Science.gov

Sample records for standardised candles improvements

  1. Improved chlorate candle provides concentrated oxygen source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haug, R. D.; Myers, D. A.; Tanzar, G. F.

    1967-01-01

    Improved chlorate candle is used as a solid, portable source of oxygen in emergency situations. It contains sodium chlorate, iron, barium peroxide, and glass mixed in powdered form. The oxygen evolves from the decomposition of the sodium chlorate when an ignition pellet is electrically initiated.

  2. LSQ13fn: A type II-Plateau supernova with a possibly low metallicity progenitor that breaks the standardised candle relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polshaw, J.; Kotak, R.; Dessart, L.; Fraser, M.; Gal-Yam, A.; Inserra, C.; Sim, S. A.; Smartt, S. J.; Sollerman, J.; Baltay, C.; Rabinowitz, D.; Benetti, S.; Botticella, M. T.; Campbell, H.; Chen, T.-W.; Galbany, L.; McKinnon, R.; Nicholl, M.; Smith, K. W.; Sullivan, M.; Takáts, K.; Valenti, S.; Young, D. R.

    2016-04-01

    We present optical imaging and spectroscopy of supernova (SN) LSQ13fn, a type II supernova with several hitherto-unseen properties. Although it initially showed strong symmetric spectral emission features attributable to He ii, N iii, and C iii, reminiscent of some interacting SNe, it transitioned into an object that would fall more naturally under a type II-Plateau (IIP) classification. However, its spectral evolution revealed several unusual properties: metal lines appeared later than expected, were weak, and some species were conspicuous by their absence. Furthermore, the line velocities were found to be lower than expected given the plateau brightness, breaking the SN IIP standardised candle method for distance estimates. We found that, in combination with a short phase of early-time ejecta-circumstellar material interaction, metal-poor ejecta, and a large progenitor radius could reasonably account for the observed behaviour. Comparisons with synthetic model spectra of SNe IIP of a given progenitor mass would imply a progenitor star metallicity as low as 0.1 Z⊙. LSQ13fn highlights the diversity of SNe II and the many competing physical effects that come into play towards the final stages of massive star evolution immediately preceding core-collapse. The reduced spectra are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/588/A1

  3. A five-year performance review of field-scale, slow-release permanganate candles with recommendations for second-generation improvements.

    PubMed

    Christenson, Mark; Kambhu, Ann; Reece, James; Comfort, Steve; Brunner, Laurie

    2016-05-01

    In 2009, we identified a TCE plume at an abandoned landfill that was located in a low permeable silty-clay aquifer. To treat the TCE, we manufactured slow-release potassium permanganate cylinders (oxidant candles) that had diameters of either 5.1 or 7.6 cm and were 91.4 cm long. In 2010, we compared two methods of candle installation by inserting equal masses of the oxidant candles (7.6-cm vs 5.1-cm dia). The 5.1-cm dia candles were inserted with direct-push rods while the 7.6-cm candles were housed in screens and lowered into 10 permanent wells. Since installation, the 7.6-cm oxidant candles have been refurbished approximately once per year by gently scraping off surface oxides. In 2012, we reported initial results; in this paper, we provide a 5-yr performance review since installation. Temporal sampling shows oxidant candles placed in wells have steadily reduced migrating TCE concentrations. Moreover, these candles still maintain an inner core of oxidant that has yet to contribute to the dissolution front and should provide several more years of service. Oxidant candles inserted by direct-push have stopped reducing TCE concentrations because a MnO2 scale developed on the outside of the candles. To counteract oxide scaling, we fabricated a second generation of oxidant candles that contain sodium hexametaphosphate. Laboratory experiments (batch and flow-through) show that these second-generation permanganate candles have better release characteristics and are less prone to oxide scaling. This improvement should reduce the need to perform maintenance on candles placed in wells and provide greater longevity for candles inserted by direct-push. PMID:26901481

  4. Clinical handover improvement in context: exploring tensions between user-centred approaches and standardisation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ming Chao; Turner, Paul; Yee, Kwang Chien

    2013-01-01

    User-centred approaches in the development and evaluation of health information systems promote the importance of involving users and understanding their social contexts to optimise the quality and safety of these systems for patient care. Simultaneously, the standardisation of clinical practices has also been advocated to improve the quality and safety of patient care. In the context of clinical handover improvement within three different departments in one tertiary teaching hospital, this paper highlights the potential for tensions between these two approaches and explores their implications. Based on a user-centred approach, the paper reports on the unique requirements identified within each of the three departments for an information system to support improved clinical handover. Each department had clinical practices, work cultures and user requirements that needed to be considered and accommodated. This led to the project developing distinct minimum data sets for each of the three departments that posed challenges for efforts to standardise handover practices across the hospital and for building an integrated information system. While on the one hand accommodating unique departmental user requirements was valuable, they revealed the potential for the introduction of quality and safety risks at the organisational level. To resolve these tensions, the project team developed an approach called flexible standardisation that has now been embedded in Australia' s national guidelines on clinical handover improvement. PMID:23941929

  5. Cutting Candles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranucci, Ernest R.

    1973-01-01

    Different regular-polygon-shaped candles wound with a sheet of paper are cut through obliquely. When the papers are unwound, unique patterns are revealed. Investigation of these patterns leads to the discovery of geometric concepts. (JP)

  6. Low background techniques in CANDLES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, K.; Iida, T.; Kishimoto, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Nomachi, M.; Umehara, S.; Chan, W. M.; Kakubata, H.; Li, X.; Maeda, T.; Ohata, T.; Temuge, B.; Tetsuno, K.; Trang, V. T. T.; Uehara, T.; Yoshida, S.; Morishita, K.; Ogawa, I.; Sakamoto, K.; Tamagawa, Y.; Yoshizawa, M.; Fushimi, K.; Hazama, R.; Naktani, N.; Suzuki, K.

    2015-08-01

    CANDLES is a double beta decay experiment using 48Ca in CaF2 crystals. The measurement is being performed with prototype detector (CANDLES III) for high sensitive measurement in the future. Recent status of detector improvements and background reduction techniques are described in this paper.

  7. Low background techniques in CANDLES

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, K. E-mail: nkyohei@u-fukui.ac.jp; Iida, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Nomachi, M.; Umehara, S.; Kishimoto, T.; Chan, W. M.; Kakubata, H.; Li, X.; Maeda, T.; Ohata, T.; Temuge, B.; Tetsuno, K.; Trang, V. T. T.; Uehara, T.; Yoshida, S.; Morishita, K.; Ogawa, I.; Sakamoto, K.; Tamagawa, Y.; and others

    2015-08-17

    CANDLES is a double beta decay experiment using {sup 48}Ca in CaF{sub 2} crystals. The measurement is being performed with prototype detector (CANDLES III) for high sensitive measurement in the future. Recent status of detector improvements and background reduction techniques are described in this paper.

  8. Improving Information Exchange in the Chicken Processing Sector Using Standardised Data Lists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Kathryn Anne-Marie; van der Roest, Joop; Höskuldsson, Stefán Torfi; Olsen, Petter; Karlsen, Kine Mari

    Research has shown that to improve electronic communication between companies, universal standardised data lists are necessary. In food supply chains in particular there is an increased need to exchange data in the wake of food safety incidents. Food supply chain companies already record numerous measurements, properties and parameters. These records are necessary for legal reasons, labelling, traceability, profiling desirable characteristics, showing compliance and for meeting customer requirements. Universal standards for name and content of each of these data elements would improve information exchange between buyers, sellers, authorities, consumers and other interested parties. A case study, carried out for the chicken sector, attempted to identify the most relevant parameters including which of these were already communicated to external bodies.

  9. Catalyzed sodium chlorate candles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malich, C. W.; Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    The catalytic effect of cobalt powder on chlorate decomposition has been confirmed. Catalysis is enhanced by oxidation of the metal during burning. Catalysts other than cobalt compounds should also be effective; the complete elimination of fuel has shown that the oxidation of cobalt during decomposition is not a vital factor in the improved performance of catalyzed candles.

  10. Improving Type Ia Supernova Standard Candle Cosmology Measurements Using Observations of Early-Type Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Joshua Evan

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are the current standard-bearers for dark energy but face several hurdles for their continued success in future large surveys. For example, spectroscopic classification of the myriad SNe soon to be discovered will not be possible, and systematics from uncertainties in dust corrections and the evolution of SN demographics and/or empirical calibrations used to standardize SNe Ia must be studied. Through the identification of low-dust host galaxies and through increased understanding of both the SN - progenitor connections and empirical calibrations, host galaxy information may offer opportunities to improve the cosmological utility of SNe Ia. The first half of this thesis analyzes the sample of SNe Ia discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cluster Supernova Survey augmented with HST-observed SNe Ia in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields. Correlations between properties of SNe and their host galaxies are examined at high redshift. Using galaxy color and quantitative morphology to determine the red sequence in 25 clusters, a model is developed to distinguish passively evolving early-type galaxies from star-forming galaxies in both clusters and the field. With this approach, 6 early-type cluster member hosts and 11 SN Ia early-type field hosts are identified. For the first time at z > 0.9, the correlation between host galaxy type and the rise and fall time of SN Ia light curves is confirmed. The relatively simple spectral energy distributions of early-type galaxies also enables stellar mass measurements for these hosts. In combination with literature host mass measurements, these measurements are used to show, at z > 0.9, a hint of the correlation between host mass and Hubble residuals reported at lower redshift. By simultaneously fitting cluster galaxy formation histories and dust content to the scatter of the cluster red sequences, it is shown that dust reddening of early-type cluster SN hosts is likely less

  11. Standardising Home Range Studies for Improved Management of the Critically Endangered Black Rhinoceros

    PubMed Central

    Plotz, Roan D.; Grecian, W. James; Kerley, Graham I.H.; Linklater, Wayne L.

    2016-01-01

    Comparisons of recent estimations of home range sizes for the critically endangered black rhinoceros in Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park (HiP), South Africa, with historical estimates led reports of a substantial (54%) increase, attributed to over-stocking and habitat deterioration that has far-reaching implications for rhino conservation. Other reports, however, suggest the increase is more likely an artefact caused by applying various home range estimators to non-standardised datasets. We collected 1939 locations of 25 black rhino over six years (2004–2009) to estimate annual home ranges and evaluate the hypothesis that they have increased in size. A minimum of 30 and 25 locations were required for accurate 95% MCP estimation of home range of adult rhinos, during the dry and wet seasons respectively. Forty and 55 locations were required for adult female and male annual MCP home ranges, respectively, and 30 locations were necessary for estimating 90% bivariate kernel home ranges accurately. Average annual 95% bivariate kernel home ranges were 20.4 ± 1.2 km2, 53 ±1.9% larger than 95% MCP ranges (9.8 km2 ± 0.9). When home range techniques used during the late-1960s in HiP were applied to our dataset, estimates were similar, indicating that ranges have not changed substantially in 50 years. Inaccurate, non-standardised, home range estimates and their comparison have the potential to mislead black rhino population management. We recommend that more care be taken to collect adequate numbers of rhino locations within standardized time periods (i.e., season or year) and that the comparison of home ranges estimated using dissimilar procedures be avoided. Home range studies of black rhino have been data deficient and procedurally inconsistent. Standardisation of methods is required. PMID:27028728

  12. Standardising Home Range Studies for Improved Management of the Critically Endangered Black Rhinoceros.

    PubMed

    Plotz, Roan D; Grecian, W James; Kerley, Graham I H; Linklater, Wayne L

    2016-01-01

    Comparisons of recent estimations of home range sizes for the critically endangered black rhinoceros in Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park (HiP), South Africa, with historical estimates led reports of a substantial (54%) increase, attributed to over-stocking and habitat deterioration that has far-reaching implications for rhino conservation. Other reports, however, suggest the increase is more likely an artefact caused by applying various home range estimators to non-standardised datasets. We collected 1939 locations of 25 black rhino over six years (2004-2009) to estimate annual home ranges and evaluate the hypothesis that they have increased in size. A minimum of 30 and 25 locations were required for accurate 95% MCP estimation of home range of adult rhinos, during the dry and wet seasons respectively. Forty and 55 locations were required for adult female and male annual MCP home ranges, respectively, and 30 locations were necessary for estimating 90% bivariate kernel home ranges accurately. Average annual 95% bivariate kernel home ranges were 20.4 ± 1.2 km(2), 53 ± 1.9% larger than 95% MCP ranges (9.8 km(2) ± 0.9). When home range techniques used during the late-1960s in HiP were applied to our dataset, estimates were similar, indicating that ranges have not changed substantially in 50 years. Inaccurate, non-standardised, home range estimates and their comparison have the potential to mislead black rhino population management. We recommend that more care be taken to collect adequate numbers of rhino locations within standardized time periods (i.e., season or year) and that the comparison of home ranges estimated using dissimilar procedures be avoided. Home range studies of black rhino have been data deficient and procedurally inconsistent. Standardisation of methods is required. PMID:27028728

  13. Standardised Tests: Wristwatch or Dipstick?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    If US education is to be improved a tool is needed that will measure quality. Standardised tests are the only serious contender for the job. This article explores in detail why standardised tests are such a powerful, if limited, tool. It discusses the following three topics: (1) a brief history of tests: the start of the controversy, (2) the…

  14. LEAD IN CANDLE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The candle-using public should be made aware that the core of candle wicks may contain lead. Used as a stiffening agent to keep the wick out of the molten wax, lead can be emitted as particulate to the air and then deposited on indoor surfaces. To define the problem, 100 sets of ...

  15. Development of a methodology for the standardisation and improvement of 'Smartphone' photography of patterned bruises and other cutaneous injuries.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Paul R; Evans, Samuel T; Jones, Michael D; Theobald, Peter S

    2013-09-01

    Human bite-mark analyses can play a prominent role in forensic case investigations, including those involving sexual assault. High-quality photographs routinely secure a link between a bite-mark and an individual's dentition. Access to around the clock forensic photography, however, is often limited, resulting in delay and/or missed opportunities to record valuable evidence. The emergence of Smartphone high-quality photographic technology now provides a previously unimagined opportunity to gather timely forensic photographic evidence. Problems can arise, however, due to the relatively poor quality of the photographs, as a result of many of those taking photographs having received little or no forensic photography training. This study compares unassisted photography with assisted photography, by a specifically developed camera application (App), to provide a standardised method for taking forensic photographs. An App, written in Java, was hosted on the Google Android Operating System, on a Samsung Galaxy SII Smartphone. Twenty-four volunteers participated in a study to photograph a pseudo bite-mark using three methods, (1) unassisted (as a control), (2) assisted by an ABFO No.2 right-angled photographic reference scale and (3) assisted by the App. The App, method (3), was shown to consistently outperform methods (1) and (2), demonstrating greater standardisation and precision (p<0.001). Analysis of the data showed the extent to which acquiring an accurate photograph depends on the image being orthogonal to the camera. It appears likely that the relatively inaccurate photographs acquired by methods (1) and (2), were as a result of deviation from the plane, orthogonal to the bite-mark. Therefore, the App was successful in ensuring that the camera was both orthogonal and at an appropriate distance, relative to the bite-mark. Thus, the App enhanced the abilities of non-experts to acquire more accurate photographs and created the potential to significantly improve the

  16. Candle flames in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. L.; Ross, H. D.; Tien, J. S.

    1995-01-01

    The candle flame in both normal and microgravity is non-propagating. In microgravity, however, the candle flame is also non-convective where (excepting Stefan flow) pure diffusion is the only transport mode. It also shares many characteristics with another classical problem, that of isolated droplet combustion. Given their qualitatively similar flame shapes and the required heat feedback to condensed-phase fuels, the gas-phase flow and temperature fields should be relatively similar for a droplet and a candle in reduced gravity. Unless the droplet diameter is maintained somehow through non-intrusive replenishment of fuel, the quasi-steady burning characteristics of a droplet can be maintained for only a few seconds. In contrast, the candle flame in microgravity may achieve a nearly steady state over a much longer time and is therefore ideal for examining a number of combustion-related phenomena. In this paper, we examine candle flame behavior in both short-duration and long-duration, quiescent, microgravity environments. Interest in this type of flame, especially 'candle flames in weightlessness', is demonstrated by very frequent public inquiries. The question is usually posed as 'will a candle flame burn in zero gravity', or, 'will a candle burn indefinitely (or steadily) in zero gravity in a large volume of quiescent air'. Intuitive speculation suggests to some that, in the absence of buoyancy, the accumulation of products in the vicinity of the flame will cause flame extinction. The classical theory for droplet combustion with its spherically-shaped diffusion flame, however, shows that steady combustion is possible in the absence of buoyancy if the chemical kinetics are fast enough. Previous experimental studies of candle flames in reduced and microgravity environments showed the flame could survive for at least 5 seconds, but did not reach a steady state in the available test time.

  17. Social and Economic Impact of the Candle Light Source Project Candle project impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghiryan, M.

    Social and economic progress related to the realization of the CANDLE synchrotron light source creation project in Armenia is discussed. CANDLE service is multidisciplinary and long-lasting. Its impacts include significant improvement in science capacities, education quality, industrial capabilities, investment climate, country image, international relations, health level, restraining the "brain-drain", new workplaces, etc. CANDLE will serve as a universal national infrastructure assuring Armenia as a country with knowledge-based economy, a place for doing high-tech business, and be a powerful tool in achieving the country's jump forward in general.

  18. Candle Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. L.; Ross, H. D.; T'ien, J. S.; Chang, P.; Shu, Y.

    1999-01-01

    This work is a study of a candle flame in a microgravity environment. The purpose of the work is to determine if a steady (or quasi-steady) flame can exist in a microgravity environment, study the characteristics of the steady flame, investigate the pre-extinction flame oscillations observed in a previous experiment in more detail, and finally, determine the nature of the interactions between two closely spaced candle flames. The candle flame in microgravity is used as a model of a non-propagating, steady-state, pure diffusion flame. The present work is a continuation of two small-scale, space-based experiments on candle flames, one on the Shuttle and the other on the Mir OS. The previous studies showed nearly steady dim blue flames with flame lifetimes as high as 45 minutes, and 1 Hz spontaneous flame oscillations prior to extinction. The present paper summarizes the results of the modeling efforts to date.

  19. Religious Candles Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... windows where a blind or curtain could catch fire. KKK Candles placed on, or near tables, altars, ... in a deep basin filled with water. General Fire Safety • Matches and lighters should be stored out ...

  20. Candle Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. L.; Ross, H. D.; Chang, P.; T'ien, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this work is to study both experimentally and numerically the behavior of a candle flame burning in a microgravity environment. Two space experiments (Shuttle and Mir) have shown the candle flame in microgravity to be small (approximately 1.5 cm diameter), dim blue, and hemispherical. Near steady flames with very long flame lifetimes (up to 45 minutes in some tests) existed for many of the tests. Most of the flames spontaneously oscillated with a period of approximately 1 Hz just prior to extinction). In a previous model of candle flame in microgravity, a porous sphere wetted with liquid fuel simulated the evaporating wick. The sphere, with a temperature equal to the boiling temperature of the fuel, was at the end of an inert cone that had a prescribed temperature. This inert cone produces the quenching effect of the candle wax in the real configuration. Although the computed flame shape resembled that observed in the microgravity experiment, the model was not able to differentiate the effect of wick geometry, e.g., a long vs. a short wick. This paper presents recent developments in the numerical model of the candle flame. The primary focus has been to more realistically account for the actual shape of the candle.

  1. Improving analgesia in fractured neck of femur with a standardised fascia iliaca block protocol

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Paul; Rugonfalvi-Kiss, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    Fractured neck of femur (NOF) causes significant morbidity and pain for patients; adequate analgesia is an essential component of patient centred care. Patients experiencing greater pain during treatment for fractured NOF are slower to mobilise and have poorer health-related quality of life. NICE guidance suggests considering adding nerve blocks if paracetamol and opioids do not provide sufficient preoperative pain relief. We set out to audit pain levels in this group of patients in a small District General Hospital and to develop a protocol to improve analgesia provision if required. We identified that patients waiting a long time for fixation of fractured NOF could benefit from safe, effective analgesia by way of fascia iliaca compartment block (FICB). We drew up a protocol and held training sessions bringing about a culture change to provide an excellent standard of analgesia for these patients. Most patients reported much better levels of analgesia post-block and junior doctors felt more empowered. Further developments considered are training of senior ED nurses to administer FICB (in keeping with the AAGBI position statement) and a fascia iliaca catheter placement service. PMID:27239308

  2. Candle Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, Daniel L.; Ross, Howard D.; Frate, David T.; Tien, James S.; Shu, Yong

    1997-01-01

    This work is a study of a candle flame in a microgravity environment. The purpose of the work is to determine if a steady (or quasi-steady) flame can exist in a microgravity environment, study the characteristics of the steady flame, investigate the pre-extinction flame oscillations observed in a previous experiment in more detail, and finally, determine the nature of the interactions between two closely spaced candle flames. The candle flame is used as a model combustion system, in that in microgravity it is one of the only examples of a non-propagating, steady-state, pure diffusion flame. Others have used the candle to study a number of combustion phenomena including flame flicker, flame oscillations, electric field effects and enhanced and reduced gravitational effects in flames. The present work is a continuation of a small-scale Shuttle experiment on candle flames. That study showed that the candle flame lifetimes were on the order of 40 seconds, the flames were dim blue after a transient ignition period, and that just prior to extinction the flames oscillated spontaneously for about five seconds at a frequency of 1 Hz. The authors postulated that the gas phase in the immediate vicinity of the flame was quasi-steady. Further away from the flame, however, the assertion of a quasi-steady flame was less certain, thus the authors did not prove that a steady flame could exist. They also speculated that the short lifetime of the candle flame was due to the presence of the small, weakly perforated box that surrounded the candle. The Candle Flames in Microgravity (CFM) experiment, with revised hardware, was recently flown aboard the Mir orbiting station, and conducted inside the glovebox facility by Dr. Shannon Lucid. In addition to the purposes described above, the experiments were NASA's first ability to ascertain the merits of the Mir environment for combustion science studies. In this article, we present the results of that experiment. We are also in the process

  3. Candle filter fabrication using combustion synthesis method

    SciTech Connect

    Hanus, G.J.; Uznanski, K.T.; DeCoursin, D.G.; Hickel, S.D.; Shtessel, E.

    1996-12-31

    Using self-propagating, high-temperature synthesis fabrication techniques, unique combinations of materials were studied for use in candle filter development. Materials suitable for corrosive atmospheres with improved filtration and mechanical properties were identified within the context of manufacturing simplicity, versatility and cost-effectiveness. Material combinations suitable for combustion synthesis were identified which match the temperature, strength and corrosion resistance requirements of operation in pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion environments. Tests on porosity, permeability and strength indicated the ability of the method to process porous filter material which matches or surpasses the performance levels of current, production candle filter material samples.

  4. Candles in Our Windows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Kathryn

    2005-01-01

    "Candles in Our Windows"--also titled "Nightlights"--is a play developed for elementary and middle school students about how residents in Billings, Montana, took a stand against hate. Last March, the 6th-grade students of Woodland Elementary School in New Jersey performed an early version of the play based on a children's book, "The Christmas…

  5. Progress in research on chlorate candle technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littman, J.

    1970-01-01

    Research and development program improves sodium chlorate candle formulation, production method, and igniter design. Cobalt is used as the fuel, dry processing methods are used to lower the water content, and a device based on pyrotechnic heater concepts is used as the igniter.

  6. 16 CFR 501.7 - Candles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Candles. 501.7 Section 501.7 Commercial... 500 § 501.7 Candles. Tapered candles and irregularly shaped decorative candles which are either hand... extent that diameter of such candles need not be expressed. The requirements of § 500.7 of this...

  7. 16 CFR 501.7 - Candles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Candles. 501.7 Section 501.7 Commercial... 500 § 501.7 Candles. Tapered candles and irregularly shaped decorative candles which are either hand... extent that diameter of such candles need not be expressed. The requirements of § 500.7 of this...

  8. 16 CFR 501.7 - Candles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Candles. 501.7 Section 501.7 Commercial... 500 § 501.7 Candles. Tapered candles and irregularly shaped decorative candles which are either hand... extent that diameter of such candles need not be expressed. The requirements of § 500.7 of this...

  9. 16 CFR 501.7 - Candles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Candles. 501.7 Section 501.7 Commercial... 500 § 501.7 Candles. Tapered candles and irregularly shaped decorative candles which are either hand... extent that diameter of such candles need not be expressed. The requirements of § 500.7 of this...

  10. 16 CFR 501.7 - Candles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Candles. 501.7 Section 501.7 Commercial... 500 § 501.7 Candles. Tapered candles and irregularly shaped decorative candles which are either hand... extent that diameter of such candles need not be expressed. The requirements of § 500.7 of this...

  11. Standardisation and Its Discontents

    PubMed Central

    Wears, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    In discussions of the quality and safety problems of modern, Western healthcare, one of the most frequently heard criticisms has been that: “It is not standardised.” This paper explores issues around standardisation that illustrate its surprising complexity, its potential advantages and disadvantages, and its political and sociological implications, in the hope that discourses around standardisation might become more fruitful. PMID:25667566

  12. Parallel Professionalism in an Era of Standardisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone-Johnson, Corrie

    2014-01-01

    Today's American educational context is characterised by increasing standardisation coupled with heightened accountability. While some view standardisation as a lever for equity, many view it as problematic for the work of teachers. Efforts to improve student achievement by focusing on the activities of teachers have resulted in an…

  13. Study of the light guide system for CANDLES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Y.; CANDLES Collaboration

    2008-07-01

    We are trying to observe the neutrinoless double beta decay at Osaka University with the detector system named CANDLES III that uses CaF2(pure) crystals and liquid scintillator. CANDLES III has the photo-coverage of about 30% now. We will install the mirror light guide system to improve this photo-coverage. This means the improvement of the energy resolution. We will report on the result of the experiment to evaluate the performance of this light guide system.

  14. Standardising the organisation of clinical equipment on surgical wards at North Bristol NHS Trust: a quality improvement initiative

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Joseph; Spencer, Robin; Soo, Eleanor; finucane, katherine

    2015-01-01

    Poorly organised clinical equipment can waste significant amounts of time otherwise available for direct patient care. As a group of foundation year one doctors, we identified the organisation of clinical equipment across surgical wards at North Bristol NHS Trust to be poor with stocks often low and items frequently difficult to locate. Time-motion studies (n=80) were confirmatory demonstrating that the mean time to collect equipment necessary for venepuncture, cannulation, arterial blood gases, or blood cultures ranged from 121 to 174 seconds between different areas. By applying a plan-do-study-act (PDSA) methodology, surveying peers as well as working with nursing staff and senior managers, we were able to purchase and implement clinical equipment trolleys on 10 surgical wards across the trust to reduce the time-taken to locate clinical equipment to between 38 to 45 seconds (p=0.01). We feel the key factors for the success of our initiative were strong multidisciplinary engagement and a simple uniform idea. Clinical equipment trolleys organised in a standardised manner have now been rolled out hospital-wide in the new Southmead Hospital Brunel building. PMID:26734373

  15. Application of a standardised protocol for hepatic venous pressure gradient measurement improves quality of readings and facilitates reduction of variceal bleeding in cirrhotics

    PubMed Central

    Tey, Tze Tong; Gogna, Apoorva; Irani, Farah Gillan; Too, Chow Wei; Lo, Hoau Gong Richard; Tan, Bien Soo; Tay, Kiang Hiong; Lui, Hock Foong; Chang, Pik Eu Jason

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) measurement is recommended for prognostic and therapeutic indications in centres with adequate resources and expertise. Our study aimed to evaluate the quality of HVPG measurements at our centre before and after introduction of a standardised protocol, and the clinical relevance of the HVPG to variceal bleeding in cirrhotics. METHODS HVPG measurements performed at Singapore General Hospital from 2005–2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Criteria for quality HVPG readings were triplicate readings, absence of negative pressure values and variability of ≤ 2 mmHg. The rate of variceal bleeding was compared in cirrhotics who achieved a HVPG response to pharmacotherapy (reduction of the HVPG to < 12 mmHg or by ≥ 20% of baseline) and those who did not. RESULTS 126 HVPG measurements were performed in 105 patients (mean age 54.7 ± 11.4 years; 55.2% men). 80% had liver cirrhosis and 20% had non-cirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH). The mean overall HVPG was 13.5 ± 7.2 mmHg, with a significant difference between the cirrhosis and NCPH groups (p < 0.001). The proportion of quality readings significantly improved after the protocol was introduced. HVPG response was achieved in 28 (33.3%, n = 84) cirrhotics. Nine had variceal bleeding over a median follow-up of 29 months. The rate of variceal bleeding was significantly lower in HVPG responders compared to nonresponders (p = 0.025). CONCLUSION The quality of HVPG measurements in our centre improved after the introduction of a standardised protocol. A HVPG response can prognosticate the risk of variceal bleeding in cirrhotics. PMID:26996384

  16. CANDLE Syndrome: orodfacial manifestations and dental implications.

    PubMed

    Roberts, T; Stephen, L; Scott, C; di Pasquale, T; Naser-Eldin, A; Chetty, M; Shaik, S; Lewandowski, L; Beighton, P

    2015-01-01

    A South African girl with CANDLE Syndrome is reported with emphasis on the orodental features and dental management. Clinical manifestations included short stature, wasting of the soft tissue of the arms and legs, erythematous skin eruptions and a prominent abdomen due to hepatosplenomegaly. Generalized microdontia, confirmed by tooth measurement and osteopenia of her jaws, confirmed by digitalized radiography, were previously undescribed syndromic components. Intellectual impairment posed problems during dental intervention. The carious dental lesions and poor oral hygiene were treated conservatively under local anaesthetic. Prophylactic antibiotics were administered an hour before all procedures.Due to the nature of her general condition, invasive dental procedures were minimal. Regular follow-ups were scheduled at six monthly intervals. During this period, her overall oral health status had improved markedly.The CANDLE syndrome is a rare condition with grave complications including immunosuppression and diabetes mellitus. As with many genetic disorders, the dental manifestations are often overshadowed by other more conspicuous and complex syndromic features. Recognition of both the clinical and oral changes that occur in the CANDLE syndrome facilitates accurate diagnosis and appropriate dental management of this potentially lethal condition. PMID:26711936

  17. Emission of air pollutants from burning candles with different composition in indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Derudi, Marco; Gelosa, Simone; Sliepcevich, Andrea; Cattaneo, Andrea; Cavallo, Domenico; Rota, Renato; Nano, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Candle composition is expected to influence the air pollutants emissions, possibly leading to important differences in the emissions of volatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In this regard, the purity of the raw materials and additives used can play a key role. Consequently, in this work emission factors for some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatic species, short-chain aldehydes and particulate matter have been determined for container candles constituted by different paraffin waxes burning in a test chamber. It has been found that wax quality strongly influences the air pollutant emissions. These results could be used, at least at a first glance, to foresee the expected pollutant concentration in a given indoor environment with respect to health safety standards, while the test chamber used for performing the reported results could be useful to estimate the emission factors of any other candle in an easy-to-build standardised environment. PMID:24318837

  18. How complete are our clerkings? A project aimed at improving the quality of medical records by using a standardised proforma.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Jij; Yvon, Camille; Stanger, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Clerking a patient is the first and most important contact that any medical team has with the patient. It provides information that may not be available later in the admission if recorded improperly, such as referral letters, collateral history, dosette boxes or prescription sheets. The quality of data recorded from this encounter was examined at a busy district general hospital surgical department. Initial measurement demonstrated that less than half of certain key parameters like dosages of medication were being recorded by clerking doctors. A clerking proforma was therefore designed to combat this problem. Over three audit cycles (n = 170, 150, 174) the proforma showed statistically significant improvements in the proportion of data that was captured at initial contact with the patient. We conclude that the introduction of proformas for clerking significantly improves the collection of data that impacts patient care during their hospital stay. PMID:26734242

  19. NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION OF CERAMIC CANDLE FILTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Roger H.L. Chen, Ph.D.; Alejandro Kiriakidis

    1999-09-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques have been used to reduce the potential mechanical failures and to improve the reliability of a structure. Failure of a structure is usually initiated at some type of flaw in the material. NDE techniques have been developed to determine the presence of flaws larger than an acceptable size and to estimate the remaining stiffness of a damaged structure (Chen, et. al, 1995). Ceramic candle filters have been tested for use in coal-fueled gas turbine systems. They protect gas turbine components from damage due to erosion. A total of one hundred and one candle filters were nondestructively evaluated in this study. Ninety-eight ceramic candle filters and three ceramic composite filters have been nondestructively inspected using dynamic characterization technique. These ceramic filters include twelve unused Coors alumina/mullite, twenty-four unused and fifteen used Schumacher-Dia-Schumalith TF-20, twenty-five unused and nine used Refractron 326, eight unused and three used Refractron 442T, one new Schumacher-T 10-20, and one used Schumacher-Dia-Schumalith F-40. All filters were subjected to a small excitation and the dynamic response was picked up by a piezoelectric accelerometer. The evaluation of experimental results was processed using digital signal analysis technique including various forms of data transformation. The modal parameters for damage assessment for the unexposed (unused) vs. exposed (used) specimen were based on two vibration parameters: natural frequencies and mode shapes. Finite Element models were built for each specimen type to understand its dynamic response. Linear elastic modal analysis was performed using eight nodes, three-dimensional isotropic solid elements. Conclusions based on our study indicate that dynamic characterization is a feasible NDE technique in studying structural properties of ceramic candle filters. It has been shown that the degradation of the filters due to long working hours (or

  20. Education improves referral of patients suspected of having spondyloarthritis by general practitioners: a study with unannounced standardised patients in daily practice

    PubMed Central

    van Onna, Marloes; Gorter, Simone; Maiburg, Bas; Waagenaar, Gerrie; van Tubergen, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the practice performance of general practitioners (GPs) and GP residents in recognising and referring patients suspected for having axial or peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA), and to investigate the influence of education on this performance. Methods GP (residents) were visited in two rounds by standardised patients (SPs) simulating axial SpA, peripheral SpA or carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) with in between an educational intervention on SpA for part of the participants. Participants were unaware of the nature of the medical problem and study purpose. CTS was included as diversionary tactic. The primary outcome was ≥40% improvement in (considering) referral of the SPs with SpA to the rheumatologist after education. Secondary outcomes included ordering additional diagnostic tests, correct recognition of SpA and identification of variables contributing to this. Results 68 participants (30 GPs and 38 GP residents) were included, of which 19 received education. The primary outcome was met. A significantly higher proportion of GP (residents) from the intervention group referred patients to the rheumatologist compared with the control group after education (change scores, axial SpA +71% vs +15% (p<0.01); peripheral SpA +48% vs 0% (p<0.001)). Participants who received education, more frequently correctly recognised SpA compared with controls (change scores, axial SpA +50% vs −5% (p<0.001); peripheral SpA +21% vs 0% (p=0.01). Conclusions Recognition and referral of patients suspected for having SpA by GP (residents) is low, but targeted education markedly improved this. This supports the development of educational initiatives to improve recognition of SpA and hence referral to a rheumatologist. PMID:26535152

  1. Lighting that One Little Candle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarnati, James T.; Tice, Craig J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a lesson in which fifth graders made observations of candles. Discusses the progress of the lesson and the necessity of instructing students in what and how to watch and measure. Stresses that this can be easily accomplished inexpensively with imagination. (CW)

  2. LED solution for E14 candle lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun; Liu, Ye; Boonekamp, Erik P.; Shi, Lei; Mei, Yi; Jiang, Tan; Guo, Qing; Wu, Huarong

    2009-08-01

    On a short to medium term, energy efficient retrofit LED products can offer an attractive solution for traditional lamps replacement in existing fixtures. To comply with user expectations, LED retrofit lamps should not only have the same mechanical interface to fit (socket and shape), but also have the similar light effect as the lamps they replace. The decorative lighting segment shows the best conditions to meet these requirements on short term. In 2008, Philips Lighting Shanghai started with the development of an LED candle lamp for the replacement of a 15W Candle shape (B35 E14) incandescent bulb, which is used in e.g. chandeliers. In this decorative application the main objective is not to generate as much light as possible, but the application requires the lamp to have a comparable look and, primarily, the same light effect as the incandescent candle lamp. This effect can be described as sparkling light, and it has to be directed sufficiently downwards (i.e., in the direction of the base of the lamp). These requirements leave very limited room for optics, electronics, mechanics and thermal design to play with in the small outline of this lamp. The main voltage AC LED concept is chosen to save the space for driver electronics. However the size of the AC LED is relatively big, which makes the optical design challenging. Several optical solutions to achieve the required light effect, to improve the optical efficiency, and to simplify the system are discussed. A novel prismatic lens has been developed which is capable of transforming the Lambertian light emission from typical high power LEDs into a butter-fly intensity distribution with the desired sparkling light effect. Thanks to this lens no reflecting chamber is needed, which improves the optical efficiency up to 70%, while maintaining the compact feature of the original optics. Together with advanced driver solution and thermal solution, the resulting LED candle lamp operates at 230V, consumes 1.8W, and

  3. Candle Synchrotron Light Source Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakanov, V. M.

    CANDLE - Center for the Advancement of Natural Discoveries using Light Emission - is a 3 GeV energy synchrotron light facility project in the Republic of Armenia. The main design features of the new facility are given. The results of the beam physics study in the future facility is overviewed including the machine impedance, single and multi-bunch instabilities, ion trapping and beam lifetime. The preliminary list of first group beamlines is discussed.

  4. Properties of ceramic candle filters

    SciTech Connect

    Pontius, D.H.; Starrett, H.S.

    1994-10-01

    The objectives of this program have been: (1) the post-test evaluation of candle filters, (2) to measure the material properties of current filter materials, destructively and non-destructively, and to relate these properties and behaviors to in-service performance, (3) to develop an understanding of the material requirements for hot gas filter elements, (4) to develop material property goals for filter materials, and (5) to establish test matrices and a protocol to evaluate candidate filter materials.

  5. Candle and candle wax containing metathesis and metathesis-like products

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Timothy A; Tupy, Michael J; Abraham, Timothy W; Shafer, Andy

    2014-04-01

    A wax comprises a metathesis product and/or a product that resembles, at least in part, a product which may be formed from a metathesis reaction. The wax may be used to form articles, for example, candles (container candles, votive candles, and/or a pillar candles), crayons, fire logs, or tarts. The wax commonly includes other components in addition to the metathesis product.

  6. Candle and candle wax containing metathesis and metathesis-like products

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Timothy A; Tupy, Michael J; Abraham, Timothy W; Shafer, Andy

    2014-12-16

    A wax comprises a metathesis product and/or a product that resembles, at least in part, a product which may be formed from a metathesis reaction. The wax may be used to form articles for example, candles (container candles, votive candles, and/or a pillar candles), crayons, fire logs or tarts. The wax commonly includes other components in addition to the metathesis product.

  7. Candle Flames in Microgravity Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This video of a candle flame burning in space was taken by the Candle Flames in Microgravity (CFM) experiment on the Russian Mir space station. It is actually a composite of still photos from a 35mm camera since the video images were too dim. The images show a hemispherically shaped flame, primarily blue in color, with some yellow early int the flame lifetime. The actual flame is quite dim and difficult to see with the naked eye. Nearly 80 candles were burned in this experiment aboard Mir. NASA scientists have also studied how flames spread in space and how to detect fire in microgravity. Researchers hope that what they learn about fire and combustion from the flame ball experiments will help out here on Earth. Their research could help create things such as better engines for cars and airplanes. Since they use very weak flames, flame balls require little fuel. By studying how this works, engineers may be able to design engines that use far less fuel. In addition, microgravity flame research is an important step in creating new safety precautions for astronauts living in space. By understanding how fire works in space, the astronauts can be better prepared to fight it.

  8. Burning Candles in the Microgravity of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, Daniel; Ross, Howard; Tien, James

    1997-01-01

    The Candle Flames in Microgravity (CFM) experiment was designed to study how long candle flames can be sustained in microgravity, how the flames behave prior to extinction, and the how two closely spaced candle flames behave. The scientists hope that one day the results will help resolve age-old questions regarding the effects of gravity on certain types of flames (low momentum diffusion flames, or candle flames) and their ability to burn without the presence of gravity. This information will provide a better understanding of fires on spacecraft and could lead to advances in fire detection and extinction techniques.

  9. CANDLE: The New Burnup Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Ryu, Kouichi; Yoshimura, Yoshikane

    2001-11-15

    The new burnup strategy CANDLE (Constant Axial shape of Neutron flux, nuclide densities and power shape During Life of Energy production) is proposed. With this burnup strategy, distributions of fuel nuclide densities, neutron flux, and power density move with the same constant speed and without any change in their shapes. The excess reactivity is constant during the burnup. Therefore, any control mechanisms for the burnup are not required. Calculation procedures are presented to find these shapes and the speed of the burning region with the neutron multiplication factor of a reactor employing this burnup strategy.To demonstrate the CANDLE burnup strategy, it is applied to a fast reactor with excellent neutron economy. Only the initially built reactor requires some fissile material such as plutonium or enriched uranium for the nuclear ignition region of its core, but only natural uranium or depleted uranium is required for the other region. Succeeding reactors require only natural or depleted uranium since the burning region of the previous reactor can be utilized for the ignition region. The life of a reactor can be made longer by elongating the core height. The drift speed of the burning region for the presented fast reactor design is {approx}4 cm/yr, which is a preferable value for designing a long-life reactor. The burnup of spent fuel is {approx}40%. It is equivalent to 40% utilization of natural uranium without reprocessing and enrichment.

  10. When a Standard Candle Flickers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Cherry, M. L.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Case, G. L.; Chaplin, V.; Connaughton, V.; Finger, M. H.; Greiner, J.; Jahoda, K.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuulkers, E.; Meegan, C. A.; Natalucci, L.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Rodi, J. C.; Shaposhnikov, N.; Swartz, D.; von Kienlin, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Crab is the only bright steady source in the X-ray sky. The Crab consists of a pulsar wind nebula, a synchrotron nebula, and a cloud of expanding ejecta. On small scales, the Crab is extremely complex and turbulent. X-ray astronomers have often used the Crab as a standard candle to calibrate instruments, assuming its spectrum and overall flux remains constant over time. Four instruments (Fermi/GBM, RXTE/PCA, Swift/BAT, INTEGRAL/ISGRI) show a approx.5% (50 m Crab) decline in the Crab from 2008-2010. This decline appears to be larger with increasing energy and is not present in the pulsed flux, implying changes in the shock acceleration, electron population or magnetic field in the nebula. The Crab is known to be dynamic on small scales, so it is not too surprising that its total flux varies as well. Caution should be taken when using the Crab for in-orbit calibrations.

  11. Novel Backup Filter Device for Candle Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, B.; Goldsmith, R.; Dunham, G.; Henderson, A.

    2002-09-18

    The currently preferred means of particulate removal from process or combustion gas generated by advanced coal-based power production processes is filtration with candle filters. However, candle filters have not shown the requisite reliability to be commercially viable for hot gas clean up for either integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) or pressurized fluid bed combustion (PFBC) processes. Even a single candle failure can lead to unacceptable ash breakthrough, which can result in (a) damage to highly sensitive and expensive downstream equipment, (b) unacceptably low system on-stream factor, and (c) unplanned outages. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the need to have fail-safe devices installed within or downstream from candle filters. In addition to CeraMem, DOE has contracted with Siemens-Westinghouse, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) at the University of North Dakota, and the Southern Research Institute (SRI) to develop novel fail-safe devices. Siemens-Westinghouse is evaluating honeycomb-based filter devices on the clean-side of the candle filter that can operate up to 870 C. The EERC is developing a highly porous ceramic disk with a sticky yet temperature-stable coating that will trap dust in the event of filter failure. SRI is developing the Full-Flow Mechanical Safeguard Device that provides a positive seal for the candle filter. Operation of the SRI device is triggered by the higher-than-normal gas flow from a broken candle. The CeraMem approach is similar to that of Siemens-Westinghouse and involves the development of honeycomb-based filters that operate on the clean-side of a candle filter. The overall objective of this project is to fabricate and test silicon carbide-based honeycomb failsafe filters for protection of downstream equipment in advanced coal conversion processes. The fail-safe filter, installed directly downstream of a candle filter, should have the capability for stopping essentially all particulate

  12. Burns and injuries resulting from the use of gel candles.

    PubMed

    Pickus, E J; Lionelli, G T; Parmele, J B; Lawrence, W T; Korentager, R A

    2001-01-01

    Scented gel candles are common decorative household items composed of gelled mineral oil, fragrances, and dye. Like traditional wax candles, they have an open flame. Because of defective design, there have been several burns and injuries caused by these products. Here we report our experience with a scald burn from a gel candle and describe 34 additional injuries attributed to gel candles previously unreported in the medical literature. PMID:11403248

  13. WHEN A STANDARD CANDLE FLICKERS

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Jenke, Peter; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Cherry, Michael L.; Case, Gary L.; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Krimm, Hans A.; Bhat, P. Narayana; Briggs, Michael S.; Chaplin, Vandiver; Connaughton, Valerie; Camero-Arranz, Ascension; Finger, Mark H.; Gehrels, Neil; Jahoda, Keith; Greiner, Jochen; Kippen, R. Marc; Kuulkers, Erik; Lund, Niels

    2011-02-01

    The Crab Nebula is the only hard X-ray source in the sky that is both bright enough and steady enough to be easily used as a standard candle. As a result, it has been used as a normalization standard by most X-ray/gamma-ray telescopes. Although small-scale variations in the nebula are well known, since the start of science operations of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in 2008 August, a {approx}7% (70 mCrab) decline has been observed in the overall Crab Nebula flux in the 15-50 keV band, measured with the Earth occultation technique. This decline is independently confirmed in the {approx}15-50 keV band with three other instruments: the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (Swift/BAT), the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array (RXTE/PCA), and the Imager on-Board the INTEGRAL Satellite (IBIS). A similar decline is also observed in the {approx}3-15 keV data from the RXTE/PCA and in the 50-100 keV band with GBM, Swift/BAT, and INTEGRAL/IBIS. The pulsed flux measured with RXTE/PCA since 1999 is consistent with the pulsar spin-down, indicating that the observed changes are nebular. Correlated variations in the Crab Nebula flux on a {approx}3 year timescale are also seen independently with the PCA, BAT, and IBIS from 2005 to 2008, with a flux minimum in 2007 April. As of 2010 August, the current flux has declined below the 2007 minimum.

  14. When A Standard Candle Flickers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Cherry, Michael L.; Case, Gary L.; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Beklen Elif; Bhat, P. Narayana; Briggs, Michael S.; Camero-Arranz, Ascension; Chaplin, Vandiver; Connaughton, Valerie; Finger, Mark H.; Gehrels, Neil; Greiner, Jochen; Jahoda, Keith; Jenke, Peter; Kippen, R. Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Krimm, Hans A.; Kuulkers, Erik; Lund, Niels; Meegan, Charles A.; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert; Rodi, James C.

    2011-01-01

    The Crab Nebula is the only hard X-ray source in the sky that is both bright enough and steady enough to be easily used as a standard candle. As a result, it has been used as a normalization standard by most X-ray/gamma ray telescopes. Although small-scale variations in the nebula are well-known, since the start of science operations of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in August 2008 a 7% (70 mcrab) decline has been observed in the overall Crab Nebula flux in the 15-50 keV band, measured with the Earth occultation technique. This decline is independently confirmed in the 15-50 keV band with three other instruments: the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (Swift/BAT), the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array (RXTE/PCA), and the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory Imager on Board INTEGRAL (IBIS). A similar decline is also observed in the 3 - 15 keV data from the RXTE/PCA and in the 50 - 100 keV band with GBM, Swift/BAT, and INTEGRAL/IBIS. The change in the pulsed flux measured with RXTE/PCA since 1999 is consistent with the pulsar spin-down, indicating that the observed changes are nebular. Correlated variations in the Crab Nebula flux on a 3 year timescale are also seen independently with the PCA, BAT, and IBIS from 2005 to 2008, with a flux minimum in April 2007. As of August 2010, the current flux has declined below the 2007 minimum.

  15. Chaotic dynamics of a candle oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mary Elizabeth; Byrne, Greg; Fenton, Flavio

    The candle oscillator is a simple, fun experiment dating to the late nineteenth century. It consists of a candle with a rod that is transverse to its long axis, around which it is allowed to pivot. When both ends of the candle are lit, an oscillatory motion will initiate due to different mass loss as a function of the flame angle. Stable oscillations can develop due to damping when the system has friction between the rod and the base where the rod rests. However, when friction is minimized, it is possible for chaos to develop. In this talk we will show periodic orbits found in the system as well as calculated, maximal Lyapunov exponents. We show that the system can be described by three ordinary differential equations (one each for angle, angular velocity and mass loss) that can reproduce the experimental data and the transition from stable oscillations to chaotic dynamics as a function of damping.

  16. 75 FR 38121 - Petroleum Wax Candles From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... petroleum wax candles from China (70 FR 56890, September 29, 2005). The Commission is now conducting a third... COMMISSION Petroleum Wax Candles From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of a five-year review concerning the antidumping duty order on petroleum wax candles from...

  17. Christmas-candle Senna:An ornamental and pharmaceutical plant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Christmas candle (Senna alata L.) is an underutilized legume. The USDA, ARS, PGRCU curates only 2 accessions of Christmas candle. Christmas candle plants were transplanted from about 21 day-old seedlings with further transplanting to larger pots containing potting soil as the plants grew larger. Ho...

  18. Contact binary stars as standard candles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klagyivik, P.; Csizmadia, Sz.

    2004-06-01

    Rucinski (1996) suggested to use contact binary stars as standard candles. We investigated the properties of contact binary stars in order to search for possibility of their using as standard candles. For this purpose a catalogue of their light curve solution was compiled and on the basis of the catalogue data we calculated the rate of energy transfer between the two components. This allowed us to determine the mass-luminosity relation of the primary as well as secondary components in a contact binary and using Kepler's third law and the strict geometry a very reliable distance determination method was developed.

  19. 75 FR 44224 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Yankee Candle Corporation (Candles and Gift Sets); Whately...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... the Federal Register (75 FR 3705-3706, 1-22-2010) and the application has been processed pursuant to... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Yankee Candle Corporation (Candles and... application to the Board for authority to establish a special-purpose subzone at the candle and gift...

  20. 75 FR 3705 - Foreign-Trade Zone 201-Holyoke, MA; Application for Subzone; Yankee Candle Corporation (Candles...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 201--Holyoke, MA; Application for Subzone; Yankee Candle Corporation (Candles and Gift Sets); Whately and South Deerfield, MA An application has been submitted to the..., grantee of FTZ 201, requesting special-purpose subzone status for the candle and gift set...

  1. New materials and manufacturing options for low-cost candle filter production

    SciTech Connect

    Hanus, G.J.; Uznanski, K.T.; Decoursin, D.G.; Shtessel, E.

    1997-07-01

    Using self-propagating, high-temperature synthesis fabrication techniques, unique combinations of materials were studied for use in candle filter development. Materials suitable for corrosive atmospheres with improved filtration and mechanical properties were identified within the context of manufacturing simplicity, versatility and cost-effectiveness. Material combinations suitable for combustion synthesis were identified which match the temperature, strength and corrosion resistance requirements of operation in pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) environments. Tests on porosity, permeability and strength indicated the ability of the method to process porous filter material which matches or surpasses the performance levels of current, production candle filter material samples.

  2. FINE PARTICULATE MATTER EMISSIONS FROM CANDLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives reulst of testing five types of candles, purchased from local stores, for fine particulate matter (PM) emissions under close-to-realistic conditions in a research house. The test method allows for determination of both the emission and deposition rates. Most tes...

  3. ADVANCED SECOND GENERATION CERAMIC CANDLE FILTERS

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Alvin

    2002-01-31

    Through sponsorship from the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), development and manufacture of advanced second generation candle filters was undertaken in the early 1990's. Efforts were primarily focused on the manufacture of fracture toughened, 1.5 m, continuous fiber ceramic composite (CFCC) and filament wound candle filters by 3M, McDermott, DuPont Lanxide Composites, and Techniweave. In order to demonstrate long-term thermal, chemical, and mechanical stability of the advanced second generation candle filter materials, Siemens Westinghouse initiated high temperature, bench-scale, corrosion testing of 3M's CVI-SiC and DuPont's PRD-66 mini-candles, and DuPont's CFCC SiC-SiC and IF&P Fibrosic{sup TM} coupons under simulated, pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) conditions. This effort was followed by an evaluation of the mechanical and filtration performance of the advanced second generation filter elements in Siemens Westinghouse's bench-scale PFBC test facility in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Arrays of 1.4-1.5 m 3M CVI-SiC, DuPont PRD-66, DuPont SiC-SiC, and IF&P Fibrosic{sup TM} candles were subjected to steady state process operating conditions, increased severity thermal transients, and accelerated pulse cycling test campaigns which represented {approx}1760 hours of equivalent filter operating life. Siemens Westinghouse subsequently participated in early material surveillance programs which marked entry of the 3M CVI-SiC and DuPont PRD-66 candle filters in Siemens Westinghouse Advanced Particulate Filtration (APF) system at the American Electric Power (AEP) Tidd Demonstration Plant in Brilliant, Ohio. Siemens Westinghouse then conducted an extended, accelerated life, qualification program, evaluating the performance of the 3M, McDermott, and Techniweave oxide-based CFCC filter elements, modified DuPont PRD-66 elements, and the Blasch, Scapa Cerafil{sup TM}, and Specific Surface monolithic candles for use in the APF

  4. CANDLES - Search for Neutrino-less Double Beta Decay of 48Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umehara, Saori; Candles Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    CANDLES is the project to search for neutrino-less double beta decay (0 νββ) of 48Ca. The CANDLES system aims at a high sensitive measurement by a characteristic detector system and 48Ca enrichment. The system realizes a complete 4 π active shield by immersing the CaF2 scintillators in liquid scintillator. The active shield by the liquid scintillator will effectively reject background events from external origins. On the other band, we have studied 48Ca enrichment and succeeded in obtaining enriched 48Ca although it is a small amount. Now we have developed the CANDLES III system, which contained 350 g of 48Ca without enrichment, at the Kamioka underground laboratory. Two improvements, a light-concentration system and a new DAQ system, were installed for the CANDLES III system. The light-concentration system improved a energy resolution by increasing a PMT photo-coverage by 80%. The new DAQ system, which is a dead time less system, improved a rejection efficiency for a characteristic background origin. We checked detector performance with the light-concentration system and the new DAQ system. Here we will report the detector performance for background rejection and the expected sensitivity with the two improvements.

  5. Modeling Candle Flame Behavior In Variable Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alsairafi, A.; Tien, J. S.; Lee, S. T.; Dietrich, D. L.; Ross, H. D.

    2003-01-01

    The burning of a candle, as typical non-propagating diffusion flame, has been used by a number of researchers to study the effects of electric fields on flame, spontaneous flame oscillation and flickering phenomena, and flame extinction. In normal gravity, the heat released from combustion creates buoyant convection that draws oxygen into the flame. The strength of the buoyant flow depends on the gravitational level and it is expected that the flame shape, size and candle burning rate will vary with gravity. Experimentally, there exist studies of candle burning in enhanced gravity (i.e. higher than normal earth gravity, g(sub e)), and in microgravity in drop towers and space-based facilities. There are, however, no reported experimental data on candle burning in partial gravity (g < g(sub e)). In a previous numerical model of the candle flame, buoyant forces were neglected. The treatment of momentum equation was simplified using a potential flow approximation. Although the predicted flame characteristics agreed well with the experimental results, the model cannot be extended to cases with buoyant flows. In addition, because of the use of potential flow, no-slip boundary condition is not satisfied on the wick surface. So there is some uncertainty on the accuracy of the predicted flow field. In the present modeling effort, the full Navier-Stokes momentum equations with body force term is included. This enables us to study the effect of gravity on candle flames (with zero gravity as the limiting case). In addition, we consider radiation effects in more detail by solving the radiation transfer equation. In the previous study, flame radiation is treated as a simple loss term in the energy equation. Emphasis of the present model is on the gas-phase processes. Therefore, the detailed heat and mass transfer phenomena inside the porous wick are not treated. Instead, it is assumed that a thin layer of liquid fuel coated the entire wick surface during the burning process

  6. Standard errors of non-standardised and age-standardised relative survival of cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, L; Hakulinen, T; Brenner, H

    2012-01-01

    Background: Relative survival estimates cancer survival in the absence of other causes of death. Previous work has shown that standard errors of non-standardised relative survival may be substantially overestimated by the conventionally used method. However, evidence was restricted to non-standardised relative survival estimates using Hakulinen's method. Here, we provide a more comprehensive evaluation of the accuracy of standard errors including age-standardised survival and estimation by the Ederer II method. Methods: Five- and ten-year non-standardised and age-standardised relative survival was estimated for patients diagnosed with 25 common forms of cancer in Finland in 1989–1993, using data from the nationwide Finnish Cancer Registry. Standard errors of mutually comparable non-standardised and age-standardised relative survival were computed by the conventionally used method and compared with bootstrap standard errors. Results: When using Hakulinen's method, standard errors of non-standardised relative survival were overestimated by up to 28%. In contrast, standard errors of age-standardised relative survival were accurately estimated. When using the Ederer II method, deviations of the standard errors of non-standardised and age-standardised relative survival were generally small to negligible. Conclusion: In most cases, overestimations of standard errors are effectively overcome by age standardisation and by using Ederer II rather than Hakulinen's method. PMID:22173672

  7. CANDLE syndrome: a recently described autoinflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tüfekçi, Özlem; Bengoa, ŞebnemYilmaz; Karapinar, Tuba Hilkay; Ataseven, Eda Büke; İrken, Gülersu; Ören, Hale

    2015-05-01

    CANDLE syndrome (chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature) is a recently described autoinflammatory syndrome characterized by early onset, recurrent fever, skin lesions, and multisystemic inflammatory manifestations. Most of the patients have been shown to have mutation in PSMB8 gene. Herein, we report a 2-year-old patient with young onset recurrent fever, atypical facies, widespread skin lesions, generalized lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, joint contractures, hypertrglyceridemia, lipodystrophy, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Clinical features together with the skin biopsy findings were consistent with the CANDLE syndrome. The pathogenesis and treatment of this syndrome have not been fully understood. Increased awareness of this recently described syndrome may lead to recognition of new cases and better understanding of its pathogenesis which in turn may help for development of an effective treatment. PMID:25036278

  8. The paradox of the floating candle that continues to burn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakis, Stavros; Aristidou, Charalambos

    2012-08-01

    What happens after lighting a paraffin candle that is barely floating in water and kept upright with the aid of an appropriately weighted nail attached to its bottom? Presumably, it should sink because the buoyant force will decrease more than the weight. Surprisingly, the candle will continue to burn, rising slowly above the surface of the water. The reason for this is that the flame forms a well around the wick filled with molten paraffin, while the water keeps the outer walls of the candle cool and unscathed. Thus, the buoyancy hardly changes while the weight is reduced through burning, resulting in a floating candle that will rise above water. We present a quantitative model that describes the formation of the well and verify it experimentally, examining first the case of a candle in the air and then the case of a candle immersed in water.

  9. Candle Flames in Non-Buoyant Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. L.; Ross, H. D.; Shu, Y.; Tien, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses the behavior of a candle flame in a long-duration, quiescent microgravity environment both on the space Shuttle and the Mir Orbiting Station (OS). On the Shuttle, the flames became dim blue after an initial transient where there was significant yellow (presumably soot) in the flame. The flame lifetimes were typically less than 60 seconds. The safety-mandated candlebox that contained the candle flame inhibited oxygen transport to the flame and thus limited the flame lifetime. 'Me flames on the Mir OS were similar, except that the yellow luminosity persisted longer into the flame lifetime because of a higher initial oxygen concentration. The Mir flames burned for as long as 45 minutes. The difference in the flame lifetime between the Shuttle and Mir flames was primarily the redesigned candlebox that did not inhibit oxygen transport to the flame. In both environments, the flame intensity and the height-to-width ratio gradually decreased as the ambient oxygen content in the sealed chamber slowly decreased. Both sets of experiments showed spontaneous, axisymmetric flame oscillations just prior to extinction. The paper also presents a numerical model of candle flame. The model is detailed in the gas-phase, but uses a simplified liquid/wick phase. 'Me model predicts a steady flame with a shape and size quantitatively similar to the Shuttle and Mir flames. ne model also predicts pre-extinction flame oscillations if the decrease in ambient oxygen is small enough.

  10. Difficulties in Using GRBs as Standard Candles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts have been detected uniformly all over the observable universe, ranging in comoving distance from a few hundred Mpc to a few thousand Mpc, representing the farthest observable objects in the universe. This large distance coverage is highly attractive to those who study cosmology and the history of the early universe since there are no other observed objects that represent such a deep and comprehensive probe of the history of the universe. For this reason, there have been extensive studies into the possibility of using GRBs as standard candles much like Type Ia Supernovae, even though little is known about the physical mechanism that produces the observed burst of gamma-rays. We discuss the attempts at defining GRBs as standard candles, such as the search for a robust luminosity indicator, pseudo-redshift predictions, the complications that emission collimation introduces into the estimation of the rest-frame energetics, and the difficulty introduced by the widely varying observed properties of GRBs. These topics will be examined with supporting data and analyses from both Fermi and Swift observations. Problems with current studies using GRBs as standard candles will be noted as well as potential paths forward to solve these problems.

  11. Indoor protection against mosquito and sand fly bites: a comparison between citronella, linalool, and geraniol candles.

    PubMed

    Müller, Günter C; Junnila, Amy; Kravchenko, Vasiliy D; Revay, Edita E; Butlers, Jerry; Schlein, Yosef

    2008-03-01

    The repellent effect of 3 essential-oil-based candles was evaluated in a high biting pressure environment in Israel. In human landing assays, the repellency rate of 5% citronella candles against mosquitoes was 29.0%, of 5% linalool candles was 71.1%, and of 5% geraniol candles was 85.4%. The candles with geraniol were about twice as effective as those with linalool and were about 5 times as effective as citronella candles in protecting a person from being bitten indoors by mosquitoes. The repellency rate of 5% citronella candles towards sand flies was 24.7%, of 5% linalool candles was 55.2%, and of 5% geraniol candles was 79.7%. A geraniol candle was almost 5 times as effective as a citronella candle and about twice as effective as a linalool candle in protecting a person from being bitten indoors by sand flies. PMID:18437831

  12. 7 CFR 3201.79 - Candles and wax melts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Candles and wax melts. 3201.79 Section 3201.79... Designated Items § 3201.79 Candles and wax melts. (a) Definition. Products composed of a solid mass and... wax melts. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or...

  13. 7 CFR 3201.79 - Candles and wax melts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Candles and wax melts. 3201.79 Section 3201.79... Designated Items § 3201.79 Candles and wax melts. (a) Definition. Products composed of a solid mass and... wax melts. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or...

  14. 75 FR 80843 - Petroleum Wax Candles From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... COMMISSION Petroleum Wax Candles From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty order on petroleum wax candles from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury to an industry in the United States within a reasonably foreseeable time....

  15. Sharing the Arts of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Candles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holman, Martha; Gailey, Lamar

    This module on candles is one of eight modules designed to provide instruction on authentic Blue Ridge Mountain crafts to adult basic education students at a low cost. Contents include notes on the history of candle making; process used, including equipment and materials, as well as method described narratively and graphically; and the followup,…

  16. Candle Flames in Non-Buoyant Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. L.; Ross, H. D.; Shu, Y.; Chang, P.; Tien, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses the behavior of a candle flame in a long-duration, quiescent microgravity environment both on the space Shuttle and the Mir Orbiting Station. On the Shuttle, the flames became dim blue after an initial transient where there was significant yellow (presumably soot) in the flame. The flame lifetimes were typically less than 60 seconds. The safety-mandated candlebox that contained the candle flame inhibited oxygen transport to the flame and thus limited the flame lifetime. The flames on the Mir were similar, except that the yellow luminosity persisted longer into the flame lifetime because of a higher initial oxygen concentration, The Mir flames burned for as long as 45 minutes. The difference in the flame lifetime between the Shuttle and Mir flames was primarily the redesigned candlebox that did not inhibit oxygen transport to the flame. In both environments, the flame intensity and the height-to-width ratio gradually decreased as the ambient oxygen content in the sealed chamber slowly decreased. Both sets of experiments showed spontaneous, axisymmetric flame oscillations just prior to extinction. The paper also presents a numerical model of a candle flame. The formulation is two-dimensional and time-dependent in the gas phase with constant specific heats, thermal conductivity and Lewis number (although different species can have different Lewis numbers), one-step finite-rate kinetics, and gas-phase radiative losses from CO2 and H2O. The treatment of the liquid/wick phase assumes that the, fuel evaporates from a constant diameter sphere connected to an inert cone. The model predicts a steady flame with a shape and size quantitatively similar to the Shuttle and Mir flames. The computation predicts that the flame size will increase slightly with increasing ambient oxygen mole fraction. The model also predicts pre-extinction flame oscillations if the rate of decrease in ambient oxygen is small enough, such as that which would occur for a flame

  17. The First Group of CANDLE Beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Aghasyan, M.; Grigoryan, A.; Mikaelyan, R.

    2004-05-12

    The Center for the Advancement of Natural Discoveries using Light Emission (CANDLE) is a 3 GeV intermediate energy light source project in Armenia. The paper presents the study and design futures of the first group of beamlines that are planed to run among with the facility operation scheduled for year 2007. Presented beamlines will cover the experimental researches based on diffraction and powder diffraction, XAS, Soft X-ray spectroscopy and microscopy, Small angle X-ray scattering, X-ray Imaging techniques and LIGA.

