Science.gov

Sample records for standardized endoskeleton-including hip

  1. Mechanical behaviour of standardized, endoskeleton-including hip spacers implanted into composite femurs

    PubMed Central

    Thielen, T.; Maas, S.; Zuerbes, A.; Waldmann, D.; Anagnostakos, K.; Kelm, J.

    2009-01-01

    Two-stage reconstruction using an antibiotic loaded cement spacer is the preferred treatment method of late hip joint infections. Hip spacers maintain stability of the joint and length of the limb during treatment period. However, as the material strength of bone cement (PMMA) is limited, spacer fractures led to serious complications in the past. This study investigated the load capacity of custom made hip spacers, developed at the 'Klinik für Orthopädie und Orthopädische Chirurgie' (Universitätsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg / Saar, Germany), and implanted into composite femurs. In a quasi-static test, non-reinforced spacers tolerated hip joint loads of about 3000 N, whereas reinforced spacers with titanium-grade-two endoskeletons doubled this load up to 6000 N. Even for cyclic loading, endoskeleton-including hip spacers tolerated loads of >4500 N with 500,000 load cycles. Thus, an endoskeleton-including spacer should provide a mobile and functional joint through the treatment course. A generated FE-model was used to determine the fracture stresses and allows for further sensitivity analysis. PMID:19834594

  2. Standardized Loads Acting in Hip Implants.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Georg; Bender, Alwina; Dymke, Jörn; Duda, Georg; Damm, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing success of hip joint replacements, the average age of patients has decreased, patients have become more active and their expectations of the implant durability have risen. Thus, pre-clinical endurance tests on hip implants require defining realistic in vivo loads from younger and more active patients. These loads require simplifications to be applicable for simulator tests and numerical analyses. Here, the contact forces in the joint were measured with instrumented hip implants in ten subjects during nine of the most physically demanding and frequent activities of daily living. Typical levels and directions of average and high joint loads were extracted from the intra- and inter-individually widely varying individual data. These data can also be used to analyse bone remodelling at the implant-bone interface, evaluate tissue straining in finite element studies or validate analytical loading predictions, among other uses. The current ISO standards for endurance tests of implant stems and necks are based on historic analytical data from the 1970s. Comparisons of these test forces with in vivo loads unveiled that their unidirectional orientations deviate from the time-dependent in vivo directions during walking and most other activities. The ISO force for testing the stem is substantially too low while the ISO force for the neck better matches typical in vivo magnitudes. Because the magnitudes and orientations of peak forces substantially vary among the activities, load scenarios that reflect a collection of time-dependent high forces should be applied rather than using unidirectional forces. Based on data from ten patients, proposals for the most demanding activities, the time courses of the contact forces and the required cycle numbers for testing are given here. Friction moments in the joint were measured in addition to the contact forces. The moment data were also standardized and can be applied to wear tests of the implant. It was shown that

  3. Standardized Loads Acting in Hip Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Georg; Bender, Alwina; Dymke, Jörn; Duda, Georg; Damm, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing success of hip joint replacements, the average age of patients has decreased, patients have become more active and their expectations of the implant durability have risen. Thus, pre-clinical endurance tests on hip implants require defining realistic in vivo loads from younger and more active patients. These loads require simplifications to be applicable for simulator tests and numerical analyses. Here, the contact forces in the joint were measured with instrumented hip implants in ten subjects during nine of the most physically demanding and frequent activities of daily living. Typical levels and directions of average and high joint loads were extracted from the intra- and inter-individually widely varying individual data. These data can also be used to analyse bone remodelling at the implant-bone interface, evaluate tissue straining in finite element studies or validate analytical loading predictions, among other uses. The current ISO standards for endurance tests of implant stems and necks are based on historic analytical data from the 1970s. Comparisons of these test forces with in vivo loads unveiled that their unidirectional orientations deviate from the time-dependent in vivo directions during walking and most other activities. The ISO force for testing the stem is substantially too low while the ISO force for the neck better matches typical in vivo magnitudes. Because the magnitudes and orientations of peak forces substantially vary among the activities, load scenarios that reflect a collection of time-dependent high forces should be applied rather than using unidirectional forces. Based on data from ten patients, proposals for the most demanding activities, the time courses of the contact forces and the required cycle numbers for testing are given here. Friction moments in the joint were measured in addition to the contact forces. The moment data were also standardized and can be applied to wear tests of the implant. It was shown that

  4. Hip Arthroplasty in Obese Patients: Rising Prevalence–Standard Procedures?

    PubMed Central

    Skutek, Michael; Wirries, Nils; von Lewinski, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    We examined our experience and, in particular, complications associated with total hip arthroplasty in obese and morbidly obese patients. We prospectively gathered 50 patients in a matched control series including 25 obese and morbidly obese patients. All patients were operated using the direct lateral approach and standard postoperative protocols. Operating room time, complications, dislocations, blood loss, cup position and clinical parameters using the Harris Hip Score and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index results were compared. Although there were some significant differences in clinical outcomes, standard procedures yielded good overall results and an acceptable rate of complications. Details approaching this patient entity are being discussed. PMID:27433302

  5. Hip Arthroplasty in Obese Patients: Rising Prevalence-Standard Procedures?

    PubMed

    Skutek, Michael; Wirries, Nils; von Lewinski, Gabriela

    2016-06-27

    We examined our experience and, in particular, complications associated with total hip arthroplasty in obese and morbidly obese patients. We prospectively gathered 50 patients in a matched control series including 25 obese and morbidly obese patients. All patients were operated using the direct lateral approach and standard postoperative protocols. Operating room time, complications, dislocations, blood loss, cup position and clinical parameters using the Harris Hip Score and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index results were compared. Although there were some significant differences in clinical outcomes, standard procedures yielded good overall results and an acceptable rate of complications. Details approaching this patient entity are being discussed. PMID:27433302

  6. Accelerated care versus standard care among patients with hip fracture: the HIP ATTACK pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background: A hip fracture causes bleeding, pain and immobility, and initiates inflammatory, hypercoagulable, catabolic and stress states. Accelerated surgery may improve outcomes by reducing the duration of these states and immobility. We undertook a pilot trial to determine the feasibility of a trial comparing accelerated care (i.e., rapid medical clearance and surgery) and standard care among patients with a hip fracture. Methods: Patients aged 45 years or older who, during weekday, daytime working hours, received a diagnosis of a hip fracture requiring surgery were randomly assigned to receive accelerated or standard care. Our feasibility outcomes included the proportion of eligible patients randomly assigned, completeness of follow-up and timelines of accelerated surgery. The main clinical outcome, assessed by data collectors and adjudicators who were unaware of study group allocations, was a major perioperative complication (i.e., a composite of death, preoperative myocardial infarction, myocardial injury after noncardiac surgery, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, stroke, and life-threatening or major bleeding) within 30 days of randomization. Results: Of patients eligible for inclusion, 80% consented and were randomly assigned to groups (30 to accelerated care and 30 to standard care) at 2 centres in Canada and 1 centre in India. All patients completed 30-day follow-up. The median time from diagnosis to surgery was 6.0 hours in the accelerated care group and 24.2 hours in the standard care group (p < 0.001). A major perioperative complication occurred in 9 (30%) of the patients in the accelerated care group and 14 (47%) of the patients in the standard care group (hazard ratio 0.60, 95% confidence interval 0.26–1.39). Interpretation: These results show the feasibility of a trial comparing accelerated and standard care among patients with hip fracture and support a definitive trial. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, no. NCT01344343. PMID:24246589

  7. Mid-term clinical results of total hip arthroplasty using a Wagner standard cup for dysplastic hip

    PubMed Central

    Maezawa, Katsuhiko; Nozawa, Masahiko; Yuasa, Takahito; Aritomi, Kentaro; Ogawa, Seiki; Maruyama, Yuichiro; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Background The outcome of cementless total hip arthroplasty depends on many factors. We must not forget fundamental things those are design of outer surface of the component, that leads bone ingrowth into the prosthesis, better initial stability, and better insertional techniques. The purpose of this study was to review our experience with metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty with a Wagner standard cup for patients who had acetabular dysplasia. Patients and methods Fifty-four patients with 55 hips underwent primary metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (Metasul prosthesis) with a Wagner standard cup (44–48 mm in outer diameter) and were followed for a minimum of 10 years. All patients received the same type of cementless femoral component (Natural hip stem) and femoral head (28 mm in diameter). Results Seventeen of the 55 Wagner standard cups (30.9%) showed aseptic loosening over a mean period of 3.6 years after surgery, and there were no bone anchors on the outer surface of the 16 retrieved cups. Conclusion From our experience, the small Wagner standard cup does not achieve sufficient osteointegration and we do not recommend the use of this cup, especially for patients with acetabular dysplasia and/or those with a small stature. PMID:25561751

  8. Survivorship of standard versus modified posterior surgical approaches in metal-on-metal hip resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    M. Takamura, K.; Maher, P.; Nath, T.; Su, E. P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (MOMHR) is available as an alternative option for younger, more active patients. There are failure modes that are unique to MOMHR, which include loosening of the femoral head and fractures of the femoral neck. Previous studies have speculated that changes in the vascularity of the femoral head may contribute to these failure modes. This study compares the survivorship between the standard posterior approach (SPA) and modified posterior approach (MPA) in MOMHR. Methods A retrospective clinical outcomes study was performed examining 351 hips (279 male, 72 female) replaced with Birmingham Hip Resurfacing (BHR, Smith and Nephew, Memphis, Tennessee) in 313 patients with a pre-operative diagnosis of osteoarthritis. The mean follow-up period for the SPA group was 2.8 years (0.1 to 6.1) and for the MPA, 2.2 years (0.03 to 5.2); this difference in follow-up period was statistically significant (p < 0.01). Survival analysis was completed using the Kaplan–Meier method. Results At four years, the Kaplan–Meier survival curve for the SPA was 97.2% and 99.4% for the MPA; this was statistically significant (log-rank; p = 0.036). There were eight failures in the SPA and two in the MPA. There was a 3.5% incidence of femoral head collapse or loosening in the SPA and 0.4% in the MPA, which represented a significant difference (p = 0.041). There was a 1.7% incidence of fractures of the femoral neck in the SPA and none in the MPA (p = 0.108). Conclusion This study found a significant difference in survivorship at four years between the SPA and the MPA (p = 0.036). The clinical outcomes of this study suggest that preserving the vascularity of the femoral neck by using the MPA results in fewer vascular-related failures in MOMHRs. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:150–4 PMID:24842931

  9. Geriatric orthopedic co-management of older adults with hip fracture: an emerging standard

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei

    2015-01-01

    Hip fracture, a common complication of fall injuries in older adults, often results in high rate of mortality, increased debility, functional loss, and worse quality of life. The value of geriatric teams and model of care for the hip fracture patients have been examined in a number of studies, and even though most studies have demonstrated potential impact in improving outcomes for the hip fracture patients, they are often observational or quasi-experimental designs that are prone to bias. In this editorial, we review the Lancet article by Prestmo and colleagues, a randomized controlled trial that demonstrated improved outcomes for hip fracture patients managed in a geriatric unit. PMID:26539441

  10. Rose Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... a chemical found in rose hip, might slow blood clotting. Taking rose hip might increase the risk of ... a chemical found in rose hip, might slow blood clotting. There is concern that rose hip might cause ...

  11. Hip pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bones or cartilage of your hip, including: Hip fractures – can cause sudden hip pain. These injuries can be serious and lead to major problems. Hip fractures are more common as people get older because ...

  12. Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgeon removes damaged cartilage and bone from your hip joint and replaces them with new, man-made parts. A hip replacement can Relieve pain Help your hip joint work better Improve walking and other movements The ...

  13. The effectiveness of a standardized rose hip powder, containing seeds and shells of Rosa canina, on cell longevity, skin wrinkles, moisture, and elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Phetcharat, L; Wongsuphasawat, K; Winther, K

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of a rose hip powder (Hyben Vital®) made from seeds and shells on cell senescence, skin wrinkling, and aging. Methods A total of 34 healthy subjects, aged 35–65 years, with wrinkles on the face (crow’s-feet) were subjected to a randomized and double-blinded clinical study of the effects of the rose hip powder, as compared to astaxanthin, a well-known remedy against wrinkles. During the 8-week study, half of the participants ingested the standardized rose hip product, while the other half ingested astaxanthin. Objective measurements of facial wrinkles, skin moisture, and elasticity were made by using Visioscan, Corneometer, and Cutometer at the beginning of the study, after 4 weeks, and after 8 weeks. Evaluation of participant satisfaction of both supplements was assessed using questionnaires. In addition, the effect of the rose hip preparation on cell longevity was measured in terms of leakage of hemoglobin through red cell membranes (hemolytic index) in blood samples kept in a blood bank for 5 weeks. Significance of all values was attained with P≤0.05. Results In the double-blinded study, the rose hip group showed statistically significant improvements in crow’s-feet wrinkles (P<0.05), skin moisture (P<0.05), and elasticity (P<0.05) after 8 weeks of treatment. A similar improvement was observed for astaxanthin, with P-values 0.05, 0.001, and 0.05. Likewise, both groups expressed equal satisfaction with the results obtained in their self-assessment. The rose hip powder further resulted in increased cell longevity of erythrocyte cells during storage for 5 weeks in a blood bank. Conclusion Results suggest that intake of the standardized rose hip powder (Hyben Vital®) improves aging-induced skin conditions. The apparent stabilizing effects of the rose hip product on cell membranes of stored erythrocyte cells observed in this study may contribute to improve the cell longevity and obstructing skin aging. PMID:26604725

  14. Rose Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... de l’Églantier, Gulab, Heps, Hip, Hip Fruit, Hip Sweet, Hipberry, Hop Fruit, Persian Rose, Phool Gulab, Pink Rose, Poire d’oiseaux, Rosa alba, Rosa centifolia, Rosa damascena, Rosa de castillo, Rosa ... Rose Hips, Rosa lutetiana, Rosa pomifera, Rosa rugosa, Rosa villosa, ...

  15. [Hip arthroscopy].

    PubMed

    Gollwitzer, H; Banke, I J; Schauwecker, J

    2016-02-01

    Hip arthroscopy represents an important component in the treatment of diseases of the hip joint and is nowadays an indispensible tool in modern hip-preserving surgery. This article provides a review of the basic technical principles, typical indications and complications of hip arthroscopy. Furthermore, current developments as well as possibilities and limitations of the arthroscopic technique are reviewed. PMID:26781702

  16. Hip instability.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew V; Sekiya, Jon K

    2010-06-01

    Hip instability is becoming a more commonly recognized source of pain and disability in patients. Traumatic causes of hip instability are often clear. Appropriate treatment includes immediate reduction, early surgery for acetabular rim fractures greater than 25% or incarcerated fragments in the joint, and close follow-up to monitor for avascular necrosis. Late surgical intervention may be necessary for residual symptomatic hip instability. Atraumatic causes of hip instability include repetitive external rotation with axial loading, generalized ligamentous laxity, and collagen disorders like Ehlers-Danlos. Symptoms caused by atraumatic hip instability often have an insidious onset. Patients may have a wide array of hip symptoms while demonstrating only subtle findings suggestive of capsular laxity. Traction views of the affected hip can be helpful in diagnosing hip instability. Open and arthroscopic techniques can be used to treat capsular laxity. We describe an arthroscopic anterior hip capsular plication using a suture technique. PMID:20473129

  17. Comparison of a minimally invasive posterior approach and the standard posterior approach for total hip arthroplasty A prospective and comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is not clear whether total hip arthroplasty performed via a minimally invasive approach leads to less muscle trauma compared to the standard approach. Materials and methods To investigate whether a minimally invasive posterior approach for total hip arthroplasty results in lower levels of muscle-derived enzymes and better post-operative clinical results than those obtained with the standard posterolateral approach fifty patients in both groups were compared in a prospective and comparative study. The following parameters were examined: muscle-derived enzymes CPK, CK-MM and myoglobin pre-operatively, 24 and 48 hours post-operatively, CRP and hemoglobin on the third postoperative day, loss of blood, daily pain levels, the rate of recovery (time taken to attain predefined functional parameters), the Oxford Hip Score, the SF-36 score and the WOMAC score pre-operatively and six weeks post-surgery, the position of the implant and the cement coating by post-operative X-ray examination. Results and Conclusions The minimally invasive operated patients exhibited a significantly lower loss of blood, significantly less pain at rest and a faster rate of recovery but the clinical chemistry values and the other clinical parameters were comparable. PMID:20663200

  18. Hip Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... HIPS. See your doctor. Use ice and an anti-inflammatory medicine to relieve the pain. *3. Do you ... hip pain may be from ARTHRITIS. Try an anti-inflammatory medicine. If you don't feel better, see ...

  19. Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... replacement is an operation in which a damaged hip joint is removed and replaced with an artificial joint. ... are many medical conditions that can damage the hip joint. (Watch the video to learn about what goes ...

  20. Arthroscopic Treatment of Traumatic Hip Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Begly, John P; Robins, Bryan; Youm, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic hip dislocations are high-energy injuries that often result in considerable morbidity. Although appropriate management improves outcomes, associated hip pathology may complicate the recovery and lead to future disability and pain. Historically, open reduction has been the standard of care for treating hip dislocations that require surgical intervention. The use of hip arthroscopy to treat the sequelae and symptoms resulting from traumatic hip dislocations recently has increased, however. When used appropriately, hip arthroscopy is a safe, effective, and minimally invasive treatment option for intra-articular pathology secondary to traumatic hip dislocation. PMID:27007728

  1. Migration and head penetration of Vitamin-E diffused cemented polyethylene cup compared to standard cemented cup in total hip arthroplasty: study protocol for a randomised, double-blind, controlled trial (E1 HIP)

    PubMed Central

    Sköldenberg, Olof; Rysinska, Agata; Chammout, Ghazi; Salemyr, Mats; Muren, Olle; Bodén, Henrik; Eisler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In vitro, Vitamin-E-diffused, highly cross-linked polyethylene (PE) has been shown to have superior wear resistance and improved mechanical properties when compared to those of standard highly cross-linked PE liners used in total hip arthroplasty (THA). The aim of the study is to evaluate the safety of a new cemented acetabular cup with Vitamin-E-doped PE regarding migration, head penetration and clinical results. Methods and analysis In this single-centre, double-blinded, randomised controlled trial, we will include 50 patients with primary hip osteoarthritis scheduled for THA and randomise them in a 1:1 ratio to a cemented cup with either argon gas-sterilised PE (control group) or Vitamin-E-diffused PE (vitamin-e group). All patients and the assessor of the primary outcome will be blinded and the same uncemented stem will be used for all participants. The primary end point will be proximal migration of the cup at 2 years after surgery measured with radiostereometry. Secondary end points include proximal migration at other follow-ups, total migration, femoral head penetration, clinical outcome scores and hip-related complications. Patients will be followed up at 3 months and at 1, 2, 5 and 10 years postoperatively. Results Results will be analysed using 95% CIs for the effect size. A regression model will also be used to adjust for stratification factors. Ethics and dissemination The ethical committee at Karolinska Institutet has approved the study. The first results from the study will be disseminated to the medical community via presentations and publications in relevant medical journals when the last patient included has been followed up for 2 years. Trial registration number NCT02254980. PMID:27388352

  2. Infant hip sonography: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Harcke, H T; Grissom, L E

    1994-08-01

    Sonography of the infant hip has gained wide acceptance in the decade since its introduction. The two principle techniques of Graf and Harcke have been combined with the proposal of a Dynamic Standard Minimum Examination. Whereas sonography is used increasingly to manage developmental dislocation and/or displasia of the hip, there is no agreement on the use of sonography for universal newborn screening. This article describes in detail the Dynamic Standard Minimum Sonographic Examination of the infant hip. In addition, this article reviews the classification and management of infant hip disorders. PMID:7946476

  3. Hip arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    Johnson D, Weiss WM. Basic arthroscopic principles. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic ... 11. Sanchez VMI, Meza AO. Hip arthroscopy. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic ...

  4. Hip arthroscopy☆

    PubMed Central

    de Amorim Cabrita, Henrique Antônio Berwanger; de Castro Trindade, Christiano Augusto; de Campos Gurgel, Henrique Melo; Leal, Rafael Demura; de Souza Marques, Ricardo da Fonseca

    2014-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy is a safe method for treating a variety of pathological conditions that were unknown until a decade ago. Femoroacetabular impingement is the commonest of these pathological conditions and the one with the best results when treated early on. The instruments and surgical technique for hip arthroscopy continue to evolve. New indications for hip arthroscopy has been studied as the ligamentum teres injuries, capsular repair in instabilities, dissection of the sciatic nerve and repair of gluteal muscles tears (injuries to the hip rotator cuff), although still with debatable reproducibility. The complication rate is low, and ever-better results with fewer complications should be expected with the progression of the learning curve. PMID:26229924

  5. Hip ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Martinoli, Carlo; Garello, Isabella; Marchetti, Alessandra; Palmieri, Federigo; Altafini, Luisa; Valle, Maura; Tagliafico, Alberto

    2012-12-01

    In newborns, US has an established role in the detection and management of developmental dysplasia of the hip. Later in childhood, when the limping child is a major diagnostic dilemma, US is extremely helpful in the identification of the varied disease processes underlying this condition, as transient synovitis, septic arthritis, Perthes disease and slipped femoral capital epiphysis. In adolescent practicing sporting activities, US is an excellent means to identify apophyseal injures about the pelvic ring, especially when avulsions are undisplaced and difficult-to-see radiographically. Later on, in the adulthood, US is an effective modality to diagnose tendon and muscle injuries about the hip and pelvis, identify effusion or synovitis within the hip joint or its adjacent bursae and guide the treatment of these findings. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the most common pathologic conditions about the hip, in which the contribution of US is relevant for the diagnostic work-up. PMID:21571471

  6. Hip flexor strain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Pulled hip flexor - aftercare; Hip flexor injury - aftercare; Hip flexor tear - aftercare; Iliopsoas strain - aftercare; Strained iliopsoas muscle - aftercare; Torn iliopsoas muscle - aftercare; Psoas strain - aftercare

  7. Hip Implant Systems

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip replacement surgery, the damaged portions of the hip joint are removed. The ball (femoral head) is removed ... hip or leg Swelling at or near the hip joint A limp or change in walking ability Noise ( ...

  8. 'Hip' pain.

    PubMed

    Zacher, Josef; Gursche, Angelika

    2003-02-01

    'Hip' pain is usually located in the groin, upper thigh or buttock and is a common complaint. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis, avascular femoral head necrosis and apophyseal avulsion are the most common diagnoses in childhood and adolescents. Strains and fractures are common in sport-active adults. Osteoarthritis occurs in middle-aged and older adults. Trauma may result in femoral head fracture or typical muscle and tendon sprains and bursitis. Septic or inflammatory arthritis can occur at every age. Septic arthritis, fractures and acute epiphyseal slipping are real emergency cases. Congenital dysplasia of the hip joint may lead to labral tears and early osteoarthritis. The most important hip problems in children, adolescents, adult and older people are discussed; these problems originate from intra-articular disorders and the surrounding extra-articular soft tissues. Medical history, clinical examination and additional tests, including imaging, will be demonstrated. Principles of treatment are given for specific disorders. PMID:12659822

  9. Hip Surgery Candidates: A Comparative Study of Hip Osteoarthritis and Prior Hip Fracture Patient Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Ray

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To assess similarities and differences in patient-related characteristics before and after surgery for painful disabling hip osteoarthritis among elderly subgroups with and without a trauma history. Method: First, a cohort of 1000 hospitalized patients were assessed for trends in: perceived duration of the condition, pain intensity, functional performance ability, walking distance, body mass, and comorbidity characteristics among other factors. Then, the most salient of these patient-related characteristics were compared between 42 cases of hip osteoarthritis without a trauma history and 42 cases with a trauma history matched for age and gender, using medical records and standard data recording and analysis procedures. Results: Hip osteoarthritis cases with a prior hip fracture history had a longer duration of disability, and were more impaired functionally before surgery (p < 0.05) than those with no such history. They also had lower leg muscle strength and used more assistive devices. Conclusion: Patients undergoing hip replacement surgery for painful hip osteoarthritis who have a hip fracture history are likely to be more impaired and disabled than those with no such history. PMID:19478931

  10. Mini-Incision versus Standard Incision Total Hip Arthroplasty Regarding Surgical Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jin-Qi; Cui, Zhuang; Yu, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose It remains controversial whether mini-incision (MI) benefits patients in total hip arthroplasty (THA). We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to assess the effects of MI on surgical and functional outcomes in THA patients. Methods A systematic electronic literature search (up to May 2013) was conducted to identify RCTs comparing MI with standard incision (SI) THA. The primary outcome measures were surgical and functional outcomes. According to the surgical approach taken, MI THA patients were divided into four subgroups for sub-group meta-analysis. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) or risk differences (RDs) with accompanying 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated and pooled using a fixed-effect or random-effect model according to the heterogeneity. Results A total of 14 RCTs involving THA 1,174 patients met the inclusion criteria. The trials were medium risk of bias. The overall meta-analysis showed MI THA reduced total blood loss (95% CI, -201.83 to -21.18; p=.02) and length of hospital stay ( 95% CI, -0.67 to -0.08; p=.01) with significant heterogeneity. However, subgroup meta-analysis revealed posterior MI THA had perioperative advantages of reduced surgical duration ( 95% CI, -8.45 to -2.67; P<.001), less blood loss ( 95% CI, -107.20 to -1.73; P=.04) and shorter hospital stay ( 95% CI, -0.74 to -0.06; p=.002) with low heterogeneity. There were no significant differences between MI and SI THA groups in term of pain medication dose, functional outcome (HHS), radiological outcome or complications (P>.05, respectively). Conclusions Although no definite overall conclusion can be arrived at on whether MI THA is superior to SI THA, posterior MI THA clearly result in a significant decrease in surgical duration, blood loss and hospital stay. It seems to be a safe minimally invasive surgical procedure without increasing the risk of component malposition or complications. PMID:24265792

  11. Primary total hip replacement versus hip resurfacing - hospital considerations.

    PubMed

    Ward, William G; Carter, Christina J; Barone, Marisa; Jinnah, Riyaz

    2011-01-01

    Multiple factors regarding surgical procedures and patient selection affect hospital staffing needs as well as hospital revenues. In order to better understand the potential impact on hospitals that hip arthroplasty device selection (standard total hip arthroplasty vs. resurfacing) creates, a review of all primary hip arthroplasties performed at one institution was designed to identify factors that impacted hospital staffing needs and revenue generation. All primary hip arthroplasties undertaken over three fiscal years (2008 to 2010) were reviewed, utilizing only hospital business office data and medical records data that had been previously extracted prior for billing purposes. Analysis confirmed differing demographics for two hip arthroplasty populations, with the resurfacing patients (compared to the conventional total hip arthroplasty population) consisting of younger patients (mean age, 50 vs. 61 years), who were more often male (75% vs. 45%), were more likely to have osteoarthritis as their primary diagnosis (83 vs. 67%) and were more often covered by managed care or commercial insurance (83 vs. 34%). They also had shorter hospital stays (mean length of stay, 2.3 vs. 4.1 days) and consequently provided a more favorable financial revenue stream to the hospital on a per patient basis. Several trends appeared during the study periods. There was a steady increase in all procedures in all groups except for the resurfacings, which decreased 26% in males and 53% in females between 2009 and 2010. Differences were observed in the demographics of patients presenting for resurfacing, compared to those presenting for conventional total hip arthroplasty. In addition to the revenue stream considerations, institutions undertaking a resurfacing program must commit the resources and planning in order to rehabilitate these patients more expeditiously than is usually required with conventional hip arthroplasty patients. PMID:22035493

  12. Basic Hip Arthroscopy: Supine Patient Positioning and Dynamic Fluoroscopic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Mannava, Sandeep; Howse, Elizabeth A.; Stone, Austin V.; Stubbs, Allston J.

    2015-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy serves as both a diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the management of various conditions that afflict the hip. This article reviews the basics of hip arthroscopy by demonstrating supine patient positioning, fluoroscopic evaluation of the hip under anesthesia, and sterile preparation and draping. Careful attention to detail during the operating theater setup ensures adequate access to the various compartments of the hip to facilitate the diagnosis of disease and treatment with minimally invasive arthroscopy. Furthermore, having a routine method for patient positioning and operative setup improves patient safety, as well as operative efficiency, as the operative team becomes familiar with the surgeon's standard approach to hip arthroscopy cases. PMID:26759783

  13. Prevention of cement leakage into the hip joint by a standard cement plug during PFN-A cement augmentation: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Hanke, M; Djonov, V; Tannast, M; Keel, M J; Bastian, J D

    2016-06-01

    Medial penetration of the helical blade into the hip joint after fixation of trochanteric fractures using the proximal femur nail antirotation (PFN-A) is a potential failure mode. In low demand patients a blade exchange with cement augmentation may be an option if conversion to total hip arthroplasty is unfeasible to salvage the cut-through. This article describes a technique to avoid intraarticular cement leakage using a cement plug to close the defect in the femoral head caused by the cut-through. PMID:27010468

  14. Accuracy of Functional and Predictive Methods to Calculate the Hip Joint Center in Young Non-pathologic Asymptomatic Adults with Dual Fluoroscopy as a Reference Standard.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Niccolo M; Kutschke, Michael J; Atkins, Penny R; Foreman, K Bo; Kapron, Ashley L; Anderson, Andrew E

    2016-07-01

    Predictions from biomechanical models of gait may be sensitive to joint center locations. Most often, the hip joint center (HJC) is derived from locations of reflective markers adhered to the skin. Here, predictive techniques use regression equations of pelvic anatomy to estimate the HJC, whereas functional methods track motion of markers placed at the pelvis and femur during a coordinated motion. Skin motion artifact may introduce errors in the estimate of HJC for both techniques. Quantifying the accuracy of these methods is an area of open investigation. In this study, we used dual fluoroscopy (DF) (a dynamic X-ray imaging technique) and three-dimensional reconstructions from computed tomography images, to measure HJC locations in vivo. Using dual fluoroscopy as the reference standard, we then assessed the accuracy of three predictive and two functional methods. Eleven non-pathologic subjects were imaged with DF and reflective skin marker motion capture. Additionally, DF-based solutions generated virtual markers placed on bony landmarks, which were input to the predictive and functional methods to determine if estimates of the HJC improved. Using skin markers, functional methods had better mean agreement with the HJC measured by DF (11.0 ± 3.3 mm) than predictive methods (18.1 ± 9.5 mm); estimates from functional and predictive methods improved when using the DF-based solutions (1.3 ± 0.9 and 17.5 ± 8.6 mm, respectively). The Harrington method was the best predictive technique using both skin markers (13.2 ± 6.5 mm) and DF-based solutions (10.6 ± 2.5 mm). The two functional methods had similar accuracy using skin makers (11.1 ± 3.6 and 10.8 ± 3.2 mm) and DF-based solutions (1.2 ± 0.8 and 1.4 ± 1.0 mm). Overall, functional methods were superior to predictive methods for HJC estimation. However, the improvements observed when using the DF-based solutions suggest that skin motion artifact is a large source of error for the

  15. Hip Protectors: Are They Worth it?

    PubMed

    Cianferotti, Luisella; Fossi, Caterina; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-07-01

    Hip fractures are one of the most serious conditions in frail elderly subjects, greatly increasing morbidity and mortality, and decreasing healthy life years. Since their first introduction on the market, hip protectors have been revealed to be a potential preventive measure for hip fractures, in addition to other well-known recognized medical interventions and rehabilitation procedures. However, randomized controlled trials have given contradictory results regarding their efficacy. Moreover, little data are available on the cost effectiveness of hip protectors. Adherence is a major problem in assessing the effectiveness of hip protectors in preventing fractures. Indeed, there is a lack of general consensus on a standard definition and quantitative objective estimation of adherence to hip protectors, along with still scarce evidence on specific interventions on how to ameliorate it. From what is known so far, it seems reasonable to advise the use of hip protectors in aged care facilities, since recent pooled analyses have suggested their efficacy in this setting. The introduction of sensors combined with hip protectors will probably address this issue, both for monitoring and optimizing compliance, especially in elderly people. In the meantime, new, well-designed studies following specific guidelines are strongly encouraged and needed. In particular, studies in community-dwelling elderly individuals at high risk of first or further fragility fractures are required. The optimization of the tested devices in a preclinical setting according to international standard biomechanical testing is necessary. PMID:25926045

  16. [Hip fracture: call the geriatrician? ].

