as the peak burn temperature and pressure, are dependent upon the gas composition. If there is little or no knowledge about the gas composition, safety analysis utilize compositions that yield the worst case in a deflagration or detonation. This conservative approach to unknowns necessitates a significant increase in administrative and engineering costs. Knowledge of the true composition could lead to reductions in the assumptions and therefore contribute to a reduction in controls and work restrictions. Also, knowledge of the actual composition will be required information for the analysis that is needed to remove tanks from the Watch List. Similarly, the rate of generation and release of gases is required information for performing safety analysis, developing controls, designing equipment, and closing safety issues. To determine release rate, both the gas concentrations and the dome space ventilation rates (exhauster flow rate or passive dome/atmosphere exchange rate) are needed. Therefore, to quickly verify waste tank categorization or to provide additional characterization for tanks with installed gas monitoring, a temporary, portable standard hydrogen monitoring system is needed that can be used to measure gas compositions at both high and low sensitivities.

  16. Standard hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS) engineering task plan

    SciTech Connect

    Tate, D.D.

    1997-05-01

    This document details the responsibilities and requirements for the design, technical documents, fabrication, testing, and installation of the SHMS-E and SHMS-E+ continuous gas monitors. The SHMS-E is identical in function to a SHMS-B but has the interface to accommodate an analytical module containing a gas chromatograph and a B and K photo acoustic gas monitor. Temporary addition of the analytical module adds the ``+`` to the SHMS-E designation. The analytical module is temporary in all installations.

  17. Standard-B auto grab sampler hydrogen monitoring system, Acceptance Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lott, D.T.

    1995-05-18

    Project W-369, Watch List Tank Hydrogen Monitors, installed a Standard-C Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) on the Flammable gas waste tank AN-104. General Support Projects (8K510) was support by Test Engineering (7CH30) in the performance of the Acceptance Test Procedures (ATP) to qualify the SHMS cabinets on the waste tank. The ATP`s performance was controlled by Tank Farm work package. This completed ATP is transmitted by EDT-601748 as an Acceptance Test Report (ATR) in accordance with WHC-6-1, EP 4.2 and EP 1.12.

  18. The family of standard hydrogen monitoring system computer software design description: Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, R.M.

    1994-11-16

    In March 1990, 23 waste tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation were identified as having the potential for the buildup of gas to a flammable or explosive level. As a result of the potential for hydrogen gas buildup, a project was initiated to design a standard hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS) for use at any waste tank to analyze gas samples for hydrogen content. Since it was originally deployed three years ago, two variations of the original system have been developed: the SHMS-B and SHMS-C. All three are currently in operation at the tank farms and will be discussed in this document. To avoid confusion in this document, when a feature is common to all three of the SHMS variants, it will be referred to as ``The family of SHMS.`` When it is specific to only one or two, they will be identified. The purpose of this computer software design document is to provide the following: the computer software requirements specification that documents the essential requirements of the computer software and its external interfaces; the computer software design description; the computer software user documentation for using and maintaining the computer software and any dedicated hardware; and the requirements for computer software design verification and validation.

  19. Overview of North American Hydrogen Sensor Standards

    SciTech Connect

    O'Malley, Kathleen; Lopez, Hugo; Cairns, Julie; Wichert, Richard; Rivkin, Carl; Burgess, Robert; Buttner, William

    2015-08-11

    An overview of the main North American codes and standards associated with hydrogen safety sensors is provided. The distinction between a code and a standard is defined, and the relationship between standards and codes is clarified, especially for those circumstances where a standard or a certification requirement is explicitly referenced within a code. The report identifies three main types of standards commonly applied to hydrogen sensors (interface and controls standards, shock and hazard standards, and performance-based standards). The certification process and a list and description of the main standards and model codes associated with the use of hydrogen safety sensors in hydrogen infrastructure are presented.

  20. Gamma ray slush hydrogen monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Shen, Chih-Peng; Sprinkle, Danny R.

    1992-01-01

    Mass attenuation for 109Cd radiation have been measured in mixtures of phases and in single phases of five chemical compounds. As anticipated, the mass attenuation coefficients are independent of the phases of the test chemicals. It is recommended that a slush hydrogen monitoring system based on low energy gamma ray attenuation be developed for utilization aboard the NASP.

  1. Characteristics of advanced hydrogen maser frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    In house research and development at Goddard Space Flight Center to provide advanced frequency and time standards for the most demanding applications is concentrated primarily in field operable atomic hydrogen masers. Some of the most important goals for the new maser designs have been improved long and short term stability, elimination of the need for auto tuning, increased maser oscillation level, improved hydrogen economy, increased operational life, minimization of operator control or monitoring, improvement in magnetic isolation or sensitivity, and reduction in size and weight. New design concepts which have been incorporated in these masers to achieve these goals are described. The basic maser assemblies and control systems have recently been completed; the masers are oscillating; and operational testing has begun. Data illustrating the improvements in maser performance was available and presented.

  2. NASA atomic hydrogen standards program - An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V. S.; Kaufmann, D. C.; Adams, W. A.; Deluca, J. J.; Soucy, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Some of the design features of NASA hydrogen masers are discussed including the large hydrogen source bulb, the palladium purified, the state selector, the replaceable pumps, the small entrance stem, magnetic shields, the elongated storage bulb, the aluminum cavity, the electronics package, and the autotuner. Attention is also given to the reliability and operating life of these hydrogen atomic standards.

  3. National Agenda for Hydrogen Codes and Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, C.

    2010-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of hydrogen codes and standards with an emphasis on the national effort supported and managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). With the help and cooperation of standards and model code development organizations, industry, and other interested parties, DOE has established a coordinated national agenda for hydrogen and fuel cell codes and standards. With the adoption of the Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap and with its implementation through the Codes and Standards Technical Team, DOE helps strengthen the scientific basis for requirements incorporated in codes and standards that, in turn, will facilitate international market receptivity for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies.

  4. Safety, codes and standards for hydrogen installations :

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Aaron P.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; LaFleur, Angela Christine; San Marchi, Christopher W.

    2014-04-01

    Automakers and fuel providers have made public commitments to commercialize light duty fuel cell electric vehicles and fueling infrastructure in select US regions beginning in 2014. The development, implementation, and advancement of meaningful codes and standards is critical to enable the effective deployment of clean and efficient fuel cell and hydrogen solutions in the energy technology marketplace. Metrics pertaining to the development and implementation of safety knowledge, codes, and standards are important to communicate progress and inform future R&D investments. This document describes the development and benchmarking of metrics specific to the development of hydrogen specific codes relevant for hydrogen refueling stations. These metrics will be most useful as the hydrogen fuel market transitions from pre-commercial to early-commercial phases. The target regions in California will serve as benchmarking case studies to quantify the success of past investments in research and development supporting safety codes and standards R&D.

  5. Characteristics of advanced hydrogen maser frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements with several operational atomic hydrogen maser standards have been made which illustrate the fundamental characteristics of the maser as well as the analysability of the corrections which are made to relate the oscillation frequency to the free, unperturbed, hydrogen standard transition frequency. Sources of the most important perturbations, and the magnitude of the associated errors, are discussed. A variable volume storage bulb hydrogen maser is also illustrated which can provide on the order of 2 parts in 10 to the 14th power or better accuracy in evaluating the wall shift. Since the other basic error sources combined contribute no more than approximately 1 part in 10 to the 14th power uncertainty, the variable volume storage bulb hydrogen maser will have net intrinsic accuracy capability of the order of 2 parts in 10 to the 14th power or better. This is an order of magnitude less error than anticipated with cesium standards and is comparable to the basic limit expected for a free atom hydrogen beam resonance standard.

  6. Hydrogen and Oxygen Gas Monitoring System Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader; Kevin G. DeWall; J. Stephen Herring

    2007-06-01

    This paper describes pertinent design practices of selecting types of monitors, monitor unit placement, setpoint selection, and maintenance considerations for gas monitors. While hydrogen gas monitors and enriched oxygen atmosphere monitors as they would be needed for hydrogen production experiments are the primary focus of this paper, monitors for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are also discussed. The experiences of designing, installing, and calibrating gas monitors for a laboratory where experiments in support of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) are described along with codes, standards, and regulations for these monitors. Information from the literature about best operating practices is also presented. The NHI program has two types of activities. The first, near-term activity is laboratory and pilot-plant experimentation with different processes in the kilogram per day scale to select the most promising types of processes for future applications of hydrogen production. Prudent design calls for indoor gas monitors to sense any hydrogen leaks within these laboratory rooms. The second, longer-term activity is the prototype, or large-scale plants to produce tons of hydrogen per day. These large, outdoor production plants will require area (or “fencepost”) monitoring of hydrogen gas leaks. Some processes will have oxygen production with hydrogen production, and any oxygen releases are also safety concerns since oxygen gas is the strongest oxidizer. Monitoring of these gases is important for personnel safety of both indoor and outdoor experiments. There is some guidance available about proper placement of monitors. The fixed point, stationary monitor can only function if the intruding gas contacts the monitor. Therefore, monitor placement is vital to proper monitoring of the room or area. Factors in sensor location selection include: indoor or outdoor site, the location and nature of potential vapor/gas sources, chemical and physical data of the

  7. Autocorrelation standard deviation and root mean square frequency analysis of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell to monitor for hydrogen and air undersupply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joo Gon; Mukherjee, Santanu; Bates, Alex; Zickel, Benjamin; Park, Sam; Son, Byung Rak; Choi, Jae Sung; Kwon, Osung; Lee, Dong Ha; Chung, Hyun-Youl

    2015-12-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells are a promising energy conversion device which can help to solve urgent environmental and economic problems. Among the various types of fuel cells, the air breathing proton exchange membrane fuel cell, which minimizes the balance of plant, has drawn a lot of attention due to its superior energy density. In this study a compact, air breathing, proton exchange membrane fuel cell based on Nafion and a Pt/C membrane electrode assembly was designed. The fuel cell was tested using a Scribner Associates 850e fuel cell test station. Specifically, the hydrogen fuel and oxygen starvation of the fuel cell were accurately and systematically tested and analyzed using a frequency analysis method which can analyze the input and output frequency. The analysis of the frequency variation under a fuel starvation condition was done using RMSF (root mean square frequency) and ACSD (autocorrelation standard deviation). The study reveals two significant results: first, the fuel starvations show entirely different phenomenon in both RMSF and ACSD and second, the results of the Autocorrelation show clearer results for fuel starvation detection than the results with RMSF.

  8. User's guide to the hydrogen monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, M.M.; Adams, E.L.

    1981-08-01

    A protocol for calibration of the hydrogen monitor and for its use as an assay instrument is presented. A statistical analysis for the system, including effects of deadtime and pile-up loss, is developed, and the software that supports the system is described.

  9. Monitoring Standards for Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Helen

    2001-01-01

    A central issue in professional education is who has a mandate for determining the appropriateness of university curriculum and monitoring its quality. Examination of the accreditation guidelines of seven professions (law, medicine, nursing, psychology, physiotherapy, social work, and teaching) suggests that the relevance of professional…

  10. Topics in atomic hydrogen standard research and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.

    1971-01-01

    Hydrogen maser based frequency and time standards have been in continuous use at NASA tracking stations since February 1970, while laboratory work at Goddard has continued in the further development and improvement of hydrogen masers. Concurrently, experimental work has been in progress with a new frequency standard based upon the hydrogen atom using the molecular beam magnetic resonance method. Much of the hydrogen maser technology is directly applicable to the new hydrogen beam standard, and calculations based upon realistic data indicate that the accuracy potential of the hydrogen atomic beam exceeds that of either the cesium beam tube or the hydrogen maser, possibly by several orders of magnitude. In addition, with successful development, the hydrogen beam standard will have several other performance advantages over other devices, particularly exceptional stability and long continuous operating life. Experimental work with a new laboratory hydrogen beam device has recently resulted in the first resonance transition curves, measurements of relative state populations, beam intensities, etc. The most important aspects of both the hydrogen maser and the hydrogen beam work are covered.

  11. Final Technical Report: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Outreach

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Karen I.

    2007-05-12

    This project contributed significantly to the development of new codes and standards, both domestically and internationally. The NHA collaborated with codes and standards development organizations to identify technical areas of expertise that would be required to produce the codes and standards that industry and DOE felt were required to facilitate commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and infrastructure. NHA staff participated directly in technical committees and working groups where issues could be discussed with the appropriate industry groups. In other cases, the NHA recommended specific industry experts to serve on technical committees and working groups where the need for this specific industry expertise would be on-going, and where this approach was likely to contribute to timely completion of the effort. The project also facilitated dialog between codes and standards development organizations, hydrogen and fuel cell experts, the government and national labs, researchers, code officials, industry associations, as well as the public regarding the timeframes for needed codes and standards, industry consensus on technical issues, procedures for implementing changes, and general principles of hydrogen safety. The project facilitated hands-on learning, as participants in several NHA workshops and technical meetings were able to experience hydrogen vehicles, witness hydrogen refueling demonstrations, see metal hydride storage cartridges in operation, and view other hydrogen energy products.

  12. Summary of gas release events detected by hydrogen monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    MCCAIN, D.J.

    1999-05-18

    This paper summarizes the results of monitoring tank headspace for flammable gas release events. In over 40 tank years of monitoring the largest detected release in a single-shell tank is 2.4 cubic meters of Hydrogen. In the double-shell tanks the largest release is 19.3 cubic meters except in SY-101 pre mixer pump installation condition.

  13. Study of Improvement of Hydrogen Maser Frequency Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crampton, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    The research work dealt primarily with reducing the atom leakage rate using as storage surfaces the FEP Teflon surfaces conventionally used in contemporary hydrogen maser frequency standards. Some work was also done on a possible alternative to the conventional surfaces, but the results here and elsewhere suggest that the alternative surface is not promising enough to warrant much further work.

  14. APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant - Monitoring System Report

    SciTech Connect

    James Francfort; Dimitri Hochard

    2005-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), along with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Pubic Service (APS), is monitoring the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant to determine the costs to produce hydrogen fuels (including 100% hydrogen as well as hydrogen and compressed natural gas blends) for use by fleets and other operators of advanced-technology vehicles. The hydrogen fuel cost data will be used as benchmark data by technology modelers as well as research and development programs. The Pilot Plant can produce up to 18 kilograms (kg) of hydrogen per day by electrolysis. It can store up to 155 kg of hydrogen at various pressures up to 6,000 psi. The dispenser island can fuel vehicles with 100% hydrogen at 5,000 psi and with blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas at 3,600 psi. The monitoring system was designed to track hydrogen delivery to each of the three storage areas and to monitor the use of electricity on all major equipment in the Pilot Plant, including the fuel dispenser island. In addition, water used for the electrolysis process is monitored to allow calculation of the total cost of plant operations and plant efficiencies. The monitoring system at the Pilot Plant will include about 100 sensors when complete (50 are installed to date), allowing for analysis of component, subsystems, and plant-level costs. The monitoring software is mostly off-the-shelve, with a custom interface. The majority of the sensors input to the Programmable Automation Controller as 4- to 20-mA analog signals. The plant can be monitored over of the Internet, but the control functions are restricted to the control room equipment. Using the APS general service plan E32 electric rate of 2.105 cents per kWh, during a recent eight-month period when 1,200 kg of hydrogen was produced and the plant capacity factor was 26%, the electricity cost to produce one kg of hydrogen was $3.43. However, the

  15. Round robin analyses of hydrogen isotope thin films standards.

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, James Frederick; Doyle, Barney Lee; Wampler, William R.; Wetteland, C. J.; LaDuca, Carol A.; Banks, James Clifford; Wang, Y. Q.; Tesmer, Joseph R.

    2003-06-01

    Hydrogen isotope thin film standards have been manufactured at Sandia National Laboratories for use by the materials characterization community. Several considerations were taken into account during the manufacture of the ErHD standards, with accuracy and stability being the most important. The standards were fabricated by e-beam deposition of Er onto a Mo substrate and the film stoichiometrically loaded with hydrogen and deuterium. To determine the loading accuracy of the standards two random samples were measured by thermal desorption mass spectrometry and atomic absorption spectrometry techniques with a stated combined accuracy of {approx}1.6% (1{sigma}). All the standards were then measured by high energy RBS/ERD and RBS/NRA with the accuracy of the techniques {approx}5% (1{sigma}). The standards were then distributed to the IBA materials characterization community for analysis. This paper will discuss the suitability of the standards for use by the IBA community and compare measurement results to highlight the accuracy of the techniques used.

  16. Standardized Testing Program for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael A.; Page, Richard A.

    2012-07-30

    In the US and abroad, major research and development initiatives toward establishing a hydrogen-based transportation infrastructure have been undertaken, encompassing key technological challenges in hydrogen production and delivery, fuel cells, and hydrogen storage. However, the principal obstacle to the implementation of a safe, low-pressure hydrogen fueling system for fuel-cell powered vehicles remains storage under conditions of near-ambient temperature and moderate pressure. The choices for viable hydrogen storage systems at the present time are limited to compressed gas storage tanks, cryogenic liquid hydrogen storage tanks, chemical hydrogen storage, and hydrogen absorbed or adsorbed in a solid-state material (a.k.a. solid-state storage). Solid-state hydrogen storage may offer overriding benefits in terms of storage capacity, kinetics and, most importantly, safety.The fervor among the research community to develop novel storage materials had, in many instances, the unfortunate consequence of making erroneous, if not wild, claims on the reported storage capacities achievable in such materials, to the extent that the potential viability of emerging materials was difficult to assess. This problem led to a widespread need to establish a capability to accurately and independently assess the storage behavior of a wide array of different classes of solid-state storage materials, employing qualified methods, thus allowing development efforts to focus on those materials that showed the most promise. However, standard guidelines, dedicated facilities, or certification programs specifically aimed at testing and assessing the performance, safety, and life cycle of these emergent materials had not been established. To address the stated need, the Testing Laboratory for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies was commissioned as a national-level focal point for evaluating new materials emerging from the designated Materials Centers of Excellence (MCoE) according to

  17. Evaluation of a hydrogen chloride detector for environmental monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Moyer, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes a hydrogen chloride detector designed to monitor concentrations of hydrogen chloride gas in the ambient environment. The detector was developed for NASA for use in launch vehicle effluent monitoring. The detector operates on chemiluminescence principles with a lower detection limit of less than 5 x 10 to the -3rd ppm (by volume). The hydrogen chloride in the air sample reacts with a bromide-bromate coating in the inlet tube of the instrument producing bromine. Bromine is then quantitated by chemiluminescent oxidation of luminol. The visible light generated in the chemiluminescent reaction is proportional to the hydrogen chloride concentration of the sampled airstream. The detector is most suited to laboratory or field studies where hydrogen chloride is the dominant pollutant, as compared to the interfering species. Interferences include strong acids, acid-forming gases, and halogen gases. Of the interferences investigated the most serious in these groups are hydrochloric and sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, and chlorine, respectively. The detector has been in use since 1974 and has been found to be highly portable, rugged, and stable under extreme environmental conditions.

  18. Standard Hydrogen Test Protocols for the NREL Sensor Testing Laboratory (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-12-01

    This brochure summarizes the test protocols used in the NREL Hydrogen Sensor Test Laboratory for the quantitative assessment of critical analytical performance specifications for hydrogen sensors. Researchers at the NREL Hydrogen Safety Sensor Test Laboratory developed a variety of test protocols to quantitatively assess critical analytical performance specifications for hydrogen sensors. Many are similar to, but typically more rigorous than, the test procedures mandated by ISO Standard 26142 (Hydrogen Detector for Stationary Applications). Specific protocols were developed for linear range, short-term stability, and the impact of fluctuations in temperature (T), pressure (P), relative humidity (RH), and chemical environment. Specialized tests (e.g., oxygen requirement) may also be performed. Hydrogen safety sensors selected for evaluation are subjected to a thorough regimen of test protocols, as described. Sensor testing is performed at NREL on custom-built sensor test fixtures. Environmental parameters such as T, P, RH, and gas composition are rigorously controlled and monitored. The NREL evaluations are performed on commercial hydrogen detectors, on emerging sensing technologies, and for end users to validate sensor performance for specific application needs. Test results and data are shared with the manufacturer or client via summary reports, teleconference phone calls, and, when appropriate, site visits to manufacturer facilities. Client representatives may also monitor NREL's operation while their technologies are being tested. Manufacturers may use test data to illustrate the analytical capability of their technologies and, more importantly, to guide future developments. NREL uses the data to assess technology gaps and deployment considerations. Per NREL Sensor Testing Laboratory policy, test results are treated as proprietary and are not shared with other manufacturers or other entities without permission. The data may be used by NREL in open publications

  19. Analyses to support development of risk-informed separation distances for hydrogen codes and standards.

    SciTech Connect

    LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Houf, William G.; Fluer, Inc., Paso Robels, CA; Fluer, Larry; Middleton, Bobby

    2009-03-01

    The development of a set of safety codes and standards for hydrogen facilities is necessary to ensure they are designed and operated safely. To help ensure that a hydrogen facility meets an acceptable level of risk, code and standard development organizations are tilizing risk-informed concepts in developing hydrogen codes and standards.

  20. Toward standardizing deuterium content reporting in hydrogen exchange-MS.

    PubMed

    Sheff, Joey G; Schriemer, David C

    2014-12-16

    We introduce a method to monitor dispensing ratios during labeling reactions in hydrogen exchange (HX)-MS. The method corrects for systematic and random dispensing errors and harmonizes data incorporating variable %D2O in the experiment design. A correction factor for deuterium levels is obtained by quantifying the relative signal intensities arising from nonexchanging heavy caffeine (spiked into labeling buffer) and light caffeine (spiked into sample solutions). Dispensing variability over a wide range of %D2O composition can be detected and corrected to a common value, and although random dispensing error is usually minor, we show it can be the limiting factor in high quality signal measurements. Applying a dispensing control is therefore an effective tool for monitoring measurement precision in HX-MS. PMID:25427063

  1. Optical methods for hydrogen degassing monitoring in urban conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timchenko, E. V.; Timchenko, P. E.; Zherdeva, L. A.; Tregub, N. V.; Selezneva, E. A.; Yakovlev, V. N.

    2015-12-01

    Results of a study of variations in optical parameters of bioindicators that grow in the regions of hydrogen degassing in Samara are presented. Raman spectroscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy were used as the main methods of the study. Features of Raman spectra of plants that grow in zones with presence/ absence of deep hydrogen emissions have been ascertained. The main variations have been recorded at wavenumbers of 1380, 1522, 1547, and 1600 cm-1, which are responsible for stretching vibrations in lignin and β-carotene and chlorophyll a and cellulose in plant leaves. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed an increase in the chloroplasts in leaves of plants which grow at hydrogen degassing territories. An optical coefficient was introduced, on the basis of which the Samara region was monitored.

  2. 40 CFR 141.601 - Standard monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... must collect dual sample sets at each monitoring location. One sample in the dual sample set must be analyzed for TTHM. The other sample in the dual sample set must be analyzed for HAA5. You must conduct one... dual sample set (i.e., a TTHM and an HAA5 sample) must be taken at each monitoring location during...

  3. 40 CFR 141.601 - Standard monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... must collect dual sample sets at each monitoring location. One sample in the dual sample set must be analyzed for TTHM. The other sample in the dual sample set must be analyzed for HAA5. You must conduct one... dual sample set (i.e., a TTHM and an HAA5 sample) must be taken at each monitoring location during...

  4. 40 CFR 141.601 - Standard monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... must collect dual sample sets at each monitoring location. One sample in the dual sample set must be analyzed for TTHM. The other sample in the dual sample set must be analyzed for HAA5. You must conduct one... dual sample set (i.e., a TTHM and an HAA5 sample) must be taken at each monitoring location during...

  5. Solid-state, resistive hydrogen sensors for safety monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.; Fleming, P.H.; Nave, S.E.

    1993-07-01

    Solid-state, resistive hydrogen sensors have been designed and fabricated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Sensor response has been successfully tested with H{sub 2} gas in argon and air under ambient temperature and pressure, while immersed in transformer oil at temperatures between 25{degrees}C and 90{degrees}C, and under site-specific conditions at Westinghouse Savannah River Co. Current versions of the sensors (25 {times} 25 {times} 0.6 mm) are small enough to be incorporated into hand-held leak detectors or distributed sensor systems for safety monitoring throughout a large area. Another foreseeable application is in electrical power transformers where the buildup of hydrogen gas accompanies oil breakdown. The use of these sensors to monitor transformer oil changes could help predict and prevent catastrophic failure.

  6. Field evaluation of hydrogen fluoride continuous monitoring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, V.V.M.; Dunder, T.

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents the results of a comparative study of commercially available hydrogen fluoride (HF) continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMSs). The evaluation was conducted at a primary aluminum smelting plant. Three CEMSs-one infrared (IR) absorption analyzer and two ion mobility spectroscopy (IMS) analyzers-gathered data continuously over a 12-day time frame. Manual sampling trains were run concurrently with the CEMSs. All three monitoring systems provided time-averaged emissions estimates within 0.5 parts per million of each other. CEMS data were comparable to data gathered by manual sampling techniques.

  7. Safety Standard for Hydrogen and Hydrogen Systems: Guidelines for Hydrogen System Design, Materials Selection, Operations, Storage and Transportation. Revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Safety Standard, which establishes a uniform process for hydrogen system design, materials selection, operation, storage, and transportation, is presented. The guidelines include suggestions for safely storing, handling, and using hydrogen in gaseous (GH2), liquid (LH2), or slush (SLH2) form whether used as a propellant or non-propellant. The handbook contains 9 chapters detailing properties and hazards, facility design, design of components, materials compatibility, detection, and transportation. Chapter 10 serves as a reference and the appendices contained therein include: assessment examples; scaling laws, explosions, blast effects, and fragmentation; codes, standards, and NASA directives; and relief devices along with a list of tables and figures, abbreviations, a glossary and an index for ease of use. The intent of the handbook is to provide enough information that it can be used alone, but at the same time, reference data sources that can provide much more detail if required.