  18. Philips' 2nd generation Novallure LED candle lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun; Pei, Zhigang; Yuan, Chuan; Jiang, Tan; Lu, Zhengsong; Wang, Yuqian; Duan, Xiaoqing; Xiong, Yan; Zhong, Hong; Liu, Ye

    2010-08-01

    Finding an energy efficient replacement of incandescent candle lamp has been a technical challenge. Compact fluorescent lamps, for example, can be miniaturized to fit the form factor of a candle lamp but they fail to reproduce its "sparkle" effect. Empowered by solid state lighting technology along with original optical design, Philips has successfully developed LED-powered candle lamps "Novallure" with great energy savings (2W power consumption with lumen output of 55 lumen) and the "butterfly" radiation pattern that mimics the sparkle effect from an incandescent candle lamp. With new high performance LED packages, novel under-cut prismatic optics and state-of-the-art electronic driver solution and thermal solution, we have developed a 2nd generation Novallure with breakthrough performance: a dimmable 2700K 136 lumen LED candle lamp with CRI 90.

  19. Assessment of the advanced clay bonded silicon carbide candle filter materials. Topical report, September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.

    1995-07-01

    Advancements have been made during the past five years to not only increase the strength of the as-manufactured clay bonded silicon carbide candle filter materials, but also to improve their high temperature creep resistance properties. This report reviews these developments, and describes the results of preliminary qualification testing which has been conducted at Westinghouse prior to utilizing the advanced clay bonded silicon carbide filters in high temperature, pressurized, coal-fired combustion and/or gasification applications.

  20. Nondestructive evaluation of ceramic candle filter with various boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.L.; Kiriakidis, A.C.

    2005-06-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) using a dynamic characterization technique was conducted to study ceramic candle filters. Ceramic candle filters are hollow cylindrical structures made of porous ceramic materials used to protect gas turbine in coal-fired power plants. Deterioration and failure of ceramic filters occurs after being exposed to high-temperature and high-pressure operational environment over a period of time. This paper focuses on the development of an NDE method that can predict the in-situ structural stiffness of the candle filters while still being attached to the plenum. A combination of laboratory testing, theoretical analysis, and finite element method (FEM) simulations are presented. The candle filters were tested using a laser vibrometer/accelerometer setup with variable boundary restraints. A variable end-restraint Timoshenko beam equation was derived to determine the dynamic response of the candle filters with simulated in-situ boundary conditions. Results from the FEM simulation were verified with the analysis to determine the stiffness degradation of the candle filters as well as the boundary conditions. Results from this study show that the vibration characteristics can be used effectively to evaluate both the structural stiffness and the in-situ boundary restraints of the ceramic candle filters during field inspections.

  1. Advanced lightweight ceramic candle filter module

    SciTech Connect

    Zievers, J.F.; Eggerstedt, P.

    1992-01-01

    To determine the economic effect of light weight ceramics, several sizes of filters were cost estimated for operation at 217.5 psi (15 bar) based on the use of all light weight ceramics (Fibro/Fibro) vs. the use of cooled alloy (RA300) tubesheets and silicon carbide candles (Alloy/SiC). A jet pulse delivery system was included in both estimates. The Fibro/Fibro system was estimated with the plenum design while the Alloy/SiC system was based on header/nozzle design. Battery limits were the filters and jet pulse delivery systems, Ex-works, with no main valves or dust removal systems. It was found that the cost of Fibro/Fibro components were consistently lower than the cost of the Alloy/SiC components; this comparison is illustrated in Figure 8.

  2. Advanced lightweight ceramic candle filter module

    SciTech Connect

    Zievers, J.F.; Eggerstedt, P.

    1992-11-01

    To determine the economic effect of light weight ceramics, several sizes of filters were cost estimated for operation at 217.5 psi (15 bar) based on the use of all light weight ceramics (Fibro/Fibro) vs. the use of cooled alloy (RA300) tubesheets and silicon carbide candles (Alloy/SiC). A jet pulse delivery system was included in both estimates. The Fibro/Fibro system was estimated with the plenum design while the Alloy/SiC system was based on header/nozzle design. Battery limits were the filters and jet pulse delivery systems, Ex-works, with no main valves or dust removal systems. It was found that the cost of Fibro/Fibro components were consistently lower than the cost of the Alloy/SiC components; this comparison is illustrated in Figure 8.

  3. FILTER COMPONENT ASSESSMENT--CERAMIC CANDLES--

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Alvin

    2004-04-23

    Efforts at Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) have been focused on development of hot gas filter systems as an enabling technology for advanced coal and biomass-based gas turbine power generation applications. SWPC has been actively involved in the development of advanced filter materials and component configuration, has participated in numerous surveillance programs characterizing the material properties and microstructure of field tested filter elements, and has undertaken extended, accelerated filter life testing programs. This report summarizes the results of SWPC's filter component assessment efforts, identifying the performance and stability of porous monolithic, fiber reinforced, and filament wound ceramic hot gas candle filters, potentially for {ge}3 years of viable pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) service operating life.

  4. A Simple Candle Filter Safeguard Device

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.P.; Henderson, A.K.; Swanson, M.L.

    2002-09-18

    In order to reach the highest possible efficiencies in a coal-fired turbine-based power system, the turbine should be directly fired with the products of coal utilization. Two main designs employ these turbines: those based on pressurized fluidized-bed combustors (PFBCs) and those based on integrated gasification combined cycles (IGCCs). In both designs, the suspended particulates, or dust, must be cleaned from the gas before it enters the turbine to prevent fouling and erosion of the blades. To produce the cleanest gas, barrier filters are being developed and are in commercial use. Barrier filters are composed of porous, high-temperature materials that allow the hot gas to pass but collect the dust on the surface. The three main configurations are candle, cross-flow, and tube. Both candle and tube filters have been tested extensively. They are primarily composed of coarsely porous ceramic that serves as a structural support, overlain with a thin, microporous ceramic layer o n the dirty gas side that serves as the primary filter surface. They are highly efficient at removing particulate matter from the gas stream and, because of their ceramic construction, are resistant to gas and ash corrosion. However, ceramics are brittle, and individual elements can fail, allowing the particulates to pass through the hole left by the filter element and erode the turbine. Because of the possibility of occasional filter breakage, safeguard devices (SGDs) must be employed to prevent the dust streaming through broken filters from reaching the turbine. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) safeguard device is composed of three main parts: the ceramic substrate, the adhesive coating, and the safeguard device housing. This report describes the development and laboratory testing of each of those parts as well as the bench-scale performance of both types of complete SGDs.

  5. Nondestructive Evaluation of Ceramic Candle Filters Using Vibration Response

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Roger H. L.; Kiriakidis, Alejandro C.; Peng, Steve W.

    1997-07-01

    This study aims at the development of an effective nondestructive evaluation technique to predict the remaining useful life of a ceramic candle filter during a power plant's annual maintenance shutdown. The objective of the present on-going study is to establish the vibration signatures of ceramic candle filters at varying degradation levels due to different operating hours, and to study the various factors involving the establishment of the signatures.

  6. Candle Flames in Microgravity: USML-1 Results - 1 Year Later

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H. D.; Dietrich, D. L.; Tien, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the sustained behavior of a candle flame in microgravity determined in the glovebox facility aboard the First United States Microgravity Labomtofy. In a quiescent, microgmvjfy environment, diffusive transport becomes the dominant mode of heat and mass transfer; whether the diffusive transport rate is fast enough to sustain low-gravity candle flames in air was unknown to this series of about 70 tests. After an initial transient in which soot is observed, the microgravity candle flame in air becomes and remains hemispherical and blue (apparently soot-Ne) with a large flame standoff distance. Near flame extinction, spontaneous flame oscillations are regularly observed; these are explained as a flashback of flame through a premixed combustible gas followed by a retreat owed to flame quenching. The frequency of oscillations can be related to diffusive transport rates, and not to residual buoyant convective flow. The fact that the flame tip is the last point of the flame to survive suggests that it is the location of maximum fuel reactivity; this is unlike normal gravity, where the location of maximum fuel reactivity is the flame base. The flame color, size, and shape behaved in a quasi-steady manner; the finite size of the glovebox, combined with the restricted passages of the candlebox, inhibited the observation of true steady-state burning. Nonetheless, through calculations, and inference from the series of shuttle tests, if is concluded that a candle can burn indefinitely in a large enough ambient of air in microgravity. After igniting one candle, a second candle in close pximity could not be lit. This may be due to wax coating the wick and/or local oxygen depletion around the second, unlit candle. Post-mission testing suggests that simultaneous ignition may overcome these behaviors and enable both candles to be ignited.

  7. Standardisation of crown-rump length measurement.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, C; Sarris, I; Hoch, L; Salomon, L J; Papageorghiou, A T

    2013-09-01

    Correct estimation of gestational age is essential for any study of ultrasound biometry and for everyday clinical practice. However, inconsistency in pregnancy dating may occur through differences in measurement methods or errors during measurement. In the INTERGROWTH-21(st) Project, pregnancies are dated by the last menstrual period, provided that it is certain and associated with a regular menstrual cycle, and the gestational age by dates concurs with a first-trimester ultrasound crown-rump length (CRL) estimation. Hence, there was a need to standardise CRL measurement methodology across the study sites in this international, multicentre project to avoid systematic differences in dating. To achieve uniformity we undertook the following steps: the ultrasound technique was standardised by disseminating an illustrated, operating manual describing CRL plane landmarks and calliper application, and posters describing the correct acquisition technique were disseminated for quick reference. To ensure that all ultrasonographers understood the methodology, they forwarded a log-book to the INTERGROWTH-21(st) Ultrasound Coordinating Unit, containing the answers to a written test on the manual material and five images of a correctly acquired CRL. Interpretation of CRL was also standardised by ensuring that the same CRL regression formula was used across all study sites. These methods should minimise potential systematic errors in dating associated with pooling data from different health institutions, and represent a model for standardising CRL measurement in future studies. PMID:23678951

  8. Preliminary engineering design of sodium-cooled CANDLE core

    SciTech Connect

    Takaki, Naoyuki; Namekawa, Azuma; Yoda, Tomoyuki; Mizutani, Akihiko; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2012-06-06

    The CANDLE burning process is characterized by the autonomous shifting of burning region with constant reactivity and constant spacial power distribution. Evaluations of such critical burning process by using widely used neutron diffusion and burning codes under some realistic engineering constraints are valuable to confirm the technical feasibility of the CANDLE concept and to put the idea into concrete core design. In the first part of this paper, it is discussed that whether the sustainable and stable CANDLE burning process can be reproduced even by using conventional core analysis tools such as SLAROM and CITATION-FBR. As a result, it is certainly possible to demonstrate it if the proper core configuration and initial fuel composition required as CANDLE core are applied to the analysis. In the latter part, an example of a concrete image of sodium cooled, metal fuel, 2000MWt rating CANDLE core has been presented by assuming an emerging inevitable technology of recladding. The core satisfies engineering design criteria including cladding temperature, pressure drop, linear heat rate, and cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of cladding, fast neutron fluence and sodium void reactivity which are defined in the Japanese FBR design project. It can be concluded that it is feasible to design CANDLE core by using conventional codes while satisfying some realistic engineering design constraints assuming that recladding at certain time interval is technically feasible.

  9. Casting light on BSM physics with SM standard candles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtin, David; Jaiswal, Prerit; Meade, Patrick; Tien, Pin-Ju

    2013-08-01

    The Standard Model (SM) has had resounding success in describing almost every measurement performed by the ATLAS and CMS experiments. In particular, these experiments have put many beyond the SM models of natural Electroweak Symmetry Breaking into tension with the data. It is therefore remarkable that it is still the LEP experiment, and not the LHC, which often sets the gold standard for understanding the possibility of new color-neutral states at the electroweak (EW) scale. Recently, ATLAS and CMS have started to push beyond LEP in bounding heavy new EW states, but a gap between the exclusions of LEP and the LHC typically remains. In this paper we show that measurements of SM Standard Candles can be repurposed to set entirely complementary constraints on new physics. To demonstrate this, we use W + W -cross section measurements to set bounds on a set of slepton-based simplified models which fill in the gaps left by LEP and dedicated LHC searches. Having demonstrated the sensitivity of the W + W -measurement to light sleptons, we also find regions where sleptons can improve the fit of the data compared to the NLO SM W + W -prediction alone. Remarkably, in those regions the sleptons also provide for the right relic-density of Bino-like Dark Matter and provide an explanation for the longstanding 3 σ discrepancy in the measurement of ( g - 2) μ.

  10. CANDLES project for the study of neutrino-less double beta decay of 48Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Sei

    2014-09-01

    There is, presently, strong evidence that neutrinos undergo flavor oscillations,and hence must have finite masses. Neutrino-less double beta (0 νββ) decay measurement offers a realistic opportunity to establish the Majorana nature of neutrinos and gives the absolute scale of the effective neutrino mass. CANDLES is the project to search for 0 νββ decay of 48Ca. A distinctive characteristic of 48Ca is the highest Q value (4.3 MeV) among 0 νββ isotopes. Therefore it enables us to measure 0 νββ decay signals in background free contribution. The CANDLES system consists of undoped CaF2 scintillators (CaF2),liquid scintillator (LS), and large photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). A large number of CaF2 crystals in the form of 10 cm cubes are immersed in the LS. Scintillating CaF2 crystals work as an active source detector for 0 νββ decay of 48Ca, together with LS as a multi-purpose detector component to both reject backgrounds and to propagate scintillation photons. PMTs are placed around the LS vessel to detect photons from both scintillators. The simple design concept of CANDLES enables us to increase the 48Ca source amount. 48Ca enrichment is also effective for the high sensitive measurement, because natural abundance of 48Ca is very low (0.19%). We have studied 48Ca enrichment and succeeded in obtaining enriched 48Ca although it is a small amount. Now we have developed the CANDLES III system, which contained with 300kg CaF2 crystals without enrichment, at the Kamioka underground laboratory. New light collection system was installed in 2012, and accordingly photo-coverage has been enlarged by about 80%. Further improvement will be expected in 2014 by installing a detector cooling system in order to increase light emission from CaF2 crystals. The detail of the latest CANDLES III (U.G.) system and its performance will be presented. Recently, we found that gamma rays from neutron captures on materials surrounding detector could be dominant background. These

  11. From meteorological to hydrological drought using standardised indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Lucy J.; Hannaford, Jamie; Chiverton, Andrew; Svensson, Cecilia

    2016-06-01

    Drought monitoring and early warning (M & EW) systems are a crucial component of drought preparedness. M & EW systems typically make use of drought indicators such as the Standardised Precipitation Index (SPI), but such indicators are not widely used in the UK. More generally, such tools have not been well developed for hydrological (i.e. streamflow) drought. To fill these research gaps, this paper characterises meteorological and hydrological droughts, and the propagation from one to the other, using the SPI and the related Standardised Streamflow Index (SSI), with the objective of improving understanding of the drought hazard in the UK. SPI and SSI time series were calculated for 121 near-natural catchments in the UK for accumulation periods of 1-24 months. From these time series, drought events were identified and for each event, the duration and severity were calculated. The relationship between meteorological and hydrological drought was examined by cross-correlating the 1-month SSI with various SPI accumulation periods. Finally, the influence of climate and catchment properties on the hydrological drought characteristics and propagation was investigated. Results showed that at short accumulation periods meteorological drought characteristics showed little spatial variability, whilst hydrological drought characteristics showed fewer but longer and more severe droughts in the south and east than in the north and west of the UK. Propagation characteristics showed a similar spatial pattern with catchments underlain by productive aquifers, mostly in the south and east, having longer SPI accumulation periods strongly correlated with the 1-month SSI. For catchments in the north and west of the UK, which typically have little catchment storage, standard-period average annual rainfall was strongly correlated with hydrological drought and propagation characteristics. However, in the south and east, catchment properties describing storage (such as base flow

  12. From meteorological to hydrological drought using standardised indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, L. J.; Hannaford, J.; Chiverton, A.; Svensson, C.

    2015-12-01

    Drought monitoring and early warning (M&EW) systems are a crucial component of drought preparedness. M&EW systems typically make use of drought indicators such as the Standardised Precipitation Index (SPI), but such indicators are not widely used in the UK. More generally, such tools have not been well developed for hydrological (i.e. streamflow) drought. To fill these research gaps, this paper characterises meteorological and hydrological droughts, and the propagation from one to the other using the SPI and the related Standardised Streamflow Index (SSI), with the objective of improving understanding of the drought hazard in the UK. SPI and SSI time series were calculated for 121 near-natural catchments in the UK for accumulation periods of 1-24 months. From these time series, drought events were identified and for each event, the duration and severity was calculated. The relationship between meteorological and hydrological drought was examined by cross-correlating the one month SSI with various SPI accumulation periods. Finally, the influence of climate and catchment properties on the drought characteristics and propagation were investigated. Results showed that at short accumulation periods meteorological drought characteristics showed little spatial variability, whilst hydrological drought characteristics showed fewer but longer and more severe droughts in the south and east than in the north and west of the UK. Propagation characteristics showed a similar spatial pattern with catchments underlain by productive aquifers, mostly in the south and east, having longer SPI accumulation periods strongly correlated with the one-month SSI. For catchments in the north and west of the UK, which typically have little catchment storage, standard-period annual average rainfall was strongly correlated to drought and propagation characteristics. However, in the south and east, catchment properties describing storage, such as base flow index, percentage of highly productive

  13. Comparison of Removed Fuel Compositions of CANDLE, PWR, and FBR

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Akito; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    A new reactor burnup strategy CANDLE was proposed, where shapes of neutron flux, nuclide densities and power density distributions remain constant but move to an axial direction. Application of this burnup strategy to neutron rich fast reactors makes excellent performances. Only natural or depleted uranium is required for the replaced fresh fuels. About 40% of natural or depleted uranium undergoes fission. In this paper, spent fuels of PWR, FBR and CANDLE reactor are compared. Fresh fuels of PWR, FBR and CANDLE reactor are 4.1% enriched uranium (UO{sub 2}), MOX with 18.5% plutonium enrichment and natural uranium nitride (natural-UN), respectively. In once-through fuel cycle point of view, low disposal amount for high energy is better and CANDLE reactor can decrease this amount more than other reactors, especially it is only one-tenth of PWR fuel. Also, it can decrease MA and this amount is 0.4 times of PWR. Total FP amount of each reactor is nearly same. However, LLFP amount of CANDLE reactor is the largest. (authors)

  14. Preliminary engineering design of sodium-cooled CANDLE core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaki, Naoyuki; Namekawa, Azuma; Yoda, Tomoyuki; Mizutani, Akihiko; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    The CANDLE burning process is characterized by the autonomous shifting of burning region with constant reactivity and constant spacial power distribution. Evaluations of such critical burning process by using widely used neutron diffusion and burning codes under some realistic engineering constraints are valuable to confirm the technical feasibility of the CANDLE concept and to put the idea into concrete core design. In the first part of this paper, it is discussed that whether the sustainable and stable CANDLE burning process can be reproduced even by using conventional core analysis tools such as SLAROM and CITATION-FBR. As a result, it is certainly possible to demonstrate it if the proper core configuration and initial fuel composition required as CANDLE core are applied to the analysis. In the latter part, an example of a concrete image of sodium cooled, metal fuel, 2000MWt rating CANDLE core has been presented by assuming an emerging inevitable technology of recladding. The core satisfies engineering design criteria including cladding temperature, pressure drop, linear heat rate, and cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of cladding, fast neutron fluence and sodium void reactivity which are defined in the Japanese FBR design project. It can be concluded that it is feasible to design CADLE core by using conventional codes while satisfying some realistic engineering design constraints assuming that recladding at certain time interval is technically feasible.

  15. Standardised (plain) packaging: the time for implementation has come.

    PubMed

    Hoek, Janet; Edwards, Richard; Daube A O, Mike

    2015-07-01

    Although a growing number of countries have passed legislation to introduce standardised (or 'plain') packaging, New Zealand's legislation is currently stalled. The research evidence supporting standardised packaging is strong. Furthermore, evaluations from Australia, the first country to introduce this measure, show standardised packaging is reducing the appeal of smoking. Tobacco consumption in Australia has also fallen since the introduction of standardised packaging. The government should reassert its commitment to New Zealand's Smokefree 2025 goal by recognising the Australian evidence and passing and implementing standardised packaging as soon as possible. PMID:26149904

  16. Brightest cluster galaxies as standard candles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Lauer, Tod R.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the use of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) as standard candles for measuring galaxy peculiar velocities on large scales. We have obtained precise large-format CCD surface photometry and redshifts for an all-sky, volume-limited (z less than or = 0.05) sample of 199 BCG. We reinvestigate the Hoessel (1980) relationship between the metric luminosity, L(sub m), within the central 10 kpc/h of the BCGs and the logarithmic slope of the surface brightness profile, alpha. The L(sub m)-alpha relationship reduces the cosmic scatter in L(sub m) from 0.327 mag to 0.244 mag, yielding a typical distance accuracy of 17% per BCG. Residuals about the L(sub m)-alpha relationship are independent of BCG luminosity, BCG B - R(sub c) color, BCG location within the host cluster, and richness of the host cluster. The metric luminosity is independent of cluster richness even before correcting for its dependence on alpha, which provides further evidence for the unique nature of the BCG luminosity function. Indeed, the BCG luminosity function, both before and after application of the alpha-correction, is consistent with a single Gaussian distribution. Half the BCGs in the sample show some evidence of small color gradients as a function of radius within their central 50 kpc/h regions but with almost equal numbers becoming redder as becoming bluer. However, with the central 10 kpc/h the colors are remarkably constant -- the mean B - R(sub c) color is 1.51 with a dispersion of only 0.06 mag. The narrow photometric and color distributions of the BCGs, the lack of 'second-parameter' effects, as well as the unique rich cluster environment of BCGs, argue that BCGs are the most homogeneous distance indicators presently available for large-scale structure research.

  17. Study of 48Ca double beta decay by CANDLES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, I.; Kishimoto, T.; Umehara, S.; Ito, G.; Yasuda, K.; Kakubata, H.; Miyashita, M.; Takubo, K.; Matsuoka, K.; Nomachi, M.; Saka, M.; Seki, K.; Fushimi, K.; Hazama, R.; Ohsumi, H.; Okada, K.; Tamagawa, Y.; Jinno, T.; Fujiwara, N.; Yoshida, S.; CANDLES Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    CANDLES is the project to search for double beta decay (DBD) of 48Ca by using CaF2 scintillators. The Q-value of 48Ca, which is the highest (4.27 MeV) among potential DBD nuclei, is far above energies of γ-rays from natural radioactivities (maximum 2.615 MeV from 208Tl decay), therefore we can naturally expect small backgrounds in the energy region we are interested in. We have constructed the prototype detector, CANDLES III in our laboratory (Osaka U.) at sea level and studied the basic performance of the system, including the light collection, position reconstruction and background rejection. After R&D study we moved the detector system to new experimental room at Kamioka underground laboratory. Herein the expected performances and current status of the CANDLES system are described.

  18. Argon flash candle. Quarterly report, April--June 1964

    SciTech Connect

    Rigdon, J.K.

    1997-09-01

    Several additional argon flash candles have been fired during the quarter. Several shots both straight-in and at 45{degrees} with and without the prism were fired. Some interesting data were obtained from pseudo-spectrograph shots performed by interposing filters in the light path of the camera and using both glass and Plexiglas simultaneously on the candle front. From these shots, we were able to better illustrate some of the differences in glass and Plexiglas with regard to diffusion and light scattering, as well as spectral transmission characteristics.

  19. A CANDLE for a deeper in vivo insight.

    PubMed

    Coupé, Pierrick; Munz, Martin; Manjón, Jose V; Ruthazer, Edward S; Collins, D Louis

    2012-05-01

    A new Collaborative Approach for eNhanced Denoising under Low-light Excitation (CANDLE) is introduced for the processing of 3D laser scanning multiphoton microscopy images. CANDLE is designed to be robust for low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions typically encountered when imaging deep in scattering biological specimens. Based on an optimized non-local means filter involving the comparison of filtered patches, CANDLE locally adapts the amount of smoothing in order to deal with the noise inhomogeneity inherent to laser scanning fluorescence microscopy images. An extensive validation on synthetic data, images acquired on microspheres and in vivo images is presented. These experiments show that the CANDLE filter obtained competitive results compared to a state-of-the-art method and a locally adaptive optimized non-local means filter, especially under low SNR conditions (PSNR<8dB). Finally, the deeper imaging capabilities enabled by the proposed filter are demonstrated on deep tissue in vivo images of neurons and fine axonal processes in the Xenopus tadpole brain. PMID:22341767

  20. Gamma-ray burst supernovae as standardizable candles

    SciTech Connect

    Cano, Z.

    2014-10-20

    A long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) marks the violent end of a massive star. GRBs are rare in the universe, and their progenitor stars are thought to possess unique physical properties such as low metal content and rapid rotation, while the supernovae (SNe) that are associated with GRBs are expected to be highly aspherical. To date, it has been unclear whether GRB-SNe could be used as standardizable candles, with contrasting conclusions found by different teams. In this paper, I present evidence that GRB-SNe have the potential to be used as standardizable candles and show that a statistically significant relation exists between the brightness and width of their decomposed light curves relative to a template SN. Every single nearby spectroscopically identified GRB-SN for which the rest frame and host contributions have been accurately determined follows this relation. Additionally, it is shown that not only GRB-SNe, but perhaps all SNe whose explosions are powered by a central engine may eventually be used as a standardizable candle. Finally, I suggest that the use of GRB-SNe as standardizable candles likely arises from a combination of the viewing angle and similar explosion geometry in each event, the latter of which is influenced by the explosion mechanism of GRB-SNe.

  1. The Persistence of the Candle-and-Cylinder Misconception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birk, James P.; Lawson, Anton E.

    1999-01-01

    Argues that the candle-and-cylinder demonstration does not show that air is composed of 21% oxygen. Finds that the heating of air results in a partial expulsion of air, and that the flame is extinguished by a local, rather than a complete, consumption of oxygen. (WRM)

  2. Filter holder and gasket assembly for candle or tube filters

    DOEpatents

    Lippert, T.E.; Alvin, M.A.; Bruck, G.J.; Smeltzer, E.E.

    1999-03-02

    A filter holder and gasket assembly are disclosed for holding a candle filter element within a hot gas cleanup system pressure vessel. The filter holder and gasket assembly includes a filter housing, an annular spacer ring securely attached within the filter housing, a gasket sock, a top gasket, a middle gasket and a cast nut. 9 figs.

  3. Filter holder and gasket assembly for candle or tube filters

    DOEpatents

    Lippert, Thomas Edwin; Alvin, Mary Anne; Bruck, Gerald Joseph; Smeltzer, Eugene E.

    1999-03-02

    A filter holder and gasket assembly for holding a candle filter element within a hot gas cleanup system pressure vessel. The filter holder and gasket assembly includes a filter housing, an annular spacer ring securely attached within the filter housing, a gasket sock, a top gasket, a middle gasket and a cast nut.

  4. I Wish We Could Be Together: The Candle Ceremony.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Caroline V.

    1999-01-01

    Notes that young children need to express joys and sadness; discusses candle ceremony designed for discussions of grief. Suggests teachers inform parents of the ceremony and solicit their help in preparing children, resolve not to try to solve all problems that may be discussed, inform children the moments are private, and plan for difficult…

  5. Demonstrating Sound Wave Propagation with Candle Flame and Loudspeaker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrepic, Zdeslav; Nettles, Corey; Bonilla, Chelsea

    2013-01-01

    The motion of a candle flame in front of a loudspeaker has been suggested as a productive demonstration of the longitudinal wave nature of sound. The demonstration has been used also as a research tool to investigate students' understanding about sound. The underpinning of both applications is the expectation of a horizontal, back-and-forth…

  6. Gamma-Ray Burst Supernovae as Standardizable Candles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano, Z.

    2014-10-01

    A long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) marks the violent end of a massive star. GRBs are rare in the universe, and their progenitor stars are thought to possess unique physical properties such as low metal content and rapid rotation, while the supernovae (SNe) that are associated with GRBs are expected to be highly aspherical. To date, it has been unclear whether GRB-SNe could be used as standardizable candles, with contrasting conclusions found by different teams. In this paper, I present evidence that GRB-SNe have the potential to be used as standardizable candles and show that a statistically significant relation exists between the brightness and width of their decomposed light curves relative to a template SN. Every single nearby spectroscopically identified GRB-SN for which the rest frame and host contributions have been accurately determined follows this relation. Additionally, it is shown that not only GRB-SNe, but perhaps all SNe whose explosions are powered by a central engine may eventually be used as a standardizable candle. Finally, I suggest that the use of GRB-SNe as standardizable candles likely arises from a combination of the viewing angle and similar explosion geometry in each event, the latter of which is influenced by the explosion mechanism of GRB-SNe.

  7. Managing EEE part standardisation and procurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serieys, C.; Bensoussan, A.; Petitmangin, A.; Rigaud, M.; Barbaresco, P.; Lyan, C.

    2002-12-01

    This paper presents the development activities in space components selection and procurement dealing with a new data base tool implemented at Alcatel Space using TransForm softwaa re configurator developed by Techform S.A. Based on TransForm, Access Ingenierie has devv eloped a software product named OLG@DOS which facilitate the part nomenclatures analyses for new equipment design and manufacturing in term of ACCESS data base implementation. Hi-Rel EEE part type technical, production and quality information are collected and compiled usingproduction data base issued from production tools implemented for equipment definition, description and production based on Manufacturing Resource Planning (MRP II Control Open) and Parametric Design Manager (PDM Work Manager). The analysis of any new equipment nomenclature may be conducted through this means for standardisation purpose, cost containment program and management procurement activities as well as preparation of Component reviews as Part Approval Document and Declared Part List validation.

  8. Standardised animal models of host microbial mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Macpherson, A J; McCoy, K D

    2015-01-01

    An appreciation of the importance of interactions between microbes and multicellular organisms is currently driving research in biology and biomedicine. Many human diseases involve interactions between the host and the microbiota, so investigating the mechanisms involved is important for human health. Although microbial ecology measurements capture considerable diversity of the communities between individuals, this diversity is highly problematic for reproducible experimental animal models that seek to establish the mechanistic basis for interactions within the overall host-microbial superorganism. Conflicting experimental results may be explained away through unknown differences in the microbiota composition between vivaria or between the microenvironment of different isolated cages. In this position paper, we propose standardised criteria for stabilised and defined experimental animal microbiotas to generate reproducible models of human disease that are suitable for systematic experimentation and are reproducible across different institutions. PMID:25492472

  9. Minority Language Standardisation and the Role of Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Developing a standard for a minority language is not a neutral process; this has consequences for the status of the language and how the language users relate to the new standard. A potential inherent problem with standardisation is whether the language users themselves will accept and identify with the standard. When standardising minority…

  10. Standardised Library Instruction Assessment: An Institution-Specific Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staley, Shannon M.; Branch, Nicole A.; Hewitt, Tom L.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: We explore the use of a psychometric model for locally-relevant, information literacy assessment, using an online tool for standardised assessment of student learning during discipline-based library instruction sessions. Method: A quantitative approach to data collection and analysis was used, employing standardised multiple-choice…

  11. Standardisation and "Quick Languages": The Shape-Shifting of Standardised Measurement of Pupil Achievement in Sweden and Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundahl, Christian; Waldow, Florian

    2009-01-01

    The article discusses the entry of standardised measurement into the educational systems of Sweden and Germany and the processes of shape-shifting associated with this process. In the first part of the article, we investigate how standardised measurement challenged existing ways of conceiving education in Sweden and Germany during the first half…

  12. How Real Detector Thresholds Create False Standard Candles

    SciTech Connect

    Shahmoradi, Amir; Nemiroff, Robert

    2009-05-25

    GRB satellites are relatively inefficient detectors of dim hard bursts. For example, given two bursts of identical peak luminosity near the detection threshold, a dim soft burst will be preferentially detected over a dim hard burst. This means that a high E{sub peak} burst will need a higher peak luminosity to be detected than a low E{sub peak} GRB. This purely detector-created attribute will appear as a correlation between E{sub peak} and luminosity, and should not be interpreted as a real standard candle effect. This result derives from Monte Carlo simulations utilizing a wide range of initial GRB spectra, and retriggering to create a final ''detected'' sample. In sum, E{sub peak} is not a good standard candle, and its appearance as such in seeming correlations such as the Amati and other L{sub iso} vs. E{sub peak} relations is likely a ghost of real energy-related detection thresholds.

  13. Evaluating structural deterioration of ceramic candle filters using dynamic response

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, R.H.L.; Parthasarathy, B.

    1996-12-31

    Ceramic candle filters used in the recent demonstration plant have experienced degradation and fracturing. Preliminary examination of these ceramic filters indicated that damage of the filters may have resulted from strength degradation. This study proposes a nondestructive evaluation of the structural properties of the ceramic candle filters. A virgin Refraction filter and twelve Schumacher filters which were previously tested under high pressure and high temperature at the demonstration power plant were evaluated. The vibration signatures of the ceramic filters at different degradation levels are established using transient impact response technique. Results from this study indicate that the natural frequencies of the filters can be used as an index to quantify the damage condition of the filters. The results of this study also indicate the feasibility of using the vibration mode shapes to predict the damage location of the filters.

  14. A chlorate candle/lithium hydroxide personal breathing apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, F. E.

    1972-01-01

    A portable coal mine rescue and survival equipment is reported that consists of a chlorate candle with a lithium hydroxide carbon-dioxide absorbent for oxygen generation, a breathing bag and tubing to conduct breathing to and from the man. A plastic hood incorporating a mouth piece for communication provides also eye protection and prevents inhalation through the nose. Manned testing of a prototype system demonstrated the feasibility of this closed circuit no-maintenance breathing apparatus that provides for good voice communication.

  15. Comparison of cosmological models using standard rulers and candles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Lei; Cao, Shuo; Zheng, Xiao-Gang; Li, Song; Biesiada, Marek

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we used standard rulers and standard candles (separately and jointly) to explore five popular dark energy models under the assumption of the spatial flatness of the Universe. As standard rulers, we used a data set comprised of 118 galactic scale strong lensing systems (individual standard rulers if properly calibrated for the mass density profile) combined with BAO diagnostics (statistical standard ruler). Type Ia supernovae served as standard candles. Unlike most previous statistical studies involving strong lensing systems, we relaxed the assumption of a singular isothermal sphere (SIS) in favor of its generalization: the power-law mass density profile. Therefore, along with cosmological model parameters, we fitted the power law index and its first derivative with respect to the redshift (thus allowing for mass density profile evolution). It turned out that the best fitted γ parameters are in agreement with each other, irrespective of the cosmological model considered. This demonstrates that galactic strong lensing systems may provide a complementary probe to test the properties of dark energy. The fits for cosmological model parameters which we obtained are in agreement with alternative studies performed by other researchers. Because standard rulers and standard candles have different parameter degeneracies, a combination of standard rulers and standard candles gives much more restrictive results for cosmological parameters. Finally, we attempted an analysis based on model selection using information theoretic criteria (AIC and BIC). Our results support the claim that the cosmological constant model is still best and there is no (at least statistical) reason to prefer any other more complex model.

  16. Nondestructive Degradation Evaluation of Ceramic Candle Filters Using Vibration Signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, R.H.L.; Parthasarathy, B.

    1996-12-31

    The structural integrity of ceramic candle filters is a key element for hot gas cleanup systems, They protect the heat exchanger and gas turbine components from getting clogged and also prevent erosion. Ceramic candle filters used in the recent demonstration plant have experienced degradation and fracturing. Preliminary examination of these ceramic filters indicated that damage of the filters may have resulted from strength degradation at consistent high temperature operation, thermal transient events, excessive ash accumulation and bridging and pulse cleaning. The ceramic candle filter is a slender structure made of layers of porous materials. The structure has high acoustic attenuation which has greatly limited the conventional ultrasonic detection capability. In general, stiffness reduction of a structure will cause the change of the modal parameters of the structure. This study proposes a nondestructive approach for evaluating the structural properties of the ceramic filters using dynamic characterization method. The vibration signatures of the ceramic filters at different degradation levels are established using transient impact-response technique. Results from this study indicate that the vibration signatures of the filters can be used as an index to quantify the darnage condition of the filters. The results also indicate the feasibility of using the vibration mode shapes to predict the damage location. The application of this study can be implemented to develop a nondestructive evaluation method for future in-situ inspection of the ceramic filters.

  17. Emphysema- and airway-dominant COPD phenotypes defined by standardised quantitative computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Deepak R; Gupta, Sumit; Burggraf, Dorothe; Vom Silberberg, Suzan J; Heimbeck, Irene; Heiss-Neumann, Marion S; Haeussinger, Karl; Newby, Chris; Hargadon, Beverley; Raj, Vimal; Singh, Dave; Kolsum, Umme; Hofer, Thomas P; Al-Shair, Khaled; Luetzen, Niklas; Prasse, Antje; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Benea, Giorgio; Leprotti, Stefano; Boschetto, Piera; Gorecka, Dorota; Nowinski, Adam; Oniszh, Karina; Castell, Wolfgang Zu; Hagen, Michael; Barta, Imre; Döme, Balázs; Strausz, Janos; Greulich, Timm; Vogelmeier, Claus; Koczulla, Andreas R; Gut, Ivo; Hohlfeld, Jens; Welte, Tobias; Lavae-Mokhtari, Mahyar; Ziegler-Heitbrock, Loems; Brightling, Christopher; Parr, David G

    2016-07-01

    EvA (Emphysema versus Airway disease) is a multicentre project to study mechanisms and identify biomarkers of emphysema and airway disease in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The objective of this study was to delineate objectively imaging-based emphysema-dominant and airway disease-dominant phenotypes using quantitative computed tomography (QCT) indices, standardised with a novel phantom-based approach.441 subjects with COPD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stages 1-3) were assessed in terms of clinical and physiological measurements, laboratory testing and standardised QCT indices of emphysema and airway wall geometry.QCT indices were influenced by scanner non-conformity, but standardisation significantly reduced variability (p<0.001) and led to more robust phenotypes. Four imaging-derived phenotypes were identified, reflecting "emphysema-dominant", "airway disease-dominant", "mixed" disease and "mild" disease. The emphysema-dominant group had significantly higher lung volumes, lower gas transfer coefficient, lower oxygen (PO2 ) and carbon dioxide (PCO2 ) tensions, higher haemoglobin and higher blood leukocyte numbers than the airway disease-dominant group.The utility of QCT for phenotyping in the setting of an international multicentre study is improved by standardisation. QCT indices of emphysema and airway disease can delineate within a population of patients with COPD, phenotypic groups that have typical clinical features known to be associated with emphysema-dominant and airway-dominant disease. PMID:27230444

  18. Candle light-style OLED: a plausibly human-friendly safe night light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, Jwo-Huei; Chen, Po-Wei; Hsieh, Chun-Yu; Wang, Ching-Chiun; Chen, Chien-Chih; Tung, F.-C.; Chen, Szu-Hao; Wang, Yi-Shan

    2013-09-01

    Candles emit sensationally-warm light with a very-low color-temperature, comparatively most suitable for use at night. In response to the need for such a human-friendly night light, we demonstrate the employment of a high number of candle light complementary organic emitters to generate mimic candle light based on organic light emitting diode (OLED). One resultant candle light-style OLED shows a very-high color rendering index, with an efficacy at least 300 times that of candles or twice that of an incandescent bulb. The device can be fabricated, for example, by using four candle light complementary emitters, namely: red, yellow, green, and sky-blue phosphorescent dyes, vacuum-deposited into two emission layers, separated by a nano-layer of carrier modulation material to maximize both the desirable very-high color rendering index and energy efficiency, while keeping the blue emission very low and red emission high to obtain the desirable low color temperature. With different layer structures, the OLEDs can also show color tunable between that of candle light and dusk-hue. Importantly, a romantic sensation giving and supposedly physiologically-friendly candle light-style emission can hence be driven by electricity in lieu of the hydrocarbon-burning and greenhouse gas releasing candles that were invented 5,000 years ago.

  19. Thermal/chemical degradation of ceramic candle filter materials. Final report, September 1988--October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    High-temperature ceramic candle filters are being developed for use in advanced power generation systems such as the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustor (PFBC), and Direct Coal-Fired Turbine (DCFT). The direct firing of coal produces particulate matter which must be removed to meet both environmental and process limitations. The ceramic candles increase the efficiency of the advanced power generation systems and protect downstream equipment from erosion and impingement of particulate matter in the hot exhaust gases. Ceramic candle filters are rigid, closed-ended (capped on one side) porous cylinders which generally have a flange on the open-ended side. The flange at the open end allows the candle to be suspended by a tubesheet in the filter vessel. Candle filters have shown promise, but have also encountered durability problems during use in hostile, high-temperature environments. Limitations in the candle lifetime lower the economic advantages of using candle filters for this application. Candles typically fail by cracking at the flange or in the body of the candle. The objective of this project was to test and analyze ceramic candle filter materials and to evaluate the degradation mechanisms. The tests were conducted such that the effects of each degradation mechanism could be examined. Separately. The overall objective of the project was to: (a) develop a better understanding of the thermal and chemical degradation mechanisms of ceramic candle filter materials in advanced coal utilization projects, (b) develop test procedures, and (c) recommend changes to increase filter lifetime. 15 refs., 67 figs., 17 tabs.

  20. The effectiveness of a standardised positioning tool and bedside education on the developmental positioning proficiency of NICU nurses.

    PubMed

    Spilker, Arlene; Hill, Constance; Rosenblum, Ruth

    2016-08-01

    In order to improve the developmental proficiency of neonatal intensive care unit nurses, a standardised infant positioning assessment tool and a bedside education programme were introduced to the registered nurses in a 46 bed level III neonatal intensive care unit in the western United States. A developmental positioning team collected pre-intervention positioning scores on 54 preterm infants. This was followed by a survey of the registered nurses beliefs and attitudes, the introduction of the standardised assessment tool and an informal education programme. Post-intervention positioning scores were collected on 55 preterm infants, and analysis of the data indicated there was a statistically significant change in mean positioning scores. Additionally, the registered nurses identified several barriers to the implementation of developmental positioning. This research indicates the use of a standardised infant positioning assessment tool and bedside education may be useful strategies for improving the developmental positioning proficiency of NICU nurses. PMID:26947083

  1. Standardised Embedded Data framework for Drones [SEDD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyngaard, J.; Barbieri, L.; Peterson, F. S.

    2015-12-01

    A number of barriers to entry remain for UAS use in science. One in particular is that of implementing an experiment and UAS specific software stack. Currently this stack is most often developed in-house and customised for a particular UAS-sensor pairing - limiting its reuse. Alternatively, when adaptable a suitable commercial package may be used, but such systems are both costly and usually suboptimal.In order to address this challenge the Standardised Embedded Data framework for Drones [SEDD] is being developed in μpython. SEDD provides an open source, reusable, and scientist-accessible drop in solution for drone data capture and triage. Targeted at embedded hardware, and offering easy access to standard I/O interfaces, SEDD provides an easy solution for simply capturing data from a sensor. However, the intention is rather to enable more complex systems of multiple sensors, computer hardware, and feedback loops, via 3 primary components.A data asset manager ensures data assets are associated with appropriate metadata as they are captured. Thereafter, the asset is easily archived or otherwise redirected, possibly to - onboard storage, onboard compute resource for processing, an interface for transmission, another sensor control system, remote storage and processing (such as EarthCube's CHORDS), or to any combination of the above.A service workflow managerenables easy implementation of complex onboard systems via dedicated control of multiple continuous and periodic services. Such services will include the housekeeping chores of operating a UAS and multiple sensors, but will also permit a scientist to drop in an initial scientific data processing code utilising on-board compute resources beyond the autopilot. Having such capabilities firstly enables easy creation of real-time feedback, to the human- or auto- pilot, or other sensors, on data quality or needed flight path changes. Secondly, compute hardware provides the opportunity to carry out real-time data triage

  2. Scientific Observation and the Learning Cycle: Burning the Candle at Both Ends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Kevin; Bluhm, William J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a twist on the basic "Science 101" investigation of having students observe a birthday candle before, during, and after burning. It engages students in exploring the attributes of a candle, introduces them to the concepts of empirical observation and investigation, and involves them in developing and conducting a burning…

  3. Low radioactivity CaF{sub 2} scintillator crystals for CANDLES

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, I.; Umehara, S.; Ito, G.; Yasuda, K.; Kakubata, H.; Miyashita, M.; Matsuoka, K.; Nomachi, M.; Kishimoto, T.; Fushimi, K.; Hazama, R.; Ohsumi, H.; Okada, K.; Tamagawa, Y.; Yoshida, S.

    2011-04-27

    CANDLES is the project to search for neutrinoless double beta (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay of {sup 48}Ca by using CaF{sub 2} scintillators. The observation of 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay will prove the existence of massive Majorana neutrinos. Expected performances and current status of the CANDLES system are described.

  4. Qualifications of Candle Filters for Combined Cycle Combustion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasz Wiltowski

    2008-08-31

    The direct firing of coal produces particulate matter that has to be removed for environmental and process reasons. In order to increase the current advanced coal combustion processes, under the U.S. Department of Energy's auspices, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) has developed ceramic candle filters that can operate at high temperatures. The Coal Research Center of Southern Illinois University (SIUC), in collaboration with SWPC, developed a program for long-term filter testing at the SIUC Steam Plant followed by experiments using a single-filter reactor unit. The objectives of this program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy were to identify and demonstrate the stability of porous candle filter elements for use in high temperature atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (AFBC) process applications. These verifications were accomplished through extended time slipstream testing of a candle filter array under AFBC conditions using SIUC's existing AFBC boiler. Temperature, mass flow rate, and differential pressure across the filter array were monitored for a duration of 45 days. After test exposure at SIUC, the filter elements were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy and BET surface area analyses. In addition, a single-filter reactor was built and utilized to study long term filter operation, the permeability exhibited by a filter element before and after the slipstream test, and the thermal shock resilience of a used filter by observing differential pressure changes upon rapid heating and cooling of the filter. The data acquired during the slipstream test and the post-test evaluations demonstrated the suitability of filter elements in advanced power generation applications.

  5. Demonstrating Sound Wave Propagation with Candle Flame and Loudspeaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrepic, Zdeslav; Nettles, Corey; Bonilla, Chelsea

    2013-01-01

    The motion of a candle flame in front of a loudspeaker has been suggested as a productive demonstration of the longitudinal wave nature of sound. The demonstration has been used also as a research tool to investigate students' understanding about sound.2-4 The underpinning of both applications is the expectation of a horizontal, back-and-forth vibration of the flame around its upright position. Unlike experts, who regularly anticipate this outcome, students with no previous formal knowledge typically anticipate that the flame will lean away from the speaker.

  6. Fuel-Cycle of 'CANDLE' Burnup with Depleted Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroshi, Sekimoto

    2006-07-01

    A new reactor burnup strategy CANDLE (Constant Axial shape of Neutron flux, nuclide densities and power shape During Life of Energy producing reactor) was proposed, where shapes of neutron flux, nuclide densities and power density distributions remain constant but move upward (or downward) along its core axis. This burnup strategy can derive many merits, especially from safety point of view. The change of excess reactivity along burnup is theoretically zero, and the core characteristics, such as power feedback coefficients and power peaking factor, are not changed along burnup. Application of this burnup strategy to neutron rich fast reactors makes excellent performances. Only natural or depleted uranium is required for the replacing fuels. About 40 % of natural or depleted uranium undergoes fission without the conventional reprocessing and enrichment. If the LWR produced energy of X Joules, the CANDLE reactor can produce about 50 X Joules from the depleted uranium left at the enrichment facility for the LWR fuel. If we can say LWRs have produced energy sufficient for full 20 years, we can produce the energy for 1000 years by using the CANDLE reactors with depleted uranium. We need not mine any uranium ore, and do not need reprocessing facility. The burnup of spent fuel becomes 10 times. Therefore, the spent fuel amount per produced energy is also reduced to one-tenth. The equilibrium core contains a lot of instable materials such as higher actinides and fission products, the enough amounts of which can not be obtained easily. The construction of the initial core is a difficult problem. However, by using enriched uranium substituted for actinides in the equilibrium core, we can construct the initial core whose power profile is similar to the equilibrium one and will reach the equilibrium state without any big change during transient. At present we do not have any material standing for such a high burnup. However, the CANDLE burnup can be realized by employing

  7. Five Requirements for Nuclear Energy and CANDLE Fast Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    The Center for Research into Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems (CRINES) was established in order to succeed the COE-INES mission after finishing this program in Tokyo Tech. CRINES considers nuclear energy should satisfy 5 requirements; sustainability as basic energy, solving 3 problems inherent to accidents, radioactive waste and nuclear bomb, and economical acceptance. Characteristics of CANDLE fast reactor are discussed for these requirements. It satisfies 4 requirements; sustainability and solving 3 inherent problems. For the remaining requirement for economy, a high potential to satisfy this requirement is also shown.

  8. Beam dynamics of CANDLE storage ring low alpha operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, A.; Amatuni, G.; Sahakyan, V.; Tsakanov, V.; Zanyan, G.

    2015-10-01

    The generation of the coherent THz radiation and short pulse synchrotron radiation in dedicated electron storage rings requires the study of non-standard magnetic lattices which provide low momentum compaction factor (alpha) of the ring. In the present paper two low alpha operation lattices based on modification of the original beam optics and implementation of inverse bend magnets are studied for CANDLE storage ring. For considered cases an analysis of transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics is given and the feasibility of lattices is discussed.

  9. On Calibrations Using the Crab Nebula as a Standard Candle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin; Guainazzi, Matteo; Jahoda, Keith; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai; ODell, Stephen; Zavlin, Vyacheslav; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Elsner, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Inspired by a recent paper (Kirsch et al. 2005) on possible use of the Crab Nebula as a standard candle for calibrating X-ray response func tions, we examine possible consequences of intrinsic departures from a single (absorbed) power law upon such calibrations. We limited our analyses to three more modern X-ray instruments -- the ROSAT/PSPC, th e RXTE/PCA, and the XMM-Newton/EPIC-pn. The results are unexpected an d indicate a need to refine two of the three response functions studi ed. The implications for Chandra will be discussed.

  10. Five Requirements for Nuclear Energy and CANDLE Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2010-06-22

    The Center for Research into Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems (CRINES) was established in order to succeed the COE-INES mission after finishing this program in Tokyo Tech. CRINES considers nuclear energy should satisfy 5 requirements; sustainability as basic energy, solving 3 problems inherent to accidents, radioactive waste and nuclear bomb, and economical acceptance. Characteristics of CANDLE fast reactor are discussed for these requirements. It satisfies 4 requirements; sustainability and solving 3 inherent problems. For the remaining requirement for economy, a high potential to satisfy this requirement is also shown.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A CANDLE FILTER FAILURE SAFEGUARD DEVICE

    SciTech Connect

    Todd R. Snyder

    2002-03-29

    The full-flow mechanical safeguard device (FFMSGD) has been developed under contract to the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to address problems with the reliability of ceramic candle filter elements installed on high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) Hot Gas Cleanup (HGCU) filters. Although systems candle filters are expected to perform satisfactorily when in good operating condition, the failure of even a single filter element can increase the filter system outlet dust loading enough to potentially damage gas turbine blades, contaminate other downstream processes, and limit the availability of the power system. Filter failure safeguard devices that are installed on each individual candle filter element are envisioned as a guarantee of a candle filter system's ability to withstand some number of element failures and continue operation without these negative consequences. The intention of the FFMSGD is to provide this guarantee without incurring any significant pressure drop penalty or constraining the filter system's reverse-pulse cleaning procedures. The FFMSGD provides a clear flow path for filtered and reverse-flow cleaning gases when its filter element is intact, and activates to provide a positive mechanical seal against gas flow in either direction when its filter element breaks or fails. This activation is induced by the increase in the flow rate of gas through the device in event of filter failure. The FFMSGD is designed to be easily removed and reconditioned when the filter system is taken off line for routine maintenance. This report is intended to be issued with a companion appendix. As instructed in Section J.12 of Contract No. DE-AC26-99FT40678, all the restricted, proprietary, and patentable information (not yet disclosed through the patent application process) related to the FFMSGD and its evaluation under this contract has been included only in the appendix. This Final Report, which is available to the public, contains background

  12. 76 FR 773 - Petroleum Wax Candles From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-06

    ... a reasonably foreseeable future. See Petroleum Wax Candles From China Determination, 75 FR 80843... International Trade Administration Petroleum Wax Candles From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of... the antidumping duty order on petroleum wax candles from the People's Republic of China...

  13. Facile preparation of superhydrophobic candle soot coating and its wettability under condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhiqing; Huang, Juan; Peng, Chaoyi; Wang, Menglei; Wang, Xian; Bin, Jiping; Xing, Suli; Xiao, Jiayu; Zeng, Jingcheng; Xiao, Ximei; Fu, Xin; Gong, Huifang; Zhao, Dejian; Chen, Hong

    2016-02-01

    A facile method was developed to prepare a superhydrophobic candle soot coating by burning candle and simple deposition on a low-density polyethylene substrate. The water contact angle and sliding angle of the as-prepared superhydrophobic candle soot coating were, respectively, 160 ± 2° and 1° under common condition. ESEM images showed that the superhydrophobic candle soot coating was comprised of many nanoparticles with the size range of about 30-50 nm. After condensation for 30 min, the average contact angle of the condensed water droplets was 150° ± 2°, showing excellent superhydrophobicity under condensation. The mechanism of the candle soot coating remaining superhydrophobicity under condensation was analyzed. This work is helpful for the design and preparation of superhydrophobic surface which can remain superhydrophobicity in future.

  14. From CANDLE reactor to pebble-bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X. N.; Maschek, W.

    2006-07-01

    This paper attempts to reveal theoretically, by studying a diffusion-burn-up coupled neutronic model, that a so-called CANDLE reactor and a pebble-bed type reactor have a common burn-up feature. As already known, a solitary burn-up wave that can develop in the common U-Pu and Th-U conversion processes is the basic mechanism of the CANDLE reactor. In this paper it is demonstrated that a family of burn-up wave solution exists in the boundary value problem characterizing a pebble bed reactor, in which the fuel is loaded from above into the core and unloaded from bottom. Among this solution family there is a particular case, namely, a partial solitary wave solution, which begins from the fuel entrance side and extends into infinity on the exit side, and has a maximal bum-up rate in this family. An example dealing with the {sup 232}Th-{sup 233}U conversion chain is studied and the solutions are presented in order to show the mechanism of the burn-up wave. (authors)

  15. Candle soot nanoparticles-polydimethylsiloxane composites for laser ultrasound transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wei-Yi; Huang, Wenbin; Kim, Jinwook; Li, Sibo; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2015-10-01

    Generation of high power laser ultrasound strongly demands the advanced materials with efficient laser energy absorption, fast thermal diffusion, and large thermoelastic expansion capabilities. In this study, candle soot nanoparticles-polydimethylsiloxane (CSNPs-PDMS) composite was investigated as the functional layer for an optoacoustic transducer with high-energy conversion efficiency. The mean diameter of the collected candle soot carbon nanoparticles is about 45 nm, and the light absorption ratio at 532 nm wavelength is up to 96.24%. The prototyped CSNPs-PDMS nano-composite laser ultrasound transducer was characterized and compared with transducers using Cr-PDMS, carbon black (CB)-PDMS, and carbon nano-fiber (CNFs)-PDMS composites, respectively. Energy conversion coefficient and -6 dB frequency bandwidth of the CSNPs-PDMS composite laser ultrasound transducer were measured to be 4.41 × 10-3 and 21 MHz, respectively. The unprecedented laser ultrasound transduction performance using CSNPs-PDMS nano-composites is promising for a broad range of ultrasound therapy applications.

  16. Characterization of hazardous and odorous volatiles emitted from scented candles before lighting and when lit.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jeong-Hyeon; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Bo-Won

    2015-04-01

    Scented candles are known to release various volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including both pleasant aromas and toxic components both before lighting (off) and when lit (on). In this study, we explored the compositional changes of volatiles from scented candles under various settings to simulate indoor use. Carbonyl compounds and other VOCs emitted from six different candle types were analyzed under 'on/off' conditions. The six candle types investigated were: (1) Clean cotton (CT), (2) Floral (FL), (3) Kiwi melon (KW), (4) Strawberry (SB), (5) Vanilla (VN), and (6) Plain (PL). Although a large number of chemicals were released both before lighting and when lit, their profiles were noticeably distinguishable. Before lighting, various esters (n = 30) showed the most dominant emissions. When lit, formaldehyde was found to have the highest emission concentration of 2098 ppb (SB), 1022 ppb (CT), and 925 ppb (PL). In most lit scented candles, there was a general tendency to show increased concentrations of low boiling point compounds. For some scented candle products, the emission of volatiles occurred strongly both before lighting and when lit. For instance, in terms of TVOC (ppbC), the highest concentrations were observed from the KW product with their values of 12,742 (on) and 2766 ppbC (off). As such, the results suggest that certain scented candle products should act as potent sources of VOC emission in indoor environment, regardless of conditions--whether being lit or not. PMID:25588193

  17. Towards standardised evaluative measurement of nature impacts: two spatial planning case studies for major Dutch lakes.

    PubMed

    van Puijenbroek, P J T M; Sijtsma, F J; Wortelboer, F G; Ligtvoet, W; Maarse, M

    2015-02-01

    In the assessment of complex spatial planning projects, the ecological impacts and socio-economic impacts are fundamental to the evaluation. The measurements of ecological impacts of spatial plans have to be integrated in a standardised way. In the present paper, we analyse two Dutch case studies and apply the standardised Threat-Weighted Ecological Quality Area measurement. This measurement is developed to evaluate projects with terrestrial impacts but has not yet been applied for water evaluations. We aim to show how the use of a common measurement tool incorporates both ecological quality and degree of threat on criteria in the EU Water Framework Directive and Nature 2000. The measurements discussed here derive from two cases of cost-benefit analysis: The first case is the Markermeer, the second largest lake of The Netherlands, and a study on water quality improvement and nature restoration; an artificial island will also be the setting for a new residential area. The second case study is on water level management carried out on the IJsselmeer, the largest lake in the country. Results of our analysis show the potential impacts with a standardised method to the spatial distribution and quality of the ecosystems. PMID:24770926

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ADHESIVE CANDLE FILTER SAFEGUARD DEVICE

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Hurley; Ann K. Henderson; Jan W. Nowok; Michael L. Swanson

    2002-01-01

    In order to reach the highest possible efficiencies in a coal-fired turbine-based power system, the turbine should be directly fired with the products of coal conversion. Two main types of systems employ these turbines: those based on pressurized fluidized-bed combustors and those based on integrated gasification combined cycles. In both systems, suspended particulates must be cleaned from the gas stream before it enters the turbine so as to prevent fouling and erosion of the turbine blades. To produce the cleanest gas, barrier filters are being developed and are in use in several facilities. Barrier filters are composed of porous, high-temperature materials that allow the hot gas to pass but collect the particulates on the surface. The three main configurations of the barrier filters are candle, cross-flow, and tube filters. Both candle and tube filters have been tested extensively. They are composed of coarsely porous ceramic that serves as a structural support, overlain with a thin, microporous ceramic layer on the dirty gas side that serves as the primary filter surface. They are highly efficient at removing particulate matter from the gas stream and, because of their ceramic construction, are resistant to gas and ash corrosion. However, ceramics are brittle and individual elements can fail, allowing particulates to pass through the hole left by the filter element and erode the turbine. Preventing all failure of individual ceramic filter elements is not possible at the present state of development of the technology. Therefore, safeguard devices (SGDs) must be employed to prevent the particulates streaming through occasional broken filters from reaching the turbine. However, the SGD must allow for the free passage of gas when it is not activated. Upon breaking of a filter, the SGD must either mechanically close or quickly plug with filter dust to prevent additional dust from reaching the turbine. Production of a dependable rapidly closing autonomous mechanical

  19. Evaluating the quality of antimicrobial prescribing: is standardisation possible?

    PubMed

    Retamar, Pilar; Martín, M Luisa; Molina, José; del Arco, Alfonso

    2013-09-01

    The quality of antimicrobial prescribing refers to the optimal way to use antibiotics in regard to their benefits, safety (e.g., resistance generation and toxicity) and cost. Evaluating the quality of antimicrobial prescribing in a way that focuses not only on reducing antimicrobial consumption but also on using them in a more optimal way allows us to understand patterns of use and to identify targets for intervention. The lack of standardisation is the primary problem to be addressed when planning an evaluation of antimicrobial prescribing. There is little information specifically describing an evaluation methodology. Information related to prescription evaluation can be obtained from the guidelines of Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs (ASPs) and from local and international experience. The criteria used to evaluate the quality of prescription should include the indication for antimicrobial therapy, the timeliness of initiation, the correct antibiotic choice (according to local guidelines), the dosing, the duration, the route of administration and the time at which to switch to oral administration. A locally developed guideline on antimicrobial therapy should preferably be the gold standard by which to evaluate the appropriatenes of prescriptions. Various approaches used to carry out the evaluations have been described in the literature. Repeated point-prevalence surveys (PPS) have been proven to be effective in identifying targets for quality improvement. Continuous prospective monitoring allows the identification of more precise intervention points at different times during prescription. The design of the study chosen to perform the evaluation should be adapted according to the resources available in each centre. Evaluating the quality of antimicrobial prescribing should be the first step to designing ASPs, as well as to evaluating their impact and the changes in prescribing trends over time. PMID:24129286

  20. Axial and transverse characterizations of ceramic candle filters

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.-E.; Nishihama, Y.; Yue, P.C.

    2008-09-01

    Ceramic candle filters are stiff composite tubes used in particle-removal during hot-gas filtration in coal energy generation. These filters are designed to withstand high temperature and pressure gradients. To determine the consistency in manufactured qualities of these filters, dynamic characterization method is recommended as a nondestructive evaluation technique. Six filters of the same manufactured batch were tested dynamically to establish the baseline properties of these filters. The test results are compared to theoretical values and are used to identify the variation in the manufactured products. This paper reports the frequencies in both transverse and axial directions indicating acceptable variations between all filters that are compatible to variations in measured physical parameters including density, stiffness and elastic modulus.

  1. Quantitative analysis of CT scans of ceramic candle filters

    SciTech Connect

    Ferer, M.V.; Smith, D.H.

    1996-12-31

    Candle filters are being developed to remove coal ash and other fine particles (<15{mu}m) from hot (ca. 1000 K) gas streams. In the present work, a color scanner was used to digitize hard-copy CT X-ray images of cylindrical SiC filters, and linear regressions converted the scanned (color) data to a filter density for each pixel. These data, with the aid of the density of SiC, gave a filter porosity for each pixel. Radial averages, density-density correlation functions, and other statistical analyses were performed on the density data. The CT images also detected the presence and depth of cracks that developed during usage of the filters. The quantitative data promise to be a very useful addition to the color images.

  2. How Beatrice Tinsley Destroyed Sandage's Quest for a Standard Candle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitton, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The goal of cosmology and most extragalactic optical astronomy during the heroic period spanning the half century from Hubble to Sandage (1920s - 1970s) was a search for two numbers, the Hubble constant and the deceleration parameter. Standard candles were needed to establish the measure of the universe. In 1968, Beatrice Tinsley, then a postdoctoral fellow in the astronomy department of the University of Texas at Austin showed that the great enterprise at Palomar of calibrating the galaxies was in need of major revision. At the 132nd AAS Meeting (June 1970, Boulder, Colorado) she presented a paper on galactic evolution on the magnitude-redshift relation. In her Abstract she boldly wrote: "My present conclusion is opposite to that reached by most cosmologists." In fact her claims caused great consternation among cosmologists. In 1972 she published eight papers on the evolution of galaxies, and the effects of that evolution for observational cosmology and the origin of structure.

  3. Gas cleaning, gas conditioning and tar abatement by means of a catalytic filter candle in a biomass fluidized-bed gasifier.

    PubMed

    Rapagnà, Sergio; Gallucci, Katia; Di Marcello, Manuela; Matt, Muriel; Nacken, Manfred; Heidenreich, Steffen; Foscolo, Pier Ugo

    2010-09-01

    A bench-scale fluidized-bed biomass gasification plant, operating at atmospheric pressure and temperature within the range 800-820 degrees C, has been used to test an innovative gas cleaning device: a catalytic filter candle fitted into the bed freeboard. This housing of the gas conditioning system within the gasifier itself results in a very compact unit and greatly reduced thermal losses. Long term (22h) tests were performed on the gasifier both with and without the catalytic candle filter, under otherwise identical conditions. Analysis of the product gas for the two cases showed the catalytic filtration to give rise to notable improvements in both gas quality and gas yield: an increase in hydrogen yield of 130% and an overall increase in gas yield of 69% - with corresponding decreases in methane and tar content of 20% and 79%, respectively. HPLC/UV analysis was used to characterize the tar compounds. PMID:20413303

  4. Internationalisation and Standardisation of European Environmental Assessment. Relevance to India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gazzola, Paola; Jha-Thakur, Urmila

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the rationale underlying "PENTA", an EU funded Erasmus Mundus project. In doing so, it explores the challenges of internationalising and standardising European environmental assessment (EA) practice and education to a third country audience, looking at India as a case study. It is argued that the EU EA Directives are…

  5. Study of Double Beta Decay of {sup 48}Ca by CANDLES

    SciTech Connect

    Umehara, S.; Kishimoto, T.; Ogawa, I.; Matsuoka, K.; Ito, G.; Yasuda, K.; Kakubata, H.; Miyashita, M.; Nomachi, M.; Ajimura, S.; Tamagawa, Y.; Fushimi, K.; Hazama, R.; Ohsumi, H.; Okada, K.; Yoshida, S.; Fujii, Y.