    PubMed

    Coutaz, M

    2014-11-01

    Hip fracture management by the geriatrician demands a close cooperation with orthopedic surgeons and a interdisciplinary approach with the implementation of protocole-driven care to standardize the care of most patients. From admission to discharge this orthogeriatric management is based on the comprehensive geriatric assessment to reduce the delays in surgery, the occurence of delirium or the most postoperative complications. This collaborative model of care seems to have the potential to improve function, admissions to nursing homes and mortality outcomes compared with usual care of geriatric patient with hip fracture. PMID:25536828

  17. Developmental dysplasia of the hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... Developmental hip dysplasia; DDH; Congenital dysplasia of the hip; Congenital dislocation of the hip; CDH; Pavlik harness ... dislocation Shorter leg on the side with the hip dislocation Uneven skin folds of thigh or buttocks After ...

  18. Hip joint replacement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100006.htm Hip joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 5 out of 5 Overview The hip joint is made up of two major parts: the ...

  19. Hip joint injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007633.htm Hip joint injection To use the sharing features on this ... injection is a shot of medicine into the hip joint. The medicine helps relieve pain and inflammation. It ...

  20. Hip joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002975.htm Hip joint replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hip joint replacement is surgery to replace all or part ...

  1. Hip Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... or falling can all sometimes lead to hip injuries. These include Strains Bursitis Dislocations Fractures Certain diseases also lead to hip injuries or problems. Osteoarthritis can cause pain and limited ...

  2. Hip fracture surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... neck fracture repair; Trochanteric fracture repair; Hip pinning surgery; Osteoarthritis-hip ... You may receive general anesthesia before this surgery. This means ... spinal anesthesia. With this kind of anesthesia, medicine is ...

  3. Bursitis of the Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... following: Repeated overuse or stress of the hip Rheumatoid arthritis Gout Pseudogout Injury of the hip Infection with bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus (or a staph infection) Diabetes Spine problems, such as scoliosis Uneven leg lengths ...

  4. HipMatch: an object-oriented cross-platform program for accurate determination of cup orientation using 2D-3D registration of single standard X-ray radiograph and a CT volume.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoyan; Zhang, Xuan; Steppacher, Simon D; Murphy, Stephen B; Siebenrock, Klaus A; Tannast, Moritz

    2009-09-01

    The widely used procedure of evaluation of cup orientation following total hip arthroplasty using single standard anteroposterior (AP) radiograph is known inaccurate, largely due to the wide variability in individual pelvic orientation relative to X-ray plate. 2D-3D image registration methods have been introduced for an accurate determination of the post-operative cup alignment with respect to an anatomical reference extracted from the CT data. Although encouraging results have been reported, their extensive usage in clinical routine is still limited. This may be explained by their requirement of a CAD model of the prosthesis, which is often difficult to be organized from the manufacturer due to the proprietary issue, and by their requirement of either multiple radiographs or a radiograph-specific calibration, both of which are not available for most retrospective studies. To address these issues, we developed and validated an object-oriented cross-platform program called "HipMatch" where a hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme combining an iterative landmark-to-ray registration with a 2D-3D intensity-based registration was implemented to estimate a rigid transformation between a pre-operative CT volume and the post-operative X-ray radiograph for a precise estimation of cup alignment. No CAD model of the prosthesis is required. Quantitative and qualitative results evaluated on cadaveric and clinical datasets are given, which indicate the robustness and the accuracy of the program. HipMatch is written in object-oriented programming language C++ using cross-platform software Qt (TrollTech, Oslo, Norway), VTK, and Coin3D and is transportable to any platform. PMID:19328585

  5. Do normal hips dislocate?

    PubMed

    Alshameeri, Zeiad; Rehm, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    There have been a small number of case reports describing late normal-hip dislocations in children who were later diagnosed with developmental dysplasia of the hip. Here, we contest the assumption that normal hips can dislocate. We argue that (as in our case) the ultrasound scans in all published case reports on late dislocated normal hips did not show results that were entirely normal and therefore, so far, there has been no convincing evidence of a dislocation of a normal hip. We also want to highlight the importance of meticulous ultrasound and clinical assessments of high-risk children by an experienced orthopaedic surgeon. PMID:25144883

  6. Surgical hip dislocation does not result in atrophy or fatty infiltration of periarticular hip muscles

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, Aaron A.; Barattiero, Fabio Y.; Albers, Christoph E.; Hanke, Markus S.; Steppacher, Simon D.; Tannast, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    Surgical hip dislocation is the gold standard for treatment of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). It utilizes an intermuscular and internervous approach to the hip. Concerns have been expressed that this approach causes soft tissue trauma resulting in post-operative muscle weakness of patients undergoing this procedure. We therefore asked whether surgical hip dislocation leads to (i) atrophy (decreased muscle diameter or cross-sectional area [CSA]) and (ii) degeneration (fatty infiltration) of 18 evaluated periarticular hip muscles. We retrospectively evaluated 32 patients (34 hips) following surgical hip dislocation for the treatment of FAI using pre and post-operative magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography of the hip. We evaluated muscle diameter, CSA and degree of fatty infiltration according to Goutallier for 18 periarticular hip muscles on axial and sagittal views. The mean interval between pre and post-operative MR was 1.9 ± 1.5 years (range, 0.4–6.1 years). Pre and post-operative muscle diameter and CSA of all 18 evaluated hip muscles did not differ. There was no post-operative change in the Goutallier classification for any of the evaluated 18 muscles. No muscle had post-operative degeneration higher than Grade 1 according to Goutallier. No atrophy or degeneration of periarticular hip muscles could be found following surgical hip dislocation for treatment of FAI. Any raised concerns about the invasiveness and potential muscle trauma for this type of surgery are unfounded. Level III, retrospective comparative study. See guidelines for authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:27011807

  7. Plain Radiography of the Hip: A Review of Radiographic Techniques and Image Features

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Plain radiographic examination is a fundamental approach to the diagnosis and treatment decision-making of the hip. A thorough understanding of standard radiographic techniques, radiographic anatomy, and disease patterns affecting the hip can be helpful in improving diagnostic accuracy. This article reviews the standard protocols used to obtain radiographic projections of the hip and addresses specific signs and various radiographic measurements used to adequately and reliably recognize structural diseases of the hip.

  8. Hip fracture as the tracer condition.

    PubMed

    Kassim Javaid, M; Chana, Jasroop; Cooper, Cyrus

    2013-12-01

    Hip fractures represent the most severe complication of osteoporosis from the perspectives of the patient, carer, health care system and society. Given the strong association with age, numbers are set to rise significantly in the next few decades despite evidence that the age adjusted rates in some countries are either plateauing or falling. Given the almost invariable need for inpatient admission, hospital administrative data for hip fractures remain a robust measure of number of hip fractures in the community and can be extrapolated to determine the total expected number of clinical fragility fractures from the same population. Both process and outcome standards have now been developed to benchmark clinical quality in the care of patients with hip fractures and fragility fractures at other sites. PMID:24836330

  9. Hip fracture - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Inter-trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Subtrochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Femoral neck fracture repair - discharge; Trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Hip pinning surgery - discharge

  10. Transient Synovitis of the Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation and swelling of the tissues around the hip joint. Usually only one hip is affected. This condition ... to reduce the swelling and inflammation around the hip joint. Your child's doctor will probably ask you to ...

  11. Measurement outcomes from hip simulators.

    PubMed

    de Villiers, Danielle; Shelton, Julia C

    2016-05-01

    Simulation of wear in total hip replacements has been recognised as an important factor in determining the likelihood of clinical success. However, accurate measurement of wear can be problematic with factors such as number and morphology of wear particles produced as well as ion release proving more important in the biological response to hip replacements than wear volume or wear rate alone. In this study, hard-on-hard (CoCr alloy, AgCrN coating) and hard-on-soft (CoCr alloy and CrN coating on vitamin E blended highly cross-linked polyethylene) bearing combinations were tested in an orbital hip simulator under standard and some adverse conditions. Gravimetric wear rates were determined for all bearings, with cobalt and where applicable, silver release determined throughout testing. Isolation of wear particles from the lubricating fluid was used to determine the influence of different bearing combinations and wear conditions on particle morphology. It was found that cobalt and silver could be measured in the lubricating fluid even when volumetric wear was not detectable. In hard-on-hard bearings, Pearson's correlation of 0.98 was established between metal release into the lubricating fluid and wear volume. In hard-on-soft bearings, coating the head did not influence the polyethylene wear rates measured under standard conditions but did influence the cobalt release; the diameter influenced both polyethylene wear and cobalt release, and the introduction of adverse testing generated smaller polyethylene particles. While hip simulators can be useful to assess the wear performance of a new material or design, measurement of other outcomes may yield greater insight into the clinical behaviour of the bearings in vivo. PMID:26888886

  12. Hip Problems in Infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems that can lead to dislocation of the hip bones. This is also called dysplasia (say: "diss-play-see-uh"). This means that ... problems later in life? Source Screening for Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip by LM French, M.D., and FR Dietz, ...

  13. Hip Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... because the ball-like top of your thigh bone moves within a cup-like space in your pelvis. Your hips are very stable. When they are healthy, it takes great force to hurt them. However, playing sports, running, ... of the hip causes weak bones that break easily. Both of these are common ...

  14. Total Hip Arthroplasty for Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Monzón, Daniel Godoy; Iserson, Kenneth V.; Jauregui, José; Musso, Carlos; Piccaluga, Francisco; Buttaro, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to determine the dislocation and reoperation rate, functional outcomes, and the survival rate of the unique subset of very old but lucid and independent patients with hip fractures following a total hip arthroplasty (THA) and geriatric team-coordinated perioperative care. Method: Between 2000 and 2006, previously independent ambulatory patients ≥80 years old presenting with an intracapsular hip fracture were given THAs under the care of an integrated orthopedic surgery–geriatric service. Their fracture-related complications, ambulation, mental status, and survival were followed for 5 to 11 years postinjury. Results: Five years postinjury, 57 (61.3%) patients of the original study group were living. In all, 3 (3.2%) patients had postoperative hip dislocations (and 2 patients had dislocation twice) and 2 reoperations were needed within the first postoperative month. There were no hip dislocations or reoperations after the first year. Radiographs obtained on 88% of the surviving patients at 5 years postoperatively showed that all remained unchanged from their immediate postoperative images. Nearly half of the patients were still able to ambulate as they did preoperatively and their mixed-model equation was statistically unchanged. Conclusion: This study of patients >80 years old with previously good functional status demonstrates that with appropriate surgical (best prosthesis, good operating technique, and regional anesthesia) and geriatric (pre- and postoperative assessments, close follow-up, medication adjustments, and fall-prevention instruction) care, they have few hip dislocations and reoperations, survive postfracture at least as long as their noninjured contemporaries, and continue to function and ambulate as they did prior to their injury. PMID:24660092

  15. Formed HIP Can Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Kester Diederik

    2015-07-27

    The intent of this report is to document a procedure used at LANL for HIP bonding aluminum cladding to U-10Mo fuel foils using a formed HIP can for the Domestic Reactor Conversion program in the NNSA Office of Material, Management and Minimization, and provide some details that may not have been published elsewhere. The HIP process is based on the procedures that have been used to develop the formed HIP can process, including the baseline process developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The HIP bonding cladding process development is summarized in the listed references. Further iterations with Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) to refine the process to meet production and facility requirements is expected.

  16. The World Hip Trauma Evaluation Study 3

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, N.; Achten, J.; Griffin, X. L.; Costa, M. L.; Reed, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Approximately half of all hip fractures are displaced intracapsular fractures. The standard treatment for these fractures is either hemiarthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty. The recent National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance on hip fracture management recommends the use of ‘proven’ cemented stem arthroplasty with an Orthopaedic Device Evaluation Panel (ODEP) rating of at least 3B (97% survival at three years). The Thompsons prosthesis is currently lacking an ODEP rating despite over 50 years of clinical use, likely due to the paucity of implant survival data. Nationally, adherence to these guidelines is varied as there is debate as to which prosthesis optimises patient outcomes. Design This study design is a multi-centre, multi-surgeon, parallel, two arm, standard-of-care pragmatic randomised controlled trial. It will be embedded within the WHiTE Comprehensive Cohort Study (ISRCTN63982700). The main analysis is a two-way equivalence comparison between Hemi-Thompson and Hemi-Exeter polished taper with Unitrax head. Secondary outcomes will include radiological leg length discrepancy measured as per Bidwai and Willett, mortality, re-operation rate and indication for re-operation, length of index hospital stay and revision at four months. This study will be supplemented by the NHFD (National Hip Fracture Database) dataset. Discussion Evidence on the optimum choice of prosthesis for hemiarthroplasty of the hip is lacking. National guidance is currently based on expert opinion rather than empirical evidence. The incidence of hip fracture is likely to continue to increase and providing high quality evidence on the optimum Cite this article: A. L. Sims. The World Hip Trauma Evaluation Study 3: Hemiarthroplasty Evaluation by Multicentre Investigation – WHITE 3: HEMI – An Abridged Protocol. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:18–25. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.51.2000473 PMID:26825319

  17. Influence of anaesthesia on canine hip dysplasia score.

    PubMed

    Genevois, J-P; Chanoit, G; Carozzo, C; Remy, D; Fau, D; Viguier, E

    2006-10-01

    Hip dysplasia (HD) scores, based on the five grades, as defined by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale, were compared between anaesthetized (group 1, n = 3839) and non-sedated non-anaesthetized dogs (group 2, n = 1517). Each dog was radiographed in the standard ventro-dorsal hip joint extended position. Each radiograph was evaluated by the same reader blinded regarding the dog's status of anaesthesia. Results showed that there was a significant difference in hip dysplasia prevalence between group 1 (22%) compared with group 2 (9%) (P < 0.005). This difference was the result of a lower rate of hip-joint laxity assessment and the measurement of Norberg-Olsson angle <105 degrees in group 2 compared with group 1. The acetabular and femoral morphologies were not significantly different between the groups. The data confirm that the scoring of dogs for HD on standard radiographs with the hip joints extended is influenced by anaesthesia. PMID:16970631

  18. Eponymous hip joint approaches.

    PubMed

    Somford, Matthijs P; Hoornenborg, Daniël; Wiegerinck, Johannes I; Bolder, Stefan B T; Schreurs, Berend W

    2016-07-01

    After the low friction arthroplasty by John Charnley was no longer confined to specialized hospitals but commonplace in the general orthopedic practice, the issue remained how to most optimally reach the hip. The names of the authors of these approaches remain in a lot of cases connected to the approach. By evaluating the original articles in which the approaches are described we ascertain the original description and technique. By various sources we obtained the (short) biography of the people whose name is connected to the approach. Our research covers the biographies of colleagues Smith-Petersen, Watson-Jones, Hardinge, Charnley, Moore and Ludloff. The eponymous approaches are shown and described after the short biography on each individual. This study shows that without the work of our colleagues we cannot proceed in our profession. An understanding and knowledge of the people who dedicated themselves to developing the orthopedic surgery to the high standard it has today is the least honour we should give them. PMID:27139185

  19. The impact and consequences of hip fracture in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Jaglal, Susan B.; Sherry, Paul G.; Schatzker, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    Objectives To assess the magnitude and the burden of hip fracture on the health care system, including time trends in hip fracture rates, in-hospital death rates, length of hospital stay (LHS) and discharge destination. Design A retrospective study of discharge abstracts. Setting The Province of Ontario. Patients All patients (n = 93 660) over the age of 50 years and with a diagnosis of hip fracture discharged from hospital between 1981 and 1992 (excluding transfers). Main Outcome Measures Age-sex standardized hip fracture rates per 1000 population, in-hospital death rates and age-adjusted mean LHS. Results The overall hip fracture rate was 3.3 per 1000 persons (1.7 per 1000 men and 4.6 per 1000 women). There was no change in rates between 1981 and 1992 (p = 0.089), but there have been increases in the numbers of hip fractures. There was no change in the in-hospital death rate over time (p = 0.78). The age-adjusted mean LHS in 1981 was 28.6 days compared with 22.2 days in 1992. The numbers of hip fractures will increase from 8490 in 1990 to 16 963 in 2010. Conclusions Despite stable age-adjusted rates of hip fractures, the doubling of the number of hip fractures by the year 2010 due to an aging population will become an increasing burden on the health care system. PMID:8769920

  20. Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, M.; Kowalczuk, M.; Simunovic, N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia is controversial in the orthopaedic community, as the outcome literature has been variable and inconclusive. We hypothesise that outcomes of hip arthroscopy may be diminished in the setting of hip dysplasia, but outcomes may be acceptable in milder or borderline cases of hip dysplasia. Methods A systematic search was performed in duplicate for studies investigating the outcome of hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia up to July 2015. Study parameters including sample size, definition of dysplasia, outcomes measures, and re-operation rates were obtained. Furthermore, the levels of evidence of studies were collected and quality assessment was performed. Results The systematic review identified 18 studies investigating hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia, with 889 included patients. Criteria used by the studies to diagnose hip dysplasia and borderline hip dysplasia included centre edge angle in 72% of studies but the range of angles were quite variable. Although 89% of studies reported improved post-operative outcome scores in the setting of hip dysplasia, revision rates were considerable (14.1%), with 9.6% requiring conversion to total hip arthroplasty. Conclusion The available orthopaedic literature suggests that although improved outcomes are seen in hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia, there is a high rate of re-operation and conversion to total hip arthroplasty. Furthermore, the criteria used to define hip dysplasia vary considerably among published studies. Cite this article: M. Yeung, M. Kowalczuk, N. Simunovic, O. R. Ayeni. Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:225–231. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.56.2000533. PMID:27313136

  1. Hip replacement - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... a hip replacement and need antibiotics before any dental work. When to Call Your Doctor Call your health care provider if you have: A sudden increase in pain Chest pain or shortness of breath Frequent urination ...

  2. Hip joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    Preventing venous thromboembolic disease in patients undergoing elective hip and knee arthopolasty: Evidence-based guideline and evidence report. American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2011. Harkess JW, Crockarell JR. Arthroplasty of ...

  3. Arthroscopic hip labral repair.

    PubMed

    Philippon, Marc J; Faucet, Scott C; Briggs, Karen K

    2013-05-01

    Labral tears in the hip may cause painful clicking or locking of the hip, reduced range of motion, and disruption to sports and daily activities. The acetabular labrum aids stabilization of the hip joint, particularly during hip motion. The fibrocartilaginous structure extends the acetabular rim and provides a suction seal around the femoroacetabular interface. Treatment options for labral tears include debridement, repair, and reconstruction. Repair of the labrum has been shown to have better results than debridement. Labral refixation is achieved with sutures anchored into the acetabular rim. The acetabular rim is trimmed either to correct pincer impingement or to provide a bleeding bed to improve healing. Labral repair has shown excellent short-term to midterm outcomes and allows patients to return to activities and sports. Arthroscopic rim trimming and labral refixation comprise an effective treatment for labral tears with an underlying diagnosis of femoroacetabular impingement and are supported by the peer-reviewed literature. PMID:23875153

  4. Hip fracture - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... hemiarthroplasty to replace the ball part of your hip joint. You should have received physical therapy while you were in the hospital or at a rehabilitation center before going home from the hospital.

  5. Ultrasound: Infant Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip area, and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  6. Hip flexor strain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as sprinting, kicking, and changing direction while running or moving, can stretch and tear the hip flexors. Runners, people who do martial arts, and football, soccer, and hockey players are more likely to have ...

  7. Minimally invasive hip replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Smits SA, Swinford RR, Bahamonde RE. A randomized, prospective study of 3 minimally invasive surgical approaches in total hip arthroplasty: comprehensive gait analysis. J Arthroplasty . 2008;23:68-73. PMID: 18722305 ...

  8. Treatment of hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Anderson, A

    2011-04-01

    Hip dysplasia is a common orthopaedic developmental disorder of dogs. This paper reviews the treatment options available for management of the condition in the skeletally immature and adult dog. PMID:21906059

  9. HIP osteoarthritis and work.

    PubMed

    Harris, E Clare; Coggon, David

    2015-06-01

    Epidemiological evidence points strongly to a hazard of hip osteoarthritis from heavy manual work. Harmful exposures may be reduced by the elimination or redesign of processes and the use of mechanical aids. Reducing obesity might help to protect workers whose need to perform heavy lifting cannot be eliminated. Particularly high relative risks have been reported in farmers, and hip osteoarthritis is a prescribed occupational disease in the UK for long-term employees in agriculture. Even where it is not attributable to employment, hip osteoarthritis impacts importantly on the capacity to work. Factors that may influence work participation include the severity of disease, the physical demands of the job, age and the size of the employer. Published research does not provide a strong guide to the timing of return to work following hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, and it is unclear whether patients should avoid heavy manual tasks in their future employment. PMID:26612242

  10. HIP OSTEOARTHRITIS AND WORK

    PubMed Central

    Harris, E Clare; Coggon, David

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence points strongly to a hazard of hip osteoarthritis from heavy manual work. Harmful exposures may be reduced by elimination or redesign of processes and use of mechanical aids. Reducing obesity might help to protect workers whose need to perform heavy lifting cannot be eliminated. Particularly high relative risks have been reported in farmers, and hip osteoarthritis is a prescribed occupational disease in the UK for long-term employees in agriculture. Even where it is not attributable to employment, hip osteoarthritis impacts importantly on capacity to work. Factors that may influence work participation include the severity of disease, the physical demands of the job, age, and the size of the employer. Published research does not provide a strong guide to the timing of return to work following hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, and it is unclear whether patients should avoid heavy manual tasks in their future employment. PMID:26612242

  11. Hip fusion as hip salvage procedure in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Fucs, Patricia M De Moraes Barros; Yamada, Helder H

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of the spastic hip in Cerebral Palsy (CP) remains a challenge especially in cases of advance changes. Many options are available and the key for a good outcome is to find the best surgical procedure to an individualized patient. The hip fusion is one of the surgical options. The authors presented a group of spastic CP with painful chronic hip subluxation and dislocation treated with hip fusion with a mean follow-up period of 14.5 years. Surgical technique, post-operative management and outcomes were shown, also with the observations done regarding the evolution of the contralateral hip after the hip fusion. They concluded that the hip arthrodesis is an option for patients with spastic CP with painful subluxation or dislocated hips with the goal of pain relief maintain or improve functional status, and facilitating the care. The best candidate is a young ambulatory patient with normal contralateral hip and normal spinal alignment. PMID:25207734

  12. Hip Resurfacing Implants.

    PubMed

    Cadossi, Matteo; Tedesco, Giuseppe; Sambri, Andrea; Mazzotti, Antonio; Giannini, Sandro

    2015-08-01

    EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Describe the advantages of hip resurfacing. 2. Describe the disadvantages of hip resurfacing. 3. Identify the population in which hip resurfacing is most often indicated. 4. Demonstrate how to properly postoperatively manage patients with metal-on-metal prostheses. Hip resurfacing offers a suitable solution for young patients affected by hip disease who have high function demands and good bone quality. Bone stock preservation, restoration of the normal proximal femur anatomy, the lack of stress shielding, and the possibility of resuming sporting activity are proven advantages of hip resurfacing. However, there are some disadvantages, such as fracture of the femoral neck, onset of neck narrowing, and possible complications due to the metal-on-metal bearings, including pseudotumors, peri-implant osteolysis, and chronic elevation of metal ions in serum levels. Recent data suggest that the ideal candidate for hip resurfacing is an active male, younger than 65 years, with primary or posttraumatic osteoarthritis, and with a femoral head diameter larger than 50 to 54 mm. Based on these selection criteria, the literature reports implant survival to be similar to that of total hip arthroplasty. The current authors' experience confirms a low failure rate and excellent functional outcomes, with metal ion serum levels becoming stable over time in well-functioning implants. Proper surgical technique, correct patient selection, and the right choice of a well-established prosthetic model are essential elements for the long-term success of these implants. PMID:26270748

  13. Single-Portal Arthroscopy of the Central Compartment of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Mannava, Sandeep; Howse, Elizabeth A.; Kelsey, Thomas J.; Barnes, Ryan H.; Antunes, Andre; Stubbs, Allston J.

    2015-01-01

    Since hip arthroscopy has become a standard of orthopaedic practice, the indications have continued to expand as it has proved to be a helpful diagnostic, as well as therapeutic, tool. Access to the hip joint, however, remains challenging for the orthopaedic surgeon who does not routinely perform hip arthroscopy. We present a single-portal arthroscopic technique, showing the feasibility of single-portal arthroscopic access to the hip joint, as well as describing basic indications and instrumentation for single-portal hip arthroscopy. Single-portal hip arthroscopy is ideal for the patient who needs to undergo diagnostic hip arthroscopy or for treatment in patients with simple hip pathology (e.g., removal of loose bodies or debridement). PMID:26258043

  14. HIP ARTHROSCOPY IN ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Polesello, Giancarlo Cavalli; Keiske Ono, Nelson; Bellan, Davi Gabriel; Honda, Emerson Kiyoshi; Guimarães, Rodrigo Pereira; Junior, Walter Riccioli; Do Val Sella, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    To confirm the therapeutic importance of hip arthroplasty in athletes whose pain precludes sportive function of the hip joint, being able to minimize it to the extent of helping on the return of sports practice at satisfactory levels. Methods: 49 athlete patients (51 hips) submitted to hip arthroscopy complaining of pain and inability to practice sports were assessed. Follow-up time ranged from 12 to 74 months (mean: 39.0 months). Preoperatively, pain site, severity according to Facial Expression Scale (FES) and the degree of disability using the modified Harris Hip Score (HHS) were assessed. Different diagnoses were provided, which led to the indication of arthroscopy, such as femoralacetabular impact, acetabular lip injury not secondary to femoral-acetabular impact, etc. Postoperatively, the patients were assessed by using the same methods as used at baseline and by the subjective analysis of return to sports activities. Results: Based on pre-and postoperative HHS and FES, the statistical analysis showed significance between values. We found some improvement in all cases and return to sports activities at a satisfactory level in most of the cases. Conclusion: As a result of our study, we confirm that arthroscopy in athletes with local hip injuries is an effective technique, able to promote the return to sports practice in most of the cases, without pain, and with an effective joint function, provided well indicated. PMID:26998449

  15. Ultrasonography and developmental dysplasia of the infant hip.

    PubMed

    Grissom, L E; Harcke, H T

    1999-02-01

    Hip sonography has been developed, refined, and critiqued for over 18 years. It is now widely accepted as a highly sensitive and useful technique for both the diagnosis and management of developmental dysplasia of the infant hip. Controversy continues surrounding the issue of when and how often hip sonography should be performed. Currently, clinical screening of newborns is the standard of care in the United States, with sonography employed selectively based on clinical findings. Universal ultrasound screening has been used in some countries and is under consideration by many investigators, using a variety of algorithms. This review will focus on recent reports dealing with issues of screening for developmental dysplasia of the infant hip and also will highlight techniques suggested for use in the treatment of development dysplasia of the infant hip. PMID:10084087

  16. Extreme Kinematics in Selected Hip Hop Dance Sequences.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Shaw; Ojofeitimi, Sheyi; Woo, Helen

    2015-09-01

    Hip hop dance has many styles including breakdance (breaking), house, popping and locking, funk, streetdance, krumping, Memphis jookin', and voguing. These movements combine the complexity of dance choreography with the challenges of gymnastics and acrobatic movements. Despite high injury rates in hip hop dance, particularly in breakdance, to date there are no published biomechanical studies in this population. The purpose of this study was to compare representative hip hop steps found in breakdance (toprock and breaking) and house and provide descriptive statistics of the angular displacements that occurred in these sequences. Six expert female hip hop dancers performed three choreographed dance sequences, top rock, breaking, and house, to standardized music-based tempos. Hip, knee, and ankle kinematics were collected during sequences that were 18 to 30 sec long. Hip, knee, and ankle three-dimensional peak joint angles were compared in repeated measures ANOVAs with post hoc tests where appropriate (p<0.01). Peak angles of the breaking sequence, which included floorwork, exceeded the other two sequences in the majority of planes and joints. Hip hop maximal joint angles exceeded reported activities of daily living and high injury sports such as gymnastics. Hip hop dancers work at weight-bearing joint end ranges where muscles are at a functional disadvantage. These results may explain why lower extremity injury rates are high in this population. PMID:26395613

  17. Imaging of Sports-Related Hip and Groin Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Lischuk, Andrew W.; Dorantes, Thomas M.; Wong, William; Haims, Andrew H.

    2010-01-01

    A normally functioning hip joint is imperative for athletes who use their lower extremities with running, jumping, or kicking activities. Sports-related injuries of the hip and groin are far less frequent than injuries to the more distal aspect of the extremity, accounting for less than 10% of lower extremity injuries. Despite the lower incidence, hip and groin injuries can lead to significant clinical and diagnostic challenges related to the complex anatomy and biomechanical considerations of this region. Loads up to 8 times normal body weight have been documented in the joint in common daily activities, such as jogging, with significantly greater force expected during competitive athletics. Additionally, treatment for hip and groin injuries can obviate the participation of medical and surgical specialties, with a multidisciplinary approach frequently required. Delay in diagnosis and triage of these injuries may cause loss of time from competition and, potentially, early onset of degenerative changes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the hip has proven to be the gold standard for the diagnosis of sports-related hip and groin injuries in the setting of negative radiographs. With its exquisite soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capabilities, and lack of ionizing radiation, MRI is unmatched in the noninvasive diagnosis of intra-articular and extra-articular pathology, as well as intraosseous processes. This review focuses on MRI of common athletic injuries of the hip and groin, including acetabular labral tears, femoral acetabular impingement syndrome, muscle injuries around the hip and groin (including athletic pubalgia), and athletic osseous injuries. PMID:23015946

  18. Imaging of sports-related hip and groin injuries.

    PubMed

    Lischuk, Andrew W; Dorantes, Thomas M; Wong, William; Haims, Andrew H

    2010-05-01

    A normally functioning hip joint is imperative for athletes who use their lower extremities with running, jumping, or kicking activities. Sports-related injuries of the hip and groin are far less frequent than injuries to the more distal aspect of the extremity, accounting for less than 10% of lower extremity injuries. Despite the lower incidence, hip and groin injuries can lead to significant clinical and diagnostic challenges related to the complex anatomy and biomechanical considerations of this region. Loads up to 8 times normal body weight have been documented in the joint in common daily activities, such as jogging, with significantly greater force expected during competitive athletics. Additionally, treatment for hip and groin injuries can obviate the participation of medical and surgical specialties, with a multidisciplinary approach frequently required. Delay in diagnosis and triage of these injuries may cause loss of time from competition and, potentially, early onset of degenerative changes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the hip has proven to be the gold standard for the diagnosis of sports-related hip and groin injuries in the setting of negative radiographs. With its exquisite soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capabilities, and lack of ionizing radiation, MRI is unmatched in the noninvasive diagnosis of intra-articular and extra-articular pathology, as well as intraosseous processes. This review focuses on MRI of common athletic injuries of the hip and groin, including acetabular labral tears, femoral acetabular impingement syndrome, muscle injuries around the hip and groin (including athletic pubalgia), and athletic osseous injuries. PMID:23015946

  19. Hip arthroplasty for failed treatment of proximal femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    D'Arrigo, Carmelo; Perugia, Dario; Carcangiu, Alessandro; Monaco, Edoardo; Speranza, Attilio; Ferretti, Andrea

    2010-10-01

    Failed treatment of an intertrochanteric fracture typically leads to profound functional disability and pain. Salvage treatment with hip arthroplasty may be considered. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results and complications of hip arthroplasty performed as a salvage procedure after the failed treatment of an intertrochanteric hip fracture. Twenty-one patients were treated in our hospital with hip arthroplasty for failed treatment of intertrochanteric hip fracture. There were sixteen women and five men with a mean age of 75.8 years (range 61-85 years). Fourteen patients had failure of a previous nail fixation procedure, five had failure of a plate fixation, one of hip screws fixation and one of Ender nail fixation. In 19 out of 21 patients we performed a total hip arthroplasty-14 cases used modular implants with long-stems and five cases used a standard straight stem. In 2 of 21 cases we used a bipolar hemiarthroplasty. A statistically significant improvement was found comparing pre and postoperative conditions (p < 0.05). Our experience confirms that total hip arthroplasty is a satisfactory salvage procedure after failed treatment of an intertrochanteric fracture in elderly patients with few serious orthopaedic complications and acceptable clinical outcomes. PMID:19572131

  20. The Hyperflexible Hip

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Alexander E.; Bedi, Asheesh; Tibor, Lisa M.; Zaltz, Ira; Larson, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Dance, gymnastics, figure skating, and competitive cheerleading require a high degree of hip range of motion. Athletes who participate in these sports use their hips in a mechanically complex manner. Evidence Acquisition: A search of the entire PubMed database (through December 2013) and additional searches of the reference lists of pertinent articles. Study Design: Systematic review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results: Whether innate or acquired, dancers and gymnasts have some hypermobility that allows their hips to be placed in potentially impinging or unstable positions required for their given activity. Such extremes of motion can result in both intra-articular and extra-articular impingement as well as compensatory osseous and muscular pathology. In addition, dancers and gymnasts are susceptible to impingement-induced instability. Dancers with innate generalized hyperlaxity are at increased risk of injury because of their activities and may require longer recovery times to return to play. Both nonoperative and operative treatments (arthroscopic and open) have an important role in returning flexibility athletes to their preoperative levels of sport and dance. Conclusion: Because of the extreme hip motion required and the compensatory soft tissue laxity in dancers and gymnasts, these athletes may develop instability, impingement, or combinations of both. This frequently occurs in the setting of subtle pathoanatomy or in patients with normal bony anatomy. With appropriate surgical indications and the correct operative technique, the treating surgeon can anticipate high levels of return to play for the gymnast and dancer with hip pain. PMID:26137181

  1. Bipolar hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Liu, Shubing; Guan, Changyong; Yu, Fangyuan; Wu, Shenguang; Jiang, Changliang

    2011-12-01

    Our aim was to compare hip arthroplasty with internal screw fixation in the repair of intertrochanteric fractures in elderly patients with osteoporosis. Of 112 included patient, 70 (81.81 ± 4.88 years) received hip arthroplasty with a prosthesis specially designed for intertrochanteric fractures, and 42 (83.46 ± 5.11 years) underwent plate-screw fixation. The hip arthroplasty group had significantly longer operation time, intraoperative blood loss, and total volume of blood transfused but had shorter time to beginning weight-bearing (5.94 ± 2.76 vs 23.68 ± 22.01 days) and higher postoperative Harris hip score (91.37 ± 4.80 vs 86.14 ± 5.46). In the arthroplasty group, there were 2 dislocations; and in the plate-screw fixation group, there were 5 internal fixation failures. Hip arthroplasty is preferable to internal fixation in elderly patients (age >80 years) with osteoporosis. PMID:21530148

  2. Hip joint replacement - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip socket. The socket is usually made of metal. A liner that fits inside the socket. It ... usually plastic, but some surgeons use ceramic and metal. The liner allows the hip to move smoothly. ...