  8. Physics Beyond the Standard Model from Molecular Hydrogen Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubachs, Wim; Salumbides, Edcel John; Bagdonaite, Julija

    2015-06-01

    The spectrum of molecular hydrogen can be measured in the laboratory to very high precision using advanced laser and molecular beam techniques, as well as frequency-comb based calibration [1,2]. The quantum level structure of this smallest neutral molecule can now be calculated to very high precision, based on a very accurate (10-15 precision) Born-Oppenheimer potential [3] and including subtle non-adiabatic, relativistic and quantum electrodynamic effects [4]. Comparison between theory and experiment yields a test of QED, and in fact of the Standard Model of Physics, since the weak, strong and gravitational forces have a negligible effect. Even fifth forces beyond the Standard Model can be searched for [5]. Astronomical observation of molecular hydrogen spectra, using the largest telescopes on Earth and in space, may reveal possible variations of fundamental constants on a cosmological time scale [6]. A study has been performed at a 'look-back' time of 12.5 billion years [7]. In addition the possible dependence of a fundamental constant on a gravitational field has been investigated from observation of molecular hydrogen in the photospheres of white dwarfs [8]. The latter involves a test of the Einsteins equivalence principle. [1] E.J. Salumbides et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 143005 (2011). [2] G. Dickenson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 193601 (2013). [3] K. Pachucki, Phys. Rev. A82, 032509 (2010). [4] J. Komasa et al., J. Chem. Theory Comp. 7, 3105 (2011). [5] E.J. Salumbides et al., Phys. Rev. D87, 112008 (2013). [6] F. van Weerdenburg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 180802 (2011). [7] J. Badonaite et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 071301 (2015). [8] J. Bagdonaite et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 123002 (2014).

  9. Oxygen Mass Flow Rate Generated for Monitoring Hydrogen Peroxide Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H. Richard

    2002-01-01

    Recent interest in propellants with non-toxic reaction products has led to a resurgence of interest in hydrogen peroxide for various propellant applications. Because peroxide is sensitive to contaminants, material interactions, stability and storage issues, monitoring decomposition rates is important. Stennis Space Center (SSC) uses thermocouples to monitor bulk fluid temperature (heat evolution) to determine reaction rates. Unfortunately, large temperature rises are required to offset the heat lost into the surrounding fluid. Also, tank penetration to accomodate a thermocouple can entail modification of a tank or line and act as a source of contamination. The paper evaluates a method for monitoring oxygen evolution as a means to determine peroxide stability. Oxygen generation is not only directly related to peroxide decomposition, but occurs immediately. Measuring peroxide temperature to monitor peroxide stability has significant limitations. The bulk decomposition of 1% / week in a large volume tank can produce in excess of 30 cc / min. This oxygen flow rate corresponds to an equivalent temperature rise of approximately 14 millidegrees C, which is difficult to measure reliably. Thus, if heat transfer were included, there would be no temperature rise. Temperature changes from the surrounding environment and heat lost to the peroxide will also mask potential problems. The use of oxygen flow measurements provides an ultra sensitive technique for monitoring reaction events and will provide an earlier indication of an abnormal decomposition when compared to measuring temperature rise.

  10. Implementation of standards for individual monitoring in Europe.

    PubMed

    Fantuzzi, E; Alves, J G; Ambrosi, P; Janzekovic, H; Vartiainen, E

    2004-01-01

    A large number of standards are available for radiation protection and individual monitoring purposes. They are published by various organisations, international and national. Moreover, the increasing policy of "Quality" applied to individual monitoring requires the implementation of standards on Quality Assurance (QA) both in technical and management aspects of a dosimetric service. Implementation of standards is not mandatory; therefore, varying degrees of implementation can be found in different European countries. However, for a number of good reasons, a degree of harmonisation within the European Union (EU) of the requirements and procedures for individual monitoring would be desirable. Harmonisation as applied to dosimetric services does not mean that they should all follow exactly the same procedures, but that they should aim to meet the same general requirements, and their results should be comparable. This article aims to compile information on the use of all standards applied within individual monitoring practices, be it on the calibration of dosemeters or on the QA procedures to be applied to the overall dose evaluation process. Both "technical standards" and "quality standards" will be discussed. A list of documents of relevance to subjects such as recommendations and requirements in the field of individual monitoring, whose application could help in the harmonisation of procedures, will also be given. As it is agreed that implementation of quality standards is a relevant framework within which harmonisation can be achieved, guidance on the implementation of quality standards in a dosimetric service is given. Accreditation and approval of dosimetric services will be of relevance in the process of harmonisation of individual monitoring within the EU. In this article, a discussion of various procedures and the meaning of both forms of recognition is also provided. Although most of the text applies to the monitoring of internal and external exposure to

  11. A STUDY TO EVALUATE CARBON MONOXIDE AND HYDROGEN SULFIDE CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORS AT AN OIL REFINERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An eleven month field evaluation was done on five hydrogen sulfide and four carbon monoxide monitors located at an oil refinery. The hydrogen sulfide monitors sampled a fuel gas feed line and the carbon monoxide monitors sampled the emissions from a fluid cat cracker (FCC). Two o...

  12. Considerations for Integration of a Physiological Radar Monitoring System with Gold Standard Clinical Sleep Monitoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Aditya; Baboli, Mehran; Gao, Xiaomeng; Yavari, Ehsan; Padasdao, Bryson; Soll, Bruce; Boric-Lubecke, Olga; Lubecke, Victor M.

    2016-01-01

    A design for a physiological radar monitoring system (PRMS) that can be integrated with clinical sleep monitoring systems is presented. The PRMS uses two radar systems at 2.45GHz and 24 GHz to achieve both high sensitivity and high resolution. The system can acquire data, perform digital processing and output appropriate conventional analog outputs with a latency of 130 ms, which can be recorded and displayed by a gold standard sleep monitoring system, along with other standard sensor measurements. PMID:24110139

  13. Considerations for integration of a physiological radar monitoring system with gold standard clinical sleep monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aditya; Baboli, Mehran; Gao, Xiaomeng; Yavari, Ehsan; Padasdao, Bryson; Soll, Bruce; Boric-Lubecke, Olga; Lubecke, Victor

    2013-01-01

    A design for a physiological radar monitoring system (PRMS) that can be integrated with clinical sleep monitoring systems is presented. The PRMS uses two radar systems at 2.45 GHz and 24 GHz to achieve both high sensitivity and high resolution. The system can acquire data, perform digital processing and output appropriate conventional analog outputs with a latency of 130 ms, which can be recorded and displayed by a gold standard sleep monitoring system, along with other standard sensor measurements. PMID:24110139

  14. IEC STANDARDS FOR INDIVIDUAL MONITORING OF IONISING RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Voytchev, Miroslav; Ambrosi, P.; Behrens, R.; Chiaro Jr, Peter John

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents IEC/SC 45B Radiation protection instrumentation and its standards for individual monitoring of ionising radiation: IEC 61526 Ed. 3 for active personal dosemeters and IEC 62387-1 for passive integrating dosimetry systems. The transposition of these standards as CENELEC (European) standards is also discussed together with the collaboration between IEC/SC 45B and ISO/TC 85/SC 2.

  15. Development of a passive dosimeter for hydrogen fluoride monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.S.; Monat, J.P.

    1983-02-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF), a toxic industrial chemical, is used in the manufacture of most fluorine products and in many other industrial processes. Major uses are in fluorocarbon manufacture, aluminum production, glass etching, steel pickling, uranium processing, and as a catalyst for petroleum refining. A reliable passive dosimeter has been developed for sampling of airborne hydrogen fluoride vapor. The device is small (7.7 cm x 5.4 cm x 1.9 cm) and can easily and conveniently be worn on one's lapel. It consists of polyethylene and polypropylene parts and an alkaline impregnated polypropylene collection element. It is completely self-contained requiring no pumps, impingers, or sampling tubes. Subsequent to sampling, the collection element is analyzed quickly and easily with a fluoride selective-ion electrode. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine precision, linearity, interference effects, influences of temperature and humidity, and collection element stability over time. Results of the tests indicate that the Gasbadge/sup TM/ HF dosimeter is an excellent passive HF monitor for work spaces, and that results obtained with it are accurate within +/- 17.4% in the action range and +/- 10.3% overall. These results have been corroborated in a field study. (JMT)

  16. Recent progress in the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center atomic hydrogen standards program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V. S.

    1981-01-01

    At NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and through associated contractors, a broad spectrum of work is being carried out to develop improved hydrogen maser frequency standards for field use, improved experimental hydrogen maser frequency standards, and improved frequency and time distribution and measurement systems for hydrogen maser use. Recent progress in the following areas is reported: results on the Nr masers built by the Applied Physics Laboratory of Johns Hopkins University, the development of a low cost hydrogen maser at Goddard Space Flight Center, and work on a low noise phase comparison system and digitally phase locked crystal oscillator called the distribution and measurement system.

  17. Continuous monitoring of hydrogen and carbon dioxide at Stromboli volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Martino, Roberto M. R.; Camarda, Marco; Gurrieri, Sergio; Valenza, Mariano

    2015-04-01

    Geochemical monitoring of fumarole and soil gases is a powerful tool for volcano surveillance, for investigating the subsurface magma dynamics, and for hazard assessment in volcanic areas. The monitoring of both carbon dioxide (CO2) flux, and hydrogen (H2) concentration in active volcanic areas helps to improve the understanding of the processes linking the surface gas emissions, the chemistry of the magmatic gases, and the volcanic activity. The CO2 flux measurement is a routine technique for volcano monitoring purposes, because of CO2 is the second-abundant component of the gas phase in silicate magmas, attaining saturation at the mantle to deep crustal level. The H2 concentration has provided indications concerning the oxygen fugacity of magmatic gases, a parameter that changes over a wide range of low values (10-16 - 10-8 bar), and affects the redox state of multivalent elements. This study reports on the use a tailor-made automatic system developed for continuous monitoring purposes of H2 concentration and CO2 flux in the summit area of Stromboli volcano (Aeolian islands). The automatic device consists of an H2-selective electrochemical sensor, and two IR-spectrophotometers for measuring the CO2 flux in agreement with the dynamic concentration method. The data collected by the automatic system deployed at Stromboli from 19 May 2009 to 15 December 2010 are presented herein. The data processing provides a better understanding of the relationships between the evolution of the low temperature fumarolic emissions, and the volcanic activity. The results of the data analysis indicates that the high frequency variations exhibited by CO2 flux and H2 concentration are positively correlated with the eruptive activity of Stromboli, typically changing on time scale of hours or days. Furthermore, the investigation of the relationships between CO2 flux and H2 concentration provides an evaluation of the depth of the degassing source, by which the gas mixture containing H2 and

  18. Historical Cost Curves for Hydrogen Masers and Cesium Beam Frequency and Timing Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, D. S.; Moore, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    Historical cost curves were developed for hydrogen masers and cesium beam standards used for frequency and timing calibration in the Deep Space Network. These curves may be used to calculate the cost of future hydrogen masers or cesium beam standards in either future or current dollars. The cesium beam standards are decreasing in cost by about 2.3% per year since 1966, and hydrogen masers are decreasing by about 0.8% per year since 1978 relative to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration inflation index.

  19. Rugged approach for hydrogen fluoride monitoring in aluminium smelters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, Bruno; Lord, Sylvain; Morin, Andre; Labranche, Bruno; Bernard, Pierre; Galarneau, Pierre

    1995-02-01

    A real time monitor, specifically designed to measure hydrogen fluoride (HF) concentration at the exit of the air purification system of aluminum smelters, has been tested and evaluated over a full year. The system has been designed to be rugged, with a low operating cost and easy to install and maintain in operation. These objectives have been achieved using a cheap halogen lamp as a light source, a simple micromotor as a light modulator, a pair of interference filters as optical analyzing elements and optical fibers as light guides between the central unit and the remote measurement points. In this application, the use of optical fiber provides two great advantages. Firstly, measurements in very demanding conditions become possible since the central unit, which has the task to make the entire optical electronic and digital processing, can be left in a control room where the conditions are much less difficult. Secondly, the capability of the central unit to process the optical information coming from two probe heads significantly reduces the overall costs by measurement points. The detection sensitivity limit achieved is 0.1 mg/m3 with normal stack diameter. The accuracy is around 5% depending on the care devoted to the calibration process. The response time can be adjusted over a large range but is typically set at 10 seconds.

  20. Hydrogen-Deuterium exchange monitored by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poe, Brent; Del Vecchio, Alessandro; Cestelli Guidi, Mariangela

    2016-04-01

    Measuring the extent of isotopic exchange is a common means for the determination of self-diffusion coefficients in any type of medium (gas, liquid, amorphous solid, crystalline solid). For rapidly diffusing species such as hydrogen in condensed phases, real time methods involving vibrational spectroscopy can be used by taking advantage of the large relative mass difference between 1H and 2H, resulting in large differences in the band positions of their vibrational modes. We demonstrate rapid isotopic exchange between D2O liquid and H2O vapor using ATR (attenuated total reflectance) in a FTIR spectrometer. Over the course of a few minutes several spectra were acquired of a D2O droplet mounted on a diamond crystal. The progressive exchange reaction between the liquid phase and H2O from the atmosphere was monitored by measuring the decreasing absorbance of the D-O-D bending and O-D stretching bands and the increasing absorbance of the D-O-H and H-O-H bending and O-H stretching bands as functions of time. Our results offer some intriguing insights into the structural characteristics of water as inferred by this exchange process.

  1. Standards for documenting and monitoring bird reintroduction projects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutherland, W.J.; Armstrong, D.; Butchart, S.H.M.; Earnhardt, J.M.; Ewen, J.; Jamieson, I.; Jones, C.G.; Lee, R.; Newbery, P.; Nichols, J.D.; Parker, K.A.; Sarrazin, F.; Seddon, P.J.; Shah, N.; Tatayah, V.

    2010-01-01

    It would be much easier to assess the effectiveness of different reintroduction methods, and so improve the success of reintroductions, if there was greater standardization in documentation of the methods and outcomes. We suggest a series of standards for documenting and monitoring the methods and outcomes associated with reintroduction projects for birds. Key suggestions are: documenting the planned release before it occurs, specifying the information required on each release, postrelease monitoring occurring at standard intervals of 1 and 5 years (and 10 for long-lived species), carrying out a population estimate unless impractical, distinguishing restocked and existing individuals when supplementing populations, and documenting the results. We suggest these principles would apply, largely unchanged, to other vertebrate classes. Similar methods could be adopted for invertebrates and plants with appropriate modification. We suggest that organizations publically state whether they will adopt these approaches when undertaking reintroductions. Similar standardization would be beneficial for a wide range of topics in environmental monitoring, ecological studies, and practical conservation. ??2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Regulations, Codes, and Standards (RCS) Template for California Hydrogen Dispensing Stations

    SciTech Connect

    Rivkin, C.; Blake, C.; Burgess, R.; Buttner, W.; Post, M.

    2012-11-01

    This report explains the Regulations, Codes, and Standards (RCS) requirements for hydrogen dispensing stations in the State of California. The reports shows the basic components of a hydrogen dispensing station in a simple schematic drawing; the permits and approvals that would typically be required for the construction and operation of a hydrogen dispensing station; and a basic permit that might be employed by an Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ).

  3. Using the standardized precipitation index for flood risk monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, R. A.; Hayes, M.; Bressan, L.

    2002-09-01

    Flood risk and the critical time of occurrence are difficult to monitor and detect. The availability and application of adapted indices may allow not only continuous monitoring of hydrological conditions in flood-prone areas, but also the potential threat of possible flood events in order to promote preventive actions to mitigate the impacts of the phenomenon. The standardized precipitation index (SPI) was developed for drought detection and monitoring. However, because of its characteristics, the SPI can also be used as a tool to monitor wetter-than-normal conditions. The aim of this paper, based on the recurrent floods affecting the southern Cordoba Province in Argentina, is to analyse the potential of the SPI as a tool for monitoring flood risk in that region. Results indicate that the SPI satisfactorily explains the development of conditions leading up to the three main flood events to occur in the region during the past 25 years. This fact supports the proposal for applying the SPI as an effective component of a regional system for climate risk monitoring.

  4. MOBILE SOURCE NOX MONITOR, HYDROGEN-ATOM DIRECT CHEMILUMINESCENCE METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analyzer was developed for measuring motor vehicle NOx (NO and NO2) emissions based on the chemiluminescence reaction of NO and NO2 with hydrogen atoms. This eliminated the need for an NO2 to NO converter as required with ozone chemiluminescence for NOx analysis. The hydrogen-...

  5. Mica Mountain Muscovite: A New Silicate Hydrogen Isotope Standard Reference Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonero, A.; Larson, P. B.; Neill, O. K.

    2015-12-01

    A new standard reference material consisting of finely ground muscovite flakes has been developed and utilized at Washington State University to calibrate hydrogen isotope ratio (D/H) measurements to the VSMOW scale. This standard was prepared from a single crystal 'book' of a muscovite-bearing pegmatite near Deary, ID. The value we obtained for this muscovite standard (MMM) is: δD VSMOW = -79.1 ± 2.0‰ relative to NBS-30 biotite at -65.7‰ compared to a VSMOW value of 0.00‰. This mean value was determined for the muscovite and has been used as our working standard. There have been many recent geological applications to continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectroscopy. When hydrogen isotope ratios are of interest, a suitable standard for hydrogen in silicate systems often is not available. With supplies of the older NBS-30 biotite standard exhausted, much D/H data measured on silicate minerals have been linked to the VSMOW scale via non-silicate reference materials which may not behave similarly to minerals under study. Some recent studies have shown the NBS-30 standard to have poor intra-laboratory agreement with that material's measured and accepted isotopic values (Qi et al., 2014). Many laboratories which would measure D/H in silicate minerals would benefit from using a silicate-based standard for hydrogen. With further characterization, this muscovite may also be useful as a standard for silicate oxygen ratios as well as for some major element cations. This muscovite standard gives consistent values and it is easy to work with and does not leave much combustion residue. Also, because muscovite contains little iron, metal-hydride formation and associated fractionation factors is greatly reduced during the sample combustion. A new silicate-hydrogen standard is needed by the community, and this work represents an example of what a replacement standard material could look like.

  6. Monitoring the 1996 Drought Using the Standardized Precipitation Index.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Michael J.; Svoboda, Mark. D.; Wilhite, Donald A.; Vanyarkho, Olga V.

    1999-03-01

    Droughts are difficult to detect and monitor. Drought indices, most commonly the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI), have been used with limited success as operational drought monitoring tools and triggers for policy responses. Recently, a new index, the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), was developed to improve drought detection and monitoring capabilities. The SPI has several characteristics that are an improvement over previous indices, including its simplicity and temporal flexibility, that allow its application for water resources on all timescales. In this article, the 1996 drought in the southern plains and southwestern United States is examined using the SPI. A series of maps are used to illustrate how the SPI would have assisted in being able to detect the onset of the drought and monitor its progression. A case study investigating the drought in greater detail for Texas is also given. The SPI demonstrated that it is a tool that should be used operationally as part of a state, regional, or national drought watch system in the United States. During the 1996 drought, the SPI detected the onset of the drought at least 1 month in advance of the PDSI. This timeliness will be invaluable for improving mitigation and response actions of state and federal government to drought-affected regions in the future.

  7. Evaluation of a hydrogen sensor for nuclear reactor containment monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffheins, B.S.; McKnight, T.E.; Lauf, R.J.; Smith, R.R.; James, R.E.

    1997-02-01

    Measurement of hydrogen concentration in containment atmospheres in nuclear plants is a key safety capability. Current technologies require extensive sampling systems and subsequent maintenance and calibration costs can be very expensive. A new hydrogen sensor has been developed that is small and potentially inexpensive to install and maintain. Its size and low power requirement make it suitable in distributed systems for pinpointing hydrogen buildup. This paper will address the first phase of a testing program conducted to evaluate this sensor for operation in reactor containments.

  8. Assessement of Codes and Standards Applicable to a Hydrogen Production Plant Coupled to a Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Russell

    2006-06-01

    This is an assessment of codes and standards applicable to a hydrogen production plant to be coupled to a nuclear reactor. The result of the assessment is a list of codes and standards that are expected to be applicable to the plant during its design and construction.

  9. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards to control hydrogen chloride... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  10. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards to control hydrogen chloride... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  11. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards to control hydrogen chloride... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  12. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards to control hydrogen chloride... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  13. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards to control hydrogen chloride... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  14. Revised USP standards for product dating, packaging, and temperature monitoring.

    PubMed

    Okeke, C C; Bailey, L; Medwick, T; Grady, L T

    2000-08-01

    Revisions in the standards of the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) related to product dating, packaging, and temperature monitoring are discussed. USP has revised product dating specifications as they relate to pharmacy practice. Pharmacists are required to affix beyond-use dates and not expiration dates to the prescription or repackaged vial. With respect to beyond-use dates for nonsterile products that are repackaged into unit dose or single-unit containers, the requirement has been changed from the previous period of six months from the date of repackaging or 25% of the time remaining until the expiration date, whichever is less, to one year. The type of packaging container, the material used in packaging, and the permeability of the container to moisture are important issues for pharmacists to consider. USP requires that the pharmacy facility where dispensing or repackaging occurs be maintained at controlled room temperature such that the calculated mean kinetic temperature does not exceed 25 degrees C. USP standards for product dating, packaging, and temperature monitoring have changed, and pharmacists must educate themselves about these revisions. PMID:10938985

  15. Standard line broadening impact theory for hydrogen including penetrating collisions.

    PubMed

    Alexiou, S; Poquérusse, A

    2005-10-01

    In recent years there has been significant interest in the emission spectra from high-density plasmas, as manifested by a number of experiments. At these high densities short range (small impact parameter) interactions become important and these cannot be adequately handled by the standard theory, whose predictions depend on some cutoffs, necessary to preserve unitarity, the long range approximation, and to ensure the validity of a semiclassical picture. Very recently, as a result of a debate concerning the broadening of isolated ion lines, the importance of penetration of bound electron wave functions by plasma electrons has been realized. By softening the interaction, penetration makes perturbative treatments more valid. The penetration effect has now been included analytically into the standard theory. It turns out that the integrations may be done in closed form in terms of the modified Bessel functions K0 and K1. This work develops the new theory and applies it to experimental measurements. PMID:16383542

  16. NASA hydrogen maser accuracy and stability in relation to world standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.; Percival, D. B.

    1973-01-01

    Frequency comparisons were made among five NASA hydrogen masers in 1969 and again in 1972 to a precision of one part in 10 to the 13th power. Frequency comparisons were also made between these masers and the cesium-beam ensembles of several international standards laboratories. The hydrogen maser frequency stabilities as related to IAT were comparable to the frequency stabilities of individual time scales with respect to IAT. The relative frequency variations among the NASA masers, measured after the three-year interval, were 2 + or - 2 parts in 10 to the 13th power. Thus time scales based on hydrogen masers would have excellent long-term stability and uniformity.

  17. Magnetic state selection in atomic frequency and time standards. [hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    Atomic standards such as those based upon cesium and hydrogen rely upon magnetic state selection to obtain population inversion in the hyperfine transition levels. Use of new design approaches and improved magnetic materials has made it possible to fabricate improved state selectors of small size, and thus the efficiency of utilization of beam flux is greatly improved and the size and weight of the standard is reduced. The sensitivity to magnetic perturbations is also decreased, so that the accuracy and stability of the standard is improved. Several new state selector designs are illustrated and the application to standards utilizing different atomic species is analyzed.

  18. Potential of Uav Based Convergent Photogrammetry in Monitoring Regeneration Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vepakomma, U.; Cormier, D.; Thiffault, N.

    2015-08-01

    Several thousand hectares of forest blocks are regenerating after harvest in Canada. Monitoring their performance over different stages of growth is critical in ensuring future productivity and ecological balance. Tools for rapid evaluation can support timely and reliable planning of interventions. Conventional ground surveys or visual image assessments are either time intensive or inaccurate, while alternate operational remote sensing tools are unavailable. In this study, we test the feasibility and strength of UAV-based photogrammetry with an EO camera on a UAV platform in assessing regeneration performance. Specifically we evaluated stocking, spatial density and height distribution of naturally growing (irregularly spaced stems) or planted (regularly spaced stems) conifer regeneration in different phases of growth. Standard photogrammetric workflow was applied on the 785 acquired images for 3D reconstruction of the study sites. The required parameters were derived based on automated single stem detection algorithm developed in-house. Comparing with field survey data, preliminary results hold promise. Future studies are planned to expand the scope to larger areas and different stand conditions.

  19. VERIFICATION OF AMBIENT MONITORING TECHNOLOGIES FOR AMMONIA AND HYDROGEN SULFIDE AT ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The performance of two hydrogen sulfide and seven ambient ammonia monitoring technologies was recently verified by the U.S. EPA ETV Program’s AMS Center. The nine technologies verified by the AMS Center could be used to enhance the scientific understanding of the environmental effects that emissions...

  20. In situ monitoring hydrogen isotope retention in ITER first wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhin, E. E.; Andrew, P.; Anthoine, A. D.; Bazhenov, A. N.; Barnsley, R.; Bukreev, I. M.; Bukhovets, V. L.; Chernakov, A. P.; Gorodetsky, A. E.; Kochergin, M. M.; Koval, A. N.; Kukushkin, A. B.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Kurskiev, G. S.; Levashova, M. G.; Litvinov, A. E.; Litunovsky, V. N.; Markin, A. V.; Mazul, I. V.; Masyukevich, S. V.; Miroshnikov, I. V.; Nemov, A. S.; Novokhatsky, A. N.; Razdobarin, A. G.; Sherstnev, E. V.; Samsonov, D. S.; Semenov, V. V.; Smirnov, A. S.; De Temmerman, G.; Tolstyakov, S. Yu.; Zalavutdinov, R. Kh.; Walsh, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Tritium retention inside the vacuum vessel is a potentially serious constraint in the operation of large-scale fusion machines like ITER. An in situ diagnostics for first wall H/D/T retention by laser induced desorption spectroscopy (LIDS) is proposed for use between plasma discharges. The technique is based on local baking of the first wall by laser irradiation and subsequent analysis of the in-vessel gas by optical emission spectroscopy of plasma radiation. The local heating implementation, kinetics of H/D/T thermal extraction and the accuracy of optical emission spectroscopy measurements are analysed. To resolve the H/D/T lines spectroscopically, their thermal broadening should be minimized to prevent overlapping of the line shapes. A comparative performance analysis of several types of plasma sources with relatively cold ions is made including the following types of discharges: Penning, RF multipactor, laser torch and ECR. All these radiation sources require rather low power and could be used for remote in situ measurements of relative densities of the thermally extracted hydrogen isotopes.

  1. Pd/Ag coated fiber Bragg grating sensor for hydrogen monitoring in power transformers.

    PubMed

    Ma, G M; Jiang, J; Li, C R; Song, H T; Luo, Y T; Wang, H B

    2015-04-01

    Compared with conventional DGA (dissolved gas analysis) method for on-line monitoring of power transformers, FBG (fiber Bragg grating) hydrogen sensor represents marked advantages over immunity to electromagnetic field, time-saving, and convenience to defect location. Thus, a novel FBG hydrogen sensor based on Pd/Ag (Palladium/Silver) along with polyimide composite film to measure dissolved hydrogen concentration in large power transformers is proposed in this article. With the help of Pd/Ag composite coating, the enhanced performance on mechanical strength and sensitivity is demonstrated, moreover, the response time and sensitivity influenced by oil temperature are solved by correction lines. Sensitivity measurement and temperature calibration of the specific hydrogen sensor have been done respectively in the lab. And experiment results show a high sensitivity of 0.055 pm/(μl/l) with instant response time about 0.4 h under the typical operating temperature of power transformers, which proves a potential utilization inside power transformers to monitor the health status by detecting the dissolved hydrogen concentration. PMID:25933889

  2. Pd/Ag coated fiber Bragg grating sensor for hydrogen monitoring in power transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, G. M.; Jiang, J.; Li, C. R.; Song, H. T.; Luo, Y. T.; Wang, H. B.