    2010-05-12

    CANDLES is the project to search for neutrino-less double beta decay (0nubetabeta) of {sup 48}Ca. The observation of 0nubetabeta will prove existence of a massive Majorana neutrino. We have developed the new detector system CANDLES which features CaF{sub 2}(pure) scintillators. Here expected performances of the system for background rejection are presented. It is also described current status of development for the detector system.

  6. Human health risk evaluation of selected VOC, SVOC and particulate emissions from scented candles.

    PubMed

    Petry, Thomas; Vitale, Danielle; Joachim, Fred J; Smith, Ben; Cruse, Lynn; Mascarenhas, Reuben; Schneider, Scott; Singal, Madhuri

    2014-06-01

    Airborne compounds in the indoor environment arise from a wide variety of sources such as environmental tobacco smoke, heating and cooking, construction materials as well as outdoor sources. To understand the contribution of scented candles to the indoor load of airborne substances and particulate matter, candle emission testing was undertaken in environmentally controlled small and large emission chambers. Candle emission rates, calculated on the basis of measured chamber concentrations of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (VOC, SVOC) and particulate matter (PM), were used to predict their respective indoor air concentrations in a standard EU-based dwelling using 2 models: the widely accepted ConsExpo 1-box inhalation model and the recently developed RIFM 2-box indoor air dispersion model. The output from both models has been used to estimate more realistic consumer exposure concentrations of specific chemicals and PM in candle emissions. Potential consumer health risks associated with the candle emissions were characterized by comparing the exposure concentrations with existing indoor or ambient air quality guidelines or, where not existent, to established toxicity thresholds. On the basis of this investigation it was concluded that under normal conditions of use scented candles do not pose known health risks to the consumer. PMID:24582651

  7. Educating Students About Standardisation Relating to Universal Design.

    PubMed

    Darzentas, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Standardisation education is rarely taught to students in the design disciplines in academic settings, and consequently there is not much evidence about best practices. This paper examines this situation, and elaborates on some of the possible reasons for this situation. Further, it gives an example of how students may be instructed and encouraged to further their interests in standards and the standardization-making process as a means for increasing Universal Design in practice. PMID:27534303

  8. Assessment of acrylamide toxicity using a battery of standardised bioassays.

    PubMed

    Zovko, Mira; Vidaković-Cifrek, Željka; Cvetković, Želimira; Bošnir, Jasna; Šikić, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Acrylamide is a monomer widely used as an intermediate in the production of organic chemicals, e.g. polyacrylamides (PAMs). Since PAMs are low cost chemicals with applications in various industries and waste- and drinking water treatment, a certain amount of non-polymerised acrylamide is expected to end up in waterways. PAMs are non-toxic but acrylamide induces neurotoxic effects in humans and genotoxic, reproductive, and carcinogenic effects in laboratory animals. In order to evaluate the effect of acrylamide on freshwater organisms, bioassays were conducted on four species: algae Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, duckweed Lemna minor and water flea Daphnia magna according to ISO (International Organization for Standardisation) standardised methods. This approach ensures the evaluation of acrylamide toxicity on organisms with different levels of organisation and the comparability of results, and it examines the value of using a battery of low-cost standardised bioassays in the monitoring of pollution and contamination of aquatic ecosystems. These results showed that EC50 values were lower for Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata than for Daphnia magna and Lemna minor, which suggests an increased sensitivity of algae to acrylamide. According to the toxic unit approach, the values estimated by the Lemna minor and Daphnia magna bioassays, classify acrylamide as slightly toxic (TU=0-1; Class 1). The results obtained from algal bioassays (Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) revealed the toxic effect of acrylamide (TU=1-10; Class 2) on these organisms. PMID:26751864

  9. Medical practice, procedure manuals and the standardisation of hospital death.

    PubMed

    Hadders, Hans

    2009-03-01

    This paper examines how death is managed in a larger regional hospital within the Norwegian health-care. The central focus of my paper concerns variations in how healthcare personnel enact death and handle the dead patient. Over several decades, modern standardised hospital death has come under critique in the western world. Such critique has resulted in changes in the standardisation of hospital deaths within Norwegian health-care. In the wake of the hospice movement and with greater focus on palliative care, doors have gradually been opened and relatives of the deceased are now more often invited to participate. I explore how the medical practice around death along with the procedure manual of post-mortem care at Trondheim University Hospital has changed. I argue that in the late-modern context, standardisation of hospital death is a multidimensional affair, embedded in a far more comprehensive framework than the depersonalized medico-legal. In the late-modern Norwegian hospital, interdisciplinary negotiation and co-operation has allowed a number of different agendas to co-exist, without any ensuing loss of the medical power holder's authority to broker death. I follow Mol's notion of praxiographic orientation of the actor-network approach while exploring this medical practice. PMID:19228301

  10. Type II Supernovae: Model Light Curves and Standard Candle Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasen, Daniel; Woosley, S. E.

    2009-10-01

    A survey of Type II supernovae explosion models has been carried out to determine how their light curves and spectra vary with their mass, metallicity, and explosion energy. The presupernova models are taken from a recent survey of massive stellar evolution at solar metallicity supplemented by new calculations at subsolar metallicity. Explosions are simulated by the motion of a piston near the edge of the iron core and the resulting light curves and spectra are calculated using full multi-wavelength radiation transport. Formulae are developed that describe approximately how the model observables (light curve luminosity and duration) scale with the progenitor mass, explosion energy, and radioactive nucleosynthesis. Comparison with observational data shows that the explosion energy of typical supernovae (as measured by kinetic energy at infinity) varies by nearly an order of magnitude—from 0.5 to 4.0 × 1051 ergs, with a typical value of ~0.9 × 1051 ergs. Despite the large variation, the models exhibit a tight relationship between luminosity and expansion velocity, similar to that previously employed empirically to make SNe IIP standardized candles. This relation is explained by the simple behavior of hydrogen recombination in the supernova envelope, but we find a sensitivity to progenitor metallicity and mass that could lead to systematic errors. Additional correlations between light curve luminosity, duration, and color might enable the use of SNe IIP to obtain distances accurate to ~20% using only photometric data.

  11. TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: MODEL LIGHT CURVES AND STANDARD CANDLE RELATIONSHIPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kasen, Daniel; Woosley, S. E.

    2009-10-01

    A survey of Type II supernovae explosion models has been carried out to determine how their light curves and spectra vary with their mass, metallicity, and explosion energy. The presupernova models are taken from a recent survey of massive stellar evolution at solar metallicity supplemented by new calculations at subsolar metallicity. Explosions are simulated by the motion of a piston near the edge of the iron core and the resulting light curves and spectra are calculated using full multi-wavelength radiation transport. Formulae are developed that describe approximately how the model observables (light curve luminosity and duration) scale with the progenitor mass, explosion energy, and radioactive nucleosynthesis. Comparison with observational data shows that the explosion energy of typical supernovae (as measured by kinetic energy at infinity) varies by nearly an order of magnitude-from 0.5 to 4.0 x 10{sup 51} ergs, with a typical value of approx0.9 x 10{sup 51} ergs. Despite the large variation, the models exhibit a tight relationship between luminosity and expansion velocity, similar to that previously employed empirically to make SNe IIP standardized candles. This relation is explained by the simple behavior of hydrogen recombination in the supernova envelope, but we find a sensitivity to progenitor metallicity and mass that could lead to systematic errors. Additional correlations between light curve luminosity, duration, and color might enable the use of SNe IIP to obtain distances accurate to approx20% using only photometric data.

  12. THE STANDARDIZED CANDLE METHOD FOR TYPE II PLATEAU SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Olivares E, Felipe; Hamuy, Mario; Pignata, Giuliano; Maza, Jose; Bersten, Melina; Phillips, Mark M.; Morrel, Nidia I.; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Matheson, Thomas

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, we study the 'standardized candle method' using a sample of 37 nearby (redshift z < 0.06) Type II plateau supernovae having BVRI photometry and optical spectroscopy. An analytic procedure is implemented to fit light curves, color curves, and velocity curves. We find that the V-I color toward the end of the plateau can be used to estimate the host-galaxy reddening with a precision of {sigma}(A{sub V}) = 0.2 mag. The correlation between plateau luminosity and expansion velocity previously reported in the literature is recovered. Using this relation and assuming a standard reddening law (R{sub V} = 3.1), we obtain Hubble diagrams (HDs) in the BVI bands with dispersions of {approx}0.4 mag. Allowing R{sub V} to vary and minimizing the spread in the HDs, we obtain a dispersion range of 0.25-0.30 mag, which implies that these objects can deliver relative distances with precisions of 12%-14%. The resulting best-fit value of R{sub V} is 1.4 {+-} 0.1.

  13. Sintered metal candle filter for hot gas cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jinhu; Xu Yifeng; Cheng Hanshi; Zhang Jianmin; Ding Guishan

    1997-12-31

    A kind of sintered metal candle filter has been developed to enable the performance testing for use in hot coal gas clean-up. The intention of this paper is to provide a brief overview of development of the filter, and to provide a summary of experimental results that have been gained in testing at a pilot gasifier. Two different types of stainless steel were chosen as the material to build the filter. The operational temperature range is 460--650 C. The typical inlet dust concentration is 1.0--37.71g/Nm{sup 3}. Results show the average collection efficiency is higher than 99%, the outlet dust concentration is lower than 10mg/Nm{sup 3}, which reaches the requirement of gas turbines in IGCC. The pressure drop is about 8,300--17,400Pa, and the back blowing of the filter proves to be very good. At present only single-tube testing was conducted. The multi-tube testing facility will be established, and the authors will perform the tests under the condition of high pressure to obtain more experience for design and operation.

  14. Development of 3M`s oxide/oxide candle filter

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, L.; Smith, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    3M has had a silicon carbide, SiC, matrix/oxide fiber, ceramic composite, candle filter in test and on the market for several years. Because of the effects of some corrosive environments, 3M is developing an oxide matrix/oxide fiber hot gas candle filter which will be better suited for some of the environments which can degrade SiC. This paper will discuss the progress of the development of the oxide/oxide candle filter. Composite panels using three different Nextel{trademark} fibers but the same matrix material have been exposed to different simulated environmental conditions in the laboratory. Data will be presented on the effects of these environments on the composite panels. Also prototype candles have been made from the oxide/oxide system and data will be presented on the filtration characteristics, construction, and laboratory environmental exposures of these filters. Finally, if available, data will be presented on 12-in candle filters which have been exposed in an industrial test facility.

  15. 75 FR 70713 - Petroleum Wax Candles From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Expedited Third...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... Act''). See Initiation of Five-Year (``Sunset'') Review, 75 FR 39494 (July 9, 2010). On July 16, 2010... International Trade Administration Petroleum Wax Candles From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of... petroleum wax candles from the People's Republic of China (``PRC''). On the basis of a timely notice...

  16. 75 FR 49475 - Petroleum Wax Candles From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... Order: Petroleum Wax Candles from the People's Republic of China, 51 FR 30686 (August 28, 1996) (``Order... International Trade Administration Petroleum Wax Candles From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary... International (``SI''); the Retail Industry Leaders of America (``RILA''); and Trade Associates Group,...

  17. 16 CFR Table 2 to Part 1512 - Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1 2 Table 2 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION... 1512—Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1 Observation angle Front,...

  18. 16 CFR Table 1 to Part 1512 - Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1 1 Table 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION... 1512—Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1 Observation angle Front,...

  19. 16 CFR Table 2 to Part 1512 - Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1 2 Table 2 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION... 1512—Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1 Observation angle Front,...

  20. 16 CFR Table 1 to Part 1512 - Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1 1 Table 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION... 1512—Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1 Observation angle Front,...

  1. 16 CFR Table 2 to Part 1512 - Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1 2 Table 2 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION... 1512—Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1 Observation angle Front,...

  2. 16 CFR Table 1 to Part 1512 - Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1 1 Table 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION... 1512—Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1 Observation angle Front,...

  3. 16 CFR Table 1 to Part 1512 - Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1 1 Table 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION... 1512—Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1 Observation angle Front,...

  4. 16 CFR Table 1 to Part 1512 - Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1 1 Table 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION... 1512—Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1 Observation angle Front,...

  5. 16 CFR Table 2 to Part 1512 - Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1 2 Table 2 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION... 1512—Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1 Observation angle Front,...

  6. 16 CFR Table 2 to Part 1512 - Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1 2 Table 2 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION... 1512—Minimum Candlepower per Incident Foot-Candle for Clear Reflector 1 Observation angle Front,...

  7. Value of standardised exercise tests and blood biochemistry in the selection and training of breeding stallions.

    PubMed

    Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, M M; Wensing, T; Barneveld, A; Breukink, H J

    1991-10-19

    Stallions selected by the Royal Dutch Warmblood Society were submitted to a standardised lungeing test at the beginning and at the end of a 100-day test of performance and ability. The heart rate, haematology and biochemistry values obtained in the first lungeing test showed no significant differences between the 15 stallions which were rejected by the Royal Dutch Warmblood Society during the first month of the 100-day test, the 15 stallions rejected during the last month and the 11 stallions which were approved for registration in the studbook. The 26 stallions submitted to the second lungeing test had significantly lower heart rates and blood lactate concentrations than in the first test. The standardised lungeing test had no value in predicting the rejection or approval of the stallions, and the fitness of a stallion at the beginning of the 100-day test did not influence its chance of being approved as a breeding stallion. The differences between the results of the first and the second tests suggest that the fitness of the stallions improved during the 100-day test. PMID:1759338

  8. A STUDY ON ASH PARTICLE DISTRIBUTION CHARACTERISITICS OF CANDLE FILTER SURFACE REGENERATION AT ROOM TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, V.; Kang, B.S-J.; Johnson, E.K.

    2002-09-19

    Ceramic barrier filtration is a leading technology employed in hot gas filtration. Hot gases loaded with ash particle flow through the ceramic candle filters and deposit ash on their outer surface. The deposited ash is periodically removed using back pulse cleaning jet, known as surface regeneration. The cleaning done by this technique still leaves some residual ash on the filter surface, which over a period of time sinters, forms a solid cake and leads to mechanical failure of the candle filter. A room temperature testing facility (RTTF) was built to gain more insight into the surface regeneration process before testing commenced at high temperature. RTTF was instrumented to obtain pressure histories during the surface regeneration process and a high-resolution high-speed imaging system was integrated in order to obtain pictures of the surface regeneration process. The objective of this research has been to utilize the RTTF to study the surface regeneration process at the convenience of room temperature conditions. The face velocity of the fluidized gas, the regeneration pressure of the back pulse and the time to build up ash on the surface of the candle filter were identified as the important parameters to be studied. Two types of ceramic candle filters were used in the study. Each candle filter was subjected to several cycles of ash build-up followed by a thorough study of the surface regeneration process at different parametric conditions. The pressure histories in the chamber and filter system during build-up and regeneration were then analyzed. The size distribution and movement of the ash particles during the surface regeneration process was studied. Effect of each of the parameters on the performance of the regeneration process is presented. A comparative study between the two candle filters with different characteristics is presented.

  9. Student Standardised Testing: Current Practices in OECD Countries and a Literature Review. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 65

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Allison

    2011-01-01

    This report discusses the most relevant issues concerning student standardised testing in which there are no-stakes for students ("standardised testing") through a literature review and a review of the trends in standardised testing in OECD countries. Unlike standardised tests in which there are high-stakes for students, no-stakes implies that…

  10. Nondestructive Evaluation of Stiffness and Stresses of Ceramic Candle Filters at Elevated Temperature under Vibrational Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, R.H.L.; Kiriakidia, A.

    2002-09-19

    In recent years a significant amount of effort has been devoted to develop damage-tolerant hot gas filter elements, which can withstand chemical, high pressure and extreme thermal cyclic loading in the coal-based environment (Alvin 1999, Spain and Starrett 1999). Ceramic candle filters have proven to be an effective filter for the ash laden gas streams, protecting the gas turbine components from exposure to particulate matter (Lippert et al. 1994). Ceramic candle filters need to sustain extreme thermal environment and vibration-induced stresses over a great period of time. Destructive tests have been used to describe physical, mechanical and thermal properties of the filters and to relate these properties and behaviors to in-service performance, and ultimately to predict the useful life of the filter materials (Pontius and Starrett 1994, Alvin et al. 1994). Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques have been developed to determine the deterioration or the presence of damage and to estimate the remaining stiffness of ceramic candle filters (Chen and Kiriakidis 2001). This paper presents a study of parameters involved in the prediction of remaining life of ceramic candle filters under service conditions. About one hundred ceramic candle filters from previous studies (Chen and Kiriakidis 2000) and forty-six filters received during this project have been nondestructively evaluated. They are divided in Pall Vitropore, Schumacher and Coors filters. Forty-six of these filters were used having various in-service exposure times at the PSDF and the rest were unused filters. Dynamic characterization tests were employed to investigate the material properties of ceramic candle filters. The vibration frequency changes due to exposure hours, dust cake accumulation, candle's axisymmetry, boundary conditions and elevated temperatures are studied. Investigations on fatigue stresses of the filters due to vibration of the plenum and back pulse shaking are also studied. Finite element

  11. [Surgical History Taking and Clinical Examination: Establishing a Standardised System by Means of a Nation-Wide Academic Teaching Project.

    PubMed

    von Bernstorff, W; Irmer, H; Menges, P; Peters, S; Heidecke, C-D; Busemann, A

    2014-11-13

    Background: History taking and systematic clinical examination are central techniques of physicians. Medicine in general and surgery in particular frequently require immediate decisions and start of therapies. So far, a standardised surgical system for history taking and clinical examination in teaching has been lacking at our faculty. A consensus of all medical faculties on a standardised system could be a tool to improve the medical teaching and education at our teaching institutions. Methods: The established Anglo-Saxonian system of history taking and clinical examination was adapted to our own clinical needs. Thereafter, this system was sent out to all chairmen of general and visceral surgery departments in German University Hospitals asking for evaluation and improvements. We adapted the system according to the chairmen's comments and suggestions. Since winter semester 2011 this system has been integrated into the clinical course of history taking and examination. It is compulsory for all 5th semester students (first clinical year/graduate course) at the Universitätsmedizin Greifswald. In addition, a video was produced demonstrating all major techniques of clinical examination. This video is available for all students on a password blocked site of the World Wide Web. Results: Altogether, 89 % of all contacted chairmen returned their comments and suggestions for improvements. After implementation of the new system, positive evaluations of students increased significantly from 63.5 to 77.0 % in general and abdominal surgery (p < 0.0001) and from 76.4 to 83.5 % in vascular and thoracic surgery (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The presented system is a standardised tool of history taking and clinical examination applicable for students as well as qualified surgeons in daily routine work. It has been approved by the majority of the departments of surgery of all German university hospitals. Furthermore, it can be applied by other medical specialties, in

  12. Six direct methods for standardisation of 152Eu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, L.; Altzitzoglou, T.; Sibbens, G.; Denecke, B.; Reher, D. F. G.

    2003-08-01

    In the course of the past 40 years, IRMM has developed a large number of direct methods for the accurate standardisation of radionuclide solutions, all providing traceability to the SI unit. Six different measurement methods were employed to standardise a 152Eu solution in the frame of a BIPM key comparison: 4πβ(PPC)-γ-coincidence counting, using a modified version of the 'Funck' pressurised proportional counter (Ar-CH 4) for counting the electrons and low-energy photons, and a 15×15 cm NaI(Tl) well crystal for counting the γ-rays; 4πβ(PPC)-γ-sum counting using the same equipment as above; 4πβ-γ-coincidence counting, using a 2D shaped proportional counter (Kr-CH 4) sandwiched between two 7.5×7.5 cm 2 NaI(Tl) crystals; 4πγ counting, using a 15×15 cm 2 NaI(Tl) well crystal; 4πCsI(Tl) counting; Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) using the CIEMAT/NIST method. The methods will be described and compared, with emphasis on their strengths and weaknesses. In the case of 152Eu, we were able to achieve a standard deviation of the weighted mean of 0.14% among all methods, or 0.11% when excluding the LSC result.

  13. Compilation of a standardised international folate database for EPIC.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Geneviève; Witthöft, Cornelia M; Vignat, Jérôme; Knaze, Viktoria; Huybrechts, Inge; Roe, Mark; Finglas, Paul; Slimani, Nadia

    2016-02-15

    This paper describes the methodology applied for compiling an "international end-user" folate database. This work benefits from the unique dataset offered by the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) (N=520,000 subjects in 23 centres). Compilation was done in four steps: (1) identify folate-free foods then find folate values for (2) folate-rich foods common across EPIC countries, (3) the remaining "common" foods, and (4) "country-specific" foods. Compiled folate values were concurrently standardised in terms of unit, mode of expression and chemical analysis, using information in national food composition tables (FCT). 43-70% total folate values were documented as measured by microbiological assay. Foods reported in EPIC were either matched directly to FCT foods, treated as recipes or weighted averages. This work has produced the first standardised folate dataset in Europe, which was used to calculate folate intakes in EPIC; a prerequisite to study the relation between folate intake and diseases. PMID:26433299

  14. Use and abuse of statistics in tobacco industry-funded research on standardised packaging.

    PubMed

    Laverty, Anthony A; Diethelm, Pascal; Hopkinson, Nicholas S; Watt, Hilary C; McKee, Martin

    2015-09-01

    In this commentary we consider the validity of tobacco industry-funded research on the effects of standardised packaging in Australia. As the first country to introduce standardised packs, Australia is closely watched, and Philip Morris International has recently funded two studies into the impact of the measure on smoking prevalence. Both of these papers are flawed in conception as well as design but have nonetheless been widely publicised as cautionary tales against standardised pack legislation. Specifically, we focus on the low statistical significance of the analytical methods used and the assumption that standardised packaging should have an immediate large impact on smoking prevalence. PMID:25650186

  15. Burning a Candle in a Vessel, a Simple Experiment with a Long History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vera, Francisco; Rivera, Rodrigo; Nunez, Cesar

    2011-01-01

    The experiment in which a candle is burned inside an inverted vessel partially immersed in water has a history of more than 2,200 years, but even nowadays it is common that students and teachers relate the change in volume of the enclosed air to its oxygen content. Contrary to what many people think, Lavoisier concluded that any change in volume…

  16. Ceramic candle filter performance at the Grimethorpe (UK) Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Stringer, J. ); Leitch, A.J. )

    1992-04-01

    A pilot hot-gas particulate removal system, based on positive porous ceramic filters, has been tested on the Grimethorpe Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor facility. The filters are in the form of closed-ended tubes, 1.5 m long: These are generally called candles. The dust accumulates on the outside of the cradles, and is periodically removed by a pulse of air into the candle interior, which then flows outward through the candle wall in the reverse direction to the normal flow of the combustion gas. The EPRI system contained a maximum of 130 candles, which is approximately equivalent to the requirement for 7 MW(e) capacity, depending on the filter-operating parameters. The filter unit operated for a total of 860 h under PFBC conditions, of which 790 h were at defined process conditions, typically 850{degrees}C and 10 bar. The amount of gas flowing through each filter element was varied, and the time between cleaning pulses also was varied. The pressure drop through each filter element rose as the dust accumulated on the outer wall, and recovered after the cleaning pulse.

  17. Preliminary evaluation of FIBROSIC{trademark} candle filter for particulate control in PFBC

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Eggersedt, P.; Zievers, J.F.; Honea, F.I.

    1994-07-01

    The FIBROSIC{trademark} candle filter is made by vacuum-forming a select blend of aluminosilicate fibers with silica and alumina binders and is potentially useful as a hot-gas cleanup device for particulate control in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC). It has the advantages of lighter weight, lower cost, and lower tendency for thermal shock breakage over the more widely studied SiC candle filter. Both filter types were tested with Illinois No. 6 high-sulfur coal in a laboratory-scale PFBC/alkali sorber facility for (1) particulate collection efficiency, (2) permeability characteristics, and (3) physical and mechanical strength and integrity. Tests were conducted at 800--825{degrees}C and a system pressure of 9.2 atm. Filter face velocities were 5.1 and 10.2 cm/s (10 and 20 ft/min) during test periods of 8 and 9.5 h for SiC and FIBROSIC{trademark} candle filters, respectively. The filters were periodically cleaned by a reverse jet pulse of N{sub 2} gas. Both filter types achieved particulate collection efficiencies >99.9% and exhibited comparable permeability characteristics. Although the FIBROSIC{trademark} candle filter has inherently lower bursting strength than the SiC, its physical and mechanical strengths were demonstrated to be sufficient to maintain the integrity of the filter element under PFBC conditions.

  18. Shall We Continue to Teach the Candle Burning Experiment at Lower Secondary Level?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhindsa, Harkirat S.

    2005-01-01

    The candle burning experiment is usually conducted in lower secondary classes to prove the (about) 20% oxygen in air. The aim of this paper is to show that teachers misinterpret the results of the experiment to satisfy the objectives of teaching this experiment. However, when the results of this experiment are interpreted correctly, the objectives…

  19. 9 CFR 590.508 - Candling and transfer-room operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Candling and transfer-room operations. 590.508 Section 590.508 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT)...

  20. 9 CFR 590.508 - Candling and transfer-room operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Candling and transfer-room operations. 590.508 Section 590.508 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT)...

  1. ANALYSIS OF LEAD IN CANDLE PARTICULATE EMISSIONS BY XRF USING UNIQUANT 4

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an extensive program to study the small combustion sources of indoor fine particulate matter (PM), candles with lead-core wicks were burned in a 46-L glass flow- through chamber. The particulate emissions with aerodynamic diameters <10 micrometers (PM10) were captured ...

  2. At what distance can the human eye detect a candle flame?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisciunas, Kevin; Carona, Don W.

    2015-01-01

    Various claims in television commercials and on the web suggest that the human eye can detect a candle flame 3.5 to 30 miles away. These claims are wrong, in large part because the background light of the sky is not taken into account. Even at a dark sky site, the V-band sky brightness on a moonless night varies from 21.0 to 22.0 mag/sec2 (136 to 54 nL) over the course of the 11 year solar cycle. One calculation on the web sets the background to 0.1 nL, as if one had a photographic dark room miles in extent. The most direct way to estimate the maximum distance at which a candle can be seen is to first determine how far one has to be situated from a candle such that it is comparable in brightness to a star of magnitude V = 0, such as Vega or Rigel. We find that this distance is 160 to 200 m. This can be double checked with a CCD imager. A candle flame equivalent to a star of magnitude V = 6 would be 15.85 times more distant, or roughly 2.85 km. We present the results of our own experiments and discuss formulations that take into account the background light.

  3. CANDLES AND INCENSE AS POTENTIAL SOURCES OF INDOOR AIR POLLUTION: MARKET ANALYSIS AND LITERATURE SEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes available information on candles and incense as potential sources of indoor air pollution. It covers market information and a review of the scientific literature. The market information collected focuses on production and sales data, typical uses in the U.S....

  4. Senior physiotherapy students as standardised patients for junior students enhances self-efficacy and satisfaction in both junior and senior students

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Standardised patients are used in medical education to expose students to clinical contexts and facilitate transition to clinical practice, and this approach is gaining momentum in physiotherapy programs. Expense and availability of trained standardised patients are factors limiting widespread adoption, and accessing clinical visits with real patients can be challenging. This study addressed these issues by engaging senior students as standardised patients for junior students. It evaluated how this approach impacted self-reported constructs of both the junior and senior students. Methods Learning activities for undergraduate physiotherapy students were developed in five courses (Neurology, Cardiorespiratory and three Musculoskeletal courses) so that junior students (Year 2 and 3) could develop skills and confidence in patient interview, physical examination and patient management through their interaction with standardised patients played by senior students (Year 4). Surveys were administered before and after the interactions to record junior students’ self-reported confidence, communication, preparedness for clinic, and insight into their abilities; and senior students’ confidence and insight into what it is like to be a patient. Satisfaction regarding this learning approach was surveyed in both the junior and senior students. Results A total of 253 students completed the surveys (mean 92.5% response rate). Across all courses, junior students reported a significant (all P < 0.037) improvement following the standardised patient interaction in their: preparedness for clinic, communication with clients, confidence with practical skills, and understanding of their strengths and weaknesses in relation to the learning activities. Senior students demonstrated a significant improvement in their confidence in providing feedback and insight into their own learning (P < 0.001). All students reported high satisfaction with this learning experience (mean

  5. Certifying leaders? high-quality management practices and healthy organisations: an ISO-9000 based standardisation approach

    PubMed Central

    MONTANO, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The present study proposes a set of quality requirements to management practices by taking into account the empirical evidence on their potential effects on health, the systemic nature of social organisations, and the current conceptualisations of management functions within the framework of comprehensive quality management systems. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses focusing on the associations between leadership and/or supervision and health in occupational settings are evaluated, and the core elements of an ISO 9001 standardisation approach are presented. Six major occupational health requirements to high-quality management practices are identified pertaining to communication processes, organisational justice, role clarity, decision making, social influence processes and management support. It is concluded that the quality of management practices may be improved by developing a quality management system of management practices that ensures not only conformity to product but also to occupational safety and health requirements. Further research may evaluate the practicability of the proposed approach. PMID:26860787

  6. Certifying leaders? high-quality management practices and healthy organisations: an ISO-9000 based standardisation approach.

    PubMed

    Montano, Diego

    2016-08-01

    The present study proposes a set of quality requirements to management practices by taking into account the empirical evidence on their potential effects on health, the systemic nature of social organisations, and the current conceptualisations of management functions within the framework of comprehensive quality management systems. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses focusing on the associations between leadership and/or supervision and health in occupational settings are evaluated, and the core elements of an ISO 9001 standardisation approach are presented. Six major occupational health requirements to high-quality management practices are identified pertaining to communication processes, organisational justice, role clarity, decision making, social influence processes and management support. It is concluded that the quality of management practices may be improved by developing a quality management system of management practices that ensures not only conformity to product but also to occupational safety and health requirements. Further research may evaluate the practicability of the proposed approach. PMID:26860787

  7. Standardisation and half-life measurements of (111)In.

    PubMed

    Dziel, Tomasz; Listkowska, Anna; Tymiński, Zbigniew

    2016-03-01

    The standardisation of (111)In by 4π(LS)-γ coincidence and anticoincidence counting is presented. Absolute measurements were performed for samples with different concentrations of carrier solution and for different window settings in the gamma channel. The radioactive concentration of the master solution determined on the same reference date was consistent for all measurements performed. The evaluated typical uncertainty was 0.43%. The half-life of (111)In was determined using a time series of measurements performed with an ionisation chamber. A least squares fit of the measured data resulted in a half-life of 2.8067 (34) days consistent with Decay Data Evaluation Project recommended value (0.064% higher than the DDEP value). PMID:26651174

  8. Standardisation of radiation portal monitor controls and readouts.

    PubMed

    Tinker, M

    2010-10-01

    There is an urgent need to standardise the numbering configuration of radiation portal monitor sensing panels. Currently, manufacturers use conflicting numbering schemes that may confuse operators of these varied systems. There is a similar problem encountered with the varied choices of coloured indicator lights and coloured print lines designated for gamma and neutron alarms. In addition, second-party software that changes the alarm colour scheme may also have been installed. Furthermore, no provision exists for the colour blind or to provide work stations with only black ink on alarm printouts. These inconsistencies and confusing set-ups could inadvertently cause a misinterpretation of the alarm, resulting in the potential release of a radiological hazard into a sovereign country. These issues are discussed, and a proposed solution is offered. PMID:20858682

  9. Standardisation of radiation portal monitor controls and readouts

    SciTech Connect

    Tinker, Michael R.

    2010-10-01

    There is an urgent need to standardise the numbering configuration of radiation portal monitor sensing panels. Currently, manufacturers use conflicting numbering schemes that may confuse operators of these varied systems. There is a similar problem encountered with the varied choices of colored indicator lights and colored print lines designated for gamma and neutron alarms. In addition, second-party software that changes the alarm color scheme may also have been installed. Furthermore, no provision exists for the color blind or to provide work stations with only black ink on alarm printouts. These inconsistencies and confusing setups could inadvertently cause a misinterpretation of the alarm, resulting in the potential release of a radiological hazard into a sovereign country. These issues are discussed, and a proposed solution is offered.

  10. Start-up fuel and power flattening of sodium-cooled candle core

    SciTech Connect

    Takaki, Naoyuki; Sagawa, Yu; Umino, Akitake; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2013-07-01

    The hard neutron spectrum and unique power shape of CANDLE enable its distinctive performances such as achieving high burnup more than 30% and exempting necessity of both enrichment and reprocessing. On the other hand, they also cause several challenging problems. One is how the initial fuel can be prepared to start up the first CANDLE reactor because the equilibrium fuel composition that enables stable CANDLE burning is complex both in axial and radial directions. Another prominent problem is high radial power peaking factor that worsens averaged burnup, namely resource utilization factor in once-through mode and shorten the life time of structure materials. The purposes of this study are to solve these two problems. Several ideas for core configurations and startup fuel using single enrichment uranium and iron as a substitute of fission products are studied. As a result, it is found that low enriched uranium is applicable to ignite the core but all concepts examined here exceeded heat limits. Adjustment in enrichment and height of active and burnt zone is opened for future work. Sodium duct assemblies and thorium fuel assemblies loaded in the center region are studied as measures to reduce radial power peaking factor. Replacing 37 fuels by thorium fuel assemblies in the zeroth to third row provides well-balanced performance with flattened radial power distribution. The CANDLE core loaded with natural uranium in the outer and thorium in the center region achieved 35.6% of averaged burnup and 7.0 years of cladding life time owing to mitigated local fast neutron irradiation at the center. Using thorium with natural or depleted uranium in CANDLE reactor is also beneficial to diversifying fission resource and extending available term of fission energy without expansion of needs for enrichment and reprocessing.

  11. Testing of Westinghouse hot gas candle filter at Foster Wheeler Karhula R and D Center

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, T.; Sellakumar, K.M.; Lippert, T.; Dennis, R.; Feldmann, H.; Brown, R.

    1996-12-31

    The main objectives of the project are to provide performance and environmental data to the design of a PCFB Demonstration project and evaluate Westinghouse advanced ceramic barrier filter system and candle materials. A total test duration of 1,000 to 1,500 hrs in three segments of 500 hrs each has been planned for evaluating the filter unit. A single cluster Westinghouse hot gas candle filter is being tested. The filter system, which houses 112 ceramic candles in three plenums, takes the full flue gas flow from the PCFB combustor. At full load operation (10 MW load, 10 Bar, 850 C), the nominal filtration velocity is 4.3 cm/s. FWEI and WEC have selected a set of advanced ceramic candle materials based on a state of the art evaluation of the material characteristics in the WEC facilities and earlier test experience at many coal-fired test sites including the 2000 hour testing at the Karhula PCFB pilot plant. The selection comprises the following four types of advanced ceramic candles: Schumacher FT-20; 3M SiCoNeX; Pall 326; and Coors mullite. The ICB has supplied coal and the sorbent. Tests have been in progress since November 1995 and are scheduled for completion by the middle of 1996. The filter unit performance so far has been very satisfactory at the nominal design conditions--10 to 12 bar (150 to 175 psis), 800 to 850 C (1,500 to 1,575 F), and nearly 100% dust removal. There was no visible evidence of any dust carry over into the clean side. This paper describes the performance of the filter including the pulse system and the mechanical package.

  12. Near-Infrared Hubble Diagrams and The Effectiveness of Using Type Ia Supernovae as Standard Candles In The Near-Infrared.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooding, Samuel D.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Marion, G. H.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N. B.

    2009-12-01

    We use a combination of near-infrared and optical data to study the diversity in intrinsic brightness of Type Ia supernovae and to learn how better to correct for the systematic errors involved in using them as standard candles. Our sample includes light curves of 29 nearby Type Ia SNe from the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) at Las Campanas observatory in Chile, which observes in both optical (uBVgri) and near-IR (YJHK) filters, and other well observed nearby Type Ia SNe having light curves with both optical and near-IR data published in the literature. We also use more than forty near-IR spectra from the Marion/IRTF data set plus eleven near-IR spectra of SN 1999ee from Hamuy et al. (2002). The combined set of near-IR spectra consists of many different SNe and covers the epoch range from -13 days to +76 days with respect to V-band maximum. We are working on deriving a set of near-IR, K-corrected, and extinction-corrected YJHK light curve templates and new methods for fitting future YJHK light curve data. From observations of 20 Type Ia supernovae obtained by the CSP collaboration, along with previously published results, I will present near-IR Hubble diagrams and derived absolute magnitudes at maximum brightness for the objects that have well observed near-IR light curves. Type Ia supernovae appear to be standard candles in the near-IR to ±0.15 mag or better and there is much less extinction by dust in the near-IR compared to the optical. A better understanding of the Standard Candle nature of SNe will enable us to improve their usefulness as precise distance indicators and enter deeper into the era of precision cosmology.

  13. Standardisation of the USGS Volcano Alert Level System (VALS): analysis and ramifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fearnley, C. J.; McGuire, W. J.; Davies, G.; Twigg, J.

    2012-11-01

    The standardisation of volcano early warning systems (VEWS) and volcano alert level systems (VALS) is becoming increasingly common at both the national and international level, most notably following UN endorsement of the development of globally comprehensive early warning systems. Yet, the impact on its effectiveness, of standardising an early warning system (EWS), in particular for volcanic hazards, remains largely unknown and little studied. This paper examines this and related issues through evaluation of the emergence and implementation, in 2006, of a standardised United States Geological Survey (USGS) VALS. Under this upper-management directive, all locally developed alert level systems or practices at individual volcano observatories were replaced with a common standard. Research conducted at five USGS-managed volcano observatories in Alaska, Cascades, Hawaii, Long Valley and Yellowstone explores the benefits and limitations this standardisation has brought to each observatory. The study concludes (1) that the process of standardisation was predominantly triggered and shaped by social, political, and economic factors, rather than in response to scientific needs specific to each volcanic region; and (2) that standardisation is difficult to implement for three main reasons: first, the diversity and uncertain nature of volcanic hazards at different temporal and spatial scales require specific VEWS to be developed to address this and to accommodate associated stakeholder needs. Second, the plural social contexts within which each VALS is embedded present challenges in relation to its applicability and responsiveness to local knowledge and context. Third, the contingencies of local institutional dynamics may hamper the ability of a standardised VALS to effectively communicate a warning. Notwithstanding these caveats, the concept of VALS standardisation clearly has continuing support. As a consequence, rather than advocating further commonality of a standardised

  14. Probability density functions for use when calculating standardised drought indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, Cecilia; Prosdocimi, Ilaria; Hannaford, Jamie

    2015-04-01

    Time series of drought indices like the standardised precipitation index (SPI) and standardised flow index (SFI) require a statistical probability density function to be fitted to the observed (generally monthly) precipitation and river flow data. Once fitted, the quantiles are transformed to a Normal distribution with mean = 0 and standard deviation = 1. These transformed data are the SPI/SFI, which are widely used in drought studies, including for drought monitoring and early warning applications. Different distributions were fitted to rainfall and river flow data accumulated over 1, 3, 6 and 12 months for 121 catchments in the United Kingdom. These catchments represent a range of catchment characteristics in a mid-latitude climate. Both rainfall and river flow data have a lower bound at 0, as rains and flows cannot be negative. Their empirical distributions also tend to have positive skewness, and therefore the Gamma distribution has often been a natural and suitable choice for describing the data statistically. However, after transformation of the data to Normal distributions to obtain the SPIs and SFIs for the 121 catchments, the distributions are rejected in 11% and 19% of cases, respectively, by the Shapiro-Wilk test. Three-parameter distributions traditionally used in hydrological applications, such as the Pearson type 3 for rainfall and the Generalised Logistic and Generalised Extreme Value distributions for river flow, tend to make the transformed data fit better, with rejection rates of 5% or less. However, none of these three-parameter distributions have a lower bound at zero. This means that the lower tail of the fitted distribution may potentially go below zero, which would result in a lower limit to the calculated SPI and SFI values (as observations can never reach into this lower tail of the theoretical distribution). The Tweedie distribution can overcome the problems found when using either the Gamma or the above three-parameter distributions. The

  15. ["Fitness for public service" - results of standardised acceptance examinations].

    PubMed

    Arndt, K- H; Roth, M

    2002-01-01

    From Nov. 1 1990 to Dec. 31 2001 4928 applicants (61 % female, 39 % male) were examined, totalling 6580 pre-employment examinations, to decide whether they fulfilled the health requirement criteria for civil servants. Standardised aptitude criteria were used, career-specific requirements taken into account. To exclude with a high probability were any risks of premature disability for service or frequent disorders. In 394 cases (= 5.99 %) the results were negative. This assessment was final in 298 cases (= 4.53 % of all examinations) or was confirmed negative in repeated examinations even after special conditions had been imposed. Main reasons for disqualification were second- and third-degree adipositas with additional risk factors or a metabolic syndrome, chronic cardio-vascular and metabolic diseases requiring permanent treatment, malignant neoplasms or non-fulfilment of the criteria for special careers. The comparatively high rate of disqualification is mainly due to the high average age of the applicants examined (40 % of all applicants were over 40, 13 % were older than 50). Purpose, sensitivity and specifics of such examinations are discussed. Taking into consideration the high rate of civil servants prematurely unfit for work, such pre-employment examinations are regarded as highly justified. Moreover, it is necessary to have clear guidelines, aptitude criteria and examination procedures for individual careers. It is also important to adhere strictly to local responsibility for pre-employment examinations. PMID:12221615

  16. Standardised Models for Inducing Experimental Peritoneal Adhesions in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Bernhard; Wallwiener, Christian; Rajab, Taufiek K.; Brochhausen, Christoph; Wallwiener, Markus; Rothmund, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Animal models for adhesion induction are heterogeneous and often poorly described. We compare and discuss different models to induce peritoneal adhesions in a randomized, experimental in vivo animal study with 72 female Wistar rats. Six different standardized techniques for peritoneal trauma were used: brushing of peritoneal sidewall and uterine horns (group 1), brushing of parietal peritoneum only (group 2), sharp excision of parietal peritoneum closed with interrupted sutures (group 3), ischemic buttons by grasping the parietal peritoneum and ligating the base with Vicryl suture (group 4), bipolar electrocoagulation of the peritoneum (group 5), and traumatisation by electrocoagulation followed by closure of the resulting peritoneal defect using Vicryl sutures (group 6). Upon second look, there were significant differences in the adhesion incidence between the groups (P < 0.01). Analysis of the fraction of adhesions showed that groups 2 (0%) and 5 (4%) were significantly less than the other groups (P < 0.01). Furthermore, group 6 (69%) was significantly higher than group 1 (48%) (P < 0.05) and group 4 (47%) (P < 0.05). There was no difference between group 3 (60%) and group 6 (P = 0.2). From a clinical viewpoint, comparison of different electrocoagulation modes and pharmaceutical adhesion barriers is possible with standardised models. PMID:24809049

  17. Simple exact analysis of the standardised mortality ratio.

    PubMed Central

    Liddell, F D

    1984-01-01

    The standardised mortality ratio is the ratio of deaths observed, D, to those expected, E, on the basis of the mortality rates of some reference population. On the usual assumptions--that D was generated by a Poisson process and that E is based on such large numbers that it can be taken as without error--the long established, but apparently little known, link between the Poisson and chi 2 distributions provides both an exact test of significance and expressions for obtaining exact (1-alpha) confidence limits on the SMR. When a table of the chi 2 distribution gives values for 1-1/2 alpha and 1/2 alpha with the required degrees of freedom, the procedures are not only precise but very simple. When the required values of chi 2 are not tabulated, only slightly less simple procedures are shown to be highly reliable for D greater than 5; they are more reliable for all D and alpha than even the best of three approximate methods. For small D, all approximations can be seriously unreliable. The exact procedures are therefore recommended for use wherever the basic assumptions (Poisson D and fixed E) apply. PMID:6707569

  18. Integrated interpretation of overlapping AEM datasets achieved through standardisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørensen, Camilla C.; Munday, Tim; Heinson, Graham

    2015-12-01

    Numerous airborne electromagnetic surveys have been acquired in Australia using a variety of systems. It is not uncommon to find two or more surveys covering the same ground, but acquired using different systems and at different times. Being able to combine overlapping datasets and get a spatially coherent resistivity-depth image of the ground can assist geological interpretation, particularly when more subtle geophysical responses are important. Combining resistivity-depth models obtained from the inversion of airborne electromagnetic (AEM) data can be challenging, given differences in system configuration, geometry, flying height and preservation or monitoring of system acquisition parameters such as waveform. In this study, we define and apply an approach to overlapping AEM surveys, acquired by fixed wing and helicopter time domain electromagnetic (EM) systems flown in the vicinity of the Goulds Dam uranium deposit in the Frome Embayment, South Australia, with the aim of mapping the basement geometry and the extent of the Billeroo palaeovalley. Ground EM soundings were used to standardise the AEM data, although results indicated that only data from the REPTEM system needed to be corrected to bring the two surveys into agreement and to achieve coherent spatial resistivity-depth intervals.

  19. Baseline and optional bench-scale testing of a chemical candle filter safeguard device

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.P.; Swanson, M.L.

    2000-11-01

    This project was undertaken by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to design, construct, and test the feasibility of a hot-gas filter safeguard device (SGD) to prevent the release of dust in the event of candle filter failure under both pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) (oxidizing) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) (reducing) operating conditions. The SGD must use existing filter system seals, gaskets, fixtures, and assemblies as much as possible. It must also activate quickly when a candle filter has failed, preferably preventing dust concentrations downstream of the SGD from exceeding 1 ppmw. In addition, the SGD must be able to operate in an inactive mode with minimal pressure drop, and its operation cannot be affected by repeated backpulse cleaning events of up to 3 psia and 1/2 second in duration.

  20. The Candle and the Mirror: One Author's Journey as an Outsider.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreillon, Judi

    1999-01-01

    Chronicles the author's journey as an outsider who authored a book for children about the harvest traditions of the Tohono O'odham people. Describes how her concern about the lack of literature to serve as a mirror and a candle to reflect and illuminate the lives of Tohono O'odham children led her on a journey that was both painful and affirming.…

  1. Evaluating the performance of ceramic candle filters in a hot particulate-laden stream

    SciTech Connect

    Zeh, C.M.; Chiang, T.K.; Ayers, W.J.

    1990-05-01

    A series of tests was conducted to evaluate the performance of ceramic candle filters at elevated temperatures and pressures using the hot product of a combustion stream, laden with resuspended particulate, from a bench-scale pressurized entrained combustor. Four tests using 1 m length, grade 50/10, silicon carbide candle filters from Industrial Filter and Pump (IF P) were evaluated at three face velocities with two cleaning techniques. Tests 1, 2, and 3 were operated at nominally 1.550{degree}F, 8.5 atm, with particulate loadings of 775 to 840-ppMw. Test 4 was operated at 1,370{degree}F, 9.9 atm, with a 838-ppMw particulate loading. Gas flow rates for Tests 1, 2, 3, and 4 were nominally 43, 68, 68, and 27 actual cubic feet per minute (acfm), respectively. During steady operating conditions, the specific resistance coefficient (K{sub 2}) for each of the four tests was within the range of 16 to 22 in. H{sub 2}O{center dot}ft{center dot}min/lb. Candle filter permeability varied with face velocity and cleaning technique used. Permeability decreased with increasing face velocity when temperature and pressure were held constant, and increased with off-line versus on-line cleaning when face velocity was held constant. 6 refs., 32 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. Status and future prospect of 48Ca double beta decay search in CANDLES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, T.; Nakajima, K.; Ajimura, S.; Batpurev, T.; Chan, W. M.; Fushimi, K.; Hazama, R.; Kakubata, H.; Khai, B. T.; Kishimoto, T.; Li, X.; Maeda, T.; Masuda, A.; Matsuoka, K.; Morishita, K.; Nakatani, N.; Nomachi, M.; Noshiro, S.; Ogawa, I.; Ohata, T.; Osumi, H.; Suzuki, K.; Tamagawa, Y.; Tesuno, K.; Trang, V. T. T.; Uehara, T.; Umehara, S.; Yoshida, S.

    2016-05-01

    The observation of neutrino-less double beta decay (0vßß) would be the most practical way to prove the Majorana nature of the neutrino and lepton number violation. CANDLES studies 48Ca double beta decay using CaF2 scintillator. The main advantage of 48Ca is that it has the highest Q-value (4.27 MeV) among all the isotope candidates for 0vßß. The CANDLES III detector is currently operating with 300kg CaF2 crystals in the Kamioka underground observatory, Japan. In 2014, a detector cooling system and a magnetic cancellation coil was installed with the aim to increase light emission of CaF2 scintillator and photo-electron collection efficiency of the photo-multipliers. After this upgrade, light yield was increased to 1000 p.e./MeV which is 1.6 times larger than before. According to data analysis and simulation, main background source in CANDLES is turned out to be high energy external gamma-ray originating neutron capture on the surrounding materials, so called (n,γ). Upgrading the detector by installing neutron and gamma-ray shield can reduce the remaining main backgrounds by two order magnitude. In this report, we discuss the detail of (n,γ) and background reduction by additional shielding.

  3. Histologic and Immunohistochemical Features of the Skin Lesions in CANDLE Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Torrelo, Antonio; Colmenero, Isabel; Requena, Luis; Paller, Amy S; Ramot, Yuval; Richard Lee, Chyi-Chia; Vera, Angel; Zlotogorski, Abraham; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Kutzner, Heinz

    2015-07-01

    Chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE) syndrome is a newly characterized autoinflammatory disorder, caused by mutations in PSMB8. It is characterized by early-onset fevers, accompanied by a widespread, violaceous, and often annular cutaneous eruption. Although the exact pathogenesis of this syndrome is still obscure, it is postulated that the inflammatory disease manifestations stem from excess secretion of interferons. Based on preliminary blood cytokine and gene expression studies, the signature seems to come mostly from type I interferons, which are proposed to lead to the recruitment of immature myeloid cells into the dermis and subcutis. In this study, we systematically analyzed skin biopsies from 6 patients with CANDLE syndrome by routine histopathology and immunohistochemistry methods. Skin lesions showed the presence of extensive mixed dermal and subcutaneous inflammatory infiltrate, composed of mononuclear cells, atypical myeloid cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, and some mature lymphocytes. Positive LEDER and myeloperoxidase staining supported the presence of myeloid cells. Positive CD68/PMG1 and CD163 staining confirmed the existence of histiocytes and monocytic macrophages in the inflammatory infiltrate. CD123 staining was positive, demonstrating the presence of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Uncovering the unique histopathological and immunohistochemical features of CANDLE syndrome provides tools for rapid and specific diagnosis of this disorder and further insight into the pathogenesis of this severe life-threatening condition. PMID:26091509

  4. Granular-bed and ceramic candle filters in commercial plants: A comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, K.B.; Haas, J.C.; Eshelman, M.B.

    1993-04-01

    Advanced coal fired power cycles require the removal of coal ash at high temperature and pressure. Granular-bed and ceramic candle filters can be used for this service. Conceptual designs for commercial size applications are made for each type of filter. The filters are incorporated in the design of a Foster Wheeler 450 MWe second generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion plant which contains a pressurized fluidized combustor and carbonizer. In a second application, the inters are incorporated in the design of a 100 MWe KRW (air) gasifier based power plant. The candle filter design is state of the art as determined from the open literature with an effort to minimize the cost. The granular-bed filter design is based on test work performed at high temperature and low pressure, tests at New York University performed at high pressure and temperate, and new analysis used to simplify the scale up of the filter and reduce overall cost. The incorporation of chemically reactive granites in the granular-bed filter for the removal of additional coal derived contaminants such as alkali or sulfur is considered. The conceptual designs of the granular-bed inter and the ceramic candle filter are compared in terms of the cost of electricity, capital cost, and operating and maintenance costs for each application.

  5. TYPE II-P SUPERNOVAE FROM THE SDSS-II SUPERNOVA SURVEY AND THE STANDARDIZED CANDLE METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, Chris B.; Sako, Masao; Dilday, Benjamin; Jha, Saurabh; Frieman, Joshua A.; Kessler, Richard; Holtzman, Jon; Konishi, Kohki; Yasuda, Naoki; Schneider, D. P.; Sollerman, Jesper; Wheeler, J. Craig; Cinabro, David; Nichol, Robert C.; Lampeitl, Hubert; Smith, Mathew; Atlee, David W.; Bassett, Bruce; Castander, Francisco J.; Goobar, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    We apply the Standardized Candle Method (SCM) for Type II Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P), which relates the velocity of the ejecta of a SN to its luminosity during the plateau, to 15 SNe II-P discovered over the three season run of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey. The redshifts of these SNe-0.027 < z < 0.144-cover a range hitherto sparsely sampled in the literature; in particular, our SNe II-P sample contains nearly as many SNe in the Hubble flow (z > 0.01) as all of the current literature on the SCM combined. We find that the SDSS SNe have a very small intrinsic I-band dispersion (0.22 mag), which can be attributed to selection effects. When the SCM is applied to the combined SDSS-plus-literature set of SNe II-P, the dispersion increases to 0.29 mag, larger than the scatter for either set of SNe separately. We show that the standardization cannot be further improved by eliminating SNe with positive plateau decline rates, as proposed in Poznanski et al. We thoroughly examine all potential systematic effects and conclude that for the SCM to be useful for cosmology, the methods currently used to determine the Fe II velocity at day 50 must be improved, and spectral templates able to encompass the intrinsic variations of Type II-P SNe will be needed.

  6. Characteristics of emissions of air pollutants from mosquito coils and candles burning in a large environmental chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. C.; Wang, B.

    The objective of this study was to characterize the emissions of air pollutants from mosquito coils and candles burning in a large environmental test chamber. The target pollutants included particulate matters (PM 10, PM 2.5), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO x), methane (CH 4), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and carbonyl compounds. The average PM 10 concentrations for all tested mosquito coils exceeded Excellent and Good Classes objectives specified by Indoor Air Quality Objectives for Office Buildings and Public Places (IAQO) [ HKEPD, 2003. Guidance Notes for the Management of Indoor Air Quality in Offices and Public Places. Indoor Air Quality Management Group, The Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region]. The emission factors (mg g -1 mosquito coil) of mosquito coils combustion were: PM 2.5, 20.3-47.8; PM 10, 15.9-50.8; CO, 74.6-89.1; NO, 0.1-0.5; NO 2, n.d.-0.1; NO x, 0.1-0.5; CH 4, n.d.-4.7; NMHC, 0.1-5.7. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were the most abundant carbonyls species in the coil smoke. The average concentrations of formaldehyde and benzene of all tested mosquito coils exceeded Good Class of IAQO. Nitrogen oxides were the most abundant gas pollutants relating to candle burning among all target air pollutants. The candle made of gel (CAN 4) would emit more air pollutants than the paraffin candles (CAN 1, 2 and 3) and beeswax candle (CAN 5). Among five candles tested, CAN 5, the one made of beeswax, generated relatively smaller amount of air pollutants. It was noted that the concentrations of most VOCs from candles combustion were below the detection limit.

  7. Does standardised structured reporting contribute to quality in diagnostic pathology? The importance of evidence-based datasets.

    PubMed

    Ellis, D W; Srigley, J

    2016-01-01

    Key quality parameters in diagnostic pathology include timeliness, accuracy, completeness, conformance with current agreed standards, consistency and clarity in communication. In this review, we argue that with worldwide developments in eHealth and big data, generally, there are two further, often overlooked, parameters if our reports are to be fit for purpose. Firstly, population-level studies have clearly demonstrated the value of providing timely structured reporting data in standardised electronic format as part of system-wide quality improvement programmes. Moreover, when combined with multiple health data sources through eHealth and data linkage, structured pathology reports become central to population-level quality monitoring, benchmarking, interventions and benefit analyses in public health management. Secondly, population-level studies, particularly for benchmarking, require a single agreed international and evidence-based standard to ensure interoperability and comparability. This has been taken for granted in tumour classification and staging for many years, yet international standardisation of cancer datasets is only now underway through the International Collaboration on Cancer Reporting (ICCR). In this review, we present evidence supporting the role of structured pathology reporting in quality improvement for both clinical care and population-level health management. Although this review of available evidence largely relates to structured reporting of cancer, it is clear that the same principles can be applied throughout anatomical pathology generally, as they are elsewhere in the health system. PMID:26316184

  8. Standardisation of gas mixtures for estimating carbon monoxide transfer factor.

    PubMed Central

    Kendrick, A. H.; Laszlo, G.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The American Thoracic Society recommends that the inspired concentration used for the estimation of carbon monoxide transfer factor (TLCO) mixture should be 0.25-0.35% carbon monoxide, 10-14% helium, 17-21% oxygen, balance nitrogen. Inspired oxygen influences alveolar oxygen and hence carbon monoxide uptake, such that transfer factor increases by 0.35% per mm Hg decrease in alveolar oxygen. To aid in the standardisation of TLCO either a known inspired oxygen concentration should be used, or TLCO should be corrected to a standard inspired oxygen concentration. The range of gas mixtures used in practice and the implications for cost and accuracy have been investigated. METHODS--A questionnaire was sent to 185 respiratory units in the UK requesting information on (1) the method used to estimate TLCO, (2) the manufacturer of the equipment, (3) the mixture used, (4) whether "medical quality" gas was ordered, and (5) the level of satisfaction with supplier service. RESULTS--Replies were received from 106 units. Most used the single breath breath holding method for which 17 different test mixtures were ordered. One unit also used the single breath exhalation method. Inspired oxygen ranged from 17.94% to 25%, giving a wide variation in alveolar oxygen and hence TLCO. Forty seven units ordered a specific inspired oxygen, the rest ordering "air" as balance. The cost per litre of gas varied greatly, with the mixture 14% helium, 0.28% carbon monoxide, balance air (17.9% oxygen) and 10% helium, 0.28% carbon monoxide, balance air (18.8% oxygen) being cheapest to produce. Ordering a specific inspired oxygen concentration increased the cost. Large cylinders of gas were cheaper for the same mixture. The mixture for the exhalation method was the most expensive. Sixty seven units ordered "medical quality" gas and six assumed this was supplied. Twenty nine (27%) were dissatisfied with their supplier due to (1) poor service, (2) long delivery times, (3) costs, or (4

  9. Towards a standardised surveillance for Trichinella in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Alban, L; Pozio, E; Boes, J; Boireau, P; Boué, F; Claes, M; Cook, A J C; Dorny, P; Enemark, H L; van der Giessen, J; Hunt, K R; Howell, M; Kirjusina, M; Nöckler, K; Rossi, P; Smith, G C; Snow, L; Taylor, M A; Theodoropoulos, G; Vallée, I; Viera-Pinto, M M; Zimmer, I A

    2011-05-01

    Each year, more than 167 million pigs in the European Union (EU) are tested for Trichinella spp. under the current meat hygiene regulations. This imposes large economic costs on countries, yet the vast majority of these pigs test negative and the public health risk in many countries is therefore considered very low. This work reviewed the current Trichinella status across the EU as well as the national level of monitoring and reporting. It also reviewed which animal species were affected by Trichinella and in which species it should be surveyed. This information was used to design a cost-effective surveillance programme that enables a standardised monitoring approach within the EU. The proposed surveillance programme relies on identifying sub-populations of animals with a distinct risk. Low-risk pigs are finisher pigs that originate from so-called controlled housing. All other pigs are considered high-risk pigs. Controlled housing is identified by the application of a specific list of management and husbandry practices. We suggest that member states (MS) be categorised into three classes based on the confidence that Trichinella can be considered absent, in the specified sub-population of pigs above a specified design prevalence which we set to 1 per million pigs. A simple and transparent method is proposed to estimate this confidence, based on the sensitivity of the surveillance system, taking into account the sensitivity of testing and the design prevalence. The probability of detecting a positive case, if present, must be high (>95 or >99%) to ensure that there is a low or negligible risk of transmission to humans through the food chain. In MS where the probability of a positive pig is demonstrated to be negligible, testing of fattening pigs from a sub-population consisting of pigs from controlled housing can be considered unnecessary. Furthermore, reduced testing of finishers from the sub-population consisting of pigs from non-controlled housing might even be

  10. Operation Behavior of a Multi-Candle Filter with Coupled Pressure Pulse Recleaning during Normal Operation and in the Case of a Filter Candle Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, R.; Leibold, H. Seifert, H.; Heidenreich, S.; Haag, W.

    2002-09-18

    A pilot filter with the CPP recleaning system was installed and commissioned during the first half year of 2000 in ''PYDRA'', the pyrolytic rotary tube facility of the Institute for Technical Chemistry, Research Center Karlsruhe. The filter, with a rated throughput of 50 std.m{sup 3}/h, is equipped with two clusters of three filter candles each (DIA-SCHUMALITH{reg_sign} T 10-20, 1 = 1500 mm), and has been designed for a maximum operating temperature of 550 C. After commissioning, the filter was run in the stand-alone mode, first without pyrolysis, to filter sticky inorganic dust of the type which can arise in waste incineration in the temperature range above 400 C.

  11. Using hospital standardised mortality ratios to assess quality of care--proceed with extreme caution.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ian A; Brand, Caroline A; Phelps, Grant E; Barker, Anna L; Cameron, Peter A

    2011-06-20

    Australian Health Ministers have endorsed the hospital standardised mortality ratio (HSMR) as a key indicator of quality and safety, and efforts are currently underway towards its national implementation. In the United Kingdom, Canada, the Netherlands and the United States, the HSMR has been used for several years within organisations to monitor performance and response to various quality and safety programs. In the UK and Canada, the HSMR is also publicly reported and used to compare performance between hospitals. The validity and reliability of the HSMR as a screening tool for distinguishing low-quality from high-quality hospitals remain in doubt, and it has not yet been proven that HSMR reporting necessarily leads to worthwhile improvement in quality of care and patient outcomes. Institutions may respond to an unfavourable HSMR by "gaming" administrative data and risk-adjustment models or implementing inappropriate changes to care. Despite its apparent low cost and ease of measurement, the HSMR is currently not "fit for purpose" as a screening tool for detecting low-quality hospitals and should not be used in making interhospital comparisons. It may be better suited to monitoring changes in outcomes over time within individual institutions. PMID:21692724

  12. Canadian Open Genetics Repository (COGR): a unified clinical genomics database as a community resource for standardising and sharing genetic interpretations

    PubMed Central

    Lerner-Ellis, Jordan; Wang, Marina; White, Shana; Lebo, Matthew S

    2015-01-01

    Background The Canadian Open Genetics Repository is a collaborative effort for the collection, storage, sharing and robust analysis of variants reported by medical diagnostics laboratories across Canada. As clinical laboratories adopt modern genomics technologies, the need for this type of collaborative framework is increasingly important. Methods A survey to assess existing protocols for variant classification and reporting was delivered to clinical genetics laboratories across Canada. Based on feedback from this survey, a variant assessment tool was made available to all laboratories. Each participating laboratory was provided with an instance of GeneInsight, a software featuring versioning and approval processes for variant assessments and interpretations and allowing for variant data to be shared between instances. Guidelines were established for sharing data among clinical laboratories and in the final outreach phase, data will be made readily available to patient advocacy groups for general use. Results The survey demonstrated the need for improved standardisation and data sharing across the country. A variant assessment template was made available to the community to aid with standardisation. Instances of the GeneInsight tool were provided to clinical diagnostic laboratories across Canada for the purpose of uploading, transferring, accessing and sharing variant data. Conclusions As an ongoing endeavour and a permanent resource, the Canadian Open Genetics Repository aims to serve as a focal point for the collaboration of Canadian laboratories with other countries in the development of tools that take full advantage of laboratory data in diagnosing, managing and treating genetic diseases. PMID:25904639

  13. A HIGH TEMPERATURE TEST FACILITY FOR STUDYING ASH PARTICLE CHARACTERISTICS OF CANDLE FILTER DURING SURFACE REGENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, B.S-J.; Johnson, E.K.; Rincon, J.

    2002-09-19

    Hot gas particulate filtration is a basic component in advanced power generation systems such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC). These systems require effective particulate removal to protect the downstream gas turbine and also to meet environmental emission requirements. The ceramic barrier filter is one of the options for hot gas filtration. Hot gases flow through ceramic candle filters leaving ash deposited on the outer surface of the filter. A process known as surface regeneration removes the deposited ash periodically by using a high pressure back pulse cleaning jet. After this cleaning process has been done there may be some residual ash on the filter surface. This residual ash may grow and this may lead to mechanical failure of the filter. A High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) was built to investigate the ash characteristics during surface regeneration at high temperatures. The system is capable of conducting surface regeneration tests of a single candle filter at temperatures up to 1500 F. Details of the HTTF apparatus as well as some preliminary test results are presented in this paper. In order to obtain sequential digital images of ash particle distribution during the surface regeneration process, a high resolution, high speed image acquisition system was integrated into the HTTF system. The regeneration pressure and the transient pressure difference between the inside of the candle filter and the chamber during regeneration were measured using a high speed PC data acquisition system. The control variables for the high temperature regeneration tests were (1) face velocity, (2) pressure of the back pulse, and (3) cyclic ash built-up time.

  14. Cosmokinetics: a joint analysis of standard candles, rulers and cosmic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Remya; Jhingan, Sanjay; Jain, Deepak E-mail: sjhingan@jmi.ac.in

    2012-01-01

    We study the accelerated expansion of the Universe by using the kinematic approach. In this context, we parameterize the deceleration parameter, q(z), in a model independent way. Assuming three simple parameterizations we reconstruct q(z). We do the joint analysis with combination of latest cosmological data consisting of standard candles (Supernovae Union2 sample), standard ruler (CMB/BAO), cosmic clocks (age of passively evolving galaxies) and Hubble (H(z)) data. Our results support the accelerated expansion of the Universe.