  3. Hip impingement: beyond femoroacetabular

    PubMed Central

    Bardakos, Nikolaos V.

    2015-01-01

    In the last 20 years, femoroacetabular impingement has been at the forefront of clinical practice as a cause of hip pain in young adults. As arthroscopic techniques for the hip continue to evolve, the possible presence of a new group of conditions creating mechanical conflict in and around the hip joint (ischiofemoral, subspine and iliopsoas impingement) has recently been elucidated whilst interest in already known ‘impingement’ syndromes (pelvic-trochanteric and pectineofoveal impingement) is now revived. This article attempts to increase awareness of these relatively uncommon clinical entities by describing their pathomorphology, contact mechanics, treatment and published results available to present. It is hoped that such knowledge will diversify therapeutic options for the clinician, thereby improving outcomes in a small but not negligible portion of patients with previously unexplained persistent symptoms. PMID:27011843

  4. The dancer's hip.

    PubMed

    Sammarco, G J

    1983-11-01

    Conditions that occur in the dancer's hip fall into the following categories: poor training; conditions that occur as the result of normal use; overuse syndromes, including tendinitis and myositis; and conditions referring pain to the hip. Dancers are highly motivated and goal oriented and often suppress symptoms for long periods, making diagnosis and treatment difficult. Observing the dancer at work and understanding his art are emphasized, and a practical guide to therapy is presented. Development of proper dance technique and a proper flexibility program can decrease the incidence of injuries. PMID:6652698

  5. [Complications of hip arthroscopies].

    PubMed

    Dienst, M; Grün, U

    2008-11-01

    Surgical complications of hip arthroscopies are rare in the hands of experienced hip arthroscopists. However, when performed by beginners and in more demanding situations such as marginal distraction of the head and socket and technically advanced procedures, the risk increases. This report describes possible complications which may happen during positioning and traction, portal placement, and diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Possible causes of soft tissue lesions of the portal area, perineum and foot, intra-articular lesions of the labrum and cartilage, direct and traction-related indirect neurovascular lesions, and other rare complications are analyzed. PMID:18854972

  6. [Squatting cast for biomechanical treatment of decentred hip joints].

    PubMed

    Mühlbacher, E; Lick-Schiffer, W; Lojpur, M; Baumgartner, F; Spieß, T; Tschauner, C

    2014-12-01

    The so-called "congenital" luxation of the hip joint is endemic in Central Europe and occurs in about 1% of all newborn infants. By the means of ultrasonographic diagnosis according to the Graf method an early detection instantly after birth has become a good clinical routine in the German-speaking countries. Sonography-based conservative treatment has become the gold standard. The cast in squatting ("human") position is a standard procedure in order to retain the originally decentred or unstable hip joints in the reduced position: 100° flexion and 50° abduction are necessary to fix the hip joint in the reduced position without the risk of avascular necrosis. After the fixation in a squatting-cast, a period of functional bracing in flexed position enhances bony maturation. This two-phase functional conservative treatment can avoid later osteotomies or even early total hip replacement. PMID:25531512

  7. Ureaplasma urealyticum infection in total hip arthroplasty leading to revision.

    PubMed

    Sköldenberg, Olof G; Rysinska, Agata D; Neander, Gustaf; Muren, Olle H; Ahl, Torbjörn E

    2010-10-01

    We describe an infection with Ureaplasma urealyticum causing rapid loosening of a cemented total hip arthroplasty. When reviewing the literature we found that no such case has been reported previously. Taking intraoperative cultures for U urealyticum during revision surgery is not a standard procedure. In cases with rapid, presumed aseptic, loosening of a total hip arthroplasty, an infection with U urealyticum should be considered. PMID:20705423

  8. Early Attempts at Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Pablo F; Morcuende, Jose A

    2005-01-01

    Over the last three centuries, treatment of hip arthritides has evolved from rudimentary surgery to modern total hip arthroplasty (THA), which is considered one of the most successful surgical interventions ever developed. We here review the history of the early hip arthroplasty procedures for hip arthritis that preceded Charley total hip arthroplasty. An evaluation of such past enterprises is relevant, and reminds us of the ephemeral nature of human industriousness, and how medical research and procedures are not isolated developments, but correlate to the social, economical, and cultural framework of their time. PMID:16089067

  9. Hip Arthroscopy in The Athlete

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Sports related injuries to the hip have received relatively little attention, in the part because the clinical assessment, imaging studies, and surgical techniques are less sophisticated. The evolution of hip arthroscopy has offered a less invasive technique that allows for recognition and treatment of hip pathologies that previously went unrecognized. The success of hip arthoscopy is dependent on proper patient selection based on the patient's history and diagnosis. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to outline mechanisms of injury and specific lesions that can be addresses using hip arthoscopy. PMID:21509141

  10. The athlete's hip and groin.

    PubMed

    Tammareddi, Kumar; Morelli, Vincent; Reyes, Miguel

    2013-06-01

    Groin and hip injuries are seen in athletes who perform quick directional changes and cutting movements. Because forces generated through athletic performance are transferred through the hip, injuries to these areas may limit athletes with mild pain or lead to career-ending injuries. The anatomy of the hip and groin is complex and symptoms often overlap. This article discusses some athletic causes, but other medical conditions may be associated with hip and groin pain as well. Updates in evaluation and treatment are discussed for adductor strains, hip osteoarthritis, femoroacetabular impingement, sports hernia, osteitis pubis, and obturator nerve entrapment. PMID:23668647

  11. Hip Arthroscopy: A Brief History.

    PubMed

    Kandil, Abdurrahman; Safran, Marc R

    2016-07-01

    Hip arthroscopy is a fast-growing and evolving field. Like knee and shoulder arthroscopy, hip arthroscopy began as a diagnostic procedure and then progressed to biopsy and resection of abnormalities. Subsequently, it has evolved to repair of various tissues and treatment of underlying causes. As the understanding of the hip joint and its associated pathophysiology grows, indications will continue to expand for this diagnostic and therapeutic modality. This article outlines the historic developments of hip arthroscopy, including advancements in instrumentation and techniques from the days of the first hip arthroscopies to the present day. PMID:27343387

  12. INL HIP Plate Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    B. H. Park; C. R. Clark; J. F. Jue

    2010-02-01

    This document outlines the process used to bond monolithic fuel plates by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP). This method was developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. These foils have been used in a number of irradiation experiments in support of the United States Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program.

  13. Hip Morphology Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Cristián; Diaz, Jorge; Brañes, Julian; Chaparro, Felipe; Barahona, Maximiliano; Salazar, Alfonso; Hinzpeter, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Background: Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is the result of a mechanical conflict in the hip joint, and its diagnosis is based on clinical and radiological parameters. To our knowledge, there are no published studies describing the radiologic characteristics of FAI in Latin American populations. Purpose: To describe the radiological features associated with FAI in an asymptomatic Chilean population. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: We prospectively recruited asymptomatic patients with no history or symptoms of hip pathology who underwent abdomen-pelvis computed tomography (CT) for a nonorthopaedic indication. The acetabular and femoral parameters related to FAI were measured. Results: We studied 101 subjects (202 hips) with a mean age of 36.8 ± 14.4 years. The mean center-edge angle was 39.4° ± 7.2°. The crossover sign was present in 34 cases (33.7%). The mean alpha angle was 49.7° ± 8.3°. Depending on the cut points chosen for FAI-related parameters, between 39.6% and 69.3% of an asymptomatic Chilean population were found to have morphological features related to FAI. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the proposed pathological threshold values in the literature cannot be extrapolated to a Chilean population, and this must be taken into consideration when evaluating Latin American patients with hip pain. PMID:26535273

  14. Congenital hip dislocation (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... by a blow, fall, or other trauma, a dislocation can also occur from birth. The cause is unknown but genetic factors may play a role. Problems resulting from very mild developmental dysplasia of the hip may not become apparent until the person is ...

  15. COMPLICATIONS IN HIP ARTHROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Marcos Emílio Kuschnaroff; Hoffmann, Rafael Barreiros; de Araújo, Lúcio Cappelli Toledo; Dani, William Sotau; José Berral, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of complications in a series of consecutive cases of hip arthroscopy; to assess the progression of the sample through a learning curve; and to recognize the causes of complications in arthroscopic hip operations. Method: 150 consecutive cases that underwent hip arthroscopy between May 2004 and December 2008 were evaluated. The complications encountered were classified in three ways: organic system affected, severity and groups of 50 consecutive cases. The data were analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and Fisher's exact test. Results: We observed 15 complications in this study (10%): ten were neurological, two were osteoarticular, one was vascular-ischemic and two were cutaneous. In the classification of severity, three were classified as major, 12 as intermediate and none as minor. The incidence of complications over the course of the learning curve did not present any statistically significant difference (p = 0.16). Conclusions: Hip arthroscopy is a surgical procedure that involves low morbidity, but which presents complications in some cases. These complications are frequently neurological and transitory, and mainly occur because of joint traction. The complication rate did not decrease with progression of our sample. PMID:27022521

  16. Cup positioning in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Scheerlinck, T

    2014-09-01

    The "optimal" positioning of the cup in total hip arthroplasty can improve hip function and reduce wear, impingement and dislocation. The cup position is described as the spatial relation between the hip rotation centre and the pelvis and, as the cup orientation around the rotation centre. The first parameter affects hip balance and, if not managed properly, might result in poor function and leg length discrepancy. The second parameter is often "silent", unless impingement or dislocation occurs. However, inappropriate cup orientation can accelerate wear and cause early failure. As such, it is mandatory to get both right, taking into account multiple parameters: the stem position, the approach, the bearing surface, the cup coverage and the pelvic orientation during loading. In most cases a "standard" cup position is adequate. However, specific anatomic features might require an individualized approach. This paper aims at reviewing the parameters that impact on the optimal cup position. This should allow for more judicious choices in those particular cases. PMID:26280607

  17. Effect of high hip center on stress for dysplastic hip.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong; Pei, Fuxing; Li, Zongming

    2014-07-01

    High hip center reconstruction has been advocated in treating deficient acetabulum. However, there is no consensus on the clinical outcome of this technique. In addition, it remains unclear to what extend this technique restores the normal hip biomechanics. The goal of this study was to investigate stress above the acetabular dome in response to a range of high hip center positioning for Crowe type I and II hip dysplasia. This study consisted of 2 main parts, radiologic and biomechanical. Pelvic radiographs of 18 patients were studied to determine the amount of displacement of the hip center in the superior direction compared with the normal side. Second, qualitative and quantitative changes in stress on cortical and trabecular bone in the region of the acetabular dome as a result of superior displacement of the hip center were analyzed with subject-specific finite element models. The results showed that the range of the hip center position in the superior direction for Crowe type I and II hip dysplasia was 0 to 15 mm above the contralateral femoral head center. When superior displacement of the hip center exceeded 5 mm above the anatomic hip center, cortical bone mass on the 2 thickest cross-sections above the acetabular dome decreased quickly and the stress value on posterolateral cortical bone was obviously lower than the normal level. This study showed that to restore the normal load above the acetabular dome, there is a limit of 5 mm above the anatomic hip center for high hip center acetabular reconstruction for Crowe type I and II hip dysplasia. PMID:24992059

  18. Geographic Variation in Hip Fracture Among United States Long-Stay Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Geetanjoli; Zullo, Andrew R.; Berry, Sarah D.; Lee, Yoojin; McConeghy, Kevin; Kiel, Doug P.; Mor, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite high rates of hip fracture among United States (US) nursing home (NH) residents, little is known about geographic variation in hip fracture incidence. We used nationally representative data to identify geographic variation in hip fracture among US NH residents. Design and setting Retrospective cohort study using Part A claims for a 100% of Medicare enrollees in 15,289 NHs linked to NH minimum data set and Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting databases. Participants A total of 891,085 long-stay (continuous residence of ≥100 days) NH residents ≥65 years old. Measurements Medicare Part A claims documenting a hip fracture. Mean incidence rates of hip fracture for long-stay NH residents were calculated for each state and US Census Division from 2007 to 2010. Results The age-, sex-, and race-adjusted incidence rate of hip fracture ranged from 1.49 hip fractures/100 person-years (Hawaii) to 3.60 hip fractures/100 person-years (New Mexico), with a mean of 2.38 (standard deviation 0.43) hip fractures/100 person-years. The mean incidence of hip fracture was 1.7-fold greater in the highest quintile than the lowest. Conclusions We observed modest US state and regional variation in hip fracture incidence among long-stay NH residents. Future studies should assess whether state policies or NH characteristics explain the variation. PMID:27461867

  19. Hip Arthroscopy in the Presence of Acetabular Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jayasekera, Narlaka; Aprato, Alessandro; Villar, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : Hip arthroscopy is a well established therapeutic intervention for an increasing number of painful hip conditions. Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is commonly associated with intra-articular hip pathology. However, some surgeons perceive patients with hip dysplasia as poor candidates for hip arthroscopy. Our aim was to describe early outcomes of arthroscopic treatment for patients with DDH, who also had femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) treated when necessary, and to compare these outcomes against a control group of patients without DDH. Methods : Prospective case-control study of 68 consecutive hip arthroscopy patients assessed with a modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS) preoperatively and at six weeks, six months, and one year after surgery. Presence of DDH was determined using a standard anteroposterior (AP) pelvic radiograph to measure the centre-edge angle (CEA) of Wiberg, with a CEA < 20º used as threshold for diagnosis of DDH. Results : 12 patients (eight female and four male) with acetabular dysplasia and mean CEA of 15.4º (9º to 19º). The control, nondysplastic group comprised 54 patients (23 females and 31 males) with a mean CEA of 33.1º (22º to 45º). All patients in the dysplastic group had a labral tear and 11 (91.7%) had associated femoral cam impingement lesion addressed at arthroscopy. Our study demonstrates a significant (p=0.02) improvement in outcome in the dysplastic group at one year using the mHHS. Conclusion : Hip arthroscopy in the presence of DDH is effective in relieving pain for at least one year after surgery although does not address underlying acetabular abnormality. PMID:26069512

  20. Canine hip and elbow dysplasia in UK Labrador retrievers.

    PubMed

    Woolliams, J A; Lewis, T W; Blott, S C

    2011-08-01

    This paper examines the outcomes from recent genetic analyses of hip and elbow scores from British Veterinary Association (BVA)/UK Kennel Club (KC) screening programmes targeted at reducing the prevalence of hip dysplasia (HD) and elbow dysplasia in UK Labrador retrievers. The analyses made use of 25,243 hip scores and 3613 elbow scores. Heritabilities (± standard error) for hip score, analysed on a log scale, and for elbow score were 0.35±0.02 and 0.19±0.04, respectively, with a genetic correlation of 0.41±0.09. For both hip and elbow scores, there was a near perfect genetic correlation between the left and right joint; analysis of hip score showed a predictive benefit of using the total of left and right scores rather than worst score and the benefit of using all component scores rather than their aggregate score. Downward genetic trends were observed in both hip and elbow scores, although the latter was consistent with it being correlated to response to genetic change in hip score. Estimated breeding values (EBVs) offered substantial benefits in accuracy and hence genetic progress when compared to the use of phenotypes for both hip and elbow scores. There are major opportunities for improving selection against elbow dysplasia through the use of bivariate evaluations, although progress against dysplasia would be improved by more widespread elbow scoring. The studies highlighted a number of ways in which data recording for addressing complex traits may be improved in the future. Ongoing advances in genomic technology may be utilised for increasing the rate of genetic progress in selection against HD and for complex diseases in general, through the use of genomic evaluations. PMID:21737322

  1. Cementless total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Morscher, E W

    1983-12-01

    The differences between prostheses fixed with and without cement are mainly in the design and nature of the surface implant. The shapes of the sockets to be implanted without cement show a wide variety: cylinder, square, conus, and ellipsoid with and without threads. The hemispheric shape, however, which was chosen for the acetabular component of the isoelastic hip joint, does not disturb the natural form and function of the hip joint since the outer surface is closely adapted to the original subchondral bone layer. The noncemented cup is secured by threads, pegs, screws, etc., and by ingrowth of bony tissue in the grooves of the surfaces. Most femoral stems are based on the self-locking principle. All prosthetic models incorporate attempts to increase the surface of the stem (ribs, wings, corrugations, rims, etc.). There is a tendency to use less rigid elastic implants instead of the well known rigid metallic prostheses. The aim is to overcome the problems of stress protection and stress concentration observed with rigid implants. For the biomechanical integration of an implant, the properties of the surface, especially macroporosity and microporosity, are important. Most European models of noncemented endoprostheses are based on macroporosity (porometal, madreporic, etc.). The increase in implant surface area achieved with macroscopic perforations and recesses is relatively minor compared with the possibilities offered by microporosity ("alumine fritée," Proplast, fiber-metal, etc.). The best indication for use of a cementless hip endoprosthesis is in revision arthroplasty. The lost bone stock is replaced by bone grafts, thereby creating a situation comparable with that of a primary arthroplasty. Clinical experience with noncemented hip endoprostheses is, to date, promising, although the observation time for most models is short. PMID:6357588

  2. Confronting Hip Resurfacing and Big Femoral Head Replacement Gait Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Karampinas, Panagiotis K.; Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios S.; Vlamis, John; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Korres, Dimitrios S.

    2014-01-01

    Improved hip kinematics and bone preservation have been reported after resurfacing total hip replacement (THRS). On the other hand, hip kinematics with standard total hip replacement (THR) is optimized with large diameter femoral heads (BFH-THR). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the functional outcomes of THRS and BFH-THR and correlate these results to bone preservation or the large femoral heads. Thirty-one patients were included in the study. Gait speed, postural balance, proprioception and overall performance. Our results demonstrated a non-statistically significant improvement in gait, postural balance and proprioception in the THRS confronting to BFH-THR group. THRS provide identical outcomes to traditional BFH-THR. The THRS choice as bone preserving procedure in younger patients is still to be evaluated. PMID:24744841

  3. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  9. Improving Hip Fracture Care in Ireland: A Preliminary Report of the Irish Hip Fracture Database

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, Adam; Brent, Louise; Hurson, Conor; Ahern, Emer

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Hip fractures are common injuries in the older persons, with significant associated morbidity and mortality. The Irish Hip Fracture Database (IHFD) was implemented to monitor standards of care against international standards. Methods. The IHFD is a clinically led web-based audit. We summarize the data collected on hip fractures from April 2012 to March 2013 from 8 centres. Results. There were 843 patients with the majority being (70%) female. The 80–89-year age group accounted for the majority of fractures (44%). Most (71%) sustained a fall at home. Intertrochanteric fractures (40%) were most common. Only 28% were admitted to an orthopaedic ward within 4 hours. The majority (97%) underwent surgery with 44% having surgery within 36 hours. Medical optimization (35%) and lack of theatre space (26%) accounted for most of the surgical delay. While 29% were discharged home, 33% were discharged to a nursing home or other long-stay facilities. There was a 4% in-hospital mortality rate. Conclusions. Several key areas in both the database and aspects of patient care needing improvement have been highlighted. The implementation of similar databases has led to improved hip fracture care in other countries and we believe this can be replicated in Ireland. PMID:25548713

  10. Heterotopic ossification after hip arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Amar, Eyal; Sharfman, Zachary T.; Rath, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) after hip arthroscopy is the abnormal formation of mature lamellar bone within extra skeletal soft tissues. HO may lead to pain, impaired range of motion and possibly revision surgery. There has been a substantial amount of recent research on the pathophysiology, prophylaxis and treatment of HO associated with open and arthroscopic hip surgery. This article reviews the literature on the aforementioned topics with a focus on their application in hip arthroscopy. PMID:27011859

  11. Heterotopic ossification after hip arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Amar, Eyal; Sharfman, Zachary T; Rath, Ehud

    2015-12-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) after hip arthroscopy is the abnormal formation of mature lamellar bone within extra skeletal soft tissues. HO may lead to pain, impaired range of motion and possibly revision surgery. There has been a substantial amount of recent research on the pathophysiology, prophylaxis and treatment of HO associated with open and arthroscopic hip surgery. This article reviews the literature on the aforementioned topics with a focus on their application in hip arthroscopy. PMID:27011859

  12. Capsular Management in Hip Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harris, Joshua D

    2016-07-01

    The hip capsule is a highly complex anatomic structure, which influences normal hip motion and biomechanics. A dynamic stabilizing capsular contribution exists in the iliocapsularis and gluteus minimus, among other musculotendinous structures crossing the joint. Variable types and sizes of capsulotomy are necessary to sufficiently visualize and address the bony and soft tissue pathologic source of symptoms. Unrepaired capsulotomies may leave the hip significantly unstable to variable degrees. Capsular closure is a necessary part of a comprehensive arthroscopic hip preservation procedure. Greater titration of the degree of plication may be performed for patients with risk factors for postoperative instability. PMID:27343391

  13. Anterior Hip Joint Force Increases with Hip Extension, Decreased Gluteal Force, or Decreased Iliopsoas Force

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Cara L.; Sahrmann, Shirley A.; Moran, Daniel W.

    2008-01-01

    Abnormal or excessive force on the anterior hip joint may cause anterior hip pain, subtle hip instability and a tear of the acetabular labrum. We propose that both the pattern of muscle force and hip joint position can affect the magnitude of anterior joint force and thus possibly lead to excessive force and injury. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of hip joint position and of weakness of the gluteal and iliopsoas muscles on anterior hip joint force. We used a musculoskeletal model to estimate hip joint forces during simulated prone hip extension and supine hip flexion under 4 different muscle force conditions and across a range of hip extension and flexion positions. Weakness of specified muscles was simulated by decreasing the modeled maximum force value for the gluteal muscles during hip extension and the iliopsoas muscle during hip flexion. We found that decreased force contribution from the gluteal muscles during hip extension and the iliopsoas muscle during hip flexion resulted in an increase in the anterior hip joint force. The anterior hip joint force was greater when the hip was in extension than when the hip was in flexion. Further studies are warranted to determine if increased utilization of the gluteal muscles during hip extension and of the iliopsoas muscle during hip flexion, and avoidance of hip extension beyond neutral would be beneficial for people with anterior hip pain, subtle hip instability, or an anterior acetabular labral tear. PMID:17707385

  14. Developmental Dislocation (Dysplasia) of the Hip (DDH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... developmental dysplasia (dislocation) of the hip (DDH), the hip joint has not formed normally. The ball is loose ... be taken to provide detailed pictures of the hip joint. Treatment When DDH is detected at birth, it ...

  15. Cartilage restoration technique of the hip.

    PubMed

    Mardones, Rodrigo; Larrain, Catalina

    2016-04-01

    Hip cartilage lesions represent a diagnostic challenge and can be an elusive source of pain. Treatment may present difficulties due to localization and spherical form of the joint and is most commonly limited to excision, debridement, thermal chondroplasty and microfractures. This chapter will focus in new technologies to enhance the standard techniques. These new technologies are based in stem cells therapies; as intra-articular injections of expanded mesenchymal stem cells, mononuclear concentrate in a platelet-rich plasma matrix and expanded mesenchymal stem cells seeded in a collagen membrane. This review will discuss the bases, techniques and preliminary results obtained with the use of stem cells for the treatment of hip cartilage lesions. PMID:27026816

  16. Cartilage restoration technique of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Mardones, Rodrigo; Larrain, Catalina

    2016-01-01

    Hip cartilage lesions represent a diagnostic challenge and can be an elusive source of pain. Treatment may present difficulties due to localization and spherical form of the joint and is most commonly limited to excision, debridement, thermal chondroplasty and microfractures. This chapter will focus in new technologies to enhance the standard techniques. These new technologies are based in stem cells therapies; as intra-articular injections of expanded mesenchymal stem cells, mononuclear concentrate in a platelet-rich plasma matrix and expanded mesenchymal stem cells seeded in a collagen membrane. This review will discuss the bases, techniques and preliminary results obtained with the use of stem cells for the treatment of hip cartilage lesions. PMID:27026816

  17. Alternative bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Inzerillo, V Christopher; Garino, Jonathan P

    2003-01-01

    Polyethylene wear and extension of indications of total hip arthroplasty into younger and younger age groups have pushed manufacturers to develop more durable bearing surfaces. Standard polyethylene, the plastic used for the first 3 decades of hip replacement, virtually ceases to exist in its original form. Modifications of the processing, including sterlization in an inert environment and cross-linking, have demonstrated some improvements in wear. Hard-on-hard bearings such as ceramic-on-ceramic and metal-on-metal also have demonstrated extremely low wear. This article reviews the pros and cons of the alternative bearing options available to assist in the proper bearing selection for a particular patient. PMID:12882250

  18. Clinical Outcomes Following Arthroscopic Micro Fracture of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Begly, John P.; Ryan, Michael K.; Capogna, Brian; Youm, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Objective and clinical results of microfracture for treatment of chondral defects of the knee is well documented, yet outcomes for microfracture of the hip have not been extensively studied. Recently, several studies demonstrated clinical improvements in patients treated with microfracture of the hip. The purpose of this study is to examine clinical outcomes and survivorship in patients who underwent microfracture during arthroscopic hip surgery. Methods: A retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database was performed. Thirty-eight patients with a mean age of 41 (range, 17-64) who underwent microfracture during arthroscopic hip surgery by a single surgeon (senior author) were identified. Demographic data, diagnosis, and details regarding operative procedures were collected. All patients were indicated for hip arthroscopy based on standard pre-operative examination as well as routine and advanced imaging. Baseline pre-operative modified Harris Hip Scores (mHHS) and Non-Arthritic Hip Scores (NAHS) were compared to mHHS and NAHS at two-year follow-up. Additionally, survivorship data was assessed to determine failure, defined as any subsequent revision arthroscopic surgery and/or hip arthroplasty of the same hip. Results: Thirty-four of the 38 (89.5%) patients were available for two-year clinical follow-up. Baseline mean mHHHS and NAHS for all patients improved from 50.6 (+/- 12.7) and 46.9 (+/-12.8) to 84.7 (+/- 12.5) and 85.6 (+/- 11.2) respectively. Both improvements were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Eight patients (23.5%) met failure criteria and underwent additional surgery at an average of 23.9 months. Two patients (5.8%) underwent revision arthroscopic surgery, and six patients (17.7%) underwent hip arthroplasty. Conclusion: Significant improvements in clinical outcomes are seen at two-year follow-up after microfracture treatment of chondral lesions of the hip. Despite overall success, failure rates are relatively high. As with

  19. Capsule repair may reduce dislocation following hip hemiarthroplasty through a direct lateral approach: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Hughes, A W; Clark, D; Carlino, W; Gosling, O; Spencer, R F

    2015-01-01

    Reported rates of dislocation in hip hemiarthroplasty (HA) for the treatment of intra-capsular fractures of the hip, range between 1% and 10%. HA is frequently performed through a direct lateral surgical approach. The aim of this study is to determine the contribution of the anterior capsule to the stability of a cemented HA through a direct lateral approach. A total of five whole-body cadavers were thawed at room temperature, providing ten hip joints for investigation. A Thompson HA was cemented in place via a direct lateral approach. The cadavers were then positioned supine, both knee joints were disarticulated and a digital torque wrench was attached to the femur using a circular frame with three half pins. The wrench applied an external rotation force with the hip in extension to allow the hip to dislocate anteriorly. Each hip was dislocated twice; once with a capsular repair and once without repairing the capsule. Stratified sampling ensured the order in which this was performed was alternated for the paired hips on each cadaver. Comparing peak torque force in hips with the capsule repaired and peak torque force in hips without repair of the capsule, revealed a significant difference between the 'capsule repaired' (mean 22.96 Nm, standard deviation (sd) 4.61) and the 'capsule not repaired' group (mean 5.6 Nm, sd 2.81) (p < 0.001). Capsular repair may help reduce the risk of hip dislocation following HA. PMID:25568428

  20. Hip dysplasia in the skeletally mature patient.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Rachel Y; Kaye, Ian David; Slover, James; Feldman, David

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal hip development causes one-quarter to one-half of all hip disease. Dysplastic hips typically share characteristic anatomic abnormalities. The dysplastic acetabulum is typically shallow, lateralized, and anteverted with insufficient coverage anteriorly, superiorly, and laterally. The dysplastic proximal femur has a small femoral head with excessive femoral neck anteversion and a short neck with an increased neck shaft angle. These characteristic changes result in intraarticular pathology leading to hip arthritis. A variety of treatment options exist based on the degree of dysplasia and the amount of concomitant hip arthritis. Treatment options include hip arthroscopy, acetabular or femoral osteotomies, hip arthrodesis, and total hip arthroplasty. PMID:25150325

  1. Effect of Hip Angle on Anterior Hip Joint Force during Gait

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Cara L.; Sahrmann, Shirley A.; Moran, Daniel W.

    2010-01-01

    Anterior hip or groin pain is a common complaint for which people are referred for physical therapy. We have observed that people with anterior hip pain often walk in greater hip extension than people without anterior hip pain, and that the pain is reduced when they walk in less hip extension. Therefore, we investigated anterior hip joint forces which may contribute to anterior hip pain and examined the effect of end range hip extension on the anterior hip joint force during gait. To do this, we used a 6 degree of freedom, 3-dimensional musculoskeletal model to estimate hip joint forces during gait. Within subjects, the maximum anterior hip joint force for gait trials with the most hip extension was compared to the anterior hip joint force for gait trials with the least hip extension. The musculoskeletal model indicated that increasing the maximum end range hip extension when walking results in an increase in the anterior hip joint force when compared to walking in less hip extension. Walking in greater hip extension may result in an increase in the anterior hip joint force, and thereby contribute to anterior hip pain. The findings of this study provide some evidence supporting the use of gait modification to reduce anterior hip force when treating people with anterior hip pain. PMID:20934338

  2. Representin': Drawing from Hip-Hop and Urban Youth Culture to Inform Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irizarry, Jason G.