    2015-04-01

    Compared with conventional DGA (dissolved gas analysis) method for on-line monitoring of power transformers, FBG (fiber Bragg grating) hydrogen sensor represents marked advantages over immunity to electromagnetic field, time-saving, and convenience to defect location. Thus, a novel FBG hydrogen sensor based on Pd/Ag (Palladium/Silver) along with polyimide composite film to measure dissolved hydrogen concentration in large power transformers is proposed in this article. With the help of Pd/Ag composite coating, the enhanced performance on mechanical strength and sensitivity is demonstrated, moreover, the response time and sensitivity influenced by oil temperature are solved by correction lines. Sensitivity measurement and temperature calibration of the specific hydrogen sensor have been done respectively in the lab. And experiment results show a high sensitivity of 0.055 pm/(μl/l) with instant response time about 0.4 h under the typical operating temperature of power transformers, which proves a potential utilization inside power transformers to monitor the health status by detecting the dissolved hydrogen concentration.

  3. Passive, Direct-Read Monitoring System for Selective Detection and Quantification of Hydrogen Chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, K. B.; Mihaylov, G. M.; Kirollos, K. S.

    2000-01-01

    Monitoring the exposure of an employee to hydrogen chloride or hydrochloric acid in the presence of other acids has been a challenge to the industrial hygiene community. The capability of a device to differentiate the levels of acid vapors would allow for more accurate determinations of exposure and therefore improved occupational health. In this work, a selective direct-read colorimetric badge system was validated for Short Term Exposure Limit (STEL) monitoring of hydrogen chloride. The passive colorimetric badge system consists of a direct reading badge and a color scale. The badge has a coated indicator layer with a diffusive resistance in the shape of an exclamation mark. An exclamation mark will appear if hydrogen chloride is present in the atmosphere at concentrations at or above 2.0 ppm. By using the color scale, the intensity of the color formed on the badge can be further quantified up to 25 ppm. The system was validated according to a protocol based on the NIOSH Protocol for the Evaluation of Passive Monitors. The badge was exposed to relative humidities ranging from 11% to 92%, temperatures ranging from 7 C to 400 C and air velocities ranging from 5 cm/sec to 170 cm/sec. All experiments were conducted in a laboratory vapor generation system. Hydrofluoric acid, nitric acid, sulfuric acid, chlorine, hydrogen sulfide and organic acids showed no effect on the performance of the hydrogen chloride monitoring system. The passive badge and color scale system exceeded the accuracy requirements as defined by NIOSH. At ambient conditions, the mean coefficient of variation was 10.86 and the mean bias was 1.3%. This data was presented previously at the American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Exposition in Toronto, Canada in June 1999.

  4. Defining and Monitoring Academic Standards in Australian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coates, Hamish

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines the need for adopting a more scientific approach to specifying and assessing academic standards in higher education. Drawing together insights from large-scale studies in Australia, it advances a definition of academic standards, explores potential indicators of academic quality and looks at approaches for setting standards. As…

  5. Monitoring Backbone Hydrogen-Bond Formation in β-Barrel Membrane Protein Folding.

    PubMed

    Raschle, Thomas; Rios Flores, Perla; Opitz, Christian; Müller, Daniel J; Hiller, Sebastian

    2016-05-10

    β-barrel membrane proteins are key components of the outer membrane of bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts. Their three-dimensional structure is defined by a network of backbone hydrogen bonds between adjacent β-strands. Here, we employ hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) exchange in combination with NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to monitor backbone hydrogen bond formation during folding of the outer membrane protein X (OmpX) from E. coli in detergent micelles. Residue-specific kinetics of interstrand hydrogen-bond formation were found to be uniform in the entire β-barrel and synchronized to formation of the tertiary structure. OmpX folding thus propagates via a long-lived conformational ensemble state in which all backbone amide protons exchange with the solvent and engage in hydrogen bonds only transiently. Stable formation of the entire OmpX hydrogen bond network occurs downhill of the rate-limiting transition state and thus appears cooperative on the overall folding time scale. PMID:27062600

  6. Self-Monitoring of Self-Regulation during Math Homework Behaviour Using Standardized Diaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitz, Bernhard; Perels, Franziska

    2011-01-01

    This study aims at enhancing math learning and general self-regulation by supporting daily self-regulated learning during math homework. The authors use standardized diaries as a self-monitoring tool to support self-regulatory behaviour. Following the theory of self-monitoring, frequent self-monitoring of self-regulation will lead to an…

  7. Monitoring Text Comprehension: Individual Differences in Epistemological Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Michael P.

    1984-01-01

    Individual differences in the reading comprehension standards of 90 undergraduates were examined. Students were classified as having a dualistic or relativistic conception of knowledge by attitude measures. Data suggest that epistemological beliefs may dictate choice of comprehension criteria and that these epistemological standards may control…

  8. Hydrogen Concentration in the Inner-Most Container within a Pencil Tank Overpack Packaged in a Standard Waste Box Package

    SciTech Connect

    Marusich, Robert M.

    2013-08-15

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate hydrogen generation within Pencil Tank Overpacks (PTO) in a Standard Waste Box (SWB), to establish plutonium (Pu) limits for PTOs based on hydrogen concentration in the inner-most container and to establish required configurations or validate existing or proposed configurations for PTOs. The methodology and requirements are provided in this report.

  9. TRANSFER STANDARDS FOR THE CALIBRATION OF AMBIENT AIR MONITORING ANALYZERS FOR OZONE. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE DOCUMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    New EPA regulations (40 CFR Part 50, Appendix D) allow the use of transfer standards for the calibration of ambient ozone monitors. This document is a reference aid to help users select ozone transfer standards and reference them to a primary UV standard. It defines ozone transfe...

  10. Eleven years of monitoring an ultra-stable 10 V zener-based voltage standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, H.; Trigo, L.; Slomovitz, D.

    2016-07-01

    The long-term behaviour of a voltage standard based on 140 zeners is analyzed. This standard was developed in 2004 and was monitored up to now. Noise and drift are evaluated showing better results than commercial similar devices. This source is used as the National Voltage Standard in the Uruguayan Designated National Metrology Institute (UTE).

  11. Laboratory validation and field verification of a new passive colorimetric air monitoring badge for sampling hydrogen sulfide in air.

    PubMed

    Kring, E V; Damrell, D J; Henry, T J; DeMoor, H M; Basilio, A N; Simon, C E

    1984-01-01

    The Pro-Tek passive colorimetric air monitoring badge for personal or area sampling of hydrogen sulfide is described. The badge has been validated over the range of 1.8 to 164 ppm-hours (0.23-21 ppm on an 8-hour TWA basis). It has an overall accuracy throughout this range of +/- 15.9% and meets the NIOSH accuracy criteria for an analytical and sampling method. The colorimetric analytical method used is based on the Texas Air Control Board's Molybdenum Blue method. Color-activated exposed badge solutions are read out on a standard laboratory spectrophotometer using 1 centimeter (10 mm) cells. Variations in exposure temperature (between 10 degrees and 40 degrees C), relative humidity, and face velocity (between 2 and 250 ft/min) do not affect badge performance. Unexposed badges are stable for more than 12 months refrigerated and for two months at room temperature. PMID:6702591

  12. SiC Sensors in Extreme Environments: Real-time Hydrogen Monitoring for Energy Plant Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Ruby

    2008-03-01

    Clean, efficient energy production, such as the gasification of coal (syngas), requires physical and chemical sensors for exhaust gas monitoring as well as real-time control of the combustion process. Wide-bandgap semiconducting materials systems can meet the sensing demands in these extreme environments consisting of chemically corrosive gases at high temperature and pressure. We have developed a SiC based micro-sensor for detection of hydrogen containing species with millisecond response at 600 C. The sensor is a Pt-SiO2-SiC device with a dense Pt catalytic sensing film, capable of withstanding months of continuous high temperature operation. The device was characterized in robust sensing module that is compatible with an industrial reactor. We report on the performance of the SiC sensor in a simulated syngas ambient at 370 C containing the common interferants CO2, CH4 and CO [1]. In addition we demonstrate that hours of exposure to >=1000 ppm H2S and 15% water vapor does not degrade the sensor performance. To elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the hydrogen response of the sensor we have modeled the hydrogen adsorptions kinetics at the internal Pt-SiO2 interface, using both the Tempkin and Langmuir isotherms. Under the conditions appropriate for energy plant applications, the response of our sensor is significantly larger than that obtained from ultra-high vacuum electrochemical sensor measurements at high temperatures. We will discuss the role of morphology, at the nano to micro scale, on the enhanced catalytic activity observed for our Pt sensing films in response to a heated hydrogen gas stream at atmospheric pressure. [1] R. Loloee, B. Chorpening, S. Beers & R. Ghosh, Hydrogen monitoring for power plant applications using SiC sensors, Sens. Actuators B:Chem. (2007), doi:10.1016/j.snb.2007.07.118

  13. A comparison of cover pole with standard vegetation monitoring methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of resource managers to make informed decisions regarding wildlife habitat could be improved with the use of existing datasets and the use of cost effective, standardized methods to simultaneously quantify vertical and horizontal cover. The objectives of this study were to (1) characteri...

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS FOR AIR QUALITY MONITORING AND CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents a description of the activities and accomplishments of the American Society for Testing and Materials' U. S. Technical Advisory Group (TAG) to the International Standards Organization's Technical Committee 146 on Air Quality. The purpose of the TAG is to re...

  15. Pt-TiO2/MWCNTs Hybrid Composites for Monitoring Low Hydrogen Concentrations in Air

    PubMed Central

    Trocino, Stefano; Donato, Andrea; Latino, Mariangela; Donato, Nicola; Leonardi, Salvatore Gianluca; Neri, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen is a valuable fuel for the next energy scenario. Unfortunately, hydrogen is highly flammable at concentrations higher than 4% in air. This aspect makes the monitoring of H2 leaks an essential issue for safety reasons, especially in the transportation field. In this paper, nanocomposites based on Pt-doped TiO2/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been introduced as sensitive materials for H2 at low temperatures. Pt-TiO2/MWNTs nanocomposites with different composition have been prepared by a simple wet chemical procedure and their morphological, microstructural and electrical properties were investigated. Resistive thick-film devices have been fabricated printing the hybrid nanocomposites on alumina substrates provided with Pt interdigitated electrodes. Electrical tests in air have shown that embedding MWCNTs in the TiO2 matrix modify markedly the electrical conductivity, providing a means to decrease the resistance of the sensing layer. Pt acts as a catalytic additive. Pt-TiO2/MWNTs-based sensors were found to be sensitive to hydrogen at concentrations between 0.5 and 3% in air, satisfying the requisites for practical applications in hydrogen leak detection devices.

  16. Non-intrusive, on-line, simultaneous multi-species impurity monitoring in hydrogen using LIBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eseller, K. E.; Yueh, F.-Y.; Singh, J. P.

    2011-03-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been evaluated for on-line, simultaneous multi-species impurity monitoring in hydrogen. A miniature spectrometer with spectral coverage of 620-800 nm and a gated detection system with spectral coverage of 40 nm were both used to record LIBS spectra from the spark produced in sample gas by a frequency-doubled Nd YAG laser. The effect of pressure on detecting the impurity (e.g., nitrogen, argon, and oxygen) in hydrogen was studied. LIBS spectra with different impurity levels of nitrogen, argon, and oxygen were recorded, and the intensity of the spectral lines of Ar, O, N, and H observed were used to form calibration plots for impurity measurement. The limits of detection (LODs) for oxygen, argon, and nitrogen in hydrogen were estimated from the calibration obtained with both the gated and ungated detection. The hydrogen impurity measurements based on the ungated miniature system show reliable and reproductive results. But the LODs with this system are about four times higher than the LODs obtained with a gated detection system in this work.

  17. Hydrogen monitoring for power plant applications using SiC sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Reza Loloee; Benjamin Chorpening; Steve Beer; Ruby N. Ghosha

    2007-08-01

    We have developed a high-temperature gas sensing system for the detection of combustion products under harsh conditions, such as an energy plant. The sensor, based on the wide band gap semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC), is a catalytic gate field-effect device (Pt–SiO2–SiC) that can detect hydrogen-containing species in chemically reactive, high-temperature environments. The hydrogen response of the device in an industrially robust module was determined under both laboratory and industrial conditions (1000 sccm of 350 ◦C gas) from 52 ppm to 50% H2, with the sensor held at 620 ◦C. From our data we find that the hydrogen adsorption kinetics at the catalyst–oxide interface are well fitted by the linearized Langmuir adsorption isotherm. For hydrogen monitoring in a coal gasification application, we investigated the effect of common interferants on the device response to a 20% H2 gas stream. Within our signal to noise ratio, 40% CO and 5% CH4 had no measurable effect and a 2000 ppm pulse of H2S did not poison the Pt sensing film. We have demonstrated the long-term reliability of our SiC sensor and the robustness of the sensor packaging techniques, as all the data are from a single device, obtained during 5 days of industrial measurements in addition to ∼480 continuous hours of operation under laboratory conditions.

  18. Hydrogen monitoring for power plant applications using SiC sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Loloee, R.; Chorpening, B.T.; Beer, S.K.; Ghosh, R.N.

    2008-01-29

    We have developed a high-temperature gas sensing system for the detection of combustion products under harsh conditions, such as an energy plant. The sensor, based on the wide band gap semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC), is a catalytic gate field-effect device (Pt–SiO2–SiC) that can detect hydrogen-containing species in chemically reactive, high-temperature environments. The hydrogen response of the device in an industrially robust module was determined under both laboratory and industrial conditions (1000 sccm of 350 °C gas) from 52 ppm to 50% H2, with the sensor held at 620 °C. From our data we find that the hydrogen adsorption kinetics at the catalyst–oxide interface are well fitted by the linearized Langmuir adsorption isotherm. For hydrogen monitoring in a coal gasification application, we investigated the effect of common interferants on the device response to a 20% H2 gas stream. Within our signal to noise ratio, 40% CO and 5% CH4 had no measurable effect and a 2000 ppm pulse of H2S did not poison the Pt sensing film. We have demonstrated the long-term reliability of our SiC sensor and the robustness of the sensor packaging techniques, as all the data are from a single device, obtained during 5 days of industrial measurements in addition to 480 continuous hours of operation under laboratory conditions.

  19. EVOLUTION OF THE IEC AND EN STANDARDS FOR INDIVIDUAL MONITORING OF IONISING RADIATION.

    PubMed

    Voytchev, M; Behrens, R; Ambrosi, P; Radev, R; Chiaro, P

    2016-09-01

    This article presents the evolution of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and the European standards for individual monitoring of ionising radiation issued, respectively, from the committees IEC/Sub Committee 45B and European Committee for Electro-technical Standardization/Technical Committee 45B 'Radiation protection instrumentation'. Standards for passive individual photon and beta dosimetry systems as well as those for active individual monitors are discussed. A neutron ambient dose equivalent (rate) meter standard and a technical report concerning the determination of uncertainty in measurement are also covered. PMID:26443545

  20. Removal of mercury contamination on primary mass standards by hydrogen plasma and thermal desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, P.; Marti, K.; Russi, S.

    2013-02-01

    The removal of a high mercury contamination on a Pt reference mass by thermal desorption was studied directly by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Subsequently the contamination mechanism was investigated. Samples of PtIr and AuPt exposed to vapour of mercury in air were studied using XPS and gravimetric mass determination. We find an extremely rapid mercury contamination which takes place within minutes and reaches an initial equilibrium state after 2 h to 4 h. Roughly 1 to 2 monolayers of mercury adsorbs directly on the metal surface. A natural contamination of carbon and oxygen compounds is at the top. Due to the accumulation of mercury, we find a gain in mass which corresponds to 20 µg to 26 µg for a PtIr standard. XPS data from a historical Pt standard give strong evidence for further average mercury accumulation of (1.3 ± 0.1) µg/year during a period of more than a century. This can be explained by a two-step mechanism presented in this study. The speed of contamination depends on the initial surface conditions. Polishing activates the surface and results in an enhanced accumulation of mercury. Natural contamination by C and O can delay but not prevent contamination. We further demonstrate that the mercury contamination can be removed by both hydrogen plasma and thermal desorption. The removal of mercury by hydrogen plasma can directly be attributed to the synthesis of gaseous mercury dihydrides at low pressures.

  1. Regulatory standards and other guidelines for goundwater monitoring programs

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, J.F.; Schmidt, A.J.; Selby, K.B.

    1989-07-01

    This report has been prepared to provide information on regulatory programs relevant to a groundwater monitoring program. The information provides a framework within which planners and decisions makers can systematically consider the maze of specific requirements and guidance as they develop a groundwater strategy for the Hanford Site. Although this report discusses legislation and regulations as they pertain to groundwater monitoring activities, it is not intended as a legal opinion. Rather, it is provided as a guide to the relationships among the various regulatory programs related to groundwater. Federal and state environmental pollution control statutes and regulations that have been reviewed in this document include the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); Washington's Hazardous Waste Management Act; Washington's Solid Waste Management Act; the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Liability, and Compensation Act (CERCLA); the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA); the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA); and the Clean Water Act (CWA). The implications and details of these regulations as they may apply to Hanford are discussed. The information contained within this report can be used to develop the Hanford Site's groundwater quality protection programs, assess regulatory compliance, and characterize the Hanford Site for potential remediation and corrective actions. 5 refs., 14 tabs.

  2. Hydrogen and Cesium Monitor for H- Magnetron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Cheng-Yang; Bollinger, Dan; Schupbach, Brian; Seiya, Kiyomi

    2014-07-01

    The relative concentration of cesium to hydrogen in the plasma of a H- magnetron source is an important parameter for reliable operations. If there is too much cesium, the surfaces of the source become contaminated with it and sparking occurs. If there is too little cesium then the plasma cannot be sustained. In order to monitor these two elements, a spectrometer has been built and installed on a test and operating source that looks at the plasma. It is hypothesized that the concentration of each element in the plasma is proportional to the intensity of their spectral lines.

  3. Structural health monitoring algorithm comparisons using standard data sets

    SciTech Connect

    Figueiredo, Eloi; Park, Gyuhae; Figueiras, Joaquim; Farrar, Charles; Worden, Keith

    2009-03-01

    The real-world structures are subjected to operational and environmental condition changes that impose difficulties in detecting and identifying structural damage. The aim of this report is to detect damage with the presence of such operational and environmental condition changes through the application of the Los Alamos National Laboratory’s statistical pattern recognition paradigm for structural health monitoring (SHM). The test structure is a laboratory three-story building, and the damage is simulated through nonlinear effects introduced by a bumper mechanism that simulates a repetitive impact-type nonlinearity. The report reviews and illustrates various statistical principles that have had wide application in many engineering fields. The intent is to provide the reader with an introduction to feature extraction and statistical modelling for feature classification in the context of SHM. In this process, the strengths and limitations of some actual statistical techniques used to detect damage in the structures are discussed. In the hierarchical structure of damage detection, this report is only concerned with the first step of the damage detection strategy, which is the evaluation of the existence of damage in the structure. The data from this study and a detailed description of the test structure are available for download at: http://institute.lanl.gov/ei/software-and-data/.

  4. 49 CFR 571.138 - Standard No. 138; Tire pressure monitoring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard No. 138; Tire pressure monitoring systems. 571.138 Section 571.138 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARDS Federal Motor Vehicle...

  5. 49 CFR 571.138 - Standard No. 138; Tire pressure monitoring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard No. 138; Tire pressure monitoring systems. 571.138 Section 571.138 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARDS Federal Motor Vehicle...

  6. Monitoring Surface Condition of Plasma Grid of a Negative Hydrogen Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.; Kasuya, T.; Tokushige, S.; Kenmotsu, T.

    2011-09-26

    Surface condition of a plasma grid in a negative hydrogen ion source is controlled so as to maximize the beam current under a discharge operation with introducing Cs into the ion source. Photoelectric current induced by laser beams incident on the plasma grid can produce a signal to monitor the surface condition, but the signal detection can be easily hindered by plasma noise. Reduction in size of a detection electrode embedded in the plasma grid can improve signal-to-noise ratio of the photoelectric current from the electrode. To evaluate the feasibility of monitoring surface condition of a plasma gird by utilizing photoelectric effect, a small experimental setup capable of determining quantum yields of a surface in a cesiated plasma environment is being assembled. Some preliminary test results of the apparatus utilizing oxide cathodes are reported.

  7. Water vapor inhibits hydrogen sulfide detection in pulsed fluorescence sulfur monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluhme, Anders B.; Ingemar, Jonas L.; Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S.

    2016-06-01

    The Thermo Scientific 450 Hydrogen Sulfide-Sulfur Dioxide Analyzer measures both hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). Sulfur dioxide is measured by pulsed fluorescence, while H2S is converted to SO2 with a molybdenum catalyst prior to detection. The 450 is widely used to measure ambient concentrations, e.g., for emissions monitoring and pollution control. An air stream with a constant H2S concentration was generated and the output of the analyzer recorded as a function of relative humidity (RH). The analyzer underreported H2S as soon as the relative humidity was increased. The fraction of undetected H2S increased from 8.3 at 5.3 % RH (294 K) to over 34 % at RH > 80 %. Hydrogen sulfide mole fractions of 573, 1142, and 5145 ppb were tested. The findings indicate that previous results obtained with instruments using similar catalysts should be re-evaluated to correct for interference from water vapor. It is suspected that water decreases the efficiency of the converter unit and thereby reduces the measured H2S concentration.

  8. Design of an electrochemical probe for monitoring susceptibility of steel in pickling to hydrogen-induced cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y.F.; Du, Y.L. . Corrosion Science Lab.)

    1993-09-01

    The relationship between the measured signals (hydrogen [H] permeating rate) of an electrochemical H sensor and the strength/embrittlement of plain carbon steel in acid solution as defined by slow strain rate tensile tests and scanning electron microscopy was studied. Critical parameters and criteria for hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) reported may be useful in software design of an electrochemical probe for inspecting and monitoring the HIC susceptibility of steel in pickling.

  9. Evaluation of polymeric standard reference materials for monitoring the performance of X-ray photoelectron spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmeier, Brian R.

    1991-04-01

    The use of standard reference materials is a common practice in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA). Recently, several polymeric standard reference materials have become available for monitoring various performance aspects of ESCA spectrometers. These reference materials include polyethylene (PE), polyethylene glycol (PEG), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and dimethyl silicon (DMS). The advantages and disadvantages encountered when using these materials as standards were investigated in this study. Results indicated that PEG, PTFE and DMS are useful standards for checking or determining relative elemental sensitivity factors for C, O, F and/or Si. These three materials can also be used for monitoring the linearity and stability of the instrumental binding energy scale. However, in general, metallic standards such as gold, silver and/or copper are superior to the polymeric standards for this purpose, because their photoelectron lines cover a wider binding energy range and their respective peak positions are much better known. Although PE exhibits a fairly narrow C1s line that can be used to monitor variations in the instrumental energy resolution, the FWHM observed for the C1s line is much broader that the FWHM values obtained from the appropriate lines of sputtered-cleaned metals. Results also indicated that the use of PTFE as a standard reference material must be done with caution, because PTFE readily degrades with time under X-ray exposure.

  10. Hydrogen Concentration in the Inner-Most Container within a Pencil Tank Overpack Packaged in a Standard Waste Box Package

    SciTech Connect

    Marusich, Robert M.

    2012-01-25

    A set of steady state diffusion flow equations, for the hydrogen diffusion from one bag to the next bag (or one plastic waste container to another), within a set of nested waste bags (or nested waste containers), are developed and presented. The input data is then presented and justified. Inputting the data for each volume and solving these equations yields the steady state hydrogen concentration in each volume. The input data (permeability of the bag surface and closure, dimensions and hydrogen generation rate) and equations are analyzed to obtain the hydrogen concentrations in the innermost container for a set of containers which are analyzed for the TRUCON code for the general waste containers and the TRUCON code for the Pencil Tank Overpacks (PTO) in a Standard Waste Box (SWB).

  11. The importance of screening and monitoring: the Standard Days Method and cycle regularity.

    PubMed

    Sinai, Irit; Jennings, Victoria; Arévalo, Marcos

    2004-03-01

    The Standard Days Method is a simple fertility awareness-based method of family planning with a correct-use pregnancy rate of 4.8 at 1 year and a typical-use pregnancy rate of 12. The protocol for providing the method includes guidelines for screening potential users for cycle regularity. There also are guidelines for monitoring users to determine continued method eligibility. This article explores the importance of these screening and monitoring procedures. A large existing dataset from a World Health Organization study of the Ovulation Method was used to estimate the theoretical probability of pregnancy using the Standard Days Method, with and without screening and monitoring. We used data from the efficacy study of the Standard Days Method to examine the effectiveness of current screening and monitoring procedures. Results suggest that current screening and monitoring procedures are useful in identifying women for whom the Standard Days Method is less effective. Strict adherence to these procedures is ideal, but even women who do not meet the cycle-regularity guidelines would have a relatively low probability of pregnancy. PMID:14969667

  12. Development and demonstration of a personal monitoring system for exposure to hydrogen fluoride. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.S.; Monat, J.P.

    1993-09-01

    A good, functional Hydrogen Fluoride Gasbadge dosimeter has been developed for sampling of airborne HF vapor. The device is small (7.7 cm {times} 5.4 cm {times} 1.9 cm) and can easily and conveniently be worn on one`s lapel. It consists of polyethylene and polypropylene parts and a triethanolamine-impregnated polyproylene collection element. It is completely self contained, requiring no pumps, impingers, or sampling tubes. Subsequent to sampling, the collection element is analyzed quickly and easily with a fluoride selective-ion electrode. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine precision, linearity, interference effects, influences of temperature and humidity, and collection element stability over time. Results of the tests indicate that the Abcor Gasbadge HF dosimeter is an excellent passive HF monitor for work spaces, and that results obtained with it are accurate within {plus_minus}25%. These results have been corroborated in a field study.

  13. Changes in protein structure monitored by use of gas‐phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange

    PubMed Central

    Beeston, Helen S.; Ault, James R.; Pringle, Steven D.; Brown, Jeffery M.