  15. Planetary nebulae in the NGC 3379 group - Testing a new standard candle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciardullo, Robin; Jacoby, George H.; Ford, Holland C.

    The forbidden O III 5007 A planetary nebula luminosity function (PNLF) of three early type galaxies in the Leo Cloud are compared and used to estimate distances. The shape of the PNLF, in particular the sharp bright end cutoff, is found to be the same in each galaxy and identical to that observed in M31, implying that this shape is universal and an excellent standard candle. From maximum likelihood analyses, the most probable distances to NGC 3377, NGC 3379, and NGC 3384 are 9.7, 9.1, and 9.4 Mpc, respectively, with 1 sigma errors of about 12 percent.

  16. Status and Highlights of CANDLE Synchrotron Light Source Project in Armenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakanov, V. M.

    2007-01-01

    CANDLE — Center for the Advancement of Natural Discoveries using Light Emission — is a 3 GeV energy synchrotron light facility project in the Republic of Armenia. The facility has the potential to provide more than 40 beamlines from bends, undulators and wigglers in wide spectral range from ultraviolet to hard X-Rays. The project is supposed to be an international facility for advanced studies in life and material sciences. The main features and the status of the project are presented. The preliminary list of first group beamlines is discussed.

  17. LED lighting module design based on a prescribed candle-power distribution for uniform illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jin-Jia; Huang, Kuang-Lung; Wang, Te-Yuan; Wang, Yi-Chih; Wang, Chuen-Ching; Guo, Tsung-Yi

    2010-11-01

    A simple approach is presented to design an LED lighting module to provide a uniform illumination. The reflector of the module is designed using a prescribed candle-power distribution to achieve a uniform illumination on a target surface. Both the design methodology and the construction of the reflector are stated in detail. The optical efficiency and uniformity of the module are calculated according to a ray-tracing result. In addition, the effects of the reflector's aperture and the LED chip size on the optical efficiency and uniformity are also investigated that the result can provide a reference to LED-luminaire designers and manufacturers.

  18. Planetary nebulae as standard candles. III - The distance to M81

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacoby, George H.; Ciardullo, Robin; Booth, John; Ford, Holland C.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a survey for PN in the nearby Sb galaxy M81 are reported, including the identification of 185 PN candidates. A distance to M81 of 3.50 + or - 0.40 Mpc is derived using the methods outlined by Ciardullo, et al. (1989). This value compares very well with values derived using traditional methods. Based on this agreement, it is concluded that PN are as good as, or better than, other standard candles for deriving distances to galaxies beyond 10 Mpc.

  19. Status and Highlights of CANDLE Synchrotron Light Source Project in Armenia

    SciTech Connect

    Tsakanov, V. M.

    2007-01-19

    CANDLE - Center for the Advancement of Natural Discoveries using Light Emission - is a 3 GeV energy synchrotron light facility project in the Republic of Armenia. The facility has the potential to provide more than 40 beamlines from bends, undulators and wigglers in wide spectral range from ultraviolet to hard X-Rays. The project is supposed to be an international facility for advanced studies in life and material sciences. The main features and the status of the project are presented. The preliminary list of first group beamlines is discussed.

  20. Performance and stability of advanced monolithic and fiber reinforced composite candle filters during PCFBC operation

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    Advanced clay bonded silicon carbide, alumina/mullite and CVI-SiC fiber reinforced composite porous ceramic candle filters have been identified for use in pressurized circulating fluidized-bed combustion (PCFBC) systems where operating temperatures approach 870--900 C. In this paper the author will discuss the performance of these filter elements, and explore the response and stability of the advanced filter materials after 540 hours of operation in Foster Wheeler`s PCFBC system in Karhula, Finland. The potential use of the advanced filter materials for extended operating life in high temperature, pressurized, coal-fired process applications will also be addressed.

  1. Performance of PRD-66 hot gas candle filters in the AEP/TIDD PFBC facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    The performance of PRD-66 hot gas filters in American Electric Power`s TIDD PFBC facility is described. PRD-66 hot gas filters are made of an all-oxide composition with a unique layered microstructure which lends corrosion resistance, high temperature stability and excellent resistance to thermal shock damage. The development of the PRD-66 material into a hot gas candle filter is recounted. Testing which guided filter development prior to exposure in the AEP/TIDD PFBC system is discussed. Future plans for testing in coal combustion and other industrial applications are described.

  2. Characterization of Carbon Deposits Formed During Plasma Pyrolysis of Xinjiang Candle Coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guilin; Meng, Yuedong; Shu, Xingsheng; Fang, Shidong

    2009-08-01

    Carbon deposits were formed on the reactor wall during plasma pyrolysis of the Xinjiang candle coal in our V-style plasma pyrolysis pilot-plant. The carbon deposits were studied using a scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. It was found that carbon deposits located at different parts in the reactor exhibited different microscopic patterns. The formation mechanism of the carbon deposits was deduced. The downward increase in the graphitization degree of the carbon deposits was found and interpreted.

  3. Fail save shut off valve for filtering systems employing candle filters

    DOEpatents

    VanOsdol, John

    2006-01-03

    The invention relates to an apparatus that acts as a fail save shut off valve. More specifically, the invention relates to a fail save shut off valve that allows fluid flow during normal operational conditions, but prevents the flow of fluids in the event of system failure upstream that causes over-pressurization. The present invention is particularly well suited for use in conjunction with hot gas filtering systems, which utilize ceramic candle filters. Used in such a hot gas system the present invention stops the flow of hot gas and prevents any particulate laden gas from entering the clean side of the system.

  4. Fail Save Shut Off Valve for Filtering Systems Employing Candle Filters

    SciTech Connect

    VanOsdol, John

    2006-01-03

    The invention relates to an apparatus that acts as a fail save shut off valve. More specifically, the invention relates to a fail save shut off valve that allows fluid flow during normal operational conditions, but prevents the flow of fluids in the event of system failure upstream that causes over-pressurization. The present invention is particularly well suited for use in conjunction with hot gas filtering systems, which utilize ceramic candle filters. Used in such a hot gas system the present invention stops the flow of hot gas and prevents any particulate laden gas from entering the clean side of the system.

  5. DEVELOPMENT AND UTILIZATION OF TEST FACILITY FOR THE STUDY OF CANDLE FILTER SURFACE REGENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce S. Kang; Eric K. Johnson

    2003-07-14

    Hot gas particulate filtration is a basic component in advanced power generation systems such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC). These systems require effective particulate removal to protect the downstream gas turbine and also to meet environmental emission requirements. The ceramic barrier filter is one of the options for hot gas filtration. Hot gases flow through ceramic candle filters leaving ash deposited on the outer surface of the filter. A process known as surface regeneration removes the deposited ash periodically by using a high pressure pulse of gas to back flush the filter. After this cleaning process has been completed there may be some residual ash on the filter surface. This residual ash may grow and this may then lead to mechanical failure of the filter. A Room Temperature Test Facility (RTTF) and a High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) were built to investigate the ash characteristics during surface regeneration at room and selected high temperatures. The RTTF system was used to gain experience with the selected instrumentation and develop an operating procedure to be used later at elevated temperatures. The HTTF system is capable of conducting surface regeneration tests of a single candle filter at temperatures up to 1500 F. In order to obtain sequential digital images of ash particle distribution during the surface regeneration process, a high resolution, high speed image acquisition system was integrated into the HTTF system. The regeneration pressure and the transient pressure difference between the inside of the candle filter and the chamber during regeneration were measured using a high speed PC data acquisition system. The control variables for the high temperature regeneration tests were (1) face velocity, (2) pressure of the back pulse, and (3) cyclic ash built-up time. Coal ash sample obtained from the Power System Development Facility (PSDF) at Wilsonville, AL was used at the

  6. Comparison of the egg flotation and egg candling techniques for estimating incubation day of Canada Goose nests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reiter, M.E.; Andersen, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    Both egg flotation and egg candling have been used to estimate incubation day (often termed nest age) in nesting birds, but little is known about the relative accuracy of these two techniques. We used both egg flotation and egg candling to estimate incubation day for Canada Geese (Branta canadensis interior) nesting near Cape Churchill, Manitoba, from 2000 to 2007. We modeled variation in the difference between estimates of incubation day using each technique as a function of true incubation day, as well as, variation in error rates with each technique as a function of the true incubation day. We also evaluated the effect of error in the estimated incubation day on estimates of daily survival rate (DSR) and nest success using simulations. The mean difference between concurrent estimates of incubation day based on egg flotation minus egg candling at the same nest was 0.85 ?? 0.06 (SE) days. The positive difference in favor of egg flotation and the magnitude of the difference in estimates of incubation day did not vary as a function of true incubation day. Overall, both egg flotation and egg candling overestimated incubation day early in incubation and underestimated incubation day later in incubation. The average difference between true hatch date and estimated hatch date did not differ from zero (days) for egg flotation, but egg candling overestimated true hatch date by about 1 d (true - estimated; days). Our simulations suggested that error associated with estimating the incubation day of nests and subsequently exposure days using either egg candling or egg flotation would have minimal effects on estimates of DSR and nest success. Although egg flotation was slightly less biased, both methods provided comparable and accurate estimates of incubation day and subsequent estimates of hatch date and nest success throughout the entire incubation period. ?? 2008 Association of Field Ornithologists.

  7. A qualitative analysis of New Zealand retailers’ responses to standardised packaging legislation and tobacco industry opposition

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, John; Hoek, Janet; Darroch, Ella; Wood, Zoë

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Many of the approximately 8000 New Zealand retailers selling tobacco are small stores that tobacco companies have represented as victims of policy measures designed to reduce smoking. Despite this depiction, many retailers experience considerable ambivalence in selling tobacco, a product they know harms their customers. We explored how retailers perceived the proposed introduction of standardised (or ‘plain’) packaging and their assessment of arguments made by tobacco companies in submissions on proposed standardised packaging legislation. Participants Using qualitative in-depth interviews, we recruited and interviewed 23 retailers of dairies (small convenience stores), small supermarkets, and service stations. Analyses Data were analysed using a protocol-driven approach; this stance enabled direct analysis of tobacco companies’ arguments, particularly those purporting to represent retailers’ concerns. Results Retailers were concerned about the financial implications of standardised packaging and the effects it may have on their ability to provide rapid and efficient customer service. However, few thought standardised packaging would foster illicit trade or spawn further regulation; most placed public health goals ahead of tobacco companies’ ‘rights’, and many supported government intervention to protect population health. Conclusions Retailers held ambivalent views on standardised packaging; while they were concerned about short-term effects on their business, they recognised the harm smoking causes. Policymakers and health researchers could collaborate more effectively with retailers by assisting them to create financially viable roles more compatible with public health objectives. PMID:26553840

  8. Unbiased constraints on the clumpiness of the Universe from standard candles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengxiang; Ding, Xuheng; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2015-04-01

    We perform unbiased tests for the clumpiness of the Universe by confronting the Zel'dovich-Kantowski-Dyer-Roeder luminosity distance, which describes the effect of local inhomogeneities on the propagation of light with the observational one estimated from measurements of standard candles, i.e., type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Methodologically, we first determine the light-curve fitting parameters which account for distance estimation in SNe Ia observations and the luminosity/energy relations which are responsible for distance estimation of GRBs in the global fit to reconstruct the Hubble diagrams in the context of a clumpy Universe. Subsequently, these Hubble diagrams allow us to achieve unbiased constraints on the matter density parameter Ωm , as well as the clumpiness parameter η which quantifies the fraction of homogeneously distributed matter within a given light cone. At a 1 σ confidence level, the constraints are Ωm=0.34 ±0.02 and η =1.0 0-0.02+0.00 from the joint analysis. The results suggest that the Universe full of Friedman-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker fluid is favored by observations of standard candles with very high statistical significance. On the other hand, they may also indicate that the Zel'dovich-Kantowski-Dyer-Roeder approximation is a sufficiently accurate form to describe the effects of local homogeneity on the expanding Universe.

  9. Effect of Fuel Fraction on Small Modified CANDLE Burn-up Based Gas Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ariani, Menik; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Asiah, Nur; Shafii, M. Ali; Khairurrijal

    2010-12-23

    A conceptual design study of Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Modified CANDLE Burn-up has been performed. The objective of this research is to get optimal design parameters of such type reactors. The parameters of nuclear design including the critical condition, conversion ratio, and burn-up level were compared. These parameters are calculated by variation in the fuel fraction 47.5% up to 70%. Two dimensional full core multi groups diffusion calculations was performed by CITATION code. Group constant preparations are performed by using SRAC code system with JENDL-3.2 nuclear data library. In this design the reactor cores with cylindrical cell two dimensional R-Z core models are subdivided into several parts with the same volume in the axial directions. The placement of fuel in core arranged so that the result of plutonium from natural uranium can be utilized optimally for 10 years reactor operation. Modified CANDLE burn-up was established successfully in a core radial width 1.4 m. Total thermal power output for reference core is 550 MW. Study on the effect of fuel to coolant ratio shows that effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) is in almost linear relations with the change of the fuel volume to coolant ratio.

  10. Effect of Fuel Fraction on Small Modified CANDLE Burn-up Based Gas Cooled Fast Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariani, Menik; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Khairurrijal, Asiah, Nur; Shafii, M. Ali

    2010-12-01

    A conceptual design study of Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Modified CANDLE Burn-up has been performed. The objective of this research is to get optimal design parameters of such type reactors. The parameters of nuclear design including the critical condition, conversion ratio, and burn-up level were compared. These parameters are calculated by variation in the fuel fraction 47.5% up to 70%. Two dimensional full core multi groups diffusion calculations was performed by CITATION code. Group constant preparations are performed by using SRAC code system with JENDL-3.2 nuclear data library. In this design the reactor cores with cylindrical cell two dimensional R-Z core models are subdivided into several parts with the same volume in the axial directions. The placement of fuel in core arranged so that the result of plutonium from natural uranium can be utilized optimally for 10 years reactor operation. Modified CANDLE burn-up was established successfully in a core radial width 1.4 m. Total thermal power output for reference core is 550 MW. Study on the effect of fuel to coolant ratio shows that effective multiplication factor (keff) is in almost linear relations with the change of the fuel volume to coolant ratio.

  11. Void effect analysis of Pb-208 of fast reactors with modified CANDLE burn-up scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiawati, Nina; Su'ud, Zaki

    2015-09-01

    Void effect analysis of Pb-208 as coolant of fast reactors with modified candle burn-up scheme has been conducted. Lead cooled fast reactor (LFR) is one of the fourth-generation reactor designs. The reactor is designed with a thermal power output of 500 MWt. Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme allows the reactor to have long life operation by supplying only natural uranium as fuel cycle input. This scheme introducing discrete region, the fuel is initially put in region 1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn up it is shifted to region 2 and region 1 is filled by fresh natural uranium fuel. The reactor is designed for 100 years with 10 regions arranged axially. The results of neutronic calculation showed that the void coefficients ranged from -0.6695443 % at BOC to -0.5273626 % at EOC for 500 MWt reactor. The void coefficients of Pb-208 more negative than Pb-nat. The results showed that the reactors with Pb-208 coolant have better level of safety than Pb-nat.

  12. Development of a new 48Ca enrichment method and the CANDLES experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Tadafumi

    2015-10-01

    CANDLES is a project to study double beta decay of 48Ca. CANDLES could become the most competitive experiment if we could have an efficient method to enrich 48Ca. We developed a new method for enrichment of large amount of calcium isotopes. The method is called Multi-Channel Counter-Current Electrophoresis (MCCCE) which can be found elsewhre. Essential point is the increase of the power density in the migration path. In MCCCE, ions migrate in multi-channels on a boron nitride (BN) plate by which substantial increase of the power density was achieved. We made a tiny prototype instrument with a 10 mm thick BN plate and obtained 3 for an enrichment factor for the ratio of abundance of 48Ca to 43Ca over that of natural abundance. It corresponds to 6 for the enrichment factor of 48Ca to 40Ca. Recently we obtained 10 for the enrichment factor by using 20 mm BN plate. This remarkably large enrichment factor demonstrates that the MCCCE is a realistic and promising method for the enrichment of large amount of ions. This method can be applied to many other elements and compounds. I will describe MCCCE and its effect on the study of double beta decay and other fields.

  13. A Double Candle-Flame-Shaped Solar Flare Observed by SDO and STEREO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, T.; Liu, R.; Wang, Y.; Liu, K.; Zhuang, B.; Zhang, Q.; Liu, J.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate an M1.4 flare occurring on 2011 January 28 near the northwest solar limb. The flare loop system exhibits a double candle-flame configuration in SDO/AIA's hot passbands, sharing a much larger cusp-shaped structure. The results of DEM analysis show that each candle flame has a similar temperature distribution as the famous Tsuneta flare. STEREO-A provides us a view from directly above the flare, and in SECCHI/EUVI 195 Å the post-flare loops are observed to propagate eastward. We performed a 3D reconstruction of the pos-flare loops with AIA and EUVI data. With the aid of the squashing factor Q based on a potential extrapolation of the photospheric field, we recognized that the footpoints of the post-flare loops were slipping along high-Q lines on the photosphere, and the reconstructed loops share similarity with the filed lines that are traced starting from the high-Q lines. The heights of the loops increase as they slip horizontally eastward, giving the loop-top a velocity of about 10 km/s. An extremely large EUV late phase in Fe XVI 33.5 nm observed by SDO/EVE is suggested to be related to the slipping magnetic reconnection occurring in the quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) whose photosheric footprints are featured by the high-Q lines.

  14. Enabling a blue-hazard free general lighting based on candle light-style OLED.

    PubMed

    Jou, Jwo-Huei; Kumar, Sudhir; An, Chih-Chia; Singh, Meenu; Yu, Huei-Huan; Hsieh, Chun-Yu; Lin, You-Xing; Sung, Chao-Feng; Wang, Ching-Wu

    2015-06-01

    Increasing studies report blue light to possess a potential hazard to the retina of human eyes, secretion of melatonin and artworks. To devise a human- and artwork-friendly light source and to also trigger a "Lighting Renaissance", we demonstrate here how to enable a quality, blue-hazard free general lighting source on the basis of low color-temperature organic light emitting diodes. With the use of multiple candlelight complementary emitters, the sensationally warm candle light-style emission is proven to be also drivable by electricity. To be energy-saving, highly efficient candle-light emission is demanded. The device shows, at 100 cd m-2 for example, an efficacy of 85.4 lm W-1, an external quantum efficiency of 27.4%, with a 79 spectrum resemblance index and 2,279 K color temperature. The high efficiency may be attributed to the candlelight emitting dyes with a high quantum yield, and the host molecules facilitating an effective host-to-guest energy transfer, as well as effective carrier injection balance. PMID:26072882

  15. Do All Candle-Flame-Shaped Flares Have the Same Temperature Distribution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Tingyu; Liu, Rui; Wang, Yuming

    2015-08-01

    We performed a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis of candle-flame-shaped flares observed with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The DEM profile of flaring plasmas generally exhibits a double peak distribution in temperature, with a cold component around log T≈6.2 and a hot component around log T≈7.0. Attributing the cold component mainly to the coronal background, we propose a mean temperature weighted by the hot DEM component as a better representation of flaring plasma than the conventionally defined mean temperature, which is weighted by the whole DEM profile. Based on this corrected mean temperature, the majority of the flares studied, including a confined flare with a double candle-flame shape sharing the same cusp-shaped structure, resemble the famous Tsuneta flare in temperature distribution, i.e., the cusp-shaped structure has systematically higher temperatures than the rounded flare arcade underneath. However, the M7.7 flare on 19 July 2012 poses a very intriguing violation of this paradigm: the temperature decreases with altitude from the tip of the cusp toward the top of the arcade; the hottest region is slightly above the X-ray loop-top source that is co-spatial with the emission-measure-enhanced region at the top of the arcade. This signifies that a different heating mechanism from the slow-mode shocks attached to the reconnection site operates in the cusp region during the flare decay phase.

  16. Study of hyperspectral characteristics of different types of flares and smoke candles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, Vincent; Chamberland, Martin; Lagueux, Philippe; Kastek, Mariusz; Piatkowski, Tadeusz; Dulski, Rafal

    2012-06-01

    Modern infrared camouflage and countermeasure technologies used in the context of military operations have evolved rapidly over the last decade. Indeed, some infrared seekers and decoy/flares tend to have spectral sensitivity tailored to closely match the emission signatures of military vehicles (such as aircrafts, tanks) and reject other sources. Similarly, some candles (or smoke bombs) are developed to generate large area screens with very high absorption in the infrared. The Military University of Technology has conducted an intensive field campaign where various types of flares and smoke candles were deployed in different conditions and measured. The high spectral, spatial and temporal resolution acquisition of these thermodynamic events was recorded with the Telops Hyper-Cam. The Hyper-Cam enables simultaneous acquisition of spatial and spectral information at high resolutions in both domains. The ability to study combustion systems with high resolution, co-registered imagery and spectral data is made possible. This paper presents the test campaign concept and definition and the analysis of the recorded measurements.

  17. Multispectral and hyperspectral measurements of smoke candles and soldier's camouflage equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagueux, Philippe; Gagnon, Marc-André; Kastek, Mariusz; PiÄ tkowski, Tadeusz; Dulski, Rafał; Trzaskawka, Piotr

    2012-09-01

    The emergence of new infrared camouflage and countermeasure technologies in the context of military operations has paved the way to enhanced detection capabilities. Camouflage devices such as candles (or smoke bombs) and flares are developed to generate either large area or localized screens with very high absorption in the infrared. Similarly, soldier's camouflage devices such as clothing have evolved in design to dissolve their infrared characteristics with that of the background. In all cases, the analysis of the targets infrared images needs to be conducted in both multispectral and hyperspectral domains to assess their capability to efficiently provide visible and infrared camouflage. The Military University of Technology has conducted several intensive field campaigns where various types of smoke candles and camouflage uniforms were deployed in different conditions and were measured both in the multispectral and hyperspectral domains. Cooled broadband infrared cameras were used for the multispectral analysis whereas the high spectral, spatial and temporal resolution acquisition of these thermodynamic events was recorded with the Telops Hyper-Cam sensor. This paper presents the test campaign concept and the analysis of the recorded measurements.

  18. Void effect analysis of Pb-208 of fast reactors with modified CANDLE burn-up scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Widiawati, Nina Su’ud, Zaki

    2015-09-30

    Void effect analysis of Pb-208 as coolant of fast reactors with modified candle burn-up scheme has been conducted. Lead cooled fast reactor (LFR) is one of the fourth-generation reactor designs. The reactor is designed with a thermal power output of 500 MWt. Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme allows the reactor to have long life operation by supplying only natural uranium as fuel cycle input. This scheme introducing discrete region, the fuel is initially put in region 1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn up it is shifted to region 2 and region 1 is filled by fresh natural uranium fuel. The reactor is designed for 100 years with 10 regions arranged axially. The results of neutronic calculation showed that the void coefficients ranged from −0.6695443 % at BOC to −0.5273626 % at EOC for 500 MWt reactor. The void coefficients of Pb-208 more negative than Pb-nat. The results showed that the reactors with Pb-208 coolant have better level of safety than Pb-nat.

  19. Validation of a standardised gait score to predict the healing of tibial fractures.

    PubMed

    Macri, F; Marques, L F; Backer, R C; Santos, M J; Belangero, W D

    2012-04-01

    There is no absolute method of evaluating healing of a fracture of the tibial shaft. In this study we sought to validate a new clinical method based on the systematic observation of gait, first by assessing the degree of agreement between three independent observers regarding the gait score for a given patient, and secondly by determining how such a score might predict healing of a fracture. We used a method of evaluating gait to assess 33 patients (29 men and four women, with a mean age of 29 years (15 to 62)) who had sustained an isolated fracture of the tibial shaft and had been treated with a locked intramedullary nail. There were 15 closed and 18 open fractures (three Gustilo and Anderson grade I, seven grade II, seven grade IIIA and one grade IIIB). Assessment was carried out three and six months post-operatively using videos taken with a digital camera. Gait was graded on a scale ranging from 1 (extreme difficulty) to 4 (normal gait). Bivariate analysis included analysis of variance to determine whether the gait score statistically correlated with previously validated and standardised scores of clinical status and radiological evidence of union. An association was found between the pattern of gait and all the other variables. Improvement in gait was associated with the absence of pain on weight-bearing, reduced tenderness over the fracture, a higher Radiographic Union Scale in Tibial Fractures score, and improved functional status, measured using the Brazilian version of the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment questionnaire (all p < 0.001). Although further study is needed, the analysis of gait in this way may prove to be a useful clinical tool. PMID:22434473

  20. RECIST 1.1 - Standardisation and disease-specific adaptations: Perspectives from the RECIST Working Group.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Lawrence H; Seymour, Lesley; Litière, Saskia; Ford, Robert; Gwyther, Stephen; Mandrekar, Sumithra; Shankar, Lalitha; Bogaerts, Jan; Chen, Alice; Dancey, Janet; Hayes, Wendy; Hodi, F Stephen; Hoekstra, Otto S; Huang, Erich P; Lin, Nancy; Liu, Yan; Therasse, Patrick; Wolchok, Jedd D; de Vries, Elisabeth

    2016-07-01

    Radiologic imaging of disease sites plays a pivotal role in the management of patients with cancer. Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST), introduced in 2000, and modified in 2009, has become the de facto standard for assessment of response in solid tumours in patients on clinical trials. The RECIST Working Group considers the ability of the global oncology community to implement and adopt updates to RECIST in a timely manner to be critical. Updates to RECIST must be tested, validated and implemented in a standardised, methodical manner in response to therapeutic and imaging technology advances as well as experience gained by users. This was the case with the development of RECIST 1.1, where an expanded data warehouse was developed to test and validate modifications. Similar initiatives are ongoing, testing RECIST in the evaluation of response to non-cytotoxic agents, immunotherapies, as well as in specific diseases. The RECIST Working Group has previously outlined the level of evidence considered necessary to formally and fully validate new imaging markers as an appropriate end-point for clinical trials. Achieving the optimal level of evidence desired is a difficult feat for phase III trials; this involves a meta-analysis of multiple prospective, randomised multicentre clinical trials. The rationale for modifications should also be considered; the modifications may be proposed to improve surrogacy, to provide a more mechanistic imaging technique, or be designed to improve reproducibility of the imaging biomarker. Here, we present the commonly described modifications of RECIST, each of which is associated with different levels of evidence and validation. PMID:27237360

  1. Standardised neonatal parenteral nutrition formulations – an Australasian group consensus 2012

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Standardised parenteral nutrition formulations are routinely used in the neonatal intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand. In 2010, a multidisciplinary group was formed to achieve a consensus on the formulations acceptable to majority of the neonatal intensive care units. Literature review was undertaken for each nutrient and recommendations were developed in a series of meetings held between November 2010 and April 2011. Three standard and 2 optional amino acid/dextrose formulations and one lipid emulsion were agreed by majority participants in the consensus. This has a potential to standardise neonatal parenteral nutrition guidelines, reduce costs and prescription errors. PMID:24548745

  2. 76 FR 46277 - Petroleum Wax Candles From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Request for Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ... Republic of China Antidumping Duty Order, 75 FR 49475 (August 13, 2010) (``Preliminary Results''). \\2\\ See Antidumping Duty Order: Petroleum Wax Candles from the People's Republic of China, 51 FR 30686 (August 28... Determinations, 74 FR 42230 (August 21, 2009). In that notice, interested parties were presented two options...

  3. Study on core radius minimization for long life Pb-Bi cooled CANDLE burnup scheme based fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afifah, Maryam; Miura, Ryosuke; Su'ud, Zaki; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, H.

    2015-09-01

    Fast Breeder Reactor had been interested to be developed over the world because it inexhaustible source energy, one of those is CANDLE reactor which is have strategy in burn-up scheme, need not control roads for control burn-up, have a constant core characteristics during energy production and don't need fuel shuffling. The calculation was made by basic reactor analysis which use Sodium coolant geometry core parameter as a reference core to study on minimum core reactor radius of CANDLE for long life Pb-Bi cooled, also want to perform pure coolant effect comparison between LBE and sodium in a same geometry design. The result show that the minimum core radius of Lead Bismuth cooled CANDLE is 100 cm and 500 MWth thermal output. Lead-Bismuth coolant for CANDLE reactor enable to reduce much reactor size and have a better void coefficient than Sodium cooled as the most coolant for FBR, then we will have a good point in safety analysis.

  4. First Report of Veronica Rust by Puccinia veronicae-longifoliae in Minnesota on Veronica spicata Royal Candles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In September 2008, Veronica spicata Royal Candles plants showing foliar symptoms typical of a rust infection were brought to the Plant Disease Clinic at the University of Minnesota by a commercial nursery. A dark brown discoloration was apparent on the upper surface of the leaf with lighter brown pu...

  5. Study on core radius minimization for long life Pb-Bi cooled CANDLE burnup scheme based fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Afifah, Maryam Su’ud, Zaki; Miura, Ryosuke; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, H.

    2015-09-30

    Fast Breeder Reactor had been interested to be developed over the world because it inexhaustible source energy, one of those is CANDLE reactor which is have strategy in burn-up scheme, need not control roads for control burn-up, have a constant core characteristics during energy production and don’t need fuel shuffling. The calculation was made by basic reactor analysis which use Sodium coolant geometry core parameter as a reference core to study on minimum core reactor radius of CANDLE for long life Pb-Bi cooled, also want to perform pure coolant effect comparison between LBE and sodium in a same geometry design. The result show that the minimum core radius of Lead Bismuth cooled CANDLE is 100 cm and 500 MWth thermal output. Lead-Bismuth coolant for CANDLE reactor enable to reduce much reactor size and have a better void coefficient than Sodium cooled as the most coolant for FBR, then we will have a good point in safety analysis.

  6. Using slow-release permanganate candles to remove TCE from a low permeable aquifer at a former landfill.

    PubMed

    Christenson, Mark D; Kambhu, Ann; Comfort, Steve D

    2012-10-01

    Past disposal of industrial solvents into unregulated landfills is a significant source of groundwater contamination. In 2009, we began investigating a former unregulated landfill with known trichloroethene (TCE) contamination. Our objective was to pinpoint the location of the plume and treat the TCE using in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). We accomplished this by using electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) to survey the landfill and map the subsurface lithology. We then used the ERI survey maps to guide direct push groundwater sampling. A TCE plume (100-600 μg L(-1)) was identified in a low permeable silty-clay aquifer (K(h)=0.5 md(-1)) that was within 6m of ground surface. To treat the TCE, we manufactured slow-release potassium permanganate candles (SRPCs) that were 91.4 cm long and either 5. cm or 7.6 cm in dia. For comparison, we inserted equal masses of SRPCs (7.6-cm versus 5.1-cm dia) into the low permeable aquifer in staggered rows that intersected the TCE plume. The 5.1-cm dia candles were inserted using direct push rods while the 7.6-cm SRPCs were placed in 10 permanent wells. Pneumatic circulators that emitted small air bubbles were placed below the 7.6-cm SRPCs in the second year. Results 15 months after installation showed significant TCE reductions in the 7.6-cm candle treatment zone (67-85%) and between 10% and 66% decrease in wells impacted by the direct push candles. These results support using slow-release permanganate candles as a means of treating chlorinated solvents in low permeable aquifers. PMID:22784864

  7. Vocational Training and European Standardisation of Qualifications: The Case of Aircraft Maintenance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Joachim; Ourtau, Maurice

    2009-01-01

    Initiatives to standardise the conditions for practising certain regulated activities are being taken at European level, particularly in light of the free movement of people and the recognition of qualifications in Member states. This paper looks at the introduction of european licences for aircraft maintenance engineers. It follows an in-depth…

  8. Trends in Examination Performance and Exposure to Standardised Tests in England and Wales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Harvey; Leckie, George

    2016-01-01

    Schools in England and Wales since the late 1980s have been compared in terms of their performances in public examinations and standardised test scores in the form of "school league tables", with Wales ceasing to produce these after 2001. One of the factors related to performance in examinations is the choice of the examination board,…

  9. Standardisation a Considerable Force behind Language Death: A Case of Shona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mhute, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    The paper assesses the contribution of standardisation towards language death taking Clement Doke's resolutions on the various Shona dialects as a case study. It is a qualitative analysis of views gathered from speakers of the language situated in various provinces of Zimbabwe, the country in which the language is spoken by around 75% of the…

  10. Standardised Speech-Language Tests and Students with Intellectual Disability: A Review of Normative Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cascella, Paul W.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Before a school speech-language pathologist (SLP) utilises a standardised speech-language test with a student with intellectual disability (ID), the clinician should carefully consider the purpose of the test and whether the test includes students with ID in the normative group. Method: This project reviewed 49 tests published between…

  11. Walking and Talking with Living Texts: Breathing Life against Static Standardisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Louise Gwenneth; Willis, Linda-Dianne

    2014-01-01

    Current educational reform, policy and public discourse emphasise standardisation of testing, curricula and professional practice, yet the landscape of literacy practices today is fluid, interactive, multimodal, ever-changing, adaptive and collaborative. How then can English and literacy educators negotiate these conflicting terrains? The nature…

  12. Standardised Observation Analogue Procedure (SOAP) for Assessing Parent and Child Behaviours in Clinical Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Cynthia R.; Butter, Eric M.; Handen, Benjamin L.; Sukhodolsky, Denis G.; Mulick, James; Lecavalier, Luc; Aman, Michael G.; Arnold, Eugene L.; Scahill, Lawrence; Swiezy, Naomi; Sacco, Kelley; Stigler, Kimberly A.; McDougle, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Observational measures of parent and child behaviours have a long history in child psychiatric and psychological intervention research, including the field of autism and developmental disability. We describe the development of the Standardised Observational Analogue Procedure (SOAP) for the assessment of parent-child behaviour before…

  13. The Person over Standardisation: A Humanistic Framework for Teacher Learning in Diverse School-Based Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazanjian, Christopher J.; Choi, Su-Jin

    2016-01-01

    This paper argues that the purpose of education is to help students realise their unique potentials and pursue inner directions. With this assumption, we critique the inadequacy of the current emphasis on standardisation and provide a theoretical framework for teacher education based on humanistic psychology. Three tenets of humanistic psychology,…

  14. Problematising the Standardisation of Leadership and Management Development in South African Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Clarence

    2015-01-01

    In 2007 the Department of Education introduced the standards-based Advanced Certificate in Education: School Management and Leadership. The standardisation of leadership and management development in South African schools has been uncritically accepted by most academics and professionals. The purpose of this article is to problematise the…

  15. Tensions and Fissures: The Politics of Standardised Testing and Accountability in Ontario, 1995-2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Laura Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    While Ontario has received international accolades for its enactment of province-wide standardised testing upon the formation of the Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO), a closer look at provincial assessments over a 20-year span reveals successes as well as systemic tensions and fissures. The purpose of this paper is twofold.…

  16. Optimisation of Healthcare Contracts: Tensions Between Standardisation and Innovation

    PubMed Central

    Mikkers, Misja; Ryan, Padhraig

    2016-01-01

    An important determinant of health system performance is contracting. Providers often respond to financial incentives, despite the ethical underpinnings of medicine, and payers can craft contracts to influence performance. Yet contracting is highly imperfect in both single-payer and multi-payer health systems. Arguably, in a competitive, multi-payer environment, contractual innovation may occur more rapidly than in a single-payer system. This innovation in contract design could enhance performance. However, contractual innovation often fails to improve performance as payer incentives are misaligned with public policy objectives. Numerous countries seek to improve healthcare contracts, but thus far no health system has demonstrably crafted the necessary blend of incentives to stimulate optimal contracting. PMID:26927400

  17. Planetary nebulae as standard candles. IV - A test in the Leo I group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciardullo, Robin; Jacoby, George H.; Ford, Holland C.

    1989-09-01

    In this paper, PN are used to determine accurate distances to three galaxies in the Leo I group - The E0 giant elliptical NGC 3379, its optical companion, the SB0 spiral NGC 3384, and the smaller E6 elliptical NGC 3377. In all three galaxies, the luminosity-specific PN number densities are roughly the same, and the derived stellar death rates are in remarkable agreement with the predictions of stellar evolution theory. It is shown that the shape of the forbidden O III 5007 A PN luminosity function is the same in each galaxy and indistinguishable from that observed in M31 and M81. It is concluded that the PN luminosity function is an excellent standard candle for early-type galaxies.

  18. Power flattening on modified CANDLE small long life gas-cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Monado, Fiber; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Basar, Khairul; Ariani, Menik; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-09-30

    Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is one of the candidates of next generation Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) that expected to be operated commercially after 2030. In this research conceptual design study of long life 350 MWt GFR with natural uranium metallic fuel as fuel cycle input has been performed. Modified CANDLE burn-up strategy with first and second regions located near the last region (type B) has been applied. This reactor can be operated for 10 years without refuelling and fuel shuffling. Power peaking reduction is conducted by arranging the core radial direction into three regions with respectively uses fuel volume fraction 62.5%, 64% and 67.5%. The average power density in the modified core is about 82 Watt/cc and the power peaking factor decreased from 4.03 to 3.43.

  19. Planetary nebulae as standard candles. IV - A test in the Leo I group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciardullo, Robin; Jacoby, George H.; Ford, Holland C.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, PN are used to determine accurate distances to three galaxies in the Leo I group - The E0 giant elliptical NGC 3379, its optical companion, the SB0 spiral NGC 3384, and the smaller E6 elliptical NGC 3377. In all three galaxies, the luminosity-specific PN number densities are roughly the same, and the derived stellar death rates are in remarkable agreement with the predictions of stellar evolution theory. It is shown that the shape of the forbidden O III 5007 A PN luminosity function is the same in each galaxy and indistinguishable from that observed in M31 and M81. It is concluded that the PN luminosity function is an excellent standard candle for early-type galaxies.

  20. The Hubble relation for nonstandard candles and the origin of the redshift of quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.

    1974-01-01

    It is shown that the magnitude-log (redshift) relation for brightest quasars can have a slope different from the value expected for standard candles. The value of this slope depends on the luminosity function and its evolution. Therefore the difference of this slope from the expected value cannot be used as evidence against the cosmological origin of the redshift of the quasars. It is shown that the observed variation of the luminosity of the brightest objects with redshift is consistent with the cosmological hypothesis and that it agrees with (and perhaps could be used to complement) the luminosity function obtained from V/Vm analysis. It is also shown that the nonzero slope of the magnitude-log (redshift) relation rules out the local quasar hypothesis, where it is assumed that the sources are nearby (less than 500 Mpc), that the bulk of their redshift is intrinsic, and that there is no dependence on distance of the intrinsic properties of the sources.

  1. Demonstration of a candle powered radio using GaSb thermophotovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.J.; Fraas, L.M.

    1996-02-01

    We have discovered that the flame from a single candle when surrounded by a bracelet-sized ring of GaSb cells can provide enough power to operate a transistor radio. Spectral measurements of the flame show that a large fraction of the flame energy is in the infrared in a blackbody-like emission band centered at 1.3 microns. GaSb cells capture infrared energy out to 1.7 microns, providing enough energy to power the radio. Traditional silicon solar cells only capture energy out to 1.1 microns and produce less than 30{percent} of the power of GaSb cells, which is not enough to operate the radio. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. The luminosity function of galactic X-ray sources - A cutoff and a 'standard candle'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, B.; Ostriker, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of the 2- to 10-kev luminosity distribution of 36 X-ray sources in the Local Group having known or estimated distances, showing that there exists a luminosity cutoff of approximately 10 to the 37.7th ergs/sec in agreement with the theoretical (Eddington) limit for the luminosity of an approximately 1 solar mass star. Furthermore, among the complete sample of high-luminosity sources, there appears to be a statistically significant group of X-ray 'standard candles' at (within less than 0.8 mag) the critical luminosity. This finding (which is in agreement with the self-consistent mass flow accretion models) presents the possibility that X-ray sources may be used as extragalactic distance indicators in the next generation of X-ray astronomy experiments.

  3. Power flattening on modified CANDLE small long life gas-cooled fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monado, Fiber; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Basar, Khairul; Ariani, Menik; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is one of the candidates of next generation Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) that expected to be operated commercially after 2030. In this research conceptual design study of long life 350 MWt GFR with natural uranium metallic fuel as fuel cycle input has been performed. Modified CANDLE burn-up strategy with first and second regions located near the last region (type B) has been applied. This reactor can be operated for 10 years without refuelling and fuel shuffling. Power peaking reduction is conducted by arranging the core radial direction into three regions with respectively uses fuel volume fraction 62.5%, 64% and 67.5%. The average power density in the modified core is about 82 Watt/cc and the power peaking factor decreased from 4.03 to 3.43.

  4. Load following capability of CANDLE reactor by adjusting coolant operation condition

    SciTech Connect

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Sinsuke

    2012-06-06

    The load following capability of CANDLE reactor is investigated in the condition that the control rods are unavailable. Both sodium cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (SFR) and {sup 208}Pb cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (LFR) are investigated for their performance in power rate changing by changing its coolant operation condition; either coolant flow rate or coolant inlet temperature. The change by coolant flow rate is difficult especially for SFR because the maximum temperature criteria on cladding material may be violated. The power rate can be changed for its full range easily by changing the coolant temperature at the core inlet. LFR can reduce the same amount of power rate by smaller change of temperature than SFR. However, the coolant output temperature is generally decreased for this method and the thermal efficiency becomes worse.

  5. Load following capability of CANDLE reactor by adjusting coolant operation condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Sinsuke

    2012-06-01

    The load following capability of CANDLE reactor is investigated in the condition that the control rods are unavailable. Both sodium cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (SFR) and 208Pb cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (LFR) are investigated for their performance in power rate changing by changing its coolant operation condition; either coolant flow rate or coolant inlet temperature. The change by coolant flow rate is difficult especially for SFR because the maximum temperature criteria on cladding material may be violated. The power rate can be changed for its full range easily by changing the coolant temperature at the core inlet. LFR can reduce the same amount of power rate by smaller change of temperature than SFR. However, the coolant output temperature is generally decreased for this method and the thermal efficiency becomes worse.

  6. Candle soot-based super-amphiphobic coatings resist protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Schmüser, Lars; Encinas, Noemi; Paven, Maxime; Graham, Daniel J; Castner, David G; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans Jürgen; Weidner, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Super nonfouling surfaces resist protein adhesion and have a broad field of possible applications in implant technology, drug delivery, blood compatible materials, biosensors, and marine coatings. A promising route toward nonfouling surfaces involves liquid repelling architectures. The authors here show that soot-templated super-amphiphobic (SAP) surfaces prepared from fluorinated candle soot structures are super nonfouling. When exposed to bovine serum albumin or blood serum, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis showed that less than 2 ng/cm(2) of protein was adsorbed onto the SAP surfaces. Since a broad variety of substrate shapes can be coated by soot-templated SAP surfaces, those are a promising route toward biocompatible materials design. PMID:27460261

  7. Polymer-based candle-shaped microneedle electrodes for electroencephalography on hairy skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Miyako; Kudo, Yuta; Miki, Norihisa

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we report on the optimization of the shape of dry microneedle electrodes for electroencephalography (EEG) on hairy locations and compare the electrodes we developed with conventional wet electrodes. We propose the use of SU-8-based candle-shaped microneedle electrodes (CMEs), which have pillars of 1.0 mm height and 0.4 mm diameter with a gap of 0.43 mm between pillars. Microneedles are formed on the top of the pillars. The shape was determined by how well the pillars can avoid hairs and support the microneedles to penetrate through the stratum corneum. The skin–electrode contact impedances of the fabricated CMEs were found to be higher and less stable than those of conventional wet electrodes. However, the CMEs successfully acquired signals with qualities as good as those of conventional wet electrodes. Given the usability of the CMEs, which do not require skin preparation or gel, they are promising alternatives to conventional wet electrodes.

  8. TEMPERATURE AND ELECTRON DENSITY DIAGNOSTICS OF A CANDLE-FLAME-SHAPED FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Guidoni, S. E.; Plowman, J. E.

    2015-02-10

    Candle-flame-shaped flares are archetypical structures that provide indirect evidence of magnetic reconnection. A flare resembling Tsuneta's famous 1992 candle-flame flare occurred on 2011 January 28; we present its temperature and electron density diagnostics. This flare was observed with Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager, resulting in high-resolution, broad temperature coverage, and stereoscopic views of this iconic structure. The high-temperature images reveal a brightening that grows in size to form a tower-like structure at the top of the posteruption flare arcade, a feature that has been observed in other long-duration events. Despite the extensive work on the standard reconnection scenario, there is no complete agreement among models regarding the nature of this high-intensity elongated structure. Electron density maps reveal that reconnected loops that are successively connected at their tops to the tower develop a density asymmetry of about a factor of two between the two legs, giving the appearance of ''half-loops''. We calculate average temperatures with a new fast differential emission measure (DEM) method that uses SDO/AIA data and analyze the heating and cooling of salient features of the flare. Using STEREO observations, we show that the tower and the half-loop brightenings are not a line-of-sight projection effect of the type studied by Forbes and Acton. This conclusion opens the door for physics-based explanations of these puzzling, recurrent solar flare features, previously attributed to projection effects. We corroborate the results of our DEM analysis by comparing them with temperature analyses from Hinode/XRT.

  9. Temperature and Electron Density Diagnostics of a Candle-flame-shaped Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidoni, S. E.; McKenzie, D. E.; Longcope, D. W.; Plowman, J. E.; Yoshimura, K.

    2015-02-01

    Candle-flame-shaped flares are archetypical structures that provide indirect evidence of magnetic reconnection. A flare resembling Tsuneta's famous 1992 candle-flame flare occurred on 2011 January 28; we present its temperature and electron density diagnostics. This flare was observed with Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager, resulting in high-resolution, broad temperature coverage, and stereoscopic views of this iconic structure. The high-temperature images reveal a brightening that grows in size to form a tower-like structure at the top of the posteruption flare arcade, a feature that has been observed in other long-duration events. Despite the extensive work on the standard reconnection scenario, there is no complete agreement among models regarding the nature of this high-intensity elongated structure. Electron density maps reveal that reconnected loops that are successively connected at their tops to the tower develop a density asymmetry of about a factor of two between the two legs, giving the appearance of "half-loops." We calculate average temperatures with a new fast differential emission measure (DEM) method that uses SDO/AIA data and analyze the heating and cooling of salient features of the flare. Using STEREO observations, we show that the tower and the half-loop brightenings are not a line-of-sight projection effect of the type studied by Forbes & Acton. This conclusion opens the door for physics-based explanations of these puzzling, recurrent solar flare features, previously attributed to projection effects. We corroborate the results of our DEM analysis by comparing them with temperature analyses from Hinode/XRT.

  10. Standardisation of temperature observed by automatic weather stations.

    PubMed

    Joyce, A; Adamson, J; Huntley, B; Parr, T; Baxter, R

    2001-05-01

    Daily mean, maximum and minimum surface air temperature data were gathered from a network of automatic weather stations (AWS) within the Moor House National Nature Reserve in northern England. Five AWS were installed next to the official Environmental Change Network weather station at Moor House. Data were compared graphically and correction constants were calculated to adjust data from each AWS to the standard of the official station by optimising the concordance correlation coefficient. Each corrected station was re-located next to one of five in-situ stations in and around the reserve, allowing correction of all temperature sensors to a common standard. The mean error associated with measured daily mean, maximum and minimum temperature for each sensor does not exceed +/- 0.2 K. The procedure quantifies a source of systematic measurement error, improving the identification of spatial temperature differences between stations. PMID:11411140

  11. International standardisation of optical circuit board measurement and fabrication procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitwon, Richard; Wang, Kai; Immonen, Marika; Wu, Jinhua; Zhu, Long Xiu; Yan, Hui Juan; Worrall, Alex

    2015-03-01

    Widespread adoption of optical circuit boards will herald substantial performance, environmental and cost benefits for the data communications industry. Though optical circuit board technology has advanced considerably over the past decade, commercial maturity will be gated by the availability of conformity standards to forge future quality assurance procedures. One important prerequisite to this is a reliable test and measurement definition system, which is agnostic to the type of waveguide system under test and therefore can be applied to different optical circuit board technologies as well as being adaptable to future variants. A serious and common problem with the measurement of optical waveguide systems has been lack of proper definition of the measurement conditions for a given test regime, and consequently strong inconsistencies ensue in the results of measurements by different parties on the same test sample. We report on the development of a new measurement identification standard to force testers to capture sufficient information about the measurement conditions for a given optical circuit board such as to ensure consistency of measurement results within an acceptable margin. Furthermore we demonstrate how the application of the measurement identification system can bring about a dramatic improvement in results consistency, by comparative evaluation of the results on multimode polymer waveguide based optical circuit test boards from a large selection of testing organisations.

  12. Requirement for a standardised definition of advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    DE SOL, ANGELO; TRASTULLI, STEFANO; GRASSI, VERONICA; CORSI, ALESSIA; BARILLARO, IVAN; BOCCOLINI, ANDREA; DI PATRIZI, MICOL SOLE; DI ROCCO, GIORGIO; SANTORO, ALBERTO; CIROCCHI, ROBERTO; BOSELLI, CARLO; REDLER, ADRIANO; NOYA, GIUSEPPE; KONG, SEONG-HO

    2014-01-01

    Each year, ~988,000 new cases of stomach cancer are reported worldwide. Uniformity for the definition of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) is required to ensure the improved management of patients. Various classifications do actually exist for gastric cancer, but the classification determined by lesion depth is extremely important, as it has been shown to correlate with patient prognosis; for example, early gastric cancer (EGC) has a favourable prognosis when compared with AGC. In the literature, the definition of EGC is clear, however, there is heterogeneity in the definition of AGC. In the current study, all parameters of the TNM classification for AGC reported in each previous study were individually analysed. It was necessary to perform a comprehensive systematic literature search of all previous studies that have reported a definition of ACG to guarantee homogeneity in the assessment of surgical outcome. It must be understood that the term ‘advanced gastric cancer’ may implicate a number of stages of disease, and studies must highlight the exact clinical TNM stages used for evaluation of the study. PMID:24348842

  13. Surface brightness, standard candles and q/0/. [universe deceleration parameter determination by redshift-magnitude relation of extragalactic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.

    1977-01-01

    The most direct way to determine the deceleration parameter, q(0), of the universe is through the study of the redshift-magnitude relation of extragalactic sources. Progress has been slow because the necessary sources for this study must be standard candles, which have identical absolute total luminosity (balometric or monochromatic). The present paper shows, first of all, that, although necessary, this is not a sufficient condition for nonpoint-like (or resolved) sources. A modification of the redshift-magnitude relation is then described for a certain class of nonstandard candles using measurements of isophotal surface brightness. It is noted that such measurements can be used to standardize the central surface brightness of galaxies, but the standardization of the scale parameter remains beyond observations.

  14. The impact of candle burning during All Saints' Day ceremonies on ambient alkyl-substituted benzene concentrations.

    PubMed

    Olszowski, Tomasz; Kłos, Andrzej

    2013-11-01

    Research findings concerning benzene, toluene, ethylobenzene, meta-, para- and ortho-xylene as well as styrene (BTEXS) emission at public cemeteries during All Saints' Day are presented here. Tests were carried out at town-located cemeteries in Opole and Grodków (southern Poland) and, as a benchmark, at the centres of those same towns. The purpose of the study was to estimate BTEXS emissions caused by the candle burning and, equally important to examine, whether emissions generated by the tested sources were similar to the BTEXS emissions generated by road transport. During the festive period, significant increases in benzene concentrations, by 200 % and 144 %, were noted at the cemeteries in Opole and Grodków, as well as in toluene, by 366 % and 342 %, respectively. Styrene concentrations also increased. It was demonstrated that the ratio of toluene to benzene concentrations from emissions caused by the burning candles are comparable to the ratio established for transportation emissions. PMID:24052143

  15. Multivariate standardisation for non-linear calibration range in the chemiluminescence determination of chromium.

    PubMed

    Tortajada-Genaro, L A; Campíns-Falcó, P

    2007-05-15

    Multivariate standardisation is proposed for the successful chemiluminescence determination of chromium based on luminol-hydrogen peroxide reaction. In an extended concentration range, non-linear calibration model is needed. The studied instrumental situations were different detection cells, instruments, assemblies, time and their possible combinations. Chemiluminescence kinetic registers have been transferred using piecewise direct standardisation (PDS) method. The optimisation of transfer parameters has been carried out based on the prediction residual error criteria. Non-linear principal component regression (NL-PCR) and non-linear partial least square regression (NL-PLS) were chosen for modelling the relationship signal-concentration of transferred registers. Good accuracy and precision were obtained for water samples. The concentrations of chromium were statistically in agreement with reference method values and with recovery studies. Therefore, it is possible to transfer chemiluminescence curves without loosing ability of prediction, even the presence of a non-linear behaviour. PMID:19071716

  16. Effects of Burnup and Temperature Distributions to CANDLE Burnup of Block-Type High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yasunori Ohoka; Ismile; Hiroshi Sekimoto

    2004-07-01

    The CANDLE burnup strategy is a new reactor burnup concept, where the distributions of fuel nuclide densities, neutron flux, and power density move with the same constant speed along the core axis from bottom to top or from top to bottom of the core and without any change in their shapes. It can be applied easily to the block-type high temperature gas cooled reactor using an appropriate burnable poison mixed with uranium oxide fuel. In the present study, the burnup distribution and the temperature distribution in the core are investigated and their effects on the CANDLE burnup core characteristics are studied. In this study, the natural gadolinium is used as the burnable poison. With the fuel enrichment of 15%, the natural gadolinium concentration of 3.0% and the fuel pin pitch of 6.6 cm, the CANDLE burnup is realized with the burning region moving speed of 29 cm/year and the axial half width of power density distribution of 1.5 m for uniform group constant case at 900 K. When the effect of nuclide change by burnup is considered, the burning region speed becomes 25 cm/year and the axial half-width of power density distribution becomes 1.25 m. When the temperature distributions effect is considered, the effects on the core characteristics are smaller than the burnup distribution effect. The maximum fuel temperature of the parallel flow case is higher than the counter flow case. (authors)

  17. Multicentre chest computed tomography standardisation in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis: the way forward.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Wieying; Kemner-van de Corput, Mariette P C; Perez-Rovira, Adria; de Bruijne, Marleen; Fajac, Isabelle; Tiddens, Harm A W M; van Straten, Marcel

    2016-06-01

    Progressive cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is the main cause of mortality in CF patients. CF lung disease starts in early childhood. With current standards of care, respiratory function remains largely normal in children and more sensitive outcome measures are needed to monitor early CF lung disease. Chest CT is currently the most sensitive imaging modality to monitor pulmonary structural changes in children and adolescents with CF. To quantify structural lung disease reliably among multiple centres, standardisation of chest CT protocols is needed. SCIFI CF (Standardised Chest Imaging Framework for Interventions and Personalised Medicine in CF) was founded to characterise chest CT image quality and radiation doses among 16 participating European CF centres in 10 different countries. We aimed to optimise CT protocols in children and adolescents among several CF centres. A large variety was found in CT protocols, image quality and radiation dose usage among the centres. However, the performance of all CT scanners was found to be very similar, when taking spatial resolution and radiation dose into account. We conclude that multicentre standardisation of chest CT in children and adolescents with CF can be achieved for future clinical trials. PMID:27076593

  18. Research priorities in light of current trends in microsurgical training: revalidation, simulation, cross-training, and standardisation.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Rebecca Spenser; Madada-Nyakauru, Rudo N; Irri, Renu Anita; Myers, Simon Richard; Ghanem, Ali Mahmoud

    2014-05-01

    Plastic surgery training worldwide has seen a thorough restructuring over the past decade, with the introduction of formal training curricula and work-based assessment tools. Part of this process has been the introduction of revalidation and a greater use of simulation in training delivery. Simulation is an increasingly important tool for educators because it provides a way to reduce risks to both trainees and patients, whilst facilitating improved technical proficiency. Current microsurgery training interventions are often predicated on theories of skill acquisition and development that follow a 'practice makes perfect' model. Given the changing landscape of surgical training and advances in educational theories related to skill development, research is needed to assess the potential benefits of alternative models, particularly cross-training, a model now widely used in non-medical areas with significant benefits. Furthermore, with the proliferation of microsurgery training interventions and therefore diversity in length, cost, content and models used, appropriate standardisation will be an important factor to ensure that courses deliver consistent and effective training that achieves appropriate levels of competency. Key research requirements should be gathered and used in directing further research in these areas to achieve on-going improvement of microsurgery training. PMID:24883271

  19. Research Priorities in Light of Current Trends in Microsurgical Training: Revalidation, Simulation, Cross-Training, and Standardisation

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Rebecca Spenser; Madada-Nyakauru, Rudo N; Irri, Renu Anita; Myers, Simon Richard

    2014-01-01

    Plastic surgery training worldwide has seen a thorough restructuring over the past decade, with the introduction of formal training curricula and work-based assessment tools. Part of this process has been the introduction of revalidation and a greater use of simulation in training delivery. Simulation is an increasingly important tool for educators because it provides a way to reduce risks to both trainees and patients, whilst facilitating improved technical proficiency. Current microsurgery training interventions are often predicated on theories of skill acquisition and development that follow a 'practice makes perfect' model. Given the changing landscape of surgical training and advances in educational theories related to skill development, research is needed to assess the potential benefits of alternative models, particularly cross-training, a model now widely used in non-medical areas with significant benefits. Furthermore, with the proliferation of microsurgery training interventions and therefore diversity in length, cost, content and models used, appropriate standardisation will be an important factor to ensure that courses deliver consistent and effective training that achieves appropriate levels of competency. Key research requirements should be gathered and used in directing further research in these areas to achieve on-going improvement of microsurgery training. PMID:24883271

  20. ASSESSMENT OF THE PCFBC-EXPOSED AND ACCELERATED LIFE-TESTED CANDLE FILTERS

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Alvin

    1999-09-30

    Development of the hot gas filtration technology has been the focus of DOE/FETC and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation during the past twenty years. Systems development during this time has successfully lead to the generation and implementation of high temperature Siemens Westinghouse particulate filtration systems that are currently installed and are operational at Demonstration Plant sites, and which are ready for installation at commercial plant sites. Concurrently, materials development has advanced the use of commercially available oxide- and nonoxide-based monoliths, and has fostered the manufacture and use of second generation, oxide-based, continuous fiber reinforced ceramic composites and filament wound materials. This report summarizes the material characterization results for commercially available and second generation filter materials tested in Siemens Westinghouse's advanced, high temperature, particulate removal system at the Foster Wheeler, pressurized circulating fluidized-bed combustion, pilot-scale test facility in Karhula, Finland, and subsequent extended accelerated life testing of aged elements in Siemens Westinghouse pressurized fluidized-bed combustion simulator test facility in Pittsburgh, PA. The viability of operating candle filters successfully for over 1 year of service life has been shown in these efforts. Continued testing to demonstrate the feasibility of acquiring three years of service operation on aged filter elements is recommended.

  1. Cancer Driver Log (CanDL): Catalog of Potentially Actionable Cancer Mutations.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Senthilkumar; Miya, Jharna; Kautto, Esko; Zhu, Eliot; Samorodnitsky, Eric; Datta, Jharna; Reeser, Julie W; Roychowdhury, Sameek

    2015-09-01

    Massively parallel sequencing technologies have enabled characterization of genomic alterations across multiple tumor types. Efforts have focused on identifying driver mutations because they represent potential targets for therapy. However, because of the presence of driver and passenger mutations, it is often challenging to assign the clinical relevance of specific mutations observed in patients. Currently, there are multiple databases and tools that provide in silico assessment for potential drivers; however, there is no comprehensive resource for mutations with functional characterization. Therefore, we created an expert-curated database of potentially actionable driver mutations for molecular pathologists to facilitate annotation of cancer genomic testing. We reviewed scientific literature to identify variants that have been functionally characterized in vitro or in vivo as driver mutations. We obtained the chromosome location and all possible nucleotide positions for each amino acid change and uploaded them to the Cancer Driver Log (CanDL) database with associated literature reference indicating functional driver evidence. In addition to a simple interface, the database allows users to download all or selected genes as a comma-separated values file for incorporation into their own analysis pipeline. Furthermore, the database includes a mechanism for third-party contributions to support updates for novel driver mutations. Overall, this freely available database will facilitate rapid annotation of cancer genomic testing in molecular pathology laboratories for mutations. PMID:26320871

  2. A Detailed Investigation into the Use of Planetary Nebulae as Standard Candles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciardullo, Robin

    2000-01-01

    The program's goal was to understand the physics underlying the [O III] (lambda)5007 planetary nebula luminosity function (PNLF) and evaluate its accuracy as an extragalactic distance indicator. Work under the grant concentrated in two areas. The first major goal was to extensively test the PNLF method to find its limits. We did this performing yet another internal test of the method in the core galaxies of the Fornax Cluster, performing external comparisons of PNLF distances with distances derived from Cepheids and the Surface Brightness Fluctuation method (SBF), and, in general, examining the PNLF in as many different galactic environments as possible, including the disks of late-type spirals. Because of the difficulty distinguishing planetary nebulae (PNe) from H II regions, and because spiral galaxies have uneven internal extinction, the process of identifying "statistical" samples of PNe in these objects is extremely complicated. Nevertheless, by using the ratio of [O III] (lambda)5007 to H(alpha) as a diagnostic, we were able to effectively discriminate PNe from most H II regions, and apply the method to systems such as NGC 300, M101, M51, and M96. The second goal of this research was to determine theoretically, why the PNLF is such an excellent standard candle.

  3. Design Study of Small Pb-Bi Cooled Modified Candle Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Su'ud, Zaki; Sekimoto, H.

    2010-06-22

    In this study application of modified CANDLE burnup scheme based long life Pb-Bi Cooled Fast Reactors for small long life reactors with natural Uranium as Fuel Cycle Input has been performed. The reactor cores are subdivided into several parts with the same volume in the axial directions. The natural uranium is initially put in region 1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region 2, and 10 years after that it is shifted to region 3. This concept is applied to all regions, i.e. shifted the core of I'th region into I+1 region after the end of 10 years burn-up cycle. The first region 1 is filled by fresh natural uranium fuel. Compared to the previous works, in a smaller reactor core the criticality need to be considered more carefully especially at the beginning of life. As an optimized design, a core of 85 cm radius and 150 cm height with 300 MWt power are selected. This core can be operated 10 years without refueling or fuel shuffling. The average discharge burn-up is 350 GWd/ton HM.

  4. Design Study of Small Pb-Bi Cooled Modified Candle Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su'ud, Zaki; Sekimoto, H.

    2010-06-01

    In this study application of modified CANDLE burnup scheme based long life Pb-Bi Cooled Fast Reactors for small long life reactors with natural Uranium as Fuel Cycle Input has been performed. The reactor cores are subdivided into several parts with the same volume in the axial directions. The natural uranium is initially put in region 1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region 2, and 10 years after that it is shifted to region 3. This concept is applied to all regions, i.e. shifted the core of I'th region into I+1 region after the end of 10 years burn-up cycle. The first region 1 is filled by fresh natural uranium fuel. Compared to the previous works, in a smaller reactor core the criticality need to be considered more carefully especially at the beginning of life. As an optimized design, a core of 85 cm radius and 150 cm height with 300 MWt power are selected. This core can be operated 10 years without refueling or fuel shuffling. The average discharge burn-up is 350 GWd/ton HM.

  5. From a Better Understanding of GRB Prompt Emission to a New Type of Standard Candles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiriec, Sylvain

    2016-07-01

    Recent results revealed the simultaneous existence of multiple components in the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) leading to a unified spectro-temporal model for the broadband spectrum from the optical regime up to higher gamma rays. Unexpectedly, we discovered a relation intrinsic to one specific component of this model: its luminosity is strongly and tightly correlated to its spectral break energy. This new luminosity-hardness relation has the same index for all GRBs when fitted to a power law. In addition, this relation seems to have the same normalization for all GRBs; therefore, this is a promising and physically motivated tool that may establish GRBs as cosmological standard candles. During this presentation, I will introduce this new relation, which might eventually be used to (i) estimate GRB distances, (ii) to support searches for gravitational waves and cosmic high-energy neutrinos, and (iii) constrain the cosmological parameters. I will give a few examples of GRB redshift estimates using this relation and I will show why this new result cannot solely be explain by instrumental selection effects and/or measurement/analysis biases.

  6. The charge-asymmetric nonlocally determined local-electric (CANDLE) solvation model.

    PubMed

    Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Goddard, William A

    2015-02-14

    Many important applications of electronic structure methods involve molecules or solid surfaces in a solvent medium. Since explicit treatment of the solvent in such methods is usually not practical, calculations often employ continuum solvation models to approximate the effect of the solvent. Previous solvation models either involve a parametrization based on atomic radii, which limits the class of applicable solutes, or based on solute electron density, which is more general but less accurate, especially for charged systems. We develop an accurate and general solvation model that includes a cavity that is a nonlocal functional of both solute electron density and potential, local dielectric response on this nonlocally determined cavity, and nonlocal approximations to the cavity-formation and dispersion energies. The dependence of the cavity on the solute potential enables an explicit treatment of the solvent charge asymmetry. With four parameters per solvent, this "CANDLE" model simultaneously reproduces solvation energies of large datasets of neutral molecules, cations, and anions with a mean absolute error of 1.8 kcal/mol in water and 3.0 kcal/mol in acetonitrile. PMID:25681887

  7. Calibration of Post-AGB Supergiants as Standard Extragalactic Candles for HST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Howard E.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes activities carried out with support from the NASA Ultraviolet, Visible, and Gravitational Astrophysics Research and Analysis Program. The aim of the program is to calibrate the absolute magnitudes of post-asymptotic-giant-branch (post-AGB or PAGB) stars, which we believe will be an excellent new "standard candle" for measuring extragalactic distances. The reason for this belief is that in old populations, the stars that are evolving through the PAGB region of the HR (Hertzsprung-Russell) diagram arise from only a single main-sequence turnoff mass. In addition, the theoretical PAGB evolutionary tracks show that they evolve through this region at constant luminosity; hence the PAGB stars should have an extremely narrow luminosity function. Moreover, as the PAGB stars evolve through spectral types F and A (en route from the AGB to hot stellar remnants and white dwarfs), they have the highest luminosities attained by old stars (both bolometrically and in the visual band). Finally, the PAGB stars of these spectral types are very easily identified, due to their large Balmer jumps, which are due to their very low surface gravities.