    2009-01-01

    The potential of drawing from urban youth culture, and hip-hop more specifically, to serve as a bridge to the standard curriculum has been well documented. However, the richness and potential benefits of hip-hop are more far-reaching and present significant implications for teacher education and professional development efforts as well. This…

  3. Hip-Hop and a Hybrid Text in a Postsecondary English Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Deborah M.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the epistemology present in hip-hop music and its reflection in the writing of one African American student in a postsecondary transitional English class. An integration of hip-hop and academic literacy practices in the student's essay challenges the supremacy of a "standard" academic English and deficit perspectives about…

  4. [Complications after hip osteotomy].

    PubMed

    Renner, L; Perka, C; Zahn, R

    2014-01-01

    Complex deformities of the acetabulum are one of the most common reasons for secondary pelvic osteoarthritis. One option of treatment is osteotomy of the acetabulum close to the joint. The correction of the spatially reduced roof of the femoral head resulting from pelvic dysplasia can minimize the risk of developing secondary osteoarthritis or reduce the progression of an already existing osteoarthritis. The Ganz periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) and Tönnis triple osteotomy procedures are the predominant methods used to correct hip dysplasia in adolescents. Both are complex procedures which bear specific risks and complications, thus requiring very experienced surgeons. PMID:24356819

  5. Management of hip fracture: the family physician's role.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shobha S; Cherukuri, Manjula

    2006-06-15

    The incidence of hip fracture is expected to increase as the population ages. One in five persons dies in the first year after sustaining a hip fracture, and those who survive past one year may have significant functional limitation. Although surgery is the main treatment for hip fracture, family physicians play a key role as patients' medical consultants. Surgical repair is recommended for stable patients within 24 to 48 hours of hospitalization. Antibiotic prophylaxis is indicated to prevent infection after surgery. Thromboprophylaxis has become the standard of care for management of hip fracture. Effective agents include unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, fondaparinux, and warfarin. Optimal pain control, usually with narcotic analgesics, is essential to ensure patient comfort and to facilitate rehabilitation. Rehabilitation after hip fracture surgery ideally should start on the first postoperative day with progression to ambulation as tolerated. Indwelling urinary catheters should be removed within 24 hours of surgery. Prevention, early recognition, and treatment of contributing factors for delirium also are crucial. Interventions to help prevent future falls, exercise and balance training in ambulatory patients, and the treatment of osteoporosis are important strategies for the secondary prevention of hip fracture. PMID:16836036

  6. Hip-Hop Education Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Marcella Runell

    2009-01-01

    Hip-hop music and culture are often cited as being public pedagogy, meaning the music itself has intrinsic educational value. Non-profit organizations and individual educators have graciously taken the lead in utilizing hip-hop to educate. As the academy continues to debate its effectiveness, teachers and community organizers are moving forward.…

  7. Ultrasound-Guided Hip Procedures.

    PubMed

    Payne, Jeffrey M

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the techniques for performing ultrasound-guided procedures in the hip region, including intra-articular hip injection, iliopsoas bursa injection, greater trochanter bursa injection, ischial bursa injection, and piriformis muscle injection. The common indications, pitfalls, accuracy, and efficacy of these procedures are also addressed. PMID:27468669

  8. Assessment of adult hip dysplasia and the outcome of surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Troelsen, Anders

    2012-06-01

    rapid ultrasound examination performed by an experienced examiner can potentially alter the traditional diagnostic algorithm in which magnetic resonance arthrography remains the gold standard. PERIACETABULAR OSTEOTOMY FOR SURGICAL TREATMENT OF HIP DYSPLASIA IN ADULTS: Encouraging hip joint survival and clinical outcome were reported at medium-term follow-up after periacetabular osteotomy. The small number of studies reporting the outcome beyond a 5-year follow-up is in contrast to the wide application of the periacetabular osteotomy. The performed analysis of predictors of conversion to total hip replacement following periacetabular osteotomy documented the importance of different biomechanical and degenerative factors. Knowledge about factors predicting early conversion to total hip replacement has the potential to refine patient selection and to improve treatment by periacetabular osteotomy. Cartilage thickness was documented to be preserved up to 2,5 years after periacetabular osteotomy. All but 1 hip joint had acetabular labral tears, thus indicating that the presence of labral tears does not accelerate cartilage degeneration after periacetabular osteotomy. PMID:22677250

  9. Wear testing of total hip replacements under severe conditions.

    PubMed

    Zietz, Carmen; Fabry, Christian; Reinders, Joern; Dammer, Rebecca; Kretzer, Jan Philippe; Bader, Rainer; Sonntag, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Controlled wear testing of total hip replacements in hip joint simulators is a well-established and powerful method, giving an extensive prediction of the long-term clinical performance. To understand the wear behavior of a bearing and its limits under in vivo conditions, testing scenarios should be designed as physiologically as possible. Currently, the ISO standard protocol 14242 is the most common preclinical testing procedure for total hip replacements, based on a simplified gait cycle for normal walking conditions. However, in recent years, wear patterns have increasingly been observed on retrievals that cannot be replicated by the current standard. The purpose of this study is to review the severe testing conditions that enable the generation of clinically relevant wear rates and phenomena. These conditions include changes in loading and activity, third-body wear, surface topography, edge wear and the role of aging of the bearing materials. PMID:26048088

  10. Hip Abduction Can Prevent Posterior Edge Loading of Hip Replacements

    PubMed Central

    van Arkel, Richard J; Modenese, Luca; Phillips, Andrew TM; Jeffers, Jonathan RT

    2013-01-01

    Edge loading causes clinical problems for hard-on-hard hip replacements, and edge loading wear scars are present on the majority of retrieved components. We asked the question: are the lines of action of hip joint muscles such that edge loading can occur in a well-designed, well-positioned acetabular cup? A musculoskeletal model, based on cadaveric lower limb geometry, was used to calculate for each muscle, in every position within the complete range of motion, whether its contraction would safely pull the femoral head into the cup or contribute to edge loading. The results show that all the muscles that insert into the distal femur, patella, or tibia could cause edge loading of a well-positioned cup when the hip is in deep flexion. Patients frequently use distally inserting muscles for movements requiring deep hip flexion, such as sit-to-stand. Importantly, the results, which are supported by in vivo data and clinical findings, also show that risk of edge loading is dramatically reduced by combining deep hip flexion with hip abduction. Patients, including those with sub-optimally positioned cups, may be able to reduce the prevalence of edge loading by rising from chairs or stooping with the hip abducted. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 31:1172–1179, 2013. PMID:23575923

  11. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  16. A novel DXA-based hip failure index captures hip fragility independent of BMD.

    PubMed

    Sievänen, H; Weynand, L S; Wacker, W K; Simonelli, C; Burke, P K; Ragi, S; Del Rio, L

    2008-01-01

    Capability of a novel dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-based hip failure index (HiFI) to discriminate between hip fracture cases and controls was evaluated. Given the constraints of planar DXA, the femoral neck was assumed a foam-filled ( approximately trabecular bone), thin-walled ( approximately cortical bone) sandwich structure, while HiFI estimated the critical force sufficient to buckle the wall of such a structure. Proximal femur DXA data from 1379 women aged 65yr and older, 268 with prior hip fracture were used. Comparison between standard areal bone mineral density (BMD), femur strength index (FSI), and HiFI was based on areas under receiver operatoring characteristic curves (AUC). The mean femoral neck BMD (SD) was 0.689 (0.109) g/cm(2) among the cases and 0.768 (0.119) g/cm(2) among the controls; the mean FSI 1.33 (0.36) and 1.54 (0.41), and the mean HiFI -0.28 (0.14) and -0.18 (0.15), respectively; all intergroup differences were highly significant (p<0.001). The intergroup difference for HiFI remained significant (p<0.002) after adjusting for age and BMD or FSI. The AUCs were 0.696 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.661-0.730) for BMD, 0.665 (0.630-0.700) for FSI, and 0.701 (0.666-0.736) for HiFI. In conclusion, HiFI may capture structural traits that account for femoral neck fragility independently of BMD or FSI. Obviously, the use of actual geometric and structural information from three-dimensional imaging of the femoral neck would help diminish the crude assumptions of the present DXA approach and reveal the true potential of the HiFI approach to gauge hip fragility and identify at-risk individuals for hip fractures. PMID:18456529

  17. Anterior hip pain.

    PubMed

    O'Kane, J W

    1999-10-15

    Anterior hip pain is a common complaint with many possible causes. Apophyseal avulsion and slipped capital femoral epiphysis should not be overlooked in adolescents. Muscle and tendon strains are common in adults. Subsequent to accurate diagnosis, strains should improve with rest and directed conservative treatment. Osteoarthritis, which is diagnosed radiographically, generally occurs in middle-aged and older adults. Arthritis in younger adults should prompt consideration of an inflammatory cause. A possible femoral neck stress fracture should be evaluated urgently to prevent the potentially significant complications associated with displacement. Patients with osteitis pubis should be educated about the natural history of the condition and should undergo physical therapy to correct abnormal pelvic mechanics. "Sports hernias," nerve entrapments and labral pathologic conditions should be considered in athletic adults with characteristic presentations and chronic symptoms. Surgical intervention may allow resumption of pain-free athletic activity. PMID:10537384

  18. PRECISION OF SINGLE VERSUS BILATERAL HIP BONE MINERAL DENSITY SCANS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans of the hip and lumbar spine are currently the "gold standard" for measurement of bone mineral density (BMD). DXA allows swift, noninvasive measurements with minimal radiation for both clinical practice and research. Traditional testing has used results ...

  19. Association of hip pain with radiographic evidence of hip osteoarthritis: diagnostic test study

    PubMed Central

    Nevitt, Michael C; Niu, Jingbo; Clancy, Mary M; Lane, Nancy E; Link, Thomas M; Vlad, Steven; Tolstykh, Irina; Jungmann, Pia M.; Felson, David T; Guermazi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Study question Is there concordance between hip pain and radiographic hip osteoarthritis? Methods In this diagnostic test study, pelvic radiographs were assessed for hip osteoarthritis in two cohorts: the Framingham Osteoarthritis Study (community of Framingham, Massachusetts) and the Osteoarthritis Initiative (a multicenter longitudinal cohort study of osteoarthritis in the United States). Using visual representation of the hip joint, participants reported whether they had hip pain on most days and the location of the pain: anterior, groin, lateral, buttocks, or low back. In the Framingham study, participants with hip pain were also examined for hip pain with internal rotation. The authors analysed the agreement between radiographic hip osteoarthritis and hip pain, and for those with hip pain suggestive of hip osteoarthritis they calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of radiographs as the diagnostic test. Study answer and limitations In the Framingham study (n=946), only 15.6% of hips in patients with frequent hip pain showed radiographic evidence of hip osteoarthritis, and 20.7% of hips with radiographic hip osteoarthritis were frequently painful. The sensitivity of radiographic hip osteoarthritis for hip pain localised to the groin was 36.7%, specificity 90.5%, positive predictive value 6.0%, and negative predictive value 98.9%. Results did not differ much for hip pain at other locations or for painful internal rotation. In the Osteoarthritis Initiative study (n=4366), only 9.1% of hips in patients with frequent pain showed radiographic hip osteoarthritis, and 23.8% of hips with radiographic hip osteoarthritis were frequently painful. The sensitivity of definite radiographic hip osteoarthritis for hip pain localised to the groin was 16.5%, specificity 94.0%, positive predictive value 7.1%, and negative predictive value 97.6%. Results also did not differ much for hip pain at other locations. What this

  20. Fracture After Total Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... er Total Hip Replacement cont. • Dislocation • Limb length inequality • Poor fracture healing • Repeat fracture • Lack of in- ... Surgeons (AAOS). To learn more about your orthopaedic health, please visit orthoinfo.org. Page ( 5 ) AAOS does ...

  1. Imaging methods used for children with hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Harcke, H Theodore

    2005-05-01

    Ultrasound has been used to examine the infant hip for more than 20 years. The Thornbury model for assessing the clinical efficacy of a diagnostic imaging procedure has been used in this review to determine what has been achieved and what remains to be learned. To accomplish the effective and efficient treatment of patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip, orthopaedic, radiologic, and pediatric organizations must collaborate in writing and revising standards of care and guidelines for treatment as our knowledge base grows. PMID:15864034

  2. Microinstability of the Hip and the Splits Radiograph.

    PubMed

    Harris, Joshua D; Gerrie, Brayden J; Lintner, David M; Varner, Kevin E; McCulloch, Patrick C

    2016-01-01

    A normal hip has a natural tendency toward stability because of both osseous and soft tissue structures. Hip motion is primarily rotational around a center of rotation. When the femoral head and its center of rotation translate, with or without rotation, the inherent stability of the femoroacetabular articulation may be lost. The spectrum of hip instability ranges from subtle microinstability to traumatic dislocation. Microinstability may be the cause or the effect of several other hip pathologies. Soft tissue contributions to stability include the static capsule, dynamic musculotendinous units, and underlying generalized connective tissue (eg, Ehlers-Danlos). Osseous contributions include multiple femoral and acetabular radiographic coverage parameters. Iatrogenic contributions include an unrepaired capsulotomy, overresection of the acetabular rim (iatrogenic dysplasia), overresection of cam osteochondroplasty, iliopsoas tenotomy, labral debridement, and ligamentum teres debridement. Patients with hip microinstability often have deep groin pain, exhibited by a C sign. These patients frequently participate in flexibility sports and activities, such as ballet, gymnastics, figure skating, and martial arts. On physical examination, generalized hypermobility syndromes should be assessed, as should loss of log-roll external rotation recoil, excessive abduction, trochanteric-pelvic impingement, and abductor fatigue. Standard imaging, including plain radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography, should be analyzed for all causes of hip pain. A new plain radiograph, the splits radiograph is introduced here, consistently showing lateral femoral head translation and creation of a vacuum sign, showing hip microinstability. The splits radiograph is illustrated in a 22-year-old female dancer who presented with bilateral deep anterolateral groin pain. PMID:26730687

  3. [Pseudotumors caused by hip prostheses].

    PubMed

    Helkamaa, Teemu; Lohman, Martina; Alberty, Anne

    2015-01-01

    More than 100000 hip replacements have been performed in Finland. In the hip replacement operations performed due to osteoarthritis, the artificial joint surfaces are made of metal, plastic or ceramics. Pseudotumors associated with metal-on-metal (MoM) sliding surfaces have received worldwide attention. Soft issue lesions, not always symptomatic, may develop around the joint replacements. These may even require joint revision surgery. PMID:26237883

  4. DYSPLASIA OF HIP DEVELOPMENT: UPDATE

    PubMed Central

    Guarniero, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The term “developmental dysplasia of the hip” (DDH) includes a wide spectrum of abnormalities that affect the hip during its growth, ranging from dysplasia to joint dislocation and going through different degrees of coxofemoral subluxation. The incidence of DDH is variable, and depends on a number of factors, including geographical location. Approximately one in 1,000 newborn infants may present hip dislocation and around 10 in 1,000 present hip instability. Brazil has an incidence of five per 1,000 in terms of findings of a positive Ortolani sign, which is the early clinical sign for detecting the disorder. The risk factors for DDH include: female sex, white skin color, primiparity, young mother, breech presentation at birth, family history, oligohydramnios, newborns with greater weight and height, and deformities of the feet or spine. Hip examinations should be routine for newborns, and should be emphasized in maternity units. Among newborns and infants, the diagnosis of DDH is preeminently clinical and is made using the Ortolani and Barlow maneuvers. Conventional radiography is of limited value for confirming the diagnosis of DDH among newborns, and ultrasound of the hip is the ideal examination. The treatment of DDH is challenging, both for pediatric orthopedists and for general practitioners. The objectives of the treatment include diagnosis as early as possible, joint reduction and stabilization of the hip in a secure position. Classically, treatment options are divided according to different age groups, at the time of diagnosis. PMID:27022528

  5. The hip in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Bleck, E E

    1980-01-01

    Orthopedic surgery can alleviate the hip flexion, adduction, and medial rotation deformities of the hip and improve the function and appearance of gait. To accomplish this, however, careful examination and prudence in the operative procedure to avoid overdoing and overcorrecting are important. Orthopedic surgery can prevent subluxation and dislocation of the hip before the age of seven years, and consequently repetitive radiographic examinations of the hip in children who have spastic paralysis of the hip musculature should be a routine procedure. Subluxation and dislocation of the hip, when established, can be successfully treated with orthopedic surgical procedures. Physicians must keep in mind that the spastic paralysis of cerebral palsy originates in the brain, and therefore the spasticity cannot be eliminated. The best that can be done is to weaken or remove some muscles as deforming forces and to achieve compromises for continued function. The goal should be optimal independence for the child and adolescent during development, and freedom from pain with deteriorating function due to degenerative arthritis in the adult. PMID:7360505

  6. Bilateral total hip replacement in arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Dalton, David Michael; Magill, Paul; Mulhall, Kevin James

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a case of bilateral total hip replacements (THRs) in a 56-year-old patient with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC). The considerations for the perioperative period and the outcome are discussed. Preoperative planning included an anaesthetic review and availability of fiberoptic intubation due to poor mouth opening. Perioperatively, contractures can make positioning and exposure difficult but in this case a standard posterior approach was taken. Particular attention was given to soft tissue balancing given the theoretical risk of dislocation. There were no perioperative complications. Postoperatively there has been improvement in pain and hip scores but the patient has failed to return to work. Objective improvements in range of motion (ROM) have not been made. This experience suggests THR is a safe and effective treatment for osteoarthritic hip pain in patients with AMC but patients should be informed that ROM is unlikely to improve. PMID:26607193

  7. Pathologic ligamentous constraint of the hip.

    PubMed

    Crowninshield, R D; Johnston, R C; Brand, R A; Pedersen, D R

    1983-12-01

    A mathematic model of the hip capsule and lower extremity musculature was utilized to predict the forces present in the hip ligaments during locomotion. The results demonstrate principles and trends (rather than absolute results) in hip mechanics, the details of which are affected by the associated modeling assumptions. The active stretching of a hip joint capsule tightened by scarring or surgical transfer may appreciably increase the hip contact force. Capsular elements that prevent hip flexion and adduction play a major role in hip contact force exaggeration during common activities. The positive effect of maintaining the hip capsule to reduce total hip component dislocation contrasts with the potential negative effects of restricting joint motion and increasing the joint contact force. Increased joint loading due to capsular restriction may contribute to prosthetic component loosening. PMID:6641064

  8. Review on squeaking hips.

    PubMed

    Levy, Yadin David; Munir, Selin; Donohoo, Shane; Walter, William Lindsay

    2015-11-18

    Squeaking is a well-recognized complication for hard-on-hard bearings. The nature of squeaking is not yet completely understood however it is considered a multifactorial phenomenon. Patient, implant, and surgical factors play a role in squeaking. It is believed that mechanisms damaging the fluid film lubrication in which these bearings function optimally have a critical role. Such mechanisms include edge loading, stripe wear, impingement, third body particles and ceramic fracture. The resonance of metallic parts can produce noise in the human audible range hence the implant metallurgic composition and design may play a role. Implant positioning can facilitate impingement and edge loading enhancing the occurrence of squeaking. The recent introduction of large heads (> 36 mm) 4(th) generation ceramic-on-ceramic bearing may accentuate the conditions facilitating noise formation; however the current literature is insufficient. Clinically, squeaking may manifest in extreme hip positions or during normal gait cycle however it is rarely associated with pain. Evaluations of patients with squeaking include clinical and radiographic assessments. Computer tomography is recommended as it can better reveal ceramic breakage and implant malposition. The treatments for most squeaking patients include reassurance and activity modification. However for some, noise can be a problem, requiring further surgical intervention. In the occurrence of ceramic fracture, implant failure, extreme components malposition, instability and impingement, surgery should be advised. This review will aim to discuss the current literature regarding squeaking. PMID:26601063

  9. Review on squeaking hips

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Yadin David; Munir, Selin; Donohoo, Shane; Walter, William Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    Squeaking is a well-recognized complication for hard-on-hard bearings. The nature of squeaking is not yet completely understood however it is considered a multifactorial phenomenon. Patient, implant, and surgical factors play a role in squeaking. It is believed that mechanisms damaging the fluid film lubrication in which these bearings function optimally have a critical role. Such mechanisms include edge loading, stripe wear, impingement, third body particles and ceramic fracture. The resonance of metallic parts can produce noise in the human audible range hence the implant metallurgic composition and design may play a role. Implant positioning can facilitate impingement and edge loading enhancing the occurrence of squeaking. The recent introduction of large heads (> 36 mm) 4th generation ceramic-on-ceramic bearing may accentuate the conditions facilitating noise formation; however the current literature is insufficient. Clinically, squeaking may manifest in extreme hip positions or during normal gait cycle however it is rarely associated with pain. Evaluations of patients with squeaking include clinical and radiographic assessments. Computer tomography is recommended as it can better reveal ceramic breakage and implant malposition. The treatments for most squeaking patients include reassurance and activity modification. However for some, noise can be a problem, requiring further surgical intervention. In the occurrence of ceramic fracture, implant failure, extreme components malposition, instability and impingement, surgery should be advised. This review will aim to discuss the current literature regarding squeaking. PMID:26601063

  10. Test-retest reliability of innovated strength tests for hip muscles.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Christophe; Corten, Kristoff; Wesseling, Mariska; Peers, Koen; Simon, Jean-Pierre; Jonkers, Ilse; Desloovere, Kaat

    2013-01-01

    The burden of hip muscles weakness and its relation to other impairments has been well documented. It is therefore a pre-requisite to have a reliable method for clinical assessment of hip muscles function allowing the design and implementation of a proper strengthening program. Motor-driven dynamometry has been widely accepted as the gold-standard for lower limb muscle strength assessment but is mainly related to the knee joint. Studies focusing on the hip joint are less exhaustive and somewhat discrepant with regard to optimal participants position, consequently influencing outcome measures. Thus, we aimed to develop a standardized test setup for the assessment of hip muscles strength, i.e. flexors/extensors and abductors/adductors, with improved participant stability and to define its psychometric characteristics. Eighteen participants performed unilateral isokinetic and isometric contractions of the hip muscles in the sagittal and coronal plane at two separate occasions. Peak torque and normalized peak torque were measured for each contraction. Relative and absolute measures of reliability were calculated using the intraclass correlation coefficient and standard error of measurement, respectively. Results from this study revealed higher levels of between-day reliability of isokinetic/isometric hip abduction/flexion peak torque compared to existing literature. The least reliable measures were found for hip extension and adduction, which could be explained by a less efficient stabilization technique. Our study additionally provided a first set of reference normalized data which can be used in future research. PMID:24260550

  11. Kinematic radiography of the hip joint after hip resurfacing arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hiroki; Kajino, Yoshitomo; Kabata, Tamon; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Sanada, Shigeru; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of dynamic radiography using a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) system after hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA). A total of 32 hips of 26 patients who underwent HRA were included. Sequential images of active abduction in the supine position and flexion in the 45° semilateral position were obtained using the FPD system. We examined the imaging findings of impingement between the acetabular component and femoral neck with cooperative motion at maximal exercise. Moreover, the central component coordinate of the acetabulum and femoral head sides was measured. For abduction motion, impingement was detected in two (6.3 %) hips between the superior portion of the femoral neck and acetabular component. For flexion motion, impingement was detected in 19 (59.4 %) hips. There were no findings of subluxation between the acetabular component and femoral neck after impingement, but cooperative motion of lumbar and pelvic flexion was observed. There was no significant difference in the center-to-center distance regardless of the presence or absence of impingement. Detailed postoperative kinematics of the hips after HRA showed that the proposed dynamic FPD system could reveal acquired impingement and cooperative motion as dynamic images and possibly reveal findings that would be unobservable using static images. PMID:27207072

  12. The Fate of the Contralateral Hip in Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Nepple, Jeffrey J.; Louer, Craig; Clohisy, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The pathophysiology of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) remains to be better understood. Only a fraction of all individuals with bony FAI morphology will ever develop hip symptoms or osteoarthritis. The purpose of the current study was to determine (1) rates of initial and subsequent symptom development in the contralateral hip of patients with symptomatic ipsilateral FAI and (2) to identify predictors of symptomatic contralateral FAI. Methods: The study cohort included 179 consecutive patients presenting for surgical treatment of FAI. Patients were excluded if they had previously underwent contralateral surgery. At baseline and postoperative follow-up time points, patients recorded standardized outcome questionnaires, including the presence of symptoms in the contralateral hip. Significant symptoms were defined as the presence of at least mild pain, while none or slight pain was not included. All patients underwent AP pelvis and bilateral 45 degree Dunn lateral radiographs at baseline. Patients developing symptoms in the contralateral hip were subclassified as having symptoms at presentation (initial symptoms) or developing symptoms during the follow-up period (symptom development). Patients were followed over a minimum of one year time period postoperatively. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify independent predictors of symptoms development. Results: The study cohort had a mean age of 30.2 years and included 60.3% females. FAI was classified as isolated cam in 63.1% (n=113), isolated pincer 1.1% (n=2), and combined type in 35.8% (n=64). Forty-two (23.5%) of patients had initial symptoms in the contralateral hip. Twenty-two additional hips developed symptoms during the follow-up period (16.1% of initially asymptomatic hips). For multivariate logistic regression of any symptoms development (initial or subsequent), competitive athletes (p=0.041) and contralateral HNO ratio on AP pelvis (p=0.009). However, the overall model poorly

  13. Total Hip Arthroplasty Dislocations Are More Complex Than They Appear: A Case Report of Intraprosthetic Dislocation of an Anatomic Dual-Mobility Implant After Closed Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, Bradford S.; De Martino, Ivan; Sculco, Thomas; Sculco, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: Total hip arthroplasty is a successful operation for the treatment of hip pain. One of the common complications of hip arthroplasty is dislocation. While reduction of standard prosthetic dislocations is highly successful, new prostheses add the potential for new complications. Case Report: We present the case of a patient who experienced intraprosthetic dislocation of an anatomic dual-mobility total hip prosthesis after a closed hip reduction and include the prereduction and postreduction radiographic findings. Conclusion: Emergency department physicians should be aware of intraprosthetic dislocation. This complication can be easily missed because the metal/ceramic femoral head appears to be reduced in the acetabulum. PMID:27303232

  14. Sliding screw implants for extracapsular hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Kouvidis, George; Stavropoulos, Nikolaos A; Stavrakakis, Loannis; Katonis, Pavlos; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2012-01-01

    Hip fractures are associated with significant mortality and morbidity for the patients, more dependent residual status, and increased socio-economic cost. Many hip-fracture patients experience severe functional impairment, and most never recover their pre-fracture level of function. Current research has sought to identify the most effective treatments to reduce the incidence of hip fractures, improve survival and quality of life, and minimize complications and disability. The treatment of these fractures in the elderly aims to return these people to their pre-fracture mobility and functional level. This article reviews the surgical treatment options for extracapsular hip fractures and discusses their associated advantages, disadvantages, and complications. Two types of implants are currently available: the dynamic hip screw (DHS), and the intramedullary hip nail with one or two sliding screws. In this review, no clear advantage of one implant over another for the treatment of extracapsular hip fractures was evident. Both the DHS and hip nails can be used successfully for the treatment of stable hip fractures; for unstable fractures and low subtrochanteric fractures, hip nails are preferred. Although hip nails are associated with limited exposure, lower blood loss and transfusion requirements, and shorter operative time, complications are more common with hip nails. Long-term survival and function are similar in the two approaches. Hip nails with two sliding screws do not seem to make the difference in clinical practice that is reported in biomechanical studies. PMID:23016784

  15. Evaluation of the patient with hip pain.

    PubMed

    Wilson, John J; Furukawa, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Hip pain is a common and disabling condition that affects patients of all ages. The differential diagnosis of hip pain is broad, presenting a diagnostic challenge. Patients often express that their hip pain is localized to one of three anatomic regions: the anterior hip and groin, the posterior hip and buttock, or the lateral hip. Anterior hip and groin pain is commonly associated with intra-articular pathology, such as osteoarthritis and hip labral tears. Posterior hip pain is associated with piriformis syndrome, sacroiliac joint dysfunction, lumbar radiculopathy, and less commonly ischiofemoral impingement and vascular claudication. Lateral hip pain occurs with greater trochanteric pain syndrome. Clinical examination tests, although helpful, are not highly sensitive or specific for most diagnoses; however, a rational approach to the hip examination can be used. Radiography should be performed if acute fracture, dislocations, or stress fractures are suspected. Initial plain radiography of the hip should include an anteroposterior view of the pelvis and frog-leg lateral view of the symptomatic hip. Magnetic resonance imaging should be performed if the history and plain radiograph results are not diagnostic. Magnetic resonance imaging is valuable for the detection of occult traumatic fractures, stress fractures, and osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Magnetic resonance arthrography is the diagnostic test of choice for labral tears. PMID:24444505

  16. Clinical examination versus ultrasonography in detecting developmental dysplasia of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Atalar, H.; Yavuz, O. Y.; Sayli, U.

    2007-01-01

    Although hip ultrasonography is gaining acceptance as the most effective method for the early diagnosis of developmental dysplasia of the hip, there is still some controversy regarding the use of ultrasonography as a screening method. The purpose of this study was to investigate prospectively the capacity of clinical examination findings and associated risk factors to detect developmental dysplasia of the hip defined ultrasonographically in infants. A total of 3,541 infants underwent clinical examination and hip ultrasonography. Measured against ultrasonography as a standard, the sensitivity and specificity of clinical examination were 97% and 13.68%, respectively. Graf type IIb or more severe developmental dysplasia was found in 167 infants (208 hips), at an overall frequency of 4.71%. Graf type IIa physiological immaturity was encountered in 838 hips, and of these, 15 hips (1.78%) developed Graf type IIb dysplasia and underwent treatment. Patient characteristics that were found to be significant risk factors were swaddling use, female gender, breech delivery and positive family history. Given its low specificity, our findings suggest that clinical examination does not reliably detect ultrasonographically defined developmental dysplasia of the hip in infants being screened for this disease. PMID:17333184

  17. Neonatal Incidence of Hip Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Peled, Eli; Eidelman, Mark; Katzman, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The advantages of sonographic examination are well known, but its main disadvantage is that it might lead to overdiagnosis, which might cause overtreatment. Variations in the incidence of developmental dysplasia of the hip are well known. We ascertained the incidence of neonatal sonographic developmental dysplasia of the hip without considering the development of those joints during followup. All 45,497 neonates (90,994 hips) born in our institute between January 1992 and December 2001 were examined clinically and sonographically during the first 48 hours of life. Sonography was performed according to Graf’s method, which considers mild hip sonographic abnormalities as Type IIa. We evaluated the different severity type incidence pattern and its influence on the total incidence during and between the investigated years. According to our study, sonographic Type IIa has major effects on the incidence of overall developmental dysplasia of the hip with a correlation coefficient of 0.95, whereas more severe sonographic abnormalities show relatively stable incidence patterns. Level of Evidence: Level I, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18288551

  18. Minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty: in opposition.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, David S

    2004-06-01

    At the Knee Society Winter Meeting in 2003, Seth Greenwald and I debated about whether there should be new standards (ie, regulations) applied to the release of information to the public on "new developments." I argued for the public's "right to know" prior to the publication of peer-reviewed literature. He argued for regulatory constraint or "proving by peer-reviewed publication" before alerting the public. It is not a contradiction for me to currently argue against the public advertising of minimally invasive (MIS) total hip arthroplasty as not yet being in the best interest of the public. It is hard to remember a concept that has so captured both the public's and the surgical community's fancy as MIS. Patients are "demanding" MIS without knowing why. Surgeons are offering it as the next best, greatest thing without having developed the skill and experience to avoid the surgery's risks. If you put "minimally invasive hip replacement" into the Google search engine (http://www.google.com), you get 5,170 matches. If you put the same words in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi), referencing the National Library of Medicine database, you get SEVENTEEN; none is really a peer-reviewed article. Most are 1 page papers in orthopedics from medical education meetings. On the other hand, there are over 6,000 peer-reviewed articles on total hip arthroplasty. Dr. Thomas Sculco, my couterpart in this debate, wrote an insightful editorial in the American Journal of Orthopedic Surgery in which he stated: "Although these procedures have generated incredible interest and enthusiasm, I am concerned that they may be performed to the detriment of our patients." I couldn't agree with him more. Smaller is not necessarily better and, when it is worse, it will be the "smaller" that is held accountable. PMID:15190556

  19. Minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, T.; Feng, J. G.; Liu, T.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the operative outcome between mini and standard incisions in total hip arthroplasty (THA). We identified 12 randomised or quasi-randomised control trials (RCT or qRCT) published between 1996 and 2008. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate the differences in results for surgical approach, trial quality, and follow-up duration. Operative time and blood loss were significantly reduced in the mini-incision group for studies with the posterior or posterolateral approach. Concerning postoperative complications, there were no significant differences between the two groups with no significant heterogeneity. No differences were observed between the two groups for Harris hip score and radiographic results except for cup anterversion. Although mini-incision appeared to have similar outcomes compared to standard incision, the follow-up is short-term according to current standards in THA. High-quality studies are required to compare the outcomes of these two procedures. PMID:19277652

  20. Ipsilateral Floating Hip and Floating Knee - A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Yashavantha Kumar, C; Nalini, K B; Nagaraj, Prashanth; Jawali, Abhijith

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Ipsilateral floating hip and floating knee are very rare injuries. These injuries so uncommon that only three cases of similar kind have been reported. These injuries are due to high velocity injuries following motor vehicle accidents. Management of such complex injuries is a challenging task even in experienced hands as there are no standard treatment guidelines for such fractures. Case Report: We hereby report a 20 yr old male who sustained ipsilateral floating hip and ipsilateral floating knee injuries following motor vehicle accident. Patient was stabilized initially and later taken up for surgery. Patient was treated with interlocking nail for femur and tibia in the same sitting whereas acetabulam fracture was managed conservatively. At five months all the fractures united well with restoration of good range of motion in both hip and knee Conclusion: Ipsilateral floating knee and floating hip are very rare injuries seen following high velocity motor vehicle accidents. There are no standard guidelines for treatment of those fractures as only a few cases of similar kind have been reported in literature. Early fixation and aggressive mobilization ensures fracture union and fewer complications. PMID:27298908

  1. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3360 Section 888.3360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3360 Section 888.3360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  3. Deciding to have knee or hip replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... patientinstructions/000368.htm Deciding to have knee or hip replacement To use the sharing features on this page, ... make a decision. Who Benefits From Knee or hip Replacement Surgery? The most common reason to have a ...