    2015-01-01

    The study of protein conformation by solution‐phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) coupled to MS is well documented. This involves monitoring the exchange of backbone amide protons with deuterium and provides details concerning the protein's tertiary structure. However, undesired back‐exchange during post‐HDX analyses can be difficult to control. Here, gas‐phase HDX‐MS, during which labile hydrogens on amino acid side chains are exchanged in sub‐millisecond time scales, has been employed to probe changes within protein structures. Addition of the solvent 2,2,2‐trifluoroethanol to a protein in solution can affect the structure of the protein, resulting in an increase in secondary and/or tertiary structure which is detected using circular dichroism. Using a Synapt G2‐S ESI‐mass spectrometer modified to allow deuterated ammonia into the transfer ion guide (situated between the ion mobility cell and the TOF analyser), gas‐phase HDX‐MS is shown to reflect minor structural changes experienced by the proteins β‐lactoglobulin and ubiquitin, as observed by the reduction in the level of deuterium incorporation. Additionally, the use of gas‐phase HDX‐MS to distinguish between co‐populated proteins conformers within a solution is demonstrated with the disordered protein calmodulin; the gas‐phase HDX‐MS results correspond directly with complementary data obtained by use of ion mobility spectrometry‐MS. PMID:25603979

  14. Effects of hydrogen on electropotential monitoring of stress corrosion crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.D.; Carey, D.M.; Perazzo, N.L.

    1997-08-01

    Electropotential monitoring (EPM) has a crack growth measurement resolution that is an order of magnitude greater than methods that rely on crack mouth opening displacement. However, two phenomena have been identified that compromise the accuracy of the EPM technique. Coolant hydrogen concentrations above those needed to chemically reduce nickel oxide to metallic nickel cause EPM to underestimate the true crack length. The metallic nickel provides an electrical conduction path at contact points across the irregular crack surface thereby lowering the EPM potential. The coolant hydrogen concentration at which this reduction occurs is temperature dependent and correlates with an abrupt decrease in the rate of SCC crack growth. It was also found that EPM can indicate large crack growth when none actually exists. At temperatures > 315 C (600 F) the electrical resistivity of mill annealed Alloy 600 increased by as much as 5% in a period of weeks or months. Each 1% increase in resistivity results in a bias in the EPM indicated cracklength of about 0.2 mm (0.008 inches). Smaller changes in the electrical resistivity of other alloys have been measured which rank as EN52> X-750> 304SS> nickel. It has been shown that these resistivity changes occur during exposure to high temperature water or inert gas. Strategies to minimize the effects of these two phenomena on EPM measurement are discussed.

  15. Passive monitors to measure hydrogen sulfide near concentrated animal feeding operations.

    PubMed

    Pavilonis, Brian T; O'Shaughnessy, Patrick T; Altmaier, Ralph; Metwali, Nervana; Thorne, Peter S

    2013-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is one of many airborne pollutants emitted by concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). However, few studies have characterized ambient H2S levels near these facilities, largely due to the lack of low-cost, reliable, and easily transportable instrumentation available to researchers. We determined intermediate environmental H2S exposure near CAFOs using Radiello passive monitors. First, a laboratory study was performed to determine the accuracy of the device. Next, a total of eight passive H2S monitors were deployed bi-weekly in close proximity (<40 m) to a medium-sized swine confinement for seven months in order to determine the temporal and spatial variability of H2S. Finally, we measured H2S concentrations across two rural Iowa counties to characterize ambient exposure near thirteen CAFOs and two schools. The value of the temperature-adjusted H2S passive diffusion rate provided by the supplier was 29% larger than the 24 h rate determined experimentally. Concentrations of H2S measured near the medium-sized confinement were varied and ranged from 0.2 to 48.6 ppb depending on the sampling period and proximity to a lagoon on the property. Two-week concentrations near the schools were low (<1 ppb), while concentrations near the thirteen CAFOs ranged from 0.1 to 42.9 ppb. The passive monitors were effective in measuring H2S concentrations near a swine CAFO as long as they were exposed for a sufficient period of time (two weeks). Radiello passive monitors are a promising new device in measuring intermediate H2S exposure in rural populations. Measured values in excess of an Iowa state limit of 30 ppb (24 h average) suggest that enforcement actions are needed to mitigate H2S migration from swine CAFOs. PMID:23681048

  16. Passive monitors to measure hydrogen sulfide near concentrated animal feeding operations

    PubMed Central

    Pavilonis, Brian T.; O'Shaughnessy, Patrick T.; Altmaier, Ralph; Metwali, Nervana; Thorne, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is one of many airborne pollutants emitted by concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). However, few studies have characterized ambient H2S levels near these facilities, largely due to the lack of low-cost, reliable, and easily transportable instrumentation available to researchers. We determined intermediate environmental H2S exposure near CAFOs using Radiello passive monitors. First, a laboratory study was performed to determine the accuracy of the device. Next, a total of eight passive H2S monitors were deployed bi-weekly in close proximity (<40 m) to a medium-sized swine confinement for seven months in order to determine the temporal and spatial variability of H2S. Finally, we measured H2S concentrations across two rural Iowa counties to characterize ambient exposure near thirteen CAFOs and two schools. The value of the temperature-adjusted H2S passive diffusion rate provided by the supplier was 29% larger than the 24-hr rate determined experimentally. Concentrations of H2S measured near the medium-sized confinement were varied and ranged from 0.2 to 48.6 ppb depending on the sampling period and proximity to a lagoon on the property. Two-week concentrations near the schools were low (<1 ppb), while concentrations near the thirteen CAFOs ranged from 0.1 to 42.9 ppb. The passive monitors were effective in measuring H2S concentrations near a swine CAFO as long as they were exposed for a sufficient period of time (two weeks). Radiello passive monitors are a promising new device in measuring intermediate H2S exposure in rural populations. Measured values in excess of an Iowa state limit of 30 ppb (24-hr average) suggest that enforcement actions are needed to mitigate H2S migration from swine CAFOs. PMID:23681048

  17. Glossary (for Measuring and Monitoring Biological Diversity: Standard Methods for Fungi)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Approximately 300 technical terms and 250 diagrammatic sketches and illustrations are provided for the Smithsonian Institution methods book, ‘Measuring and Monitoring Biological Diversity: Standard Methods for Fungi.’ Technical terms focus on traditional morphotaxonomy, ecology, and pathology. Als...

  18. In-situ spectroscopic monitoring of the ambient pressure hydrogenation of C2 to ethane on Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krooswyk, Joel D.; Kruppe, Christopher M.; Trenary, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The hydrogenation of C2 molecules formed on the Pt(111) surface through acetylene exposure at 750 K was monitored in-situ with reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) in the presence of up to 10 Torr of H2. The coverage of post-reaction surface carbon was measured with Auger electron spectroscopy. The RAIR spectra show that C2 is hydrogenated to an ethylidyne intermediate. The hydrogenation of ethylidyne was also monitored at 400 K for H2(g) pressures of 1.0 × 10- 2 to 10 Torr. At H2(g) pressures greater than 1.0 Torr, ethylidyne is completely hydrogenated. In an attempt to probe the nature of the C2 adsorption sites, RAIR spectra of coadsorbed CO were obtained. It is found that while C2 does not block CO adsorption, the spectra indicate that the surface carbon is free of hydrogen. In contrast, ethylidyne blocks CO adsorption sites. In the presence of coadsorbed CO, complete hydrogenation of ethylidyne occurs at 450 K versus 400 K in the absence of CO.

  19. Testing Local Position Invariance with Four Cesium-Fountain Primary Frequency Standards and Four NIST Hydrogen Masers

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, N.; Heavner, T. P.; Jefferts, S. R.; Parker, T. E.; Radnaev, A. G.; Dudin, Y. O.

    2007-02-16

    We report the most sensitive tests to date of the assumption of local position invariance (LPI) underlying general relativity, based on a 7 yr comparison of cesium and hydrogen atomic clocks (frequency standards). The latest results place an upper limit that is over 20 times smaller than the previous most sensitive tests; this is consistent with the null shift predicted by LPI. The result is based on precise comparisons of frequencies of four hydrogen masers maintained by NIST, with four independent Cs fountain clocks--one at NIST and three in Europe--as the Sun's gravitational potential at Earth's surface varies due to Earth's orbital eccentricity.

  20. Monitoring surface processes during heterogeneous asymmetric hydrogenation of ketones on a chirally modified platinum catalyst by operando spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Meemken, Fabian; Hungerbühler, Konrad; Baiker, Alfons

    2014-08-11

    Surface processes occurring at the catalytic chiral surface of a cinchona-modified Pt catalyst during the asymmetric hydrogenation of activated ketones have been monitored for the first time using operando ATR-IR spectroscopy. Fundamental information about this catalytic system could be gained, including the chiral modification process of the catalyst, the surface interaction of reactant ketone with preadsorbed chiral modifier, the role of hydrogen as well as the influence of the product enantiomers in the catalytic cycle. The formation of a diastereomeric transient surface complex between ketone and chiral modifier was found to be related to the ketone consumption. Among the studied activated ketones, a correlation between stereoselection and the strength of the intermolecular hydrogen bond was identified. Dissociated hydrogen from the catalytic surface is found to play a crucial role in the formation of the diastereomeric surface complex. PMID:24777839

  1. HTGR green rod intercomparison. I. Hydrogen assay

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, M.M.; Adams, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    A /sup 252/Cf hydrogen monitor has been used to determine the hydrogen content of each of the 144 unfired (green) fuel rods being circulated in the New Brunswick Laboratory fuel measurement evaluation program. The monitor was calibrated with standards fabricated by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) Analytical Chemistry Group, CMB-1. Measurements were made relative to these standards and overall accuracies of +-3% were achieved.

  2. Developing RCM Strategy for Hydrogen Fuel Cells Utilizing On Line E-Condition Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baglee, D.; Knowles, M. J.

    2012-05-01

    Fuel cell vehicles are considered to be a viable solution to problems such as carbon emissions and fuel shortages for road transport. Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cells are mainly used in this purpose because they can run at low temperatures and have a simple structure. Yet high maintenance costs and the inherent dangers of maintaining equipment using hydrogen are two main issues which need to be addressed. The development of appropriate and efficient strategies is currently lacking with regard to fuel cell maintenance. A Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) approach offers considerable benefit to the management of fuel cell maintenance since it includes an identification and consideration of the impact of critical components. Technological developments in e-maintenance systems, radio-frequency identification (RFID) and personal digital assistants (PDAs) have proven to satisfy the increasing demand for improved reliability, efficiency and safety. RFID technology is used to store and remotely retrieve electronic maintenance data in order to provide instant access to up-to-date, accurate and detailed information. The aim is to support fuel cell maintenance decisions by developing and applying a blend of leading-edge communications and sensor technology including RFID. The purpose of this paper is to review and present the state of the art in fuel cell condition monitoring and maintenance utilizing RCM and RFID technologies. Using an RCM analysis critical components and fault modes are identified. RFID tags are used to store the critical information, possible faults and their cause and effect. The relationship between causes, faults, symptoms and long term implications of fault conditions are summarized. Finally conclusions are drawn regarding suggested maintenance strategies and the optimal structure for an integrated, cost effective condition monitoring and maintenance management system.

  3. A liquid crystal-based passive badge for personal monitoring of exposure to hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sheila E; Grinwald, Bart A; Bremer, Laura L; Kupcho, Kurt A; Acharya, Bharat R; Owens, Patrick D

    2014-01-01

    A new liquid crystal (LC)-based passive dosimeter badge for personal monitoring of exposure to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas is reported. When a thin film of LC supported on a surface functionalized with lead perchlorate Pb(ClO4)2 (the LC sensor) is exposed to H2S, the orientation of LC molecules in the film changes from perpendicular to parallel. This reorientation induces a change in the appearance of the LC film when viewed between crossed polarizers. A H2S dosimeter was fabricated by pairing a LC sensor with a glass substrate forming a headspace between the two surfaces, to control diffusion of H2S across the LC film. When the dosimeter is exposed to H2S, a bright front appears as a function of exposure time. An algorithm has been developed to correlate this response length and exposure dose. The dosimeters are functionally stable when subjected to extreme temperature and humidity fluctuations, and are immune to a number of potentially interfering chemicals, except mercaptans. These dosimeters detect H2S at 0.2 ppm TWA (8 hr) with ±20% overall accuracy. The dosimeters were used to monitor the personal exposure of personnel working in an oil refinery. The TWA concentrations measured by the LC-based dosimeters correlate strongly with the NIOSH 1063 method that uses a sorbent tube and a pump followed by laboratory analysis. Thus, the LC-based dosimeters can provide a sensitive tool for on-site assessment of personal exposure to H2S in different environments. PMID:24766440

  4. EBUS-guided mediastinal lung cancer staging: monitoring of quality standards improves performance.

    PubMed

    Evison, Matthew; Crosbie, Philip; Martin, Julie; Shah, Rajesh; Doran, Helen; Borrill, Zoe; Hoyle, Jennifer; Rana, Durgesh; Bailey, Simon; Booton, Richard

    2016-08-01

    This audit examined key performance indices related to endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS)-guided mediastinal lung cancer staging before and after the introduction of defined quality standards, at four independent EBUS centres in one cancer network. Data from 642 procedures were prospectively collected and analysed. The introduction of standards was associated with a significant increase (p<0.001) in sampling of key mediastinal lymph node stations (4R, 4L and 7) and a reduction in the variability of staging sensitivity between centres. These data reinforce the requirement for an appropriate regulatory framework for EBUS-transbronchial needle aspiration provision that includes quality assurance and performance monitoring. PMID:27146201

  5. 25 CFR 36.51 - Standard XVIII-Office of Indian Education Programs and Agency monitoring and evaluation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Agency monitoring and evaluation responsibilities. 36.51 Section 36.51 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... AND NATIONAL CRITERIA FOR DORMITORY SITUATIONS Evaluation of Educational Standards § 36.51 Standard... Office of Indian Education Programs shall monitor and evaluate the conformance of each Agency or Area,...

  6. The new Basic Safety Standards Directive and its implications for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Augustin; Necheva, Christina; Tanner, Vesa; Turai, István

    2013-11-01

    Monitoring of levels of radioactivity in the environment is enshrined in Chapter 3 of the Euratom Treaty, in particular its Articles 35 and 36. These requirements in primary law have had an important impact on the importance of monitoring in Europe but have not been worked out in much detail in secondary legislation. The consolidation and revision of the Basic Safety Standards Directive was an opportunity for doing so. The requirements in Directive 96/29/Euratom had remained rather general. Now, more specific text is introduced on the establishment of discharge authorisations for radioactive effluents, and on monitoring these discharges. Requirements on estimation of public exposures and on environmental monitoring programmes have largely been copied from the old basic safety standards (BSS), however. The main novelty of the new BSS is the introduction of exposure situations, as defined by the ICRP in Publication 103 (2007). Environmental monitoring as part of the management of an emergency exposure situation is now addressed more clearly. As for existing exposure situations, indoor exposure to radon requires extensive surveys of indoor air or soil concentrations, and precise requirements are made on the management of residues from industries processing naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) as well as on the monitoring of building materials. Although the BSS do not address specific monitoring issues, studies have been undertaken on effluents from hospitals and on long-term management of uranium mining areas. The proposal for the new Basic Safety Standards Directive is examined in the light of experience of the accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant disabled by the terrible tsunami on 11 March 2011. The arrangements for information exchange in a normal situation and in an emergency exposure situation need to be looked at from this perspective as well as from the perspective of smaller incidents such as the release of (131)I in Hungary in

  7. Advances in the development of piezoelectric quartz-crystal oscillators, hydrogen masers, and superconducting frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suter, Joseph J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes recent research advances made in the development of radiation-hardened piezoelectric quartz oscillators, hydrogen masers, and superconducting oscillators, with emphasis placed on the principles involved in the operation of these oscillators and the factors affecting the operation. Particular attention is given to the radiation-susceptibility studies of quartz-crystal resonators, the hydrogen-maser relaxation process and noise sources, and low-phase-noise superconducting oscillators. Diagrams of these devices and performance graphs are included.

  8. Healthcare standards based sensory data exchange for Home Healthcare Monitoring System.

    PubMed

    Khan, Wajahat Ali; Hussain, Maqbool; Afzal, Muhammad; Amin, Muhammad Bilal; Lee, Sungyoung

    2012-01-01

    Interoperability is the among the key functionalities of an intelligent systems. Home Healthcare Monitoring Systems (HHMS) investigates patients activities at home, but lacks critical information exchange with Health Management Information System (HMIS). This information is vital for physicians to take necessary steps for timely and effective healthcare provisioning for patients. Physicians can only monitor and prescribe patients in time, if the data is shared with their HMIS. HMIS can be compliant to different healthcare standards. Therefore, mediation system is required to enable interoperability between HHMS and HMIS such that physicians and patients information can easily be exchanged. We propose Interoperability Mediation System (IMS) that provides interoperability services for exchange of information among HHMS and HMIS. We consider that HMIS are compliant to two heterogeneous EHR standards (HL7 CDA and openEHR). Alzheimer's patient case study is described as a proof of concept. Sensory information gathered at HHMS, is communicated with HMIS compliant to EHR based healthcare standards. Sensors information in XML form is converted by interoperability service to HL7 CDA and openEHR instances and communicated to HMIS afterwards. This allows the physicians registered with HHMS to monitor the patient using their HMIS and provide timely healthcare information. PMID:23366131

  9. Standardized phenology monitoring methods to track plant and animal activity for science and resource management applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Ellen G.; Gerst, Katharine L.; Miller-Rushing, Abraham J.; Tierney, Geraldine L.; Crimmins, Theresa M.; Enquist, Carolyn A. F.; Guertin, Patricia; Rosemartin, Alyssa H.; Schwartz, Mark D.; Thomas, Kathryn A.; Weltzin, Jake F.

    2014-05-01

    Phenology offers critical insights into the responses of species to climate change; shifts in species' phenologies can result in disruptions to the ecosystem processes and services upon which human livelihood depends. To better detect such shifts, scientists need long-term phenological records covering many taxa and across a broad geographic distribution. To date, phenological observation efforts across the USA have been geographically limited and have used different methods, making comparisons across sites and species difficult. To facilitate coordinated cross-site, cross-species, and geographically extensive phenological monitoring across the nation, the USA National Phenology Network has developed in situ monitoring protocols standardized across taxonomic groups and ecosystem types for terrestrial, freshwater, and marine plant and animal taxa. The protocols include elements that allow enhanced detection and description of phenological responses, including assessment of phenological "status", or the ability to track presence-absence of a particular phenophase, as well as standards for documenting the degree to which phenological activity is expressed in terms of intensity or abundance. Data collected by this method can be integrated with historical phenology data sets, enabling the development of databases for spatial and temporal assessment of changes in status and trends of disparate organisms. To build a common, spatially, and temporally extensive multi-taxa phenological data set available for a variety of research and science applications, we encourage scientists, resources managers, and others conducting ecological monitoring or research to consider utilization of these standardized protocols for tracking the seasonal activity of plants and animals.

  10. Standardized phenology monitoring methods to track plant and animal activity for science and resource management applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denny, Ellen G.; Gerst, Katharine L.; Miller-Rushing, Abraham J.; Tierney, Geraldine L.; Crimmins, Theresa M.; Enquist, Carolyn A.F.; Guertin, Patricia; Rosemartin, Alyssa H.; Schwartz, Mark D.; Thomas, Kathryn A.; Weltzin, Jake F.

    2014-01-01

    Phenology offers critical insights into the responses of species to climate change; shifts in species’ phenologies can result in disruptions to the ecosystem processes and services upon which human livelihood depends. To better detect such shifts, scientists need long-term phenological records covering many taxa and across a broad geographic distribution. To date, phenological observation efforts across the USA have been geographically limited and have used different methods, making comparisons across sites and species difficult. To facilitate coordinated cross-site, cross-species, and geographically extensive phenological monitoring across the nation, the USA National Phenology Network has developed in situ monitoring protocols standardized across taxonomic groups and ecosystem types for terrestrial, freshwater, and marine plant and animal taxa. The protocols include elements that allow enhanced detection and description of phenological responses, including assessment of phenological “status”, or the ability to track presence–absence of a particular phenophase, as well as standards for documenting the degree to which phenological activity is expressed in terms of intensity or abundance. Data collected by this method can be integrated with historical phenology data sets, enabling the development of databases for spatial and temporal assessment of changes in status and trends of disparate organisms. To build a common, spatially, and temporally extensive multi-taxa phenological data set available for a variety of research and science applications, we encourage scientists, resources managers, and others conducting ecological monitoring or research to consider utilization of these standardized protocols for tracking the seasonal activity of plants and animals.

  11. A Review of Standards and Statistics Used to Describe Blood Glucose Monitor Performance

    PubMed Central

    Krouwer, Jan S.; Cembrowski, George S.

    2010-01-01

    Glucose performance is reviewed in the context of total error, which includes error from all sources, not just analytical. Many standards require less than 100% of results to be within specific tolerance limits. Analytical error represents the difference between tested glucose and reference method glucose. Medical errors include analytical errors whose magnitude is great enough to likely result in patient harm. The 95% requirements of International Organization for Standardization 15197 and others make little sense, as up to 5% of results can be medically unacceptable. The current American Diabetes Association standard lacks a specification for user error. Error grids can meaningfully specify allowable glucose error. Infrequently, glucose meters do not provide a glucose result; such an occurrence can be devastating when associated with a life-threatening event. Nonreporting failures are ignored by standards. Estimates of analytical error can be classified into the four following categories: imprecision, random patient interferences, protocol-independent bias, and protocol-dependent bias. Methods to estimate total error are parametric, nonparametric, modeling, or direct. The Westgard method underestimates total error by failing to account for random patient interferences. Lawton's method is a more complete model. Bland–Altman, mountain plots, and error grids are direct methods and are easier to use as they do not require modeling. Three types of protocols can be used to estimate glucose errors: method comparison, special studies and risk management, and monitoring performance of meters in the field. Current standards for glucose meter performance are inadequate. The level of performance required in regulatory standards should be based on clinical needs but can only deal with currently achievable performance. Clinical standards state what is needed, whether it can be achieved or not. Rational regulatory decisions about glucose monitors should be based on robust

  12. Recommended volumetric capacity definitions and protocols for accurate, standardized and unambiguous metrics for hydrogen storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parilla, Philip A.; Gross, Karl; Hurst, Katherine; Gennett, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The ultimate goal of the hydrogen economy is the development of hydrogen storage systems that meet or exceed the US DOE's goals for onboard storage in hydrogen-powered vehicles. In order to develop new materials to meet these goals, it is extremely critical to accurately, uniformly and precisely measure materials' properties relevant to the specific goals. Without this assurance, such measurements are not reliable and, therefore, do not provide a benefit toward the work at hand. In particular, capacity measurements for hydrogen storage materials must be based on valid and accurate results to ensure proper identification of promising materials for further development. Volumetric capacity determinations are becoming increasingly important for identifying promising materials, yet there exists controversy on how such determinations are made and whether such determinations are valid due to differing methodologies to count the hydrogen content. These issues are discussed herein, and we show mathematically that capacity determinations can be made rigorously and unambiguously if the constituent volumes are well defined and measurable in practice. It is widely accepted that this occurs for excess capacity determinations and we show here that this can happen for the total capacity determination. Because the adsorption volume is undefined, the absolute capacity determination remains imprecise. Furthermore, we show that there is a direct relationship between determining the respective capacities and the calibration constants used for the manometric and gravimetric techniques. Several suggested volumetric capacity figure-of-merits are defined, discussed and reporting requirements recommended. Finally, an example is provided to illustrate these protocols and concepts.

  13. NREL Showcases Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Bus, Helps DOE Set Standards for Outreach (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    This fact sheet describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) accomplishments in showcasing a Ford hydrogen-powered internal combustion engine (H2ICE) bus at The Taste of Colorado festival in Denver. NREL started using its U.S. Department of Energy-funded H2ICE bus in May 2010 as the primary shuttle vehicle for VIP visitors, members of the media, and new employees. In September 2010, NREL featured the bus at The Taste of Colorado. This was the first major outreach event for the bus. NREL's educational brochure, vehicle wrap designs, and outreach efforts serve as a model for other organizations with DOE-funded H2ICE buses. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Education Group and Market Transformation Group in the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

  14. In-situ monitoring of surface hydrogen on the a-SiGe:H films

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoshima, Y.; Ganguly, G.; Ikeda, T.; Saitoh, K.; Kondo, M.; Matsuda, A.

    1997-07-01

    The bonded hydrogen on the growing surface of hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium (a-SiGe:H) alloy films has been investigated by use of infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IR-RAS). When the alloy films are Si-rich, the surface hydrogen bonded to Si atoms is found to behave in a similar way to those on the hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films. This means that the thermal desorption stability of surface Si hydride species is not significantly affected by the coexistence of a small amount (typically 20 at.%) of Ge. On the contrary, the desorption behavior of surface hydrogen depends on the alloy composition when the a-SiGe:H films are Ge-rich. A surface reaction scheme is provided in an attempt to explain this series of behavior in surface hydrogen on the a-SiGe:H films.

  15. Recommendations for standards of monitoring during anaesthesia and recovery 2015: Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

    PubMed

    Checketts, M R; Alladi, R; Ferguson, K; Gemmell, L; Handy, J M; Klein, A A; Love, N J; Misra, U; Morris, C; Nathanson, M H; Rodney, G E; Verma, R; Pandit, J J

    2016-01-01

    This guideline updates and replaces the 4th edition of the AAGBI Standards of Monitoring published in 2007. The aim of this document is to provide guidance on the minimum standards for physiological monitoring of any patient undergoing anaesthesia or sedation under the care of an anaesthetist. The recommendations are primarily aimed at anaesthetists practising in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Minimum standards for monitoring patients during anaesthesia and in the recovery phase are included. There is also guidance on monitoring patients undergoing sedation and also during transfer of anaesthetised or sedated patients. There are new sections discussing the role of monitoring depth of anaesthesia, neuromuscular blockade and cardiac output. The indications for end-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring have been updated. PMID:26582586

  16. What sort of standard candle is Orion for studying molecular hydrogen line emission in galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Michael; Puxley, Phil J.

    1990-01-01

    The total shocked and fluorescent molecular hydrogen 1-0 S(1) line luminosities from Orion have been measured to be about 2.5 solar luminosity and about 2.0 solar luminosity, respectively. The implications for using Orion to study the interstellar medium in galaxies is discussed.

  17. Viewpoint: adapting to new international tuberculosis treatment standards with medication monitors and DOT given selectively.