  8. Neutrino-less Double Beta Decay of {sup 48}Ca-CANDLES

    SciTech Connect

    Kishimoto, T.; Nomachi, M.; Yoshida, S.; Matsuoka, K.; Ichimura, K.; Ito, G.; Yasuda, K.; Kakubata, H.; Miyashita, M.; Takubo, K.; Saka, M.; Seki, K.; Ajimura, S.; Umehara, S.; Nakatani, N.; Tamagawa, Y.; Ogawa, I.; Fushimi, K.; Hazama, R.; Ohsumi, H.

    2011-10-21

    Neutrino-less double beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) is currently known to be an only experiment to verify whether lepton number is conserved or not. The lepton number non-conservation is the key to create matter dominated universe with CP violation. The so-called leptogenesys scenario presents a way to create the matter dominated universe by these violations. If neutrinos have Majorana mass, transition from a particle to an anti-particle is possible and the left-handed and right-handed neutrinos could have different masses. It is highly likely that the neutrinos are Majorana particles. We have been studying double beta decay of {sup 48}Ca. Our first stage experiment using the ELEGANT VI detector system gave the best lower limit of the half life of 0{nu}{beta}{beta} of {sup 48}Ca. We have been working on CANDLES detector system to sense much longer lifetime region. We have developed techniques to reduce backgrounds. The CADLES detector system was installed at Kamioka underground laboratory. Here I describe a schematic view of the system.

  9. Standardised studies on Molar Incisor Hypomineralisation (MIH) and Hypomineralised Second Primary Molars (HSPM): a need.

    PubMed

    Elfrink, M E C; Ghanim, A; Manton, D J; Weerheijm, K L

    2015-06-01

    In November 2014, a review of literature concerning prevalence data of Molar Incisor Hypomineralisation (MIH) and Hypomineralised Second Primary Molars (HSPM) was performed. A search of PubMed online databases was conducted for relevant articles published until November 2014. The reference lists of all retrieved articles were hand-searched. Studies were included after assessing the eligibility of the full-text article. Out of 1078 manuscripts, a total of 157 English written publications were selected based on title and abstract. Of these 157, 60 were included in the study and allocated as 52 MIH and 5 HSPM, and 3 for both MIH and HSPM. These studies utilised the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry judgment criteria, the modified index of developmental defects of enamel (mDDE) and self-devised criteria, and demonstrated a wide variation in the reported prevalence (MIH 2.9-44 %; HSPM 0-21.8 %). Most values mentioned were representative for specific areas. More studies were performed in cities compared with rural areas. A great variation was found in calibration methods, number of participants, number of examiners and research protocols between the studies. The majority of the prevalence studies also investigated possible aetiological factors. To compare MIH and HSPM prevalence and or aetiological data around the world, standardisation of such studies seems essential. Standardisation of the research protocol should include a clearly described sample of children (minimum number of 300 for prevalence and 1000 for aetiology studies) and use of the same calibration sets and methods whereas aetiological studies need to be prospective in nature. A standardised protocol for future MIH and HSPM prevalence and aetiology studies is recommended. PMID:25894247

  10. Repeatability, Reproducibility and Standardisation of a Laser Doppler Imaging Technique for the Evaluation of Normal Mouse Hindlimb Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Adelaide; Ragucci, Monica; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Gargiulo, Sara; Gramanzini, Matteo; Coda, Anna Rita Daniela; Albanese, Sandra; Mancini, Marcello; Salvatore, Marco; Brunetti, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Background Preclinical perfusion studies are useful for the improvement of diagnosis and therapy in dermatologic, cardiovascular and rheumatic human diseases. The Laser Doppler Perfusion Imaging (LDPI) technique has been used to evaluate superficial alterations of the skin microcirculation in surgically induced murine hindlimb ischemia. We assessed the reproducibility and the accuracy of LDPI acquisitions and identified several critical factors that could affect LDPI measurements in mice. Methods Twenty mice were analysed. Statistical standardisation and a repeatability and reproducibility analysis were performed on mouse perfusion signals with respect to differences in body temperature, the presence or absence of hair, the type of anaesthesia used for LDPI measurements and the position of the mouse body. Results We found excellent correlations among measurements made by the same operator (i.e., repeatability) under the same experimental conditions and by two different operators (i.e., reproducibility). A Bland-Altman analysis showed the absence of bias in repeatability (p = 0.29) or reproducibility (p = 0.89). The limits of agreement for repeatability were –0.357 and –0.033, and for reproducibility, they were –0.270 and 0.238. Significant differences in perfusion values were observed in different experimental groups. Conclusions Different experimental conditions must be considered as a starting point for the evaluation of new drugs and strategic therapies. PMID:23275085

  11. Standardisation and precise determination of the half-life of (44)Sc.

    PubMed

    García-Toraño, E; Peyrés, V; Roteta, M; Sánchez-Cabezudo, A I; Romero, E; Martínez Ortega, A

    2016-03-01

    The half-life of the positron-emitter (44)Sc has been determined by following the decay rate with two measurement systems; an Ionisation Chamber and a HPGe detector. The combination of seven results gives a value of T1/2=4.042 (25)h, about 2% higher than the recommended value of T1/2=3.97 (4)h (Browne, 2011) and with a lower uncertainty. This radionuclide has also been standardised by coincidence counting, and liquid scintillation counting techniques. A (44)Ti/(44)Sc generator developed at CIEMAT was used to obtain the (44)Sc solutions used in all measurements. PMID:26701659

  12. Activity standardisation of 45Ca and 204Tl using the new TDCR system at CMI.

    PubMed

    Sochorová, Jana; Auerbach, Pavel; Dutka, Zdeněk

    2012-09-01

    A new triple-to-double coincidence ratio (TDCR) system has been established at CMI as an additional technique for primary activity standardisation. Details of the detectors and the electronics are given. Construction of the optical chamber was validated using measurement of a (3)H standard-the efficiency achieved with Ultima Gold was 58%. Several methods of efficiency variation (coloured bands painted on vial, positioning and photomultipliers defocussing) are compared. Activity concentrations of (204)Tl and (45)Ca were determined with the TDCR method and with the efficiency tracer technique. Advantages of the TDCR method compared to the efficiency tracing method and agreement between results are shown. PMID:22476016

  13. Standard Rulers, Candles, and Clocks from the Low-Redshift Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavens, Alan; Jimenez, Raul; Verde, Licia

    2014-12-01

    We measure the length of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature, and the expansion rate of the recent Universe, from low-redshift data only, almost model independently. We make only the following minimal assumptions: homogeneity and isotropy, a metric theory of gravity, a smooth expansion history, and the existence of standard candles (supernovæ) and a standard BAO ruler. The rest is determined by the data, which are compilations of recent BAO and type IA supernova results. Making only these assumptions, we find for the first time that the standard ruler has a length of 103.9 ±2.3 h-1 Mpc . The value is a measurement, in contrast to the model-dependent theoretical prediction determined with model parameters set by Planck data (99.3 ±2.1 h-1 Mpc ). The latter assumes the cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant, and that the ruler is the sound horizon at radiation drag. Adding passive galaxies as standard clocks or a local Hubble constant measurement allows the absolute BAO scale to be determined (142.8 ±3.7 Mpc ), and in the former case the additional information makes the BAO length determination more precise (101.9 ±1.9 h-1 Mpc ). The inverse curvature radius of the Universe is weakly constrained and consistent with zero, independently of the gravity model, provided it is metric. We find the effective number of relativistic species to be Neff=3.53 ±0.32 , independent of late-time dark energy or gravity physics.

  14. Stereoscopic Observation of Slipping Reconnection in a Double Candle-flame-shaped Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Tingyu; Liu, Rui; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Kai; Zhuang, Bin; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Quanhao; Liu, Jiajia

    2016-04-01

    The 2011 January 28 M1.4 flare exhibits two side-by-side candle-flame-shaped flare loop systems underneath a larger cusp-shaped structure during the decay phase, as observed at the northwestern solar limb by the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The northern loop system brightens following the initiation of the flare within the southern loop system, but all three cusp-shaped structures are characterized by ∼10 MK temperatures, hotter than the arch-shaped loops underneath. The “Ahead” satellite of the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory provides a top view, in which the post-flare loops brighten sequentially, with one end fixed while the other apparently slipping eastward. By performing stereoscopic reconstruction of the post-flare loops in EUV and mapping out magnetic connectivities, we found that the footpoints of the post-flare loops are slipping along the footprint of a hyperbolic flux tube (HFT) separating the two loop systems and that the reconstructed loops share similarity with the magnetic field lines that are traced starting from the same HFT footprint, where the field lines are relatively flexible. These results argue strongly in favor of slipping magnetic reconnection at the HFT. The slipping reconnection was likely triggered by the flare and manifested as propagative dimmings before the loop slippage is observed. It may contribute to the late-phase peak in Fe xvi 33.5 nm, which is even higher than its main-phase counterpart, and may also play a role in the density and temperature asymmetry observed in the northern loop system through heat conduction.

  15. Stereoscopic Observation of Slipping Reconnection in a Double Candle-flame-shaped Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Tingyu; Liu, Rui; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Kai; Zhuang, Bin; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Quanhao; Liu, Jiajia

    2016-04-01

    The 2011 January 28 M1.4 flare exhibits two side-by-side candle-flame-shaped flare loop systems underneath a larger cusp-shaped structure during the decay phase, as observed at the northwestern solar limb by the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The northern loop system brightens following the initiation of the flare within the southern loop system, but all three cusp-shaped structures are characterized by ˜10 MK temperatures, hotter than the arch-shaped loops underneath. The “Ahead” satellite of the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory provides a top view, in which the post-flare loops brighten sequentially, with one end fixed while the other apparently slipping eastward. By performing stereoscopic reconstruction of the post-flare loops in EUV and mapping out magnetic connectivities, we found that the footpoints of the post-flare loops are slipping along the footprint of a hyperbolic flux tube (HFT) separating the two loop systems and that the reconstructed loops share similarity with the magnetic field lines that are traced starting from the same HFT footprint, where the field lines are relatively flexible. These results argue strongly in favor of slipping magnetic reconnection at the HFT. The slipping reconnection was likely triggered by the flare and manifested as propagative dimmings before the loop slippage is observed. It may contribute to the late-phase peak in Fe xvi 33.5 nm, which is even higher than its main-phase counterpart, and may also play a role in the density and temperature asymmetry observed in the northern loop system through heat conduction.

  16. Ultra long period Cepheids: a primary standard candle out to the Hubble flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorentino, G.; Clementini, G.; Marconi, M.; Musella, I.; Saha, A.; Tosi, M.; Contreras Ramos, R.; Annibali, F.; Aloisi, A.; van der Marel, R.

    2012-09-01

    The cosmological distance ladder crucially depends on classical Cepheids (with P=3-80 days), which are primary distance indicators up to 33 Mpc. Within this volume, very few SNe Ia have been calibrated through classical Cepheids, with uncertainty related to the non-linearity and the metallicity dependence of their period-luminosity (PL) relation. Although a general consensus on these effects is still not achieved, classical Cepheids remain the most used primary distance indicators. A possible extension of these standard candles to further distances would be important. In this context, a very promising new tool is represented by the ultra-long period (ULP) Cepheids ( P≳80 days), recently identified in star-forming galaxies. Only a small number of ULP Cepheids have been discovered so far. Here we present and analyse the properties of an updated sample of 37 ULP Cepheids observed in galaxies within a very large metallicity range of 12+log(O/H) from ˜7.2 to 9.2 dex. We find that their location in the colour-magnitude ( V- I, V) diagram as well as their Wesenheit ( V- I) index-period (WP) relation suggests that they are the counterparts at high luminosity of the shorter-period ( P≲80 days) classical Cepheids. However, a complete pulsation and evolutionary theoretical scenario is needed to properly interpret the true nature of these objects. We do not confirm the flattening in the studied WP relation suggested by Bird et al. (Astrophys. J. 695:874, 2009). Using the whole sample, we find that ULP Cepheids lie around a WP relation similar to that of the LMC, although with a large spread (˜ 0.4 mag).

  17. Standard rulers, candles, and clocks from the low-redshift universe.

    PubMed

    Heavens, Alan; Jimenez, Raul; Verde, Licia

    2014-12-12

    We measure the length of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature, and the expansion rate of the recent Universe, from low-redshift data only, almost model independently. We make only the following minimal assumptions: homogeneity and isotropy, a metric theory of gravity, a smooth expansion history, and the existence of standard candles (supernovæ) and a standard BAO ruler. The rest is determined by the data, which are compilations of recent BAO and type IA supernova results. Making only these assumptions, we find for the first time that the standard ruler has a length of 103.9±2.3h⁻¹ Mpc. The value is a measurement, in contrast to the model-dependent theoretical prediction determined with model parameters set by Planck data (99.3±2.1h⁻¹ Mpc). The latter assumes the cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant, and that the ruler is the sound horizon at radiation drag. Adding passive galaxies as standard clocks or a local Hubble constant measurement allows the absolute BAO scale to be determined (142.8±3.7 Mpc), and in the former case the additional information makes the BAO length determination more precise (101.9±1.9h⁻¹ Mpc). The inverse curvature radius of the Universe is weakly constrained and consistent with zero, independently of the gravity model, provided it is metric. We find the effective number of relativistic species to be N(eff)=3.53±0.32, independent of late-time dark energy or gravity physics. PMID:25541763

  18. Test conditions greatly influence permeation of water soluble molecules through the intestinal mucosa: need for standardisation.

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, M; Hiele, M; Ghoos, Y; Huysmans, V; Geboes, K; Vantrappen, G; Rutgeerts, P

    1994-01-01

    Permeability tests are widely used to investigate the pathogenesis of various gastrointestinal diseases including coeliac disease, infectious diarrhoea, and inflammatory bowel disease. In Crohn's disease they are used as activity parameters by some investigators. Lack of standardisation, however, makes it very difficult to compare data reported in different studies. The aim of this study was to gather permeation data in well controlled test conditions to standardise the methods. Nine healthy volunteers each received five consecutive permeability tests by mouth using polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400) and 51Cr-EDTA as probe molecules. The probes were dissolved in water, a glucose solution, a starch solution, a hyperosmolar lactulose-mannitol solution, and a liquid meal. A significantly decreased permeation for both probes was found when given with the hyperosmolar solution. The 51Cr-EDTA permeation was also decreased with water. The permeability index, 51Cr-EDTA/PEG-400, corrected for influencing factors, confirmed that the lactulose-mannitol solution and plain water yield lower values of macro-molecule permeation than starch, glucose or liquid meal. Hyperosmolarity was clearly accompanied by a decrease in permeability probably caused by reversed solvent drag. Interindividual variability of probe permeation and permeability index is very low with a standard liquid meal. It is proposed that for permeability studies a standard liquid meal is always used. PMID:7959195

  19. Test conditions greatly influence permeation of water soluble molecules through the intestinal mucosa: need for standardisation.

    PubMed

    Peeters, M; Hiele, M; Ghoos, Y; Huysmans, V; Geboes, K; Vantrappen, G; Rutgeerts, P

    1994-10-01

    Permeability tests are widely used to investigate the pathogenesis of various gastrointestinal diseases including coeliac disease, infectious diarrhoea, and inflammatory bowel disease. In Crohn's disease they are used as activity parameters by some investigators. Lack of standardisation, however, makes it very difficult to compare data reported in different studies. The aim of this study was to gather permeation data in well controlled test conditions to standardise the methods. Nine healthy volunteers each received five consecutive permeability tests by mouth using polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400) and 51Cr-EDTA as probe molecules. The probes were dissolved in water, a glucose solution, a starch solution, a hyperosmolar lactulose-mannitol solution, and a liquid meal. A significantly decreased permeation for both probes was found when given with the hyperosmolar solution. The 51Cr-EDTA permeation was also decreased with water. The permeability index, 51Cr-EDTA/PEG-400, corrected for influencing factors, confirmed that the lactulose-mannitol solution and plain water yield lower values of macro-molecule permeation than starch, glucose or liquid meal. Hyperosmolarity was clearly accompanied by a decrease in permeability probably caused by reversed solvent drag. Interindividual variability of probe permeation and permeability index is very low with a standard liquid meal. It is proposed that for permeability studies a standard liquid meal is always used. PMID:7959195

  20. Airborne trace element pollution in 11 European cities assessed by exposure of standardised ryegrass cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpp, Andreas; Ansel, Wolfgang; Klumpp, Gabriele; Breuer, Jörn; Vergne, Philippe; Sanz, María José; Rasmussen, Stine; Ro-Poulsen, Helge; Ribas Artola, Àngela; Peñuelas, Josep; He, Shang; Garrec, Jean Pierre; Calatayud, Vicent

    Within a European biomonitoring programme, Italian ryegrass ( Lolium multiflorum Lam.) was employed as accumulative bioindicator of airborne trace elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, Sb, V, Zn) in urban agglomerations. Applying a highly standardised method, grass cultures were exposed for consecutive periods of four weeks each to ambient air at up to 100 sites in 11 cities during 2000-2002. Results of the 2001 exposure experiments revealed a clear differentiation of trace element pollution within and among local monitoring networks. Pollution was influenced particularly by traffic emissions. Especially Sb, Pb, Cr, Fe, and Cu exhibited a very uneven distribution within the municipal areas with strong accumulation in plants from traffic-exposed sites in the city centres and close to major roads, and moderate to low levels in plants exposed at suburban or rural sites. Accumulation of Ni and V was influenced by other emission sources. The biomonitoring sites located in Spanish city centres featured a much higher pollution load by trace elements than those in other cities of the network, confirming previously reported findings obtained by chemical analyses of dust deposition and aerosols. At some heavily-trafficked sites, legal thresholds for Cu, Pb, and V contents in foodstuff and animal feed were reached or even surpassed. The study confirmed that the standardised grass exposure is a useful and reliable tool to monitor and to assess environmental levels of potentially toxic compounds of particulate matter.

  1. Standardisation and use of the alcohol biomarker carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT).

    PubMed

    Helander, Anders; Wielders, Jos; Anton, Raymond; Arndt, Torsten; Bianchi, Vincenza; Deenmamode, Jean; Jeppsson, Jan-Olof; Whitfield, John B; Weykamp, Cas; Schellenberg, François

    2016-08-01

    Carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) is a glycoform profile of serum transferrin that increases in response to sustained high alcohol intake and over the last decades has become an important alcohol biomarker with clinical and forensic applications. However, the wide range of CDT measurement procedures has resulted in lack of uniform results and reference limits, and hampered comparison of results. In 2005, the IFCC therefore founded a special working group (WG) aiming for standardisation of CDT measurement. This review summarises the history of CDT and the actions taken by the WG-CDT. Initial steps included the definition of the measurand (serum disialotransferrin to total transferrin fraction expressed in %), and the determination of a well-defined anion-exchange HPLC procedure as the candidate reference measurement procedure (cRMP). Subsequent achievements were the establishment of a network of reference laboratories to perform the cRMP, setting a reference interval, and development of a reference material based on human serum for which the laboratory network assign values. Using a set of reference materials for calibration allowed for achieving equivalence of results of all present CDT measurement procedures. The final steps of the WG-CDT have been a full validation of the cRMP to make it an IFCC approved RMP, and providing guidance for international standardisation of all CDT measurement procedures. PMID:27221205

  2. Near-infrared observations of Type Ia supernovae: the best known standard candle for cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone-Nugent, R. L.; Lidman, C.; Wyithe, J. S. B.; Mould, J.; Howell, D. A.; Hook, I. M.; Sullivan, M.; Nugent, P. E.; Arcavi, I.; Cenko, S. B.; Cooke, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Maguire, K.; Ofek, E.; Poznanski, D.; Xu, D.

    2012-09-01

    We present an analysis of the Hubble diagram for 12 normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed in the near-infrared (NIR) J and H bands. We select SNe exclusively from the redshift range 0.03 < z < 0.09 to reduce uncertainties coming from peculiar velocities while remaining in a cosmologically well-understood region. All of the SNe in our sample exhibit no spectral or B-band light-curve peculiarities and lie in the B-band stretch range of 0.8-1.15. Our results suggest that SNe Ia observed in the NIR are the best known standard candles. We fit previously determined NIR light-curve templates to new high-precision data to derive peak magnitudes and to determine the scatter about the Hubble line. Photometry of the 12 SNe is presented in the natural system. Using a standard cosmology of (H0, Ωm, ΩΛ) = (70, 0.27, 0.73), we find a median J-band absolute magnitude of MJ = -18.39 with a scatter of σJ = 0.116 and a median H-band absolute magnitude of MH = -18.36 with a scatter of σH = 0.085. The scatter in the H band is the smallest yet measured. We search for correlations between residuals in the J- and H-band Hubble diagrams and SN properties, such as SN colour, B-band stretch and the projected distance from the centre of the host galaxy. The only significant correlation is between the J-band Hubble residual and the J - H pseudo-colour. We also examine how the scatter changes when fewer points in the NIR are used to constrain the light curve. With a single point in the H band taken anywhere from 10 d before to 15 d after B-band maximum light and a prior on the date of H-band maximum set from the date of B-band maximum, we find that we can measure distances to an accuracy of 6 per cent. The precision of SNe Ia in the NIR provides new opportunities for precision measurements of both the expansion history of the universe and peculiar velocities of nearby galaxies.

  3. Comparison of standard ruler and standard candle constraints on dark energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Lazkoz, R; Nesseris, S; Perivolaropoulos, L E-mail: snesseris@grads.uoi.gr

    2008-07-15

    We compare the dark energy model constraints obtained by using recent standard ruler data (baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) at z = 0.2 and 0.35 and cosmic microwave background (CMB) shift parameters R and l{sub a}) with the corresponding constraints obtained by using recent type Ia supernovae (SnIa) standard candle data (ESSENCE+SNLS+HST from astro-ph/0701510). We find that, even though both classes of data are consistent with {Lambda}CDM (CDM: cold dark matter) at the 2{sigma} level, there is a systematic difference between the two classes of data. In particular, we find that for practically all values of the parameters ({Omega}{sub 0m},{Omega}{sub b}) in the 2{sigma} range of the three-year WMAP data (WMAP3) best fit, {Lambda}CDM is significantly more consistent with the SnIa data than with the CMB+BAO data. For example for ({Omega}{sub 0m},{Omega}{sub b}) = (0.24,0.042) corresponding to the best fit values of WMAP3, the dark energy equation of state parameterization w(z) = w{sub 0}+w{sub 1}(z/1+z) best fit is at a 0.5{sigma} distance from {Lambda}CDM (w{sub 0} = -1,w{sub 1} = 0) using the SnIa data and 1.7{sigma} away from {Lambda}CDM using the CMB+BAO data. There is a similar trend in the earlier data (SNLS versus CMB+BAO at z = 0.35). This trend is such that the standard ruler CMB+BAO data show a mild preference for crossing of the phantom divide line w = -1, while the recent SnIa data favor {Lambda}CDM. Despite this mild difference in trends, we find no statistically significant evidence for violation of the cosmic distance duality relation {eta} {identical_to} d{sub L}(z)/d{sub A}(z)(1+z){sup 2}=1. For example, using a prior of {Omega}{sub 0m} = 0.24, we find {eta} = 0.95 {+-} 0.025 in the redshift range 0

  4. European Sero-Epidemiology Network 2: standardisation of immunoassay results for pertussis requires homogeneity in the antigenic preparations.

    PubMed

    Giammanco, Anna; Nardone, Antony; Pebody, Richard; Kafatos, George; Andrews, Nick; Chiarini, Alfredo; Taormina, Susanna; de Ory, Fernando; Prosenc, Katarina; Krize, Bohumir; Hallander, Hans; Ljungman, Margaretha; Marva, Esther; Tsakris, Athanassios; O'Flanagan, Darina; Schneider, François; Griskevicius, Algirdas; Vranckx, Robert; Karacs, Ildiko

    2008-08-18

    A standardisation process, already developed during the earlier European Sero-Epidemiology Network (ESEN) project, was employed with a more robust algorithm to harmonise results of pertussis serological assays performed in 12 European and non-European countries. Initially, results from each country's own assay were compared with those obtained at the reference laboratory by means of an in-house pertussis toxin (PT)-based ELISA: seven countries used in-house or commercial PT-ELISAs; the other countries used assays based on Bordetella pertussis whole cell extracts (WCE) (three countries) or on combined PT-FHA (filamentous haemagglutinin) antigenic preparations (two countries). The WCE assays, although admitted for diagnostic purposes, confirmed their low correlation with the PT-ELISAs and their results could not be used for standardisation; the PT-FHA ELISAs gave results that were suitable for standardisation in one country but unsatisfactory in the other; the use of purified PT in serological assays confirmed its better reliability than other preparations and all PT-ELISAs results could be calibrated against those of the reference centre. In the standardisation process two high-titre cut-offs indicative of likelihood of recent infection (from within 4 weeks of disease onset up to 1 year after) were included for evaluations as they are suggested to be more useful, for the sero-epidemiological assays of immunity to pertussis, than the cut-off of protection, commonly employed, but still not defined for pertussis. Providing PT-ELISAs are used, standardisation of pertussis assay results is always possible and, when standardisation is performed, evaluation and comparison of the impact of different interventions can be also allowed, by measuring at the distribution of high antibody titres in the populations. PMID:18602434

  5. The Standardisation and Sequencing of Solar Eclipse Images for the Eclipse Megamovie Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krista, Larisza D.; McIntosh, Scott W.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new tool, the Solar Eclipse Image Standardisation and Sequencing (SEISS), developed to process multi-source total solar eclipse images by adjusting them to the same standard of size, resolution, and orientation. Furthermore, by analysing the eclipse images, we can determine the relative time between the observations and order them to create a movie of the observed total solar eclipse sequence. We successfully processed images taken at the 14 November 2012 total solar eclipse that occurred in Queensland, Australia, and created a short eclipse proto-movie. The SEISS tool was developed for the Eclipse Megamovie Project (EMP: www.eclipsemegamovie.org), with the goal of processing thousands of images taken by the public during solar eclipse events. EMP is a collaboration among multiple institutes aiming to engage and advance the public interest in solar eclipses and the science of the Sun-Earth connection.

  6. Predicting the development of pregnancy-associated hypertension. The place of standardised blood-pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Gallery, E D; Hunyor, S N; Ross, M; Györy, A Z

    1977-06-18

    82 initially normotensive pregnant women with no known history of renal disease were seen at monthly intervals from 16 weeks' amenorrhoea onwards, and their blood-pressure (B.P.) was measured sitting and lying on their left side. 15 developed hypertension (B.P. greater than 135/85 mm Hg lying on the left side) in late pregnancy. When these women were compared with the 67 who remained normotensive throughout, their B.P.s were found to be significantly higher even in early pregnancy, although individual patients were not always separable in this way. When B.P. measured in this rigidly standardised manner was compared with routine antenatal clinic values, it was apparent that the latter did not detect the difference between the two groups. Women who develop hypertension in the third trimester of pregnancy (pre-eclampsia) may represent a separate group from entirely normal pregnant women from the beginning of pregnancy. PMID:68380

  7. Therapeutic and diagnostic outcomes of a standardised, comprehensive care pathway for patients with systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Meijs, Jessica; Schouffoer, Anne A; Ajmone Marsan, Nina; Kroft, Lucia J M; Stijnen, Theo; Ninaber, Maarten K; Huizinga, Tom W J; Vliet Vlieland, Theodora P M; de Vries-Bouwstra, Jeska K

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the outcomes, including number of medical interventions and initiation of immunosuppressive treatment of a standardised, comprehensive, diagnostic care pathway for patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Patient characteristics associated with need for medical interventions and with need for immunosuppressive treatment were determined. Methods Data were routinely gathered in connection with a 2-day care pathway combining multidisciplinary care and complete diagnostic work-up of organ involvement in SSc. The number of patients in whom the pathway resulted in medical interventions, and/or initiation of immunosuppressives was recorded. Patient characteristics and diagnostic tests results were compared between patients with and without medical interventions, and patients with and without initiation of immunosuppressives by means of multivariable logistic regression analyses. Results During a period of 44 months, 226 patients with SSc were referred to the care pathway. They included 186 (82%) women with mean age of 54 (SD 14.5) years, and median disease duration of 4 years (range 1–11); 73 (32%) of them had diffuse cutaneous SSc. Medical interventions were initiated in 191 (85%) patients, including initiation of immunosuppressive treatment in n=49 (22%). Presence of telangiectasias and higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate were associated with any medical intervention. Of commonly available variables, lower age, higher skin score and absence of anticentromere antibody were associated with initiation of immunosuppressives. Conclusions A standardised comprehensive 2-day care pathway for patients with SSc resulted in additional diagnostic or therapeutic interventions in 85% of the patients, regardless of SSc subtype and disease duration. In 22% of the patients, immunosuppressive treatment was initiated. PMID:27042333

  8. A Standardised Vocabulary for Identifying Benthic Biota and Substrata from Underwater Imagery: The CATAMI Classification Scheme.

    PubMed

    Althaus, Franziska; Hill, Nicole; Ferrari, Renata; Edwards, Luke; Przeslawski, Rachel; Schönberg, Christine H L; Stuart-Smith, Rick; Barrett, Neville; Edgar, Graham; Colquhoun, Jamie; Tran, Maggie; Jordan, Alan; Rees, Tony; Gowlett-Holmes, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Imagery collected by still and video cameras is an increasingly important tool for minimal impact, repeatable observations in the marine environment. Data generated from imagery includes identification, annotation and quantification of biological subjects and environmental features within an image. To be long-lived and useful beyond their project-specific initial purpose, and to maximize their utility across studies and disciplines, marine imagery data should use a standardised vocabulary of defined terms. This would enable the compilation of regional, national and/or global data sets from multiple sources, contributing to broad-scale management studies and development of automated annotation algorithms. The classification scheme developed under the Collaborative and Automated Tools for Analysis of Marine Imagery (CATAMI) project provides such a vocabulary. The CATAMI classification scheme introduces Australian-wide acknowledged, standardised terminology for annotating benthic substrates and biota in marine imagery. It combines coarse-level taxonomy and morphology, and is a flexible, hierarchical classification that bridges the gap between habitat/biotope characterisation and taxonomy, acknowledging limitations when describing biological taxa through imagery. It is fully described, documented, and maintained through curated online databases, and can be applied across benthic image collection methods, annotation platforms and scoring methods. Following release in 2013, the CATAMI classification scheme was taken up by a wide variety of users, including government, academia and industry. This rapid acceptance highlights the scheme's utility and the potential to facilitate broad-scale multidisciplinary studies of marine ecosystems when applied globally. Here we present the CATAMI classification scheme, describe its conception and features, and discuss its utility and the opportunities as well as challenges arising from its use. PMID:26509918

  9. Species-specific Standardisation of Licorice by Metabolomic Profiling of Flavanones and Chalcones

    PubMed Central

    Simmler, Charlotte; Jones, Tristesse; Anderson, Jeffrey R.; Nikolić, Dejan C.; van Breemen, Richard B.; Soejarto, Djaja D.; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Major phenolics from licorice roots (Glycyrrhiza sp.) are glycosides of the flavanone liquiritigenin (F) and its 2′-hydroxychalcone isomer, isoliquiritigenin (C). As the F and C contents fluctuate between batches of licorice, both quality control and standardisation of its preparations become complex tasks. Objective To characterise the F and C metabolome in extracts from Glycyrrhiza glabra L. and Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch. ex DC. by addressing their composition in major F–C pairs and defining the total F:C proportion. Material and methods Three types of extracts from DNA-authenticated samples were analysed by a validated UHPLC/UV method to quantify major F and C glycosides. Each extract was characterised by the identity of major F–C pairs and the proportion of Fs among all quantified Fs:Cs. Results The F and C compositions and proportions were found to be constant for all extracts from a Glycyrrhiza species. All G. uralensis extracts contained up to 2.5 more Fs than G. glabra extracts. Major F–C pairs were B-ring glycosidated in G. uralensis, and A-/B-ring apiosyl-glucosidated in the G. glabra extracts. The F:C proportion was found to be linked to the glycosidation site: the more B-ring F-C glycosides were present, the higher was the final F:C proportion in the extract. These results enable the chemical differentiation of extracts from G. uralensis and G. glabra, which are characterised by total F:C proportions of 8.37:1.63 and 7.18:2.82, respectively. Conclusion Extracts from G. glabra and G. uralensis can be differentiated by their respective F and C compositions and proportions, which are both useful for further standardisation of licorice botanicals. PMID:25859589

  10. A Standardised Vocabulary for Identifying Benthic Biota and Substrata from Underwater Imagery: The CATAMI Classification Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Alan; Rees, Tony; Gowlett-Holmes, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Imagery collected by still and video cameras is an increasingly important tool for minimal impact, repeatable observations in the marine environment. Data generated from imagery includes identification, annotation and quantification of biological subjects and environmental features within an image. To be long-lived and useful beyond their project-specific initial purpose, and to maximize their utility across studies and disciplines, marine imagery data should use a standardised vocabulary of defined terms. This would enable the compilation of regional, national and/or global data sets from multiple sources, contributing to broad-scale management studies and development of automated annotation algorithms. The classification scheme developed under the Collaborative and Automated Tools for Analysis of Marine Imagery (CATAMI) project provides such a vocabulary. The CATAMI classification scheme introduces Australian-wide acknowledged, standardised terminology for annotating benthic substrates and biota in marine imagery. It combines coarse-level taxonomy and morphology, and is a flexible, hierarchical classification that bridges the gap between habitat/biotope characterisation and taxonomy, acknowledging limitations when describing biological taxa through imagery. It is fully described, documented, and maintained through curated online databases, and can be applied across benthic image collection methods, annotation platforms and scoring methods. Following release in 2013, the CATAMI classification scheme was taken up by a wide variety of users, including government, academia and industry. This rapid acceptance highlights the scheme’s utility and the potential to facilitate broad-scale multidisciplinary studies of marine ecosystems when applied globally. Here we present the CATAMI classification scheme, describe its conception and features, and discuss its utility and the opportunities as well as challenges arising from its use. PMID:26509918

  11. A standardised storage solution for venepuncture/cannulation equipment could save an NHS hospital the equivalent of a whole junior doctor

    PubMed Central

    Lindley, Steven; Robertson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Junior doctors, nursing staff, and phlebotomists spend a large proportion of their time taking blood samples and siting (venous) cannulae. Approximately 350 blood samples are taken daily across 25 wards at the Royal United Hospital Bath NHS Trust. There is no standard storage solution for venepuncture or cannulation equipment. On-call junior doctors cover most of the hospital's wards. Time is wasted locating essential equipment on unfamiliar wards and nurses are frequently interrupted to assist. These delays can compromise patient safety in emergencies as well as contributing to a source of daily inefficiency. Junior doctors were timed collecting equipment needed for venepuncture and cannulation on unfamiliar wards. Initial results suggested large variation between timings on different wards. The medical admissions unit (MAU), which organises items for venepuncture and cannulation on a single trolley, was 4 times quicker than the mean of all other wards. MAU mean time 21.0s vs. Non-standardised wards mean time 103.0s (p<0.0001). Estimates suggest approximately 47 hours per week (the equivalent of a fulltime doctor) could be saved by implementing a standard trust-wide storage solution. We set out to introduce the MAU trolley format to all adult inpatient wards. All ward managers agreed to implement the trolley. 18 wards (72% of adult inpatient wards) already possessed the ‘MAU style’ trolley, which we standardised using an easy-to-follow inventory and laminated draw inlays. Feedback was very positive from doctors and ward staff alike. We repeated timings to validate the change and successfully presented a business case to senior management for a further 10 trolleys (£3623.78) for full adult inpatient ward coverage. As junior doctors, we identified a common problem, tested solutions, and made early simple affordable changes. Initial work helped us present a compelling case for patient safety and efficiency improvements, releasing money to implement modest trust

  12. A standardised storage solution for venepuncture/cannulation equipment could save an NHS hospital the equivalent of a whole junior doctor.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Steven; Robertson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Junior doctors, nursing staff, and phlebotomists spend a large proportion of their time taking blood samples and siting (venous) cannulae. Approximately 350 blood samples are taken daily across 25 wards at the Royal United Hospital Bath NHS Trust. There is no standard storage solution for venepuncture or cannulation equipment. On-call junior doctors cover most of the hospital's wards. Time is wasted locating essential equipment on unfamiliar wards and nurses are frequently interrupted to assist. These delays can compromise patient safety in emergencies as well as contributing to a source of daily inefficiency. Junior doctors were timed collecting equipment needed for venepuncture and cannulation on unfamiliar wards. Initial results suggested large variation between timings on different wards. The medical admissions unit (MAU), which organises items for venepuncture and cannulation on a single trolley, was 4 times quicker than the mean of all other wards. MAU mean time 21.0s vs. Non-standardised wards mean time 103.0s (p<0.0001). Estimates suggest approximately 47 hours per week (the equivalent of a fulltime doctor) could be saved by implementing a standard trust-wide storage solution. We set out to introduce the MAU trolley format to all adult inpatient wards. All ward managers agreed to implement the trolley. 18 wards (72% of adult inpatient wards) already possessed the 'MAU style' trolley, which we standardised using an easy-to-follow inventory and laminated draw inlays. Feedback was very positive from doctors and ward staff alike. We repeated timings to validate the change and successfully presented a business case to senior management for a further 10 trolleys (£3623.78) for full adult inpatient ward coverage. As junior doctors, we identified a common problem, tested solutions, and made early simple affordable changes. Initial work helped us present a compelling case for patient safety and efficiency improvements, releasing money to implement modest trust

  13. "It Is Better to Light a Candle than to Curse the Darkness": Ethel Thompson Overby and Democratic Schooling in Richmond, Virginia, 1910-1958

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward Randolph, Adah L.

    2012-01-01

    In 1933, Ethel Thompson Overby became the first African American female principal in Richmond, Virginia. Her motto was "It is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness" (Overby 1975, 1). Before becoming principal, Overby had been a teacher in the southern urban "de jure" segregated schools of the city. How did the racially segregated…

  14. CANDLES AND INCENSE AS POTENTIAL SOURCES OF INDOOR AIR POLLUTION: MARKET ANALYSIS AND LITERATURE SEARCH (EPA/600/R-01/001)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes available information on candles and incense as potential sources of indoor air pollution. It covers market information and a review of the scientific literature. The market information collected focuses on production and sales data, typical uses in the U.S....

  15. CANDLES AND INCENSE AS POTENTIAL SOURCES OF INDOOR AIR POLLUTION: MARKET ANALYSIS AND LITERATURE REVIEW (EPA/600/R-01/001)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes available information on candles and incense as potential sources of indoor air pollution. It covers market information and a review of the scientific literature. The market information collected focuses on production and sales data, typical uses in the U.S...

  16. PROJECT SUMMARY -CANDLES AND INCENSE AS POTENTIAL SOURCES OF INDOOR AIR POLLUTION: MARKET ANALYSIS AND LITERATURE REVIEW (EPA/600/SR-01/001)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes available information on candles and incense as potential sources ofindoor air pollution. It covers (1) market information and (2) a scientific literature review. The market information collected focuses on production and sales data, typical uses in the US,...

  17. Who Pays for Standardised Testing? A Cost-Benefit Study of Mandated Testing in Three Queensland Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Merilyn Gladys; Klenowski, Valentina; Chalmers, Christina

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on an Australian study that explored the costs and benefits of the National Assessment Programme, Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) testing, both tangible and intangible, of Year 9 students in three Queensland schools. The study commenced with a review of pertinent studies and other related material about standardised testing in…

  18. The Power of Numbers: The Adoption and Consequences of National Low-Stakes Standardised Tests in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feniger, Yariv; Israeli, Mirit; Yehuda, Smadar

    2016-01-01

    The use of standardised tests as a central tool in education policy has in recent decades become a common feature of many national education systems. In 2002 the Israeli Ministry of Education introduced new mandatory state tests for primary and middle schools. The article describes the adoption of these low-stakes tests and assesses their impact…

  19. Students' Interpersonal Trust and Attitudes towards Standardised Tests: Exploring Affective Variables Related to Student Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Man-Wai; Guo, Qi; Leighton, Jacqueline P.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive and psychometric variables have directed research on student test performance. However, student learning involves a substantial affective component. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between two kinds of affective variables--interpersonal trust and attitudes towards standardised tests--likely to underlie student…

  20. Personal Meaning in the Public Sphere: The Standardisation and Rationalisation of Biodiversity Data in the UK and the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Anna; Turnhout, Esther

    2010-01-01

    The demand for biodiversity data is increasing. Governments require standardised, objective data to underpin planning and conservation decisions. These data are produced by large numbers of (volunteer) natural historians and non-governmental organisations. This article analyses the interface between the state and the volunteer naturalists to…

  1. Professional Standards for Teachers: How Do They "Work"? An Experiment in Tracing Standardisation In-the-Making in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceulemans, Carlijne; Simons, Maarten; Struyf, Elke

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, professional standards describing competencies for teaching staff have emerged in nation states all around the world. This article reports on a pilot-study that applies a sociotechnological "lens" to examine this standardisation process in educational policy. In line with ethnographic analyses drawing on science and…

  2. Preliminary safety analysis of Pb-Bi cooled 800 MWt modified CANDLE burn-up scheme based fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Su'ud, Zaki; Sekimoto, H.

    2014-09-30

    Pb-Bi Cooled fast reactors with modified CANDLE burn-up scheme with 10 regions and 10 years cycle length has been investigated from neutronic aspects. In this study the safety aspect of such reactors have been investigated and discussed. Several condition of unprotected loss of flow (ULOF) and unprotected rod run-out transient over power (UTOP) have been simulated and the results show that the reactors excellent safety performance. At 80 seconds after unprotected loss of flow condition, the core flow rate drop to about 25% of its initial flow and slowly move toward its natural circulation level. The maximum fuel temperature can be managed below 1000°C and the maximum cladding temperature can be managed below 700°C. The dominant reactivity feedback is radial core expansion and Doppler effect, followed by coolant density effect and fuel axial expansion effect.

  3. Conceptual Design study of Small Long-life Gas Cooled Fast Reactor With Modified CANDLE Burn-up Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Nur Asiah, A.; Su'ud, Zaki; Ferhat, A.; Sekimoto, H.

    2010-06-22

    In this paper, conceptual design study of Small Long-life Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Natural Uranium as Fuel Cycle Input has been performed. In this study Gas Cooled Fast Reactor is slightly modified by employing modified CANDLE burn-up scheme so that it can use Natural Uranium as fuel cycle input. Due to their hard spectrum, GCFR in this study showed very good performance in converting U-238 to plutonium in order to maintain the operation condition requirement of long-life reactors. Due to the limitation of thermal hydraulic aspects, the average power density of the proposed design is selected about 70 W/cc. With such condition we got an optimal design of 325 MWt reactors which can be operated 10 years without refueling and fuel shuffling and just need natural uranium as fuel cycle input. The average discharge burn-up is about 290 GWd/ton HM.

  4. Conceptual Design study of Small Long-life Gas Cooled Fast Reactor With Modified CANDLE Burn-up Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur Asiah, A.; Su'ud, Zaki; Ferhat, A.; Sekimoto, H.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, conceptual design study of Small Long-life Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Natural Uranium as Fuel Cycle Input has been performed. In this study Gas Cooled Fast Reactor is slightly modified by employing modified CANDLE burn-up scheme so that it can use Natural Uranium as fuel cycle input. Due to their hard spectrum, GCFR in this study showed very good performance in converting U-238 to plutonium in order to maintain the operation condition requirement of long-life reactors. Due to the limitation of thermal hydraulic aspects, the average power density of the proposed design is selected about 70 W/cc. With such condition we got an optimal design of 325 MWt reactors which can be operated 10 years without refueling and fuel shuffling and just need natural uranium as fuel cycle input. The average discharge burn-up is about 290 GWd/ton HM.

  5. Preliminary safety analysis of Pb-Bi cooled 800 MWt modified CANDLE burn-up scheme based fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su'ud, Zaki; Sekimoto, H.

    2014-09-01

    Pb-Bi Cooled fast reactors with modified CANDLE burn-up scheme with 10 regions and 10 years cycle length has been investigated from neutronic aspects. In this study the safety aspect of such reactors have been investigated and discussed. Several condition of unprotected loss of flow (ULOF) and unprotected rod run-out transient over power (UTOP) have been simulated and the results show that the reactors excellent safety performance. At 80 seconds after unprotected loss of flow condition, the core flow rate drop to about 25% of its initial flow and slowly move toward its natural circulation level. The maximum fuel temperature can be managed below 1000°C and the maximum cladding temperature can be managed below 700°C. The dominant reactivity feedback is radial core expansion and Doppler effect, followed by coolant density effect and fuel axial expansion effect.

  6. New mass limit for white dwarfs: super-Chandrasekhar type ia supernova as a new standard candle.

    PubMed

    Das, Upasana; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2013-02-15

    Type Ia supernovae, sparked off by exploding white dwarfs of mass close to the Chandrasekhar limit, play the key role in understanding the expansion rate of the Universe. However, recent observations of several peculiar type Ia supernovae argue for its progenitor mass to be significantly super-Chandrasekhar. We show that strongly magnetized white dwarfs not only can violate the Chandrasekhar mass limit significantly, but exhibit a different mass limit. We establish from a foundational level that the generic mass limit of white dwarfs is 2.58 solar mass. This explains the origin of overluminous peculiar type Ia supernovae. Our finding further argues for a possible second standard candle, which has many far reaching implications, including a possible reconsideration of the expansion history of the Universe. PMID:25166364

  7. Additive loss-of-function proteasome subunit mutations in CANDLE/PRAAS patients promote type I IFN production.

    PubMed

    Brehm, Anja; Liu, Yin; Sheikh, Afzal; Marrero, Bernadette; Omoyinmi, Ebun; Zhou, Qing; Montealegre, Gina; Biancotto, Angelique; Reinhardt, Adam; Almeida de Jesus, Adriana; Pelletier, Martin; Tsai, Wanxia L; Remmers, Elaine F; Kardava, Lela; Hill, Suvimol; Kim, Hanna; Lachmann, Helen J; Megarbane, Andre; Chae, Jae Jin; Brady, Jilian; Castillo, Rhina D; Brown, Diane; Casano, Angel Vera; Gao, Ling; Chapelle, Dawn; Huang, Yan; Stone, Deborah; Chen, Yongqing; Sotzny, Franziska; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Kastner, Daniel L; Torrelo, Antonio; Zlotogorski, Abraham; Moir, Susan; Gadina, Massimo; McCoy, Phil; Wesley, Robert; Rother, Kristina I; Rother, Kristina; Hildebrand, Peter W; Brogan, Paul; Krüger, Elke; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2015-11-01

    Autosomal recessive mutations in proteasome subunit β 8 (PSMB8), which encodes the inducible proteasome subunit β5i, cause the immune-dysregulatory disease chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE), which is classified as a proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome (PRAAS). Here, we identified 8 mutations in 4 proteasome genes, PSMA3 (encodes α7), PSMB4 (encodes β7), PSMB9 (encodes β1i), and proteasome maturation protein (POMP), that have not been previously associated with disease and 1 mutation in PSMB8 that has not been previously reported. One patient was compound heterozygous for PSMB4 mutations, 6 patients from 4 families were heterozygous for a missense mutation in 1 inducible proteasome subunit and a mutation in a constitutive proteasome subunit, and 1 patient was heterozygous for a POMP mutation, thus establishing a digenic and autosomal dominant inheritance pattern of PRAAS. Function evaluation revealed that these mutations variably affect transcription, protein expression, protein folding, proteasome assembly, and, ultimately, proteasome activity. Moreover, defects in proteasome formation and function were recapitulated by siRNA-mediated knockdown of the respective subunits in primary fibroblasts from healthy individuals. Patient-isolated hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells exhibited a strong IFN gene-expression signature, irrespective of genotype. Additionally, chemical proteasome inhibition or progressive depletion of proteasome subunit gene transcription with siRNA induced transcription of type I IFN genes in healthy control cells. Our results provide further insight into CANDLE genetics and link global proteasome dysfunction to increased type I IFN production. PMID:26524591

  8. Additive loss-of-function proteasome subunit mutations in CANDLE/PRAAS patients promote type I IFN production

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, Anja; Liu, Yin; Sheikh, Afzal; Marrero, Bernadette; Omoyinmi, Ebun; Zhou, Qing; Montealegre, Gina; Biancotto, Angelique; Reinhardt, Adam; Almeida de Jesus, Adriana; Pelletier, Martin; Tsai, Wanxia L.; Remmers, Elaine F.; Kardava, Lela; Hill, Suvimol; Kim, Hanna; Lachmann, Helen J.; Megarbane, Andre; Chae, Jae Jin; Brady, Jilian; Castillo, Rhina D.; Brown, Diane; Casano, Angel Vera; Gao, Ling; Chapelle, Dawn; Huang, Yan; Stone, Deborah; Chen, Yongqing; Sotzny, Franziska; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Kastner, Daniel L.; Torrelo, Antonio; Zlotogorski, Abraham; Moir, Susan; Gadina, Massimo; McCoy, Phil; Wesley, Robert; Rother, Kristina; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Brogan, Paul; Krüger, Elke; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive mutations in proteasome subunit β 8 (PSMB8), which encodes the inducible proteasome subunit β5i, cause the immune-dysregulatory disease chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE), which is classified as a proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome (PRAAS). Here, we identified 8 mutations in 4 proteasome genes, PSMA3 (encodes α7), PSMB4 (encodes β7), PSMB9 (encodes β1i), and proteasome maturation protein (POMP), that have not been previously associated with disease and 1 mutation in PSMB8 that has not been previously reported. One patient was compound heterozygous for PSMB4 mutations, 6 patients from 4 families were heterozygous for a missense mutation in 1 inducible proteasome subunit and a mutation in a constitutive proteasome subunit, and 1 patient was heterozygous for a POMP mutation, thus establishing a digenic and autosomal dominant inheritance pattern of PRAAS. Function evaluation revealed that these mutations variably affect transcription, protein expression, protein folding, proteasome assembly, and, ultimately, proteasome activity. Moreover, defects in proteasome formation and function were recapitulated by siRNA-mediated knockdown of the respective subunits in primary fibroblasts from healthy individuals. Patient-isolated hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells exhibited a strong IFN gene-expression signature, irrespective of genotype. Additionally, chemical proteasome inhibition or progressive depletion of proteasome subunit gene transcription with siRNA induced transcription of type I IFN genes in healthy control cells. Our results provide further insight into CANDLE genetics and link global proteasome dysfunction to increased type I IFN production. PMID:26524591

  9. Towards a standardised approach for evaluating guidelines and guidance documents on palliative sedation: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sedation in palliative care has received growing attention in recent years; and so have guidelines, position statements, and related literature that provide recommendations for its practice. Yet little is known collectively about the content, scope and methodological quality of these materials. According to research, there are large variations in palliative sedation practice, depending on the definition and methodology used. However, a standardised approach to comparing and contrasting related documents, across countries, associations and governmental bodies is lacking. This paper reports on a protocol designed to enable thorough and systematic comparison of guidelines and guidance documents on palliative sedation. Methods and design A multidisciplinary and international group of palliative care researchers, identified themes and clinical issues on palliative sedation based on expert consultations and evidence drawn from the EAPC (European Association of Palliative Care) framework for palliative sedation and AGREE II (Appraisal Guideline Research and Evaluation) instrument for guideline assessment. The most relevant themes were selected and built into a comprehensive checklist. This was tested on people working closely with practitioners and patients, for user-friendliness and comprehensibility, and modified where necessary. Next, a systematic search was conducted for guidelines in English, Dutch, Flemish, or Italian. The search was performed in multiple databases (PubMed, CancerLit, CNAHL, Cochrane Library, NHS Evidence and Google Scholar), and via other Internet resources. Hereafter, the final version of the checklist will be used to extract data from selected literature, and the same will be compiled, entered into SPSS, cleaned and analysed systematically for publication. Discussion We have together developed a comprehensive checklist in a scientifically rigorous manner to allow standardised and systematic comparison. The protocol is applicable to all

  10. Quantifying the impact of climate change on drought regimes using the Standardised Precipitation Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Katie; Warren, Rachel

    2015-04-01

    The study presents a methodology to characterise short- or long-term drought events, designed to aid understanding of how climate change may affect future risk. An indicator of drought magnitude, combining parameters of duration, spatial extent and intensity, is presented based on the Standardised Precipitation Index (SPI). The SPI is applied to observed (1955-2003) and projected (2003-2050) precipitation data from the Community Integrated Assessment System (CIAS). Potential consequences of climate change on drought regimes in Australia, Brazil, China, Ethiopia, India, Spain, Portugal and the USA are quantified. Uncertainty is assessed by emulating a range of global circulation models to project climate change. Further uncertainty is addressed through the use of a high-emission scenario and a low-stabilisation scenario representing a stringent mitigation policy. Climate change was shown to have a larger effect on the duration and magnitude of long-term droughts, and Australia, Brazil, Spain, Portugal and the USA were highlighted as being particularly vulnerable to multi-year drought events, with the potential for drought magnitude to exceed historical experience. The study highlights the characteristics of drought which may be more sensitive under climate change. For example, on average, short-term droughts in the USA do not become more intense but are projected to increase in duration. Importantly, the stringent mitigation scenario had limited effect on drought regimes in the first half of the twenty-first century, showing that adaptation to drought risk will be vital in these regions.

  11. Standardised surveillance of Clostridium difficile infection in European acute care hospitals: a pilot study, 2013.

    PubMed

    van Dorp, Sofie M; Kinross, Pete; Gastmeier, Petra; Behnke, Michael; Kola, Axel; Delmée, Michel; Pavelkovich, Anastasia; Mentula, Silja; Barbut, Frédéric; Hajdu, Agnes; Ingebretsen, André; Pituch, Hanna; Macovei, Ioana S; Jovanović, Milica; Wiuff, Camilla; Schmid, Daniela; Olsen, Katharina Ep; Wilcox, Mark H; Suetens, Carl; Kuijper, Ed J

    2016-07-21

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains poorly controlled in many European countries, of which several have not yet implemented national CDI surveillance. In 2013, experts from the European CDI Surveillance Network project and from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control developed a protocol with three options of CDI surveillance for acute care hospitals: a 'minimal' option (aggregated hospital data), a 'light' option (including patient data for CDI cases) and an 'enhanced' option (including microbiological data on the first 10 CDI episodes per hospital). A total of 37 hospitals in 14 European countries tested these options for a three-month period (between 13 May and 1 November 2013). All 37 hospitals successfully completed the minimal surveillance option (for 1,152 patients). Clinical data were submitted for 94% (1,078/1,152) of the patients in the light option; information on CDI origin and outcome was complete for 94% (1,016/1,078) and 98% (294/300) of the patients in the light and enhanced options, respectively. The workload of the options was 1.1, 2.0 and 3.0 person-days per 10,000 hospital discharges, respectively. Enhanced surveillance was tested and was successful in 32 of the hospitals, showing that C. difficile PCR ribotype 027 was predominant (30% (79/267)). This study showed that standardised multicountry surveillance, with the option of integrating clinical and molecular data, is a feasible strategy for monitoring CDI in Europe. PMID:27472820

  12. The development of a standardised diet history tool to support the diagnosis of food allergy.

    PubMed

    Skypala, Isabel J; Venter, Carina; Meyer, Rosan; deJong, Nicolette W; Fox, Adam T; Groetch, Marion; Oude Elberink, J N; Sprikkelman, Aline; Diamandi, Louiza; Vlieg-Boerstra, Berber J

    2015-01-01

    The disparity between reported and diagnosed food allergy makes robust diagnosis imperative. The allergy-focussed history is an important starting point, but published literature on its efficacy is sparse. Using a structured approach to connect symptoms, suspected foods and dietary intake, a multi-disciplinary task force of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology developed paediatric and adult diet history tools. Both tools are divided into stages using traffic light labelling (red, amber and green). The red stage requires the practitioner to gather relevant information on symptoms, atopic history, food triggers, foods eaten and nutritional issues. The amber stage facilitates interpretation of the responses to the red-stage questions, thus enabling the practitioner to prepare to move forward. The final green stage provides a summary template and test algorithm to support continuation down the diagnostic pathway. These tools will provide a standardised, practical approach to support food allergy diagnosis, ensuring that all relevant information is captured and interpreted in a robust manner. Future work is required to validate their use in diverse age groups, disease entities and in different countries, in order to account for differences in health care systems, food availability and dietary norms. PMID:25741437

  13. Standardisation or resilience? The paradox of stability and change in patient safety.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Kirstine Zinck

    2016-09-01

    This article explores an apparent paradox of stability and change in patient safety thinking and practice. The dominant approach to patient safety has largely been focused on closing 'safety gaps' through standardisation in seemingly stable healthcare systems. However, the presupposition of system stability and predictability is presently being challenged by critics who insist that healthcare systems are complex and changing entities, thereby shifting focus towards the healthcare organisation's resilient and adaptive capacities. Based on a close reading of predominant patient safety literature, the article analyses how a separation between stability and change is articulated in ontological, historical, and situated terms, and it suggests the way in which predetermining healthcare settings as either stable or unstable paves the way for a system engineering approach to patient safety that pre-empts certain types of safety solutions. Drawing on John Dewey's influential ideas about the interconnectedness of stability and change, this prescriptive perspective is discussed and challenged. It is suggested that only by rethinking the relationship between change and stability can patient safety efforts begin to address the uncertainty of medical practice as well as the necessary competences of healthcare professionals to act with 'safety dispositions' as a precondition for delivering safe care. PMID:27397546

  14. Validation of the standardised assessment of personality – abbreviated scale in a general population sample

    PubMed Central

    Seegobin, Seth; Frissa, Souci; Hatch, Stephani L.; Hotopf, Matthew; Hayes, Richard D.; Moran, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Personality disorder (PD) is associated with important health outcomes in the general population. However, the length of diagnostic interviews poses a significant barrier to obtaining large scale, population‐based data on PD. A brief screen for the identification of people at high risk of PD in the general population could be extremely valuable for both clinicians and researchers. Aim We set out to validate the Standardised Assessment of Personality – Abbreviated Scale (SAPAS), in a general population sample, using the Structured Clinical Interviews for DSM‐IV Personality Disorders (SCID‐II) as a gold standard. Method One hundred and ten randomly selected, community‐dwelling adults were administered the SAPAS screening interview. The SCID‐II was subsequently administered by a clinical interviewer blind to the initial SAPAS score. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to assess the discriminatory performance of the SAPAS, relative to the SCID‐II. Results Area under the curve for the SAPAS was 0.70 (95% CI = 0.60 to 0.80; p < 0.001), indicating moderate overall discriminatory accuracy. A cut point score of 4 on the SAPAS correctly classified 58% of participants. At this cut point, the sensitivity and specificity were 0.69 and 0.53 respectively. Conclusion The SAPAS operates less efficiently as a screen in general population samples and is probably most usefully applied in clinical populations. © 2015 The Authors Personality and Mental Health published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd PMID:26314385

  15. The standardised freight container: vector of vectors and vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Reiter, P

    2010-04-01

    The standardised freight container was one of the most important innovations of the 20th Century. Containerised cargoes travel from their point of origin to their destination by ship, road and rail as part of a single journey, without unpacking. This simple concept is the key element in cheap, rapid transport by land and sea, and has led to a phenomenal growth in global trade. Likewise, containerised air cargo has led to a remarkable increase in the inter-continental transportation of goods, particularly perishable items such as flowers, fresh vegetables and live animals. In both cases, containerisation offers great advantages in speed and security, but reduces the opportunity to inspect cargoes in transit. An inevitable consequence is the globalisation of undesirable species of animals, plants and pathogens. Moreover, cheap passenger flights offer worldwide travel for viral and parasitic pathogens in infected humans. The continued emergence of exotic pests, vectors and pathogens throughout the world is an unavoidable consequence of these advances in transportation technology. PMID:20617647

  16. Pervasive Monitoring—An Intelligent Sensor Pod Approach for Standardised Measurement Infrastructures

    PubMed Central

    Resch, Bernd; Mittlboeck, Manfred; Lippautz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Geo-sensor networks have traditionally been built up in closed monolithic systems, thus limiting trans-domain usage of real-time measurements. This paper presents the technical infrastructure of a standardised embedded sensing device, which has been developed in the course of the Live Geography approach. The sensor pod implements data provision standards of the Sensor Web Enablement initiative, including an event-based alerting mechanism and location-aware Complex Event Processing functionality for detection of threshold transgression and quality assurance. The goal of this research is that the resultant highly flexible sensing architecture will bring sensor network applications one step further towards the realisation of the vision of a “digital skin for planet earth”. The developed infrastructure can potentially have far-reaching impacts on sensor-based monitoring systems through the deployment of ubiquitous and fine-grained sensor networks. This in turn allows for the straight-forward use of live sensor data in existing spatial decision support systems to enable better-informed decision-making. PMID:22163537

  17. Components of a standardised olive leaf dry extract (Ph. Eur.) promote hypothiocyanite production by lactoperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Flemmig, Jörg; Rusch, Dorothea; Czerwińska, Monika Ewa; Rauwald, Hans-Wilhelm; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    We investigated in vitro the ability of a standardised olive leaf dry extract (Ph. Eur.) (OLE) as well as of its single components to circumvent the hydrogen peroxide-induced inhibition of the hypothiocyanite-producing activity of lactoperoxidase (LPO). The rate of hypothiocyanite (⁻OSCN) formation by LPO was quantified by spectrophotometric detection of the oxidation of 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoic acid (TNB). By using excess hydrogen peroxide, we forced the accumulation of inactive enzymatic intermediates which are unable to promote the two-electronic oxidation of thiocyanate. Both OLE and certain extract components showed a strong LPO-reactivating effect. Thereby an o-hydroxyphenolic moiety emerged to be essential for a good reactivity with the inactive LPO redox states. This basic moiety is found in the main OLE components oleuropein, oleacein, hydroxytyrosol, caffeic acid as well as in different other constituents including the OLE flavone luteolin. As LPO is a key player in the humoral immune response, these results propose a new mode of action regarding the well-known bacteriostatic and anti-inflammatory properties of the leaf extract of Olea europaea L. PMID:24657078

  18. Bio-objectifying European bodies: standardisation of biobanks in the Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Tamminen, Sakari

    2015-01-01

    The article traces the genealogy of the Minimum Information About Biobank Data Sharing model, created in the European Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure to facilitate collaboration among biobanks and to foster the exchange of biological samples and data. This information model is aimed at the identification of biobanks; unification of databases; and objectification of the information, samples, and related studies - to create a completely new 'bio-object infrastructure' within the EU. The paper discusses key challenges in creating a 'universal' information model of such a kind, the most important technical translations of European research policy needed for a standardised model for biobank information, and how this model creates new bio-objects. The author claims that this amounts to redefinition of biobanks and technical governance over virtually bio-objectified European populations. It is argued here that old governance models based on the nation-state need radical reconsideration so that we are prepared for a new and changing situation wherein bodies of information that lack organs flow from one database to another with a click of a mouse. PMID:26626620

  19. Minimum information about tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (MITAP): a first step towards reproducibility and standardisation of cellular therapies

    PubMed Central

    Spiering, Rachel; Aguillon, Juan C.; Anderson, Amy E.; Appel, Silke; Benitez-Ribas, Daniel; ten Brinke, Anja; Broere, Femke; Cools, Nathalie; Cuturi, Maria Cristina; Diboll, Julie; Geissler, Edward K.; Giannoukakis, Nick; Gregori, Silvia; van Ham, S. Marieke; Lattimer, Staci; Marshall, Lindsay; Harry, Rachel A.; Hutchinson, James A.; Isaacs, John D.; Joosten, Irma; van Kooten, Cees; Lopez Diaz de Cerio, Ascension; Nikolic, Tatjana; Oral, Haluk Barbaros; Sofronic-Milosavljevic, Ljiljana; Ritter, Thomas; Riquelme, Paloma; Thomson, Angus W.; Trucco, Massimo; Vives-Pi, Marta; Martinez-Caceres, Eva M.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular therapies with tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (tolAPC) show great promise for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and for the prevention of destructive immune responses after transplantation. The methodologies for generating tolAPC vary greatly between different laboratories, making it difficult to compare data from different studies; thus constituting a major hurdle for the development of standardised tolAPC therapeutic products. Here we describe an initiative by members of the tolAPC field to generate a minimum information model for tolAPC (MITAP), providing a reporting framework that will make differences and similarities between tolAPC products transparent. In this way, MITAP constitutes a first but important step towards the production of standardised and reproducible tolAPC for clinical application.

  20. TRANSVAC workshop on standardisation and harmonisation of analytical platforms for HIV, TB and malaria vaccines: 'how can big data help?'.