  4. Risks of hip and knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... is normal to lose blood during and after hip or knee replacement surgery. Some people need a blood transfusion during ... clot form are higher during and soon after hip or knee replacement surgery. Sitting or lying down for long periods ...

  5. Cementless Hydroxyapatite Coated Hip Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Antonio; Mateo, Jesús; Gil-Albarova, Jorge; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Gabarre, Sergio; Más, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    More than twenty years ago, hydroxyapatite (HA), calcium phosphate ceramics, was introduced as a coating for cementless hip prostheses. The choice of this ceramic is due to its composition being similar to organic apatite bone crystals. This ceramic is biocompatible, bioactive, and osteoconductive. These qualities facilitate the primary stability and osseointegration of implants. Our surgical experience includes the implantation of more than 4,000 cementless hydroxyapatite coated hip prostheses since 1990. The models implanted are coated with HA in the acetabulum and in the metaphyseal area of the stem. The results corresponding to survival and stability of implants were very satisfactory in the long-term. From our experience, HA-coated hip implants are a reliable alternative which can achieve long term survival, provided that certain requirements are met: good design selection, sound choice of bearing surfaces based on patient life expectancy, meticulous surgical technique, and indications based on adequate bone quality. PMID:25802848

  6. [An assistant artificial hip joint].

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhen-man; Chen, Jian-chang; Shi, Jiang; Chen, Wenhong; Zhang, Chunhao

    2002-01-01

    The assistant artificial hip joint (AAHJ) is a new impermanent hip support implanted in the body. It is used for treatment of ischemic necrosis of the femoral head at the early stage. It reserves the natural femoral head, increases its containment and decreases its load, thus makes the recovery of the necrosed femoral head. The AAHJ's moving axis center is the same as that of the femoral head. Therefore, the moving range of the hip joint is very close to the normal postoperatively. The patient can walk with loading in 3 weeks after the surgical operation, and can regain his (or her) daily work and life in 2 to 3 months of the operation. The AAHJ's structure is simple and the price is cheap. PMID:16104164

  7. [Traumatic hip dislocation in childhood].

    PubMed

    Stachel, P; Hofmann-v Kap-herr, S; Schild, H

    1989-06-01

    The article reports on eight cases of traumatic dislocation of the hip in children. Six of these were genuine dislocations and two dislocation fractures. The children were between 5 and 13 years of age at the time of injury. Seven of these 8 children could be followed up one to 21 years after the accident. All 7 children were free from complaints at the time of follow-up examination; in one case only we found a moderate loss of function in the injured hip joint. In this patient the x-ray film showed deformation of the head of the femur after partial necrosis of the femoral head, as well as initial signs of coxarthrosis. Prognosis of this rare injury in children is favourable if repositioning is performed in time and if relief of the hip is effected for the proper period of time, depending on the individual case. PMID:2665382

  8. Subspine Hip Impingement: An Unusual Cause of Hip Pain in an Elite Weightlifter.

    PubMed

    Nabhan, Dustin C; Moreau, William J; McNamara, Shannen C; Briggs, Karen K; Philippon, Marc J

    2016-01-01

    Anterior hip pain can be difficult to diagnose due to the many pathologies and overlapping pain patterns that exist in the hip region. Clinical findings of pain at the anterior inferior iliac spine with passive hip flexion, proximal quadriceps pain and weakness, and painful impingement tests of the hip may be indicative of subspine hip impingement. This report describes the diagnosis and treatment of anterior hip pain, including subspine impingement and femoroacetabular impingement in an elite weightlifter. This case also describes how with the correct diagnosis and treatment, the athlete returned to play to her previous level of sport 11 months after a complex hip injury. PMID:27618239

  9. The use of hip arthroscopy in the management of the pediatric hip.

    PubMed

    Roy, Dennis R

    2016-07-01

    Arthroscopy of the pediatric hip began in 1977 with a publication by Gross. Interest was relatively slow to develop in the 1980s and 1990s. Coupled with the success of hip arthroscopy in the adult, interest heightened in applying the procedure to a variety of pediatric hip disorders, given that the alternative was an open surgical hip dislocation. The success of this initial group of pediatric hip arthroscopist's has further expanded the application of hip arthroscopy as the primary or adjunct procedure for the management of intra-articular problems of the pediatric hip. PMID:27583144

  10. The use of hip arthroscopy in the management of the pediatric hip

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Dennis R.

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopy of the pediatric hip began in 1977 with a publication by Gross. Interest was relatively slow to develop in the 1980s and 1990s. Coupled with the success of hip arthroscopy in the adult, interest heightened in applying the procedure to a variety of pediatric hip disorders, given that the alternative was an open surgical hip dislocation. The success of this initial group of pediatric hip arthroscopist’s has further expanded the application of hip arthroscopy as the primary or adjunct procedure for the management of intra-articular problems of the pediatric hip. PMID:27583144

  11. Hip-Hop and the Academic Canon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abe, Daudi

    2009-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, the hip-hop movement has risen from the margins to become the preeminent force in US popular culture. In more recent times academics have begun to harness the power of hip-hop culture and use it as a means of infusing transformative knowledge into the mainstream academic discourse. On many college campuses, hip-hop's…

  12. Management of Periprosthetic Hip Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Dong; Prashant, Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Total hip joint replacement offers dramatic improvement in the quality of life but periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is the most devastating complication of this procedure. The infection threatens the function of the joint, the preservation of the limb, and occasionally even the life of the patient due to long term hospitalization and high cost. For the surgeon it is a disastrous burden, which requires repeated, complicated procedures to eradicate infection and to provide a mobile joint without pain. Yet in the absence of a true gold standard, the diagnosis of PJI can be elusive. Synovial fluid aspiration, diagnostic imaging, traditional culture, peripheral serum inflammatory markers, and intraoperative frozen sections each have their limitations but continue to be the mainstay for diagnosis of PJI. Treatment options mainly include thorough irrigation and debridement with prosthesis retention, or a two-stage prosthesis exchange with intervening placement of an antibiotic-loaded spacer. Success in treating PJI depends on extensive surgical debridement and adequate and effective antibiotic therapy. Treatment in two stages using a spacer is recommended for most chronic PJI. Debridement, antibiotics and implant retention is the obvious choice for treatment of acute PJI, with good success rates in selected patients. This article presents an overview of recent management concepts for PJI of the hip emphasizing diagnosis and the clinical approach, and also share own experience at our institution.

  13. Perioperative implications of surgery in elderly patients with hip fractures: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    White, Jonathan J E; Khan, Wasim S; Smitham, Peter J

    2011-06-01

    Hip fracture is a major cause of morbidity, mortality and loss of independence for the elderly. Surgical fixation of the fractured hip remains the standard of care to allow for early mobilisation and a return to independence. Operative management in this population carries its own set of problems. The altered physiological state of the older person, often coupled with significant comorbidity, can present challenges for the anaesthetist, the surgeon and the rest of the perioperative team. This article provides an evidence-based review of the important perioperative factors associated with hip fractures in the older person and their management. PMID:21823308

  14. Treatment and prevention of hip dysplasia in infants and young children.

    PubMed

    Judd, Julia; Clarke, Nicholas M P

    2014-11-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip in the infant are uniform, with consensus that diagnostic ultrasound and Pavlik harness management are standard procedures. Sequential procedures for failed early treatment, residual dysplasia and late diagnosis are dependent on the age and the severity of the dysplasia. This paper reviews the treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip from birth to subsequent follow-up procedures, with particular reference to some of the senior authors' research and the Southampton approach to the management of hip dysplasia. PMID:25218939

  15. Hip Squeaking after Ceramic-on-ceramic Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Liang; Zhu, Wei; Zhao, Yan; Ma, Qi; Weng, Xi-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed to review the characteristics and influencing factors of squeaking after ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) total hip arthroplasty (THA) and to analyze the possible mechanisms of the audible noise. Data Sources: The data analyzed in this review were based on articles from PubMed and Web of Science. Study Selection: The articles selected for review were original articles and reviews found based on the following search terms: “total hip arthroplasty”, “ceramic-on-ceramic”, “hip squeaking”, and “hip noise.” Results: The mechanism of the squeaking remains unknown. The possible explanations included stripe wear, edge loading, a third body, fracture of the ceramic liner, and resonance of the prosthesis components. Squeaking occurrence is influenced by patient, surgical, and implant factors. Conclusions: Most studies indicated that squeaking after CoC THA was the consequence of increasing wear or impingement, caused by prosthesis design, patient characteristics, or surgical factors. However, as conflicts exist among different articles, the major reasons for the squeaking remain to be identified. PMID:27453238

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of HipA Mediated Multidrug Tolerance and its Neutralization by HipB

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Maria A.; Piro, Kevin M.; Xu, Weijun; Hansen, Sonja; Lewis, Kim; Brennan, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Bacterial multidrug tolerance is largely responsible for the inability of antibiotics to eradicate infections and is caused by a small population of dormant bacteria called persisters. HipA is a critical Escherichia coli persistence factor that is normally neutralized by HipB, a transcription repressor, which also regulates hipBA expression. Here we report multiple structures of HipA and a HipA-HipB-DNA complex. HipA has a eukaryotic Ser/Thr kinase-like fold and can phosphorylate the translation factor, EF-Tu, suggesting a persistence mechanism via cell stasis. The HipA-HipB-DNA structure reveals the HipB-operator binding mechanism, ~70° DNA bending and unexpected HipA-DNA contacts. Dimeric HipB interacts with two HipA molecules to inhibit its kinase activity through sequestration and conformational inactivation. Combined, these studies suggest mechanisms for HipA-mediated persistence and its neutralization by HipB. PMID:19150849

  17. [Congenital hip dysplasia, screening and therapy].

    PubMed

    Kolb, A; Windhager, R; Chiari, C

    2015-11-01

    Congenital hip dysplasia and hip dislocation are relatively common pathological conditions of the musculoskeletal system in infants. An early and certain diagnosis can now be achieved by sonographic hip screening within the framework of screening examination programs. This early diagnostic procedure in infants is essential particularly for a conservative treatment strategy. Therefore, apart from possessing in-depth knowledge, training of the examiner in specialist courses is of central importance. This article presents an overview of the entity of congenital hip dysplasia and hip dislocation, the diagnostics and treatment with special emphasis on recent developments. PMID:26489825

  18. Hip pain and childhood malignancy.

    PubMed

    Wong, M; Chung, C H; Ngai, W K

    2002-12-01

    In children, neuroblastoma can mimic various orthopaedic pathologies and this may create difficulties for doctors in reaching the correct diagnosis. Stage IV neuroblastoma was initially diagnosed as transient synovitis in this case report of a 7-year-old girl presenting with hip and low back pain. PMID:12459605

  19. Hip-Hop Pop Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Clarence, Sr.

    2011-01-01

    Art has a way of helping students better understand and appreciate the world around them, particularly the things that are most important to them. Hip hop is one of those generational genres that capture the attention of young students like few other things do. Drawing on this genre to get students to create art is an excellent way to demonstrate…

  20. Neurovascular Injury in Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Neurological and vascular complications following hip arthroplasty are uncommon, and their impact ranges from transient and trivial to permanent and devastating. The proximity of neural and vascular structures makes any operation on the hip potentially hazardous. Direct or indirect injuries of these structures may occur during operative exposure and subsequent procedures. Thus, complete awareness of the anatomy of the pelvis and proximal femur is required. Peripheral nerve injuries can involve either distant sites or nerves in the immediate vicinity of the hip joint. Sciatic nerve injury is the most common nerve injury following total hip arthroplasty. Femoral nerve injury is much less common and is associated with an anterior approach. Its diagnosis is often delayed, but the prognosis is generally better than with sciatic nerve injury. The superior gluteal nerve is at risk during the direct lateral approach. Obturator nerve injury is the least common type of injury and has the least functional consequences. Vascular injuries are less common but more immediately life threatening. The mechanisms of vascular injury include occlusion associated with preexisting peripheral vascular disease and vascular injury during removal of cement during screw fixation of acetabular components, cages, or structural grafts. It is critical to avoid the anterior quadrants for acetabular screw fixation. All acetabular and femoral defects should be bone-grafted to avoid inadvertent cement migration. Following these guidelines, surgeons should be able to offer the most appropriate treatment and counseling to the patients.

  1. Sports hip injuries: assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Bryan T; Maak, Travis G; Larson, Christopher M; Bedi, Asheesh; Zaltz, Ira

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, the understanding, assessment, and management of hip pain and injuries in the athlete have improved. Traditionally, the evaluation of hip pain and injuries was limited to obvious disorders, such as hip arthritis and fractures, or disorders that were previously considered to be simply soft-tissue strains and contusions, such as groin pulls, hip pointers, and bursitis. Two parallel tracks of progress have improved understanding of the complexities of hip joint athletic injuries and the biomechanical basis of early hip disease. In the field of sports medicine, improved diagnostic skills now allow better interpretation of debilitating intra-articular hip disorders and their effects on core performance. In the field of hip preservation, there has been an evolution in understanding the effects of biomechanical mismatches between the femoral head and the acetabulum on the development of early hip damage, injury, and arthritis. The integration of these two parallel fields has accelerated the understanding of the importance of hip biomechanics and early hip injury in human performance and function. PMID:23395055

  2. Hip Imaging in Athletes: Sports Imaging Series.

    PubMed

    Agten, Christoph A; Sutter, Reto; Buck, Florian M; Pfirrmann, Christian W A

    2016-08-01

    Hip or groin pain in athletes is common and clinical presentation is often nonspecific. Imaging is a very important diagnostic step in the work-up of athletes with hip pain. This review article provides an overview on hip biomechanics and discusses strategies for hip imaging modalities such as radiography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MR arthrography and traction MR arthrography). The authors explain current concepts of femoroacetabular impingement and the problem of high prevalence of cam- and pincer-type morphology in asymptomatic persons. With the main focus on MR imaging, the authors present abnormalities of the hip joint and the surrounding soft tissues that can occur in athletes: intraarticular and extraarticular hip impingement syndromes, labral and cartilage disease, microinstability of the hip, myotendinous injuries, and athletic pubalgia. (©) RSNA, 2016. PMID:27429142

  3. Techniques and Results for Open Hip Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David M.; Hellman, Michael D.; Haughom, Bryan; Stover, Michael D.; Nho, Shane J.

    2015-01-01

    While hip arthroscopy grows in popularity, there are still many circumstances under which open hip preservation is the most appropriately indicated. This article specifically reviews open hip preservation procedures for a variety of hip conditions. Femoral acetabular impingement may be corrected using an open surgical hip dislocation. Acetabular dysplasia may be corrected using a periacetabular osteotomy. Acetabular protrusio may require surgical hip dislocation with rim trimming and a possible valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy. Legg–Calve–Perthes disease produces complex deformities that may be better served with osteotomies of the proximal femur and/or acetabulum. Chronic slipped capital femoral epiphysis may also benefit from a surgical hip dislocation and/or proximal femoral osteotomy. PMID:26649292

  4. Biotribology of artificial hip joints

    PubMed Central

    Di Puccio, Francesca; Mattei, Lorenza

    2015-01-01

    Hip arthroplasty can be considered one of the major successes of orthopedic surgery, with more than 350000 replacements performed every year in the United States with a constantly increasing rate. The main limitations to the lifespan of these devices are due to tribological aspects, in particular the wear of mating surfaces, which implies a loss of matter and modification of surface geometry. However, wear is a complex phenomenon, also involving lubrication and friction. The present paper deals with the tribological performance of hip implants and is organized in to three main sections. Firstly, the basic elements of tribology are presented, from contact mechanics of ball-in-socket joints to ultra high molecular weight polyethylene wear laws. Some fundamental equations are also reported, with the aim of providing the reader with some simple tools for tribological investigations. In the second section, the focus moves to artificial hip joints, defining materials and geometrical properties and discussing their friction, lubrication and wear characteristics. In particular, the features of different couplings, from metal-on-plastic to metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic, are discussed as well as the role of the head radius and clearance. How friction, lubrication and wear are interconnected and most of all how they are specific for each loading and kinematic condition is highlighted. Thus, the significant differences in patients and their lifestyles account for the high dispersion of clinical data. Furthermore, such consideration has raised a new discussion on the most suitable in vitro tests for hip implants as simplified gait cycles can be too far from effective implant working conditions. In the third section, the trends of hip implants in the years from 2003 to 2012 provided by the National Joint Registry of England, Wales and Northern Ireland are summarized and commented on in a discussion. PMID:25621213

  5. THE NATURE OF THE HYPER-RUNAWAY CANDIDATE HIP 60350

    SciTech Connect

    Irrgang, Andreas; Przybilla, Norbert; Heber, Ulrich; Fernanda Nieva, M.; Schuh, Sonja

    2010-03-01

    Young, massive stars in the Galactic halo are widely supposed to be the result of an ejection event from the Galactic disk forcing some stars to leave their place of birth as so-called runaway stars. Here, we present a detailed spectroscopic and kinematic analysis of the runaway B star HIP 60350 to determine which runaway scenario-a supernova explosion disrupting a binary system or dynamical interaction in star clusters-may be responsible for HIP 60350's peculiar orbit. Based on a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium approach, a high-resolution optical echelle spectrum was examined to revise spectroscopic quantities and for the first time to perform a differential chemical abundance analysis with respect to the B-type star 18 Peg. The results together with proper motions from the Hipparcos Catalog further allowed the three-dimensional kinematics of the star to be studied numerically. The abundances derived for HIP 60350 are consistent with a slightly supersolar metallicity agreeing with the kinematically predicted place of birth {approx}6 kpc away from the Galactic center. However, they do not exclude the possibility of an alpha-enhanced abundance pattern expected in the case of the supernova scenario. Its outstanding high Galactic rest-frame velocity of 530 +- 35 km s{sup -1} is a consequence of ejection in the direction of Galactic rotation and slightly exceeds the local Galactic escape velocity in a standard Galactic potential. Hence, HIP 60350 may be unbound to the Galaxy.

  6. Relationship between pelvic incidence and osteoarthritis of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, D. S.; Bohl, M. S.; Liu, R. W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Sagittal alignment of the lumbosacral spine, and specifically pelvic incidence (PI), has been implicated in the development of spine pathology, but generally ignored with regards to diseases of the hip. We aimed to determine if increased PI is correlated with higher rates of hip osteoarthritis (HOA). The effect of PI on the development of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) was used as a negative control. Methods We studied 400 well-preserved cadaveric skeletons ranging from 50 to 79 years of age at death. Each specimen’s OA of the hip and knee were graded using a previously described method. PI was measured from standardised lateral photographs of reconstructed pelvises. Multiple regression analysis was performed to determine the relationship between age and PI with HOA and KOA. Results The mean age was 60.2 years (standard deviation (sd) 8.1), and the mean PI was 46.7° (sd 10.7°). Multiple regression analysis demonstrated a significant correlation between increased PI and HOA (standardised beta = 0.103, p = 0.017). There was no correlation between PI and KOA (standardised beta = 0.003, p = 0.912). Conclusion Higher PI in the younger individual may contribute to the development of HOA in later life. Cite this article: Dr J. J. Gebhart. Relationship between pelvic incidence and osteoarthritis of the hip. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:66–72. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.52.2000552. PMID:26912384

  7. Prophylactic antibiotics in elective hip and knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hickson, C. J.; Metcalfe, D.; Elgohari, S.; Oswald, T.; Masters, J. P.; Rymaszewska, M.; Reed, M. R.; Sprowson†, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We wanted to investigate regional variations in the organisms reported to be causing peri-prosthetic infections and to report on prophylaxis regimens currently in use across England. Methods Analysis of data routinely collected by Public Health England’s (PHE) national surgical site infection database on elective primary hip and knee arthroplasty procedures between April 2010 and March 2013 to investigate regional variations in causative organisms. A separate national survey of 145 hospital Trusts (groups of hospitals under local management) in England routinely performing primary hip and/or knee arthroplasty was carried out by standard email questionnaire. Results Analysis of 189 858 elective primary hip and knee arthroplasty procedures and 1116 surgical site infections found statistically significant variations for some causative organism between regions. There was a 100% response rate to the prophylaxis questionnaire that showed substantial variation between individual trust guidelines. A number of regimens currently in use are inconsistent with the best available evidence. Conclusions The approach towards antibiotic prophylaxis in elective arthroplasty nationwide reveals substantial variation without clear justification. Only seven causative organisms are responsible for 89% of infections affecting primary hip and knee arthroplasty, which cannot justify such widespread variation between prophylactic antibiotic policies. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:181–189. PMID:26585304

  8. Frontal plane kinematics of the hip during running: Are they related to hip anatomy and strength?

    PubMed

    Baggaley, Michael; Noehren, Brian; Clasey, Jody L; Shapiro, Robert; Pohl, Michael B

    2015-10-01

    Excessive hip adduction has been associated with a number of lower extremity overuse running injuries. The excessive motion has been suggested to be the result of reduced strength of the hip abductor musculature. Hip anatomical alignment has been postulated to influence hip abduction (HABD) strength and thus may impact hip adduction during running. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between hip anatomy, HABD strength, and frontal plane kinematics during running. Peak isometric HABD strength, 3D lower extremity kinematics during running, femoral neck-shaft angle (NSA), and pelvis width-femur length (PW-FL) ratio were recorded for 25 female subjects. Pearson correlations (p<0.05) were performed between variables. A fair relationship was observed between femoral NSA and HABD strength (r=-0.47, p=0.02) where an increased NSA was associated with reduced HABD strength. No relationship was observed between HABD strength and hip adduction during running. None of the anatomical measurements, NSA or PW-FL, were associated with hip adduction during running. Deviations in the femoral NSA have a limited ability to influence peak isometric hip abduction strength or frontal plane hip kinematics during running. Hip abduction strength does also not appear to be linked with changes in hip kinematics. These findings in healthy individuals question whether excessive hip adduction typically seen in female runners with overuse injuries is caused by deviations in hip abduction strength or anatomical structure. PMID:26364243

  9. Estimates of genetic parameters for hip and elbow dysplasia in Finnish Rottweilers.

    PubMed

    Mäki, K; Liinamo, A E; Ojala, M

    2000-05-01

    Data from 2,764 Rottweiler dogs born from 1987 to 1996 were analyzed with a Restricted Maximum Likelihood procedure using a mixed linear animal model to obtain variance component estimates for hip and elbow dysplasia. The data included 2,764 hip dysplasia and 2,278 elbow dysplasia records. Hip joints were scored as normal (0), borderline (1), slight (2), moderate (3), and severe (4, 4.5, and 5) hip dysplasia. Elbow joints were graded normal or borderline (0), slight (1), moderate (2), and severe (3) elbow dysplasia. The mean for the hip scores was 1.07 and for the elbow scores .60. Environmental effects influencing hip dysplasia were age, birth year, birth year x season interaction, and experience of the veterinarian responsible for x-raying the dog. For elbow dysplasia, statistically significant effects were age, birth year, sex of the dog, and panelist responsible for each screening. Estimates of heritability for hip and elbow dysplasia were .58 +/- .04 and .31 +/- .04, respectively, with a genetic correlation of .37 +/- .08 between the traits. Genetic improvement of almost one genetic standard deviation was observed in both traits during the 10 yr covered by the data. PMID:10834565

  10. Minimally invasive dynamic hip screw for fixation of hip fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Michael; Garau, Giorgio; Walley, Gayle; Oliva, Francesco; Panni, Alfredo Schiavone; Longo, Umile Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    We compared a minimally invasive surgical technique to the conventional (open approach) surgical technique used in fixation of hip fractures with the dynamic hip screw (DHS) device. Using a case-control design (44 cases and 44 controls), we tested the null hypothesis that there is no difference between the two techniques in the following outcome measures: duration of surgery, time to mobilisation and weight bearing postoperatively, length of hospital stay, mean difference of pre- and postoperative haemoglobin levels, position of the lag screw of the DHS device in the femoral head, and the tip–apex distance. The minimally invasive DHS technique had significantly shorter duration of surgery and length of hospital stay. There was also less blood loss in the minimally invasive DHS technique. The minimally invasive DHS technique produces better outcome measures in the operating time, length of hospital stay, and blood loss compared to the conventional approach while maintaining equal fixation stability. PMID:18478227

  11. Economic viability of geriatric hip fracture centers.

    PubMed

    Clement, R Carter; Ahn, Jaimo; Mehta, Samir; Bernstein, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Management of geriatric hip fractures in a protocol-driven center can improve outcomes and reduce costs. Nonetheless, this approach has not spread as broadly as the effectiveness data would imply. One possible explanation is that operating such a center is not perceived as financially worthwhile. To assess the economic viability of dedicated hip fracture centers, the authors built a financial model to estimate profit as a function of costs, reimbursement, and patient volume in 3 settings: an average US hip fracture program, a highly efficient center, and an academic hospital without a specific hip fracture program. Results were tested with sensitivity analysis. A local market analysis was conducted to assess the feasibility of supporting profitable hip fracture centers. The results demonstrate that hip fracture treatment only becomes profitable when the annual caseload exceeds approximately 72, assuming costs characteristic of a typical US hip fracture program. The threshold of profitability is 49 cases per year for high-efficiency hip fracture centers and 151 for the urban academic hospital under review. The largest determinant of profit is reimbursement, followed by costs and volume. In the authors’ home market, 168 hospitals offer hip fracture care, yet 85% fall below the 72-case threshold. Hip fracture centers can be highly profitable through low costs and, especially, high revenues. However, most hospitals likely lose money by offering hip fracture care due to inadequate volume. Thus, both large and small facilities would benefit financially from the consolidation of hip fracture care at dedicated hip fracture centers. Typical US cities have adequate volume to support several such centers. PMID:24579222

  12. Total hip replacement for developmental dysplasia of hip and postoperative nursing.

    PubMed

    Zong, S J; Wang, F; Hu, S L

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the clinical effect of total hip replacement for the treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) and analyze the postoperative nursing. Sixty patients (78 hips) aged 18-75 years (average 58.6±2.31 years) who received total hip replacement for treatment of DDH at the Zhengzhou People’s Hospital, Henan, China, from April 2013 to June 2016 were selected as research subjects. Twenty-four patients were male (30 hips) and 36 were female (48 hips). Of the 60 patients, according to Crowe typing, 24 were type I (30 hips), 26 were type II (34 hips), 6 were type III (8 hips) and 4 were type IV (6 hips). According to the Harris hip score system, the score of all hips was 39.46±3.56 points average (18-56 points) before treatment and resulted as 89.60±4.25 points (79-98 points) at the last follow-up, showing a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05). Complications such as wound infection, dislocation, fracture of femoral shaft, femoral nerve and injury of sciatic nerve were not found after treatment. A total of 48 cases (58 hips) obtained excellent curative results (93.33% recovery), 8 cases (14 hips) good (92.31% recovery), and 4 cases (6 hips) medium. Total hip replacement proved to be effective in treating DDH and secondary osteoarthritis. Moreover, soft tissue release and an optimum degree recovery of anatomic form and physiological function of the diseased hip is an important basis for reconstructing the acetabulum and stabilizing acetabulum prosthesis. PMID:27049089

  13. Cover Story: The Miseducation of Hip-Hop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evelyn, Jamilah

    2000-01-01

    Some higher education officials believe that hip-hop music is eating away at the morals, and ultimately the classroom experience, of today's college students. Discusses why the gap exists between student and faculty attitudes toward hip-hop, how hip-hop music represents blackness, how people perceive hip-hop youth, the positive side of hip-hop,…

  14. [Avascular necrosis of the hip - diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Drescher, W; Pufe, T; Smeets, R; Eisenhart-Rothe, R V; Jäger, M; Tingart, M

    2011-04-01

    Femoral head necrosis is an ischaemic bone necrosis of traumatic or nontraumatic pathogenesis which can lead to hip joint destruction in young age. It is today the indication for 10 % of all the total hip joint replacements. Known aetiologies of nontraumatic femoral head necrosis are alcoholism, steroids, sickle cell anaemia, caisson, and Gaucher's disease. Further risk factors are chemotherapy, chronic inflammatory bowel disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, and multiple sclerosis, in which also steroids are involved. Gravidity is another risk factor, but still idiopathic pathogenesis is found. In diagnosis, the ARCO-classification of the Association for the Research of Osseous Circulation is essential. While stage 0 can only be found histologically, the reversible early stage 1 shows MR signal changes. In the irreversible early stage 2, first native x-ray changes are seen as lower radiolucency reflects new bone apposition on dead trabeculae. In stage 3, subchondral fracture follows, and in stage 4 secondary arthritis of the hip. Established therapy in stage 1 is core decompression, physiotherapy, and more and more also bisphosphonates. Sufficient data to support extracorporeal shock wave therapy are still lacking. Stem cell therapy seems to be a promising new therapy method in stage 2. In stage 2 and 3 mainly proximal femoral osteotomies and (non)vascularised bone transplantation are performed. In stage 4, depending on size and location of the necrotic zone and pathology of the adjacent bone, resurfacing or short stem hip arthroplasty can be performed. However, conventional THA is still golden standard. The problem and challenge, however, is the often young patient age in femoral head necrosis. Especially chemotherapy-associated osteonecrosis in leukaemia is found in patients in their second decade of life. Therefore, the hip should be preserved as long as possible. PMID:21469042

  15. Finding the right hip implant for patient and surgeon: the Dutch strategy--empowering patients.

    PubMed

    Poolman, Rudolf W; Verhaar, Jan A N; Schreurs, B Willem; Bom, L Paul A; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Koot, Henk W J; Goosen, Jon H M; Verheyen, Cees C P M

    2015-01-01

    We describe the implementation process of hip prostheses selection in the Netherlands. The recent problems with large head metal-on-metal hip prostheses resulted in substantial damage to the surgeons' credibility and reputation in the media. This led to a true sense of urgency among orthopaedic surgeons to increase their activities to secure patient safety. The board of the Dutch Orthopaedic Association (NOV) in the Netherlands established a Dutch Hip Task Force (DHTF) with the explicit assignment of formulating criteria to classify the quality of total hip implants on the Dutch market based on survivorship. The aim was to offer unequivocal information enabling a balanced choice of total hip prosthesis. The ultimate goal of the NOV is that all implanted total hip prostheses implanted in the Netherlands are based on reliable clinical evidence. The DHTF decided to adapt the principles of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE, UK) (www.nice.org.uk). The taskforce uses data from the registries as well as the Orthopaedic Data Evaluation Panel (ODEP). If the ODEP guidelines had been chosen as standard alone, one quarter of our listed hip components would not have been included. In our view this underlines the strength in the Dutch approach where high quality registry data and ODEP ratings are complementary and result in a list of reliable hip prostheses. Most importantly we offer patients insights into the known quality of the implants by sharing the results of our implant review. This will facilitate shared decision making by empowering patients in their knowledge on available hip arthroplasties. PMID:25633758

  16. Tantalum as a buffer layer in diamond-like carbon coated artificial hip joints.

    PubMed

    Kiuru, Mirjami; Alakoski, Esa; Tiainen, Veli-Matti; Lappalainen, Reijo; Anttila, Asko

    2003-07-15

    The acid resistance of tantalum coated and uncoated human hip joint prostheses was studied with commercial CrCoMo acetabular cups. The samples were exposed to 10% HCl solution and the quantities of dissolved Cr, Co, and Mo were measured with proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). The absolute quantities were obtained with the use of Cr and Se solution standards. Tantalum coatings (thicknesses 4-6 microm) were prepared in vacuum with magnetron sputtering. Tantalum coating decreased the corrosion rate by a factor of 10(6). As a spinoff from recent wear tests on artificial hip joints it was shown that tantalum has excellent mechanical properties as an intermediate layer of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings. When tantalum was tested together with DLC on three metal-on-metal hip joint pairs in a hip simulator, no observable defects occurred during 15 million walking cycles with a periodic 50-300-kg load (Paul curve). PMID:12808604

  17. A Hip Implant Energy Harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancharoen, K.; Zhu, D.; Beeby, S. P.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a kinetic energy harvester designed to be embedded in a hip implant which aims to operate at a low frequency associated with body motion of patients. The prototype is designed based on the constrained volume available in a hip prosthesis and the challenge is to harvest energy from low frequency movements (< 1 Hz) which is an average frequency during free walking of a patient. The concept of magnetic-force-driven energy harvesting is applied to this prototype considering the hip movements during routine activities of patients. The magnetic field within the harvester was simulated using COMSOL. The simulated resonant frequency was around 30 Hz and the voltage induced in a coil was predicted to be 47.8 mV. A prototype of the energy harvester was fabricated and tested. A maximum open circuit voltage of 39.43 mV was obtained and the resonant frequency of 28 Hz was observed. Moreover, the power output of 0.96 μW was achieved with an optimum resistive load of 250Ω.