    PubMed

    Moulding, Thomas S

    2007-11-01

    New international standards no longer require directly observed therapy for all tuberculosis (TB) patients, but state that practitioners must be capable of assessing adherence and addressing poor adherence. Mass-produced electronic medication monitors, which record removal of medication from a container, could help overcome the problem of assessing treatment adherence accurately even in poor countries. Both health facilities and community workers could dispense drugs for self-administered treatment in medication monitors and retrieve the adherence record with inexpensive built-in displays. These devices could keep the adherence record from the beginning of therapy for managing patients who move. Pharmacists using medication monitors could provide surveillance of self-administered treatment prescribed by private physicians with less adherent patients referred to the health departments. Less adherent patients could be managed with focused counselling, directly observed therapy when necessary, and extensions in treatment duration. Removal of the directly observed therapy burden would encourage patients to seek free high-quality supervised pubic care and help expand effective TB treatment services. If resources saved by giving less directly observed therapy were focused on poorly adherent patients, medication monitor-based programmes could create less acquired drug resistance than overwhelmed treatment programmes that attempt but fail to give uninterrupted directly observed therapy to all patients. PMID:17949402

  18. Quantum chemical approach for condensed-phase thermochemistry (III): Accurate evaluation of proton hydration energy and standard hydrogen electrode potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Atsushi; Nakai, Hiromi

    2016-04-01

    Gibbs free energy of hydration of a proton and standard hydrogen electrode potential were evaluated using high-level quantum chemical calculations. The solvent effect was included using the cluster-continuum model, which treated short-range effects by quantum chemical calculations of proton-water complexes, and the long-range effects by a conductor-like polarizable continuum model. The harmonic solvation model (HSM) was employed to estimate enthalpy and entropy contributions due to nuclear motions of the clusters by including the cavity-cluster interactions. Compared to the commonly used ideal gas model, HSM treatment significantly improved the contribution of entropy, showing a systematic convergence toward the experimental data.

  19. Do currently available blood glucose monitors meet regulatory standards? 1-day public meeting in Arlington, Virginia.

    PubMed

    Klonoff, David C; Reyes, Juliet S

    2013-07-01

    Blood glucose monitors (BGMs) are approved by regulatory agencies based on their performance during strict testing conducted by their manufacturers. However, after approval, there is uncertainty whether BGMs maintain the accuracy levels that were achieved in the initial data. The availability of inaccurate BGM systems pose a public health problem because their readings serve as a basis for treatment decisions that can be incorrect. Several articles have concluded that BGMs in the marketplace may not consistently provide accurate results in accordance with the regulatory standards that led to approval. To address this growing concern, Diabetes Technology Society organized and conducted a 1-day public meeting on May 21, 2013, in Arlington, VA, presided by its president, David Klonoff, M.D., FACP, Fellow AIMBE, to determine whether BGMs on the market meet regulatory standards. The meeting consisted of four sessions in which Food and Drug Administration diabetes experts as well as leading academic clinicians and clinical chemists participated: (1) How is BGM performance determined? (2) Do approved BGMs perform according to International Organization for Standardization standards? (3) How do approved BGMs perform when used by patients and health care professionals? (4) What could be the consequence of poor BGM performance? PMID:23911191

  20. Do Currently Available Blood Glucose Monitors Meet Regulatory Standards? 1-Day Public Meeting in Arlington, Virginia

    PubMed Central

    Klonoff, David C.; Reyes, Juliet S.

    2013-01-01

    Blood glucose monitors (BGMs) are approved by regulatory agencies based on their performance during strict testing conducted by their manufacturers. However, after approval, there is uncertainty whether BGMs maintain the accuracy levels that were achieved in the initial data. The availability of inaccurate BGM systems pose a public health problem because their readings serve as a basis for treatment decisions that can be incorrect. Several articles have concluded that BGMs in the marketplace may not consistently provide accurate results in accordance with the regulatory standards that led to approval. To address this growing concern, Diabetes Technology Society organized and conducted a 1-day public meeting on May 21, 2013, in Arlington, VA, presided by its president, David Klonoff, M.D., FACP, Fellow AIMBE, to determine whether BGMs on the market meet regulatory standards. The meeting consisted of four sessions in which Food and Drug Administration diabetes experts as well as leading academic clinicians and clinical chemists participated: (1) How is BGM performance determined? (2) Do approved BGMs perform according to International Organization for Standardization standards? (3) How do approved BGMs perform when used by patients and health care professionals? (4) What could be the consequence of poor BGM performance? PMID:23911191

  1. Derivation of water quality standards for carbamazepine, metoprolol, and metformin and comparison with monitoring data.

    PubMed

    Moermond, Caroline T A; Smit, C Els

    2016-04-01

    Environmental quality standards (EQSs) for 3 pharmaceuticals in surface water were derived: carbamazepine (epilepsy), metoprolol (heart failure), and metformin (diabetes). In recent years, these pharmaceuticals have been detected frequently in Dutch surface waters. The proposed standards are based on ecotoxicity data from national and European authorization dossiers and additional information obtained from open literature. The methods used are in accordance with the methodology of the Water Framework Directive and national frameworks for risk limit derivation. Only the exposure route regarding direct ecotoxic effects on ecosystems could be taken into account for deriving EQSs. The exposure route of secondary poisoning of fish-eating animals was not triggered, and not enough data were available or accessible to derive an EQS for the exposure of humans due to consumption of fish. Monitoring data for surface waters worldwide show that the proposed quality standards for carbamazepine may be exceeded. It could be expected that when carbamazepine use increases or effluents are diluted less during dry seasons, standards will be exceeded more often. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:882-888. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26211655

  2. Large-Scale Targeted Proteomics Using Internal Standard Triggered-Parallel Reaction Monitoring (IS-PRM)*

    PubMed Central

    Gallien, Sebastien; Kim, Sang Yoon; Domon, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Targeted high-resolution and accurate mass analyses performed on fast sequencing mass spectrometers have opened new avenues for quantitative proteomics. More specifically, parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) implemented on quadrupole-orbitrap instruments exhibits exquisite selectivity to discriminate interferences from analytes. Furthermore, the instrument trapping capability enhances the sensitivity of the measurements. The PRM technique, applied to the analysis of limited peptide sets (typically 50 peptides or less) in a complex matrix, resulted in an improved detection and quantification performance as compared with the reference method of selected reaction monitoring performed on triple quadrupole instruments. However, the implementation of PRM for the analysis of large peptide numbers requires the adjustment of mass spectrometry acquisition parameters, which affects dramatically the quality of the generated data, and thus the overall output of an experiment. A newly designed data acquisition scheme enabled the analysis of moderate-to-large peptide numbers while retaining a high performance level. This new method, called internal standard triggered-parallel reaction monitoring (IS-PRM), relies on added internal standards and the on-the-fly adjustment of acquisition parameters to drive in real-time measurement of endogenous peptides. The acquisition time management was designed to maximize the effective time devoted to measure the analytes in a time-scheduled targeted experiment. The data acquisition scheme alternates between two PRM modes: a fast low-resolution “watch mode” and a “quantitative mode” using optimized parameters ensuring data quality. The IS-PRM method exhibited a highly effective use of the instrument time. Applied to the analysis of large peptide sets (up to 600) in complex samples, the method showed an unprecedented combination of scale and analytical performance, with limits of quantification in the low amol range. The successful

  3. Polymerization Kinetics: Monitoring Monomer Conversion Using an Internal Standard and the Key Role of Sample "t[subscript 0]"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colombani, Olivier; Langelier, Ophelie; Martwong, Ekkachai; Castignolles, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    The use of an internal standard is a conventional and convenient way to monitor the conversion of one or several monomers during a controlled radical polymerization. However, the validity of this technique relies on an accurate determination of the initial monomer-to-internal standard ratio, A[subscript 0], because all subsequent calculations of…

  4. 25 CFR 36.51 - Standard XVIII-Office of Indian Education Programs and Agency monitoring and evaluation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standard XVIII-Office of Indian Education Programs and..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION MINIMUM ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR THE BASIC EDUCATION OF INDIAN CHILDREN... XVIII—Office of Indian Education Programs and Agency monitoring and evaluation responsibilities. (a)...

  5. 25 CFR 36.51 - Standard XVIII-Office of Indian Education Programs and Agency monitoring and evaluation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... AND NATIONAL CRITERIA FOR DORMITORY SITUATIONS Evaluation of Educational Standards § 36.51 Standard..., shall annually conduct a summative evaluation to assess the degree to which each Bureau educational... Agency monitoring and evaluation responsibilities. 36.51 Section 36.51 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN...

  6. 25 CFR 36.51 - Standard XVIII-Office of Indian Education Programs and Agency monitoring and evaluation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Standard XVIII-Office of Indian Education Programs and Agency monitoring and evaluation responsibilities. 36.51 Section 36.51 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION MINIMUM ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR THE BASIC EDUCATION OF INDIAN CHILDREN AND NATIONAL CRITERIA FOR...

  7. Monitoring the pH Triggered Collapse of Liposomes in the Far IR Hydrogen Bonding Continuum.

    PubMed

    Srour, Batoul; Erhard, Birgit; Süss, Regine; Hellwig, Petra

    2016-05-01

    Far infrared spectra of complex molecular structures like lipid membranes or proteins show large and broad continuum modes that include contributions of the internal hydrogen bonding of the assembled structures. Here we corroborate the pH triggered structural rearrangement in pH-sensitive liposomes with a clear shift of the far-infrared mode from 170 to 159 cm(-1). This spectral change was accompanied by the broadening of the hydrogen bonding signature by about 25 cm(-1) and correlates with the well-known hydrogen bonding dependent shifts of the ν(PO2(-))(as) vibration of the lipid headgroup in the mid infrared and with further shifts of functional group vibrations. Far infrared spectroscopy is thus a useful tool for the investigation of conformational changes in large molecular structures. PMID:27092567

  8. Industry standards for design, manufacture and in-service monitoring of unbonded flexible pipe

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, P.J.; Grealish, F.; Kavanagh, K.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes two important joint industry projects (JIP) relating to flexible pipe technology which are presently ongoing. The first JIP involves the development of new industry wide standards for design, specification and testing of unbonded flexible pipes in the offshore industry. The first phase of the project involved the development of the document ``Specification for Unbonded Flexible Pipe,`` which addresses design, materials, manufacture, testing and documentation requirements for flexible pipes. This paper discusses the scope, including new developments, addressed by the Spec. The second phase of the project is presently ongoing and will result in the rewriting of API RP 17B ``Recommended Practice for Flexible Pipe,`` so as to supplement the pipe Spec. The second JIP involves the development of a common set of guidelines for the integrity and condition monitoring of unbonded flexible pipe for the entire offshore industry. The JIP will enable operators to make bet use of the inspection and monitoring techniques currently in existence and to develop systematic programs to manage flexible pipe integrity more efficiently and cost effectively. This paper describes the project and provides an update on its present status.

  9. New solutions for standardization, monitoring and quality management of fluorescence-based imaging systems (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royon, Arnaud; Papon, Gautier

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence microscopes have become ubiquitous in life sciences laboratories, including those focused on pharmaceuticals, diagnosis, and forensics. For the past few years, the need for both performance guarantees and quantifiable results has driven development in this area. However, the lack of appropriate standards and reference materials makes it difficult or impossible to compare the results of two fluorescence microscopes, or to measure performance fluctuations of one microscope over time. Therefore, the operation of fluorescence microscopes is not monitored as often as their use warrants - an issue that is recognized by both systems manufacturers and national metrology institutes. We have developed a new process that enables the etching of long-term stable fluorescent patterns with sub-micrometer sizes in three dimensions inside glass. In this paper, we present, based on this new process, a fluorescent multi-dimensional ruler and a dedicated software that are suitable for monitoring and quality management of fluorescence-based imaging systems (wide-field, confocal, multiphoton, high content machines). In addition to fluorescence, the same patterns exhibit bright- and dark-field contrast, DIC, and phase contrast, which make them also relevant to monitor these types of microscopes. Non-exhaustively, this new solution enables the measurement of: The stage repositioning accuracy; The illumination and detection homogeneities; The field flatness; The detectors' characteristics; The lateral and axial spatial resolutions; The spectral response (spectrum, intensity and lifetime) of the system. Thanks to the stability of the patterns, microscope performance assessment can be carried out as well in a daily basis as in the long term.

  10. Studies on Hydrogen Extraction Characteristics of Proton-Conducting Ceramics and Their Applications to a Tritium Recovery System and a Tritium Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, M.; Asakura, Y.; Uda, T.; Katahira, K.; Iwahara, H.; Tsuji, N.; Yamamoto, I.

    2005-07-15

    For the purpose of the recovery of a hydrogen isotope exhausted from a fusion device and its application to a tritium monitor, hydrogen extraction properties using SrZr{sub 0.9}Yb{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-{alpha}} and CaZr{sub 0.9}In{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-{alpha}} and the effect of the electrode attachment method on the hydrogen extraction were evaluated under various atmospheres and temperatures. As a result, hydrogen could be extracted from mixed gases containing hydrogen, water vapor and methane. Furthermore, water vapor electrolysis for the tritium monitor was also evaluated under a wet atmosphere containing oxygen. From these results, it was revealed that a plated platinum electrode was suitable for mixed gases containing hydrogen, water vapor and methane, and that a porous pasted platinum electrode was suitable for water vapor electrolysis. From the findings obtained from the study of the hydrogen extraction properties, we described an optimum specification of the platinum electrode for a tritium recovery system and the number of proton-conducting ceramics for a tritium monitor.

  11. VERIFICATION OF AMBIENT MONITORING TECHNOLOGIES FOR AMMONIA AND HYDROGEN SULFIDE AT ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing concentration of livestock agriculture into animal feeding operations (AFOs) has raised concerns about the environmental and potential health impact of the emissions from AFOs into the atmosphere. Gaseous ammonia (NH3) and hydrogen sulfide (H2...

  12. Accurate standard hydrogen electrode potential and applications to the redox potentials of vitamin C and NAD/NADH.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toru; Kitagawa, Yasutaka; Okumura, Mitsutaka; Shigeta, Yasuteru

    2015-01-15

    We computationally evaluated the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) potential in aqueous phase and the Gibbs energy of a proton from the experimental pKa values of alcohol molecules. From the "golden standard" CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level calculation, we estimated the SHE potential as 4.48 V, which is very close to the IUPAC-recommended experimental value of 4.44 V. As applications to the Gaussian-3 (G3) methods, which also reproduce the "golden standard" level calculations, we computed various pKa values and redox potentials for a vitamin series. For vitamin C, we support the experimental result of +0.35 V and predict the pKa value of d-ascorbic acid to be 3.7-3.9. Using a model molecule for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), we reproduced the redox potential and determined the order of the proton/electron addition, based on both the proton affinity and redox potential. PMID:25514626

  13. On-line monitoring of mercury and hydrogen chloride in hot gases from coal gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, G.A.; Chriswell, C.D.; Eckels, D.E.; Buttermore, W.H.

    1993-09-01

    A variety of analytical techniques which may be applicable to monitoring Hg or HCl in METC gasifier streams were identified. Potential approaches for on-line analysis of Hg and HCl are discussed in detail.

  14. 40 CFR 75.32 - Determination of monitor data availability for standard missing data procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... quality-assured monitor operating hours, record, by means of the automated data acquisition and handling... the first 720 quality-assured monitor operating hours, record, by means of the automated data acquisition and handling system, the percent monitor data availability for each monitored parameter....

  15. An emerging network storage management standard: Media error monitoring and reporting information (MEMRI) - to determine optical tape data integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podio, Fernando; Vollrath, William; Williams, Joel; Kobler, Ben; Crouse, Don

    1998-01-01

    Sophisticated network storage management applications are rapidly evolving to satisfy a market demand for highly reliable data storage systems with large data storage capacities and performance requirements. To preserve a high degree of data integrity, these applications must rely on intelligent data storage devices that can provide reliable indicators of data degradation. Error correction activity generally occurs within storage devices without notification to the host. Early indicators of degradation and media error monitoring 333 and reporting (MEMR) techniques implemented in data storage devices allow network storage management applications to notify system administrators of these events and to take appropriate corrective actions before catastrophic errors occur. Although MEMR techniques have been implemented in data storage devices for many years, until 1996 no MEMR standards existed. In 1996 the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) approved the only known (world-wide) industry standard specifying MEMR techniques to verify stored data on optical disks. This industry standard was developed under the auspices of the Association for Information and Image Management (AIIM). A recently formed AIIM Optical Tape Subcommittee initiated the development of another data integrity standard specifying a set of media error monitoring tools and media error monitoring information (MEMRI) to verify stored data on optical tape media. This paper discusses the need for intelligent storage devices that can provide data integrity metadata, the content of the existing data integrity standard for optical disks, and the content of the MEMRI standard being developed by the AIIM Optical Tape Subcommittee.

  16. Development of a Prototype Optical Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using a Getter-Doped Polymer Transducer for Monitoring Cumulative Exposure: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Maitland, D J; Wilson, T S; Bearinger, J P; Letts, S A; Trebes, J E

    2008-06-05

    A novel prototype optical sensor for monitoring cumulative hydrogen gas exposure was fabricated and evaluated. Chemical-to-optical transduction was accomplished by detecting the intensity of 670 nm laser light transmitted through a hydrogen getter-doped polymer film mounted at the end of an optical fiber; the transmittance of the composite film increased with uptake of hydrogen by the embedded getter. The composite film consisted of the hydrogen getter 1,4-bis(phenylethynyl)benzene, also known as DEB, with carbon-supported palladium catalyst embedded in silicone elastomer. Because the change in transmittance was irreversible and occurred continuously as the getter captured hydrogen, the sensor behaved like a dosimeter, providing a unique indication of the cumulative gas exposure.

  17. Hydrogen Filling Station

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen

  18. Hydrogen environment embrittlement.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement is classified into three types: internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen reaction embrittlement, and hydrogen environment embrittlement. Characteristics of and materials embrittled by these types of hydrogen embrittlement are discussed. Hydrogen environment embrittlement is reviewed in detail. Factors involved in standardizing test methods for detecting the occurrence of and evaluating the severity of hydrogen environment embrittlement are considered. The effects of test technique, hydrogen pressure, purity, strain rate, stress concentration factor, and test temperature are discussed.

  19. Optical beam profile monitor and residual gas fluorescence at the relativistic heavy ion collider polarized hydrogen jet.

    PubMed

    Tsang, T; Bellavia, S; Connolly, R; Gassner, D; Makdisi, Y; Russo, T; Thieberger, P; Trbojevic, D; Zelenski, A

    2008-10-01

    A gas fluorescence beam profile monitor has been implemented at the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) using the polarized atomic hydrogen gas jet, which is part of the polarized proton polarimeter. RHIC proton beam profiles in the vertical plane of the accelerator are obtained as well as measurements of the width of the gas jet in the beam direction. For gold ion beams, the fluorescence cross section is sufficiently large so that profiles can be obtained from the residual gas alone, albeit with long light integration times. We estimate the fluorescence cross sections that were not known in this ultrarelativistic regime and calculate the beam emittance to provide an independent measurement of the RHIC beam. This optical beam diagnostic technique, utilizing the beam induced fluorescence from injected or residual gas, offers a noninvasive particle beam characterization and provides visual observation of proton and heavy ion beams. PMID:19044742

  20. Monitoring of hydrogen sulfide via substrate-integrated hollow waveguide mid-infrared sensors in real-time.

    PubMed

    Petruci, João Flávio da Silveira; Fortes, Paula Regina; Kokoric, Vjekoslav; Wilk, Andreas; Raimundo, Ivo Milton; Cardoso, Arnaldo Alves; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a highly corrosive, harmful, and toxic gas produced under anaerobic conditions within industrial processes or in natural environments, and plays an important role in the sulfur cycle. According to the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the permissible exposure limit (during 8 hours) is 10 ppm. Concentrations of 20 ppm are the threshold for critical health issues. In workplace environments with human subjects frequently exposed to H2S, e.g., during petroleum extraction and refining, real-time monitoring of exposure levels is mandatory. Sensors based on electrochemical measurement principles, semiconducting metal-oxides, taking advantage of their optical properties, have been described for H2S monitoring. However, extended response times, limited selectivity, and bulkiness of the instrumentation are common disadvantages of the sensing techniques reported to date. Here, we describe for the first time usage of a new generation of compact gas cells, i.e., so-called substrate-integrated hollow waveguides (iHWGs), combined with a compact Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer for advanced gas sensing of H2S. The principle of detection is based on the immediate UV-assisted conversion of the rather weak IR-absorber H2S into much more pronounced and distinctively responding SO2. A calibration was established in the range of 10-100 ppm with a limit of detection (LOD) at 3 ppm, which is suitable for occupational health monitoring purposes. The developed sensing scheme provides an analytical response time of less than 60 seconds. Considering the substantial potential for miniaturization using e.g., a dedicated quantum cascade laser (QCL) in lieu of the FTIR spectrometer, the developed sensing approach may be evolved into a hand-held instrument, which may be tailored to a variety of applications ranging from environmental monitoring to workplace safety surveillance, process analysis and clinical diagnostics, e.g., breath

  1. 41 CFR 102-34.75 - Who is responsible for monitoring our compliance with fuel economy standards for motor vehicles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Who is responsible for monitoring our compliance with fuel economy standards for motor vehicles we obtain? 102-34.75 Section 102-34.75 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION...

  2. 41 CFR 102-34.75 - Who is responsible for monitoring our compliance with fuel economy standards for motor vehicles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 34-MOTOR VEHICLE MANAGEMENT Obtaining Fuel Efficient Motor... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Who is responsible for monitoring our compliance with fuel economy standards for motor vehicles we obtain? 102-34.75 Section...

  3. Clinical practice in perioperative monitoring in adult cardiac surgery: is there a standard of care? Results from an national survey.

    PubMed

    Bignami, Elena; Belletti, Alessandro; Moliterni, Paola; Frati, Elena; Guarnieri, Marcello; Tritapepe, Luigi

    2016-06-01

    This study was to investigate and define what is considered as a current clinical practice in hemodynamic monitoring and vasoactive medication use after cardiac surgery in Italy. A 33-item questionnaire was sent to all intensive care units (ICUs) admitting patients after cardiac surgery. 71 out of 92 identified centers (77.2 %) returned a completed questionnaire. Electrocardiogram, invasive blood pressure, central venous pressure, pulse oximetry, diuresis, body temperature and blood gas analysis were identified as routinely used hemodynamic monitoring, whereas advanced monitoring was performed with pulmonary artery catheter or echocardiography. Crystalloids were the fluids of choice for volume replacement (86.8 % of Centers). To guide volume management, central venous pressure (26.7 %) and invasive blood pressure (19.7 %) were the most frequently used parameters. Dobutamine was the first choice for treatment of left heart dysfunction (40 %) and epinephrine was the first choice for right heart dysfunction (26.8 %). Half of the Centers had an internal protocol for vasoactive drugs administration. Intra-aortic balloon pump and extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation were widely available among Cardiothoracic ICUs. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors were suspended in 28 % of the Centers. The survey shows what is considered as standard monitoring in Italian Cardiac ICUs. Standard, routinely used monitoring consists of ECG, SpO2, etCO2, invasive BP, CVP, diuresis, body temperature, and BGA. It also shows that there is large variability among the various Centers regarding hemodynamic monitoring of fluid therapy and inotropes administration. Further research is required to better standardize and define the indicators to improve the standards of intensive care after cardiac surgery among Italian cardiac ICUs. PMID:26089166

  4. Assessment of cell death studies by monitoring hydrogen peroxide in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Irina; Prell, Erik; Weiwad, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has been widely used to study the oxidative stress response. However, H2O2 is unstable and easily decomposes into H2O and O2. Consequently, a wide range of exposure times and treatment concentrations has been described in the literature. In the present study, we established a ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange (FOX) assay, which was originally described for food and body liquids, as a method for the precise quantification of H2O2 concentrations in cell culture media. We observed that the presence of FCS and high cell densities significantly accelerate the decomposition of H2O2, therefore acting as a protection against cell death by accidental necrosis. PMID:24747006

  5. Oligomerization Interface of RAGE Receptor Revealed by MS-Monitored Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Poznański, Jarosław; Kulma, Magdalena; Dadlez, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) leads to a chronic proinflammatory signal, affecting patients with a variety of diseases. Potentially beneficial modification of RAGE activity requires understanding the signal transduction mechanism at the molecular level. The ligand binding domain is structurally uncoupled from the cytoplasmic domain, suggesting receptor oligomerization is a requirement for receptor activation. In this study, we used hydrogen-deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry to map structural differences between the monomeric and oligomeric forms of RAGE. Our results indicated the presence of a region shielded from exchange in the oligomeric form of RAGE and led to the identification of a new oligomerization interface localized at the linker region between domains C1 and C2. Based on this finding, a model of a RAGE dimer and higher oligomeric state was constructed. PMID:24098480

  6. Stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios for selected sites of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atmospheric Integrated Research Monitoring Network (AIRMoN)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Huang, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Increasingly, hydrologic studies require information on the isotopic composition of natural waters. This report presents stable hydrogen (δ2H) and oxygen isotope ratios (δ180) of precipitation samples from seven selected sites of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atmospheric Integrated Research Monitoring Network (AIRMoN) collected during the years 1992-1994.

  7. THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT: REVERBERATION MAPPING OF OPTICAL HYDROGEN AND HELIUM RECOMBINATION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Bentz, Misty C.; Walsh, Jonelle L.; Barth, Aaron J.; Thornton, Carol E.; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Sakata, Yu; Minezaki, Takeo; Woo, Jong-Hak; Malkan, Matthew A.; Wang, Xiaofeng; Steele, Thea N.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Serduke, Frank J. D.; Li, Weidong; Lee, Nicholas; Treu, Tommaso; Street, Rachel A.; Hidas, Marton G.; Hiner, Kyle D.; Greene, Jenny E.

    2010-06-20

    We have recently completed a 64-night spectroscopic monitoring campaign at the Lick Observatory 3 m Shane telescope with the aim of measuring the masses of the black holes in 12 nearby (z < 0.05) Seyfert 1 galaxies with expected masses in the range {approx}10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and also the well-studied nearby active galactic nucleus (AGN) NGC 5548. Nine of the objects in the sample (including NGC 5548) showed optical variability of sufficient strength during the monitoring campaign to allow for a time lag to be measured between the continuum fluctuations and the response to these fluctuations in the broad H{beta} emission, which we have previously reported. We present here the light curves for the H{alpha}, H{gamma}, He II {lambda}4686, and He I {lambda}5876 emission lines and the time lags for the emission-line responses relative to changes in the continuum flux. Combining each emission-line time lag with the measured width of the line in the variable part of the spectrum, we determine a virial mass of the central supermassive black hole from several independent emission lines. We find that the masses are generally consistent within the uncertainties. The time-lag response as a function of velocity across the Balmer line profiles is examined for six of the AGNs. We find similar responses across all three Balmer lines for Arp 151, which shows a strongly asymmetric profile, and for SBS 1116+583A and NGC 6814, which show a symmetric response about zero velocity. For the other three AGNs, the data quality is somewhat lower and the velocity-resolved time-lag response is less clear. Finally, we compare several trends seen in the data set against the predictions from photoionization calculations as presented by Korista and Goad. We confirm several of their predictions, including an increase in responsivity and a decrease in the mean time lag as the excitation and ionization level for the species increases. Specifically, we find the time lags of the optical

  8. EXPERT-BASED DEVELOPMENT OF A SITE-SPECIFC STANDARD IN CO2 SEQUESTRATION MONITORING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project is to help regulators and operators alike in determining the most appropriate monitoring approaches and strategy for a given CO2 sequestration site. A monitoring strategy differs from a list of tools because it is designed as a dynamic process where...