    PubMed

    Dutruel, Céline; Thole, Jelle; Geels, Mark; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Ottenhoff, Tom; Guzman, Carlos A; Fletcher, Helen A; Leroy, Odile; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2014-07-31

    High-throughput analyses of RNA and protein expression are increasingly used for better understanding of vaccine-induced immunity and protection against infectious disease. With an increasing number of vaccine candidates in clinical development, it is timely to consider standardisation and harmonisation of sample collection, storage and analysis to ensure results of highest quality from these precious samples. These challenges were discussed by a group of international experts during a workshop organised by TRANSVAC, a European Commission-funded Research Infrastructure project. The main conclusions were: Platforms are rarely standardised for use in preclinical and clinical studies. Coordinated efforts should continue to harmonise the experimental set up of these studies, as well as the establishment of internal standards and controls. This will ensure comparability, efficiency and feasibility of the global analyses performed on preclinical and clinical data sets. PMID:24950356

  1. Effect of high-pressure homogenisation on rheological properties of rennet-induced skim milk and standardised milk gels.

    PubMed

    Lodaite, Kristina; Chevalier, François; Armaforte, Emanuele; Kelly, Alan L

    2009-08-01

    The effects of high-pressure homogenisation (HPH) in the pressure range 100-300 MPa on the gel formation and rheological properties of rennet-induced skim milk (0.08%, fat, w/w) and standardised milk (3.60% fat, w/w) gels at pH 6.60 were studied. The average casein micelle size in skim milk was significantly reduced and the gel formation time decreased when skim milk was subjected to the pressures of 200 and 300 MPa. The storage modulus of rennet-induced skim milk gels at 2700 s after rennet addition was higher for samples homogenised at higher pressures, which contained smaller casein particles. HPH had little effect on the large deformation properties of rennet-induced skim milk gels. The gel formation time of renneted standardised milk was significantly reduced as a result of HPH, while the storage modulus of rennet-induced milk gels 2700 s after rennet addition increased with increasing homogenising pressure. The apparent fracture stress was slightly higher for standardised milk gels formed from HPH-treated milk, whereas the apparent strain at fracture was lower, than that of unhomogenised milk. In conclusion, HPH treatment influenced gel formation processes of skim milk and its small-deformation rheological properties, mainly through modification of casein micelles. HPH also significantly affected the gel formation process of standardised milk gels and its rheological properties as a result of an increase in volume fraction of aggregating particles, while the particle size was of lesser importance. PMID:19445828

  2. Standardised (plain) cigarette packaging increases attention to both text-based and graphical health warnings: experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Shankleman, M.; Sykes, C.; Mandeville, K.L.; Di Costa, S.; Yarrow, K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether standardised cigarette packaging increases the time spent looking at health warnings, regardless of the format of those warnings. Study design A factorial (two pack styles x three warning types) within-subject experiment, with participants randomised to different orders of conditions, completed at a university in London, UK. Methods Mock-ups of cigarette packets were presented to participants with their branded portion in either standardised (plain) or manufacturer-designed (branded) format. Health warnings were present on all packets, representing all three types currently in use in the UK: black & white text, colour text, or colour images with accompanying text. Gaze position was recorded using a specialised eye tracker, providing the main outcome measure, which was the mean proportion of a five-second viewing period spent gazing at the warning-label region of the packet. Results An opportunity sample of 30 (six male, mean age = 23) young adults met the following inclusion criteria: 1) not currently a smoker; 2) <100 lifetime cigarettes smoked; 3) gaze position successfully tracked for > 50% viewing time. These participants spent a greater proportion of the available time gazing at the warning-label region when the branded section of the pack was standardised (following current Australian guidelines) rather than containing the manufacturer's preferred design (mean difference in proportions = 0.078, 95% confidence interval 0.049 to 0.106, p < 0.001). There was no evidence that this effect varied based on the type of warning label (black & white text vs. colour text vs. colour image & text; interaction p = 0.295). Conclusions During incidental viewing of cigarette packets, young adult never-smokers are likely to spend more time looking at health warnings if manufacturers are compelled to use standardised packaging, regardless of the warning design. PMID:25542740

  3. [Comparative studies into effects of synthetic oestrogens and gestagens on certain serum protein fractions under standardised conditions (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Klinger, G; Stelzner, A; Krause, G; Tarnick, M; Scheler, R; Schubert, H; Börner, A; Carol, W

    1980-01-01

    Initial effects of the following hormonal contraceptives on certain serum proteins in 29 women were checked under standardised conditions through the first three cycles on the pill: Deposiston (ethinyloestradiol-sulphonate/norethisterone-acetate), Gravistat (ethinyloestradiol/norgestrel), Non-Ovlon (ethinyloestradiol/norethisterone-actate).--Effects were found to differ strongly by fractions. Differences were recorded also from action over time. Changes and deviations were confirmed to depend on oestrogen levels. PMID:6164183

  4. Use of non-standardised micro-destructive techniques in the characterization of traditional construction materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannou, Ioannis; Theodoridou, Magdalini; Modestou, Sevasti; Fournari, Revecca; Dagrain, Fabrice

    2013-04-01

    The characterization of material properties and the diagnosis of their state of weathering and conservation are three of the most important steps in the field of cultural heritage preservation. Several standardised experimental methods exist, especially for determining the material properties and their durability. However, they are limited in their application by the required size of test specimens and the controlled laboratory conditions needed to undertake the tests; this is especially true when the materials under study constitute immovable parts of heritage structures. The current use of other advanced methods of analysis, such as imaging techniques, in the aforementioned field of research offers invaluable results. However, these techniques may not always be accessible to the wider research community due to their complex nature and relatively high cost of application. This study presents innovative applications of two recently developed cutting techniques; the portable Drilling Resistance Measuring System (DRMS) and the scratch tool. Both methods are defined as micro-destructive, since they only destroy a very small portion of sample material. The general concept of both methods lies within the forces needed to cut a material by linear (scratch tool) or rotational (DRMS) cutting action; these forces are related to the mechanical properties of the material and the technological parameters applied on the tool. Therefore, for a given testing configuration, the only parameter influencing the forces applied is the strength of the material. These two techniques have been used alongside a series of standardised laboratory tests aiming at the correlation of various stone properties (density, porosity, dynamic elastic modulus and uniaxial compressive strength). The results prove the potential of both techniques in assessing the uniaxial compressive strength of stones. The scratch tool has also been used effectively to estimate the compressive strength of mud bricks. It

  5. Active biomonitoring of airborne fluoride near an HF producing factory using standardised grass cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzaring, J.; Klumpp, A.; Fangmeier, A.

    In order to study the pollution gradient in the vicinity of an HF producing factory, a biomonitoring programme was performed employing VDI standardised grass cultures. Specimen plants of Lolium multiflorum cv. Lema were exposed at 11 sites over five monthly periods and the biomass produced was used for subsequent F-analyses. Meteorological data from the study region confirmed that wind direction accounted for changes in the pollution pattern over periods of time. Fluoride concentrations in the grass cultures, however, were unrelated to temperature and precipitation sums during the exposures. The biomass production of the grass cultures proved to be unrelated to these parameters as well but, with the enhanced growth of the plants, the fluoride concentrations were lower due to the dilution of the element with higher biomass accumulation. Because the contribution of particulate fluoride was unknown, both the washed grass cultures and the washing water were analysed in order to determine the amount of external fluoride. Washing reduced the fluoride concentrations by 22% on average, indicating that most of the element was internal fluoride stemming from stomatal uptake. Larger amounts of fluoride, however, could be washed off from grass cultures exposed at sites close to the factory indicating that dust emissions played a greater role at these locations. Because particulate emissions were supposed to arise from CaF 2 and the waste-product anhydrite, grass cultures were also analysed for calcium and sulphur. While calcium concentrations were generally high but unrelated to fluoride, sulphur concentrations showed a slight relationship to the F-concentrations determined in the unwashed plants. Latter findings indicate the co-deposition of the two elements as surface bound, external loads, but bioindication could not clarify to what extent both elements were partitioned in the gas-to-particle phase. We therefore recommend using the grass culture method in air quality

  6. Standardised online data access and publishing for Earth Systems and Climate data in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, B. J. K.; Druken, K. A.; Trenham, C.; Wang, J.; Wyborn, L. A.; Smillie, J.; Allen, C.; Porter, D.

    2015-12-01

    The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) hosts Australia's largest repository (10+ PB) of research data collections spanning a wide range of fields from climate, coasts, oceans, and geophysics through to astronomy, bioinformatics, and the social sciences. Spatial scales range from global to local ultra-high resolution, requiring storage volumes from MB to PB. The data have been organised to be highly connected to both the NCI HPC and cloud resources (e.g., interactive visualisation and analysis environments). Researchers can login to utilise the high performance infrastructure for these data collections, or access the data via standards-based web services. Our aim is to provide a trusted platform to support interdisciplinary research across all the collections as well as services for use of the data within individual communities. We thus cater to a wide range of researcher needs, whilst needing to maintain a consistent approach to data management and publishing. All research data collections hosted at NCI are governed by a data management plan, prior to being published through a variety of platforms and web services such as OPeNDAP, HTTP, and WMS. The data management plan ensures the use of standard formats (when available) that comply with relevant data conventions (e.g., CF-Convention) and metadata standards (e.g., ISO19115). Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) can be minted at NCI and assigned to datasets and collections. Large scale data growth and use in a variety of research fields has led to a rise in, and acceptance of, open spatial data formats such as NetCDF4/HDF5, prompting a need to extend these data conventions to fields such as geophysics and satellite Earth observations. The fusion of DOI-minted data that is discoverable and accessible via metadata and web services, creates a complete picture of data hosting, discovery, use, and citation. This enables standardised and reproducible data analysis.

  7. Recommendation for a Standardised Method of Broth Microdilution Susceptibility Testing for Porcine Bordetella bronchiseptica

    PubMed Central

    Prüller, Sandra; Frömke, Cornelia; Kaspar, Heike; Klein, Günter; Kreienbrock, Lothar; Kehrenberg, Corinna

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to establish and standardise a broth microdilution susceptibility testing method for porcine Bordetella (B.) bronchiseptica. B. bronchiseptica isolates from different geographical regions and farms were genotyped by macrorestriction analysis and subsequent pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. One reference and one type strain plus two field isolates of B. bronchiseptica were chosen to analyse growth curves in four different media: cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth (CAMHB) with and without 2% lysed horse blood, Brain-Heart-Infusion (BHI), and Caso broth. The growth rate of each test strain in each medium was determined by culture enumeration and the suitability of CAMHB was confirmed by comparative statistical analysis. Thereafter, reference and type strain and eight epidemiologically unrelated field isolates of B. bronchiseptica were used to test the suitability of a broth microdilution susceptibility testing method following CLSI-approved performance standards given in document VET01-A4. Susceptibility tests, using 20 antimicrobial agents, were performed in five replicates, and data were collected after 20 and 24 hours incubation and statistically analysed. Due to the low growth rate of B. bronchiseptica, an incubation time of 24 hours resulted in significantly more homogeneous minimum inhibitory concentrations after five replications compared to a 20-hour incubation. An interlaboratory comparison trial including susceptibility testing of 24 antimicrobial agents revealed a high mean level of reproducibility (97.9%) of the modified method. Hence, in a harmonization for broth microdilution susceptibility testing of B. bronchiseptica, an incubation time of 24 hours in CAMHB medium with an incubation temperature of 35°C and an inoculum concentration of approximately 5 x 105 cfu/ml was proposed. PMID:25910232

  8. Machinability of drilling T700/LT-03A carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite laminates using candle stick drill and multi-facet drill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng-Dong; Qiu, Kun-Xian; Chen, Ming; Cai, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) composite laminates are widely used in aerospace and aircraft structural components due to their superior properties. However, they are regarded as difficult-to-cut materials because of bad surface quality and low productivity. Drilling is the most common hole making process for CFRP composite laminates and drilling induced delamination damage usually occurs severely at the exit side of drilling holes, which strongly deteriorate holes quality. In this work, the candle stick drill and multi-facet drill are employed to evaluate the machinability of drilling T700/LT-03A CFRP composite laminates in terms of thrust force, delamination, holes diameter and holes surface roughness. S/N ratio is used to characterize the thrust force while an ellipse-shaped delamination model is established to quantitatively analyze the delamination. The best combination of drilling parameters are determined by full consideration of S/N ratios of thrust force and the delamination. The results indicate that candle stick drill will induce the unexpected ellipse-shaped delamination even at its best drilling parameters of spindle speed of 10,000 rpm and feed rate of 0.004 mm/tooth. However, the multi-facet drill cutting at the relative lower feed rate of 0.004 mm/tooth and lower spindle speed of 6000 rpm can effectively prevent the delamination. Comprehensively, holes quality obtained by multi-facet drill is much more superior to those obtained by candle stick drill.

  9. Urinary Microbiota Associated with Preterm Birth: Results from the Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood (CANDLE) Study.

    PubMed

    Ollberding, Nicholas J; Völgyi, Eszter; Macaluso, Maurizio; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Tylavsky, Frances A; Piyathilake, Chandrika J

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is the leading cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Genitourinary infection is implicated in the initiation of spontaneous PTB; however, examination of the urinary microbiota in relation to preterm delivery using next-generation sequencing technologies is lacking. In a case-control study nested within the Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood (CANDLE) study, we examined associations between the urinary microbiota and PTB. A total of 49 cases (delivery < 37 weeks gestation) and 48 controls (delivery ≥ 37 weeks gestation) balanced on health insurance type were included in the present analysis. Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene V4 region was performed on urine samples collected during the second trimester. We observed no difference in taxa richness, evenness, or community composition between cases and controls or for gestational age modeled as a continuous variable. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) classified to Prevotella, Sutterella, L. iners, Blautia, Kocuria, Lachnospiraceae, and S.marcescens were enriched among cases (FDR corrected p≤ 0.05). A urinary microbiota clustering partition dominated by S. marcescens was also associated with PTB (OR = 3.97, 95% CI: 1.19-13.24). These data suggest a limited role for the urinary microbiota in PTB when measured during the second trimester by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The enrichment among cases in several organisms previously reported to be associated with genitourinary pathology requires confirmation in future studies to rule out the potential for false positive findings. PMID:27611781

  10. A semantically rich and standardised approach enhancing discovery of sensor data and metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkinaki, Alexandra; Buck, Justin; Darroch, Louise

    2016-04-01

    The marine environment plays an essential role in the earth's climate. To enhance the ability to monitor the health of this important system, innovative sensors are being produced and combined with state of the art sensor technology. As the number of sensors deployed is continually increasing,, it is a challenge for data users to find the data that meet their specific needs. Furthermore, users need to integrate diverse ocean datasets originating from the same or even different systems. Standards provide a solution to the above mentioned challenges. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) has created Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) standards that enable different sensor networks to establish syntactic interoperability. When combined with widely accepted controlled vocabularies, they become semantically rich and semantic interoperability is achievable. In addition, Linked Data is the recommended best practice for exposing, sharing and connecting information on the Semantic Web using Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs), Resource Description Framework (RDF) and RDF Query Language (SPARQL). As part of the EU-funded SenseOCEAN project, the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC) is working on the standardisation of sensor metadata enabling 'plug and play' sensor integration. Our approach combines standards, controlled vocabularies and persistent URIs to publish sensor descriptions, their data and associated metadata as 5 star Linked Data and OGC SWE (SensorML, Observations & Measurements) standard. Thus sensors become readily discoverable, accessible and useable via the web. Content and context based searching is also enabled since sensors descriptions are understood by machines. Additionally, sensor data can be combined with other sensor or Linked Data datasets to form knowledge. This presentation will describe the work done in BODC to achieve syntactic and semantic interoperability in the sensor domain. It will illustrate the reuse and extension of the Semantic Sensor

  11. Young people's perceptions of tobacco packaging: a comparison of EU Tobacco Products Directive & Ireland's Standardisation of Tobacco Act

    PubMed Central

    Babineau, Kate; Clancy, Luke

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To measure young people's perceptions of tobacco packaging according to two current pieces of legislation: The EU Tobacco Products Directive (TPD) and Ireland's Public Health (Standardisation of Tobacco Products) Act. Design Within-subject experimental cross-sectional survey of a representative sample of secondary school students. School-based pen and paper survey. Setting 27 secondary schools across Ireland, randomly stratified for size, geographic location, gender, religious affiliation and school-level socioeconomic status. Data were collected between March and May 2014. Participants 1378 fifth year secondary school students aged 16–17 in Ireland. Main outcome measures Young people's perceptions of attractiveness, health risk and smoker characteristics of packs according to EU and Irish branding and packaging guidelines. Results Packs with more branding elements were thought to be healthier than standardised packs for Silk Cut (χ2=158.58, p<0.001), Marlboro (χ2=113.65, p<0.001), and Benson and Hedges (χ2=137.95, p<0.001) brands. Generalized estimating equation binary regressions found that gender was a significant predictor of pack attractiveness for Silk Cut, with females being more likely to find the EU packs attractive (β=−0.45, p=0.007). Gender was a significant predictor for females with regards to the perceived popularity of the Silk Cut brand (β=−0.37, p=0.03). Conclusions The removal of brand identifiers, including colour, font and embossing, reduces the perceived appeal of cigarette packs for young people across all three tested brands. Packs standardised according to Irish legislation are perceived as less attractive, less healthy and smoked by less popular people than packs which conform to the EU TPD 2014 guidelines. PMID:26048206

  12. Effects of Standardised Fermented Papaya Gel on Clinical Symptoms, Inflammatory Cytokines, and Nitric Oxide Metabolites in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis: An Open Randomised Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Kharaeva, Zaira F; Zhanimova, Lyana R; Mustafaev, Magomet Sh; De Luca, Chiara; Mayer, Wolfgang; Chung Sheun Thai, Jeffrey; Tiew Siok Tuan, Rebecca; Korkina, Liudmila G

    2016-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of topical administration of standardised fermented papaya gel (SFPG), known to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, versus conventional therapy was evaluated in a group of 84 patients with moderate-to-severe periodontitis, randomly assigned to control group (n = 45) undergoing traditional pharmacologic/surgical protocols or to experimental group (n = 39), additionally treated with intragingival pocket SFPG (7 g) applications (15 min daily for 10 days). Patients undergoing SFPG treatment showed significant (P < 0.05), durable improvement of three major clinical indices of disease severity: reduced bleeding (day 7), plaque and gingival conditions (day 14), and consistent gingival pocket depth reduction (day 45). Proinflammatory nitric oxide metabolites reached normal values in plasma (day 14) and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) at day 45 with SFPG applications compared to controls that did not reach normalisation. Levels of highly increased proinflammatory (IL-1B, IL-6) and suppressed anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines normalised in the SFPG group by days 14 (plasma) and 45 (GCF), but never in the control group. Although not acting directly as antibiotic, SFPG acted in synergy with human granulocytes blocking adaptive catalase induction in S. aureus in response to granulocyte-derived oxidative stress, thus enhancing intracellular bacterial killing. PMID:26977121

  13. Effects of Standardised Fermented Papaya Gel on Clinical Symptoms, Inflammatory Cytokines, and Nitric Oxide Metabolites in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis: An Open Randomised Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Kharaeva, Zaira F.; Zhanimova, Lyana R.; Mustafaev, Magomet Sh.; De Luca, Chiara; Mayer, Wolfgang; Chung Sheun Thai, Jeffrey; Tiew Siok Tuan, Rebecca; Korkina, Liudmila G.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of topical administration of standardised fermented papaya gel (SFPG), known to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, versus conventional therapy was evaluated in a group of 84 patients with moderate-to-severe periodontitis, randomly assigned to control group (n = 45) undergoing traditional pharmacologic/surgical protocols or to experimental group (n = 39), additionally treated with intragingival pocket SFPG (7 g) applications (15 min daily for 10 days). Patients undergoing SFPG treatment showed significant (P < 0.05), durable improvement of three major clinical indices of disease severity: reduced bleeding (day 7), plaque and gingival conditions (day 14), and consistent gingival pocket depth reduction (day 45). Proinflammatory nitric oxide metabolites reached normal values in plasma (day 14) and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) at day 45 with SFPG applications compared to controls that did not reach normalisation. Levels of highly increased proinflammatory (IL-1B, IL-6) and suppressed anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines normalised in the SFPG group by days 14 (plasma) and 45 (GCF), but never in the control group. Although not acting directly as antibiotic, SFPG acted in synergy with human granulocytes blocking adaptive catalase induction in S. aureus in response to granulocyte-derived oxidative stress, thus enhancing intracellular bacterial killing. PMID:26977121

  14. Standardisation of uterine natural killer (uNK) cell measurements in the endometrium of women with recurrent reproductive failure.

    PubMed

    Lash, Gendie E; Bulmer, Judith N; Li, Tin Chiu; Innes, Barbara A; Mariee, Najat; Patel, Gnyaneshwari; Sanderson, Jean; Quenby, Siobhan; Laird, Susan M

    2016-08-01

    Considerable work is being carried out on endometrial NK cells to determine whether they play a role in successful pregnancy outcome. In addition there is debate about whether measurements of uNK should be included in the clinical assessment for women with recurrent implantation failure or recurrent miscarriage. A hindrance to taking this forward is the fact that the density of uNK cells reported by different centres is very different. The aim of this study was to determine the reason for these differences and to develop a standardised method. Three centres participated in the study. Each centre exchanged five formalin fixed, wax embedded sections of endometrium from five women. Sections were immunostained for CD56. Images were taken of 10 random fields at ×400 magnification; total stromal and uNK cells were counted using Image J. Results were expressed as % positive uNK cells and the variation in counts obtained in each centre was compared. After initial analysis a standardised protocol was agreed and the process repeated. Significant variation was seen in the counts obtained after initial analysis (Centre A vs.B, mean difference=-0.72 P<0.001; A vs.C mean difference=-0.47 P<0.001; B vs.C, mean difference=0.25 P=0.085). Analysis suggested that differences may be due to duration of tissue fixation, the embedding and sectioning processes, selection of areas for assessment, definition of immunopositive cells and inclusion or exclusion of blood vessels. Adoption of a standardised protocol reduced the variation (Centre A vs.B mean difference=-0.105 P=0.744; A vs.C mean difference=0.219 P=0.150; B vs.C mean difference=0.32 P=0.031). Use of a standardised method is needed to establish a normal range for uNK cells and to develop a meaningful clinical test for uNK cell measurements. PMID:27214130

  15. Is Consumer Response to Plain/Standardised Tobacco Packaging Consistent with Framework Convention on Tobacco Control Guidelines? A Systematic Review of Quantitative Studies

    PubMed Central

    Stead, Martine; Moodie, Crawford; Angus, Kathryn; Bauld, Linda; McNeill, Ann; Thomas, James; Hastings, Gerard; Hinds, Kate; O'Mara-Eves, Alison; Kwan, Irene; Purves, Richard I.; Bryce, Stuart L.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Standardised or ‘plain’ tobacco packaging was introduced in Australia in December 2012 and is currently being considered in other countries. The primary objective of this systematic review was to locate, assess and synthesise published and grey literature relating to the potential impacts of standardised tobacco packaging as proposed by the guidelines for the international Framework Convention on Tobacco Control: reduced appeal, increased salience and effectiveness of health warnings, and more accurate perceptions of product strength and harm. Methods Electronic databases were searched and researchers in the field were contacted to identify studies. Eligible studies were published or unpublished primary research of any design, issued since 1980 and concerning tobacco packaging. Twenty-five quantitative studies reported relevant outcomes and met the inclusion criteria. A narrative synthesis was conducted. Results Studies that explored the impact of package design on appeal consistently found that standardised packaging reduced the appeal of cigarettes and smoking, and was associated with perceived lower quality, poorer taste and less desirable smoker identities. Although findings were mixed, standardised packs tended to increase the salience and effectiveness of health warnings in terms of recall, attention, believability and seriousness, with effects being mediated by the warning size, type and position on pack. Pack colour was found to influence perceptions of product harm and strength, with darker coloured standardised packs generally perceived as containing stronger tasting and more harmful cigarettes than fully branded packs; lighter coloured standardised packs suggested weaker and less harmful cigarettes. Findings were largely consistent, irrespective of location and sample. Conclusions The evidence strongly suggests that standardised packaging will reduce the appeal of packaging and of smoking in general; that it will go some way

  16. Using multiple continuous fine particle monitors to characterize tobacco, incense, candle, cooking, wood burning, and vehicular sources in indoor, outdoor, and in-transit settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Wayne R.; Siegmann, Hans C.

    This study employed two continuous particle monitors operating on different measurement principles to measure concentrations simultaneously from common combustion sources in indoor, outdoor, and in-transit settings. The pair of instruments use (a) photo-charging (PC) operating on the principle ionization of fine particles that responds to surface particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PPAHs), and (b) diffusion charging (DC) calibrated to measure the active surface area of fine particles. The sources studied included: (1) secondhand smoke (cigarettes, cigars, and pipes), (2) incense (stick and cone), (3) candles used as food warmers, (4) cooking (toasting bread and frying meat), (5) fireplaces and ambient wood smoke, and (6) in-vehicle exposures traveling on California arterials and interstate highways. The ratio of the PC to the DC readings, or the PC/DC ratio, was found to be different for major categories of sources. Cooking, burning toast, and using a "canned heat" food warmer gave PC/DC ratios close to zero. Controlled experiments with 10 cigarettes averaged 0.15 ng mm -2 (ranging from 0.11 to 0.19 ng mm -2), which was similar to the PC/DC ratio for a cigar, although a pipe was slightly lower (0.09 ng mm -2). Large incense sticks had PC/DC ratios similar to those of cigarettes and cigars. The PC/DC ratios for ambient wood smoke averaged 0.29 ng mm -2 on 6 dates, or about twice those of cigarettes and cigars, reflecting a higher ratio of PAH to active surface area. The smoke from two artificial logs in a residential fireplace had a PC/DC ratio of 0.33-0.35 ng mm -2. The emissions from candles were found to vary, depending on how the candles were burned. If the candle flickered and generated soot, a higher PC/DC ratio resulted than if the candle burned uniformly in still air. Inserting piece of metal into the candle's flame caused high PPAH emissions with a record PC/DC reading of 1.8 ng mm -2. In-vehicle exposures measured on 43- and 50-min drives on a

  17. The development of a color-magnitude diagram for active galactic nuclei (AGN): hope for a new standard candle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinnis, G.; Chung, S.; Gonzales, E. V.; Gorjian, V.; Pruett, L.

    2015-12-01

    Of the galaxies in our universe, only a small percentage currently have Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). These galaxies tend to be further out in the universe and older, and are different from inactive galaxies in that they emit high amounts of energy from their central black holes. These AGN can be classified as either Seyferts or quasars, depending on the amount of energy emitted from the center (less or more). We are studying the correlation between the ratio of dust emission and accretion disk emission to luminosities of AGN in order to determine if there is a relationship strong enough to act as a predictive model for distance within the universe. This relationship can be used as a standard candle if luminosity is found to determine distances in space. We have created a color-magnitude diagram depicting this relationship between luminosity and wavelengths, similar to the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram. The more luminous the AGN, the more dust surface area over which to emit energy, which results in a greater near-infrared (NIR) luminosity. This differs from previous research because we use NIR to differentiate accretion from dust emission. Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), we analyzed over one thousand Type 1 Seyferts and quasars. We studied data at different wavelengths in order to show the relationship between color (the ratio of one wavelength to another) and luminosity. It was found that plotting filters i-K (the visible and mid-infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum) against the magnitude absolute K (luminosity) showed a strong correlation. Furthermore, the redshift range between 0.14 and 0.15 was the most promising, with an R2 of 0.66.

  18. Preliminary geology, mineral chemistry and diamond results from the C29/30 Candle Lake volcanic complex, Saskatchewan, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verigeanu, D.; Hetman, C. M.; Jellicoe, B.; Baumgartner, M. C.

    2009-11-01

    The C29/30 kimberlite is one of two diamondiferous kimberlites in the Candle Lake cluster located in east-central Saskatchewan, Canada, approximately 70 km from the Fort á la Corne kimberlite field. The kimberlites are hosted by a Cretaceous sequence of marine mudstone and shale of the Lower Colorado Group, and underlying siltstone and sandstone of the Mannville Group. This sequence overlies Paleozoic carbonates that were deposited over the Proterozoic crystalline basement. Based on the country rock stratigraphy and morphology of the body, C29/30 is inferred to be Cretaceous in age. The elongated kimberlite body has a lateral extent of approximately 2 km with the long axis oriented in a south-east to north-west direction and an estimated surface expression of 75.3 ha. The investigation of 47 drill cores suggests that this body is a single volcanic complex dominated by a single phase of volcaniclastic kimberlite that is characterised by absent to rare phlogopite within the groundmass of preserved juvenile clasts. Minor amounts of at least one other phase of kimberlite containing conspicuous groundmass phlogopite have also been documented. The subsurface shape of C29/30 is complex and is interpreted to result from a combination of explosive volcanic activity that formed two craters from separate feeder vents. The formation of the elongated trough is poorly understood. It may have formed by a fissure style eruption, or erosive processes related to the mass flow of material away from one of the craters or possible the collapse of an eruption column. The C29/30 kimberlite is similar to bodies of the Fort á la Corne kimberlite field with respect to country rock setting, pipe morphology and the dominant textural varieties present. This contribution presents a preliminary geological model of C29/30 based on data obtained from the drilling programmes completed in 2006, 2007 and 2008.

  19. Standardised Radon Index (SRI): a normalisation of radon data-sets in terms of standard normal variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, R. G. M.; Holt, C. P.

    2011-07-01

    During the second half of 2002, from late June to mid December, the University of Northampton Radon Research Group operated two continuous hourly-sampling radon detectors 2.25 km apart in the English East Midlands. This period included the Dudley earthquake (ML = 5, 22 September 2002) and also a smaller earthquake in the English Channel (ML = 3, 26 August 2002). Rolling/sliding windowed cross-correlation of the paired radon time-series revealed periods of simultaneous similar radon anomalies which occurred at the time of these earthquakes but at no other times during the overall radon monitoring period. Standardising the radon data in terms of probability of magnitude, analogous to the Standardised Precipitation Indices (SPIs) used in drought modelling, which effectively equalises different non-linear responses, reveals that the dissimilar relative magnitudes of the anomalies are in fact closely equiprobabilistic. Such methods could help in identifying anomalous signals in radon - and other - time-series and in evaluating their statistical significance in terms of earthquake precursory behaviour.

  20. A critical evaluation of the volume, relevance and quality of evidence submitted by the tobacco industry to oppose standardised packaging of tobacco products

    PubMed Central

    Hatchard, Jenny L; Fooks, Gary J; Evans-Reeves, Karen A; Ulucanlar, Selda; Gilmore, Anna B

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the volume, relevance and quality of transnational tobacco corporations’ (TTCs) evidence that standardised packaging of tobacco products ‘won't work’, following the UK government's decision to ‘wait and see’ until further evidence is available. Design Content analysis. Setting We analysed the evidence cited in submissions by the UK's four largest TTCs to the UK Department of Health consultation on standardised packaging in 2012. Outcome measures The volume, relevance (subject matter) and quality (as measured by independence from industry and peer-review) of evidence cited by TTCs was compared with evidence from a systematic review of standardised packaging . Fisher's exact test was used to assess differences in the quality of TTC and systematic review evidence. 100% of the data were second-coded to validate the findings: 94.7% intercoder reliability; all differences were resolved. Results 77/143 pieces of TTC-cited evidence were used to promote their claim that standardised packaging ‘won't work’. Of these, just 17/77 addressed standardised packaging: 14 were industry connected and none were published in peer-reviewed journals. Comparison of TTC and systematic review evidence on standardised packaging showed that the industry evidence was of significantly lower quality in terms of tobacco industry connections and peer-review (p<0.0001). The most relevant TTC evidence (on standardised packaging or packaging generally, n=26) was of significantly lower quality (p<0.0001) than the least relevant (on other topics, n=51). Across the dataset, TTC-connected evidence was significantly less likely to be published in a peer-reviewed journal (p=0.0045). Conclusions With few exceptions, evidence cited by TTCs to promote their claim that standardised packaging ‘won't work’ lacks either policy relevance or key indicators of quality. Policymakers could use these three criteria—subject matter, independence and peer-review status

  1. The size and structure of arm movement variability decreased with work pace in a standardised repetitive precision task.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Divya; Samani, Afshin; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Madeleine, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Increased movement variability has been suggested to reduce the risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders caused by repetitive work. This study investigated the effects of work pace on arm movement variability in a standardised repetitive pipetting task performed by 35 healthy women. During pipetting at slow and fast paces differing by 15%, movements of arm, hand and pipette were tracked in 3D, and used to derive shoulder and elbow joint angles. The size of cycle-to-cycle motor variability was quantified using standard deviations of several kinematics properties, while the structure of variability was quantified using indices of sample entropy and recurrence quantification analysis. When pace increased, both the size and structure of motor variability in the shoulder and elbow decreased. These results suggest that motor variability drops when repetitive movements are performed at increased paces, which may in the long run lead to undesirable outcomes such as muscle fatigue or overuse. PMID:25216404

  2. Intracompartmental pressure testing: results of an international survey of current clinical practice, highlighting the need for standardised protocols.

    PubMed

    Hislop, Matthew; Tierney, Paul

    2011-09-01

    Despite more recent non-invasive modalities generating some credence in the literature, intracompartmental pressure testing is still considered the 'gold standard' for investigating chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS). Intracompartmental pressure testing, when used correctly, has been shown to be accurate and reliable. However, it is a user-dependent investigation, and the manner in which the investigation is conducted plays a large role in the outcome of the test. Despite this, a standard, reproducible protocol for intracompartmental pressure testing has not been described. This results in confusion regarding interpretation of results and reduces the tests' reliability. A summary of the current understanding of CECS is presented, along with the results of a survey of specialists in Australia and New Zealand who perform intracompartmental pressure testing, which confirms that a uniform approach is currently not used in clinical practice. This highlights the need for a consensus and standardised approach to intracompartmental pressure testing. PMID:21900703

  3. Adapting a standardised international 24 h dietary recall methodology (GloboDiet software) for research and dietary surveillance in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Kyung; Park, Jin Young; Nicolas, Geneviève; Paik, Hee Young; Kim, Jeongseon; Slimani, Nadia

    2015-06-14

    During the past decades, a rapid nutritional transition has been observed along with economic growth in the Republic of Korea. Since this dramatic change in diet has been frequently associated with cancer and other non-communicable diseases, dietary monitoring is essential to understand the association. Benefiting from pre-existing standardised dietary methodologies, the present study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and describe the development of a Korean version of the international computerised 24 h dietary recall method (GloboDiet software) and its complementary tools, developed at the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), WHO. Following established international Standard Operating Procedures and guidelines, about seventy common and country-specific databases on foods, recipes, dietary supplements, quantification methods and coefficients were customised and translated. The main results of the present study highlight the specific adaptations made to adapt the GloboDiet software for research and dietary surveillance in Korea. New (sub-) subgroups were added into the existing common food classification, and new descriptors were added to the facets to classify and describe specific Korean foods. Quantification methods were critically evaluated and adapted considering the foods and food packages available in the Korean market. Furthermore, a picture book of foods/dishes was prepared including new pictures and food portion sizes relevant to Korean diet. The development of the Korean version of GloboDiet demonstrated that it was possible to adapt the IARC-WHO international dietary tool to an Asian context without compromising its concept of standardisation and software structure. It, thus, confirms that this international dietary methodology, used so far only in Europe, is flexible and robust enough to be customised for other regions worldwide. PMID:25899045

  4. Inter-individual variability in adaptation of the leg muscles following a standardised endurance training programme in young women.

    PubMed

    McPhee, Jamie S; Williams, Alun G; Degens, Hans; Jones, David A

    2010-08-01

    There is considerable inter-individual variability in adaptations to endurance training. We hypothesised that those individuals with a low local leg-muscle peak aerobic capacity (VO2peak) relative to their whole-body maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) would experience greater muscle training adaptations compared to those with a relatively high VO2peak. 53 untrained young women completed one-leg cycling to measure VO2peak and two-leg cycling to measure VO2max. The one-leg VO2peak was expressed as a ratio of the two-leg VO2max (Ratio(1:2)). Magnetic resonance imaging was used to indicate quadriceps muscle volume. Measurements were taken before and after completion of 6 weeks of supervised endurance training. There was large inter-individual variability in the pre-training Ratio(1:2) and large variability in the magnitude of training adaptations. The pre-training Ratio(1:2) was not related to training-induced changes in VO2max (P = 0.441) but was inversely correlated with changes in one-leg VO2peak and muscle volume (P < 0.05). No relationship was found between the training-induced changes in two-leg VO2max and one-leg VO2peak (r = 0.21; P = 0.129). It is concluded that the local leg-muscle aerobic capacity and Ratio(1:2) vary from person to person and this influences the extent of muscle adaptations following standardised endurance training. These results help to explain why muscle adaptations vary between people and suggest that setting the training stimulus at a fixed percentage of VO2max might not be a good way to standardise the training stimulus to the leg muscles of different people. PMID:20369366

  5. Standardised mortality ratio based on the sum of age and percentage total body surface area burned is an adequate quality indicator in burn care: An exploratory review.

    PubMed

    Steinvall, Ingrid; Elmasry, Moustafa; Fredrikson, Mats; Sjoberg, Folke

    2016-02-01

    Standardised Mortality Ratio (SMR) based on generic mortality predicting models is an established quality indicator in critical care. Burn-specific mortality models are preferred for the comparison among patients with burns as their predictive value is better. The aim was to assess whether the sum of age (years) and percentage total body surface area burned (which constitutes the Baux score) is acceptable in comparison to other more complex models, and to find out if data collected from a separate burn centre are sufficient for SMR based quality assessment. The predictive value of nine burn-specific models was tested by comparing values from the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) and a non-inferiority analysis using 1% as the limit (delta). SMR was analysed by comparing data from seven reference sources, including the North American National Burn Repository (NBR), with the observed mortality (years 1993-2012, n=1613, 80 deaths). The AUC values ranged between 0.934 and 0.976. The AUC 0.970 (95% CI 0.96-0.98) for the Baux score was non-inferior to the other models. SMR was 0.52 (95% CI 0.28-0.88) for the most recent five-year period compared with NBR based data. The analysis suggests that SMR based on the Baux score is eligible as an indicator of quality for setting standards of mortality in burn care. More advanced modelling only marginally improves the predictive value. The SMR can detect mortality differences in data from a single centre. PMID:26700877

  6. A certified plasmid reference material for the standardisation of BCR-ABL1 mRNA quantification by real-time quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    White, H; Deprez, L; Corbisier, P; Hall, V; Lin, F; Mazoua, S; Trapmann, S; Aggerholm, A; Andrikovics, H; Akiki, S; Barbany, G; Boeckx, N; Bench, A; Catherwood, M; Cayuela, J-M; Chudleigh, S; Clench, T; Colomer, D; Daraio, F; Dulucq, S; Farrugia, J; Fletcher, L; Foroni, L; Ganderton, R; Gerrard, G; Gineikienė, E; Hayette, S; El Housni, H; Izzo, B; Jansson, M; Johnels, P; Jurcek, T; Kairisto, V; Kizilors, A; Kim, D-W; Lange, T; Lion, T; Polakova, K M; Martinelli, G; McCarron, S; Merle, P A; Milner, B; Mitterbauer-Hohendanner, G; Nagar, M; Nickless, G; Nomdedéu, J; Nymoen, D A; Leibundgut, E O; Ozbek, U; Pajič, T; Pfeifer, H; Preudhomme, C; Raudsepp, K; Romeo, G; Sacha, T; Talmaci, R; Touloumenidou, T; Van der Velden, V H J; Waits, P; Wang, L; Wilkinson, E; Wilson, G; Wren, D; Zadro, R; Ziermann, J; Zoi, K; Müller, M C; Hochhaus, A; Schimmel, H; Cross, N C P; Emons, H

    2015-02-01

    Serial quantification of BCR-ABL1 mRNA is an important therapeutic indicator in chronic myeloid leukaemia, but there is a substantial variation in results reported by different laboratories. To improve comparability, an internationally accepted plasmid certified reference material (CRM) was developed according to ISO Guide 34:2009. Fragments of BCR-ABL1 (e14a2 mRNA fusion), BCR and GUSB transcripts were amplified and cloned into pUC18 to yield plasmid pIRMM0099. Six different linearised plasmid solutions were produced with the following copy number concentrations, assigned by digital PCR, and expanded uncertainties: 1.08±0.13 × 10(6), 1.08±0.11 × 10(5), 1.03±0.10 × 10(4), 1.02±0.09 × 10(3), 1.04±0.10 × 10(2) and 10.0±1.5 copies/μl. The certification of the material for the number of specific DNA fragments per plasmid, copy number concentration of the plasmid solutions and the assessment of inter-unit heterogeneity and stability were performed according to ISO Guide 35:2006. Two suitability studies performed by 63 BCR-ABL1 testing laboratories demonstrated that this set of 6 plasmid CRMs can help to standardise a number of measured transcripts of e14a2 BCR-ABL1 and three control genes (ABL1, BCR and GUSB). The set of six plasmid CRMs is distributed worldwide by the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (Belgium) and its authorised distributors (https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en/reference-materials/catalogue/; CRM code ERM-AD623a-f). PMID:25036192

  7. Standardised patients with intellectual disabilities in training tomorrow’s doctors

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Bini; Courtenay, Ken; Hassiotis, Angela; Strydom, Andre; Rantell, Khadija

    2014-01-01

    Aims and method To develop a programme to help undergraduate medical students and postgraduate trainees to improve their skills in communicating with people with intellectual disabilities through teaching sessions that had input from simulated patients with intellectual disabilities. We conducted four sessions of training for 47 undergraduate 4th-year medical students. The training involved a multiprofessional taught session followed by a clinical scenario role-play with simulated patients who were people with intellectual disabilities. The training was assessed by completing the healthcare provider questionnaire before and after the training. Results There were improvements in the students’ perceived skill, comfort and the type of clinical approach across all three scenarios. Clinical implications By involving people with intellectual disabilities in training medical students there has been a significant improvement in students’ communication skills in areas of perceived skills, comfort and type of clinical approach which will raise the quality of care provided by them in the future. PMID:25237524

  8. Changing Lives and Standardising Teachers: The Possibilities and Limits of Professional Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannon, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Along with a range of other neoliberal managerial incursions into education, the bureaucratisation of teachers' work has included the development of Professional Standards that regulate the profession and purport to improve teacher quality. This paper begins by contrasting two alternative approaches to standards in Australia, the new, centrally…

  9. Standardised Leadership Tools in MNEs--Critical Reflections on the Conditions for Successful Implementations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunnan, Randi; Amdam, Rolv Petter; Hennestad, Bjorn; Lervik, Jon Erland; Nilsen, Solvi

    2002-01-01

    Standardized leadership tools may have some control and learning benefits for multinational corporations. However, a case example from Norway illustrates how external complexity diminishes the usefulness of standardization. Although higher management autonomy results in less control, it improves subsidiary learning. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

  10. Light a candle.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, P M

    1976-08-01

    Numerous forces are presently deployed which threaten to produce largescale changes in medical practice and the systems of providing medical care. Some of these changes may be advantageous but others are likely to have deleterious effects on the quality of care, on the physician-patient relationnship and on the physician's freedom to practice as he sees fit. While certain of these pressures cannot be easily diverted, much can be accomplished with a modicum of effort to sway public opinion, the news media, the legislators and the bureaucratic regulation makers. Physicians, both individually and through their societies, must make this effort or suffer the pain of seeing immense decisions made without their leadership or intellectual guidance. PMID:970684

  11. Candles in April

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appleby, Jamila

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author tells a story which has lived in her for more than 25 years. She was in the 7th grade. She remembers April as a time of hardship because that was the month that the "people" came to shut one's power off. They did, that is, if one followed the you-don't-have-to-pay-during-the-winter-because-they-can't-shut-you-off…

  12. Bell, Book and Candle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichenberg, Fritz

    1984-01-01

    This May Hill Arbuthnot Honor Lecture relates the career of an artist and illustrator of children's books whose best-known works for young children are "Dancing in the Moon" and "Ape in a Cape." School years, apprenticeship, first books, wood engravings, use of illustrations, and the generation gap are highlighted. (EJS)

  13. Standardisation of 169Yb and precise measurement of gamma-ray emission probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Hiroshi; Nagata, Hideaki; Furusawa, Takayoshi; Murakami, Naotaka; Mori, Chizuo; Takeuchi, Norio; Genka, Tsuguo

    1999-01-01

    The gamma-ray emission probabilities of 169Yb were determined directly from the disintegration rate and the gamma-ray intensities. The disintegration rates of 169Yb sources were measured by using a 4πβ(ppc)-γ(HPGe) coincidence system with resolving times of both 2.06 and 5.66 μs and the γ-ray intensities were measured with HPGe detectors. The measured γ-ray emission probabilities agreed relatively well with those reported by Funck et al. (Int. J. Appl. Radiat. Isotopes 34 (1983) 1215) but their results were slightly larger. The uncertainties were improved.

  14. Follow-up Reality for Breast Cancer Patients – Standardised Survey of Patients and Physicians and Analysis of Treatment Data

    PubMed Central

    Feiten, S.; Dünnebacke, J.; Friesenhahn, V.; Heymanns, J.; Köppler, H.; Meister, R.; Thomalla, J.; van Roye, C.; Wey, D.; Weide, R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Currently, about 360 000 breast cancer patients who could, after completion of their primary therapy, take advantage of follow-up options are living in Germany. Up to now very little is known about the extent to which the available options are used and as to how the follow-up reality is experienced and evaluated. Thus, an explorative examination among the patients and their physicians was undertaken. Patients and Methods: All patients who underwent surgery in a certified breast centre between 2007 and 2013 received a standardised questionnaire; at the same time the physicians responsible for the follow-up were invited to answer a standardised questionnaire. Results: 920 patients (response rate: 61 %) with a median age of 65 years (32–95) could be analysed. 99 % of the participants stated that they regularly attended follow-ups. The personal contact with the physician (mean value: 4.4) and the reassurance that the cancer disease had not recurred (mean value: 4.5) were described on a scale of 0 to 5 to be two of the most important factors of the follow-up. Deficits were expressed with regard to psychosocial care (70 %) and the perception and treatment of physical complaints (55 %). In addition, 105 physicians returned completed questionnaires (response rate: 12 %). For asymptomatic patients the physicians performed the following examinations most frequently: anamnesis (92 %), physical examination (87 %) as well as laboratory tests (63 %) and tumour marker determinations (40 %). Conclusion: On the whole it became clear that the vast majority of the patients took advantage of the follow-up options. From the patientʼs perspective the importance of the follow-up lies in contact to the physician and the comforting assurance that the breast cancer has not relapsed. Deficits are seen in the psychosocial care and the perception and treatment of physical impairments. Not recommended examinations were employed by a significant proportion of

  15. Modifying candle soot with FeP nanoparticles into high-performance and cost-effective catalysts for the electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Hao, Jinhui; Yang, Wenshu; Lu, Baoping; Tang, Jilin

    2015-03-14

    Developing inexpensive and highly efficient non-precious-metal electrocatalysts has been proposed as a promising alternative to platinum-based catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Herein, we report novel FeP NPs supported on inexpensive and available candle soot (FeP-CS) derived from Fe3O4-CS hybrid precursors obtained after a phosphidation reaction. As HER electrocatalysts, the FeP-CS hybrids exhibit high electrocatalytic ability for HER with a Tafel slope of 58 mV dec(-1), a low onset overpotential of 38 mV, a large exchange current density of 2.2 × 10(-1) mA cm(-2) and an overpotential of 112 mV to obtain a current of 10 mA cm(-2). The present work shows significant advance in designing and developing non-precious-metal electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction. PMID:25685982

  16. Improvement of Sulphur Resistance of a Nickel-modified Catalytic Filter for Tar Removal from Biomass Gasification Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Draelants, D.J.; Engelen, K.; Baron, G.V.

    2002-09-19

    This work focuses on the development of catalytic candle filters for the simultaneous removal of tars and particles from the biomass gasification gas at high temperature. An improvement of sulphur resistance of the nickel-activated catalytic filter was developed by the addition of CaO. The influences of preparation procedure of catalytic filter, the ratio of Ni/CaO and the loading of Ni and CaO on the performance of the catalytic filter were investigated.

  17. [Practice report: the process-based indicator dashboard. Visualising quality assurance results in standardised processes].

    PubMed

    Petzold, Thomas; Hertzschuch, Diana; Elchlep, Frank; Eberlein-Gonska, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Process management (PM) is a valuable method for the systematic analysis and structural optimisation of the quality and safety of clinical treatment. PM requires a high motivation and willingness to implement changes of both employees and management. Definition of quality indicators is required to systematically measure the quality of the specified processes. One way to represent comparable quality results is the use of quality indicators of the external quality assurance in accordance with Sect. 137 SGB V—a method which the Federal Joint Committee (GBA) and the institutions commissioned by the GBA have employed and consistently enhanced for more than ten years. Information on the quality of inpatient treatment is available for 30 defined subjects throughout Germany. The combination of specified processes with quality indicators is beneficial for the information of employees. A process-based indicator dashboard provides essential information about the treatment process. These can be used for process analysis. In a continuous consideration of these indicator results values can be determined and errors will be remedied quickly. If due consideration is given to these indicators, they can be used for benchmarking to identify potential process improvements. PMID:25523849

  18. Recommendations for the standardisation of oxytocin nasal administration and guidelines for its reporting in human research.

    PubMed

    Guastella, Adam J; Hickie, Ian B; McGuinness, Margaret M; Otis, Melissa; Woods, Elizabeth A; Disinger, Hannah M; Chan, Hak-Kim; Chen, Timothy F; Banati, Richard B

    2013-05-01

    A series of studies have reported on the salubrious effects of oxytocin nasal spray on social cognition and behavior in humans, across physiology (e.g., eye gaze, heart rate variability), social cognition (e.g., attention, memory, and appraisal), and behavior (e.g., trust, generosity). Findings suggest the potential of oxytocin nasal spray as a treatment for various psychopathologies, including autism and schizophrenia. There are, however, increasing reports of variability of response to oxytocin nasal spray between experiments and individuals. In this review, we provide a summary of factors that influence transmucosal nasal drug delivery, deposition, and their impact on bioavailability. These include variations in anatomy and resultant airflow dynamic, vascularisation, status of blood vessels, mode of spray application, gallenic formulation (including presence of uptake enhancers, control release formulation), and amount and method of administration. These key variables are generally poorly described and controlled in scientific reports, in spite of their potential to alter the course of treatment outcome studies. Based on this review, it should be of no surprise that differences emerge across individuals and experiments when nasal drug delivery methods are employed. We present recommendations for researchers to use when developing and administering the spray, and guidelines for reporting on peptide nasal spray studies in humans. We hope that these recommendations assist in establishing a scientific standard that can improve the rigor and subsequent reliability of reported effects of oxytocin nasal spray in humans. PMID:23265311

  19. Increased Standardised Incidence Ratio of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma in Taiwanese Asbestos Workers: A 29-Year Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Kuan; Chang, Yu-Ying; Wang, Jung-Der; Lee, Lukas Jyuhn-Hsiarn

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This paper aimed to determine the standardised incidence ratio (SIR) of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) in workers exposed to asbestos in Taiwan. Methods. All workers employed in asbestos-related factories and registered by the Bureau of Labour Insurance between 1 March, 1950, and 31 December, 1989, were included in the study and were followed from 1 January, 1980, through 31 December, 2009. Incident cases of all cancers, including MPM (ICD-9 code: 163), were obtained from the Taiwan Cancer Registry. SIRs were calculated based on comparison with the incidence rate of the general population of Taiwan and adjusted for age, calendar period, sex, and duration of employment. Results. The highest SIR of MPM was found for male workers first employed before 1979, with a time since first employment more than 30 years (SIR 4.52, 95% CI: 2.25–8.09). After consideration of duration of employment, the SIR for male MPM was 5.78 (95% CI: 1.19–16.89) for the workers employed for more than 20 years in asbestos-related factories. Conclusions. This study corroborates the association between occupational asbestos exposure and MPM. The highest risk of MPM was found among male asbestos workers employed before 1979 and working for more than 20 years in asbestos-related factories. PMID:26290869

  20. Standardisation of a novel sperm banking kit - NextGen(®) - to preserve sperm parameters during shipment.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A; Sharma, R; Singh, A; Gupta, S; Sharma, R

    2016-08-01

    Many male patients diagnosed with cancer are within their reproductive years. These men are advised to freeze their spermatozoa prior to the start of cancer treatment. Very often, sperm banking facilities may not be readily available and patients may be required to travel to distant sperm bank centres. Our objective was to design and standardise a remote home shipping sperm kit that allows patients to collect a semen sample at home and ship it overnight to a sperm bank. A total of 21 semen samples and two transport media (refrigeration media and human tubal fluid) and five different combinations of ice packs were tested for maintaining desired shipping temperature. Ten semen samples were assessed for pre- and post-shipment changes in sperm motility, membrane integrity, total motile spermatozoa and recovery of motile spermatozoa. Even though motility, membrane integrity and total motile spermatozoa declined both in samples examined under simulated shipped conditions and in overnight-shipped samples, the observed motility and total motile spermatozoa were adequate for use with assisted reproductive techniques. Using refrigeration media, cooling sleeve and ice packs, adequate sperm motility can be maintained utilising NextGen(®) kit and these spermatozoa can be used for procreation utilising ART techniques such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection. PMID:26564753

  1. ‘Wanted—standard guinea pigs’: standardisation and the experimental animal market in Britain ca. 1919–1947

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Robert G.W.

    2012-01-01

    In 1942 a coalition of twenty scientific societies formed the Conference on the Supply of Experimental Animals (CSEA) in an attempt to pressure the Medical Research Council to accept responsibility for the provision of standardised experimental animals in Britain. The practice of animal experimentation was subject to State regulation under the Cruelty to Animals Act of 1876, but no provision existed for the provision of animals for experimental use. Consequently, day-to-day laboratory work was reliant on a commercial small animal market which had emerged to sustain the hobby of animal fancying. This paper explores how difficulties encountered in experimental practice within the laboratory led to the problematisation of biomedical science’s reliance upon a commercial market for animals during the inter-war period. This is shown to have produced a crisis within animal reliant experimental science in the early 1940s which enabled the left-wing Association of Scientific Workers to cast science’s reliance on a free market as economically inefficient and a threat to the reliability of British research. It is argued that the development of standard experimental animals in Britain was, therefore, embedded within the wider cultural, societal, political and economic national context of the time. PMID:18761280

  2. Observations on the application of the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology standardised terminology and nomenclature for pancreaticobiliary cytology.

    PubMed

    McKinley, Madeleine; Newman, Marsali

    2016-06-01

    In 2014 the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology (PSC) published a system of standardised terminology and nomenclature for pancreaticobiliary cytology (STNPC). In the present study, 232 previously reported pancreaticobiliary cytology specimens were categorised according to this set of guidelines in order to identify potential challenges to implementation of the PSC system into routine practice. Overall, 207 (89%) of the cases were found to comply with the PSC scheme in their original form. Twenty-five cases (11%) demonstrated that the application of the PSC system would result in a change of category. In the majority of these cases, the change was related to the method of categorising low grade and premalignant neoplasms, using the categories of 'Neoplastic: other' (a new category unique to STNPC classification scheme) and 'Atypical', for specimens deemed to be diagnostic of or suspicious for these lesions, respectively. The study also highlighted the emphasis on the inclusion of imaging context and cyst fluid analysis in the interpretation of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration specimens in the guidelines. The STNPC offers an approach to pancreaticobiliary cytology that reflects the considerable variation in the nature and treatment of the entities that may be encountered in these specimens. Challenges in utilisation of the scheme include awareness of the unique approach to the categorisation of premalignant and low grade neoplasms, and the amount and quality of available clinical and imaging information. PMID:27114371

  3. [Experiences with follow-up investigations of oral vaccination campaigns against rabies in foxes in Saxony with special emphasis on a standardised serology].

    PubMed

    Schaarschmidt, U; Müller, T; Albert, G; Muluneh, A; Cox, J; Selhorst, T; Schlüter, H

    2002-05-01

    An 8-year experience with organisation and standardisation of follow-up investigations within oral vaccination campaigns against rabies in foxes (OVF) in Saxony is summarised. With respect to OVF, the number of diagnostic tests performed during the years 1992-2000 on foxes amounts to a total of 52,226 Fluorescence antibody-(FAT), 7,551 marker-(TC) and 11,645 serological tests. The mean bait-uptake and the mean immunisation rate in foxes ranged between 78-86% and 60-89%, respectively. Based on the seroconversion rates of the years 1997-2000 observed in vaccination areas and in areas where vaccination was already finished, experience with a standardised serology under routine conditions is presented and discussed. Furthermore, recommendations concerning organisation and logistics of sampling are given. PMID:12073494

  4. Material characterization of the clay bonded silicon carbide candle filters and ash formations in the W-APF system after 500 hours of hot gas filtration at AEP. Appendix to Advanced Particle Filter: Technical progress report No. 11, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.

    1993-04-05

    (1) After 500 hours of operation in the pressurized fluidized-bed combustion gas environment, the fibrous outer membrane along the clay bonded silicon carbide Schumacher Dia Schumalith candles remained intact. The fibrous outer membrane did not permit penetration of fines through the filter wall. (2) An approximate 10-15% loss of material strength occurred within the intact candle clay bonded silicon carbide matrix after 500 hours of exposure to the PFBC gas environment. A relatively uniform strength change resulted within the intact candles throughout the vessel (i.e., top to bottom plenums), as well as within the various cluster ring positions (i.e., outer versus inner ring candle filters). A somewhat higher loss of material strength, i.e., 25% was detected in fractured candle segments removed from the W-APF ash hopper. (3) Sulfur which is present in the pressurized fluidized-bed combustion gas system induced phase changes along the surface of the binder which coats the silicon carbide grains in the Schumacher Dia Schumalith candle filter matrix.

  5. Survey of disc diffusion antimicrobial sensitivity testing in avian bacteriology laboratories and the evaluation of a standardised method.

    PubMed

    Whithear, K G; Htwe, T; Sulaiman, I

    1986-04-01

    A survey was conducted in which 15 laboratories involved in avian bacteriology tested the antimicrobial sensitivity of cultures of Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Alcaligenes faecalis and Salmonella typhimurium, using the disc diffusion test as routinely practised in each laboratory. Up to 28 different antimicrobials or antimicrobial combinations were used. The most commonly tested agents were ampicillin, benzylpenicillin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, furazolidone, neomycin, streptomycin, sulphonamide, tetracycline and trimethoprim/sulphonamide. Results between laboratories were compared according to the width of the zone of inhibition (annular radius) where 5 or more laboratories used the same disc content of a particular antimicrobial agent, and on whether a culture was interpreted as being sensitive or resistant to a particular agent. The variation in annular radii about the mean values were less than +/- 2 SD in 39.5% and greater than +/- 3 SD in 32.6% of 43 different antimicrobial/culture combinations involving 8 different agents. The range of annular radii measurements was greatest with trimethoprim/sulphonamide and streptomycin discs and with the S. epidermidis culture. Variation in the interpretation of test results was greatest with the Gram-negative bacteria, where for each of the more frequently tested agents at least one, commonly 2 and sometimes all 3 cultures were reported as sensitive and resistant to the same agent by different laboratories. The calibrated dichotomous sensitivity (CDS) test of Bell (1975, 1984) was evaluated as a standardised disc diffusion procedure and was found to be reproducible and accurate. Results obtained using antimicrobial agents calibrated for use in the CDS test were compared with results obtained in the survey using the same agents or agents showing identical resistance patterns.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3741274

  6. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of a standardised intracameral combination of mydriatics and anaesthetics for cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Labetoulle, Marc; Findl, Oliver; Malecaze, François; Alió, Jorge; Cochener, Béatrice; Lobo, Conceição; Lazreg, Sihem; Hartani, Dahbia; Colin, Joseph; Tassignon, Marie-José; Behndig, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Background/aims To compare the efficacy and safety of intracameral (IC) administration at the beginning of cataract surgery, of Mydrane, a standardised ophthalmic combination of tropicamide 0.02%, phenylephrine 0.31% and lidocaine 1%, to a standard topical regimen. Methods In this international phase III, prospective, randomised study, the selected eye of 555 patients undergoing phacoemulsification with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation received 200 μL of Mydrane (Mydrane group) just after the first incision or a topical regimen of one drop each of tropicamide 0.5% and phenylephrine 10% repeated three times (reference group). The primary efficacy variable was achievement of capsulorhexis without additional mydriatics. The non-inferiority of Mydrane to the topical regimen was tested. The main outcome measures were pupil size, patient perception of ocular discomfort and safety. Results Capsulorhexis without additional mydriatics was performed in 98.9% of patients and 94.7% in the Mydrane and reference groups, respectively. Both groups achieved adequate mydriasis (>7 mm) during capsulorhexis, phacoemulsification and IOL insertion. IOL insertion was classified as ‘routine’ in a statistically greater number of eyes in the Mydrane group compared with the reference group (p=0.047). Patients in the Mydrane group reported statistically greater comfort than the reference group before IOL insertion (p=0.034). Safety data were similar between groups. Conclusions Mydrane is an effective and safe alternative to standard eye drops for initiating and maintaining intraoperative mydriasis and analgesia. Patients who received IC Mydrane were significantly more comfortable before IOL insertion than the reference group. Surgeons found IOL insertion less technically challenging with IC Mydrane. Trial registration number NCT02101359; Results. PMID:26531052

  7. Factors influencing general practitioner referral of patients developing end-stage renal failure: a standardised case-analysis study

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Anthony J; McGee, Hannah M; Shannon, William; Donohoe, John

    2006-01-01

    Background To understand why treatment referral rates for ESRF are lower in Ireland than in other European countries, an investigation of factors influencing general practitioner referral of patients developing ESRF was conducted. Method Randomly selected general practitioners (N = 51) were interviewed using 32 standardised written patient scenarios to elicit referral strategies. Main outcome measures: General practitioner referral levels and thresholds for patients developing end-stage renal disease; referral routes (nephrologist vs other physicians); influence of patient age, marital status and co-morbidity on referral. Results Referral levels varied widely with the full range of cases (0–32; median = 15) referred by different doctors after consideration of first laboratory results. Less than half (44%) of cases were referred to a nephrologist. Patient age (40 vs 70 years), marital status, co-morbidity (none vs rheumatoid arthritis) and general practitioner prior specialist renal training (yes or no) did not influence referral rates. Many patients were not referred to a specialist at creatinine levels of 129 μmol/l (47% not referred) or 250 μmol/l (45%). While all patients were referred at higher levels (350 and 480 μmol/l), referral to a nephrologist decreased in likelihood as scenarios became more complex; 28% at 129 μmol/l creatinine; 28% at 250 μmol/l; 18% at 350 μmol/l and 14% at 480 μmol/l. Referral levels and routes were not influenced by general practitioner age, sex or practice location. Most general practitioners had little current contact with chronic renal patients (mean number in practice = 0.7, s.d. = 1.3). Conclusion The very divergent management patterns identified highlight the need for guidance to general practitioners on appropriate management of this serious condition. PMID:16970805

  8. Multicentre standardisation of a clinical grade procedure for the preparation of allogeneic platelet concentrates from umbilical cord blood

    PubMed Central

    Rebulla, Paolo; Pupella, Simonetta; Santodirocco, Michele; Greppi, Noemi; Villanova, Ida; Buzzi, Marina; De Fazio, Nicola; Grazzini, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Background In addition to a largely prevalent use for bleeding prophylaxis, platelet concentrates from adult blood have also been used for many years to prepare platelet gels for the repair of topical skin ulcers. Platelet gel can be obtained by activation of fresh, cryopreserved, autologous or allogeneic platelet concentrates with calcium gluconate, thrombin and/or batroxobin. The high content of tissue regenerative factors in cord blood platelets and the widespread availability of allogeneic cord blood units generously donated for haematopoietic transplant but unsuitable for this use solely because of low haematopoietic stem cell content prompted us to develop a national programme to standardise the production of allogeneic cryopreserved cord blood platelet concentrates (CBPC) suitable for later preparation of clinical-grade cord blood platelet gel. Materials and methods Cord blood units collected at public banks with total nucleated cell counts <1.5×109, platelet count >150×109/L and volume >50 mL, underwent soft centrifugation within 48 hours of collection. Platelet-rich plasma was centrifuged at high speed to obtain a CBPC with target platelet concentration of 800–1,200×109/L, which was cryopreserved, without cryoprotectant, below −40 °C. Results During 14 months, 13 banks produced 1,080 CBPC with mean (± standard deviation) volume of 11.4±4.4 mL and platelet concentration of 1,003±229×109/L. Total platelet count per CBPC was 11.3±4.9×109. Platelet recovery from cord blood was 47.7±17.8%. About one-third of cord blood units donated for haematopoietic transplant could meet the requirements for preparation of CBPC. The cost of preparation was € 160.92/CBPC. About 2 hours were needed for one technician to prepare four CBPC. Discussion This study yielded valuable scientific and operational information regarding the development of clinical trials using allogeneic CBPC. PMID:26509822

  9. Focal Plant Observations as a Standardised Method for Pollinator Monitoring: Opportunities and Limitations for Mass Participation Citizen Science

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Helen E.; Baxter, Elizabeth; Saunders, Aoine; Pocock, Michael J. O.