  18. Total hip replacement in dancers.

    PubMed

    Buyls, Inge R A E; Rietveld, A B M Boni; Ourila, Tiia; Emerton, Mark E; Bird, H A

    2013-04-01

    A case report of a professional contemporary dancer who successfully returned to the stage after bilateral total hip replacements (THR) for osteoarthritis is presented, together with her own commentary and a retrospective cohort study of total hip replacements in dancers. In the presented cohort, there were no post-operative dislocations or infections, the original pain had been relieved, rehabilitation was objectively normal and all resumed their dance (teaching) activities. Nevertheless, they were disappointed about the prolonged rehabilitation. Due to their high demands as professional dancers, post-operative expectations were too optimistic in view of the usual quick and favourable results of THR in the older and less physically active, general population. In all dancers with unilateral osteoarthritis, the left hip was involved, which may reflect the tendency to use the left leg as standing leg and be suggestive that strenuous physical activity may lead to osteoarthritis. Better rehabilitation guidelines are needed for dancer patients undergoing THR, especially drawing their attention to realistic post-operative expectations. PMID:23588878

  19. Posterior Hip Pain in an Athletic Population

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Slabaugh, Mark A.; Grumet, Robert C.; Virkus, Walter W.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Posterior hip pain is a relatively uncommon but increasingly recognized complaint in the orthopaedic community. Patient complaints and presentations are often vague or nonspecific, making diagnosis and subsequent treatment decisions difficult. The purposes of this article are to review the anatomy and pathophysiology related to posterior hip pain in the athletic patient population. Evidence Acquisition: Data were collected through a thorough review of the literature via a MEDLINE search of all relevant articles between 1980 and 2010. Results: Many patients who complain of posterior hip pain actually have pain referred from another part of the body—notably, the lumbar spine or sacroiliac joint. Treatment options for posterior hip pain are typically nonoperative; however, surgery is warranted in some cases. Conclusions: Recent advancements in the understanding of hip anatomy, pathophysiology, and treatment options have enabled physicians to better diagnosis athletic hip injuries and select patients for appropriate treatment. PMID:23015944

  20. Routine Complete Capsular Closure During Hip Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Joshua D.; Slikker, William; Gupta, Anil K.; McCormick, Frank M.; Nho, Shane J.

    2013-01-01

    The utility of hip arthroscopy has recently progressed beyond diagnostic to therapeutic purposes addressing central and peripheral compartment pathologies. Capsulotomy provides freedom of visualization and instrumentation. The contribution to hip stability of both dynamic and static hip structures is not fully understood. However, both basic science biomechanical and clinical outcome studies have exhibited a relevant role of the capsule in hip stability. Though rare, iatrogenic post-arthroscopy subluxation and dislocation have been reported. Therefore many surgeons have cautioned against aggressive capsulotomy or capsulectomy without repair, because of the potential for precipitation of iatrogenic hip instability. We typically perform a “T” capsulotomy and recommend complete capsular closure in conjunction with labral repair and osseous femoral and acetabular treatment. A safe, efficient, and effective method to accomplish complete capsular closure is presented to reduce iatrogenic postoperative hip instability. PMID:23875156

  1. Design and Implementation of a Home-Based Exercise Program Post-Hip Fracture: The Baltimore Hip Studies Experience

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Yahiro, Janet A.; Resnick, Barbara; Orwig, Denise; Hicks, Gregory; Magaziner, Jay

    2009-01-01

    Objective The objectives are to describe for the first time a home-based exercise intervention for frail elderly hip fracture patients and to describe the feasibility of this exercise program. Design A home-based exercise program was used in a randomized controlled trial in which the authors investigated exercise intervention versus no exercise intervention in patients after hip fracture. Setting This program was implemented at the patients’ own home or place of residence after discharge. Participants Women 65 years of age or older were recruited within 15 days of hip fracture. Eligible patients were those with a nonpathologic fracture who were admitted within 72 hours of injury, had surgical repair of the hip fracture, and met medical inclusion criteria. Participants initially were randomized to exercise groups and then assigned to exercise trainers. Intervention The exercise contained strength training and aerobic components. Participants were expected to exercise 5 days per week by performing a combination of supervised and independently performed exercise sessions. Intensity and duration were increased gradually by trainers in a standardized way. The frequency of the supervised sessions decreased as participants became more independent. Treatment fidelity visits ensured that the intervention was being delivered as intended across trainers and across participants. Main Outcome Measurement This work describes the feasibility and challenges of administering an intensive home-based exercise program in this population of older adults. Results Of those patients randomized to exercise, 82% were followed by a trainer and almost all advanced to higher levels in both aerobic and strength programs. Overall, participants received an average of 44 (78.5%) of the prescribed visits by the trainer. Conclusions This study showed that it was possible to engage a frail older population of post-hip fracture patients in a program of aerobic and strength training exercise with a

  2. Chondral Lesions of the Hip.

    PubMed

    Logan, Zachariah S; Redmond, John M; Spelsberg, Sarah C; Jackson, Timothy J; Domb, Benjamin G

    2016-07-01

    The treatment of chondral hip injuries is challenging. However, for young patients with hip disorders, orthopedic surgeons now have the opportunity to intervene early in the development of debilitating joint disease. As understanding of the hip joint continues to evolve, more effective treatment strategies are emerging. There are several reportedly successful options for surgical treatment. This article reviews the clinical presentation of chondral injuries and the surgical modalities, arthroscopic and open, available to treat them. PMID:27343390

  3. Pelvic Incidence in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Ibrahim J.; Rasouli, Mohammad R.; Kepler, Christopher K.; Restrepo, Santiago; Albert, Todd J.; Radcliff, Kris E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of pain and disability that results in considerable social and medical costs. Mechanics such as posture, alignment and orientation of the hips and the spinal column and the relationship between these factors have been implicated in the development of both hip and spine pathologies. This study aims to test the hypothesis if pelvic incidence varies in patients with and without osteoarthritis. We assessed the relationship between spinopelvic alignment as measured by pelvic incidence (PI) and the presence of hip OA. Methods: We collected supine pelvis CT scans of 1,012 consecutive patients not known to have hip OA. Our first group consisted of 95 patients with moderate to severe hip OA as per radiology reports. The second group included 87 patients with no evidence of hip OA. Power analysis revealed the need for 77 patients per group to find a mean difference in PI of 5° or less between both groups. Two trained physicians independently measured the PI to account for inter-observer reliability. Results: Patients with moderate to severe hip OA had a mean PI of 56.5°±12.8°. The mean PI for patients without hip OA was 57.2°±7.5°. An independent samples t-test revealed no significant difference between the PI values of the two groups. Spearman’s correlation coefficient of 0.754 demonstrated a high inter-observer reliability. Conclusion: There was no difference in PI angle of hip OA patients and “healthy” patients. Our measurements of patients without OA were almost identical to the reported normal PI values in the literature. It appears that hip OA is not associated with PI angle, refuting the hypothesis made in previous studies, stating that elevated PI contributes to the future development of hip arthritis. CT scan seems to be a reliable and accurate way of assessing pelvic incidence. PMID:27200390

  4. Pediatric hip sonography. Diagnosis and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Harcke, H T; Grissom, L E

    1999-07-01

    As with any sonographic study, the accuracy of the examination is related to the skill and experience of the examiner. In this review of pediatric hip sonography, we have reviewed pitfalls and differential diagnoses for the infant suspected of DDH and for the older child presenting with a painful hip. The learning process for DDH evaluation is prolonged and more difficult than learning to assess the hip for effusion. PMID:10442081

  5. Abnormal Development of the Femoral Head Epiphysis in an Infant with no Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip Apparent on Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Atalar, Hakan; Gunay, Cuneyd; Aytekin, Mahmut Nedim

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In the investigation of hip development in newborns and infants, ultrasonography and radiography are widely used, but their optimal roles in this setting remain controversial. Case Report: Here we describe an 8.5-month-old infant who had undergone hip radiography at a primary care facility and was referred to our hospital to be evaluated for developmental dysplasia of the hip. Ultrasonography showed no developmental dysplasia of the hip according to standard criteria, but developmental retardation of the femoral head was apparent on the radiograph. Conclusion: This patient's findings demonstrate that abnormalities in femoral head epiphysis development can go undetected during routine ultrasonographic evaluations for developmental dysplasia of the hip. PMID:27298982

  6. Unilateral total hip replacement patients with symptomatic leg length inequality have abnormal hip biomechanics during walking

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junyan; McWilliams, Anthony B.; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John; Stone, Martin H.; Redmond, Anthony C.; Stewart, Todd D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptomatic leg length inequality accounts for 8.7% of total hip replacement related claims made against the UK National Health Service Litigation authority. It has not been established whether symptomatic leg length inequality patients following total hip replacement have abnormal hip kinetics during gait. Methods Hip kinetics in 15 unilateral total hip replacement patients with symptomatic leg length inequality during gait was determined through multibody dynamics and compared to 15 native hip healthy controls and 15 ‘successful’ asymptomatic unilateral total hip replacement patients. Finding More significant differences from normal were found in symptomatic leg length inequality patients than in asymptomatic total hip replacement patients. The leg length inequality patients had altered functions defined by lower gait velocity, reduced stride length, reduced ground reaction force, decreased hip range of motion, reduced hip moment and less dynamic hip force with a 24% lower heel-strike peak, 66% higher mid-stance trough and 37% lower toe-off peak. Greater asymmetry in hip contact force was also observed in leg length inequality patients. Interpretation These gait adaptions may affect the function of the implant and other healthy joints in symptomatic leg length inequality patients. This study provides important information for the musculoskeletal function and rehabilitation of symptomatic leg length inequality patients. PMID:25900447

  7. Management of Hip Pain in Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Ward, Derek; Parvizi, Javad

    2016-07-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of hip pain in the young adult remains a challenge. Recently, understanding of a few specific hip conditions has improved; most notably femoroacetabular impingement. The differential diagnosis of hip pain has also expanded significantly, offering new challenges and opportunities. Along with the diagnostic dilemma, optimal treatment strategies for many conditions have yet to be proven and are current areas of important inquiry. This article reviews the current research on hip pain in the young adult and presents an overview of diagnostic and management strategies. PMID:27241373

  8. Life Estimation of Hip Joint Prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, C.; Hirani, H.; Chawla, A.

    2014-11-01

    Hip joint is one of the largest weight-bearing structures in the human body. In the event of a failure of the natural hip joint, it is replaced with an artificial hip joint, known as hip joint prosthesis. The design of hip joint prosthesis must be such so as to resist fatigue failure of hip joint stem as well as bone cement, and minimize wear caused by sliding present between its head and socket. In the present paper an attempt is made to consider both fatigue and wear effects simultaneously in estimating functional-life of the hip joint prosthesis. The finite element modeling of hip joint prosthesis using HyperMesh™ (version 9) has been reported. The static analysis (load due to the dead weight of the body) and dynamic analysis (load due to walking cycle) have been described. Fatigue life is estimated by using the S-N curve of individual materials. To account for progressive wear of hip joint prosthesis, Archard's wear law, modifications in socket geometry and dynamic analysis have been used in a sequential manner. Using such sequential programming reduction in peak stress has been observed with increase in wear. Finally life is estimated on the basis of socket wear.

  9. Mechanical evaluation of unipolar hip spacer constructs.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Frederick J; Strauss, Eric; Wright, Kevin; Kubiak, Erik N; Di Cesare, Paul E

    2008-10-01

    The strengths of 3 hip spacer constructs--Steinmann pins, a short intramedullary nail (both cement-incorporated), and a Charnley prosthesis--were determined and compared with the strength of a commercially available hip spacer. The hip prosthesis construct was more than twice as strong as the other 2 constructs and was equivalent in strength to the commercial spacer. For spacer applications in which limited weight-bearing is anticipated, the hip prosthesis construct appears more efficacious, but its pros and cons should be compared with those of the commercial product. PMID:19081880

  10. Modular noncemented total hip arthroplasty for congenital dislocation of the hip. Case report and design rationale.

    PubMed

    Gorski, J M

    1988-03-01

    The highest rate of failure and the greatest technical difficulty in total hip arthroplasty occurs with congenital dislocation of the hip (CDH). Predisposing factors are failure to secure special femoral components to fit an extremely narrow and straight medullary cavity with space for only a very thin mantle of cement. The acetabulum is usually atrophic, and bone grafts are commonly required to support a small-diameter cup. The young age of the average patient and high levels of activity contribute to cement failure. A new modular cementless prosthesis provides excellent immediate skeletal fixation and pain relief in CDH patients. Five modular components are screwed or press-fit into bone. The modular approach facilitates implantation, reduces inventory, and is adaptable to unforeseen problems. These advantages are ordinarily absent with standard or custom cemented components. Modular components may also permit easier revision. The prosthesis is made of titanium alloy for its superalloy strength, elastic modulus, and bioinertness. By omitting the cement mantle, press-fit is obtained with the largest possible implant. The large size minimizes stem breakage in these young, small bones. Excellent short-term results suggest that modular cementless implants are indicated in some patients with CDH. PMID:3342552

  11. Hip2Norm: an object-oriented cross-platform program for 3D analysis of hip joint morphology using 2D pelvic radiographs.

    PubMed

    Zheng, G; Tannast, M; Anderegg, C; Siebenrock, K A; Langlotz, F

    2007-07-01

    We developed an object-oriented cross-platform program to perform three-dimensional (3D) analysis of hip joint morphology using two-dimensional (2D) anteroposterior (AP) pelvic radiographs. Landmarks extracted from 2D AP pelvic radiographs and optionally an additional lateral pelvic X-ray were combined with a cone beam projection model to reconstruct 3D hip joints. Since individual pelvic orientation can vary considerably, a method for standardizing pelvic orientation was implemented to determine the absolute tilt/rotation. The evaluation of anatomically morphologic differences was achieved by reconstructing the projected acetabular rim and the measured hip parameters as if obtained in a standardized neutral orientation. The program had been successfully used to interactively objectify acetabular version in hips with femoro-acetabular impingement or developmental dysplasia. Hip(2)Norm is written in object-oriented programming language C++ using cross-platform software Qt (TrollTech, Oslo, Norway) for graphical user interface (GUI) and is transportable to any platform. PMID:17499878

  12. Hip or knee replacement - after - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 7. Read More Hip joint replacement Hip pain Knee joint replacement Knee pain ... joint replacement - discharge Taking care of your new hip joint Update Date 3/5/2015 Updated by: C. ...

  13. Hip or knee replacement - before - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 7. Read More Hip joint replacement Hip pain Knee joint replacement Knee pain ... joint replacement - discharge Taking care of your new hip joint Update Date 3/5/2015 Updated by: C. ...

  14. Conventional Versus Cross-Linked Polyethylene for Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Surace, Michele F; Monestier, Luca; Vulcano, Ettore; Harwin, Steven F; Cherubino, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    The clinical and radiographic outcomes of 88 patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty with either conventional polyethylene or cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) from the same manufacturer were compared. There were no significant differences between the 2 subpopulations regarding average age, gender, side affected, or prosthetic stem and cup size. The average follow-up was 104 months (range, 55 to 131 months). To the authors' knowledge, this is the longest follow-up for this particular insert. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and then annually. Results showed that XLPE has a significantly greater wear reduction than that of standard polyethylene in primary total hip arthroplasty. At the longest available follow-up for these specific inserts, XLPE proved to be effective in reducing wear. PMID:26375527

  15. Influence of Hip-Flexion Angle on Hamstrings Isokinetic Activity in Sprinters

    PubMed Central

    Guex, Kenny; Gojanovic, Boris; Millet, Grégoire P.

    2012-01-01

    sprint-specific hip-flexion angles (70° to 80°) could help prevent hamstrings injuries in sprinters. Moreover, hamstrings-to-quadriceps ratio assessment should be standardized at 80° of hip flexion. PMID:22889654

  16. Bipolar hip arthroplasty as salvage treatment for loosening of the acetabular cup with significant bone defects

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Glase, Almuth; Zajonz, Dirk; Roth, Andreas; Heyde, Christoph-E.; Josten, Christoph; von Salis-Soglio, Georg

    2016-01-01

    well as subjective pain relief in the majority of patients. We clearly achieved clinically satisfactory results in 14 patients. Conclusion: Bipolar hip arthroplasty is by no means to be regarded as standard procedure in revision surgery of THR. It provides an option or salvage procedure for patients with poor general condition in whom the quickest possible surgical intervention preserving mobility is required. This is particularly true for multi-morbid patients in whom sufficient acetabular fixation is not possible. PMID:27110478

  17. Alumina-on-alumina total hip prostheses in patients 40 years of age or younger.

    PubMed

    Bizot, P; Banallec, L; Sedel, L; Nizard, R

    2000-10-01

    To avoid the consequences of polyethylene wear in a high-risk population, 128 alumina-on-alumina total hip arthroplasties have been done in 104 consecutive patients. The maximum age of patients was 40 years. The main preoperative diagnoses were osteonecrosis and sequellae of congenital hip dislocation (71% of the hips). The same titanium alloy cemented stem was implanted in all of the hips. Four types of alumina acetabular component fixations were used: a cemented plain alumina socket (41 hips), a screw-in ring with an alumina insert (22 hips), a press-fit plain alumina socket (32 hips), and a press-fit titanium metal back with an alumina insert (33 hips). Eight patients (11 hips) died during the followup period. Sixteen revisions have been documented, 12 for acetabular aseptic loosening, three for bipolar loosening (two of which were septic), and one for unexplained pain. Eighty-eight hips in 74 patients have been followed up radiologically for 2 to 22 years. Wear was unmeasurable. Four additional sockets showed definite migration. The respective survival rates after 7 years were 94.1% for the cemented cup, 88.8% for the screw-in ring, 95.1% for cementless press-fit plain alumina socket and 94.3% for the metal-back press-fit component. The 10-year survival rate was 90.4% for the cemented socket and 88.8% for the screw-in ring. The 15-year survival rate was 78.9% for the cemented socket. Grafting was the only prognostic factor, with a survival rate of 62.6% after 10 years for the hips with a bone graft and of 90.1% for hips without a graft. The alumina-on-alumina bearing surfaces seem to be a valuable alternative to the standard metal-on-polyethylene system for young patients. However, an improvement in socket fixation is required to lengthen the life span of the prosthesis to match the life expectancy of this demanding population. PMID:11039794

  18. Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    are a focus of concern. Risk of Cancer To date, only one study has examined the incidence of cancer after MOM and polyethylene on metal total hip arthroplasties. The results were compared to that of general population in Finland. The mean duration of follow-up for MOM arthroplasty was 15.7 years; for polyethylene arthroplasty, it was 12.5 years. The standardized incidence ratio for all cancers in the MOM group was 0.95 (95% CI, 0.79–1.13). In the polyethylene on metal group it was 0.76 (95% CI, 0.68–0.86). The combined standardized incidence ratio for lymphoma and leukemia in the patients who had MOM THR was 1.59 (95% CI, 0.82–2.77). It was 0.59 (95% CI, 0.29–1.05) for the patients who had polyethylene on metal THR. Patients with MOM THR had a significantly higher risk of leukemia. All patients who had leukemia were aged over than 60 years. Cobalt Cardiotoxicity   Epidemiological Studies of Myocardiopathy of Beer Drinkers An unusual type of myocardiopathy, characterized by pericardial effusion, elevated hemoglobin concentrations, and congestive heart failure, occurred as an epidemic affecting 48 habitual beer drinkers in Quebec City between 1965 and 1966. This epidemic was directly related the consumption of a popular beer containing cobalt sulfate. The epidemic appeared 1 month after cobalt sulfate was added to the specific brewery, and no further cases were seen a month after this specific chemical was no longer used in making this beer. A beer of the same name is made in Montreal, and the only difference at that time was that the Quebec brand of beer contained about 10 times more cobalt sulphate. Cobalt has been added to some Canadian beers since 1965 to improve the stability of the foam but it has been added in larger breweries only to draught beer. However, in small breweries, such as those in Quebec City, separate batches were not brewed for bottle and draught beer; therefore, cobalt was added to all of the beer processed in this brewery. In March 1966

  19. Botulinum toxin type A injections for the management of muscle tightness following total hip arthroplasty: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Anil; Zywiel, Michael G; Ulrich, Slif D; McGrath, Mike S; Seyler, Thorsten M; Marker, David R; Delanois, Ronald E; Mont, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Background Development of hip adductor, tensor fascia lata, and rectus femoris muscle contractures following total hip arthroplasties are quite common, with some patients failing to improve despite treatment with a variety of non-operative modalities. The purpose of the present study was to describe the use of and patient outcomes of botulinum toxin injections as an adjunctive treatment for muscle tightness following total hip arthroplasty. Methods Ten patients (14 hips) who had hip adductor, abductor, and/or flexor muscle contractures following total arthroplasty and had been refractory to physical therapeutic efforts were treated with injection of botulinum toxin A. Eight limbs received injections into the adductor muscle, 8 limbs received injections into the tensor fascia lata muscle, and 2 limbs received injection into the rectus femoris muscle, followed by intensive physical therapy for 6 weeks. Results At a mean final follow-up of 20 months, all 14 hips had increased range in the affected arc of motion, with a mean improvement of 23 degrees (range, 10 to 45 degrees). Additionally all hips had an improvement in hip scores, with a significant increase in mean score from 74 points (range, 57 to 91 points) prior to injection to a mean of 96 points (range, 93 to 98) at final follow-up. There were no serious treatment-related adverse events. Conclusion Botulinum toxin A injections combined with intensive physical therapy may be considered as a potential treatment modality, especially in difficult cases of muscle tightness that are refractory to standard therapy. PMID:19709429

  20. Canine hip extension range during gait.

    PubMed

    van der Walt, A M; Stewart, A V; Joubert, K E; Bekker, P

    2008-12-01

    Assessment of canine gait is frequently used by veterinary clinicians to establish the presence of orthopaedic pain. As up to 30% of canine orthopaedic conditions affect the pelvic limb, knowledge of pelvic limb biomechanics during gait is very important. Previous studies have investigated the biomechanics at the tarsus and stifle, but little information is available regarding hip motion during gait. The aim of this study was to determine the maximum hip extension range achieved during the stance phase of gait in normal canines. In addition, this study aimed to determine the difference between maximum passive hip extension and maximum hip extension during gait. Using a sample of 30 morphologically similar normal dogs, mean maximum passive hip extension was measured using a goniometer and mean maximum hip extension range during gait was determined videographically. Inter- and intra-assessor reliability studies performed at the start of the study showed that the measurement tools and techniques used in this study were valid and reliable. The goniometric data showed that mean maximum passive hip extension range was 162.44 degrees (+/-3.94) with no significant difference between the left and the right hind limbs. The videographic data showed that mean maximum hip extension range during gait was 119.9 degrees (+/-9.26) with no significant difference between the left and right hind limbs. The results of this study provided reference values for active and passive hip extension range and showed that the degree of hip extension range required for normal gait is significantly less than maximum passive hip extension range. PMID:19496317

  1. The hip-spine connection: understanding its importance in the treatment of hip pathology.

    PubMed

    Redmond, John M; Gupta, Asheesh; Nasser, Rima; Domb, Benjamin G

    2015-01-01

    EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Discuss the kinematic relationship between the hip and lumbar spine. 2. Explain the innervation of the hip and lumbar spine and how they relate to one another. 3. Recognize the effect of hip disease on the lumbar spine in an athletic population, prior to the onset of degenerative changes. 4. Describe an algorithm for diagnosis and treatment of patients who present with concomitant hip and lumbar spine pain. The hip and lumbar spine are closely related and can create similar patterns of pain and dysfunction. Diagnosis and treatment of hip and spine-related conditions can be challenging due to symptom overlap. Successful evaluation and treatment of hip and lumbar spine conditions requires a thorough understanding the hip-spine connection. Historically the hip-spine connection has been considered in the context of arthrosis; however, the hip-spine connection also needs to be considered in a younger athletic population. The purpose of this review is to describe the hip-spine connection, discuss the clinical implications of this connection, and offer an approach to diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25611411

  2. HIP Joining of Cemented Carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Derby, B.; Miodownik, M.

    1999-04-01

    Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) is investigated as a technique for joining the cermet WC-15% Co to itself. Encapsulation of the specimens prior to HIPing was carried out using steel encapsulation, glass encapsulation and self encapsulation. The bonds were evaluated using a four point bend method. It is shown that the glass and steel encapsulation methods have a number of inherent problems which make them inappropriate for near net shape processing. In contrast the novel self encapsulation method, described for the first time in this communication, is both simple and effective, producing joined material with bulk strength. The concept of self encapsulation is potentially widely applicable for joining composite materials.

  3. Burnishing Techniques Strengthen Hip Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1990s, Lambda Research Inc., of Cincinnati, Ohio, received Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from Glenn Research Center to demonstrate low plasticity burnishing (LPB) on metal engine components. By producing a thermally stable deep layer of compressive residual stress, LPB significantly strengthened turbine alloys. After Lambda patented the process, the Federal Aviation Administration accepted LPB for repair and alteration of commercial aircraft components, the U.S. Department of Energy found LPB suitable for treating nuclear waste containers at Yucca Mountain. Data from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration confirmed LPB to completely eliminate the occurrence of fretting fatigue failures in modular hip implants.

  4. Biomechanics of the Hip Capsule and Capsule Management Strategies in Hip Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nepple, Jeffrey J; Smith, Matthew V

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the function of the hip capsule have clarified its importance to normal hip function and kinematics. The iliofemoral ligament is the primary stabilizing structure for controlling anterior translation and external rotation of the hip, and is violated by the arthroscopic interportal capsulotomy. Microinstability of the hip occurring after surgical trauma remains a poorly defined clinical entity. In certain at-risk populations, capsular repair should be considered as part of an arthroscopic hip procedure to achieve optimal outcomes and avoid iatrogenic instability (dislocation or microinstability). Despite a lack of conclusive evidence-based indications, we recommend capsular repair in the settings of borderline hip dysplasia (or dysplastic variants such as increased femoral anteversion), hip hypermobility, connective tissue disorders, and traumatic or atraumatic instability. With careful attention to arthroscopic capsular management, adequate exposure can be achieved and reproducibly allow for an effective capsular repair when indicated. PMID:26524549

  5. Morphometric assessment of the canine hip joint using the acetabular angle of retrotorsion.

    PubMed

    Doskarova, B; Kyllar, M; Paral, V

    2010-01-01

    Morphometric assessment of the canine hip joint using acetabular angle of retrotorsion was used in this study. The aim of our study was to compare the acetabular angle of retrotorsion (AAR) with values of the Norberg angle (NA) and the hip score (HS) in the Leonberger dog breed and to determine the cut-off point of AAR that distinguish between normal and dysplastic hip status on the basis of Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) hip evaluation. Retrospective analysis of NA and AAR was measured from standard ventrodorsal pelvic radiographs with extended femurs in 387 Leonberger dogs (141 males and 246 females) from 18 to 63 months of age, which were then divided into five age-groups. Through analysis of these radiographs, it was determined that the cut-off point for NA was 105°, AAR was 15°, and the acetabular angle of retrotorsion was positively correlated with Norberg angle and negatively correlated with hip score. The results of our study indicate that the acetabular angle of retrotorsion may represent a reliable morphometric assessment tool in evaluating acetabular cup conformation, and values of AAR may help to assess the FCI grade of canine hip dysplasia. PMID:20740259

  6. In-situ electrochemical study of interaction of tribology and corrosion in artificial hip prosthesis simulators.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yu; Dowson, Duncan; Neville, Anne

    2013-02-01

    The second generation Metal-on-Metal (MoM) hip replacements have been considered as an alternative to commonly used Polyethylene-on-Metal (PoM) joint prostheses due to polyethylene wear debris induced osteolysis. However, the role of corrosion and the biofilm formed under tribological contact are still not fully understood. Enhanced metal ion concentrations have been reported widely from hair, blood and urine samples of patients who received metal hip replacements and in isolated cases when abnormally high levels have caused adverse local tissue reactions. An understanding of the origin of metal ions is really important in order to design alloys for reduced ion release. Reciprocating pin-on-plate wear tester is a standard instrument to assess the interaction of corrosion and wear. However, more realistic hip simulator can provide a better understanding of tribocorrosion process for hip implants. It is very important to instrument the conventional hip simulator to enable electrochemical measurements. In this study, simple reciprocating pin-on-plate wear tests and hip simulator tests were compared. It was found that metal ions originated from two sources: (a) a depassivation of the contacting surfaces due to tribology (rubbing) and (b) corrosion of nano-sized wear particles generated from the contacting surfaces. PMID:23182693

  7. Hip dysplasia in Estrela mountain dogs: prevalence and genetic trends 1991-2005.

    PubMed

    Ginja, M M D; Silvestre, A M; Colaço, J; Gonzalo-Orden, J M; Melo-Pinto, P; Orden, M A; Llorens-Pena, M P; Ferreira, A J

    2009-11-01

    Three hundred and thirteen Estrela mountain dogs were examined for hip dysplasia (HD) using the standard ventrodorsal hip extended view, and graded into five categories (A, B, C, D and E) using the Fédération Cynologique Internationale's (FCI) scoring system. The Ortolani method was performed to evaluate hip joint laxity. Pedigree information was obtained from the Portuguese Kennel Club and the genetic trend was evaluated by calculating the mean breeding values (BVs) for the last 15 years, using the threshold model. HD was found in 66% of the dogs. There was low-moderate correlation between the results of the Ortolani test and FCI hip scores (r(s)=0.386; P<0.001). Grades of hip dysplasia were equal in both males and females (P=0.14) and in the animals' right and left sides (P=0.51). The mean BVs for HD were stable in dogs born between 1991 and 2003, and showed an improvement in 2004 and 2005. The data confirm the high prevalence and severity of HD in predisposed breeds that do not have breeding programmes in place. It also confirms an initial favourable change in BVs that is a likely consequence of the voluntary radiographic hip-screening programme. PMID:18722145

  8. Sonography of Sports Injuries of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, Aaron R. L.; Seidenberg, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Sports-related injuries of the hip are a common complaint of both competitive and recreational athletes of all ages. The anatomic and biomechanical complexity of the hip region often cause diagnostic uncertainty for the clinicians evaluating these injuries. Therefore, obtaining additional diagnostic information is often crucial for providing injured athletes with a prompt and accurate diagnosis so they can return to activity as soon as possible. Musculoskeletal ultrasound is becoming increasingly important in evaluating and treating sports-related injuries of the hip. Evidence Acquisition: The PubMed database was searched in May of 2013 for English-language articles pertaining to sonography of sports injuries of the hip using the following keywords in various combinations: musculoskeletal, ultrasound, hip, hip sonography, and sports. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Musculoskeletal ultrasound is currently being used for both diagnosis and treatment in a wide range of acute and chronic conditions affecting the hip, including tendinosis, tendon/muscle strains, ligamentous sprains, enthesopathies, growth plate injuries, fractures, bursitis, effusions, synovitis, labral tears, and snapping hip. Therapeutically, it is used to guide injections, aspirations, and biopsies. Conclusion: Musculoskeletal ultrasound use is expanding and will likely continue to do so as more clinicians realize its capabilities. Characteristics, including accessibility, portability, noninvasiveness, dynamic examination, power Doppler examination, and low cost highlight the potential of ultrasound. PMID:25364486

  9. Process for HIP canning of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhas, John J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A single step is relied on in the canning process for hot isostatic pressing (HIP) metallurgy composites. The composites are made from arc sprayed and plasma sprayed monotape. The HIP can is of compatible refractory metal and is sealed at high vacuum and temperature. This eliminates outgassing during hot isostatic pressing.