  9. Method of monitoring CO concentrations in hydrogen feed to a PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Grot, Stephen Andreas; Meltser, Mark Alexander; Gutowski, Stanley; Neutzler, Jay Kevin; Borup, Rodney Lynn; Weisbrod, Kirk

    2000-01-01

    The CO concentration in the H.sub.2 feed stream to a PEM fuel cell stack is monitored by measuring current and/or voltage behavior patterns from a PEM-probe communicating with the reformate feed stream. Pattern recognition software may be used to compare the current and voltage patterns from the PEM-probe to current and voltage telltale outputs determined from a reference cell similar to the PEM-probe and operated under controlled conditions over a wide range of CO concentrations in the H.sub.2 fuel stream. The PEM-probe is intermittently purged of any CO build-up on the anode catalyst (e.g., by (1) flushing the anode with air, (2) short circuiting the PEM-probe, or (3) reverse biasing the PEM-probe) to keep the PEM-probe at peak performance levels.

  10. Hydrogen environment embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement is classified into three types: internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen reaction embrittlement, and hydrogen environment embrittlement. Characteristics of and materials embrittled by these types of hydrogen embrittlement are discussed. Hydrogen environment embrittlement is reviewed in detail. Factors involved in standardizing test methods for detecting the occurrence of and evaluating the severity of hydrogen environment embrittlement are considered. The effect of test technique, hydrogen pressure, purity, strain rate, stress concentration factor, and test temperature are discussed. Additional research is required to determine whether hydrogen environment embrittlement and internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement are similar or distinct types of embrittlement.

  11. Prediction of landslide activation at locations in Beskidy Mountains using standard and real-time monitoring methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarczyk, Z.

    2012-04-01

    The paper presents landslide monitoring methods used for prediction of landslide activity at locations in the Carpathian Mountains (SE Poland). Different types of monitoring methods included standard and real-time early warning measurement with use of hourly data transfer to the Internet were used. Project financed from the EU funds was carried out for the purpose of public road reconstruction. Landslides with low displacement rates (varying from few mm to over 5cm/year) had size of 0.4-2.2mln m3. Flysch layers involved in mass movements represented mixture of clayey soils and sandstones of high moisture content and plasticity. Core sampling and GPR scanning were used for recognition of landslide size and depths. Laboratory research included index, IL oedometer, triaxial and direct shear laboratory tests. GPS-RTK mapping was employed for actualization of landslide morphology. Instrumentation consisted of standard inclinometers, piezometers and pore pressure transducers. Measurements were carried 2006-2011, every month. In May 2010 the first in Poland real-time monitoring system was installed at landslide complex over the Szymark-Bystra public road. It included in-place uniaxial sensors and 3D continuous inclinometers installed to the depths of 12-16m with tilt sensors every 0.5m. Vibrating wire pore pressure and groundwater level transducers together with automatic meteorological station analyzed groundwater and weather conditions. Obtained monitoring and field investigations data provided parameters for LEM and FEM slope stability analysis. They enabled prediction and control of landslide behaviour before, during and after stabilization or partly stabilization works. In May 2010 after the maximum precipitation (100mm/3hours) the rates of observed displacements accelerated to over 11cm in a few days and damaged few standard inclinometer installations. However permanent control of the road area was possible by continuous inclinometer installations. Comprehensive

  12. Fluorescence technique for on-line monitoring of state of hydrogen-producing microorganisms

    DOEpatents

    Seibert, Michael; Makarova, Valeriya; Tsygankov, Anatoly A.; Rubin, Andrew B.

    2007-06-12

    In situ fluorescence method to monitor state of sulfur-deprived algal culture's ability to produce H.sub.2 under sulfur depletion, comprising: a) providing sulfur-deprived algal culture; b) illuminating culture; c) measuring onset of H.sub.2 percentage in produced gas phase at multiple times to ascertain point immediately after anerobiosis to obtain H.sub.2 data as function of time; and d) determining any abrupt change in three in situ fluorescence parameters; i) increase in F.sub.t (steady-state level of chlorophyll fluorescence in light adapted cells); ii) decrease in F.sub.m', (maximal saturating light induced fluorescence level in light adapted cells); and iii) decrease in .DELTA.F/F.sub.m'=(F.sub.m'-F.sub.t)/F.sub.m' (calculated photochemical activity of photosystem II (PSII) signaling full reduction of plastoquinone pool between PSII and PSI, which indicates start of anaerobic conditions that induces synthesis of hydrogenase enzyme for subsequent H.sub.2 production that signal oxidation of plastoquinone pool asmain factor to regulate H.sub.2 under sulfur depletion.

  13. Hydrogen Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Another spinoff from spacecraft fuel cell technology is the portable hydrogen generator shown. Developed by General Electric Company, it is an aid to safer operation of systems that use hydrogen-for example, gas chromatographs, used in laboratory analysis of gases. or flame ionization detectors used as $ollution monitors. The generator eliminates the need for high-pressure hydrogen storage bottles, which can be a safety hazard, in laboratories, hospitals and industrial plants. The unit supplies high-purity hydrogen by means of an electrochemical process which separates the hydrogen and oxygen in distilled water. The oxygen is vented away and the hydrogen gas is stored within the unit for use as needed. GE's Aircraft Equipment Division is producing about 1,000 of the generators annually.

  14. 49 CFR 571.138 - Standard No. 138; Tire pressure monitoring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 CFR part 585, between the manufacturer so specified and the manufacturer to which the vehicle... in Table 1 of Standard No. 101 (49 CFR 571.101); and (c) Is illuminated under the conditions... Malfunction” Telltale in Table 1 of Standard No. 101 (49 CFR 571.101); (3) Continues to illuminate the...

  15. 49 CFR 571.138 - Standard No. 138; Tire pressure monitoring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... in Table 1 of Standard No. 101 (49 CFR 571.101); and (c) Is illuminated under the conditions... Malfunction” Telltale in Table 1 of Standard No. 101 (49 CFR 571.101); (3) Continues to illuminate the TPMS... period corresponding to S7.1 filed pursuant to 49 CFR 585.66. The vehicles are counted in fulfillment...

  16. 49 CFR 571.138 - Standard No. 138; Tire pressure monitoring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... in Table 1 of Standard No. 101 (49 CFR 571.101); and (c) Is illuminated under the conditions... Malfunction” Telltale in Table 1 of Standard No. 101 (49 CFR 571.101); (3) Continues to illuminate the TPMS... period corresponding to S7.1 filed pursuant to 49 CFR 585.66. The vehicles are counted in fulfillment...

  17. Monitoring of Atmospheric Hydrogen Peroxide in Houston Using Long Path-Length Laser-Based Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, N. P.; Cao, Y.; Jiang, W.; Tittel, F. K.; Griffin, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a relevant atmospheric species mainly formed by recombination of hydroperoxyl radicals. H2O2 participates in the formation of sulfate aerosol by in-cloud oxidation of S(IV) to S(VI) and has been associated with the generation of multi-functional water soluble organic compounds in atmospheric particulate matter. Furthermore, H2O2 plays an important role in the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere as it acts as a reservoir for HOx radicals (OH and HO2). Particular conditions in the Houston area (e.g. extensive presence of petrochemical industry and high ozone and humidity levels) indicate the potential relevance of this species at this location. Despite its atmospheric relevance, no reports on the levels of H2O2 in Houston have been presented previously in the scientific literature. Determination of atmospheric H2O2 usually has been conducted based on transfer of the gas-phase H2O2 to the liquid phase prior to quantification by techniques such as fluorescence spectroscopy. Although these methods allow detection of H2O2 at the sub-ppb level, they present some limitations including the interference from other atmospheric constituents and potential sampling artifacts. In this study, a high sensitivity sensor based on long-path absorption spectroscopy using a distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser was developed and used to conduct direct gas-phase H2O2 monitoring in Houston. The sensor, which targets a strong H2O2 absorption line (~7.73 μm) with no interference from other atmospheric species, was deployed at a ground level monitoring station near the University of Houston main campus during summer 2014. The performance of this novel sensor was evaluated by side-by-side comparison with a fluorescence-based instrument typically used for atmospheric monitoring of H2O2. H2O2 levels were determined, and time series of H2O2 mixing ratios were generated allowing insight into the dynamics, trends, and atmospheric inter-relations of H2O2 in the

  18. Monitors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, David

    1984-01-01

    Provides guidelines for selecting a monitor to suit specific applications, explains the process by which graphics images are produced on a CRT monitor, and describes four types of flat-panel displays being used in the newest lap-sized portable computers. A comparison chart provides prices and specifications for over 80 monitors. (MBR)

  19. On-line monitor of hydrogen porosity based on arc spectral information in Al-Mg alloy pulsed gas tungsten arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huanwei; Xu, Yanling; Song, Jinquan; Pu, Jianzhong; Zhao, Xingbo; Yao, Guoping

    2015-07-01

    An on-line approach based on arc spectral information was proposed to monitor the hydrogen porosity in Al-Mg alloy pulsed gas tungsten arc welding. For this purpose, spectral lines of the hydrogen and argon components of the arc atmosphere were analyzed when porosities occurred, and that interference of the continuous spectra involved in these lines was eliminated. The peak component of the intensity ratio of the H I line at 656.28 nm to the Ar I line at 641.63 nm was extracted as the characteristic signal to avoid the pulse interference and the non-hydrogen disturbances. Based on the statistical analysis of the extracted characteristic signal under different welding conditions, a predicting model for weld porosity detection was established and successfully used to identify the most probable position of the native porosity as well as the exact position of the artificial porosity.

  20. The effect of standard heat and filtration processing procedures on antimicrobial activity and hydrogen peroxide levels in honey

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cuilan; Campbell, Leona T.; Blair, Shona E.; Carter, Dee A.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the antimicrobial properties of honey. In most honey types, antimicrobial activity is due to the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), but this can vary greatly among samples. Honey is a complex product and other components may modulate activity, which can be further affected by commercial processing procedures. In this study we examined honey derived from three native Australian floral sources that had previously been associated with H2O2-dependent activity. Antibacterial activity was seen in four red stringybark samples only, and ranged from 12 to 21.1% phenol equivalence against Staphylococcus aureus. Antifungal activity ranged from MIC values of 19–38.3% (w/v) against Candida albicans, and all samples were significantly more active than an osmotically equivalent sugar solution. All honey samples were provided unprocessed and following commercial processing. Processing was usually detrimental to antimicrobial activity, but occasionally the reverse was seen and activity increased. H2O2 levels varied from 0 to 1017 μM, and although samples with no H2O2 had little or no antimicrobial activity, some samples had relatively high H2O2 levels yet no antimicrobial activity. In samples where H2O2 was detected, the correlation with antibacterial activity was greater in the processed than in the unprocessed samples, suggesting other factors present in the honey influence this activity and are sensitive to heat treatment. Antifungal activity did not correlate with the level of H2O2 in honey samples, and overall it appeared that H2O2 alone was not sufficient to inhibit C. albicans. We conclude that floral source and H2O2 levels are not reliable predictors of the antimicrobial activity of honey, which currently can only be assessed by standardized antimicrobial testing. Heat processing should be reduced where possible, and honey destined for medicinal use should be retested post-processing to ensure that activity levels have not changed

  1. Standard measures are inadequate to monitor pediatric adherence in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Müller, Alexandra D; Jaspan, Heather B; Myer, Landon; Hunter, Ashley Lewis; Harling, Guy; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Orrell, Catherine

    2011-02-01

    This study aims to compare the use and cost of objective and subjective measures of adherence to pediatric antiretroviral treatment in a primary care facility in South Africa. In a 1-month longitudinal study of 53 caregiver-child dyads, pharmacy refill (PR), measurement of returned syrups (RS), caregiver self-report (3DR) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) were compared to Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS). Adherence was 100% for both VAS and 3DR; by PR and RS 100% and 103%, respectively. MEMS showed that 92% of prescribed doses were administered, but only 66% of these within the correct 12-hourly interval. None of the four measures correlated significantly with MEMS. MEMS data suggest that timing of doses is often more deviant from prescribed than expected and should be better addressed when monitoring adherence. Of all, MEMS was by far the most expensive measure. Alternative, cheaper electronic devices need to be more accessible in resource-limited settings. PMID:20953692

  2. First fully-synthetic standard gas mixtures with atmospheric isotopic composition for global CO2 and CH4 monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Paul

    2014-05-01

    As the requirement for data that is comparable to the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) scale increases, there is a corresponding increase in the demand for comparable reference standards. An infrastructure to disseminate gravimetric reference standards that are traceable to the International System of Units (SI) offers a means of broadening availability. These could overcome the cost and complexity of sampling air under global background conditions which can only be carried out at remote locations. It promises the possibility for the provision of standards from more than one source and would be enabled and supported by the global agreement under the International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA) to which the WMO became a signatory is 2010. We report the first fully- synthetic gaseous reference standards of CO2 and CH4 in a whole air matrix with an isotopic distribution matching that in the ambient atmosphere. The mixtures are accurately representative of the ambient atmosphere and were prepared gravimetrically. The isotopic distribution of the CO2 was matched to the abundance in the ambient atmosphere by blending 12C enriched CO2 with 13C enriched CO2 in order to avoid measurement biases, introduced by measurement instrumentation detecting only certain isotopologues. The reference standards demonstrate excellent comparability to the WMO scale. This work is a valuable step towards enabling the wider dissemination of traceability for these atmospheric components. Since these standards are prepared synthetically, they can be replicated and avoid the complexity of sampling whole air in global background locations. They are a significant step towards making suitable reference standards for global atmospheric monitoring available more widely.

  3. 78 FR 71817 - Liquidity Coverage Ratio: Liquidity Risk Measurement, Standards, and Monitoring

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... Covered Companies,'' 77 FR 594 (Jan. 5, 2010); ``Enhanced Prudential Standards and Early Remediation Requirements for Foreign Banking Organizations and Foreign Nonbank Financial Companies,'' 77 FR 76628 (Dec. 28... and liquidity risk management. \\10\\ 75 FR 13656 (March 22, 2010). Additionally, in 2012, pursuant...

  4. 78 FR 73112 - Monitoring System Conditions-Transmission Operations Reliability Standards; Interconnection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-05

    ... revised IRO Reliability Standards: IRO-001-3 (Responsibilities and Authorities), IRO-002-3 (Analysis Tools... requiring actions in adjacent Reliability Coordinator Areas are coordinated. IRO-002-3 (Analysis Tools) 29... cancel planned outages of its own analysis tools. R2. Each Reliability Coordinator shall have...

  5. A system for monitoring quality standards in the provision of non-prescription medicines from Australian community pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Benrimoj, Shalom I; Werner, Joel B; Raffaele, Catherine; Roberts, Alison S

    2008-04-01

    There is a growing trend, globally, for consumers to self-medicate with non-prescription medications for common ailments. Pharmacists and pharmacy assistants are thought to be in a unique position to support consumers' purchases of these medicines through the application of knowledge and skills, in an environment in which safety and quality remains paramount. Standards of practice have been developed by the profession to address the provision of these medicines, using a consumer-focused and risk management approach. The application of these standards has been monitored since 2002, by the Quality Care Pharmacy Support Centre (QCPSC), created as a joint venture between the University and the Pharmacy Guild of Australia. The establishment of the QCPSC has allowed the development of a system to monitor and improve the application of standards for the provision of non-prescription medicines to consumers in community pharmacies in Australia. This system is unique in two aspects. The first is the use of pseudo-patient methodology, also called "mystery shoppers", "pseudo-customers" and "simulated patients", for the purpose of both assessment and quality improvement. The second unique aspect is the capturing of data based on assessments of behaviour in practice environments. To date, the centre has conducted 14,738 standards maintenance assessment (SMA) visits, involving over 4,200 pharmacies across all states and territories in Australia. The data generated by such a system create a feedback mechanism for policy decision-making in the area of Quality Use of Medicines (QUM) for non-prescription medicines, which is of critical importance to the health and safety of consumers. PMID:17939057

  6. 18O-Labeled Proteome Reference as Global Internal Standards for Targeted Quantification by Selected Reaction Monitoring-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jong Seo; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Liu, Tao; Robinson, Errol W.; Hossain, Mahmud; Champion, Boyd L.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2011-10-11

    Selected reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (SRM-MS) is an emerging technology for high throughput targeted protein quantification and verification in biological and biomarker discovery studies; however, the cost associated with the use of stable isotope labeled synthetic peptides as internal standards is prohibitive for quantitatively screening large numbers of candidate proteins as often required in the pre-verification phase of biomarker discovery. Herein we present the proof-of-concept experiments of using an 18O-labeled 'universal' reference as comprehensive internal standards for quantitative SRM-MS analysis. With an 18O-labeled whole proteome sample as reference, every peptide of interest will have its own corresponding heavy isotope labeled internal standard, thus providing an ideal approach for quantitative screening of a large number of candidates using SRM-MS. Our results showed that the 18O incorporation efficiency using a recently improved protocol was >99.5% for most peptides investigated, a level comparable to 13C/15N labeled synthetic peptides in terms of heavy isotope incorporation. The accuracy, reproducibility, and linear dynamic range of quantification were further assessed based on known ratios of standard proteins spiked into mouse plasma with an 18O-labeled mouse plasma reference. A dynamic range of four orders of magnitude in relative concentration was obtained with high reproducibility (i.e., coefficient of variance <10%) based on the 16O/18O peak area ratios. Absolute and relative quantification of C-reactive protein and prostate-specific antigen were demonstrated by coupling an 18O-labeled reference with standard additions of protein standards. Collectively, our results demonstrated that the use of 18O-labeled reference provides a convenient and effective strategy for quantitative SRM screening of large number of candidate proteins.

  7. Monitoring accelerated carbonation on standard Portland cement mortar by nonlinear resonance acoustic test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiras, J. N.; Kundu, T.; Popovics, J. S.; Monzó, J.; Borrachero, M. V.; Payá, J.

    2015-03-01

    Carbonation is an important deleterious process for concrete structures. Carbonation begins when carbon dioxide (CO2) present in the atmosphere reacts with portlandite producing calcium carbonate (CaCO3). In severe carbonation conditions, C-S-H gel is decomposed into silica gel (SiO2.nH2O) and CaCO3. As a result, concrete pore water pH decreases (usually below 10) and eventually steel reinforcing bars become unprotected from corrosion agents. Usually, the carbonation of the cementing matrix reduces the porosity, because CaCO3 crystals (calcite and vaterite) occupy more volume than portlandite. In this study, an accelerated carbonation-ageing process is conducted on Portland cement mortar samples with water to cement ratio of 0.5. The evolution of the carbonation process on mortar is monitored at different levels of ageing until the mortar is almost fully carbonated. A nondestructive technique based on nonlinear acoustic resonance is used to monitor the variation of the constitutive properties upon carbonation. At selected levels of ageing, the compressive strength is obtained. From fractured surfaces the depth of carbonation is determined with phenolphthalein solution. An image analysis of the fractured surfaces is used to quantify the depth of carbonation. The results from resonant acoustic tests revealed a progressive increase of stiffness and a decrease of material nonlinearity.

  8. Recommendations for Standardizing Validation Procedures Assessing Physical Activity of Older Persons by Monitoring Body Postures and Movements

    PubMed Central

    Lindemann, Ulrich; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Aminian, Kamiar; Chastin, Sebastien F.M.; de Bruin, Eling D.; Helbostad, Jorunn L.; Bussmann, Johannes B.J.

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity is an important determinant of health and well-being in older persons and contributes to their social participation and quality of life. Hence, assessment tools are needed to study this physical activity in free-living conditions. Wearable motion sensing technology is used to assess physical activity. However, there is a lack of harmonisation of validation protocols and applied statistics, which make it hard to compare available and future studies. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to formulate recommendations for assessing the validity of sensor-based activity monitoring in older persons with focus on the measurement of body postures and movements. Validation studies of body-worn devices providing parameters on body postures and movements were identified and summarized and an extensive inter-active process between authors resulted in recommendations about: information on the assessed persons, the technical system, and the analysis of relevant parameters of physical activity, based on a standardized and semi-structured protocol. The recommended protocols can be regarded as a first attempt to standardize validity studies in the area of monitoring physical activity. PMID:24434881

  9. A global standard for monitoring coastal wetland vulnerability to accelerated sea-level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, Edward L.; Friess, Daniel A.; Krauss, Ken W.; Cahoon, Donald R.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Phelps, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Sea-level rise threatens coastal salt-marshes and mangrove forests around the world, and a key determinant of coastal wetland vulnerability is whether its surface elevation can keep pace with rising sea level. Globally, a large data gap exists because wetland surface and shallow subsurface processes remain unaccounted for by traditional vulnerability assessments using tide gauges. Moreover, those processes vary substantially across wetlands, so modelling platforms require relevant local data. The low-cost, simple, high-precision rod surface-elevation table–marker horizon (RSET-MH) method fills this critical data gap, can be paired with spatial data sets and modelling and is financially and technically accessible to every country with coastal wetlands. Yet, RSET deployment has been limited to a few regions and purposes. A coordinated expansion of monitoring efforts, including development of regional networks that could support data sharing and collaboration, is crucial to adequately inform coastal climate change adaptation policy at several scales.

  10. LUMOR: an app for standardized control and monitoring of a porcine lung and its nutrient cycle.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Gregor; Frohner, Matthias; Sauermann, Stefan; Forjan, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    The outcome of the EU-funded project ElBik has been the lung simulator 'iLung', which imitates an actively breathing human lung with a porcine lung. In order to keep the explanted lung in a nearly physiological state during transportation from the slaughterhouse to the ventilation laboratory the tissue needs to be nourished and temperature controlled. The Project AlveoPic designs a mobile transport vehicle implementing an ISO/IEEE 11073-20601 compliant communication interface for the exchange of the physical parameters, alert messages and setpoint-values. An appropriate 11073 domain information model is designed and limitations of the defined services and attributes are identified. For monitoring purposes the Android App LUMOR is implemented providing a user with an easy-to-handle GUI. It was found, that alert capabilities and remote set features are not well supported in ISO/IEEE 11073-20601 at the moment and possible workarounds are discussed. PMID:24825688

  11. Proof of the standard quantum limit for monitoring free-mass position

    SciTech Connect

    Kosugi, Seiji

    2010-08-15

    The measurement result of the moved distance for a free mass m during the time {tau} between two position measurements cannot be predicted with uncertainty smaller than {radical}(({h_bar}/2{pi}){tau}/m). This is formulated as a standard quantum limit and it has been proven to always hold for the following position measurement: a probe is set in a prescribed position before the measurement. Just after the interaction of the mass with the probe, the probe position is measured, and using this value, the measurement results of the premeasurement and postmeasurement positions are estimated.

  12. Milk and serum standard reference materials for monitoring organic contaminants in human samples.

    PubMed

    Schantz, Michele M; Eppe, Gauthier; Focant, Jean-François; Hamilton, Coreen; Heckert, N Alan; Heltsley, Rebecca M; Hoover, Dale; Keller, Jennifer M; Leigh, Stefan D; Patterson, Donald G; Pintar, Adam L; Sharpless, Katherine E; Sjödin, Andreas; Turner, Wayman E; Vander Pol, Stacy S; Wise, Stephen A

    2013-02-01

    Four new Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) have been developed to assist in the quality assurance of chemical contaminant measurements required for human biomonitoring studies, SRM 1953 Organic Contaminants in Non-Fortified Human Milk, SRM 1954 Organic Contaminants in Fortified Human Milk, SRM 1957 Organic Contaminants in Non-Fortified Human Serum, and SRM 1958 Organic Contaminants in Fortified Human Serum. These materials were developed as part of a collaboration between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with both agencies contributing data used in the certification of mass fraction values for a wide range of organic contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, chlorinated pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners, and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (PCDD) and dibenzofuran (PCDF) congeners. The certified mass fractions of the organic contaminants in unfortified samples, SRM 1953 and SRM 1957, ranged from 12 ng/kg to 2200 ng/kg with the exception of 4,4'-DDE in SRM 1953 at 7400 ng/kg with expanded uncertainties generally <14 %. This agreement suggests that there were no significant biases existing among the multiple methods used for analysis. PMID:23132544

  13. [Monitor on influence of quality standard improvement upon Guizhi Fuling capsules efficacy].

    PubMed

    Ding, Yue; Cao, Ze-yui; Ke, Zhi-peng; Su, Zhen-zhen; Cao, Liang; Li, Na; Zhang, Chen-feng; Wang, Tuan-jie; Ding, Gang; Wang, Zhen-zhong; Xiao, Wei

    2015-10-01

    In 2012, the preparation process and quality standard for Guizhi Fuling capsule were improved. To compare the effects and differences of capsules before (2011) and after(2012-2014) the improvement, evaluation models for intrinsic dysmenorrhea, pelvic inflammation and hysteromyoma were applied in rats. Models were induced by oxytocin, liqiud bacteria mixture and estrogen loading, respectively. The capsules (12 batchs/year, 48 bathcs in all), sampled randomly in 2011-2014, the effects were assessed using the three models. In anti-dysmenorrhea models, remarked reduction of writhing frequency, ET-1 and PGF2α content in uterus could be detected, as well as extension of writhing latency. In pelvic inflammation rats, depression of TNF-α and raise of IL-2 were induced by earh batch of capsules. In hysteromyoma model, uterine weight and smooth muscle proliferation, including E2 and P level in plasma, were lowered obviously by all batchs of capsules. Secondly, Guizhi Fuling capsules produced in 2012-2014 revealed better effectiveness than the ones manufactured in 2011. Moreover, pharmacodynamics indexes of the samples made in 2011 differed significantly between groups, which could not be observed in the ones ot 2012-2014. After tne preparation process and quality standard improvement, the effectiveness and homogeneity of Guizhi Fuling capsules were enhanced. PMID:26975103

  14. Polar Aprotic Modifiers for Chromatographic Separation and Back-Exchange Reduction for Protein Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Monitored by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeja, Santosh G.; Emmett, Mark R.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2012-04-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry is an important non-perturbing tool to study protein structure and protein-protein interactions. However, water in the reversed-phase liquid chromatography mobile phase leads to back-exchange of D for H during chromatographic separation of proteolytic peptides following H/D exchange, resulting in incorrect identification of fast-exchanging hydrogens as unexchanged hydrogens. Previously, fast high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and supercritical fluid chromatography have been shown to decrease back-exchange. Here, we show that replacement of up to 40% of the water in the LC mobile phase by the modifiers, dimethylformamide (DMF) and N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) (i.e., polar organic modifiers that lack rapid exchanging hydrogens), significantly reduces back-exchange. On-line LC micro-ESI FT-ICR MS resolves overlapped proteolytic peptide isotopic distributions, allowing for quantitative determination of the extent of back-exchange. The DMF modified solvent composition also improves chromatographic separation while reducing back-exchange relative to conventional solvent.