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently there has been increasing focus on monitoring pollinating insects, due to concerns about their declines, and interest in the role of volunteers in monitoring pollinators, particularly bumblebees, via citizen science. Methodology / Principal Findings The Big Bumblebee Discovery was a one-year citizen science project run by a partnership of EDF Energy, the British Science Association and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology which sought to assess the influence of the landscape at multiple scales on the diversity and abundance of bumblebees. Timed counts of bumblebees (Bombus spp.; identified to six colour groups) visiting focal plants of lavender (Lavendula spp.) were carried out by about 13 000 primary school children (7–11 years old) from over 4000 schools across the UK. 3948 reports were received totalling 26 868 bumblebees. We found that while the wider landscape type had no significant effect on reported bumblebee abundance, the local proximity to flowers had a significant effect (fewer bumblebees where other flowers were reported to be >5m away from the focal plant). However, the rate of mis-identifcation, revealed by photographs uploaded by participants and a photo-based quiz, was high. Conclusions / Significance Our citizen science results support recent research on the importance of local flocal resources on pollinator abundance. Timed counts of insects visiting a lure plant is potentially an effective approach for standardised pollinator monitoring, engaging a large number of participants with a simple protocol. However, the relatively high rate of mis-identifications (compared to reports from previous pollinator citizen science projects) highlights the importance of investing in resources to train volunteers. Also, to be a scientifically valid method for enquiry, citizen science data needs to be sufficiently high quality, so receiving supporting evidence (such as photographs) would allow this to be tested and for records to be verified

  10. STANDARDISATION OF SIDDHA DRUGS

    PubMed Central

    Saraswathy, Ariamuthu

    1994-01-01

    Siddha system is the ancient Dravidian system of medicine presently practiced predominantly in South India. In practice, generally the plants used are often in the compound form to which either herbs, metals, minerals and animals products are added. This paper attempts to describe the need for standardizing the drugs since the efficacy of medicines depends on their genuineness, indicating the methodology to be adopted for standardization. PMID:22556676

  11. Standardising infection control precautions.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Lisa; McIntyre, Jackie

    To minimise the risk of infection transmission, standard infection control precautions must be practised whether a patient is known to have an infection. The main aim of any infection control guideline or policy should, therefore, be to make it easy for staff to do the right thing at the right time. This article outlines standard precautions, explains their importance and presents the critical elements that should be applied in all care settings. PMID:26513984

  12. Standardisation of pravala bhasma.

    PubMed

    Rao, V N; Dixit, S K

    1998-01-01

    Now-a-days it has become quite common to use modern electric heating devices in the place of conventional ones. A stud was conducted to standardize the temperature for the preparation of Pravala Bhasma by using Electric Muffle furnace (EMF) The details are presented in this article. PMID:22556842

  13. STANDARDISATION OF PRAVALA BHASMA

    PubMed Central

    Rao, V. Nageshwar; Dixit, S.K

    1998-01-01

    Now-a-days it has become quite common to use modern electric heating devices in the place of conventional ones. A stud was conducted to standardize the temperature for the preparation of Pravala Bhasma by using Electric Muffle furnace (EMF) The details are presented in this article. PMID:22556842

  14. Establishment of an integrated model incorporating standardised uptake value and N-classification for predicting metastasis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Peng, Hao; Sun, Ying; Liu, Qing; Chen, Lei; Ma, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies reported a correlation between the maximum standardised uptake value (SUVmax) obtained by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and distant metastasis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, an integrated model incorporating SUVmax and anatomic staging for stratifying metastasis risk has not been reported. Results The median SUVmax for primary tumour (SUV-T) and cervical lymph nodes (SUV-N) was 13.6 (range, 2.2 to 39.3) and 8.4 (range, 2.6 to 40.9), respectively. SUV-T (HR, 3.396; 95% CI, 1.451-7.947; P = 0.005), SUV-N (HR, 2.688; 95%CI, 1.250-5.781; P = 0.011) and N-classification (HR, 2.570; 95%CI, 1.422-4.579; P = 0.001) were identified as independent predictors for DMFS from multivariate analysis. Three valid risk groups were derived by RPA: low risk (N0-1 + SUV-T <10.45), medium risk (N0-1 + SUV-T >10.45) and high risk (N2-3). The three risk groups contained 100 (22.3%), 226 (50.3%), and 123 (27.4%) patients, respectively, with corresponding 3-year DMFS rates of 99.0%, 91.5%, and 77.5% (P <0.001). Moreover, multivariate analysis confirmed the RPA-based prognostic grouping as the only significant prognostic indicator for DMFS (HR, 3.090; 95%CI, 1.975-4.835; P <0.001). Methods Data from 449 patients with with histologically-confirmed, stage I-IVB NPC treated with radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy were retrospectively analysed. A prognostic model for distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) was derived by recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) combining independent predictors identified by multivariate analysis. Conclusion SUV-T, SUV-N and N-classification were identified as independent predictors for DMFS. An integrated RPA-based prognostic model for DMFS incorporating SUV-N and N-classification was proposed. PMID:26871291

  15. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity and standardisation of hydro-methanol extract of underground tuber of Dioscorea alata.

    PubMed

    Dey, Priyankar; Roy Chowdhuri, Sumedha; Sarkar, Mousumi Poddar; Chaudhuri, Tapas Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Context The underground edible tuber of Dioscorea alata L. (Dioscoreaceae) is a functional food with high nutritive value and therapeutic potential. The tuber is known to possess anti-inflammatory properties in traditional medicine. Objective The present study explores the anti-inflammatory activity and standardisation of D. alata tuber hydromethanol extract. Materials and methods Hydromethanol extract (70%) of D. alata tuber was chemically characterised using HPLC and GC-MS techniques. Murine lymphocytes were cultured for 48 h with six different concentrations (0-80 μg/mL) of the extract. The expression of nitric oxide (NO), TNF-α, COX-1, COX-2, and PGE2 were evaluated using colorimetric and ELISA methods. Results Dioscorea alata extract inhibited the expression of NO and TNF-α with an IC50 value of 134.51 ± 6.75 and 113.30 ± 7.44 μg/mL, respectively. The IC50 values for inhibition of total COX, COX-1, COX-2 activities and PGE2 level were 41.96 ± 3.07, 141.41 ± 8.99, 32.50 ± 1.69, and 186.34 ± 15.36 μg/mL, respectively. Inhibition of PGE2 level and COX-2 activity was positively correlated (R(2) = 0.9393). Gallic acid (GA), 4-hydroxy benzoic acid (4HBA), syringic acid (SYA), p-coumaric acid (PCA), and myricetin (MY) were identified and quantified using HPLC. GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of 13 different phytocompounds such as hexadecanoic acid, methyl stearate, cinnamyl cinnamate, and squalene. Conclusion The D. alata extract significantly down-regulated the pro-inflammatory signals in a gradual manner compared with control (0 μg/mL). Different bioactive phytocompounds individually possessing anti-inflammatory activities contributed to the overall bioactivity of the D. alata tuber extract. PMID:26864460

  16. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) for cancer after renal transplant in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and non-SLE recipients

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Brar, Amarpali; Richardson, Carrie; Salifu, Moro O; Clarke, Ann; Bernatsky, Sasha; Stefanov, Dimitre G; Jindal, Rahul M

    2016-01-01

    Objective We investigated malignancy risk after renal transplantation in patients with and without systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Using the United States Renal Data System from 2001 to 2009, 143 652 renal transplant recipients with and without SLE contributed 585 420 patient-years of follow-up to determine incident cancers using Medicare claims codes. We calculated standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) of cancer by group using age, sex, race/ethnicity-specific and calendar year-specific cancer rates compared with the US population. Results 10 160 cancers occurred at least 3 months after renal transplant. Overall cancer risk was increased in both SLE and non-SLE groups compared with the US general population, SIR 3.5 (95% CI 2.1 to 5.7) and SIR 3.7 (95% CI 2.4 to 5.7), respectively. Lip/oropharyngeal, Kaposi, neuroendocrine, thyroid, renal, cervical, lymphoma, liver, colorectal and breast cancers were increased in both groups, whereas only melanoma was increased in SLE and lung cancer was increased in non-SLE. In Cox regression analysis, SLE status (HR 1.1, 95% CI 0.9 to 1.3) was not associated with increased risk of developing cancer, adjusted for other independent risk factors for developing cancer in renal transplant recipients. We found that smoking (HR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2 to 4.0), cytomegalovirus positivity at time of transplant (HR 1.3, 95% CI 1.2 to 1.4), white race (HR 1.2, 95% CI 1.2 to 1.3) and older recipient age at time of transplantation (HR 1.0 95% CI 1.0 to 1.2) were associated with an increased risk for development of cancer, whereas shorter time on dialysis, Epstein-Barr virus or HIV were associated with a lower risk for development of cancer. Conclusions Cancer risk in renal transplant recipients appeared similar in SLE and non-SLE subjects, aside from melanoma. Renal transplant recipients may need targeted counselling regarding surveillance and modifiable risk factors. PMID:27335659

  17. Standardised exhaled breath collection for the measurement of exhaled volatile organic compounds by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Exhaled breath volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis for airway disease monitoring is promising. However, contrary to nitric oxide the method for exhaled breath collection has not yet been standardized and the effects of expiratory flow and breath-hold have not been sufficiently studied. These manoeuvres may also reveal the origin of exhaled compounds. Methods 15 healthy volunteers (34 ± 7 years) participated in the study. Subjects inhaled through their nose and exhaled immediately at two different flows (5 L/min and 10 L/min) into methylated polyethylene bags. In addition, the effect of a 20 s breath-hold following inhalation to total lung capacity was studied. The samples were analyzed for ethanol and acetone levels immediately using proton-transfer-reaction mass-spectrometer (PTR-MS, Logan Research, UK). Results Ethanol levels were negatively affected by expiratory flow rate (232.70 ± 33.50 ppb vs. 202.30 ± 27.28 ppb at 5 L/min and 10 L/min, respectively, p < 0.05), but remained unchanged following the breath hold (242.50 ± 34.53 vs. 237.90 ± 35.86 ppb, without and with breath hold, respectively, p = 0.11). On the contrary, acetone levels were increased following breath hold (1.50 ± 0.18 ppm) compared to the baseline levels (1.38 ± 0.15 ppm), but were not affected by expiratory flow (1.40 ± 0.14 ppm vs. 1.49 ± 0.14 ppm, 5 L/min vs. 10 L/min, respectively, p = 0.14). The diet had no significant effects on the gasses levels which showed good inter and intra session reproducibility. Conclusions Exhalation parameters such as expiratory flow and breath-hold may affect VOC levels significantly; therefore standardisation of exhaled VOC measurements is mandatory. Our preliminary results suggest a different origin in the respiratory tract for these two gasses. PMID:23837867

  18. Applying the expanding photosphere and standardized candle methods to Type II-Plateau supernovae at cosmologically significant redshifts . The distance to SN 2013eq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, E. E. E.; Kotak, R.; Leibundgut, B.; Taubenberger, S.; Hillebrandt, W.; Kromer, M.

    2016-08-01

    Based on optical imaging and spectroscopy of the Type II-Plateau SN 2013eq, we present a comparative study of commonly used distance determination methods based on Type II supernovae. The occurrence of SN 2013eq in the Hubble flow (z = 0.041 ± 0.001) prompted us to investigate the implications of the difference between "angular" and "luminosity" distances within the framework of the expanding photosphere method (EPM) that relies upon a relation between flux and angular size to yield a distance. Following a re-derivation of the basic equations of the EPM for SNe at non-negligible redshifts, we conclude that the EPM results in an angular distance. The observed flux should be converted into the SN rest frame and the angular size, θ, has to be corrected by a factor of (1 + z)2. Alternatively, the EPM angular distance can be converted to a luminosity distance by implementing a modification of the angular size. For SN 2013eq, we find EPM luminosity distances of DL = 151 ± 18 Mpc and DL = 164 ± 20 Mpc by making use of different sets of dilution factors taken from the literature. Application of the standardized candle method for Type II-P SNe results in an independent luminosity distance estimate (DL = 168 ± 16 Mpc) that is consistent with the EPM estimate. Spectra of SN 2013eq are available in the Weizmann Interactive Supernova data REPository (WISeREP): http://wiserep.weizmann.ac.il

  19. Evaluating a standardised tool to explore the nature and extent of foot and ankle injuries in amateur and semi-professional footballers

    PubMed Central

    Evans, S.; Walker-Bone, K.; Otter, S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Football is a popular sport amongst amateurs as well as professionals. To date, most studies of football injuries have included only professional players and data have been collected in a variety of different ways. There is currently no single validated, standardised tool for the assessment of injures. Therefore, we developed a standardised questionnaire based upon an instrument used in rheumatoid arthritis sufferers and used it in a group of semi-professional and amateur footballers. We quantified the prevalence of foot/ankle injuries and evaluated risk factors for these injuries. Method A trained recorder administered a 33-item questionnaire (recording quantitative and qualitative data) in three football teams, 1 amateur and 2 semi-professional. The questionnaire enquired about demography, football specific information such as footwear and orthoses, and nature & extent of injuries. Results 42/42 eligible footballers completed the questionnaire. 34/42 respondents (81%) reported that they had experienced a total of 273 football-related injuries, 114 of which occurred at the foot or ankle. 70 injuries occurred at the ankle and 44 at the foot and 44% of the footballers had suffered one or more foot/ankle injuries in the past 12 months. Statistically significant relationships were seen between occurrence of lower limb and foot/ankle injuries and age, (p=0.03) weight (p=0.01) height (p=0.01) and shorter duration of warm-up (p). Conclusion The standardised tool performed well with an excellent response rate. Foot and ankle injuries were common in semi-professional and amateur footballers. Amongst this relatively small sample, statistically significant risk factors were identified which may be potential targets for prevention strategies but larger studies will be required. PMID:25605413

  20. Forming implementation intentions improves prospective memory in early psychosis.

    PubMed

    Khoyratty, Nasseema-Bee; Wang, Ya; O'Gorman, John G; Lloyd, Chris; Williams, Philip Lee; Chan, Raymond C K; Shum, David H K

    2015-08-30

    The study examined whether individuals with early psychosis are impaired in prospective memory (PM), that is, remembering to execute a planned intention in the future, and whether implementation intentions can improve their PM performance. Thirty participants with early psychosis and 33 healthy controls were randomly allocated to either an implementation intentions or control condition and completed a computerised event-based PM task. Participants were also administered two standardised tests of PM and an abbreviated IQ test. Results demonstrated that individuals with early psychosis showed PM deficits relative to healthy controls on the computerised PM task and on some standardised measures of PM. The PM performance of the early psychosis group benefited from forming implementation intentions. Implementation intentions was concluded to be an effective strategy for improving PM performance in individuals with early psychosis. PMID:26142837

  1. The relevance, biases, and importance of digitising opportunistic non-standardised collections: A case study in Iberian harvestmen fauna with BOS Arthropod Collection datasets (Arachnida, Opiliones)

    PubMed Central

    Merino-Sáinz, Izaskun; Torralba-Burrial, Antonio; Anadón, Araceli

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we analyse the relevance of harvestmen distribution data derived from opportunistic, unplanned, and non-standardised collection events in an area in the north of the Iberian Peninsula. Using specimens deposited in the BOS Arthropod Collection at the University of Oviedo, we compared these data with data from planned, standardised, and periodic collections with pitfall traps in several locations in the same area. The Arthropod Collection, begun in 1977, includes specimens derived from both sampling types, and its recent digitisation allows for this type of comparative analysis. Therefore, this is the first data-paper employing a hybrid approach, wherein subset metadata are described alongside a comparative analysis. The full dataset can be accessed through Spanish GBIF IPT at http://www.gbif.es:8080/ipt/archive.do?r=Bos-Opi, and the metadata of the unplanned collection events at http://www.gbif.es:8080/ipt/resource.do?r=bos-opi_unplanned_collection_events. We have mapped the data on the 18 harvestmen species included in the unplanned collections and provided records for some species in six provinces for the first time. We have also provided the locations of Phalangium opilio in eight provinces without published records. These results highlight the importance of digitising data from unplanned biodiversity collections, as well as those derived from planned collections, especially in scarcely studied groups and areas. PMID:24843271

  2. The relevance, biases, and importance of digitising opportunistic non-standardised collections: A case study in Iberian harvestmen fauna with BOS Arthropod Collection datasets (Arachnida, Opiliones).

    PubMed

    Merino-Sáinz, Izaskun; Torralba-Burrial, Antonio; Anadón, Araceli

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we analyse the relevance of harvestmen distribution data derived from opportunistic, unplanned, and non-standardised collection events in an area in the north of the Iberian Peninsula. Using specimens deposited in the BOS Arthropod Collection at the University of Oviedo, we compared these data with data from planned, standardised, and periodic collections with pitfall traps in several locations in the same area. The Arthropod Collection, begun in 1977, includes specimens derived from both sampling types, and its recent digitisation allows for this type of comparative analysis. Therefore, this is the first data-paper employing a hybrid approach, wherein subset metadata are described alongside a comparative analysis. The full dataset can be accessed through Spanish GBIF IPT at http://www.gbif.es:8080/ipt/archive.do?r=Bos-Opi, and the metadata of the unplanned collection events at http://www.gbif.es:8080/ipt/resource.do?r=bos-opi_unplanned_collection_events. We have mapped the data on the 18 harvestmen species included in the unplanned collections and provided records for some species in six provinces for the first time. We have also provided the locations of Phalangium opilio in eight provinces without published records. These results highlight the importance of digitising data from unplanned biodiversity collections, as well as those derived from planned collections, especially in scarcely studied groups and areas. PMID:24843271

  3. Repressed ethylene production in the gynoecium of long-lasting flowers of the carnation 'White Candle': role of the gynoecium in carnation flower senescence.

    PubMed

    Nukui, Hideki; Kudo, Sakiko; Yamashita, Atsushi; Satoh, Shigeru

    2004-03-01

    Ethylene production and expression of ethylene biosynthetic genes was investigated in senescing flowers of carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) cultivars 'White Candle (WC)' and 'Light Pink Barbara (LPB)', with long and short vase-lives, respectively. Ethylene production from the gynoecium and petals of senescing 'WC' flowers was below the limit of detection, in agreement with the repressed ethylene production from the whole flowers. However, exogenous ethylene treatment caused the accumulation of transcripts for DC-ACS1 and DC-ACO1 genes in both the gynoecium and petals, resulting in ethylene production from the flowers. Moreover, application of ABA or IAA, which are known to exhibit their action through the induction of ethylene synthesis in the gynoecium, to 'WC' flowers from their cut stem-end induced ethylene production and wilting in the flowers. These findings suggested that, in 'WC' flowers the mechanism of ethylene biosynthesis, i.e. the induction of expression of genes for ethylene biosynthesis and the action of resulting enzymes, was not defective, but that its function was repressed during natural senescence. Transcripts of DC-ACO1, DC-ACS3, and DC-ACS1 were present in the gynoecium of senescing 'LPB' flowers. In the gynoecium of senescing 'WC' flowers, however, the DC-ACO1 transcript was present, but the DC-ACS1 transcript was absent and the DC-ACS3 transcript was detected only in a small amount; the latter two were associated with the low rate of ethylene production in the gynoecium of 'WC' flowers. These findings indicated that the repressed ethylene production in 'WC' flowers during natural senescence is caused by the repressed ethylene production in the gynoecium, giving further support for the role of the gynoecium in regulating petal senescence in carnation flowers. PMID:14966220

  4. Bactericidal activity and silver release of porous ceramic candle filter prepared by sintering silica with silver nanoparticles/zeolite for water disinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh Nguyen, Thuy Ai; Phu Dang, Van; Duy Nguyen, Ngoc; Le, Anh Quoc; Thanh Nguyen, Duc; Hien Nguyen, Quoc

    2014-09-01

    Porous ceramic candle filters (PCCF) were prepared by sintering silica from rice husk with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)/zeolite A at about 1050 °C to create bactericidal PCCF/AgNPs for water disinfection. The silver content in PCCF/AgNPs was of 300-350 mg kg-1 determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and the average pore size of PCCF/AgNPs was of 50-70 Å measured by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method. The bactericidal activity and silver release of PCCF/AgNPs have been investigated by flow test with water flow rate of 5 L h-1 and initial inoculation of E. coli in inlet water of 106 CFU/100 mL. The volume of filtrated water was collected up to 500 L. Results showed that the contamination of E. coli in filtrated water was <1 CFU/100 mL and the content of silver released from PCCF/AgNPs into filtrated water was <1 μg L-1, it is low, far under the WHO guideline of 100 μg L-1 at maximum for drinking water. Based on the content of silver in PCCF/AgNPs and in filtrated water, it was estimated that one PCCF/AgNPs could be used to filtrate of ˜100 m3 water. Thus, as-prepared PCCF/AgNPs releases low content of silver into water and shows effectively bactericidal activity that is promising to apply as point-of-use water treatment technology for drinking water disinfection.

  5. Dietary patterns in pregnancy and effects on nutrient intake in the Mid-South: the Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood (CANDLE) study.

    PubMed

    Völgyi, Eszter; Carroll, Kecia N; Hare, Marion E; Ringwald-Smith, Karen; Piyathilake, Chandrika; Yoo, Wonsuk; Tylavsky, Frances A

    2013-05-01

    Dietary patterns are sensitive to differences across socio-economic strata or cultural habits and may impact programing of diseases in later life. The purpose of this study was to identify distinct dietary patterns during pregnancy in the Mid-South using factor analysis. Furthermore, we aimed to analyze the differences in the food groups and in macro- and micronutrients among the different food patterns. The study was a cross-sectional analysis of 1155 pregnant women (mean age 26.5 ± 5.4 years; 62% African American, 35% Caucasian, 3% Other; and pre-pregnancy BMI 27.6 ± 7.5 kg/m(2)). Using food frequency questionnaire data collected from participants in the Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood (CANDLE) study between 16 and 28 weeks of gestation, dietary patterns were identified using factor analysis. Three major dietary patterns, namely, Healthy, Processed, and US Southern were identified among pregnant women from the Mid-South. Further analysis of the three main patterns revealed four mixed dietary patterns, i.e., Healthy-Processed, Healthy-US Southern, Processed-US Southern, and overall Mixed. These dietary patterns were different (p < 0.001) from each other in almost all the food items, macro- and micro nutrients and aligned across socioeconomic and racial groups. Our study describes unique dietary patterns in the Mid-South, consumed by a cohort of women enrolled in a prospective study examining the association of maternal nutritional factors during pregnancy that are known to affect brain and cognitive development by age 3. PMID:23645026

  6. Dietary Patterns in Pregnancy and Effects on Nutrient Intake in the Mid-South: The Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood (CANDLE) Study

    PubMed Central

    Völgyi, Eszter; Carroll, Kecia N.; Hare, Marion E.; Ringwald-Smith, Karen; Piyathilake, Chandrika; Yoo, Wonsuk; Tylavsky, Frances A.

    2013-01-01

    Dietary patterns are sensitive to differences across socio-economic strata or cultural habits and may impact programing of diseases in later life. The purpose of this study was to identify distinct dietary patterns during pregnancy in the Mid-South using factor analysis. Furthermore, we aimed to analyze the differences in the food groups and in macro- and micronutrients among the different food patterns. The study was a cross-sectional analysis of 1155 pregnant women (mean age 26.5 ± 5.4 years; 62% African American, 35% Caucasian, 3% Other; and pre-pregnancy BMI 27.6 ± 7.5 kg/m2). Using food frequency questionnaire data collected from participants in the Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood (CANDLE) study between 16 and 28 weeks of gestation, dietary patterns were identified using factor analysis. Three major dietary patterns, namely, Healthy, Processed, and US Southern were identified among pregnant women from the Mid-South. Further analysis of the three main patterns revealed four mixed dietary patterns, i.e., Healthy-Processed, Healthy-US Southern, Processed-US Southern, and overall Mixed. These dietary patterns were different (p < 0.001) from each other in almost all the food items, macro- and micro nutrients and aligned across socioeconomic and racial groups. Our study describes unique dietary patterns in the Mid-South, consumed by a cohort of women enrolled in a prospective study examining the association of maternal nutritional factors during pregnancy that are known to affect brain and cognitive development by age 3. PMID:23645026

  7. Towards standardisation and improved understanding of sleep restriction therapy for insomnia disorder: A systematic examination of CBT-I trial content.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Simon D; Aquino, Maria Raisa Jessica; Miller, Christopher B; Henry, Alasdair L; Crawford, Megan R; Espie, Colin A; Spielman, Arthur J

    2015-10-01

    Sleep restriction therapy is a core element of contemporary cognitive-behavioural therapy for insomnia and is also effective as a single-component therapeutic strategy. Since its original description, sleep restriction therapy has been applied in several different ways, potentially limiting understanding of key therapeutic ingredients, mode of action, evidence synthesis, and clinical implementation. We sought to examine the quality of reporting and variability in the application of sleep restriction therapy within the context of insomnia intervention trials. Systematic literature searches revealed 88 trials of cognitive-behavioural therapy/sleep restriction therapy that met pre-defined inclusion/exclusion criteria. All papers were coded in relation to their description of sleep restriction therapy procedures. Findings indicate that a large proportion of papers (39%) do not report any details regarding sleep restriction therapy parameters and, for those papers that do, variability in implementation is present at every level (sleep window generation, minimum time-in-bed, sleep efficiency titration criteria, and positioning of sleep window). Only 7% of papers reported all parameters of sleep restriction treatment. Poor reporting and variability in the application of sleep restriction therapy may hinder progress in relation to evidence synthesis, specification of mechanistic components, and refinement of therapeutic procedures for patient benefit. We set out guidelines for the reporting of sleep restriction therapy as well as a research agenda aimed at advancing understanding of sleep restriction therapy. PMID:25771293

  8. Making the Standard Candle: A study of how the progenitor white dwarf modulates the peak luminosity of type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Edward F

    2010-01-21

    The goals of the proposed research as stated in the proposal were to: • Build a suite of one-dimensional initial models of different metallicities and central densities. • Using the improved flame capturing scheme, simulate the explosion of a white dwarf with embedded Lagrangian tracer particles, and post-process the thermal histories of the tracers to reconstruct the nucleosynthesis of the explosion. • Survey the effects of a changing progenitor metallicity on the isotopic yields. Of particular interest is 1) whether the linear relation between the mass of 56Ni synthesized and the pro- genitor metallicity is moderated by the effect of electron captures in the core; and 2) how a varying central density alters the relation between metallicity and 56Ni mass. • Using these results, examine how the observed metallicity distribution would affect the brightness distribution of SNe Ia and the isotopic ratios about the Fe-peak.

  9. Curved reformat of the paediatric brain MRI into a 'flat-earth map' - standardised method for demonstrating cortical surface atrophy resulting from hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Ewan; Andronikou, Savvas; Vedajallam, Schadie; Chacko, Anith; Thai, Ngoc Jade

    2016-09-01

    Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy is optimally imaged with brain MRI in the neonatal period. However neuroimaging is often also performed later in childhood (e.g., when parents seek compensation in cases of alleged birth asphyxia). We describe a standardised technique for creating two curved reconstructions of the cortical surface to show the characteristic surface changes of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy in children imaged after the neonatal period. The technique was applied for 10 cases of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy and also for age-matched healthy children to assess the visibility of characteristic features of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. In the abnormal brains, fissural or sulcal widening was seen in all cases and ulegyria was identifiable in 7/10. These images could be used as a visual aid for communicating MRI findings to clinicians and other interested parties. PMID:27337989

  10. Effects of the pharmaceuticals gemfibrozil and diclofenac on biomarker expression in the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) and their comparison with standardised toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Brian; Schmidt, Wiebke; O'Rourke, Kathleen; Hernan, Robert

    2011-07-01

    Pharmaceuticals, including the lipid regulator gemfibrozil and the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac have been identified in waste water treatment plant effluents and receiving waters throughout the western world. The acute and chronic toxicity of these compounds was assessed for three freshwater species (Daphnia magna, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, Lemna minor) using standardised toxicity tests with toxicity found in the non-environmentally relevant mid mg L(-1) concentration range. For the acute endpoints (IC(50) and EC(50)) gemfibrozil showed higher toxicity ranging from 29 to 59 mg L(-1) (diclofenac 47-67 mg L(-1)), while diclofenac was more toxic for the chronic D. magna 21 d endpoints ranging from 10 to 56 mg L(-1) (gemfibrozil 32-100 mg L(-1)). These results were compared with the expression of several biomarkers in the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) 24 and 96 h after exposure by injection to concentrations of 21 and 21,000 μg L(-1) corresponding to nominal concentrations of 1 and 1000 μg L(-1). Exposure to gemfibrozil and diclofenac at both concentrations significantly increased the level of lipid peroxidation, a biomarker of damage. At the elevated nominal concentration of 1000 μg L(-1) the biomarkers of defence glutathione transferase and metallothionein were significantly elevated for gemfibrozil and diclofenac respectively, as was DNA damage after 96 h exposure to gemfibrozil. No evidence of endocrine disruption was observed using the alkali-labile phosphate technique. Results from this suite of biomarkers indicate these compounds can cause significant stress at environmentally relevant concentrations acting primarily through oxidation pathways with significant destabilization of the lysosomal membrane and that biomarker expression is a more sensitive endpoint than standardised toxicity tests. PMID:21489596

  11. Towards a standardised informed consent procedure for live donor nephrectomy: the PRINCE (Process of Informed Consent Evaluation) project—study protocol for a nationwide prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kortram, Kirsten; Spoon, Emerentia Q W; Ismail, Sohal Y; d'Ancona, Frank C H; Christiaans, Maarten H L; van Heurn, L W Ernest; Hofker, H Sijbrand; Hoksbergen, Arjan W J; Homan van der Heide, Jaap J; Idu, Mirza M; Looman, Caspar W N; Nurmohamed, S Azam; Ringers, Jan; Toorop, Raechel J; van de Wetering, Jacqueline; Ijzermans, Jan N M; Dor, Frank J M F

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Informed consent is mandatory for all (surgical) procedures, but it is even more important when it comes to living kidney donors undergoing surgery for the benefit of others. Donor education, leading to informed consent, needs to be carried out according to certain standards. Informed consent procedures for live donor nephrectomy vary per centre, and even per individual healthcare professional. The basis for a standardised, uniform surgical informed consent procedure for live donor nephrectomy can be created by assessing what information donors need to hear to prepare them for the operation and convalescence. Methods and analysis The PRINCE (Process of Informed Consent Evaluation) project is a prospective, multicentre cohort study, to be carried out in all eight Dutch kidney transplant centres. Donor knowledge of the procedure and postoperative course will be evaluated by means of pop quizzes. A baseline cohort (prior to receiving any information from a member of the transplant team in one of the transplant centres) will be compared with a control group, the members of which receive the pop quiz on the day of admission for donor nephrectomy. Donor satisfaction will be evaluated for all donors who completed the admission pop-quiz. The primary end point is donor knowledge. In addition, those elements that have to be included in the standardised format informed consent procedure will be identified. Secondary end points are donor satisfaction, current informed consent practices in the different centres (eg, how many visits, which personnel, what kind of information is disclosed, in which format, etc) and correlation of donor knowledge with surgeons' estimation thereof. Ethics and dissemination Approval for this study was obtained from the medical ethical committee of the Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, on 18 February 2015. Secondary approval has been obtained from the local ethics committees in six participating centres. Approval in the

  12. Adapting High-Resolution Respirometry to Glucose-Limited Steady State Mycelium of the Filamentous Fungus Penicillium ochrochloron: Method Development and Standardisation

    PubMed Central

    Schinagl, Christoph W.; Vrabl, Pamela; Burgstaller, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Fungal electron transport systems (ETS) are branched, involving alternative NADH dehydrogenases and an alternative terminal oxidase. These alternative respiratory enzymes were reported to play a role in pathogenesis, production of antibiotics and excretion of organic acids. The activity of these alternative respiratory enzymes strongly depends on environmental conditions. Functional analysis of fungal ETS under highly standardised conditions for cultivation, sample processing and respirometric assay are still lacking. We developed a highly standardised protocol to explore in vivo the ETS—and in particular the alternative oxidase—in Penicillium ochrochloron. This included cultivation in glucose-limited chemostat (to achieve a defined and reproducible physiological state), direct transfer without any manipulation of a broth sample to the respirometer (to maintain the physiological state in the respirometer as close as possible to that in the chemostat), and high-resolution respirometry (small sample volume and high measuring accuracy). This protocol was aimed at avoiding any changes in the physiological phenotype due to the high phenotypic plasticity of filamentous fungi. A stable oxygen consumption (< 5% change in 20 minutes) was only possible with glucose limited chemostat mycelium and a direct transfer of a broth sample into the respirometer. Steady state respiration was 29% below its maximum respiratory capacity. Additionally to a rotenone-sensitive complex I and most probably a functioning complex III, the ETS of P. ochrochloron also contained a cyanide-sensitive terminal oxidase (complex IV). Activity of alternative oxidase was present constitutively. The degree of inhibition strongly depended on the sequence of inhibitor addition. This suggested, as postulated for plants, that the alternative terminal oxidase was in dynamic equilibrium with complex IV—independent of the rate of electron flux. This means that the onset of activity does not depend on a

  13. Adapting High-Resolution Respirometry to Glucose-Limited Steady State Mycelium of the Filamentous Fungus Penicillium ochrochloron: Method Development and Standardisation.

    PubMed

    Schinagl, Christoph W; Vrabl, Pamela; Burgstaller, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Fungal electron transport systems (ETS) are branched, involving alternative NADH dehydrogenases and an alternative terminal oxidase. These alternative respiratory enzymes were reported to play a role in pathogenesis, production of antibiotics and excretion of organic acids. The activity of these alternative respiratory enzymes strongly depends on environmental conditions. Functional analysis of fungal ETS under highly standardised conditions for cultivation, sample processing and respirometric assay are still lacking. We developed a highly standardised protocol to explore in vivo the ETS-and in particular the alternative oxidase-in Penicillium ochrochloron. This included cultivation in glucose-limited chemostat (to achieve a defined and reproducible physiological state), direct transfer without any manipulation of a broth sample to the respirometer (to maintain the physiological state in the respirometer as close as possible to that in the chemostat), and high-resolution respirometry (small sample volume and high measuring accuracy). This protocol was aimed at avoiding any changes in the physiological phenotype due to the high phenotypic plasticity of filamentous fungi. A stable oxygen consumption (< 5% change in 20 minutes) was only possible with glucose limited chemostat mycelium and a direct transfer of a broth sample into the respirometer. Steady state respiration was 29% below its maximum respiratory capacity. Additionally to a rotenone-sensitive complex I and most probably a functioning complex III, the ETS of P. ochrochloron also contained a cyanide-sensitive terminal oxidase (complex IV). Activity of alternative oxidase was present constitutively. The degree of inhibition strongly depended on the sequence of inhibitor addition. This suggested, as postulated for plants, that the alternative terminal oxidase was in dynamic equilibrium with complex IV-independent of the rate of electron flux. This means that the onset of activity does not depend on a complete

  14. A standardised, generic, validated approach to stratify the magnitude of clinical benefit that can be anticipated from anti-cancer therapies: the European Society for Medical Oncology Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (ESMO-MCBS).

    PubMed

    Cherny, N I; Sullivan, R; Dafni, U; Kerst, J M; Sobrero, A; Zielinski, C; de Vries, E G E; Piccart, M J

    2015-08-01

    The value of any new therapeutic strategy or treatment is determined by the magnitude of its clinical benefit balanced against its cost. Evidence for clinical benefit from new treatment options is derived from clinical research, in particular phase III randomised trials, which generate unbiased data regarding the efficacy, benefit and safety of new therapeutic approaches. To date, there is no standard tool for grading the magnitude of clinical benefit of cancer therapies, which may range from trivial (median progression-free survival advantage of only a few weeks) to substantial (improved long-term survival). Indeed, in the absence of a standardised approach for grading the magnitude of clinical benefit, conclusions and recommendations derived from studies are often hotly disputed and very modest incremental advances have often been presented, discussed and promoted as major advances or 'breakthroughs'. Recognising the importance of presenting clear and unbiased statements regarding the magnitude of the clinical benefit from new therapeutic approaches derived from high-quality clinical trials, the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) has developed a validated and reproducible tool to assess the magnitude of clinical benefit for cancer medicines, the ESMO Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (ESMO-MCBS). This tool uses a rational, structured and consistent approach to derive a relative ranking of the magnitude of clinically meaningful benefit that can be expected from a new anti-cancer treatment. The ESMO-MCBS is an important first step to the critical public policy issue of value in cancer care, helping to frame the appropriate use of limited public and personal resources to deliver cost-effective and affordable cancer care. The ESMO-MCBS will be a dynamic tool and its criteria will be revised on a regular basis. PMID:26026162

  15. Evaluation of a standardised real-time PCR based DNA-detection method (Realstar®) in whole blood for the diagnosis of primary human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections in immunocompetent patients.

    PubMed

    Berth, M; Benoy, I; Christensen, N

    2016-02-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA detection in blood could, as a supplementary test to serology, improve the accuracy and speed of diagnosis of an acute CMV infection. In this study we evaluated the performance of a commercially available and standardised CMV PCR assay in whole blood for the diagnosis of a primary infection in immunocompetent adults. Moreover, the kinetics of viral DNA was evaluated in order to provide a time frame in which viral DNA could be detected during an acute primary infection. Whole blood samples were collected from 66 patients with an acute CMV infection, 65 patients with an acute Epstein-Barr virus infection, 27 patients with various other acute infections (parvovirus B19, HIV, Toxoplasma gondii), 20 patients with past CMV infections (>1 year) and 20 apparently healthy persons. For CMV DNA detection and quantification a commercially available real-time PCR was applied (RealStar®, altona Diagnostics). The clinical sensitivity of CMV PCR in whole blood for the diagnosis of a recent primary CMV infection was 93.9 % and the diagnostic specificity 99.2 %. In the majority of the patients CMV DNA was not detectable anymore approximately within 4 weeks after the first blood sample was taken. From these data we concluded that, together with a suggestive serological profile, a positive CMV PCR result in whole blood can be regarded as a diagnostic confirmation of a recent CMV infection on a single blood sample in an immunocompetent patient. However, a negative CMV PCR result does not exclude a recent CMV infection. PMID:26661089

  16. Testing and Improving the Luminosity Relations for Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collazzi, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) have several luminosity relations where a measurable property of a burst light curve or spectrum is correlated with the burst luminosity. These luminosity relations are calibrated for the fraction of bursts with spectroscopic redshifts and hence the known luminosities. GRBs have thus become known as a type of "standard candle” where standard candle is meant in the usual sense that luminosities can be derived from measurable properties of the bursts. GRBs can therefore be used for the same cosmology applications as Type Ia supernovae, including the construction of the Hubble Diagram and measuring massive star formation rate. The greatest disadvantage of using GRBs as standard candles is that their accuracy is lower than desired. With the recent advent of GRBs as a new standard candle, every effort must be made to test and improve the distance measures. Here, methods are employed to do just that. First, generalized forms of two tests are performed on the luminosity relations. All the luminosity relations pass one of these tests, and all but two pass the other. Even with this failure, redundancies in using multiple luminosity relations allows all the luminosity relations to retain value. Next, the "Firmani relation” is shown to have poorer accuracy than first advertised. It is also shown to be derivable from two other luminosity relations. For these reasons, the Firmani relation is useless for cosmology. The Amati relation is then revisited and shown to be an artifact of a combination of selection effects. Therefore, the Amati relation is also not good for cosmology. Fourthly, the systematic errors involved in measuring a luminosity indicator (Epeak) are measured. The result is an irreducible systematic error of 28%. Finally, the work concludes with a discussion about the impact of the work and the future of GRB luminosity relations.

  17. Optimisation of Healthcare Contracts: Tensions Between Standardisation and Innovation: Comment on "Competition in Healthcare: Good, Bad or Ugly?".

    PubMed

    Mikkers, Misja; Ryan, Padhraig

    2016-02-01

    An important determinant of health system performance is contracting. Providers often respond to financial incentives, despite the ethical underpinnings of medicine, and payers can craft contracts to influence performance. Yet contracting is highly imperfect in both single-payer and multi-payer health systems. Arguably, in a competitive, multi-payer environment, contractual innovation may occur more rapidly than in a single-payer system. This innovation in contract design could enhance performance. However, contractual innovation often fails to improve performance as payer incentives are misaligned with public policy objectives. Numerous countries seek to improve healthcare contracts, but thus far no health system has demonstrably crafted the necessary blend of incentives to stimulate optimal contracting. PMID:26927400

  18. Cherry-Slush-Candling Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, James B.; Weiss, James R.; Hoover, Gordon

    1996-01-01

    Proposed infrared-scanning apparatus for use in bakeries making cherry pies detect cherry pits remaining in cherry slush after pitting process. Pits detected via their relative opacity to infrared radiation.

  19. Not-so-standard candles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Matthew R.

    2015-10-01

    The discovery in the 1990s that the expansion of the universe is accelerating relied on the assumption that type Ia supernovae could all be calibrated to have the same brightness as each other. But as Matthew R Francis reports, new evidence shows that these objects in fact come in two previously indistinguished varieties.

  20. Properties of ceramic candle filters

    SciTech Connect

    Pontius, D.H.

    1995-06-01

    The mechanical integrity of ceramic filter elements is a key issue for hot gas cleanup systems. To meet the demands of the advanced power systems, the filter components must sustain the thermal stresses of normal operations (pulse cleaning), of start-up and shut-down conditions, and of unanticipated process upsets such as excessive ash accumulation without catastrophic failure. They must also survive the various mechanical loads associated with handling and assembly, normal operation, and process upsets. For near-term filter systems, these elements must survive at operating temperatures of 1650{degrees}F for three years.

  1. First Candle/SIDS Alliance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sleep sponsored by Delta Children Baby Safety in Day Care and with the Babysitter sponsored by Love to ... them: Safe Sleep Media Stars Safe Sleep in Day Care Pregnant and Empowered Safe Sleep for Military Parents ...

  2. Global coordination and standardisation in marine biodiversity through the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) and related databases.

    PubMed

    Costello, Mark J; Bouchet, Philippe; Boxshall, Geoff; Fauchald, Kristian; Gordon, Dennis; Hoeksema, Bert W; Poore, Gary C B; van Soest, Rob W M; Stöhr, Sabine; Walter, T Chad; Vanhoorne, Bart; Decock, Wim; Appeltans, Ward

    2013-01-01

    The World Register of Marine Species is an over 90% complete open-access inventory of all marine species names. Here we illustrate the scale of the problems with species names, synonyms, and their classification, and describe how WoRMS publishes online quality assured information on marine species. Within WoRMS, over 100 global, 12 regional and 4 thematic species databases are integrated with a common taxonomy. Over 240 editors from 133 institutions and 31 countries manage the content. To avoid duplication of effort, content is exchanged with 10 external databases. At present WoRMS contains 460,000 taxonomic names (from Kingdom to subspecies), 368,000 species level combinations of which 215,000 are currently accepted marine species names, and 26,000 related but non-marine species. Associated information includes 150,000 literature sources, 20,000 images, and locations of 44,000 specimens. Usage has grown linearly since its launch in 2007, with about 600,000 unique visitors to the website in 2011, and at least 90 organisations from 12 countries using WoRMS for their data management. By providing easy access to expert-validated content, WoRMS improves quality control in the use of species names, with consequent benefits to taxonomy, ecology, conservation and marine biodiversity research and management. The service manages information on species names that would otherwise be overly costly for individuals, and thus minimises errors in the application of nomenclature standards. WoRMS' content is expanding to include host-parasite relationships, additional literature sources, locations of specimens, images, distribution range, ecological, and biological data. Species are being categorised as introduced (alien, invasive), of conservation importance, and on other attributes. These developments have a multiplier effect on its potential as a resource for biodiversity research and management. As a consequence of WoRMS, we are witnessing improved communication within the

  3. Global Coordination and Standardisation in Marine Biodiversity through the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) and Related Databases

    PubMed Central

    Bouchet, Philippe; Boxshall, Geoff; Fauchald, Kristian; Gordon, Dennis; Hoeksema, Bert W.; Poore, Gary C. B.; van Soest, Rob W. M.; Stöhr, Sabine; Walter, T. Chad; Vanhoorne, Bart; Decock, Wim

    2013-01-01

    The World Register of Marine Species is an over 90% complete open-access inventory of all marine species names. Here we illustrate the scale of the problems with species names, synonyms, and their classification, and describe how WoRMS publishes online quality assured information on marine species. Within WoRMS, over 100 global, 12 regional and 4 thematic species databases are integrated with a common taxonomy. Over 240 editors from 133 institutions and 31 countries manage the content. To avoid duplication of effort, content is exchanged with 10 external databases. At present WoRMS contains 460,000 taxonomic names (from Kingdom to subspecies), 368,000 species level combinations of which 215,000 are currently accepted marine species names, and 26,000 related but non-marine species. Associated information includes 150,000 literature sources, 20,000 images, and locations of 44,000 specimens. Usage has grown linearly since its launch in 2007, with about 600,000 unique visitors to the website in 2011, and at least 90 organisations from 12 countries using WoRMS for their data management. By providing easy access to expert-validated content, WoRMS improves quality control in the use of species names, with consequent benefits to taxonomy, ecology, conservation and marine biodiversity research and management. The service manages information on species names that would otherwise be overly costly for individuals, and thus minimises errors in the application of nomenclature standards. WoRMS' content is expanding to include host-parasite relationships, additional literature sources, locations of specimens, images, distribution range, ecological, and biological data. Species are being categorised as introduced (alien, invasive), of conservation importance, and on other attributes. These developments have a multiplier effect on its potential as a resource for biodiversity research and management. As a consequence of WoRMS, we are witnessing improved communication within the

  4. Behavioural and Electrophysiological Evidence of Impaired Learning and Memory in Male Sprague Dawley Rats following Subchronic Exposure to Standardised Methanolic Extract of Mitragyna speciosa Korth

    PubMed Central

    ILMIE, Mohd Ulul; MANSOR, Sharif Mahsufi; ABDULLAH, Jafri Malin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mitragyna speciosa (MS) or ketum is primarily found in Southeast Asia, particularly in northern Malaysia and Thailand. The medicinal value of this plant has attracted significant attention from both herbal medicine practitioners and scientists worldwide. Despite having illegal consumption status, the plant merits study. We conducted a series of experiments to test our hypothesis that ketum impairs both learning and memory in rats. Methods: Ketum leaves were extracted using methanol and standardised for the amount of its pure compound, mitragynine. Rats were divided into groups for a passive avoidance task and long-term potentiation (LTP) extracellular recording. In the extracellular recording condition, rats were grouped into control, MS100 (100 mg/kg of ketum extract), MS200 (200 mg/kg of ketum extract), and MS500 (500 mg/kg of ketum extract) groups. An additional group that received morphine was included in the passive avoidance task (10 mg/kg), and there were six animals per group. Rats received daily treatments orally for 28 days for both experiments. Result: Using a passive avoidance task, our data revealed that the rats' memory significantly increased with increasing doses of MS compared to the morphine-treated group. Our findings from LTP recordings showed that LTP was fully blocked by the higher doses of MS. Conclusion: We speculate on the possibility that additional factors were involved in the passive avoidance task because it was an in vivo animal study, while the LTP experiment solely involved brain slices. PMID:27006637

  5. The Modified Rainfall Anomaly Index (mRAI)—is this an alternative to the Standardised Precipitation Index (SPI) in evaluating future extreme precipitation characteristics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänsel, Stephanie; Schucknecht, Anne; Matschullat, Jörg

    2016-02-01

    Precipitation extremes affect various economic sectors and may result in substantial costs for societies. Future projections of such extreme occurrences are needed to successfully develop robust regional adaptation strategies. Model ensemble-based approaches provide a higher level of confidence since they compensate to some degree for the uncertainties of individual climate model projections. An ensemble of twelve regional climate projections from five regional climate models was used to evaluate the suitability of a modified version of the Rainfall Anomaly Index (mRAI) as an alternative to the Standardised Precipitation Index (SPI) in assessing future precipitation conditions. We compared frequency distributions and trends of the mRAI with the SPI for a test region that is climatologically representative of Central Eastern Europe. Both indices are highly correlated with each other at all tested timescales—both for stations and for regionally averaged data—with Pearson correlation coefficients >>0.9 and Spearman correlation coefficients >0.99. There are no significant differences in their frequency distributions, although the mRAI shows slightly higher frequencies in the classes of `moderately dry' to `very dry' conditions. The change signals revealed by SPI and mRAI are very similar for mean changes as well as for changes in the extremes. Considering the large bandwidth of change signals of individual regional climate projections, the mRAI provides sufficiently robust results for the evaluation of future precipitation anomaly trends. The notably more complex calculation of the SPI has no appreciable advantage for this application.

  6. Standardised Mindfulness-Based Interventions in Healthcare: An Overview of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses of RCTs

    PubMed Central

    Gotink, Rinske A.; Chu, Paula; Busschbach, Jan J. V.; Benson, Herbert; Fricchione, Gregory L.; Hunink, M. G. Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Background Mindfulness-based therapies are being used in a wide range of common chronic conditions in both treatment and prevention despite lack of consensus about their effectiveness in different patient categories. Objective To systematically review the evidence of effectiveness MBSR and MBCT in different patient categories. Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis of systematic reviews of RCTs, using the standardized MBSR or MBCT programs. We used PRISMA guidelines to assess the quality of the included reviews and performed a random effects meta-analysis with main outcome measure Cohen’s d. All types of participants were considered. Results The search produced 187 reviews: 23 were included, covering 115 unique RCTs and 8,683 unique individuals with various conditions. Compared to wait list control and compared to treatment as usual, MBSR and MBCT significantly improved depressive symptoms (d=0.37; 95%CI 0.28 to 0.45, based on 5 reviews, N=2814), anxiety (d=0.49; 95%CI 0.37 to 0.61, based on 4 reviews, N=2525), stress (d=0.51; 95%CI 0.36 to 0.67, based on 2 reviews, N=1570), quality of life (d=0.39; 95%CI 0.08 to 0.70, based on 2 reviews, N=511) and physical functioning (d=0.27; 95%CI 0.12 to 0.42, based on 3 reviews, N=1015). Limitations include heterogeneity within patient categories, risk of publication bias and limited long-term follow-up in several studies. Conclusion The evidence supports the use of MBSR and MBCT to alleviate symptoms, both mental and physical, in the adjunct treatment of cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic pain, depression, anxiety disorders and in prevention in healthy adults and children. PMID:25881019

  7. Standardised packaging and new enlarged graphic health warnings for tobacco products in Australia—legislative requirements and implementation of the Tobacco Plain Packaging Act 2011 and the Competition and Consumer (Tobacco) Information Standard, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Scollo, Michelle; Lindorff, Kylie; Coomber, Kerri; Bayly, Megan; Wakefield, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development, content and implementation of two pieces of Australian tobacco control legislation: one to standardise the packaging of tobacco products and the other to introduce new, enlarged graphic health warnings. It describes the process of legislative drafting, public consultation and parliamentary consideration. It summarises exactly how tobacco products have been required to look since late 2012. Finally, it describes implementation, most particularly, the extent to which packs compliant with the legislation became available to consumers over time.

  8. A randomised controlled pilot study of standardised counselling and cost-free pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation among stroke and TIA patients.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Sophia; Aitken, Debbie; Gocan, Sophia; Riley, Dana; Laplante, Mary Ann; Bhatnagar-Bost, Abha; Cousineau, Donna; Simpson, Danielle; Edjoc, Rojiemiahd; Pipe, Andrew L; Sharma, Mukul; Reid, Robert D

    2011-01-01

    Background Tobacco use is a major risk factor for recurrent stroke. The provision of cost-free quit smoking medications has been shown to be efficacious in increasing smoking abstinence in the general population. Objective The objective of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility and obtain preliminary data on the effectiveness of providing cost-free quit smoking pharmacotherapy and counselling to smokers identified in a stroke prevention clinic. Trial design Cluster randomised controlled trial. Methods All patients seen at the Ottawa Hospital Stroke Prevention Clinic who smoked more five or more cigarettes per day, were ready to quit smoking in the next 30 days, and were willing to use pharmacotherapy were invited to participate in the study. All participants were advised to quit smoking and treated using a standardised protocol including counselling and pharmacotherapy. Participants were randomly assigned to either a prescription only usual care group or an experimental group who received a 4-week supply of cost-free quit smoking medications and a prescription for medication renewal. All patients received follow-up counselling. The primary outcome was biochemically validated quit rates at 26 weeks. The research coordinator conducting outcome assessment was blind to group allocation. Results Of 219 smokers screened, 73 were eligible, 28 consented and were randomised, and 25 completed the 26-week follow-up assessment. All 28 patients randomised were included in the analysis. The biochemically validated 7-day point prevalence abstinence rate in the experimental group compared to the usual care group was 26.6% vs 15.4% (adjusted OR 2.00, 95% CI 0.33 to 13.26; p=0.20). Conclusions It would be feasible to definitively evaluate this intervention in a large multi-site trial. Trial registration number http://ClinicalTrials.gov # UOHI2010-1. PMID:22123923

  9. Covert checks by standardised patients of general practitioners' delivery of new periodic health examinations: clustered cross-sectional study from a consumer organisation

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Kylie; Harris, Mark F

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess if data collected by a consumer organisation are valid for a health service research study on physicians' performance in preventive care. To report first results of the analysis of physicians performance like consultation time and guideline adherence in history taking. Design Secondary data analysis of a clustered cross-sectional direct observation survey. Setting General practitioners (GPs) in Vienna, Austria, visited unannounced by mystery shoppers (incognito standardised patients (ISPs)). Participants 21 randomly selected GPs were visited by two different ISPs each. 40 observation protocols were realised. Main outcome measures Robustness of sampling and data collection by the consumer organisation. GPs consultation and waiting times, guideline adherence in history taking. Results The double stratified random sampling method was robust and representative for the private and contracted GPs mix of Vienna. The clinical scenarios presented by the ISPs were valid and believable, and no GP realised the ISPs were not genuine patients. The average consultation time was 46 min (95% CI 37 to 54 min). Waiting times differed more than consultation times between private and contracted GPs. No differences between private and contracted GPs in terms of adherence to the evidence-based guidelines regarding history taking including questions regarding alcohol use were found. According to the analysis, 20% of the GPs took a perfect history (95% CI 9% to 39%). Conclusions The analysis of secondary data collected by a consumer organisation was a valid method for drawing conclusions about GPs preventive practice. Initial results, like consultation times longer than anticipated, and the moderate quality of history taking encourage continuing the analysis on available clinical data. PMID:22872721

  10. Do larger graphic health warnings on standardised cigarette packs increase adolescents’ cognitive processing of consumer health information and beliefs about smoking-related harms?

    PubMed Central

    White, Victoria; Williams, Tahlia; Faulkner, Agatha; Wakefield, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the impact of plain packaging of cigarettes with enhanced graphic health warnings on Australian adolescents’ cognitive processing of warnings and awareness of different health consequences of smoking. Methods Cross-sectional school-based surveys conducted in 2011 (prior to introduction of standardised packaging, n=6338) and 2013 (7–12 months afterwards, n=5915). Students indicated frequency of attending to, reading, thinking or talking about warnings. Students viewed a list of diseases or health effects and were asked to indicate whether each was caused by smoking. Two—‘kidney and bladder cancer’ and ‘damages gums and teeth’—were new while the remainder had been promoted through previous health warnings and/or television campaigns. The 60% of students seeing a cigarette pack in previous 6 months in 2011 and 65% in 2013 form the sample for analysis. Changes in responses over time are examined. Results Awareness that smoking causes bladder cancer increased between 2011 and 2013 (p=0.002). There was high agreement with statements reflecting health effects featured in previous warnings or advertisements with little change over time. Exceptions to this were increases in the proportion agreeing that smoking was a leading cause of death (p<0.001) and causes blindness (p<0.001). The frequency of students reading, attending to, thinking or talking about the health warnings on cigarette packs did not change. Conclusions Acknowledgement of negative health effects of smoking among Australian adolescents remains high. Apart from increased awareness of bladder cancer, new requirements for packaging and health warnings did not increase adolescents’ cognitive processing of warning information.

  11. Use of illicit tobacco following introduction of standardised packaging of tobacco products in Australia: results from a national cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Scollo, Michelle; Zacher, Meghan; Coomber, Kerri; Wakefield, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess whether following standardisation of tobacco packaging in Australia, smokers were, as predicted by the tobacco industry, more likely to use illicit tobacco. Methods National cross-sectional telephone surveys conducted continuously from April 2012 (6 months before implementation of plain packaging (PP)) to March 2014 (15 months after) using responses from current cigarette smokers (n=8679). Changes between pre-PP, the transition to PP and PP phase were examined using logistic regression models. Results Among those whose factory-made cigarettes were purchased in Australia, compared with pre-PP, there were no significant increases in the PP phase in use of: ‘cheap whites’ (<0.1%; OR=0.24, 95% CI 0.04 to 1.56, p=0.134); international brands purchased for 20% or more below the recommended retail price (0.2%; OR=3.49, 95% CI 0.66 to 18.35, p=0.140); or packs purchased from informal sellers (<0.1%; OR=0.24, 95% CI 0.04 to 1.47, p=0.124). The prevalence of any use of unbranded illicit tobacco remained at about 3% (adjusted OR=0.79, 95% CI 0.58 to 1.08, p=0.141). Conclusions While unable to quantify the total extent of use of illicit manufactured cigarettes, in this large national survey we found no evidence in Australia of increased use of two categories of manufactured cigarettes likely to be contraband, no increase in purchase from informal sellers and no increased use of unbranded illicit ‘chop-chop’ tobacco.

  12. Using interprofessional simulation to improve collaborative competences for nursing, physiotherapy, and respiratory therapy students.

    PubMed

    King, Judy; Beanlands, Sarah; Fiset, Valerie; Chartrand, Louise; Clarke, Shelley; Findlay, Tarra; Morley, Michelle; Summers, Ian

    2016-09-01

    Within the care of people living with respiratory conditions, nursing, physiotherapy, and respiratory therapy healthcare professionals routinely work in interprofessional teams. To help students prepare for their future professional roles, there is a need for them to be involved in interprofessional education. The purpose of this project was to compare two different methods of patient simulation in improving interprofessional competencies for students in nursing, physiotherapy, and respiratory therapy programmes. The Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative competencies of communication, collaboration, conflict resolution patient/family-centred care, roles and responsibilities, and team functioning were measured. Using a quasi-experimental pre-post intervention approach two different interprofessional workshops were compared: the combination of standardised and simulated patients, and exclusively standardised patients. Students from nursing, physiotherapy, and respiratory therapy programmes worked together in these simulation-based activities to plan and implement care for a patient with a respiratory condition. Key results were that participants in both years improved in their self-reported interprofessional competencies as measured by the Interprofessional Collaborative Competencies Attainment Survey (ICCAS). Participants indicated that they found their interprofessional teams did well with communication and collaboration. But the participants felt they could have better involved the patients and their family members in the patient's care. Regardless of method of patient simulation used, mannequin or standardised patients, students found the experience beneficial and appreciated the opportunity to better understand the roles of other healthcare professionals in working together to help patients living with respiratory conditions. PMID:27340933

  13. Representation and Misrepresentation of Scientific Evidence in Contemporary Tobacco Regulation: A Review of Tobacco Industry Submissions to the UK Government Consultation on Standardised Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Ulucanlar, Selda; Fooks, Gary J.; Hatchard, Jenny L.; Gilmore, Anna B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Standardised packaging (SP) of tobacco products is an innovative tobacco control measure opposed by transnational tobacco companies (TTCs) whose responses to the UK government's public consultation on SP argued that evidence was inadequate to support implementing the measure. The government's initial decision, announced 11 months after the consultation closed, was to wait for ‘more evidence’, but four months later a second ‘independent review’ was launched. In view of the centrality of evidence to debates over SP and TTCs' history of denying harms and manufacturing uncertainty about scientific evidence, we analysed their submissions to examine how they used evidence to oppose SP. Methods and Findings We purposively selected and analysed two TTC submissions using a verification-oriented cross-documentary method to ascertain how published studies were used and interpretive analysis with a constructivist grounded theory approach to examine the conceptual significance of TTC critiques. The companies' overall argument was that the SP evidence base was seriously flawed and did not warrant the introduction of SP. However, this argument was underpinned by three complementary techniques that misrepresented the evidence base. First, published studies were repeatedly misquoted, distorting the main messages. Second, ‘mimicked scientific critique’ was used to undermine evidence; this form of critique insisted on methodological perfection, rejected methodological pluralism, adopted a litigation (not scientific) model, and was not rigorous. Third, TTCs engaged in ‘evidential landscaping’, promoting a parallel evidence base to deflect attention from SP and excluding company-held evidence relevant to SP. The study's sample was limited to sub-sections of two out of four submissions, but leaked industry documents suggest at least one other company used a similar approach. Conclusions The TTCs' claim that SP will not lead to public health benefits is largely

  14. Clues for a standardised thermal-optical protocol for the assessment of organic and elemental carbon within ambient air particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappini, L.; Verlhac, S.; Aujay, R.; Maenhaut, W.; Putaud, J. P.; Sciare, J.; Jaffrezo, J. L.; Liousse, C.; Galy-Lacaux, C.; Alleman, L. Y.; Panteliadis, P.; Leoz, E.; Favez, O.

    2014-06-01

    measurements. Nevertheless, this should be confirmed by further experiments, involving more samples and various instruments, to enable statistical processing. All these results provide insights to determine the quality of EC-OC analytical methods and may contribute to the work toward establishing method standardisation.

  15. Clues for a standardised thermal-optical protocol for the assessment of organic and elemental carbon within ambient air particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappini, L.; Verlhac, S.; Aujay, R.; Maenhaut, W.; Putaud, J. P.; Sciare, J.; Jaffrezo, J. L.; Liousse, C.; Gally-Lacaux, C.; Alleman, L.; Panteliadis, P.; Leoz, E.; Favez, O.

    2013-11-01

    . Nevertheless, this should be confirmed by further experiments, involving more samples and various instruments, to enable statistical processing. All these results provide insights to determine the quality of EC-OC analytical methods and may contribute to the work toward establishing method standardisation.

  16. Development of Simulation System for Hot Gas Filtration by Ceramic Candle Filters on High Temperature and/or High Pressure Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.J.; Lim, J.H.; Kim, S.D.; Choi, H.K.; Park, H,S.; Park, Y.O.

    2002-09-19

    Hot gas filtration from industrial processes offers various advantages in terms of improvement of process efficiencies, heat recovery and protection of plant installation. Especially hot gas filtration is an essential technology for pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC).

  17. Improving the management and care of people with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, David; McKenna, Michael; Rooney, Kevin; Beckett, Dan; Pringle, Norma

    2014-04-01

    Many hospitals struggle to implement the full sepsis care bundle, but research suggests that many patients with sepsis are transported to hospital by ambulance. In 2011, the Scottish Ambulance Service introduced a pre-hospital sepsis screening tool (PSST) to expedite sepsis identification and care delivery. However, ambulance clinicians have reported varying degrees of interest and enthusiasm from hospital staff during handover. Therefore, an online survey was set up to investigate medical and nursing staff perceptions and experiences of the introduction of a PSST. This article discusses the results, which show that participants perceive the PSST reduces time to treatment, improves continuity of care, benefits patients and is accurately applied by ambulance clinicians, but which also highlight problems with communication. The delivery of in-hospital and pre-hospital sepsis care is challenging, but simple measures such as improving and standardising communication and alert systems between ambulance services and receiving hospitals could improve the clinical effects of a PSST. PMID:24689480

  18. Measurement of the Inclusive $Z \\to ee$ Production Cross Section in Proton-Proton Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7TeV and $Z \\to ee$ Decays as Standard Candles for Luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    This thesis comprises a precision measurement of the inclusive \\Zee production cross section in proton-proton collisions provided by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=7$~TeV and the absolute luminosity based on \\Zee decays. The data was collected by the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector near Geneva, Switzerland during the year of 2010 and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of $\\int\\mathcal{L}dt = 35.9\\pm 1.4$~pb$^{-1}$. Electronic decays of $Z$ bosons allow one of the first electroweak measurements at the LHC, making the cross section measurement a benchmark of physics performance after the first year of CMS detector and LHC machine operations. It is the first systematic uncertainty limited \\Zee cross section measurement performed at $\\sqrt{s}=7$~TeV. The measured cross section pertaining to the invariant mass window $M_{ee}\\in (60,120)$~GeV is reported as: $\\sigma(pp\\to Z+X) \\times \\mathcal{B}( Z\\to ee ) = 997 \\pm 11 \\mathrm{(sta t)} \\pm 19 \\mathrm{(syst)} \\pm 40 \\mathrm{(lumi)} \\textrm{ pb}$, which agrees with the theoretical prediction calculated to NNLO in QCD. Leveraging \\Zee decays as ``standard candles'' for measuring the absolute luminosity at the LHC is examined; they are produced copiously, are well understood, and have clean detector signatures. Thus the consistency of the inclusive \\Zee production cross section measurement with the theoretical prediction motivates inverting the measurement to instead use the \\Zee signal yield to measure the luminosity. The result, which agrees with the primary relative CMS luminosity measurement calibrated using Van der Meer separation scans, is not only the most precise absolute luminosity measurement performed to date at a hadron collider, but also the first one based on a physics signal at the LHC.