  10. Implant Design in Cementless Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Taek

    2016-01-01

    When performing cementless hip arthroplasty, it is critical to achieve firm primary mechanical stability followed by biological fixation. In order to achieve this, it is essential to fully understand characteristics of implant design. In this review, the authors review fixation principles for a variety of implants used for cementless hip replacement and considerations for making an optimal selection. PMID:27536647

  11. Hip Arthroscopy: Tales From the Crypt.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Dean K; Philippon, Marc J; Safran, Marc R; Sampson, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    Complications after hip arthroscopy vary in frequency and severity, even for experienced surgeons. It is important for surgeons to be aware of some of the more dramatic, often unusual, and always memorable (nightmarish) complications of hip arthroscopy and understand how they are caused, how they can be treated, and how they can be prevented. PMID:27049210

  12. Auditing hip ultrasound screening of infants at increased risk of developmental dysplasia of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, C; Donoghue, V; Murphy, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Clinical examination, while useful, has been shown to be insufficient as the sole screening method in infants. Ultrasound examination at 8 weeks in high risk infants is an integral part of the screening process in some units. Aims: To show the efficiency of hip sonography in detection of developmental dysplasia of the hips in those without clinically dislocated hips. Methods: All infants born at the National Maternity Hospital between January 1994 and December 2001 were included. All those with clinically dislocated hips were treated by a Pavlik harness and referred for follow up to a paediatric orthopaedic surgeon. An 8 week hip ultrasound scan was performed for those infants with stable hips on examination but who met the following criteria: (1) a first degree relative with congenital dislocation of hips; (2) breech presentation at birth; and (3) a persistent "click" at birth in an otherwise stable hip. Results: During the period of study a total of 52 893 infants were born in the National Maternity Hospital. Based on the criteria above, 5485 hip ultrasound scans were performed. Of those scanned, 18 (0.33%) were found to have dislocated hips and 153 (2.78%) to have dysplasic hips. The 18 infants with dislocation were treated with Pavlik harness; the remaining 153 were followed up by serial ultrasound examinations but did not require active intervention. Conclusions: Among the population of infants at increased risk of developmental dysplasia of the hip, the hip screening programme identified 18 cases among 5485 infants; a rate of 3.2 per 1000. Hip sonography is therefore worthwhile. PMID:15908620

  13. Geriatric Patients With Fractures Below the Hip are Medically Similar to Geriatric Patients With Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Harmeeth S.; Copeland, Marilyn E.; Crist, Brett D.; Volgas, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare a cohort of geriatric patients with operatively managed isolated fractures below the hip to a cohort of geriatric patients with operatively managed isolated hip fractures. All patients greater than 59 years of age admitted to our institution for surgical care of an isolated lower extremity fracture during a 3-year period were included. Patients were divided into 2 cohorts: BTH (fracture below the subtrochanteric region of the femur) and HIP (proximal femoral fracture at subtrochanteric region or proximal). We identified 141 patients included in cohort BTH and 205 patients included in cohort HIP. HIP patients were older (P < .01) and less obese (P < .01) but were otherwise very similar. An extensive comorbidity review revealed that the 2 cohorts were similar, with the exception of an increased incidence of dementia (P = .012) or glaucoma (P = .04) in HIP patients and of peripheral neuropathy (P = .014) in BTH patients. HIP patients were more likely to be under active antiosteoporotic medication management and were more likely to be receiving pharmacological anticoagulation at the time of admission. HIP patients and BTH patients were similar with regard to necessity of assistance with ambulation preinjury, but HIP patients were less likely to reside independently at home than were BTH patients (P < .001). HIP patients were also less likely to be discharged directly home from the hospital (P < .001). Geriatric patients with fractures below the hip are medically similar to geriatric patients with hip fracture. Medical comanagement protocols have been extensively published that improve care of geriatric patients with hip fracture; consideration should be given to similar protocol-driven medical comanagement programs for geriatric patients with fractures below the hip. PMID:26246950

  14. Hip Dysplasia in the Young Adult.

    PubMed

    Gala, Luca; Clohisy, John C; Beaulé, Paul E

    2016-01-01

    Hip dysplasia is a leading precursor of osteoarthritis and is seen in 20% to 40% of patients with osteoarthritis of the hip. An increase in mechanical stress on the cartilage matrix with failure of the acetabular labrum represents the major pathomechanism of degeneration. Because the prevalence of associated femoral deformities is high (>50%), the structural anatomy of the dysplastic hip must be assessed in multiple planes using radiographs and, if needed, advanced imaging modalities. Acetabular osteotomy (periacetabular and/or rotational) is the most commonly used procedure for the treatment of the majority of dysplastic hips in adults. Modern total hip replacement remains an excellent option for the more arthritic joints. Difficulties can arise from anatomical abnormalities and previous operations. PMID:26738905

  15. Hip fracture programs: are they effective?

    PubMed

    Kates, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript will evaluate the published evidence on efficacy of organized hip fracture programs to determine if they improve patient outcomes. A detailed literature search was conducted to find manuscripts published in the past 20 years about organized hip fracture care programs. Seventeen programs with published results were identified from this detailed search and these were evaluated and synthesized in the following manuscript. Organized hip fracture programs offer significant benefits to patients, care providers and health systems. The more complex program designs have a more profound effect on improvement in outcomes for hip fracture patients. Most programs have reported reduced length of stay, reduced in-hospital mortality rates, and reduced complications. Some programs have reported reduced costs and reduced readmission rates after implementing an organized hip fracture program. PMID:26768285

  16. Hip arthroscopy in obese, a successful combination?

    PubMed

    Bech, N H; Kodde, I F; Dusseldorp, F; Druyts, P A M C; Jansen, S P L; Haverkamp, D

    2016-04-01

    Discussion persists about the outcome and results of hip arthroscopy in obese patients. Hip arthroscopy gained popularity over time. A current discussion is if obese patients can reach similar results after surgery compared with non-obese. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic review of literature about hip arthroscopy and obesity. We searched the Pubmed/Medline databases for literature and included three studies that compared the outcome of hip arthroscopy between different BMI groups. We extracted and pooled the data. For continues data a weighted mean difference was calculated, for dichotomous variables a weighted odds ratio (OR) was calculated using Review Software Manager. Heterogeneity of the included studies was calculated using I(2) statistics. Data were extracted from two studies. In the Obese group, there was significant more conversion to total hip replacement or resurfacing hip replacement (OR = 2.21, 95% CI 1.07-4.56) and more re-arthroscopy (OR = 4.68, 95% CI 1.41-15.45). Any reoperation occurred more often in the obese group (OR = 2.87, 95% CI 1.53-5.38). In the Non Arthritic Hip Score obese scored lower than the non-Obese group [10.9 (-14,6 to 7.1)]. For the modified Harris Hip Score the score is - 6,6, according to the MCID this difference is clinically relevant. For both scores obese show lower outcomes but similar improvement after hip arthroscopy. Regarding a higher chance of needing a re-operation and lower subjective outcome scores obesity appears to have a negative influence on the outcome of hip arthroscopy. PMID:27026817

  17. Hip arthroscopy in obese, a successful combination?

    PubMed Central

    Bech, N. H.; Kodde, I. F.; Dusseldorp, F.; Druyts, P. A. M. C.; Jansen, S. P. L.; Haverkamp, D.

    2016-01-01

    Discussion persists about the outcome and results of hip arthroscopy in obese patients. Hip arthroscopy gained popularity over time. A current discussion is if obese patients can reach similar results after surgery compared with non-obese. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic review of literature about hip arthroscopy and obesity. We searched the Pubmed/Medline databases for literature and included three studies that compared the outcome of hip arthroscopy between different BMI groups. We extracted and pooled the data. For continues data a weighted mean difference was calculated, for dichotomous variables a weighted odds ratio (OR) was calculated using Review Software Manager. Heterogeneity of the included studies was calculated using I2 statistics. Data were extracted from two studies. In the Obese group, there was significant more conversion to total hip replacement or resurfacing hip replacement (OR = 2.21, 95% CI 1.07–4.56) and more re-arthroscopy (OR = 4.68, 95% CI 1.41–15.45). Any reoperation occurred more often in the obese group (OR = 2.87, 95% CI 1.53–5.38). In the Non Arthritic Hip Score obese scored lower than the non-Obese group [10.9 (−14,6 to 7.1)]. For the modified Harris Hip Score the score is − 6,6, according to the MCID this difference is clinically relevant. For both scores obese show lower outcomes but similar improvement after hip arthroscopy. Regarding a higher chance of needing a re-operation and lower subjective outcome scores obesity appears to have a negative influence on the outcome of hip arthroscopy. PMID:27026817

  18. Minimally invasive medial hip approach.

    PubMed

    Chiron, P; Murgier, J; Cavaignac, E; Pailhé, R; Reina, N

    2014-10-01

    The medial approach to the hip via the adductors, as described by Ludloff or Ferguson, provides restricted visualization and incurs a risk of neurovascular lesion. We describe a minimally invasive medial hip approach providing broader exposure of extra- and intra-articular elements in a space free of neurovascular structures. With the lower limb in a "frog-leg" position, the skin incision follows the adductor longus for 6cm and then the aponeurosis is incised. A slide plane between all the adductors and the aponeurosis is easily released by blunt dissection, with no interposed neurovascular elements. This gives access to the lesser trochanter, psoas tendon and inferior sides of the femoral neck and head, anterior wall of the acetabulum and labrum. We report a series of 56 cases, with no major complications: this approach allows treatment of iliopsoas muscle lesions and resection or filling of benign tumors of the cervical region and enables intra-articular surgery (arthrolysis, resection of osteophytes or foreign bodies, labral suture). PMID:25164350

  19. [Ultrasonography of the neonatal hip: state of the art and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Ortore, P; Fodor, G; Silverio, R; Milani, C; Psenner, K

    1996-01-01

    Since the first studies by Graf, medical interest for neonatal hip sonography (US) has grown, till the redefinition of the name itself of the pathologic condition, which has been recently renamed developmental dysplasia of the hip. After briefly reviewing our personal series of patients (18,388 hips studied from March, 1986, through June, 1995, with 2.81% positives according to Graf, 0.65% of them with subluxated hips), several issues are discussed relative to US of the neonatal hip in the study of dysplasia, namely: 1) technique, 2) measurements, 3) unstable hips, 4) screening, 5) protocols, 6) perspectives. Relative to the technique, Graf's method is currently the method of choice because it is easy to perform (single scanning) and repeatable, different from what other authors, particularly Novick and Harcke, suggested; they use a dynamic approach with more scans and different stress tests. Moreover, in Graf's technique, special attention is paid to the need for correct measurements, which phase was criticized by Couture who complained of its claimed complexity. Hip measurements are an important step in the study of this condition thanks to the information they yield the physician who can thus customize the therapy. The problem of the unstable hip and focal ligament laxity is discussed, which is hypothesized to be a possible cause of hip dysplasia misdiagnosis; according to Graf and Tönnis, this condition is related mostly to hormonal factors and has no actual clinical importance in the possible evolution to a pathologic condition. US of the neonatal hip must be set in a general screening program for newborns to be carried out by the 6th week of life to achieve optimal recovery in positive newborns, without limiting it to supposedly at risk groups. Moreover, the cost-benefit ratio of US screening is emphasized, provided that both medical staff and units are used correctly. A working diagnostic-therapeutic protocol is needed to plan standard epidemiologic

  20. [Symptoms. Localizations: knee, hip, hands, spine, other localizations].

    PubMed

    Pérez Martín, Álvaro

    2014-01-01

    The symptoms of osteoarthritis vary widely from patient to patient, depending especially on the localization on the disease. There is a poor correlation between radiological involvement and pain. In general, symptom onset is gradual and symptoms increase slowly but progressively. The most commonly affected joints are the knees, hips, hands, and spine. The main signs and symptoms are pain, stiffness, joint deformity, and crepitus. Pain is mechanical and its causes are multifactorial; in the initial phases, pain usually manifests in self-limiting episodes but may subsequently be almost constant. The criteria of the American college of Rheumatology for the classification of osteoarthritis of the knee, hip and hands are an aid to classification and standardization but are not useful for diagnosis. Hip osteoarthritis usually produces inguinal pain in the internal and anterior sections of the muscle extending to the knee and, with progression, tends to limit mobility. Knee osteoarthritis is more frequent in women and is usually associated with hand osteoarthritis and obesity. In hand osteoarthritis, the most commonly affected joints are the distal interphalangeal joints, followed by the proximal interphalangeal joints and the trapeziometacarpal joints; the development of Heberden and Bouchard nodes is common; involvement of the trapeziometacarpal joint is called rhizarthrosis and is one of the forms of osteoarthritis that produces the greatest limitation on hand function. Osteoarthritis of the spine affects the facet joints and the vertebral bodies. Other, less frequent, localizations are the foot, elbow and shoulder, which are generally secondary forms of osteoarthritis. PMID:24467955

  1. Automated measurement of diagnostic angles for hip dysplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Raedt, Sepp; Mechlenburg, Inger; Stilling, Maiken; Rømer, Lone; Søballe, Kjeld; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2013-03-01

    A fully automatic method for measuring diagnostic angles of hip dysplasia is presented. The method consists of the automatic segmentation of CT images and detection of anatomical landmarks on the femur and acetabulum. The standard angles used in the diagnosis of hip dysplasia are subsequently automatically calculated. Previous work in automating the measuring of angles required the manual segmentation or delineation of the articular joint surface. In the current work automatic segmentation is established using graph-cuts with a cost function based on a sheetness score to detect the sheet-like structure of the bone. Anatomical landmarks are subsequently detected using heuristics based on ray-tracing and the distance to the approximated acetabulur joint surface. Standard diagnositic angles are finally calculated and presented for interpretation. Experiments using 26 patients, showed a good agreement with gold standard manual measurements by an expert radiologist as performed in daily practice. The mean difference for the five angles was between -1:1 and 2:0 degrees with a concordance correlation coefficient between 0:87 and 0:93. The standard deviation varied between 2:3 and 4:1 degrees. These values correspond to values found in evaluating interobserver and intraobserver variation for manual measurements. The method can be used in clinical practice to replace the current manual measurements performed by radiologists. In the future, the method will be integrated into an intraoperative surgical guidance system.

  2. Hip cortical thickness assessment in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and strontium ranelate effect on hip geometry.

    PubMed

    Briot, Karine; Benhamou, Claude Laurent; Roux, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the relationship between hip geometry and the 5-yr risk of hip fractures in postmenopausal osteoporotic women and the effects of strontium ranelate on these parameters. Using the 5-yr data of a randomized placebo-controlled trial of strontium ranelate (Treatment of Peripheral Osteoporosis Study [TROPOS]), we reanalyzed the hip dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans to determine the role of hip geometry in the risk of hip fractures (placebo group, n=636) and to analyze the effects of strontium ranelate (n=483). The outcomes included the hip structure analysis (HSA) parameters: cross-sectional area (CSA), section modulus, cortical thickness, and buckling ratio, measured at femoral neck, intertrochanteric (IT) region, and proximal shaft. The geometric parameters associated with an increased risk of hip fracture over 5yr were IT CSA and femoral shaft cortical thickness independent of age and total-hip bone mineral density (BMD). Using Bonferroni adjustment, IT cortical thickness was associated with the risk of hip fracture. Over 5yr, significant decreases in some femoral dimensions of the placebo group contrast with significant increases in strontium ranelate group after adjustment for age and BMD. Using Bonferroni adjustment, differences between placebo and strontium ranelate groups were no longer significant after adjustment on 5-yr BMD changes. Some HSA parameters have predictive value for hip fracture risk in postmenopausal osteoporotic women. Strontium ranelate improves some HSA parameters, through the BMD increase. PMID:22321661

  3. [Total hip arthroplasty in the treatment of arthrosis with coexistent high developmental hip dislocation].

    PubMed

    Matewski, Dariusz; Szymkowiak, Edward; Gumański, Ryszard

    2008-01-01

    The question if total hip arthroplasty ought to be advised for patients with high developmental hip dislocation is still actual. The subject of hip arthroplasty, as a method of surgical treatment of high developmental hip dislocation, was analyzed on the base of follow up of seven patients, who underwent this procedure. The mean age of patients was 44.5 (+/- 12.6) years. The mean time of follow up was 64.4 (21.6) months. Initial three patients were treated in two stage regime. In first stage, a surgical hip liberalization and skeletal traction through 3 weeks was performed. In 2nd stage we did total hip replacement with simultaneous shortening of the femoral shaft just below the lesser trochanter. In next four patients we performed total hip arthroplasty with simultaneous shortening of the femoral shaft in one stage. Protection of undesirable rotational instability after osteotomy was done by means of different ways of osteotomy fixation describe in paper. Applied surgical treatment allowed for implanting a cup of prosthesis in original place of acetabulum and reduction of the big anteversion of the femoral neck. The hip congruency was improved in all patients. Score in functional Harris hip scale increased from mean value of 50 points before hip arthroplasty to mean value of 85 points after surgery. The symptoms of late consolidation of osteotomy were observed in one patient with transverse osteotomy without anty-rotational fixation. Total hip replacement with simultaneous "Z" shortening osteotomy of the femoral shaft give good such clinical as radiological results in the treatment of hip osteoarthritis in accordance to high developmental hip dislocation. PMID:18847022

  4. Gait and stair function in total and resurfacing hip arthroplasty: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Shrader, M Wade; Bhowmik-Stoker, Manoshi; Jacofsky, Marc C; Jacofsky, David J

    2009-06-01

    Standard total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the established surgical treatment for patients older than 65 years with progressive osteoarthritis but survivorship curves wane in patients younger than 50. Resurfacing hip arthroplasty (RHA) is an alternative for younger, active patients reportedly providing superior range of motion. Quantitative investigation of functional recovery following arthroplasty may elucidate limitations that aid in device selection. Although limited long-term kinematic data are available, the early rate of recovery and gait compensations are not well described. This information may aid in refining rehabilitation protocols based on limitations specific to the implant. We presumed hip motion and forces for subjects receiving RHA are more similar to age-matched controls during physically demanding tasks, such as stair negotiation, at early time points than those for THA. In a pilot study, we quantified walking and stair negotiation preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively for seven patients with RHA (mean age, 49 years), seven patients with standard THA (mean age, 52 years), and seven age-matched control subjects (mean age, 56 years). Although both treatment groups demonstrated trends toward functional recovery, the RHA group had greater improvements in hip extension and abduction moment indicating typical loading of the hip. Further investigation is needed to determine if differences persist long term or are clinically meaningful. PMID:19305961

  5. BLEEDING OF FEMORAL HEAD DURING TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY FOR OSTEOARTHROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Sotomayor, Marco Yánez; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Silva, Marcelo Faria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the bleeding of the femoral head on hip osteoarthritis in patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty. Methods: One hundred and three hips affected by primary hip osteoarthritis were evaluated. After surgical dislocation, the femoral head was divided into four quadrants, and micro perforations were made in order to observe and assess the presence of bleeding, as early type (EB), late type (LB) or without bleeding (WB). Results: We observed early bleeding (EB) in the upper quadrant in 16 hips (15.5%), late bleeding in 14 hips (13.6%) and no bleeding (WB) in 73 hips (70.9%). The anterior quadrant showed EB in 24 hips (23.3%), LB in 7 hips (6.8%) and WB in 72 hips (69.9%). The lower quadrant presented EB in 40 hips (38.8%), LB 14 hips (13.6%) and WB in 49 hips (47.6%). The posterior quadrant showed EB in 39 hips (37.9%), LB 19 hips (18.4%) and WB in 45 hips (43.7%). Comparing BMI and gender, we found no association between these parameters (p> 0.05). Conclusions: The inferior and posterior quadrant had the highest bleeding levels, following the path of the medial circumflex artery. Level of Evidence III, Therapeutic Study. PMID:26981036

  6. Simple suture and anchor in rabbit hips

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Filho, Fernando Cal; Guarniero, Roberto; de Godoy Júnior, Rui Maciel; Pereira, César Augusto Martins; Matos, Marcos Almeida; Garcia, Lucas Cortizo

    2012-01-01

    Objective Using biomechanical studies, this research aims to compare hip capsulorrhaphy in rabbits, carried out with two different techniques: capsulorrhaphy with simple sutures and with anchors. Method Thirteen New Zealand Albino (Oryctolaguscuniculus) male rabbits, twenty-six hip joints, were used. First, a pilot project was performed with three rabbits (six hip joints). This experiment consisted of ten rabbits divided into two groups: group 1 underwent capsulorrhaphy on both right and left hips with simple suture using polyglycolic acid absorbable thread, and group 2 underwent capsulorrhaphy with titanium anchors. After a four-week postoperative period, the animals were euthanized and the hip joints were frozen. On the same day of the biomechanical studies, after the hip joints were previously unfrozen, the following parameters were evaluated: rigidity, maximum force, maximum deformity and energy. Results There was no relevant statistical difference in rigidity, maximum force, maximum deformity and energy between the simple suture and anchor groups. Conclusion Through biomechanical analyses, using parameters of rigidity, maximum force, maximum deformity and energy, it has been shown that capsulorrhaphy with simple suture and with anchors has similar results in rabbit hip joints. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Comparative Study. PMID:24453618

  7. Mechanical Evaluation of Polymer Composite Hip Protectors

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Jose Daniel Diniz; Barbosa, Ayrles S. Gonçalves; Guerra, Ricardo Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Hip fractures often result in serious health implications, particularly in the geriatric population, and have been related to long-term morbidity and death. In most cases, these fractures are caused by impact loads in the area of the greater trochanter, which are produced in a fall. This work is aimed at developing hip protectors using composite materials and evaluating their effectiveness in preventing hip fractures under high impact energy (120 J). The hip protectors were developed with an inner layer of energy absorbing soft material and an outer rigid shell of fiberglass-reinforced polymer composite. According to the experimental results, all tested configurations proved to be effective at reducing the impact load to below the average fracture threshold of proximal femur. Furthermore, an addition of Ethylene Vinyl Acetate (EVA) to the impacted area of the composite shell proved to be beneficial to increase impact strength of the hip protectors. Thus, composite hip protectors proved to be a viable alternative for a mechanically efficient and cost-effective solution to prevent hip fractures. PMID:20871841

  8. Traumatic inferior hip dislocation: a rare adult case with ipsilateral bifocal hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    El Hajj Moussa, Majd; Tawk, Charbel; Hoyek, Fadi; Lahoud, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Inferior dislocation is a rare type of hip dislocation, especially in adults. Few cases have been reported; most of them were isolated. This is the case of a traumatic adult hip dislocation after a road traffic accident. Reduction was made under general anaesthesia; a CT-Scan after the reduction showed a bifocal non-displaced hip fracture. In this article, we present a small review of the literature and we discuss the possible mechanism of hip dislocation. We found through our case study that this condition is not exclusive to children and CT-Scan is mandatory after the reduction of hip dislocation to eliminate any associated injury. To our knowledge, a bifocal hip fracture has not previously been documented, in the English language literature. PMID:27141043

  9. Evaluation of the hip center in total hip arthroplasty for old developmental dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Flecher, Xavier; Parratte, Sebastien; Brassart, Nicolas; Aubaniac, Jean-Manuel; Argenson, Jean-Noël

    2008-12-01

    We describe the problems with positioning the hip center according to the severity of dislocation in 97 cementless total hip arthroplasty for developmental dysplasia of the hip. The mean location of the hip center from the interteardrop was 30.4 +/- 8.7 mm horizontally and 23.4 +/- 5.4 mm vertically. The presence of a limp correlated with a superior placement of the cup. Four cups were revised, 2 of which with a significant high hip center. The survival rate of the acetabular component was 95% at 12 years. Craniopodal repositioning was easy in class 1. In class 2, the cup was the largest. In class 3, the greatest variations of the hip center were found. In class 4, the smallest implants were necessary for positioning in the true acetabulum. PMID:18534475

  10. [Results of cementless hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Grübl, A

    2006-09-01

    Hip arthroplasty is performed nowadays according to the needs of the patients irrespective of their age. Tapered rectangular stems for cementless fixation are chosen in most cases in central Europe. They provide primary stability by press-fit implantation into a precisely rasped osseous bed and secondary stability by bone ingrowth into the highly biocompatible titanium alloy with a microrough surface. The 10-year survival of such devices is 92%. Typical radiographic patterns include cortical atrophy and radiolucent lines in Gruen zones 1 and 7. They are due to stress shielding with these distally fixed implants. The number one reason for revision is polyethylene wear and subsequent osteolysis. Metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic bearings show less wear but osteolysis continues to be a problem. PMID:16552511

  11. Late arthroscopic retrieval of a bullet from hip joint

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ravi K; Aggarwal, Varun

    2009-01-01

    We describe a case of arthroscopic retrieval of a bullet from the hip joint of an 18-year-old boy, who sustained the injury four months back, accidentally, while bird hunting with a country made shotgun. The surgery was performed with the standard ordinary instrumentation of knee arthroscopy. The patient became pain-free the same evening and started partial weight bearing on the next day of surgery. At 13 months follow-up, the patient had returned to normal activity without any functional limitations. PMID:19838396

  12. [Update on current care guidelines: Hip fracture].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    In Finland approximately 7,000 hip fractures occurred annually during 1996-2008. Risk of hip fracture can be diminished through efforts to prevent falls and osteoporosis. A hip fracture is treated operatively, with the aim of early mobilisation and full weight bearing. Postoperative care and rehabilitation requires multidisciplinary and multifaceted management, focusing on improvement of the patient's physical condition, appropriate pain management, the prevention of delirium and other possible complications. Rehabilitation should be centralised in specialised rehabilitation centres for the elderly. Secondary prevention of future fractures should include management of osteoporosis and fall prevention. PMID:21888050

  13. Mild to Moderate Hip OA: Joint Preservation or Total Hip Arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Peters, Christopher L

    2015-07-01

    Treatment of structural hip disease such as FAI and acetabular dysplasia has increased dramatically over the past decade with the goal of preservation of the native hip joint. A number of patient and disease specific parameters including the amount of underlying hip osteoarthrosis can help predict success with joint preservation surgery. Total hip arthroplasty remains a very good option in young patients who are not ideal candidates for joint preservation surgery. Future developments will help to better identify ideal surgical candidates and improve understanding of the disease processes. PMID:25842248

  14. Taking care of your new hip joint

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cabrera AL. Total hip replacement. In: Frontera, WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine ... Groomes TE. Total knee replacement. In: Frontera, WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine ...