  15. Transcriptional analysis of Mycobacterium fortuitum cultures upon hydrogen peroxide treatment using the novel standard rrnA-P1

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, María Carmen; Menéndez, María Carmen; Rebollo, María José; García, María J

    2008-01-01

    Background The ability of an intracellular pathogen to establish infection depends on the capacity of the organism to survive and replicate inside the host. Mycobacterium fortuitum is a bacteria that contains genes involved in the detoxification of the oxygen reactive species such as those produced by the host during the infection. In this work, we investigate the effects of hydrogen peroxide on the transcription and expression of these genes by developing a real time quantitative PCR technique (qRT-PCR) using the ribosomal promoter region (rrnA-P1) as reference product for quantification of the mRNA levels. Results M. fortuitum cultures were treated with different hydrogen peroxide concentrations (0.02 to 20 mM) during several periods of time (30 to 120 minutes). The activity of the enzymes KatGII and SodA, and the transcription of corresponding genes were evaluated. The transcriptional regulator furAII gene was also studied. The ribosomal promoter region rrnA-P1 was validated as referential product under the stress conditions checked by qRT-PCR. Minor changes were observed under the conditions tested except when bacteria were incubated in the presence of 20 mM hydrogen peroxide. Under those conditions, the levels of transcription of the three genes under study increased at 30 minutes of treatment. The viability of the bacteria was not influenced under the conditions tested. Conclusion In this work, we have quantified transcriptional responses to stress suggesting that, the opportunistic pathogen M. fortuitum is more resistant and differs in behaviour in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, when compared to the major pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the saprophyte Mycobacterium smegmatis. Besides, we demonstrate the mycobacterial non-coding region rrnA-P1 to be a suitable reference product in the analysis of qRT-PCR transcriptional data of M. fortuitum. PMID:18565220

  16. Validation of simple and inexpensive algometry using sphygmomanometer cuff and neuromuscular junction monitor with standardized laboratory algometer

    PubMed Central

    Durga, Padmaja; Wudaru, Sreedhar Reddy; Khambam, Sunil Kumar Reddy; Chandra, Shobha Jagadish; Ramachandran, Gopinath

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The availability, ergonomics and economics prohibit the routine use of algometers in clinical practice and research by the anesthesiologists. A simple bedside technique of quantitative pain measurement would enable the routine use of algometry. We proposed to validate simple pain provocation using sphygmomanometer cuff and the electric stimulation of neuromuscular junction monitor (TOF-guard, Organon Teknika) to measure pain against a standardized laboratory pressure algometer. Material and Methods: Pain detection threshold (Pdt) and pain tolerance threshold (Ptt) were measured in forty healthy volunteers of both genders, using the above three techniques. All measurements were repeated three times. The co-efficient of inter-rater reliability (or consistency) between three independent measurements obtained from each of the techniques was determined by Cronbach's co-efficient alpha (α C). The correlation between the mean Pdt and Ptt values recorded by standardized algometer and the sphygmomanometer technique and nerve stimulator technique was performed using Pearson Correlation. An r >0.5 and a two-tailed significance of <0.05 were considered as good correlation between the standardized algometer and the tested techniques. Results: There was a good inter-rater reliability (α C > 0.7) for the three techniques. There was a good correlation with r >0.65 (P < 0.001) between the measurements of standardized pressure algometer and the two techniques being tested as alternatives for algometer to measure pain. Conclusion: The sphygmomanometer cuff technique and electrical stimulation with the peripheral nerve stimulator to measure pain threshold and tolerance provide a simple, efficient, repeatable measure of pain intensity and can be used as suitable alternatives to standard algometers. PMID:27006546

  17. Systems approach to monitoring and evaluation guides scale up of the Standard Days Method of family planning in Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Igras, Susan; Sinai, Irit; Mukabatsinda, Marie; Ngabo, Fidele; Jennings, Victoria; Lundgren, Rebecka

    2014-01-01

    There is no guarantee that a successful pilot program introducing a reproductive health innovation can also be expanded successfully to the national or regional level, because the scaling-up process is complex and multilayered. This article describes how a successful pilot program to integrate the Standard Days Method (SDM) of family planning into existing Ministry of Health services was scaled up nationally in Rwanda. Much of the success of the scale-up effort was due to systematic use of monitoring and evaluation (M&E) data from several sources to make midcourse corrections. Four lessons learned illustrate this crucially important approach. First, ongoing M&E data showed that provider training protocols and client materials that worked in the pilot phase did not work at scale; therefore, we simplified these materials to support integration into the national program. Second, triangulation of ongoing monitoring data with national health facility and population-based surveys revealed serious problems in supply chain mechanisms that affected SDM (and the accompanying CycleBeads client tool) availability and use; new procedures for ordering supplies and monitoring stockouts were instituted at the facility level. Third, supervision reports and special studies revealed that providers were imposing unnecessary medical barriers to SDM use; refresher training and revised supervision protocols improved provider practices. Finally, informal environmental scans, stakeholder interviews, and key events timelines identified shifting political and health policy environments that influenced scale-up outcomes; ongoing advocacy efforts are addressing these issues. The SDM scale-up experience in Rwanda confirms the importance of monitoring and evaluating programmatic efforts continuously, using a variety of data sources, to improve program outcomes. PMID:25276581

  18. California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project

    SciTech Connect

    Heydorn, Edward C

    2013-03-12

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a real-world retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation's hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling stations

  19. The Noninvestigational Use of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Thyroid Cancer: Establishing a Standard for Patient Safety and Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Carhill, Aubrey A.; Cabanillas, Maria E.; Jimenez, Camilo; Waguespack, Steven G.; Habra, Mouhammed A.; Hu, Mimi; Ying, Anita; Vassilopoulou-Sellin, Rena; Gagel, Robert F.; Sherman, Steven I.

    2013-01-01

    Context: The increasing use of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy outside of the context of the clinical trial for treatment of advanced thyroid cancer has highlighted the need for a systematic approach to the clinical application of these agents in order to improve patient safety and monitoring promote consistency among providers, and ensure compliance with both institutional and industry standards. Evidence: We reviewed professional thyroid cancer guidelines, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network task force reports, American Society of Clinical Oncology safety standards, review articles, and clinical trials published within the past 10 yr and also included relevant older studies. Conclusions: Review of available published data and the collective experience prescribing tyrosine kinase inhibitors at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have highlighted the need for a systematic, comprehensive, and uniform approach to managing these patients. This paper discusses the approach adopted by the Department of Endocrine Neoplasia at the MD Anderson Cancer Center and illustrates practice patterns, experience, and our standardized approach related to prescribing commercially available tyrosine kinase inhibitors outside of the context of a clinical trial for patients with advanced thyroid cancer. PMID:23185034

  20. Standardized large-scale H-1PV production process with efficient quality and quantity monitoring.

    PubMed

    Leuchs, Barbara; Roscher, Mandy; Müller, Marcus; Kürschner, Kathrin; Rommelaere, Jean

    2016-03-01

    The promising anticancer properties of rodent protoparvoviruses, notably H-1PV, have led to their clinical testing. This makes it necessary to produce highly pure, well-characterized virus batches in sufficient quantity. The present work focused on developing standardized production, purification, and characterization procedures as a basis for exploiting H-1PV both preclinically and in clinical trials for anticancer virotherapy. Two infection and two virus purification strategies were tested and the resulting virus preparations compared for their purity and full-, infectious-, and empty-particle contents. The adopted production process, which involves culturing and infecting NB-324K cells in 10-layer CellSTACK(®) chambers (1×10(3) infectious units per infected cell), is simple, scalable, and reproducible. Downstream processing to eliminate contaminating DNA and protein includes DNAse treatment, filtration, and two Iodixanol density-gradient centrifugations, the first gradient being a step gradient and the second, either a step (1×10(10) PFU/ml) or a continuous gradient (3×10(11) PFU/ml). A procedure was also developed for obtaining infectious particle-free preparations of empty virions for research purposes: cesium chloride density gradient centrifugation followed by UV irradiation (1×10(14) physical particles/ml). For quick, sensitive determination of physical particles (and hence, particle-to-infectivity ratios), a "Capsid-ELISA" was developed, based on a novel monoclonal antibody that specifically targets assembled capsids. PMID:26658622

  1. Monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2004-11-23

    The invention provides apparatus and methods which facilitate movement of an instrument relative to an item or location being monitored and/or the item or location relative to the instrument, whilst successfully excluding extraneous ions from the detection location. Thus, ions generated by emissions from the item or location can successfully be monitored during movement. The technique employs sealing to exclude such ions, for instance, through an electro-field which attracts and discharges the ions prior to their entering the detecting location and/or using a magnetic field configured to repel the ions away from the detecting location.

  2. Influence of Pichia pastoris cellular material on polymerase chain reaction performance as a synthetic biology standard for genome monitoring.

    PubMed

    Templar, Alexander; Woodhouse, Stefan; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli; Nesbeth, Darren N

    2016-08-01

    Advances in synthetic genomics are now well underway in yeasts due to the low cost of synthetic DNA. These new capabilities also bring greater need for quantitating the presence, loss and rearrangement of loci within synthetic yeast genomes. Methods for achieving this will ideally; i) be robust to industrial settings, ii) adhere to a global standard and iii) be sufficiently rapid to enable at-line monitoring during cell growth. The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) is increasingly used for industrial production of biotherapeutic proteins so we sought to answer the following questions for this particular yeast species. Is time-consuming DNA purification necessary to obtain accurate end-point polymerase chain reaction (e-pPCR) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) data? Can the novel linear regression of efficiency qPCR method (LRE qPCR), which has properties desirable in a synthetic biology standard, match the accuracy of conventional qPCR? Does cell cultivation scale influence PCR performance? To answer these questions we performed e-pPCR and qPCR in the presence and absence of cellular material disrupted by a mild 30s sonication procedure. The e-pPCR limit of detection (LOD) for a genomic target locus was 50pg (4.91×10(3) copies) of purified genomic DNA (gDNA) but the presence of cellular material reduced this sensitivity sixfold to 300pg gDNA (2.95×10(4) copies). LRE qPCR matched the accuracy of a conventional standard curve qPCR method. The presence of material from bioreactor cultivation of up to OD600=80 did not significantly compromise the accuracy of LRE qPCR. We conclude that a simple and rapid cell disruption step is sufficient to render P. pastoris samples of up to OD600=80 amenable to analysis using LRE qPCR which we propose as a synthetic biology standard. PMID:27211507

  3. A Drought Monitoring Tool for Customized Calculation of a Standardized Precipitation Index Value in the Navajo Nation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cary, C.; Ly, V.; Gao, M.; Surunis, A.; Turnbull-Appell, S.; Sodergren, C.; Brooks, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Navajo Nation, located in the southwestern United States, has been increasingly impacted by severe drought events and regional changes in climate. These events are coupled with a lack of domestic water infrastructure and economic resources, leaving approximately one-third of the population without access to potable water in their homes. Current methods of monitoring climate and drought are dependent on national-scale monthly drought maps calculated by the Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC). These maps do not provide the spatial resolution needed to examine differences in drought severity across the vast Nation. To better understand and monitor drought regime changes in the Navajo Nation, this project comprises of two main components: 1) a geodatabase of historical climate information necessary to calculate Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) values and 2) a tool that calculates SPI values for a user-selected area within the study site. The tool and geodatabase use TRMM and GPM observed precipitation data, and Parameter-elevation Relationships on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) modeled historical precipitation data. These products allow resource managers in the Navajo Nation to utilize current and future NASA Earth observation data for increased decision-making capacity regarding future climate change impact on water resources.

  4. HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM SLUDGE SAMPLE BOTTLES CAUSED BY RADIOLYSIS AND CHEMISTRY WITH CONCETNRATION DETERMINATION IN A STANDARD WASTE BOX (SWB) OR DRUM FOR TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    RILEY DL; BRIDGES AE; EDWARDS WS

    2010-03-30

    A volume of 600 mL of sludge, in 4.1 L sample bottles (Appendix 7.6), will be placed in either a Super Pig (Ref. 1) or Piglet (Ref. 2, 3) based on shielding requirements (Ref. 4). Two Super Pigs will be placed in a Standard Waste Box (SWB, Ref. 5), as their weight exceeds the capacity of a drum; two Piglets will be placed in a 55-gallon drum (shown in Appendix 7.2). The generation of hydrogen gas through oxidation/corrosion of uranium metal by its reaction with water will be determined and combined with the hydrogen produced by radiolysis. The hydrogen concentration in the 55-gallon drum and SWB will be calculated to show that the lower flammability limit of 5% hydrogen is not reached. The inner layers (i.e., sample bottle, bag and shielded pig) in the SWB and drum will be evaluated to assure no pressurization occurs as the hydrogen vents from the inner containers (e.g., shielded pigs, etc.). The reaction of uranium metal with anoxic liquid water is highly exothermic; the heat of reaction will be combined with the source term decay heat, calculated from Radcalc, to show that the drum and SWB package heat load limits are satisfied. This analysis does five things: (1) Estimates the H{sub 2} generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water; (2) Estimates the H{sub 2} generation from radiolysis (using Radcalc 4.1); (3) Combines both H{sub 2} generation amounts, from Items 1 and 2, and determines the percent concentration of H{sub 2} in the interior of an SWB with two Super Pigs, and the interior of a 55-gallon drum with two Piglets; (4) From the combined gas generation rate, shows that the pressure at internal layers is minimal; and (5) Calculates the maximum thermal load of the package, both from radioactive decay of the source and daughter products as calculated/reported by Radcalc 4.1, and from the exothermic reaction of uranium metal with water.

  5. Comparison of Standard Automated Perimetry, Short-Wavelength Automated Perimetry, and Frequency-Doubling Technology Perimetry to Monitor Glaucoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rongrong; Wang, Chenkun; Gu, Yangshun; Racette, Lyne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Detection of progression is paramount to the clinical management of glaucoma. Our goal is to compare the performance of standard automated perimetry (SAP), short-wavelength automated perimetry (SWAP), and frequency-doubling technology (FDT) perimetry in monitoring glaucoma progression. Longitudinal data of paired SAP, SWAP, and FDT from 113 eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma enrolled in the Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study or the African Descent and Glaucoma Evaluation Study were included. Data from all tests were expressed in comparable units by converting the sensitivity from decibels to unitless contrast sensitivity and by expressing sensitivity values in percent of mean normal based on an independent dataset of 207 healthy eyes with aging deterioration taken into consideration. Pointwise linear regression analysis was performed and 3 criteria (conservative, moderate, and liberal) were used to define progression and improvement. Global mean sensitivity (MS) was fitted with linear mixed models. No statistically significant difference in the proportion of progressing and improving eyes was observed across tests using the conservative criterion. Fewer eyes showed improvement on SAP compared to SWAP and FDT using the moderate criterion; and FDT detected less progressing eyes than SAP and SWAP using the liberal criterion. The agreement between these test types was poor. The linear mixed model showed a progressing trend of global MS overtime for SAP and SWAP, but not for FDT. The baseline estimate of SWAP MS was significantly lower than SAP MS by 21.59% of mean normal. FDT showed comparable estimation of baseline MS with SAP. SWAP and FDT do not appear to have significant benefits over SAP in monitoring glaucoma progression. SAP, SWAP, and FDT may, however, detect progression in different glaucoma eyes. PMID:26886602

  6. Effect of standardized fruit extract of Luffa cylindrica on oxidative stress markers in hydrogen peroxide induced cataract

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Suchita; Saha, Sudipta; Kaithwas, Gaurav; Saraf, Shubhini A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The ability of Luffa cylindrica Roem fruit extract (LCE) to modulate biochemical parameters was investigated by in vitro studies for its role in hydrogen peroxide induced cataract on isolated goat lenses which were incubated for 72 h at 37°C. Materials and Methods: Test groups contained 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 µg/ml of LCE along with 1 ml of H2O2 (0.5 mM) as cataract inducer. Lenses were examined for morphological variation and transparency periodically during the incubation. Biochemical parameters such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), reduced glutathione (GSH), total protein content (TPC), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were estimated. Results: SOD, GSH, and TPC levels were found to increase proportionally with the concentration of LCE. However, MDA levels were found to be inversely proportional to the concentration of LCE. Opacity was graded as per “lens opacities classification system III.” Morphological examination suggested that LCE (25 µg/ml) maintained a vision for 44 h. No lens in LCE dose groups developed dense nuclear opacity after 24 h as opposed to 80% in negative control. Conclusion: The results suggest that LCE can delay the onset and/or prevent the progression of cataract which can be attributed to the presence of adequate phenolics, flavonoids, and Vitamin A and its high nutritional value. This preliminary study can be further synergized by testing LCE against other in vivo and in vitro models of cataract. PMID:26729957

  7. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring (ABPM) as the reference standard for diagnosis of hypertension and assessment of vascular risk in adults.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Ramón C; Smolensky, Michael H; Ayala, Diana E; Portaluppi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    New information has become available since the ISC, AAMCC, and SECAC released their first extensive guidedelines to improve the diagnosis and treatment of adult arterial hypertension. A critical assessment of evidence and a comparison of what international guidelines now propose are the basis for the following statements, which update the recommendations first issued in 2013. Office blood pressure (BP) measurements should no longer be considered to be the "gold standard" for the diagnosis of hypertension and assessment of cardiovascular risk. Relying on office BP, even when supplemented with at-home wake-time self-measurements, to identify high-risk individuals, disregarding circadian BP patterning and asleep BP level, leads to potential misclassification of 50% of all evaluated persons. Accordingly, ambulatory BP monitoring is the recommended reference standard for the diagnosis of true hypertension and accurate assessment of cardiovascular risk in all adults ≥18 yrs of age, regardless of whether office BP is normal or elevated. Asleep systolic BP mean is the most significant independent predictor of cardiovascular events. The sleep-time relative SBP decline adds prognostic value to the statistical model that already includes the asleep systolic BP mean and corrected for relevant confounding variables. Accordingly, the asleep systolic BP mean is the recommended protocol to diagnose hypertension, assess cardiovascular risk, and predict cardiovascular event-free interval. In men, and in the absence of compelling clinical conditions, reference thresholds for diagnosing hypertension are 120/70 mmHg for the asleep systolic/diastolic BP means derived from ambulatory BP monitoring. However, in women, in the absence of complicating co-morbidities, the same thresholds are lower by 10/5 mmHg, i.e., 110/65 mmHg for the asleep means. In high-risk patients, including those diagnosed with diabetes or chronic kidney disease, and/or those having experienced past

  8. Development of a standard protocol for monitoring trace elements in continental waters with moss bags: inter- and intraspecific differences.

    PubMed

    Cesa, Mattia; Bertossi, Alberto; Cherubini, Giovanni; Gava, Emanuele; Mazzilis, Denis; Piccoli, Elisa; Verardo, Pierluigi; Nimis, Pier Luigi

    2015-04-01

    This paper is a contribution for validating a standard method for trace element monitoring based on transplants and analysis of aquatic bryophytes, in the framework of the EC Directive 2000/60. It presents the results of an experiment carried out to assess significant differences in the amount and variability of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn in three moss species (Cinclidotus aquaticus, Fontinalis antipyretica, Platyhypnidium riparioides) and two different parts of the moss (whole plant vs apical tips). Mosses were caged in bags made of a plastic net and transplanted for 2 weeks to an irrigation canal impacted by a waste water treatment plant. Trace element concentrations were measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) before and after exposure to the experimental and control sites in five samples. Enrichment factors >2 were found for Cu, Ni, Mn, Pb and Zn in all moss species, lower in C. aquaticus, intermediate in F. antipyretica and higher in P. riparioides (the species we recommend to use). The analysis of apical tips after exposure instead of the whole plant led to (I) lower concentrations of As, Co, Cr, Fe and Zn in C. aquaticus (-7 to -30%) and of Fe and Pb (-13, -18%) in P. riparioides, (II) higher concentrations of Cu, Ni and Zn (+14 to +18%) in P. riparioides, while (III) no significant difference (p > 0.05) in F. antipyretica. Data variability after exposure was generally lower in apical tips, especially in C. aquaticus and in F. antipyretica, less in P. riparioides. In the aim of standardizing the moss-bag technique, the analysis of apical tips is recommended. PMID:25647488

  9. Providing hydrogen maser timing stability to orbiting VLBI radio telescope observations by post-measurement compensation of linked frequency standard imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springett, James C.

    1994-01-01

    Orbiting VLBI (OVLBI) astronomical observations are based upon measurements acquired simultaneously from ground-based and earth-orbiting radio telescopes. By the mid-1990s, two orbiting VLBI observatories, Russia's Radioastron and Japan's VSOP, will augment the worldwide VLBI network, providing baselines to earth radio telescopes as large as 80,000 km. The challenge for OVLBI is to effectuate space to ground radio telescope data cross-correlation (the observation) to a level of integrity currently achieved between ground radio telescopes. VLBI radio telescopes require ultrastable frequency and timing references in order that long term observations may be made without serious cross-correlation loss due to frequency source drift and phase noise. For this reason, such instruments make use of hydrogen maser frequency standards. Unfortunately, space-qualified hydrogen maser oscillators are currently not available for use on OVLBI satellites. Thus, the necessary long-term stability needed by the orbiting radio telescope may only be obtained by microwave uplinking a ground-based hydrogen maser derived frequency to the satellite. Although the idea of uplinking the frequency standard intrinsically seems simple, there are many 'contaminations' which degrade both the long and short term stability of the transmitted reference. Factors which corrupt frequency and timing accuracy include additive radio and electronic circuit thermal noise, slow or systematic phase migration due to changes of electronic circuit temporal operating conditions (especially temperature), ionosphere and troposphere induced scintillations, residual Doppler-incited components, and microwave signal multipath propagation. What is important, though, is to realize that ultimate stability does not have to be achieved in real-time. Instead, information needed to produce a high degree of coherence in the subsequent cross-correlation operation may be derived from a two-way coherent radio link, recorded and later

  10. Do Parents Meet Adolescents’ Monitoring Standards? Examination of the Impact on Teen Risk Disclosure and Behaviors if They Don’t

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Lesley; Cottrell, Scott; Metzger, Aaron; Ahmadi, Halima; Wang, Bo; Li, Xiaoming; Stanton, Bonita

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined how adolescents compare monitoring efforts by their parents to those of a "good parent" standard and assessed the impact of these comparisons on adolescent self-disclosure and risk behavior and their perceptions of their parents' monitoring knowledge. Survey responses from 519 adolescents (12–17 years) at baseline of a larger, longitudinal study examining parental monitoring and adolescent risk were examined. Adolescents’ “good parent comparisons” differed greatly by monitoring areas (e.g., telephone use, health, money); however, between 5.5% and 25.8% of adolescents believed their parents needed to monitor their activities more than they currently were monitoring. Alternatively, between 8.5% and 23.8% of adolescents believed their parents needed to monitor their activities less often. These perceptions significantly distinguished adolescents in terms of their level of disclosure, perceived monitoring knowledge, and risk involvement. Adolescents who viewed their parents as needing to monitor more were less likely to disclose information to their parents (p<.001), less likely to perceive their parents as having greater monitoring knowledge (p<.001), and more likely to be involved in a risk behaviors (p<.001) than adolescents who perceived their parents needed no change. Adolescent disclosure to a parent is a powerful predictor of adolescent risk and poor health outcomes. These findings demonstrate that adolescents' comparisons of their parents' monitoring efforts can predict differences in adolescent disclosure and future risk. Obtaining adolescent "good parent" comparisons may successfully identify intervention opportunities with the adolescent and parent by noting the areas of need and direction of monitoring improvement. PMID:25955160

  11. Clinical validation protocols for noninvasive blood pressure monitors and their recognition by regulatory authorities and professional organizations: rationale and considerations for a single unified protocol or standard.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kim-Gau

    2013-10-01

    Standardized protocols for validating the clinical accuracy of noninvasive blood pressure (NIBP) monitors have been available since 1987. Some of them were developed by standards bodies and others by professional organizations. They have been well-tested through use and progressively improved through multiple revisions; however, many methodological differences exist between them. In addition, for the purpose of regulatory approval or marketing clearance, some protocols are recognized in some countries but not in others; thus, manufacturers have to validate their NIBP monitors to more than one protocol in order to market them worldwide. The use of different protocols not only makes it difficult to compare one device with another but also complicates the validation, regulatory approval, marketing, and public acceptance of NIBP monitors, creating undue burden on manufacturers and unnecessary confusion among users. There is a need for protocol developers, standards bodies, and regulatory authorities to work together to develop and agree on a single unified protocol or standard, one that builds on the strengths of the various protocols that have been developed so far. It is apparent that there is already a trend toward convergence of the various protocols into two protocols, namely, the ISO 81060-2:2009 standard and the 2010 European Society of Hypertension International Protocol. With further reconciliation and consensus, it should be possible to integrate the best features of the ISO, European Society of Hypertension, and other protocols, along with further improvements, into a single unified protocol or standard. PMID:23709002

  12. Curriculum-Based Measurement of Oral Reading: Standard Errors Associated with Progress Monitoring Outcomes from DIBELS, AIMSweb, and an Experimental Passage Set

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ardoin, Scott P.; Christ, Theodore J.

    2009-01-01

    There are relatively few studies that evaluate the quality of progress monitoring estimates derived from curriculum-based measurement of reading. Those studies that are published provide initial evidence for relatively large magnitudes of standard error relative to the expected magnitude of weekly growth. A major contributor to the observed…

  13. SECONDARY STANDARD CALIBRATION, MEASUREMENT AND IRRADIATION CAPABILITIES OF THE INDIVIDUAL MONITORING SERVICE AT THE HELMHOLTZ ZENTRUM MÜNCHEN: ASPECTS OF UNCERTAINTY AND AUTOMATION.