  19. A single supplement of a standardised bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) extract (36 % wet weight anthocyanins) modifies glycaemic response in individuals with type 2 diabetes controlled by diet and lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Hoggard, Nigel; Cruickshank, Morven; Moar, Kim-Marie; Bestwick, Charles; Holst, Jens J; Russell, Wendy; Horgan, Graham

    2013-01-01

    Dietary strategies for alleviating health complications associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are being pursued as alternatives to pharmaceutical interventions. Berries such as bilberries (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) that are rich in polyphenols may influence carbohydrate digestion and absorption and thus postprandial glycaemia. In addition, berries have been reported to alter incretins as well as to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that may also affect postprandial glycaemia. The present study investigated the acute effect of a standardised bilberry extract on glucose metabolism in T2D. Male volunteers with T2D (n 8; BMI 30 (sd 4) kg/m(2)) controlling their diabetes by diet and lifestyle alone were given a single oral capsule of either 0·47 g standardised bilberry extract (36 % (w/w) anthocyanins) which equates to about 50 g of fresh bilberries or placebo followed by a polysaccharide drink (equivalent to 75 g glucose) in a double-blinded cross-over intervention with a 2-week washout period. The ingestion of the bilberry extract resulted in a significant decrease in the incremental AUC for both glucose (P = 0·003) and insulin (P = 0·03) compared with the placebo. There was no change in the gut (glucagon-like peptide-1, gastric inhibitory polypeptide), pancreatic (glucagon, amylin) or anti-inflammatory (monocyte chemotactic protein-1) peptides. In addition there was no change in the antioxidant (Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, ferric-reducing ability of plasma) responses measured between the volunteers receiving the bilberry extract and the placebo. In conclusion the present study demonstrates for the first time that the ingestion of a concentrated bilberry extract reduces postprandial glycaemia and insulin in volunteers with T2D. The most likely mechanism for the lower glycaemic response involves reduced rates of carbohydrate digestion and/or absorption. PMID:25191571

  20. High-frequency-peaked BL Lacertae Objects as Spectral Candles to Measure the Extragalactic Background Light in the Fermi and Air Cherenkov Telescopes Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankuzhiyil, Nijil; Persic, Massimo; Tavecchio, Fabrizio

    2010-05-01

    The extragalactic background light (EBL) is the integrated light from all the stars that have ever formed, and spans the IR-UV range. The interaction of very high-energy (VHE: E > 100 GeV) γ-rays, emitted by sources located at cosmological distances, with the intervening EBL results in e - e + pair production that leads to energy-dependent attenuation of the observed VHE flux. This introduces a fundamental ambiguity into the interpretation of measured VHE γ-ray spectra: neither the intrinsic spectrum nor the EBL are separately known—only their combination is. In this Letter, we propose a method to measure the EBL photon number density. It relies on using simultaneous observations of BL Lac objects in the optical, X-ray, high-energy (HE: E > 100 MeV) γ-ray (from the Fermi telescope), and VHE γ-ray (from Cherenkov telescopes) bands. For each source, the method involves best-fitting the spectral energy distribution from optical through HE γ-rays (the latter being largely unaffected by EBL attenuation as long as z <~ 1) with a synchrotron self-Compton model. We extrapolate such best-fitting models into the VHE regime and assume they represent the BL Lacs' intrinsic emission. Contrasting measured versus intrinsic emission leads to a determination of the γγ opacity to VHE photons. Using, for each given source, different states of emission will only improve the accuracy of the proposed method. We demonstrate this method using recent simultaneous multifrequency observations of the high-frequency-peaked BL Lac object PKS 2155-304 and discuss how similar observations can more accurately probe the EBL.

  1. HIGH-FREQUENCY-PEAKED BL LACERTAE OBJECTS AS SPECTRAL CANDLES TO MEASURE THE EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUND LIGHT IN THE FERMI AND AIR CHERENKOV TELESCOPES ERA

    SciTech Connect

    Mankuzhiyil, Nijil; Persic, Massimo; Tavecchio, Fabrizio

    2010-05-20

    The extragalactic background light (EBL) is the integrated light from all the stars that have ever formed, and spans the IR-UV range. The interaction of very high-energy (VHE: E > 100 GeV) {gamma}-rays, emitted by sources located at cosmological distances, with the intervening EBL results in e {sup -} e {sup +} pair production that leads to energy-dependent attenuation of the observed VHE flux. This introduces a fundamental ambiguity into the interpretation of measured VHE {gamma}-ray spectra: neither the intrinsic spectrum nor the EBL are separately known-only their combination is. In this Letter, we propose a method to measure the EBL photon number density. It relies on using simultaneous observations of BL Lac objects in the optical, X-ray, high-energy (HE: E > 100 MeV) {gamma}-ray (from the Fermi telescope), and VHE {gamma}-ray (from Cherenkov telescopes) bands. For each source, the method involves best-fitting the spectral energy distribution from optical through HE {gamma}-rays (the latter being largely unaffected by EBL attenuation as long as z {approx_lt} 1) with a synchrotron self-Compton model. We extrapolate such best-fitting models into the VHE regime and assume they represent the BL Lacs' intrinsic emission. Contrasting measured versus intrinsic emission leads to a determination of the {gamma}{gamma} opacity to VHE photons. Using, for each given source, different states of emission will only improve the accuracy of the proposed method. We demonstrate this method using recent simultaneous multifrequency observations of the high-frequency-peaked BL Lac object PKS 2155-304 and discuss how similar observations can more accurately probe the EBL.

  2. Suggestions for improving the study of health program implementation.

    PubMed

    Shortell, S M

    1984-04-01

    More will be learned about health programs and the implementation of health policy in this country if we pay more attention to issues of program implementation. Of particular use would be more studies which explicitly link program implementation with program outcomes and which recognize the need to combine quantitative and qualitative analysis of program implementation; the use of triangulated methods in focusing on the relationship between program implementation and program outcomes; the incorporation and study of planned variation in the methods of implementing programs; recognition that the process is essentially one of organizational change and innovation, and the incorporation of existing theory and evidence relevant to these issues; and recognition that the ongoing nature of the implementation process requires longitudinal study designs for implementation as well as for outcome assessment. Cronbach [9] has remarked that evaluation research "lights a candle in the darkness, but it never brings dazzling clarity." It may be that more attention to program implementation and better research on the process, such as that suggested in this note, will provide a little more light and will bring if not dazzling , at least modest, improvements in clarity. PMID:6724951

  3. Suggestions for improving the study of health program implementation.

    PubMed Central

    Shortell, S M

    1984-01-01

    More will be learned about health programs and the implementation of health policy in this country if we pay more attention to issues of program implementation. Of particular use would be more studies which explicitly link program implementation with program outcomes and which recognize the need to combine quantitative and qualitative analysis of program implementation; the use of triangulated methods in focusing on the relationship between program implementation and program outcomes; the incorporation and study of planned variation in the methods of implementing programs; recognition that the process is essentially one of organizational change and innovation, and the incorporation of existing theory and evidence relevant to these issues; and recognition that the ongoing nature of the implementation process requires longitudinal study designs for implementation as well as for outcome assessment. Cronbach [9] has remarked that evaluation research "lights a candle in the darkness, but it never brings dazzling clarity." It may be that more attention to program implementation and better research on the process, such as that suggested in this note, will provide a little more light and will bring if not dazzling , at least modest, improvements in clarity. PMID:6724951

  4. Powerless Prof: From Candle Bearer to Burnout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melendez, Winifred Albizu

    1986-01-01

    College faculty suffer from loss of esteem and place in the institutional structure, discrepancies between their commitment and that of the institution, and government intrusion into the academy. Burnout is one result of this loss of power and opportunity. Faculty must not become passive or cease caring or creating. (MSE)

  5. Better to light a single candle.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Sandra Stafford

    2011-01-01

    The following is a clinical narrative that describes one nurse's attempt to motivate a patient who had recently sustained an injury that caused quadriplegia and the practice implications that arose from "silo" thinking between disciplines. PMID:21675397

  6. RR Lyrae stars as standard candles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Young-Wook

    1992-01-01

    Recent developments in our understanding of RR Lyrae variables are discussed, with special emphasis on their role as distance indicators. The dependence of RR Lyrae luminosity on metallicity and horizontal-branch (HB) morphology is now well understood with many pieces of supporting evidence. This allows the determination of distances to several Local Group galaxies (LMC, M31, and M33) by constructing HB population models that reproduce the observed luminosity functions of RR Lyraes in these galaxies. The new RR Lyrae distances to M31 and M33 are some 15-37 percent larger than those adopted by de Vaucouleurs (1986) and by Aaronson et al. (1986), while they are in reasonable agreements with the recent results based on multicolor CCD photometry of classical Cepheids. This indicates that the large value of Hubble constant (90-100 km/s/Mpc) suggested by these authors may be due, at least in part, to the errors in distances to nearby calibrating galaxies.

  7. Type Ia supernovae as standard candles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branch, David; Miller, Douglas L.

    1993-01-01

    The distribution of absolute blue magnitudes among Type Ia supernovae (SNs Ia) is studied. Supernovae were used with well determined apparent magnitudes at maximum light and parent galaxies with relative distances determined by the Tully-Fisher or Dn - sigma techniques. The mean absolute blue magnitude is given and the observational dispersion is only sigma(MB) 0.36, comparable to the expected combined errors in distance, apparent magnitude, and extinction. The mean (B-V) color at maximum light is 0.03 +/- 0.04, with a dispersion sigma(B-V) = 0.20. The Cepheid-based distance to IC 4182, the parent galaxy of the normal and unextinguished Type Ia SN 1937C, leads to a Hubble constant of H(0) + 51 +/- 12 km/s Mpc. The existence of a few SNs Ia that appear to have been reddened and dimmed by dust in their parent galaxies does not seriously compromise the use of SNs Ia as distance indicators.

  8. Dopamine: burning the candle at both ends.

    PubMed

    Pearson, John M; Platt, Michael L

    2013-09-01

    Dopamine neurons are well known for signaling reward-prediction errors. In this issue, Matsumoto and Takada (2013) show that some dopamine neurons also signal salient events during progression through a visual search task requiring working memory and sustained attention. PMID:24011998

  9. Science as a Candle in the Dark

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder-Davis, Steven

    2012-01-01

    A major impediment to fostering critical thinking in STEM programs is, ironically, state science standards. In 2012, the Thomas Fordham Foundation completed a review of multiple aspects of US state science standards and determined states averaged a "C-" overall, with only six states earning an "A." This article is about how teachers (whether in a…

  10. Burning the Candle at Just One End

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Kien H.

    2009-01-01

    To deeply understand proportional reasoning, students must be able to differentiate proportional situations from nonproportional situations. Unfortunately, the emphasis on the use of proportional strategies in middle-grades mathematics has led students to develop a disposition to associate certain characteristics of problem formulation with the…

  11. Discourse, the moral imperative and Faraday's candle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melville, Wayne

    2013-03-01

    This commentary considers two lines of inquiry into the work of Ideland and Malmberg: the role of discourse in shaping teachers' responses to Roberts' (2011) Visions of Science and the moral imperatives that will accompany any shifts between Vision I and II. Vision I of science has accreted to itself great power and prestige, both of which shape notions of a `good' science education. Any shift towards Vision II will require serious engagement in a Foucaultian discourse into the issues of power, inclusion and exclusion that Ideland and Malmberg describe. Similarly, the moral imperatives that arise require courage to both contest the status quo in science education, and develop a reasoned, morally defensible, response to the challenge that Vision II is really a form of ideological activism.

  12. Discourse, the Moral Imperative and Faraday's Candle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melville, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    This commentary considers two lines of inquiry into the work of Ideland and Malmberg: the role of discourse in shaping teachers' responses to Roberts' (2011) Visions of Science and the moral imperatives that will accompany any shifts between Vision I and II. Vision I of science has accreted to itself great power and prestige, both of which shape…

  13. Pulmonary disease caused by Mycobacterium xenopi in HIV-negative patients: five year follow-up of patients receiving standardised treatment.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, P A; Campbell, I A

    2003-04-01

    The literature concerning the management of pulmonary disease caused by Mycobacterium xenopi is scanty and consists of retrospective reports, mostly of small series of patients. Our aim was to document the clinical features and response to treatment of this rare but challenging disease. Patients were treated in a randomised, multi-centre trial with either rifampicin plus ethambutol or rifampicin, ethambutol and isoniazid. Clinical, bacteriological and radiological progress was monitored at set intervals for 5 years. As no differences emerged between the two groups, the results have been combined to provide this prospective survey. Forty-two patients were studied. Mean age was 65 years, three-quarters were male and two-thirds had other lung disease(s). Sputum was positive on direct smear in 62%. Cavitation was present in 81%, mostly large cavities, and disease was extensive in 38%. Despite good clinical response and little toxicity the death rate was high (69%), but less than 10% died primarily because of the M. xenopi disease. The failure of treatment/relapse rate was 12%. Only 11 (26%) were known to be alive at 5 years of whom seven (17%) were known to be cured. There was no correlation between failure of treatment/relapse and in vitro resistance. Better methods of susceptibility testing and more effective regimens are needed, but it is also evident that improved management of concomitant diseases and better general health will play a major part in increasing survival. PMID:12693807

  14. An in-house real-time polymerase chain reaction: standardisation and comparison with the Cobas Amplicor HBV monitor and Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HBV tests for the quantification of hepatitis B virus DNA

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Ana Paula de Torres; Levi, José Eduardo; Lemos, Marcilio Figueiredo; Calux, Samira Julien; Oba, Isabel Takano; Moreira, Regina Célia

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to standardise an in-house real-time polymerase chain reaction (rtPCR) to allow quantification of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in serum or plasma samples, and to compare this method with two commercial assays, the Cobas Amplicor HBV monitor and the Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HBV test. Samples from 397 patients from the state of São Paulo were analysed by all three methods. Fifty-two samples were from patients who were human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus positive, but HBV negative. Genotypes were characterised, and the viral load was measure in each sample. The in-house rtPCR showed an excellent success rate compared with commercial tests; inter-assay and intra-assay coefficients correlated with commercial tests (r = 0.96 and r = 0.913, p < 0.001) and the in-house test showed no genotype-dependent differences in detection and quantification rates. The in-house assay tested in this study could be used for screening and quantifying HBV DNA in order to monitor patients during therapy. PMID:26872342

  15. Subcutaneous fat patterning in athletes: selection of appropriate sites and standardisation of a novel ultrasound measurement technique: ad hoc working group on body composition, health and performance, under the auspices of the IOC Medical Commission

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Wolfram; Lohman, Timothy G; Stewart, Arthur D; Maughan, Ronald J; Meyer, Nanna L; Sardinha, Luis B; Kirihennedige, Nuwanee; Reguant-Closa, Alba; Risoul-Salas, Vanessa; Sundgot-Borgen, Jorunn; Ahammer, Helmut; Anderhuber, Friedrich; Fürhapter-Rieger, Alfred; Kainz, Philipp; Materna, Wilfried; Pilsl, Ulrike; Pirstinger, Wolfram; Ackland, Timothy R

    2016-01-01

    Background Precise and accurate field methods for body composition analyses in athletes are needed urgently. Aim Standardisation of a novel ultrasound (US) technique for accurate and reliable measurement of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT). Methods Three observers captured US images of uncompressed SAT in 12 athletes and applied a semiautomatic evaluation algorithm for multiple SAT measurements. Results Eight new sites are recommended: upper abdomen, lower abdomen, erector spinae, distal triceps, brachioradialis, lateral thigh, front thigh, medial calf. Obtainable accuracy was 0.2 mm (18 MHz probe; speed of sound: 1450 m/s). Reliability of SAT thickness sums (N=36): R2=0.998, SEE=0.55 mm, ICC (95% CI) 0.998 (0.994 to 0.999); observer differences from their mean: 95% of the SAT thickness sums were within ±1 mm (sums of SAT thicknesses ranged from 10 to 50 mm). Embedded fibrous tissues were also measured. Conclusions A minimum of eight sites is suggested to accommodate inter-individual differences in SAT patterning. All sites overlie muscle with a clearly visible fascia, which eases the acquisition of clear images and the marking of these sites takes only a few minutes. This US method reaches the fundamental accuracy and precision limits for SAT measurements given by tissue plasticity and furrowed borders, provided the measurers are trained appropriately. PMID:26702017

  16. Practical Applications of the Standardised Precipitation Index (SPI) as a Tool for Very Early Warning of Droughts and Floods in the Balkans Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Southern Europe is repeatedly identified in IPCC Reports as being particularly vulnerable to water resource impacts with risks being assessed as medium to high with current (low) levels of adaptation. Drought frequency will likely increase by the end of the 21st century under IPCC RCP8.5 (medium confidence) . The Balkans region has encountered some of its most significant ever floods and droughts since 2000, highly symptomatic of intense climate change. Foremost of these are the regional catastrophic floods in Albania (2009-10) (2010-11), Bosnia, Herzegovina and Serbia (2014), and the widespread droughts of 2007-08 and 2013-14. There is an urgent need to improve the awareness and implementation of drought and flood risk management tools in the national Ministries and National Hydrometeorological Services (NHMSs) of s.e. Europe generally. This paper describes the development and application of a practical user-friendly tool to calculate SPI across a range of timescales as recommended by the WMO , using a conventional 'Year Book' format to enter monthly precipitation values, coupled with some automated and relatively simple VBA code. Since the tool is spreadsheet based, it is user-friendly and graphically intuitive. The conditional formatting capability introduces a visualisation element to the SPI which is extremely helpful to NHMSs and other non-expert decision makers in understanding SPI significance. Recent practical application of the tool in relation to significant recent floods and droughts in Albania, Kosovo and Macedonia has demonstrated its value as a Very Early Warning tool. However, there are some implicit dangers in simply tracking the SPI 1, 2, n value per se without taking account of the actual accumulated deficits that may generate agricultural and ultimately hydrological droughts. It is conventionally assumed that the sum of the SPI for all months within a drought event can be termed the drought's "magnitude". In fact this is not the case. In regions

  17. Towards the standardisation of the neuroblastoma (neuro-2a) cell-based assay for ciguatoxin-like toxicity detection in fish: application to fish caught in the Canary Islands.

    PubMed

    Caillaud, A; Eixarch, H; de la Iglesia, P; Rodriguez, M; Dominguez, L; Andree, K B; Diogène, J

    2012-01-01

    The ouabain/veratridine-dependent neuroblastoma (neuro-2a) cell-based assay (CBA) was applied for the determination of the presence of ciguatoxin (CTX)-like compounds in ciguatera-suspected fish samples caught in the Canary Islands. In order to avoid matrix interferences the maximal concentration of wet weight fish tissue exposed to the neuro-2a cells was set at 20 mg tissue equivalent (TE) ml(-1) according to the sample preparation procedure applied. In the present study, the limit of quantification (LOQ) of CTX1B equivalents in fish extract was set at the limit of detection (LOD), being defined as the concentration of CTX1B equivalents inhibiting 20% cell viability (IC(20)). The LOQ was estimated as 0.0096 ng CTX1B eq.g TE(-1) with 23-31% variability between experiments. These values were deemed sufficient even though quantification given at the IC(50) (the concentration of CTX1B equivalents inhibiting 50% cell viability) is more accurate with a variability of 17-19% between experiments. Among the 13 fish samples tested, four fish samples were toxic to the neuro-2a cells with estimations of the content in CTX1B g(-1) of TE ranging from 0.058 (± 0.012) to 6.23 (± 0.713) ng CTX1B eq.g TE(-1). The high sensitivity and specificity of the assay for CTX1B confirmed its suitability as a screening tool of CTX-like compounds in fish extracts at levels that may cause ciguatera fish poisoning. Species identification of fish samples by DNA sequence analysis was conducted in order to confirm tentatively the identity of ciguatera risk species and it revealed some evidence of inadvertent misidentification. Results presented in this study are a contribution to the standardisation of the neuro-2a CBA and to the risk analysis for ciguatera in the Canary Islands. PMID:22394180

  18. ‘It will harm business and increase illicit trade’: an evaluation of the relevance, quality and transparency of evidence submitted by transnational tobacco companies to the UK consultation on standardised packaging 2012

    PubMed Central

    Evans-Reeves, K A; Hatchard, J L; Gilmore, A B

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transnational tobacco companies (TTCs) submitted evidence to the 2012 UK Consultation on standardised packaging (SP) to argue the policy will have detrimental economic impacts and increase illicit tobacco trade. Methods A content analysis of the four TTC submissions to the consultation assessed the relevance and quality of evidence TTCs cited to support their arguments. Investigative research was used to determine whether the cited evidence was industry connected. Fisher's exact tests were used to compare the relevance and quality of industry-connected and independent from the industry evidence. The extent to which TTCs disclosed financial conflicts of interest (COI) when citing evidence was examined. Results We obtained 74 pieces of TTC-cited evidence. The quality of the evidence was poor. TTCs cited no independent, peer-reviewed evidence that supported their arguments. Nearly half of the evidence was industry-connected (47%, 35/74). None of this industry-connected evidence was published in peer-reviewed journals (0/35) and 66% (23/35) of it was opinion only. Industry-connected evidence was of significantly poorer quality than independent evidence (p<0.001). COIs were not disclosed by TTCs in 91% (32/35) of cases. Conclusions In the absence of peer-reviewed research to support their arguments, TTCs relied on evidence they commissioned and the opinions of TTC-connected third-parties. Such connections were not disclosed by TTCs when citing this evidence and were time consuming to uncover. In line with Article 5.3 of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control and broader transparency initiatives, TTCs should be required to disclose their funding of all third-parties and any COIs when citing evidence. PMID:25472733

  19. Standardisation of the factor H autoantibody assay.

    PubMed

    Watson, Rachael; Lindner, Susanne; Bordereau, Pauline; Hunze, Eva-Maria; Tak, Federico; Ngo, Stéphanie; Zipfel, Peter F; Skerka, Christine; Dragon-Durey, Marie-Agnes; Marchbank, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    The screening of all atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS) patients for factor H autoantibodies is best practice. However, there is no consensus assay for the reporting of factor H autoantibody titres. In this study, three European complement laboratories with expertise in the field of autoantibody testing address this by systematically evaluating several ELISA methods used for the detection of factor H autoantibodies. All methods tested adequately detect high titre samples. However, this study recommends the Paris method for the detection and reporting of factor H autoantibodies to be used when setting up a factor H autoantibody screen. The importance of individual sample background subtraction in these ELISA tests was established. The use of a relative or arbitrary unit index with a common positive and negative serum allowed for consistent comparison of findings from different test centres. Therefore, it is recommended that a standard arbitrary unit scale based on a titration curve from a common positive anti-serum be adopted to allow future establishment of the relative importance of particular titres of factor H autoantibodies in aHUS. Systematic assay for the presence of factor H autoantibodies in patients using the Paris method will provide the longitudinal analysis needed to fully establish the importance of factor H autoantibodies in disease. This will feed into additional research to clarify whether additional factors have a bearing on the phenotype/outcome of autoimmune aHUS. PMID:23891327

  20. Pancreatic cytology: standardised terminology and nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Perez-Machado, M A

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic cytology can make a real difference to the management of patients. However it is a challenge in those cases where a definitive diagnosis of malignancy cannot be made with confidence. This creates the need for a unified terminology and nomenclature system that provides intra- and interdepartmental guidance for diagnosis. The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology (PSC) has published new guidelines for pancreaticobiliary cytology, addressing indications, techniques, terminology and nomenclature, ancillary studies, and postprocedure management. PMID:27221751

  1. Standardising Responsibility? The Significance of Interstitial Spaces.

    PubMed

    Wickson, Fern; Forsberg, Ellen-Marie

    2015-10-01

    Modern society is characterised by rapid technological development that is often socially controversial and plagued by extensive scientific uncertainty concerning its socio-ecological impacts. Within this context, the concept of 'responsible research and innovation' (RRI) is currently rising to prominence in international discourse concerning science and technology governance. As this emerging concept of RRI begins to be enacted through instruments, approaches, and initiatives, it is valuable to explore what it is coming to mean for and in practice. In this paper we draw attention to a realm that is often backgrounded in the current discussions of RRI but which has a highly significant impact on scientific research, innovation and policy-namely, the interstitial space of international standardization. Drawing on the case of nanoscale sciences and technologies to make our argument, we present examples of how international standards are already entangled in the development of RRI and yet, how the process of international standardization itself largely fails to embody the norms proposed as characterizing RRI. We suggest that although current models for RRI provide a promising attempt to make research and innovation more responsive to societal needs, ethical values and environmental challenges, such approaches will need to encompass and address a greater diversity of innovation system agents and spaces if they are to prove successful in their aims. PMID:25344842

  2. Standardisation of Study Protocols - Pros and Cons.

    PubMed

    D'Haens, Geert

    2016-09-01

    Designing clinical trials in inflammatory bowel diseases is challenging. Composite scores that have been used for drug approval until recently such as the Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI) and the Mayo score for ulcerative colitis have been criticized by regulatory bodies for its lack of validation, poor correlation with objective mucosal disease and absence of 'patient reported outcomes'.Most drug development programs use the 'classic 'separation' between an induction and a maintenance phase. Challenging issues are the 'ideal timing' of the primary endpoint for induction and maintenance studies, strategies to reduce placebo response rates and rules for corticosteroids withdrawal. Discussion about which patients to re-randomize after induction into the maintenance phase of the study is critical.Presently, new instruments for disease assessment in IBD are being developed and validated. Central (independent) review of endoscopic recordings at screening and at the end of the intervention will probably become standard. Finally, the most optimal trial design for every individual intervention is likely to depend on the mechanism of action of the medication under study. PMID:27604980

  3. Teaching Package on Standardisation in Information Handling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). General Information Programme.

    One of the objectives of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) is to promote standardization in the field of information handling, both in development of guidelines and standards and in the use and application of existing norms and standards. This teaching package on the standardization of information…

  4. Toward standardising gamma camera quality control procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhorayef, M. A.; Alnaaimi, M. A.; Alduaij, M. A.; Mohamed, M. O.; Ibahim, S. Y.; Alkandari, F. A.; Bradley, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    Attaining high standards of efficiency and reliability in the practice of nuclear medicine requires appropriate quality control (QC) programs. For instance, the regular evaluation and comparison of extrinsic and intrinsic flood-field uniformity enables the quick correction of many gamma camera problems. Whereas QC tests for uniformity are usually performed by exposing the gamma camera crystal to a uniform flux of gamma radiation from a source of known activity, such protocols can vary significantly. Thus, there is a need for optimization and standardization, in part to allow direct comparison between gamma cameras from different vendors. In the present study, intrinsic uniformity was examined as a function of source distance, source activity, source volume and number of counts. The extrinsic uniformity and spatial resolution were also examined. Proper standard QC procedures need to be implemented because of the continual development of nuclear medicine imaging technology and the rapid expansion and increasing complexity of hybrid imaging system data. The present work seeks to promote a set of standard testing procedures to contribute to the delivery of safe and effective nuclear medicine services.

  5. Improving Documentation and Communication Using Operative Note Proformas

    PubMed Central

    Mahapatra, Piyush; ieong, edmund

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and detailed documentation of surgical procedures is part of good clinical practice, set out by the General Medical Council (GMC). Knee arthroscopy often involves large data sets which require accurate documentation for future assessment and management. This study assesses the quality of documentation of knee arthroscopy, followed by an evaluation of the implementation of a novel operative proforma. A review of 30 consecutive knee arthroscopy operation notes were analysed for missing information, set against a standardised 30 point criteria. An operation proforma was then introduced, and a further 30 consecutive knee arthroscopy operation notes were analysed. We evaluated allied health professional satisfaction with a Likert point scale survey of 21 allied healthcare professionals (recovery and ward nurses, and physiotherapists) following introduction of the proforma. The mean number of missing items on a 30 point scale was 8.8 (range 0 to 23). Examination under anaesthesia was missed in 43% of cases, tourniquet time in 37% of cases, and wear results in 17% of cases. Following introduction of the proforma, the mean number of missing items was 1.1 (range 0 to 24; p <0.001). This rose to 3.8 after one year (p <0.001) before improvement to 0.7 (p <0.01) with a new and improved proforma. Eighty percent strongly agreed the operation note was clearer, 90% strongly agreed it was more legible, 90% strongly agreed it was more understandable, 50% strongly agreed there was more information recorded, and 100% strongly agreed on the proforma having been improved. Knee arthroscopy is a common procedure with large data sets, which can often be missed or incomplete. A standardised proforma results in a statistically significant improvement in documentation and reduces the incidence of missing information. They are subjectively clearer, more legible, and generally better compared with handwritten notes. This study demonstrates the improvements in healthcare documentation

  6. Improving Documentation and Communication Using Operative Note Proformas.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Piyush; Ieong, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and detailed documentation of surgical procedures is part of good clinical practice, set out by the General Medical Council (GMC). Knee arthroscopy often involves large data sets which require accurate documentation for future assessment and management. This study assesses the quality of documentation of knee arthroscopy, followed by an evaluation of the implementation of a novel operative proforma. A review of 30 consecutive knee arthroscopy operation notes were analysed for missing information, set against a standardised 30 point criteria. An operation proforma was then introduced, and a further 30 consecutive knee arthroscopy operation notes were analysed. We evaluated allied health professional satisfaction with a Likert point scale survey of 21 allied healthcare professionals (recovery and ward nurses, and physiotherapists) following introduction of the proforma. The mean number of missing items on a 30 point scale was 8.8 (range 0 to 23). Examination under anaesthesia was missed in 43% of cases, tourniquet time in 37% of cases, and wear results in 17% of cases. Following introduction of the proforma, the mean number of missing items was 1.1 (range 0 to 24; p <0.001). This rose to 3.8 after one year (p <0.001) before improvement to 0.7 (p <0.01) with a new and improved proforma. Eighty percent strongly agreed the operation note was clearer, 90% strongly agreed it was more legible, 90% strongly agreed it was more understandable, 50% strongly agreed there was more information recorded, and 100% strongly agreed on the proforma having been improved. Knee arthroscopy is a common procedure with large data sets, which can often be missed or incomplete. A standardised proforma results in a statistically significant improvement in documentation and reduces the incidence of missing information. They are subjectively clearer, more legible, and generally better compared with handwritten notes. This study demonstrates the improvements in healthcare documentation

  7. Tome Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Careless, James

    1994-01-01

    College catalogs can be made less costly by various techniques such as using inexpensive paper, keeping as much of the production as possible in-house, minimizing photographs and color, and printing separate catalogs for different divisions. Catalogs can be improved by providing greater visual appeal and ease of use. (MSE)

  8. Performance Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document contains four papers presented at a symposium on performance improvement moderated by Edward Schorer at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD) "The Organizational Ecology of Ethical Problems: International Case Studies in the Light of HPT [Human Performance Technology]" (Peter J. Dean, Laurence…

  9. Early evidence about the predicted unintended consequences of standardised packaging of tobacco products in Australia: a cross-sectional study of the place of purchase, regular brands and use of illicit tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Scollo, Michelle; Zacher, Meghan; Durkin, Sarah; Wakefield, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To test for early evidence whether, following the standardisation of tobacco packaging, smokers in Australia were—as predicted by the tobacco industry—less likely to purchase from small mixed business retailers, more likely to purchase cheap brands imported from Asia and more likely to use illicit tobacco. Design Serial cross-sectional population telephone surveys in November 2011 (a year prior to implementation), 2012 (during roll-out) and 2013 (a year after implementation). Setting/participants Smokers aged 18 years and over identified in an annual population survey in the Australian state of Victoria (2011: n=754; 2012: n=590; 2013: n=601). Main outcome measures Changes between 2011 and 2013 in: proportions of current smokers who purchased their last cigarette from discount outlets such as supermarkets compared with small mixed business retail outlets; prevalence of regular use of low-cost brands imported from Asia and use of unbranded tobacco. Results The proportion of smokers purchasing from supermarkets did not increase between 2011 (65.4%) and 2013 (65.7%; p=0.98), and the percentage purchasing from small mixed business outlets did not decline (2011: 9.2%; 2012: 11.2%; p=0.32). The prevalence of low-cost Asian brands was low and did not increase between 2011 (1.1%) and 2013 (0.9%; p=0.98). The proportion reporting current use of unbranded illicit tobacco was 2.3% in 2011 and 1.9% in 2013 (p=0.46). In 2013, 2.6% of cigarette smokers reported having purchased one or more packets of cigarettes in non-compliant packaging in the past 3 months; 1.7% had purchased one or more packets from an informal seller in the past year. Conclusions One year after implementation, this study found no evidence of the major unintended consequences concerning loss of smoker patrons from small retail outlets, flooding of the market by cheap Asian brands and use of illicit tobacco predicted by opponents of plain packaging in Australia. PMID:25168041

  10. Improved professionalism

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    The availability of good technology does not automatically produce profit (or comparable goals). The necessary bridge between the two is how professionally the technology is used. Many people believe that the general level of professionalism must be elevated if we are to improve the health of the petroleum industry. The petroleum industry is not unique in this regard. This paper discusses professionalism issues from current and historical perspectives, then proposes concrete actions for industry, educators, and SPE to consider.

  11. Improving Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthesis is the basis of plant growth, and improving photosynthesis can contribute toward greater food security in the coming decades as world population increases. Multiple targets have been identified that could be manipulated to increase crop photosynthesis. The most important target is Rubisco because it catalyses both carboxylation and oxygenation reactions and the majority of responses of photosynthesis to light, CO2, and temperature are reflected in its kinetic properties. Oxygenase activity can be reduced either by concentrating CO2 around Rubisco or by modifying the kinetic properties of Rubisco. The C4 photosynthetic pathway is a CO2-concentrating mechanism that generally enables C4 plants to achieve greater efficiency in their use of light, nitrogen, and water than C3 plants. To capitalize on these advantages, attempts have been made to engineer the C4 pathway into C3 rice (Oryza sativa). A simpler approach is to transfer bicarbonate transporters from cyanobacteria into chloroplasts and prevent CO2 leakage. Recent technological breakthroughs now allow higher plant Rubisco to be engineered and assembled successfully in planta. Novel amino acid sequences can be introduced that have been impossible to reach via normal evolution, potentially enlarging the range of kinetic properties and breaking free from the constraints associated with covariation that have been observed between certain kinetic parameters. Capturing the promise of improved photosynthesis in greater yield potential will require continued efforts to improve carbon allocation within the plant as well as to maintain grain quality and resistance to disease and lodging. PMID:23812345

  12. Improving photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Evans, John R

    2013-08-01

    Photosynthesis is the basis of plant growth, and improving photosynthesis can contribute toward greater food security in the coming decades as world population increases. Multiple targets have been identified that could be manipulated to increase crop photosynthesis. The most important target is Rubisco because it catalyses both carboxylation and oxygenation reactions and the majority of responses of photosynthesis to light, CO₂, and temperature are reflected in its kinetic properties. Oxygenase activity can be reduced either by concentrating CO₂ around Rubisco or by modifying the kinetic properties of Rubisco. The C₄ photosynthetic pathway is a CO₂-concentrating mechanism that generally enables C₄ plants to achieve greater efficiency in their use of light, nitrogen, and water than C₃ plants. To capitalize on these advantages, attempts have been made to engineer the C₄ pathway into C₃ rice (Oryza sativa). A simpler approach is to transfer bicarbonate transporters from cyanobacteria into chloroplasts and prevent CO₂ leakage. Recent technological breakthroughs now allow higher plant Rubisco to be engineered and assembled successfully in planta. Novel amino acid sequences can be introduced that have been impossible to reach via normal evolution, potentially enlarging the range of kinetic properties and breaking free from the constraints associated with covariation that have been observed between certain kinetic parameters. Capturing the promise of improved photosynthesis in greater yield potential will require continued efforts to improve carbon allocation within the plant as well as to maintain grain quality and resistance to disease and lodging. PMID:23812345

  13. Determination of significance in Ecological Impact Assessment: Past change, current practice and future improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, Sam; Hudson, Malcolm D.

    2013-01-15

    Ecological Impact Assessment (EcIA) is an important tool for conservation and achieving sustainable development. 'Significant' impacts are those which disturb or alter the environment to a measurable degree. Significance is a crucial part of EcIA, our understanding of the concept in practice is vital if it is to be effective as a tool. This study employed three methods to assess how the determination of significance has changed through time, what current practice is, and what would lead to future improvements. Three data streams were collected: interviews with expert stakeholders, a review of 30 Environmental Statements and a broad-scale survey of the United Kingdom Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management (IEEM) members. The approach taken in the determination of significance has become more standardised and subjectivity has become constrained through a transparent framework. This has largely been driven by a set of guidelines produced by IEEM in 2006. The significance of impacts is now more clearly justified and the accuracy with which it is determined has improved. However, there are limitations to accuracy and effectiveness of the determination of significance. These are the quality of baseline survey data, our scientific understanding of ecological processes and the lack of monitoring and feedback of results. These in turn are restricted by the limited resources available in consultancies. The most notable recommendations for future practice are the implementation of monitoring and the publication of feedback, the creation of a central database for baseline survey data and the streamlining of guidance. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The assessment of significance has changed markedly through time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The IEEM guidelines have driven a standardisation of practice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Currently limited by quality of baseline data and scientific understanding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Monitoring and

  14. Improved aethalometer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, A.D.

    1988-01-25

    An improved aethalometer having a single light source and a single light detector and two light paths from the light source to the light detector. A quartz fiber filter is inserted in the device, the filter having a collection area in one light path and a reference area in the other light path. A gas flow path through the aethalometer housing allows ambient air to flow through the collection area of the filter so that aerosol particles can be collected on the filter. A rotating disk with an opening therethrough allows light for the light source to pass alternately through the two light paths. The voltage output of the detector is applied to a VCO and the VCO pulses for light transmission separately through the two light paths, are counted and compared to determine the absorption coefficient of the collected aerosol particles. 5 figs.

  15. Improved traditional phytomedicines in current use for the clinical treatment of malaria.

    PubMed

    Willcox, Merlin

    2011-04-01

    Phytomedicines and "green pharmacies" are promoted by some NGOs and governments as part of their efforts to control malaria. "Improved traditional medicines" (ITMs) are standardised as regards preparation and dose, although not always according to the concentration of active compounds. A systematic literature search revealed that six such phytomedicines are currently government-approved in at least one country and used on a relatively large scale nationally or internationally: Artemisia annua L. (Asteraceae), Cinchona bark (Rubiaceae), Cryptolepis sanguinolenta (Lindl.) Schltr. (Apocynaceae), "Ayush-64", "Malarial-5" and Cochlospermum planchonii Hook. f. ex Planch. (Bixaceae). One further ITM has been developed and is in the process of being approved: Argemone mexicana decoction. Their development, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and clinical trials are reviewed, as well as priorities for future research. PMID:21204042

  16. Improving growth in preterm infants during initial hospital stay: principles into practice.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Richard J

    2016-07-01

    Despite recent innovations in nutritional care, postnatal growth failure between birth and hospital discharge remains a significant problem in preterm infants. Whether or not it is entirely preventable is unclear. What is clear is that feeding practices and growth outcomes vary widely between neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). This partly reflects lack of data in key areas but it also reflects inconsistent translation of principles into practice and limitations in the way infants are fed and growth monitored in the NICU. These issues will be reviewed, in the process underline the key roles that audit, standardised feeding protocol, individualised nutritional care and a nutritional support team play in improving outcome in these high-risk infants. PMID:26867763

  17. Improved predictability of droughts over southern Africa using the standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index and ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manatsa, Desmond; Mushore, Terrence; Lenouo, Andre

    2015-09-01

    The provision of timely and reliable climate information on which to base management decisions remains a critical component in drought planning for southern Africa. In this observational study, we have not only proposed a forecasting scheme which caters for timeliness and reliability but improved relevance of the climate information by using a novel drought index called the standardised precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI), instead of the traditional precipitation only based index, the standardised precipitation index (SPI). The SPEI which includes temperature and other climatic factors in its construction has a more robust connection to ENSO than the SPI. Consequently, the developed ENSO-SPEI prediction scheme can provide quantitative information about the spatial extent and severity of predicted drought conditions in a way that reflects more closely the level of risk in the global warming context of the sub region. However, it is established that the ENSO significant regional impact is restricted only to the period December-March, implying a revisit to the traditional ENSO-based forecast scheme which essentially divides the rainfall season into the two periods, October to December and January to March. Although the prediction of ENSO events has increased with the refinement of numerical models, this work has demonstrated that the prediction of drought impacts related to ENSO is also a reality based only on observations. A large temporal lag is observed between the development of ENSO phenomena (typically in May of the previous year) and the identification of regional SPEI defined drought conditions. It has been shown that using the Southern Africa Regional Climate Outlook Forum's (SARCOF) traditional 3-month averaged Nino 3.4 SST index (June to August) as a predictor does not have an added advantage over using only the May SST index values. In this regard, the extended lead time and improved skill demonstrated in this study could immensely benefit

  18. Measurement of the inclusive Z boson going to electron-electron production cross section in proton-proton collisions at center of mass energy = 7 TeV and Z boson going to electron-electron decays as standard candles for luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Jeremy Scott

    This thesis comprises a precision measurement of the inclusive Z→ee production cross section in proton-proton collisions provided by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a center-of-mass energy of s = 7 TeV and the absolute luminosity based on Z→ ee decays. The data was collected by the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector near Geneva, Switzerland during the year of 2010 and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of Ldt = 35.9 +/- 1.4 pb-1. Electronic decays of Z bosons allow one of the first electroweak measurements at the LHC, making the cross section measurement a benchmark of physics performance after the first year of CMS detector and LHC machine operations. It is the first systematic uncertainty limited Z→ee cross section measurement performed at s = 7 TeV. The measured cross section pertaining to the invariant mass window Mee ∈ (60, 120) GeV is reported as sigma( pp → Z + X) x B (Z → ee) = 997 +/- 11(stat) +/- 19(syst) +/- 40(lumi) pb, which agrees with the theoretical prediction calculated to NNLO in QCD. Leveraging Z→ee decays as "standard candles" for measuring the absolute luminosity at the LHC is examined; they are produced copiously, are well understood, and have clean detector signatures. Thus the consistency of the inclusive Z→ ee production cross section measurement with the theoretical prediction motivates inverting the measurement to instead use the Z→ ee signal yield to measure the luminosity. The result, which agrees with the primary relative CMS luminosity measurement calibrated using Van der Meer separation scans, is one of the most precise absolute luminosity measurements performed to date at a hadron collider and the first based on a physics signal at the LHC.

  19. Quality improvement techniques to improve patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Torres, E Joseph; Guo, Kristina L

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes several approaches for implementing quality improvement initiatives to improve patient satisfaction, which enables health-care organizations to position themselves for success in today's global and increasingly competitive environment. Specifically, measuring the views of patients, improving patient satisfaction through a community-wide effort, and using a Six Sigma program are discussed. Each of these programs can be an effective mechanism for quality improvement. A key component to quality improvement techniques involves collaborative efforts by all health-care professionals and managers as they seek to increase patient satisfaction. PMID:15552388

  20. Improved Quantification, Propagation, Purification and Storage of the Obligate Intracellular Human Pathogen Orientia tsutsugamushi

    PubMed Central

    Giengkam, Suparat; Blakes, Alex; Utsahajit, Peemdej; Chaemchuen, Suwittra; Atwal, Sharanjeet; Blacksell, Stuart D.; Paris, Daniel H.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Salje, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Background Scrub typhus is a leading cause of serious febrile illness in rural Southeast Asia. The causative agent, Orientia tsutsugamushi, is an obligate intracellular bacterium that is transmitted to humans by the bite of a Leptotrombidium mite. Research into the basic mechanisms of cell biology and pathogenicity of O. tsutsugamushi has lagged behind that of other important human pathogens. One reason for this is that O. tsutsugamushi is an obligate intracellular bacterium that can only be cultured in mammalian cells and that requires specific methodologies for propagation and analysis. Here, we have performed a body of work designed to improve methods for quantification, propagation, purification and long-term storage of this important but neglected human pathogen. These results will be useful to other researchers working on O. tsutsugamushi and also other obligate intracellular pathogens such as those in the Rickettsiales and Chlamydiales families. Methodology A clinical isolate of O. tsutsugamushi was grown in cultured mouse embryonic fibroblast (L929) cells. Bacterial growth was measured using an O. tsutsugamushi-specific qPCR assay. Conditions leading to improvements in viability and growth were monitored in terms of the effect on bacterial cell number after growth in cultured mammalian cells. Key results Development of a standardised growth assay to quantify bacterial replication and viability in vitro. Quantitative comparison of different DNA extraction methods. Quantification of the effect on growth of FBS concentration, daunorubicin supplementation, media composition, host cell confluence at infection and frequency of media replacement. Optimisation of bacterial purification including a comparison of host cell lysis methods, purification temperature, bacterial yield calculations and bacterial pelleting at different centrifugation speeds. Quantification of bacterial viability loss after long term storage and freezing under a range of conditions including

  1. Manual therapy improved signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Morell, Gaston Coutsiers

    2016-03-01

    Data sourcesMedline, Cochrane, Web of Science, SciELO and Embase databases from 1993-2014.Study selectionRandomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) comparing a manual therapy physical therapy intervention to a reference group (placebo intervention, controlled comparison intervention, standard treatment or other treatment).Data extraction and synthesisTwo independent reviewers abstracted data and assessed quality and clinical relevance of each paper. In case of disagreement, a third reviewer was consulted. The PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence-Based Database) scale was used to assess the methodological quality of the studies.ResultsEight studies were included. The number of patients in the studies ranged from 30-93. Seven out of the eight studies presented high methodological quality. Treatment effect size was calculated for pain, maximum mouth opening (MMO) and pressure pain threshold (PPT). There was moderate and low evidence that myofascial release and massage techniques are more effective than placebo or no intervention for MMO and pain outcomes respectively. There was also moderate evidence that no significant difference exists between myofascial release and toxin botulinum for improvement on the same outcomes. There was low to high quality evidence that upper cervical spine thrust manipulation or mobilisation techniques are more effective than control, while thoracic manipulations are not. Overall there was moderate-to-high evidence that MT techniques protocols are effective. Methodological heterogeneity of the trial protocols frequently contributed to a decrease in the quality of evidence.ConclusionsThere is widely varying evidence that MT improves pain, MMO and PPT in subjects with TMD signs and symptoms, depending on the technique. Further studies should consider using standardised evaluations and better study designs to strengthen clinical relevance. PMID:27012575

  2. How to improve the performances of Fecal Immunological Tests (FIT): Need for standardization of the sampling and pre-analytical phases and revision of the procedures for comparison of methods.

    PubMed

    Rapi, Stefano; Rubeca, Tiziana; Fraser, Callum G

    2015-01-01

    Lack of reference materials and standard procedures, on faecal tests leads to major problems in harmonisation of methods and do not allow the comparison of outcome data. In particular the absence of standardisation of pre-analytical characteristic was noted for faecal test methods for haemoglobin since different manufacturers have developed different sampling procedures and report units. Moreover the physical characteristics of the faecal specimen and the designs of specimen collection devices do not allow analysis of samples on different systems in consequence, faecal tests cannot be compared using standard evaluation protocols. To improve the harmonization of results generated using different analytical systems and the overall performances of test on faecal materials we propose the introduction of standard procedures for sampling and pre-analytical phase and the adoption of specific procedures based on the use of artificial biological samples for comparison of methods. Harmonization of sampling devices with the use of a standard design for pickers and a standard ratio between analyte and buffer for different manufacturers represent a mandatory step in the roadmap for harmonization of clinical laboratory measurement on faecal materials and can allow a significant standardisation of results generated by different devices.The creation of specific protocols for the evaluation and comparison of analytical methods for analyse of faeces could lead to a significant improvement in the performance of methods and systems. PMID:24855037

  3. Improving documentation of clinical care within a clinical information network: an essential initial step in efforts to understand and improve care in Kenyan hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Tuti, Timothy; Bitok, Michael; Malla, Lucas; Paton, Chris; Muinga, Naomi; Gathara, David; Gachau, Susan; Mbevi, George; Nyachiro, Wycliffe; Ogero, Morris; Julius, Thomas; Irimu, Grace; English, Mike

    2016-01-01

    In many low income countries health information systems are poorly equipped to provide detailed information on hospital care and outcomes. Information is thus rarely used to support practice improvement. We describe efforts to tackle this challenge and to foster learning concerning collection and use of information. This could improve hospital services in Kenya. We are developing a Clinical Information Network, a collaboration spanning 14 hospitals, policy makers and researchers with the goal of improving information available on the quality of inpatient paediatric care across common childhood illnesses in Kenya. Standardised data from hospitals’ paediatric wards are collected using non-commercial and open source tools. We have implemented procedures for promoting data quality which are performed prior to a process of semi-automated analysis and routine report generation for hospitals in the network. In the first phase of the Clinical Information Network, we collected data on over 65 000 admission episodes. Despite clinicians’ initial unfamiliarity with routine performance reporting, we found that, as an initial focus, both engaging with each hospital and providing them information helped improve the quality of data and therefore reports. The process has involved mutual learning and building of trust in the data and should provide the basis for collaborative efforts to improve care, to understand patient outcome, and to evaluate interventions through shared learning. We have found that hospitals are willing to support the development of a clinically focused but geographically dispersed Clinical Information Network in a low-income setting. Such networks show considerable promise as platforms for collaborative efforts to improve care, to provide better information for decision making, and to enable locally relevant research. PMID:27398232

  4. The impact of improved JACIE standards on the care of related BM and PBSC donors.

    PubMed

    Anthias, C; Ethell, M E; Potter, M N; Madrigal, A; Shaw, B E

    2015-02-01

    Discrepancies exist between the care of unrelated donors (UDs) and related donors (RDs), particularly regarding medical suitability criteria, consenting procedures and donor follow-up. Changes to the most recent JACIE standards have addressed these issues. We studied 208 RDs who underwent PBSC or BM donation in a single centre during 2004-2013 to determine the impact of regulatory changes on donor care, and assessed the safety and efficacy of stem cell donation in donors not meeting UD medical suitability criteria. We observed significant improvements in donor consenting procedures (P=0.003) and donor follow-up (P=0.007) after stipulations in these areas were introduced. We saw a higher incidence of serious adverse events (SAEs) in RDs not meeting UD suitability criteria (P=0.018), and a higher incidence of SAEs in donors ⩾60 years (P=0.020). Haematopoietic progenitor cell donation is less safe in RDs who do not meet UD criteria for medical suitability. Although changes to JACIE standards have improved practice, development of specific medical suitability for RDs and guidelines around 'grey areas' where risks to a donor are unclear or theoretical, will be important in improving RD safety and standardising practice. PMID:25387092

  5. Testing of the Westinghouse hot gas filter at Ahlstrom Pyropower Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.; Alvin, M.A.; Bruck, G.J.; Isaksson, J.; Dennis, R.A.; Brown, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    A single cluster Westinghouse hot gas filter has been tested for over 2050 hours on Ahlstrom Pyropower Corporation`s Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) 10 MW test facility at Karhula, Finland. This filter system, which houses 128 ceramic candles in three plenums, takes the full flow from the PCFB. Two candle types, an alumina/mullite candle manufactured by Coors Ceramics and a clay bonded SiC candle manufactured by Refractron Corporation were evaluated over a range of filtration face velocities, dust loadings, coal types and temperatures. Both candle systems allowed less than 3 ppmw to exit the candles with inlet dust loadings as high as 18,000 ppm. Stable pressure drop across the filter in the steady state was achieved with less than 60 in wg (150 mbar) for either candle system. Pulse cleaning air pressure was less than 435 psi (30 bar) when the plant was operated at 145 to 175 psi (10 to 12 bar). Improvements to the flow distribution in the filter housing and fine tuning of the pulsing system were incorporated. The alumina/mullite candles accumulated around 750 hours at operating temperatures to 1,650 F (900 C). The SiC accumulated about 1,300 hours at temperatures to 1,560 F (850 C). Strength measurements and SEM examination of the candle material have been conducted to help evaluate long-term ceramic candle filter material stability. All metal structures within the filter assembly performed as designed.

  6. Making process improvement 'stick'.

    PubMed

    Studer, Quint

    2014-06-01

    To sustain gains from a process improvement initiative, healthcare organizations should: Explain to staff why a process improvement initiative is needed. Encourage leaders within the organization to champion the process improvement, and tie their evaluations to its outcomes. Ensure that both leaders and employees have the skills to help sustain the sought-after process improvements. PMID:24968631

  7. Improvement in the Grain Growth of Plasma-Treated Nano-Sized ZnO Films and Their Characterization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mi; Chou, Ching-Chuan; Lin, Ching-Cheng; Koo, Horng-Show

    2015-11-01

    The well-aligned ZnO nanorods were rapidly grown on an indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrate using Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin film as seed layer by the microwave-assisted hydrothermal chemical route. The optimal growth conditions for the well-aligned ZnO nanorods were obtained by modulating H2 plasma pretreatment time for the seed layer and synthesis time for ZnO nanorods. The H2 plasma effect of the seed layer on the alignment, growth rate and crysallinity of ZnO nanods is also demonstrated. The synthesized ZnO nanorods were annealed in atmosphere of N2, O2 and H2 + N2 mixed gas to improve the related physical characteristics, the ZnO nanorods on grapheme/ITO substrate were also investigated. The results show that the alignment and growth rate of ZnO nanorods depends on the physical characteristics and roughness of the seed layer, which can be improved by H2 plasma pretreatment. The average growth rate of ZnO nanorods synthesized by microwave hydrothermal technique is about 2.2 μm/hr which significantly superior to other conventional techniques. After the appropriate N2 annealing treatment, good quality and well-aligned ZnO nanorods, which are single crystal with stacking defects and pyramid or candle shape, were obtained. A fundamental model of the effect of H2 plasma pretreatment on the surface of seed layer and the growth of ZnO nanorods using a microwave-assisted hydrothermal chemical route is also described. PMID:26726662

  8. RECONSTRUCTING COSMOLOGICAL MATTER PERTURBATIONS USING STANDARD CANDLES AND RULERS

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Ujjaini; Sahni, Varun; Starobinsky, Alexei A. E-mail: varun@iucaa.ernet.i

    2009-10-20

    For a large class of dark energy (DE) models, for which the effective gravitational constant is a constant and there is no direct exchange of energy between DE and dark matter (DM), knowledge of the expansion history suffices to reconstruct the growth factor of linearized density perturbations in the non-relativistic matter component on scales much smaller than the Hubble distance. In this paper, we develop a non-parametric method for extracting information about the perturbative growth factor from data pertaining to the luminosity or angular size distances. A comparison of the reconstructed density contrast with observations of large-scale structure and gravitational lensing can help distinguish DE models such as the cosmological constant and quintessence from models based on modified gravity theories as well as models in which DE and DM are either unified or interact directly. We show that for current supernovae (SNe) data, the linear growth factor at z = 0.3 can be constrained to 5% and the linear growth rate to 6%. With future SNe data, such as expected from the Joint Dark Energy Mission, we may be able to constrain the growth factor to 2%-3% and the growth rate to 3%-4% at z = 0.3 with this unbiased, model-independent reconstruction method. For future baryon acoustic oscillation data which would deliver measurements of both the angular diameter distance and the Hubble parameter, it should be possible to constrain the growth factor at z = 2.5%-9%. These constraints grow tighter with the errors on the data sets. With a large quantity of data expected in the next few years, this method can emerge as a competitive tool for distinguishing between different models of dark energy.

  9. Could edge-lit type Ia supernovae be standard candles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regős, Enikő; Tout, Christopher A.; Wickramasinghe, Dayal; Hurley, Jarrod R.; Pols, Onno R.

    2003-05-01

    The progenitors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have not been identified. Though they are no longer fashionable, we investigate the consequences if a significant number of SNe Ia were edge-lit detonations (ELDs) of carbon/oxygen white dwarfs that have accreted a critical mass of helium. Our best understanding of the Phillips relation between light curve speed and peak luminosity assigns both these phenomena to the amount of 56Ni produced. In ELDs there are two sites of 56Ni synthesis. If the peak luminosity is determined primarily by the CO ratio in the core it is primarily a function of the initial main-sequence mass of the progenitor of the CO white dwarf. If the light curve decay speed is determined by the total mass of iron group elements ejected this is a function of the total mass of the ELD at the time of explosion because both the CO core and the He envelope are substantially converted to 56Ni. In general, binary star evolution ensures that these two masses are correlated and an empirical relation between peak luminosity and light curve shape can be expected. However when we perform population synthesis for progenitors of different metallicities we find a systematic shift in this relation that would make distant ELD SNe Ia fainter than those nearby. The abundances of alpha-rich isotopes, such as 44Ca, in the solar system indicate that only about 40 per cent of SNe Ia could be edge-lit so any systematic effect that could be present would be correspondingly diluted. A systematic effect is still expected even if we examine only the small subset of ELDs that accrete from a naked helium star, rather than a He white dwarf.

  10. X-ray afterglow light curves: toward a standard candle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendre, B.; Galli, A.; Boër, M.

    2008-05-01

    We investigate the clustering of afterglow light curves observed at X-ray and optical wavelengths. We construct a sample of 34 bursts with known distance and X-ray afterglow. We correct the light curves for cosmological effects and compare the observed X-ray fluxes one day after the burst. We check for correlations between the observed flux and the burst spectral and temporal properties. We confirm the previous result of Boër and Gendre (2000) that X-ray afterglow light curves cluster in luminosity, even when we consider the SWIFT data. We observe this clustering only for the afterglow light curves; the inclusion of prompt-related data broaden the distribution. The same clustering is observed for the optical light curves; GRB sources can be divided in three classes, namely optical and X-ray bright afterglows, optical and X-ray dim ones, and optically bright-X-ray dim ones. We argue that this clustering is related to the fireball total energy, the external medium density, the fraction of fireball energy going in relativistic electrons and magnetic fields. These parameters can be either fixed to a standard value, or correlated.

  11. X-ray afterglow light curves : toward standard candle ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendre, B.; Galli, A.; Boër, M.

    2007-07-01

    We investigate the clustering of afterglow light curves observed in X-ray and in optical before the launch of SWIFT in light of SWIFT observations. We have constructed a sample of 34 bursts with known distance and X-ray afterglow. This sample includes bursts observed by BeppoSAX, XMM-Newton, Chandra, and SWIFT. We correct the light curves for cosmological effects and compare the observed X-ray fluxes at 1 day after the burst. We check if there is any correlation between the observed flux and the burst spectral and temporal properties. We find that X-ray afterglow light curves cluster in luminosity, even in the SWIFT era. We show that this clustering is due only to the afterglow, and that the inclusion of prompt-related data broaden the distribution and hide the clustering. The same clustering is observed in optical, and we found three sub-division between optical and X-ray bright afterglows, dim ones, and optically bright -X-ray dim ones. We argue that the observed optical and X-ray clustering are related to the fireball total energy, the external medium density, the fraction of fireball energy going in relativistic electrons and magnetic fields. These parameters are either all fixed to a standard value, or all linked together.

  12. X-Ray Afterglow Light Curves: Toward A Standard Candle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendre, B.; Galli, A.; Boër, M.

    2008-08-01

    We investigate the clustering of afterglow light curves observed at X-ray and optical wavelengths. We have constructed a sample of 61 bursts with known distance and X-ray afterglow. This sample includes bursts observed by BeppoSAX, XMM-Newton, Chandra, and Swift. We correct the light curves for cosmological effects and compare the observed X-ray fluxes 1 day after the burst. We check for correlations between the observed flux and the burst spectral and temporal properties. We confirm the previous result of Boër & Gendre that X-ray afterglow light curves cluster in luminosity, even when we consider the last Swift data. We observe this clustering only for the afterglow light curves; the inclusion of prompt-related data broadens the distribution. A similar clustering is observed for the optical light curves; gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources can be divided into three classes, namely, optically and X-ray bright afterglows, optically and X-ray dim ones, and optically bright but X-ray dim ones. We argue that this clustering is related to the fireball total energy, the external medium density, and the fraction of fireball energy going into relativistic electrons and magnetic fields. These parameters can be either fixed to a standard value or correlated. We finally propose a method for the estimation of the GRB source redshift based on the observed X-ray flux 1 day after the burst and optical properties. Using this method, we compute a redshift of 1.4 +/- 0.2 for GRB 980519 and of 1.9 +/- 0.3 for GRB 040827. We tested this method on three recently detected Swift GRBs with known redshift, and found it in good agreement with the reported distance from optical spectroscopy.

  13. 75 FR 63200 - Petroleum Wax Candles From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-14

    ... of institution (75 FR 38121, July 1, 2010) of the subject five-year review was adequate and that the... the Commission's rules, as amended, 67 FR 68036 (November 8, 2002). Even where electronic filing of a... Commission's Handbook on Electronic ] Filing Procedures, 67 FR 68168, 68173 (November 8, 2002). \\2\\...

  14. Development of a Candle Filter Failure Safeguard Device

    SciTech Connect

    Sanjana, Z.; Bruck, G.; Smeltzer, E.; Alvin, M.A.; Newby, R.; Foote, J.

    2002-09-18

    The objective of the program was to develop an SGD which would essentially eliminate ash or char leakage. The quantitative target was arrived at based on detailed estimates of gas turbine and combustor performance degradation due to particle erosion and deposition. An SGD capable of limiting particle leakage to <0.5 ppmw will be needed to achieve highest system availability, commensurate with annual maintenance outage. Our advanced SGD concepts were selected to achieve the goal of >16,000 hours cleaning interval.

  15. Are long gamma-ray bursts standard candles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hai-Nan; Li, Xin; Wang, Sai; Chang, Zhe

    2015-10-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are widely proposed as an effective probe to trace the Hubble diagram of the Universe in high-redshift range. However, the calibration of GRBs is not as easy as that of Type-Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Most calibrating methods at present make use one or some of the empirical luminosity correlations, e.g. Amati relation. One of the underlying assumptions of these calibrating methods is that the empirical correlation is universal over all redshifts. In this paper, we check to what extent this assumption holds. Assuming that SNe Ia exactly trace the Hubble diagram of the Universe, we re-investigate the Amati relation for low-redshift (z < 1.4) and high-redshift (z > 1.4) GRBs, respectively. It is found that the Amati relation of low-z GRBs differs from that of high-z GRBs at more than 3σ confidence level. This result is insensitive to cosmological models. We should be cautious when using Amati relation to reconstruct the Hubble diagram of the Universe.

  16. Dark Candles of the Universe: Black Hole Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aykutalp, Aycin

    2016-03-01

    In 1916, when Karl Schwarzschild solved the Einstein field equations of general relativity for a spherically symmetric, non-rotating mass no one anticipated the impact black holes would have on astrophysics. I will review the main formation channels for black hole seeds and their evolution through cosmic time. In this, emphasis will be placed on the observational diagnostics of astrophysical black holes and their role on the assembly of galaxy formation and evolution. I then review how these observations put constrain on the seed black hole formation theories. Finally, I present an outlook for how future observations can shed light on our understanding of black holes. This work is supported by NSF Grant AST-1333360.

  17. Cosmology with AGN: can we use quasars as standard candles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risaliti, G.

    2016-06-01

    The non-linear relation between X-ray and UV luminosity in quasars can be used to estimate their distance. Recently, we have shown that despite the large dispersion of the relation, a Hubble Diagram made of large samples of quasars can provide unique constraints on cosmology at high redshift. Furthermore, the dispersion of the relation is heavily affected by measurement errors: until now we have used serendipitous X-ray observations, but dedicated observations would significantly increase the precision of the distance estimates. I discuss the future role of XMM in this new field, showing (1) the fundamental contribution of the Serendipitous Source Catalogue and of large surveys, and (2) the breakthrough advancements we may achieve with the observation of a large number of SDSS quasars at high redshift: every 12-15 quasars observed at z~3 would be equivalent to discovering a supernova at that redshift.

  18. On Picturing a Candle: The Prehistory of Imagery Science.

    PubMed

    MacKisack, Matthew; Aldworth, Susan; Macpherson, Fiona; Onians, John; Winlove, Crawford; Zeman, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The past 25 years have seen a rapid growth of knowledge about brain mechanisms involved in visual mental imagery. These advances have largely been made independently of the long history of philosophical - and even psychological - reckoning with imagery and its parent concept 'imagination'. We suggest that the view from these empirical findings can be widened by an appreciation of imagination's intellectual history, and we seek to show how that history both created the conditions for - and presents challenges to - the scientific endeavor. We focus on the neuroscientific literature's most commonly used task - imagining a concrete object - and, after sketching what is known of the neurobiological mechanisms involved, we examine the same basic act of imagining from the perspective of several key positions in the history of philosophy and psychology. We present positions that, firstly, contextualize and inform the neuroscientific account, and secondly, pose conceptual and methodological challenges to the scientific analysis of imagery. We conclude by reflecting on the intellectual history of visualization in the light of contemporary science, and the extent to which such science may resolve long-standing theoretical debates. PMID:27148124

  19. I Light This Candle: Using Rituals in Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Laura E.

    2008-01-01

    The use of rituals in the classroom can enrich and enhance learning. They can also build a sense of community and belonging which in turn makes the classroom a safer place to risk sharing ideas and engaging in class discussion. Rituals also bring closure to a particular segment of the class learning experience or for the class itself. How many…

  20. On Picturing a Candle: The Prehistory of Imagery Science

    PubMed Central

    MacKisack, Matthew; Aldworth, Susan; Macpherson, Fiona; Onians, John; Winlove, Crawford; Zeman, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The past 25 years have seen a rapid growth of knowledge about brain mechanisms involved in visual mental imagery. These advances have largely been made independently of the long history of philosophical – and even psychological – reckoning with imagery and its parent concept ‘imagination’. We suggest that the view from these empirical findings can be widened by an appreciation of imagination’s intellectual history, and we seek to show how that history both created the conditions for – and presents challenges to – the scientific endeavor. We focus on the neuroscientific literature’s most commonly used task – imagining a concrete object – and, after sketching what is known of the neurobiological mechanisms involved, we examine the same basic act of imagining from the perspective of several key positions in the history of philosophy and psychology. We present positions that, firstly, contextualize and inform the neuroscientific account, and secondly, pose conceptual and methodological challenges to the scientific analysis of imagery. We conclude by reflecting on the intellectual history of visualization in the light of contemporary science, and the extent to which such science may resolve long-standing theoretical debates. PMID:27148124