    PubMed

    Greiter, M B; Denk, J; Hoedlmoser, H

    2016-09-01

    The individual monitoring service at the Helmholtz Zentrum München has adopted the recommendations of the ISO 4037 and 6980 standards series as base of its dosimetric systems for X-ray, gamma and beta dosimetry. These standards define technical requirements for radiation spectra and measurement processes, but leave flexibility in the implementation of irradiations as well as in the resulting uncertainty in dose or dose rate. This article provides an example for their practical implementation in the Munich IAEA/WHO secondary standard dosimetry laboratory. It focusses on two aspects: automation issues and uncertainties in calibration. PMID:26838065

  14. Creating and Implementing a Regularized Monitoring and EnforcementSystem for China's Mandatory Standards and Energy Information Label forAppliances

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiang

    2007-03-01

    China has developed a comprehensive program of energy efficiency standards and labels for household appliances. In 1989, China first launched its minimum energy performance standards (MEPS), which are now applied to an extensive list of products. In 1998, China launched a voluntary energy endorsement label, which has grown to cover both energy-saving and water-saving products. And, in 2005, China launched a mandatory energy information label that initially covered two products. CLASP has assisted China in developing 11 minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) for 9 products and endorsement labels for 11 products including: refrigerators; air conditioners; televisions; printers; computers; monitors; fax machines; copiers; DVD/VCD players; external power supplies; and set-top boxes. CLASP has also assisted China in the development of the mandatory energy information label. Increasingly, attention is being placed on maximum energy savings from China's standards and labeling (S&L) efforts in order to meet the recently announced goal of reducing China's energy intensity by 20 percent by 2010 with an interim objective of 4 percent in 2006. China's mandatory standards system is heavily focused on the technical requirements for efficiency performance, but historically, it has lacked administrative and personnel capacity to undertake monitoring and enforcement of these legally binding standards. Similarly, resources for monitoring and enforcement have been quite limited. As a consequence, compliance to both the mandatory standards and the mandatory energy information label is uneven with the potential and likely result of lost energy savings. Thus, a major area for improvement, which could significantly increase overall energy savings, is the creation and implementation of a regularized monitoring system for tracking the compliance to, and enforcement of, mandatory standards and the energy information label in China. CLASP has been working with the China National

  15. Red-shifted hydrogen bonds and blue-shifted van der Waals contact in the standard Watson-Crick adenine-thymine base pair.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Pan-Pan; Qiu, Wen-Yuan

    2009-09-24

    Standard Watson-Crick adenine-thymine (AT) base pair has been investigated by using the B3LYP functional with 6-31G(d, p) basis set, at which level of theory the geometrical characteristics of the AT base pair are the best in agreement with the experiment. It exhibits simultaneously red-shifted N-H...O and N-H...N hydrogen bonds as well as a blue-shifted C-H...O contact. AIM analysis suggests that the blue-shifted C-H...O contact exists as van der Waals interaction, and the electron density rho that reflects the strength of a bond has been used to explain the red- and blue-shifted. By means of NBO analysis, we report a method to estimate the effect of hyperconjugation quantitatively, which combines the electron density in the X-H (X = N, C) sigma bonding orbital with that in the sigma* antibonding orbital. The effect of structural reorganization on the origins of the red- and blue-shifted has been considered by the partial optimization, its behavior on the X-H (X = N, C) bond is quite different. Rehybridization and repolarization models are employed, and they act as bond-shortening effects. The competition between the electrostatic attractions and Pauli/nucleus repulsions is present in the two typical red-shifted N-H...O and N-H...N hydrogen bonds as well as in the blue-shifted C-H...O van der Waals contact. Electrostatic attraction between H and Y atoms (Y = O, N) is an important reason for the red shift, while the nucleus-nucleus repulsion between H and O atoms may be a factor leading to the C-H bond contraction and its blue shift. The electric field effect induced by the acceptor O atom on the C-H bond is also discussed. PMID:19715282

  16. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIii of... - Work Practice Standards-Required Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen and Mercury Vapor Leaks 3 Table 3 to... Standards—Required Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen and Mercury Vapor Leaks... cell back into service until the leaking equipment is repaired. 3. A decomposer or hydrogen...

  17. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIii of... - Work Practice Standards-Required Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen and Mercury Vapor Leaks 3 Table 3 to... Standards—Required Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen and Mercury Vapor Leaks... cell back into service until the leaking equipment is repaired. 3. A decomposer or hydrogen...

  18. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIii of... - Work Practice Standards-Required Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen and Mercury Vapor Leaks 3 Table 3 to... Standards—Required Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen and Mercury Vapor Leaks... cell back into service until the leaking equipment is repaired. 3. A decomposer or hydrogen...

  19. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIii of... - Work Practice Standards-Required Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen and Mercury Vapor Leaks 3 Table 3 to... Standards—Required Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen and Mercury Vapor Leaks... cell back into service until the leaking equipment is repaired. 3. A decomposer or hydrogen...

  20. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIii of... - Work Practice Standards-Required Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen and Mercury Vapor Leaks 3 Table 3 to... Standards—Required Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen and Mercury Vapor Leaks... cell back into service until the leaking equipment is repaired. 3. A decomposer or hydrogen...

  1. Testing for hydrogen environment embrittlement - Experimental variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1974-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement is classified into three types: internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen reaction embrittlement, and hydrogen environment embrittlement. Characteristics of and materials embrittled by these types of hydrogen embrittlement are discussed. Hydrogen environment embrittlement is reviewed in detail. Factors involved in standardizing test methods for detecting the occurrence of and evaluating the severity of hydrogen environment embrittlement are considered. The effects of test technique, hydrogen pressure, gas purity, strain rate, stress concentration factor, and test temperature are discussed.

  2. Molecular beam-thermal hydrogen desorption from palladium

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, R. F. M.; Berardo, F. M. V.; Ribeiro, J. H. F.

    2010-04-15

    Among the most efficient techniques for hydrogen desorption monitoring, thermal desorption mass spectrometry is a very sensitive one, but in certain cases can give rise to uptake misleading results due to residual hydrogen partial pressure background variations. In this work one develops a novel thermal desorption variant based on the effusive molecular beam technique that represents a significant improvement in the accurate determination of hydrogen mass absorbed on a solid sample. The enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio for trace hydrogen is on the order of 20%, and no previous calibration with a chemical standard is required. The kinetic information obtained from the hydrogen desorption mass spectra (at a constant heating rate of 1 deg. C/min) accounts for the consistency of the technique.

  3. Hydrogen chloride test set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Detector uses tertiary amine, which makes reaction fairly specific for relatively small highly polarized hydrogen chloride molecule. Reaction is monitored by any microbalance capable of measuring extremely small mass differences in real time.

  4. The hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} hydrocarbons on Pt(111) monitored in situ over 13 orders of magnitude in pressure with infrared-visible sum frequency generation

    SciTech Connect

    Cremer, P.S.

    1996-05-01

    The hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of ethylene, propylene, and isobutene were monitored in situ during heterogeneous catalysis over Pt(111) between 10{sup -10} Torr and 1000 Torr with infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG). SFG is a surface specific vibrational spectroscopy capable of achieving submonolayer sensitivity under reaction conditions in the presence of hundreds of Toff of reactants and products. Olefin dehydrogenation experiments were carried out with SFG under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions on the (111) crystal face of platinum Ethylene chemisorbed on Pt(111) below 230 K in the di-{sigma} bonded conformation (Pt-CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}-Pt). Upon annealing the system to form the dehydrogenation product, ethylidyne (M=CCH{sub 3}), evidence was found for an ethylidene intermediate (M=CHCH{sub 3}) from its characteristic v{sub as}(CH{sub 3}) near 2960 cm{sup -1}. Hydrogenation of ethylene was carried out between 1 Toff and 700 Torr of H{sub 2} while the vibrational spectrum of surface species was monitored with SFG. Simultaneously, gas chromatography was used to obtain the turnover rate for the catalytic reaction, which could be correlated with the adsorbed intermediate concentration to determine the reaction rate per surface intermediate. Di-{sigma} bonded ethylene, {pi}-bonded ethylene, ethyl groups and ethylidyne resided on the surface during reaction. The mechanistic pathway for ethylene hydrogenation involved the stepwise hydrogenation of {pi}-bonded ethylene through an ethyl intermediate to ethane. The hydrogenation of propylene was carried out under the same conditions as ethylene. It was found that propylene hydrogenates from {pi}-bonded propylene through a 2-propyl intermediate to propane on Pt(111). The rate of reaction was approximately 50% slower than that of ethylene hydrogenation. Isobutene, however, was found to hydrogenate almost two order of magnitude slower than propylene on Pt(111).

  5. Simultaneous reduction and digestion of proteins with disulfide bonds for hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui-Min; McLoughlin, Shaun M; Frausto, Stephen D; Tang, Hengli; Emmett, Mark R; Marshall, Alan G

    2010-02-15

    Proteolyzed peptides provide the basis for mass-analyzed hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) for mapping solvent access to various segments of solution-phase proteins. Aspergillus saitoi protease type XIII and porcine pepsin can generate peptides of overlapping sequences and high sequence coverage. However, if disulfide bonds are present, proteolysis can be severely limited, particularly in the vicinity of the disulfide linkage(s). Disulfide bonds cannot be reduced before or during the H/D exchange reaction without affecting the protein higher-order structure. Here, we demonstrate simultaneous quench/digestion/reduction following H/D exchange, for subsequent mass analysis. Proteolysis is conducted in the presence of tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine hydrochloride (TCEP.HCl) and urea, and all other steps of the H/D exchange and analysis are maintained. This method yields dramatically increased sequence coverage and localization of solvent-exposed segments for mass-analyzed solution-phase H/D exchange of proteins containing disulfide bonds. PMID:20099838

  6. Uncertainty in drought monitoring by the Standardized Precipitation Index: the case study of the Abruzzo region (central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergni, L.; Di Lena, B.; Todisco, F.; Mannocchi, F.

    2015-12-01

    As shown by several authors, drought monitoring by the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) presents some uncertainties, mainly dependent on the choice of the probability distribution used to describe the cumulative precipitation and on the characteristics (e.g., length and variability) of the dataset. In this paper, the uncertainty related to SPI estimates has been quantified and analyzed with regards to the case study of the Abruzzo region (Central Italy), by using monthly precipitation recorded at 75 stations during the period 1951-2009. First, a set of distributions suitable to describe the cumulative precipitation at the 3-, 6-, and 12-month time scales was identified by using L-moments ratio diagrams. The goodness-of-fit was evaluated by applying the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, and the Normality test on the derived SPI series. Then the confidence intervals of SPI have been calculated by applying a bootstrap procedure. The size of the confidence intervals has been considered as a measure of uncertainty, and its dependence on several factors such as the distribution type, the time scale, the record length, and the season has been examined. Results show that the distributions Pearson type III (PE3), Weibull (WEI), Generalized Normal (GNO), Generalized Extreme Value (GEV), and Gamma (GA2) are all suitable to describe the cumulative precipitation, with a slightly better performance of the PE3 and GNO distributions. As expected, the uncertainty increases as the record length and time scale decrease. The leading source of uncertainty is the record length while the effects due to seasonality and time scale are negligible. Two-parameter distributions make it possible to obtain confidence intervals of SPI (particularly for extreme values) narrower than those obtained by three-parameter distributions. Nevertheless, due to a poorer goodness of fit, two-parameter distributions can provide less reliable estimates of the precipitation probability. In any event, independently

  7. Characterization of the International Humic Substances Society standard and reference fulvic and humic acids by solution state carbon-13 (13C) and hydrogen-1 (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Folan, Daniel W.; MacCarthy, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Standard and reference samples of the International Humic Substances Society have been characterized by solution state carbon-13 and hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. Samples included the Suwannee River, soil, and peat standard fulvic and humic acids, the Leonardite standard humic acid, the Nordic aquatic reference fulvic and humic acids, and the Summit Hill soil reference humic acid. Aqueous-solution carbon-13 NMR analyses included the measurement of spin-lattice relaxation times, measurement of nuclear Overhauser enhancement factors, measurement of quantitative carbon distributions, recording of attached proton test spectra, and recording of spectra under nonquantitative conditions. Distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer carbon-13 NMR spectra also were recorded on the Suwannee River fulvic acid in deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide. Hydrogen-1 NMR spectra were recorded on sodium salts of the samples in deuterium oxide. The carbon aromaticities of the samples ranged from 0.24 for the Suwannee River fulvic acid to 0.58 for the Leonardite humic acid.

  8. Closer look at our neighbors to the south: Air quality trends, standards, and monitoring programs of Latin American countries

    SciTech Connect

    Childers, L.O.; Medina-Vera, M.; Mitchell, W.J.

    1997-09-01

    The Global Environment Monitoring System (GEMS/Air) is a program in which air monitoring data from over 50 countries throughout the world are collected and analyzed. The GEMS/Air program is sponsored by the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and the World Health Organization (WHO). As part of a technical systems agreement between the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the UNEP/WHO, collaborative reviews of eighteen Latin American cities were conducted over the past two years. The countries visited include Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, and Venezuela. The findings of these reviews and the future direction of air pollution monitoring programs in these countries are presented.

  9. Provision of the International standards by the data of the monitoring of heliophysical perturbations of near Earth's space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avakyan, Sergey

    middle geomagnetic latitudes in the times of principal geomagnetic storms. Continuous and spectrally complete measurements of solar radiation are essential in detecting extreme events in the Sun (flares, coronal ejections etc.), in order to forecast such events. Therefore, «Space Solar Patrol» should be launched on the board of a space vehicle with a sun-synchronous orbit, to the altitude close to the upper boundary of the ionosphere. In our report, we underline the importance of the suggested monitoring for implementation of International Standards, taking into account similar experiments (such as SolACES), which are carried out or planned.

  10. Application of a newly developed hydrogen peroxide vapor phase sensor to HPV sterilizer.

    PubMed

    Taizo, I; Sinichi, A; Kawamura, K

    1998-01-01

    A new type of concentration sensor for hydrogen peroxide vapor has been developed by making use of a semiconductor. Output from the vapor sensor has been shown to have a good linear relationship with the logarithm of the concentration of hydrogen peroxide vapor. Concentration of hydrogen peroxide vapor introduced into the sterilization chamber could be kept constant by monitoring the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide vapor continuously and controlling the vapor supply. Temperature and humidity have also been kept constant. D-values for B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 at various concentrations of hydrogen peroxide vapor have been determined by using the combination system of the hydrogen peroxide vapor sensor, the hydrogen peroxide vapor supplier, thermosensor and humidity sensor. D-values at the temperature of 30 degrees C and the absolute humidity of 0.7 mg H2O/L thus obtained, were 0.2 minutes at hydrogen peroxide concentration of 600 ppm and 1.2 minutes at 200 ppm at the temperature of 30 degrees C and 0.7 mg/L absolute humidity. D-values for B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 at various temperatures, humidity and levels of hydrogen peroxide concentration have also been determined. These fundamental data indicate that the sterilization by hydrogen peroxide vapor can be validated as precisely as steam sterilization by measuring and controlling the concentration of hydrogen peroxide vapor using a combination of the hydrogen peroxide concentration sensor and the vapor generator. Influence of temperature and humidity have also been studied. The hydrogen peroxide sensor has been calibrated and standardized by using the standard hydrogen peroxide vapor whose concentration has been determined by calculating partial pressure of hydrogen peroxide over the water-hydrogen peroxide solution. PMID:9542409

  11. Hydrogen Fuel Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Rockward, Tommy

    2012-07-16

    For the past 6 years, open discussions and/or meetings have been held and are still on-going with OEM, Hydrogen Suppliers, other test facilities from the North America Team and International collaborators regarding experimental results, fuel clean-up cost, modeling, and analytical techniques to help determine levels of constituents for the development of an international standard for hydrogen fuel quality (ISO TC197 WG-12). Significant progress has been made. The process for the fuel standard is entering final stages as a result of the technical accomplishments. The objectives are to: (1) Determine the allowable levels of hydrogen fuel contaminants in support of the development of science-based international standards for hydrogen fuel quality (ISO TC197 WG-12); and (2) Validate the ASTM test method for determining low levels of non-hydrogen constituents.

  12. Comprehensive air monitoring plan: general monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-31

    Recommendations are provided for general monitoring of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) in ambient air in parts of Colusa, Lake, Mendocino, Napa, and Sonoma counties potentially impacted by emissions from geothermal development projects in the Geysers-Calistoga Known Geothermal Resource Area. Recommendations for types, placement, performance guidelines, and criteria and procedure for triggering establishment and termination of CAMP monitoring equipment were determined after examination of four factors: population location; emission sources; meteorological considerations; and data needs of permitting agencies and applicants. Three alternate financial plans were developed. Locations and equipment for immediate installation are recommended for: two air quality stations in communities where the State ambient air quality standard for H/sub 2/S has been exceeded; three air quality trend stations to monitor progress in reduction of H/sub 2/S emissions; two meteorological observation stations to monitor synoptic wind flow over the area; and one acoustic radar and one rawinsonde station to monitor air inversions which limit the depth of the mixing layer.

  13. Simultaneous Real-Time Monitoring of Oxygen Consumption and Hydrogen Peroxide Production in Cells Using Our Newly Developed Chip-Type Biosensor Device

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Ankush; Kikuchi, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Kumi Y.; Suzuki, Makoto; Sugiura, Yamato; Sugai, Tomoya; Tomonori, Amano; Tada, Mika; Kobayashi, Masaki; Matsue, Tomokazu; Kasai, Shigenobu

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms bear its defense mechanism. Immune cells during invasion by foreign body undergoes phagocytosis during which monocyte and neutrophil produces reactive oxygen species (ROS). The ROS generated in animal cells are known to be involved in several diseases and ailments, when generated in excess. Therefore, if the ROS generated in cells can be measured and analyzed precisely, it can be employed in immune function evaluation and disease detection. The aim of the current study is to introduce our newly developed chip-type biosensor device with high specificity and sensitivity. It comprises of counter electrode and working electrodes I and II. The counter electrode is a platinum plate while the working electrodes I and II are platinum microelectrode and osmium-horseradish peroxidase modified gold electrode, respectively which acts as oxygen and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection sensors. Simultaneous measurement of oxygen consumption and H2O2 generation were measured in animal cells under the effect of exogenous addition of differentiation inducer, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. The results obtained showed considerable changes in reduction currents in the absence and presence of inducer. Our newly developed chip-type biosensor device is claimed to be a useful tool for real-time monitoring of the respiratory activity and precise detection of H2O2 in cells. It can thus be widely applied in biomedical research and in clinical trials being an advancement over other H2O2 detection techniques. PMID:27065878

  14. Simultaneous Real-Time Monitoring of Oxygen Consumption and Hydrogen Peroxide Production in Cells Using Our Newly Developed Chip-Type Biosensor Device.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Ankush; Kikuchi, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Kumi Y; Suzuki, Makoto; Sugiura, Yamato; Sugai, Tomoya; Tomonori, Amano; Tada, Mika; Kobayashi, Masaki; Matsue, Tomokazu; Kasai, Shigenobu

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms bear its defense mechanism. Immune cells during invasion by foreign body undergoes phagocytosis during which monocyte and neutrophil produces reactive oxygen species (ROS). The ROS generated in animal cells are known to be involved in several diseases and ailments, when generated in excess. Therefore, if the ROS generated in cells can be measured and analyzed precisely, it can be employed in immune function evaluation and disease detection. The aim of the current study is to introduce our newly developed chip-type biosensor device with high specificity and sensitivity. It comprises of counter electrode and working electrodes I and II. The counter electrode is a platinum plate while the working electrodes I and II are platinum microelectrode and osmium-horseradish peroxidase modified gold electrode, respectively which acts as oxygen and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection sensors. Simultaneous measurement of oxygen consumption and H2O2 generation were measured in animal cells under the effect of exogenous addition of differentiation inducer, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. The results obtained showed considerable changes in reduction currents in the absence and presence of inducer. Our newly developed chip-type biosensor device is claimed to be a useful tool for real-time monitoring of the respiratory activity and precise detection of H2O2 in cells. It can thus be widely applied in biomedical research and in clinical trials being an advancement over other H2O2 detection techniques. PMID:27065878

  15. 40 CFR 415.425 - New source performance standards (NSPS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production... achieve the following new source performance standards (NSPS): Subpart AP—Hydrogen Cyanide Pollutant...

  16. 40 CFR 415.425 - New source performance standards (NSPS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production... achieve the following new source performance standards (NSPS): Subpart AP—Hydrogen Cyanide Pollutant...

  17. 40 CFR 415.425 - New source performance standards (NSPS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production... achieve the following new source performance standards (NSPS): Subpart AP—Hydrogen Cyanide Pollutant...

  18. 40 CFR 415.425 - New source performance standards (NSPS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production... achieve the following new source performance standards (NSPS): Subpart AP—Hydrogen Cyanide Pollutant...

  19. 40 CFR 415.425 - New source performance standards (NSPS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production... achieve the following new source performance standards (NSPS): Subpart AP—Hydrogen Cyanide Pollutant...

  20. Hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Chirivella, J. E.; Fujita, T.; Jeffe, R. E.; Lawson, D.; Manvi, R.

    1975-01-01

    The state of hydrogen production technology is evaluated. Specific areas discussed include: hydrogen production fossil fuels; coal gasification processes; electrolysis of water; thermochemical production of hydrogen; production of hydrogen by solar energy; and biological production of hydrogen. Supply options are considered along with costs of hydrogen production.

  1. Development and application of Marinelli beaker standards for monitoring radioactivity in Dairy-Products by gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lavi, N; Alfassi, Z B

    2004-12-01

    Marinelli (reentrant) beakers are recommended for measurement of low-activity radioactive environmental samples, in both liquid and solid phase. The preparation of Marinelli beaker standards of milk powder containing 232ThO2 at secular equilibrium with its daughter radionuclides was studied. Standards were prepared by mixing of known amounts of solid ThO2 and milk powder. The densities of the standards were 0.5-0.7 kg dm(-3). Measurements of calibrated Marinelli beaker standards with HPGe detector showed that the energy dependence of the efficiency is similar to that of a point source, i.e. an almost linear dependence of log-efficiency vs. log-energy in the 200-2000 keV range, however the parabolic correlation fits better. The validity of these standards was checked by comparison with certified standard reference material IAEA-152-Milk powder containing radiocesium and radiopotassium. The results obtained were found to be in a good agreement with the published certified data. The limit of detection for the determination of radiocesium by gamma ray spectrometry under the prevailing experimental conditions is 0.03 Bq (i.e. 0.8 pCi), for samples of dairy products having lower densities of 0.7 kg dm(-1). PMID:15388145

  2. Guidelines and standard procedures for continuous water-quality monitors: Station operation, record computation, and data reporting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Richard J.; Boulger, Robert W., Jr.; Oblinger, Carolyn J.; Smith, Brett A.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey uses continuous water-quality monitors to assess the quality of the Nation's surface water. A common monitoring-system configuration for water-quality data collection is the four-parameter monitoring system, which collects temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, and pH data. Such systems also can be configured to measure other properties, such as turbidity or fluorescence. Data from sensors can be used in conjunction with chemical analyses of samples to estimate chemical loads. The sensors that are used to measure water-quality field parameters require careful field observation, cleaning, and calibration procedures, as well as thorough procedures for the computation and publication of final records. This report provides guidelines for site- and monitor-selection considerations; sensor inspection and calibration methods; field procedures; data evaluation, correction, and computation; and record-review and data-reporting processes, which supersede the guidelines presented previously in U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report WRIR 00-4252. These procedures have evolved over the past three decades, and the process continues to evolve with newer technologies.

  3. 40 CFR 63.8240 - What are my monitoring requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell...? For each by-product hydrogen stream, each end box ventilation system vent, and each mercury thermal recovery unit vent, you must monitor the mercury emissions using the procedures in paragraph (a) or (b)...

  4. 40 CFR 63.8240 - What are my monitoring requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell...? For each by-product hydrogen stream, each end box ventilation system vent, and each mercury thermal recovery unit vent, you must monitor the mercury emissions using the procedures in paragraph (a) or (b)...

  5. 40 CFR 63.8240 - What are my monitoring requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali...-product hydrogen stream, each end box ventilation system vent, and each mercury thermal recovery unit vent, you must monitor the mercury emissions using the procedures in paragraph (a) or (b) of this...

  6. 40 CFR 63.8240 - What are my monitoring requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell...? For each by-product hydrogen stream, each end box ventilation system vent, and each mercury thermal recovery unit vent, you must monitor the mercury emissions using the procedures in paragraph (a) or (b)...

  7. 40 CFR 63.8240 - What are my monitoring requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell...? For each by-product hydrogen stream, each end box ventilation system vent, and each mercury thermal recovery unit vent, you must monitor the mercury emissions using the procedures in paragraph (a) or (b)...

  8. The maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures: definition and determination

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yang; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; He, Chuan-Shu; Zhao, Quan-Bao; Wang, Yi; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production from wastes has many advantages compared to various chemical methods. Methodology for characterizing the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures is essential for monitoring reactor operation in fermentative hydrogen production, however there is lack of such kind of standardized methodologies. In the present study, a new index, i.e., the maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity (SHAm) of anaerobic mixed cultures, was proposed, and consequently a reliable and simple method, named SHAm test, was developed to determine it. Furthermore, the influences of various parameters on the SHAm value determination of anaerobic mixed cultures were evaluated. Additionally, this SHAm assay was tested for different types of substrates and bacterial inocula. Our results demonstrate that this novel SHAm assay was a rapid, accurate and simple methodology for determining the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures. Thus, application of this approach is beneficial to establishing a stable anaerobic hydrogen-producing system. PMID:24912488

  9. The maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures: definition and determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Yang; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; He, Chuan-Shu; Zhao, Quan-Bao; Wang, Yi; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-06-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production from wastes has many advantages compared to various chemical methods. Methodology for characterizing the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures is essential for monitoring reactor operation in fermentative hydrogen production, however there is lack of such kind of standardized methodologies. In the present study, a new index, i.e., the maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity (SHAm) of anaerobic mixed cultures, was proposed, and consequently a reliable and simple method, named SHAm test, was developed to determine it. Furthermore, the influences of various parameters on the SHAm value determination of anaerobic mixed cultures were evaluated. Additionally, this SHAm assay was tested for different types of substrates and bacterial inocula. Our results demonstrate that this novel SHAm assay was a rapid, accurate and simple methodology for determining the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures. Thus, application of this approach is beneficial to establishing a stable anaerobic hydrogen-producing system.

  10. Guidelines and standard procedures for continuous water-quality monitors : site selection, field operation, calibration, record computation, and reporting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Richard J.; Mattraw, H.C.; Ritz, G.F.; Smith, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey uses continuous water-quality monitors to assess variations in the quality of the Nation's surface water. A common system configuration for data collection is the four-parameter water-quality monitoring system, which collects temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, and pH data, although systems can be configured to measure other properties such as turbidity or chlorophyll. The sensors that are used to measure these water properties require careful field observation, cleaning, and calibration procedures, as well as thorough procedures for the computation and publication of final records. Data from sensors can be used in conjunction with collected samples and chemical analyses to estimate chemical loads. This report provides guidelines for site-selection considerations, sensor test methods, field procedures, error correction, data computation, and review and publication processes. These procedures have evolved over the past three decades, and the process continues to evolve with newer technologies.