  15. Microbial assisted High Impact Polystyrene (HIPS) degradation.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Arya J; Sekhar, Vini C; Bhaskar, Thallada; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan

    2016-08-01

    The efficacy of newly isolated Pseudomonas and Bacillus strains to degrade brominated High Impact Polystyrene (HIPS) was investigated. Viability of these cultures while using e-plastic as sole carbon source was validated through Triphenyl Tetrazolium Chloride (TTC). Four days incubation of HIPS emulsion with Bacillus spp. showed 94% reduction in turbidity and was 97% with Pseudomonas spp. Confirmation of degradation was concluded by HPLC, NMR, FTIR, TGA and weight loss analysis. NMR spectra of the degraded film revealed the formation of aliphatic carbon chain with bromine and its release. FTIR analysis of the samples showed a reduction in CH, CO and CN groups. Surface changes in the brominated HIPS film was visualized through SEM analysis. Degradation with Bacillus spp showed a weight loss of 23% (w/w) of HIPS film in 30days. PMID:26993201

  16. Atraumatic Anterior Dislocation of the Hip Joint

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuru, Tadahiko; Morita, Yasuyuki; Murata, Yasuaki; Itou, Junya; Morita, Yuji; Munakata, Yutaro; Kato, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Dislocation of the hip joint in adults is usually caused by high-energy trauma such as road traffic accidents or falls from heights. Posterior dislocation is observed in most cases. However, atraumatic anterior dislocation of the hip joint is extremely rare. We present a case of atraumatic anterior dislocation of the hip joint that was induced by an activity of daily living. The possible causes of this dislocation were anterior capsule insufficiency due to developmental dysplasia of the hip, posterior pelvic tilt following thoracolumbar kyphosis due to vertebral fracture, and acetabular anterior coverage changes by postural factor. Acetabular anterior coverage changes in the sagittal plane were measured using a tomosynthesis imaging system. This system was useful for elucidation of the dislocation mechanism in the present case. PMID:26819791

  17. Developmental dysplasia of the hip: diagnosis and management to 18 months.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Nicholas M P

    2014-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip represents a spectrum of disease ranging from transient neonatal instability to established dislocation. It is accepted that female sex, breech presentation, and family history are risk factors for the disease. Early diagnosis by clinical examination or ultrasound imaging is emphasized, with splint treatment ideally commencing by 6 weeks of age. Treatment using the Pavlik harness is successful in up to 90% of patients. Ultrasound imaging is the gold standard for monitoring a patient during harness wear. Failed splintage or late presentation usually necessitates surgical intervention depending on the patient's age and the severity of the hip dysplasia and displacement. PMID:24720316

  18. Epidemiology of Hip Injuries in the National Basketball Association

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Timothy J.; Starkey, Chad; McElhiney, Danielle; Domb, Benjamin G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Professional athletes are subject to various injuries that are often dictated by the nature of their sport. Professional basketball players previously have been shown to sustain injuries throughout the musculoskeletal system, most commonly to the ankle and knee. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to report the epidemiology of injuries specific to the pelvis, hip, and thigh and their effect on games missed in professional basketball players. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiological. Methods: Records were recalled from the National Basketball Association epidemiological database for athletic-related pelvis, hip, or thigh injuries that occurred from the 1988-1989 through the 2011-2012 seasons. The primary information collected included anatomic location where the injury occurred, when in the course of the season injury occurred, specific pathology, date, activity at the time of injury, injury mechanism, number of practices and games missed, and whether surgery was required. The number of practices and games missed were summed to yield the number of days missed per episode. Results: There were 2852 cases (14.6% of all athletic-related injuries) involving 967 individual players. In 1746 (61.2%) cases, injuries occurred during game competition. Across the course of this study, clinical incidence of injury to the pelvis, hip, or thigh was 1.50 per 100 players. The mean (±standard deviation) number of days missed per case was 6.3 ± 10.2. The quadriceps group was the most commonly injured structure (contusions and strains) and had a significantly higher game-related injury rate than other structures (0.96 per 100 athletic exposures, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.87-1.04). Players had the greatest risk (relative risk = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.26-1.52) of sustaining a strain than any other type of injury, with a game-related injury rate of 1.79 (95% CI = 1.67-1.90). The hamstring muscle group was the most frequently strained. Strains were more likely to occur

  19. Celiac Disease in Women with Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    LeBoff, Meryl S.; Cobb, Haley; Gao, Lisa Y.; Hawkes, William; Yu-Yahiro, Janet; Kolatkar, Nikheel S.; Magaziner, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Objective Celiac disease is associated with decreased bone density, however, the risk of fractures in celiac disease patients is unclear. We compared the prevalence of celiac disease between a group of women with hip fractures and a group of women undergoing elective joint replacement surgery and the association between celiac disease and vitamin D levels. Methods Two hundred eight community dwelling and postmenopausal women were recruited from Boston, MA (n=81) and Baltimore, MD (n=127). We measured tissue transglutaminase IgA by ELISA to diagnose celiac disease and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels by radioimmunoassay in both women with hip fractures (n=157) and the control group (n=51), all of whom were from Boston. Subjects were excluded if they took any medications or had medical conditions that might affect bone. Results Median serum 25(OH)D levels were significantly lower (p< 0.0001) in the hip fracture cohorts compared to the elective joint replacement cohort (14.1 ng/ml vs. 21.3 ng/ml, respectively). There were no differences in the percentage of subjects with a positive tissue transglutaminase in the women with hip fractures versus the control group (1.91% vs. 1.61%, respectively). Conclusion Vitamin D levels are markedly reduced in women with hip fractures, however hip fracture patients did not show a higher percentage of positive tissue transglutaminase levels compared with controls. These data suggest that routine testing for celiac disease among hip fracture patients may not prove useful, although larger prospective studies among hip fracture subjects are needed. PMID:23732553

  20. Active Robotics for Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dungy, Danton S; Netravali, Nathan A

    2016-01-01

    Robotics and computer-assisted navigation have been developed to increase the accuracy of hip implant placement and improve long-term outcomes of total hip arthroplasty (THA). These technologies have shown significant improvements in implant positioning when compared to conventional techniques. Currently, 3 robotic systems are cleared for use for THA in the US. The lead author (DSD) describes his preferred technique for using one of these systems, the TSolution One® (Think Surgical, Inc.). PMID:27327918

  1. NEW BEARING SURFACES IN TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; de Freitas Spinelli, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is being increasingly indicated for younger and more active patients, in addition to a naturally growing demand for the procedure because of increasing life expectancy among patients. The high costs of this surgery and the controversies regarding implant performance have made this topic the subject of constant research, seeking new materials with better resistance to wear and better biocompatibility. The present article provides a review of new surfaces in total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27042614

  2. [Treatment of hip fractures in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Hack, Juliana; Bliemel, Christopher; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Bücking, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Hip fractures are among the most common fractures in elderly people. The annual number of femoral fractures is even expected to increase because of an aging society. Due to the high number of comorbidities, there are special challenges in treating geriatric hip fracture patients, which require a multidisciplinary management. This includes surgical treatment allowing full weight bearing in the immediate postoperative period, osteoporosis treatment and falls prevention as well as an early ortho-geriatric rehabilitation program. PMID:25919823

  3. Quality of life impairments after hip arthroscopy in people with hip chondropathy.

    PubMed

    Filbay, Stephanie R; Kemp, Joanne L; Ackerman, Ilana N; Crossley, Kay M

    2016-07-01

    Many young individuals undergoing hip arthroscopic surgery have hip chondropathy. The impact of mild or more severe hip chondropathy 1-2 years following arthroscopy is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to (i) compare health-related quality of life (HRQoL), anxiety and depression scores between people who underwent arthroscopic treatment for hip chondropathy 1-2 years previously and pain-free controls; (ii) compare HRQoL, hip-related quality of life (QoL) and anxiety/depression scores in people with mild versus severe hip chondropathy and (iii) compare hip-related QoL items between chondropathy groups. The Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), International Hip Outcome Tool (iHOT-33), EuroQol-5D and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were compared between 71 individuals aged 18-60 years following arthroscopic treatment for hip chondroplasty (12-24 months previously) and 46 healthy controls. Comparisons were also performed between people with mild (Outerbridge grade 1-2) and severe (Outerbridge grade 3-4) hip chondropathy. Participants following arthroscopic treatment for hip chondroplasty reported worse HRQoL, hip-related QoL and anxiety, compared with pain-free controls (all P < 0.05), but no difference in self-care (P = 0.20). There were differences between mild and severe chondropathy groups for pain during sport/recreation [median (IQR) 20 (5-80) versus 60 (25-90) P = 0.01), pain after activity (40 (20-75) versus 75 (50-90) P = 0.01), difficulty maintaining fitness (30 (10-70) versus 75 (35-85) P = 0.02) and reduced hip confidence. Hip chondropathy was associated with significant QoL impairment, with severe chondropathy associated with the greatest impairment. The identification of specific areas of QoL impairment provides avenues to target rehabilitation and support. PMID:27583152

  4. Quality of life impairments after hip arthroscopy in people with hip chondropathy

    PubMed Central

    Filbay, Stephanie R.; Kemp, Joanne L.; Ackerman, Ilana N.; Crossley, Kay M.

    2016-01-01

    Many young individuals undergoing hip arthroscopic surgery have hip chondropathy. The impact of mild or more severe hip chondropathy 1–2 years following arthroscopy is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to (i) compare health-related quality of life (HRQoL), anxiety and depression scores between people who underwent arthroscopic treatment for hip chondropathy 1–2 years previously and pain-free controls; (ii) compare HRQoL, hip-related quality of life (QoL) and anxiety/depression scores in people with mild versus severe hip chondropathy and (iii) compare hip-related QoL items between chondropathy groups. The Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), International Hip Outcome Tool (iHOT-33), EuroQol-5D and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were compared between 71 individuals aged 18–60 years following arthroscopic treatment for hip chondroplasty (12–24 months previously) and 46 healthy controls. Comparisons were also performed between people with mild (Outerbridge grade 1–2) and severe (Outerbridge grade 3–4) hip chondropathy. Participants following arthroscopic treatment for hip chondroplasty reported worse HRQoL, hip-related QoL and anxiety, compared with pain-free controls (all P < 0.05), but no difference in self-care (P = 0.20). There were differences between mild and severe chondropathy groups for pain during sport/recreation [median (IQR) 20 (5–80) versus 60 (25–90) P = 0.01), pain after activity (40 (20–75) versus 75 (50–90) P = 0.01), difficulty maintaining fitness (30 (10–70) versus 75 (35–85) P = 0.02) and reduced hip confidence. Hip chondropathy was associated with significant QoL impairment, with severe chondropathy associated with the greatest impairment. The identification of specific areas of QoL impairment provides avenues to target rehabilitation and support. PMID:27583152

  5. Assessing risk factors for early hip osteoarthritis in activity-related hip pain: a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, K A; Glyn-Jones, S; Batt, M E; Arden, N K; Newton, J L

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hip pain and injury as a result of activity can lead to the development of early hip osteoarthritis (OA) in susceptible individuals. Our understanding of the factors that increase susceptibility continues to evolve. The ability to clearly identify individuals (and cohorts) with activity-related hip pain who are at risk of early hip OA is currently lacking. The purpose of this study was to gain expert consensus on which key clinical measures might help predict the risk of early hip OA in individuals presenting with activity-related hip pain. The agreed measures would constitute a standardised approach to initial clinical assessment to help identify these individuals. Methods This Dephi study used online surveys to gain concordance of expert opinion in a structured process of ‘rounds’. In this study, we asked ‘What outcome measures are useful in predicting hip OA in activity-related hip pain?’ The Delphi panel consisted of experts from sport and exercise medicine, orthopaedics, rheumatology, physiotherapy and OA research. Results The study identified key clinical measures in the history, examination and investigations (plain anteroposterior radiograph and femoroacetabular impingement views) that the panel agreed would be useful in predicting future risk of hip OA when assessing activity-related hip pain. The panel also agreed that certain investigations and tests (eg, MR angiography) did not currently have a role in routine assessment. There was a lack of consensus regarding the role of MRI, patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) and certain biomechanical and functional assessments. Conclusions We provide a standardised approach to the clinical assessment of patients with activity-related hip pain. Assessment measures rejected by the Delphi panel were newer, more expensive investigations that currently lack evidence. Assessment measures that did not reach consensus include MRI and PROMs. Their role remains ambiguous and would benefit from further

  6. [Fatigue property analysis of prosthesis of hip joint with two different materials].

    PubMed

    Tang, Gang; Wang, Jiange; Luo, Hongxia

    2015-02-01

    Total hip replacement (THR) is replacing the prosthesis stem similar to human bone that takes advantage of the material with both good mechanical properties and biocompatibility to the damaged articular surface. Thus it can not only alleviate or even eliminate the pain but also effectively maintain the joint stability and freedom and restore its normal performance. Finite element analysis was used in this study to establish a 3D model of artificial hip stem, and explore its fatigue properties of different materials to ensure the safety and reliability. The calculating obtained two results of different metal hip prosthesis, including lifetime and deformation. The minimum service life of titanium prosthesis reaches 568 million times, which satisfies ISO standards, while the stainless steel does not suit to be a prosthesis material. PMID:25997269

  7. Effects of limited food consumption on the incidence of hip dysplasia in growing dogs.

    PubMed

    Kealy, R D; Olsson, S E; Monti, K L; Lawler, D F; Biery, D N; Helms, R W; Lust, G; Smith, G K

    1992-09-15

    Forty-eight 8-week-old Labrador Retrievers were allotted to 2 groups of 24 dogs each; 1 group was fed ad libitum and the other group was given 25% less of the same feed until the dogs were 2 years old. Radiography of the hip joints was done when the dogs were 30, 42, 54, 78, and 104 weeks old. Subluxation was measured by the Norberg angle on radiographs made with the dog in the standard (extended limb) position. Independent of age at which the radiography was done, there was less subluxation of the femoral heads in the limit-fed dogs. Using the Swedish method of hip joint evaluation on the same radiographs, it was found that fewer dogs on limited food intake had signs of hip dysplasia. Radiographs done when dogs were 2 years old, for all the methods used (Norberg angle in standard and frog-limb position, the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals [OFA] score, and the Swedish score), revealed less hip dysplasia (less joint subluxation and less degenerative joint disease) in the limit-fed dogs. Using the OFA method, 7 of the 24 limit-fed dogs and 16 of the 24 ad libitum-fed dogs were diagnosed as having hip dysplasia. Similarly, using the Swedish method, 5 of the 24 limit-fed dogs and 18 of the 24 ad libitum-fed dogs were diagnosed as having hip dysplasia. The food-intake-related differences were significant both for the OFA score and for the Swedish score.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1399793

  8. Total Hip Arthroplasty in a Girdlestone Hip following a Failed Hemiarthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Purushotham, VJ; Ranganath, BT

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Girdlestone hip arthroplasty, though described as a salvage procedure for infected hip joints, can also be considered for failed Hemiarthroplasty procedures. The functional results of such Girdlestone hip may not be satisfactory. They may require total hip replacement to improve the quality of life, which are technically challenging. Here we are reporting such a case ina 60 year old male patient, with review of literature. Case Report: A 60 year old male patient underwent cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty for fracture neck of femur which failed, owing to improper implantation. Subsequently he underwent Girdlestone arthroplasty which resulted in persistent painful hip. He presented to us in this situation, where we successfully converted the Girdlestone arthroplasty to a Total Hip arthroplasty. Conclusion: Improper implantation in Hemiarthroplasty fails subsequently. In such cases Girdlestone arthroplasty may be an option to consider, though it may not give requisite relief to patient in some cases. In such situations total hip arthroplasty procedure, though technically challenging will give stable painless hip to the patient. PMID:27299043

  9. Hip reconstruction osteotomy by Ilizarov method as a salvage option for abnormal hip joints.

    PubMed

    Umer, Masood; Rashid, Haroon; Umer, Hafiz Muhammad; Raza, Hasnain

    2014-01-01

    Hip joint instability can be secondary to congenital hip pathologies like developmental dysplasia (DDH) or acquired such as sequel of infective or neoplastic process. An unstable hip is usually associated with loss of bone from the proximal femur, proximal migration of the femur, lower-extremity length discrepancy, abnormal gait, and pain. In this case series of 37 patients coming to our institution between May 2005 and December 2011, we report our results in treatment of unstable hip joint by hip reconstruction osteotomy using the Ilizarov method and apparatus. This includes an acute valgus and extension osteotomy of the proximal femur combined with gradual varus and distraction (if required) for realignment and lengthening at a second, more distal, femoral osteotomy. 18 males and 19 females participated in the study. There were 17 patients with DDH, 12 with sequelae of septic arthritis, 2 with tuberculous arthritis, 4 with posttraumatic arthritis, and 2 with focal proximal femoral deficiency. Outcomes were evaluated by using Harris Hip Scoring system. At the mean follow-up of 37 months, Harris Hip Score had significantly improved in all patients. To conclude, illizarov hip reconstruction can successfully improve Trendelenburg's gait. It supports the pelvis and simultaneously restores knee alignment and corrects lower-extremity length discrepancy (LLD). PMID:24895616

  10. The 1963 Hip-Hop Machine: Hip-Hop Pedagogy as Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Proposes an alternative invention strategy for research-based argumentative writing. Investigates the coincidental usage of the term "whatever" in hip-hop, theory, and composition studies. Presents a "whatever-pedagogy" identified as "hip-hop pedagogy," a writing practice that models itself after digital sampling's rhetorical strategy of…

  11. HIP HOP for HIV Awareness: Using Hip Hop Culture to Promote Community-Level HIV Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Mandy J.; Hallmark, Camden J.; McNeese, Marlene; Blue, Nike; Ross, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper was to determine the effectiveness of the HIP HOP for HIV Awareness intervention, an innovative model utilising an exchange of an HIV test for a hip hop concert ticket, in a metropolitan city among African American youth and young adults. A subset of intervention participants participated in standardised testing, sex…

  12. Hip Reconstruction Osteotomy by Ilizarov Method as a Salvage Option for Abnormal Hip Joints

    PubMed Central

    Umer, Masood; Rashid, Haroon; Raza, Hasnain

    2014-01-01

    Hip joint instability can be secondary to congenital hip pathologies like developmental dysplasia (DDH) or acquired such as sequel of infective or neoplastic process. An unstable hip is usually associated with loss of bone from the proximal femur, proximal migration of the femur, lower-extremity length discrepancy, abnormal gait, and pain. In this case series of 37 patients coming to our institution between May 2005 and December 2011, we report our results in treatment of unstable hip joint by hip reconstruction osteotomy using the Ilizarov method and apparatus. This includes an acute valgus and extension osteotomy of the proximal femur combined with gradual varus and distraction (if required) for realignment and lengthening at a second, more distal, femoral osteotomy. 18 males and 19 females participated in the study. There were 17 patients with DDH, 12 with sequelae of septic arthritis, 2 with tuberculous arthritis, 4 with posttraumatic arthritis, and 2 with focal proximal femoral deficiency. Outcomes were evaluated by using Harris Hip Scoring system. At the mean follow-up of 37 months, Harris Hip Score had significantly improved in all patients. To conclude, illizarov hip reconstruction can successfully improve Trendelenburg's gait. It supports the pelvis and simultaneously restores knee alignment and corrects lower-extremity length discrepancy (LLD). PMID:24895616

  13. Total hip replacement for high dislocated hips without femoral shortening osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Zhu, Z-A; Xie, Y-Z; Yu, B; Yu, D-G

    2011-09-01

    When performing total hip replacement (THR) in high dislocated hips, the presence of soft-tissue contractures means that most surgeons prefer to use a femoral shortening osteotomy in order to avoid the risk of neurovascular damage. However, this technique will sacrifice femoral length and reduce the extent of any leg-length equalisation. We report our experience of 74 THRs performed between 2000 and 2008 in 65 patients with a high dislocated hip without a femoral shortening osteotomy. The mean age of the patients was 55 years (46 to 72) and the mean follow-up was 42 months (12 to 78). All implants were cementless except for one resurfacing hip implant. We attempted to place the acetabular component in the anatomical position in each hip. The mean Harris hip score improved from 53 points (34 to 74) pre-operatively to 86 points (78 to 95) at final follow-up. The mean radiologically determined leg lengthening was 42 mm (30 to 66), and the mean leg-length discrepancy decreased from 36 mm (5 to 56) pre-operatively to 8.5 mm (0 to 18) postoperatively. Although there were four (5%) post-operative femoral nerve palsies, three had fully resolved by six months after the operation. No loosening of the implant was observed, and no dislocations or infections were encountered. Total hip replacement without a femoral shortening osteotomy proved to be a safe and effective surgical treatment for high dislocated hips. PMID:21911529

  14. Invariant hip moment pattern while walking with a robotic hip exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Cara L; Ferris, Daniel P

    2011-03-15

    Robotic lower limb exoskeletons hold significant potential for gait assistance and rehabilitation; however, we have a limited understanding of how people adapt to walking with robotic devices. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that people reduce net muscle moments about their joints when robotic assistance is provided. This reduction in muscle moment results in a total joint moment (muscle plus exoskeleton) that is the same as the moment without the robotic assistance despite potential differences in joint angles. To test this hypothesis, eight healthy subjects trained with the robotic hip exoskeleton while walking on a force-measuring treadmill. The exoskeleton provided hip flexion assistance from approximately 33% to 53% of the gait cycle. We calculated the root mean squared difference (RMSD) between the average of data from the last 15 min of the powered condition and the unpowered condition. After completing three 30-min training sessions, the hip exoskeleton provided 27% of the total peak hip flexion moment during gait. Despite this substantial contribution from the exoskeleton, subjects walked with a total hip moment pattern (muscle plus exoskeleton) that was almost identical and more similar to the unpowered condition than the hip angle pattern (hip moment RMSD 0.027, angle RMSD 0.134, p<0.001). The angle and moment RMSD were not different for the knee and ankle joints. These findings support the concept that people adopt walking patterns with similar joint moment patterns despite differences in hip joint angles for a given walking speed. PMID:21333995

  15. The Effects of a Home-Based Connective Tissue Targeting Therapy on Hip Development in Children With Cerebral Palsy: Six Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Drewes, Erika; Driscoll, Mark; Blyum, Leonid; Vincentz, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Hip subluxation in children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) has an incidence of 10-30 %, and children with severe CP having the highest incidence. The condition deteriorates if left untreated. Surgery is the most common method used in managing hip subluxation because standard conservative therapies do not improve it. Surgery may have to be repeated and comes at a biological cost to the child. A new home-based CAM, Advanced Biomechanical Rehabilitation (ABR), has shown encouraging results leading to improved spinal stability and stability in sitting in children with severe CP. This case report examines hip development over time in six children with severe CP in the ABR Program. Changes in their clinical picture and pelvic X-Rays are reported. ABR appeared to help stabilize and improve hip subluxation, resulting in these children not requiring further surgical intervention. These findings warrant further investigation of ABR as a noninvasive therapy for hip subluxation. PMID:27198038

  16. Isokinetic performance of hip muscles after revision total hip arthroplasty via previous anterolateral approach.

    PubMed

    Cankaya, Deniz; Aydin, Cemal; Karakus, Dilek; Toprak, Ali; Ozkurt, Bulent; Tabak, Yalçın

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the isokinetic performance of hip muscles and clinical outcomes after revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) via same anterolateral approach used in primary surgery. Thirty patients who had undergone previous THA via an anterolateral approach underwent both acetabular and femoral component revision after aseptic loosening. The Harris Hip Score (HHS) was evaluated during a minimum 2-year follow-up. The isokinetic muscle strength of the operated and nonoperated hips was assessed 1 year after surgery. The HHS improved from 49.0 to 77.4. Operated and nonoperated hips exhibited similar isokinetic performance during all measurements (flexion, extension, and abduction) (p>0.05). This prospective study showed that the anterolateral approach preserves abductor strength after revision THA in aseptic cases with acceptable functional and clinical results. The main clinical relevance of this study is that the same anterolateral approach used in previous primary THA is also safe and viable for revision THA. PMID:26435233

  17. ELIGIBILITY FOR THE HIP-RESURFACING ARTHROPLASTY PROCEDURE: AN EVALUATION ON 592 HIPS

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Roberto Dantas; Faria, Rafael Salomon Silva; Duarte, David Marcelo; Takano, Marcelo Itiro; Sugiyama, Mauricio Morita

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the percentage of ideal patients who would be eligible for hip-resurfacing surgery at a reference service for hip arthroplasty. Methods: Out of all the cases of hip arthroplasty operated at Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo (HSPE) between January 2009 and December 2010, we assessed a total of 592 procedures that would fit the criteria for indication for resurfacing arthroplasty, after clinical and radiological evaluation according to the criteria established by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and by Seyler et al. Results: Among the total number of hip replacement arthroplasty cases, 5.74% of the patients were eligible. Among the patients who underwent primary arthroplasty, we found that 8.23% presented ideal conditions for this procedure. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that this type of surgery still has a limited role among hip surgery methods. PMID:27047851

  18. Automatic assessment of volume asymmetries applied to hip abductor muscles in patients with hip arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemt, Christian; Modat, Marc; Pichat, Jonas; Cardoso, M. J.; Henckel, Joahnn; Hart, Alister; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2015-03-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip arthroplasties have been utilised over the last 15 years to restore hip function for 1.5 million patients worldwide. Althoug widely used, this hip arthroplasty releases metal wear debris which lead to muscle atrophy. The degree of muscle wastage differs across patients ranging from mild to severe. The longterm outcomes for patients with MoM hip arthroplasty are reduced for increasing degrees of muscle atrophy, highlighting the need to automatically segment pathological muscles. The automated segmentation of pathological soft tissues is challenging as these lack distinct boundaries and morphologically differ across subjects. As a result, there is no method reported in the literature which has been successfully applied to automatically segment pathological muscles. We propose the first automated framework to delineate severely atrophied muscles by applying a novel automated segmentation propagation framework to patients with MoM hip arthroplasty. The proposed algorithm was used to automatically quantify muscle wastage in these patients.

  19. Powered hip exoskeletons can reduce the user's hip and ankle muscle activations during walking.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, Tommaso; Carrozza, Maria Chiara; Agrawal, Sunil K

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we study the human locomotor adaptation to the action of a powered exoskeleton providing assistive torque at the user's hip during walking. To this end, we propose a controller that provides the user's hip with a fraction of the nominal torque profile, adapted to the specific gait features of the user from Winter's reference data . The assistive controller has been implemented on the ALEX II exoskeleton and tested on ten healthy subjects. Experimental results show that when assisted by the exoskeleton, users can reduce the muscle effort compared to free walking. Despite providing assistance only to the hip joint, both hip and ankle muscles significantly reduced their activation, indicating a clear tradeoff between hip and ankle strategy to propel walking. PMID:23529105

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of hip joint cartilage and labrum

    PubMed Central

    Zilkens, Christoph; Miese, Falk; Jäger, Marcus; Bittersohl, Bernd; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2011-01-01

    Hip joint instability and impingement are the most common biomechanical risk factors that put the hip joint at risk to develop premature osteoarthritis. Several surgical procedures like periacetabular osteotomy for hip dysplasia or hip arthroscopy or safe surgical hip dislocation for femoroacetabular impingement aim at restoring the hip anatomy. However, the success of joint preserving surgical procedures is limited by the amount of pre-existing cartilage damage. Biochemically sensitive MRI techniques like delayed Gadolinium Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) might help to monitor the effect of surgical or non-surgical procedures in the effort to halt or even reverse joint damage. PMID:22053256

  1. Resurfacing hip arthroplasty in neuromuscular hip disorders – A retrospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Tudor, Francois; Ariamanesh, Amir; Potty, Anish; Hashemi-Nejad, Aresh

    2013-01-01

    Background Management of the degenerate hip in patients with neuromuscular conditions should be aimed at improving quality of life and ease of nursing care. Arthroplasty poses a significant challenge with predisposition to dislocation and loosening due to anatomical abnormalities, soft tissue contractures and impaired muscle tone. Methods We present a series of 11 hips (9 patients) following total hip resurfacing arthroplasty for painful osteoarthritis in patients with differing neuromuscular conditions. Patients were assessed clinically and radiographically and also for satisfaction of their carers due to improved ability to provide nursing care. Mean patient age was 33.1 years (range 13–49 years) with mean follow up at publication 63.7 months (41–89 months). All patients were operated by a single surgeon (AHN) and received the required post operative care and physiotherapy. Soft tissue releases were performed when necessary. All hips were assessed clinically and radiographically at 6 weeks and 6 months and 1 year post-operatively. Six month follow-up also included a questionnaire with scoring of care-provider satisfaction. Results Ten hips had good clinical results with improvement in pain and function and radiologically showed no signs of loosening. One hip required revision to proximal femoral excision due to dislocation and loose acetabular component with severe pain. None of the other hips dislocated. Analysis of care provider satisfaction assessing ability to provide personal care, positioning and transferring, comfort, interaction and communication scored excellent to good in 10 patients and satisfactory in one. Conclusion We believe hip resurfacing arthroplasty to be a viable option in the treatment of the complex problem of osteoarthritis in the hips of patients with neuromuscular disease. The improved biomechanics confer greater stability when compared to conventional total hip arthroplasty. Although technically demanding, a successful result has

  2. Effects of arthroscopic-assisted surgery on irreducible developmental dislocation of hip by mid-term follow-up: An observational study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui-Fa; Yan, Ya-Bo; Xu, Chao; Li, Tian-Qing; Zhao, Tian-Feng; Liu, Ning; Huang, Lu-Yu; Zhang, Chun-Li; Lei, Wei

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the indications, surgical technique, and the clinical effects of arthroscopic-assisted treatment of irreducible developmental dislocation of the hip by mid-term follow-up. Arthroscopic-assisted surgeries were performed on 40 children (52 hips) between January 2005 and December 2009. Anterior and antero-superior greater trochanter portals were used in these treatments. Spica cast and abduction splint were applied for 3 months postoperatively. The follow-up was conducted on every 3 months postoperatively. During 12-month follow-up, a secondary treatment such as acetabuloplasty and/or femoral osteotomy (shortening, varus, and derotation) was applied if the acetabular angle was greater than 25°. The pelvic acetabular angle, Mckay and Severin score were evaluated every 6 months in all children. With 36 to 96 months (average 71 months) follow-up, 35 children (44 hips) were successfully followed up with complete case data while 5 children unsuccessfully. According to Tönnis classification, there were 5 grade 1 hips, 14 grade 2 hips, 14 grade 3 hips, 11 grade 4 hips, in which 3 children (4 hips) were failed in arthroscopic reduction and femoral head avascular necrosis occurred in 2 children (4 hips). According to Mckay standard, the good rate is 100%. According to Severin standard, the good rate is 84.1%. Arthroscopic assisted treatment is an effective way of reduction of the irreducible hip. Compared with the open reduction, arthroscopic treatment combined with acetabuloplasty and/or femoral osteotomy has advantages of less trauma and better function preservation. PMID:27537595

  3. Evidence-based clinical audit criteria for the prevention and management of delirium in the postoperative patient with a hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Holly, Cheryl; Rittenmeyer, Leslie; Weeks, Susan Mace

    2014-01-01

    Delirium is a frequent, yet often unrecognized, occurrence in elderly hospitalized patients. In patients with hip fracture, the incidence of delirium is reported to be as high as 62% and even greater if over 65 years of age. One approach to the prevention and management of postoperative delirium in elderly patients with hip fracture is the clinical audit. A clinical audit is a retrospective assessment of clinical care of patients and is guided by criteria that are evidence-based statements of best practice. The use of measurable, objective criterion, with an agreed standard of performance is the hallmark of an audit. The clinical audit criteria presented in this article for the prevention and management of delirium in hospitalized elderly with hip fracture were determined by a compilation of systematic reviews and existing evidence-based clinical guidelines. The following 5 audit criteria are discussed: (1) All elderly patients with a hip fracture are assessed for risk factors for developing delirium daily using a valid and reliable tool; (2) the environment of the patient with hip fracture is assessed daily for conduciveness to maintaining sensory orientation; (3) all patients with hip fracture receive essential nursing care; (4) appropriate clinical criteria are applied to confirm a diagnosis of delirium in patients with hip fracture; and (5) nonpharmacologic interventions are employed before pharmacologic interventions in patients with hip fracture with a diagnosis of delirium. PMID:24457386

  4. Impact of hip fracture on mortality: a cohort study in hip fracture discordant identical twins.

    PubMed

    Michaëlsson, Karl; Nordström, Peter; Nordström, Anna; Garmo, Hans; Byberg, Liisa; Pedersen, Nancy L; Melhus, Håkan

    2014-02-01

    Several studies have shown a long-lasting higher mortality after hip fracture, but the reasons for the excess risk are not well understood. We aimed to determine whether a higher mortality after hip fracture exists when controlling for genetic constitution, shared environment, comorbidity, and lifestyle by use of a nationwide cohort study in hip fracture discordant monozygotic twins. All 286 identical Swedish twin pairs discordant for hip fracture (1972 to 2010) were identified. Comorbidity and lifestyle information was retrieved by registers and questionnaire information. We used intrapair Cox regression to compute multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for death. During follow-up, 143 twins with a hip fracture died (50%) compared with 101 twins (35%) without a hip fracture. Through the first year after hip fracture, the rate of death increased fourfold in women (HR = 3.71; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.32-10.40) and sevenfold in men (HR = 6.67; 95% CI 1.47-30.13). The increased rate in women only persisted during the first year after hip fracture (HR after 1 year = 0.99; 95% CI 0.66-1.50), whereas the corresponding HR in men was 2.58 (95% CI 1.02-6.62). The higher risk in men after the hip fracture event was successively attenuated during follow-up. After 5 years, the hazard ratio in men with a hip fracture was 1.19 (95% CI 0.29-4.90). On average, the hip fracture contributed to 0.9 years of life lost in women (95% CI 0.06-1.7) and 2.7 years in men (95% CI 1.7-3.7). The potential years of life lost associated with the hip fracture was especially pronounced in older men (>75 years), with an average loss of 47% (95% CI 31-61) of the expected remaining lifetime. We conclude that both women and men display a higher mortality after hip fracture independent of genes, comorbidity, and lifestyle. PMID:23821464

  5. Arthroscopic Treatment for External Snapping Hip

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jae Youn; Kwak, Hong Suk; Yoon, Kang Sup; Chang, Jae Suk

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of arthroscopic treatment for recalcitrant external snapping hip. Materials and Methods Between September 2011 and June 2013, we evaluated 7 patients (10 cases) with snapping hip who were refractory to conservative treatments for at least 3 months. Two patients (4 cases) were impossible to adduct both knees in 90°of hip flexion. Surgery was done in lateral decubitus position, under spinal anesthesia. We made 2 arthroscopic portals to operate the patients, and used cross-cutting with flap resection technique to treat the lesion. We performed additional gluteal sling release in those 2 patients (4 cases) with adduction difficulty. Average follow-up length was 19 months (range, 12-33 months). Clinical improvement was evaluated with visual analog scale (VAS), modified Harris hip score (mHHS), and also investigated for presence of limping or other complications as well. Results The VAS decreased from 6.8 (range, 6-9) preoperatively to 0.2 (range, 0-2) postoperatively, and the mHHS improved from 68.2 to 94.8 after surgery. None of the patients complained of post-operative wound problem or surgical complications. Conclusion The clinical outcome of arthroscopic treatment for recalcitrant external snapping hip was encouraging and all patients were also satisfied with the cosmetic results. PMID:27536576

  6. Trajectories of depressive symptoms after hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cristancho, P.; Lenze, E. J.; Avidan, M. S.; Rawson, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hip fracture is often complicated by depressive symptoms in older adults. We sought to characterize trajectories of depressive symptoms arising after hip fracture and examine their relationship with functional outcomes and walking ability. We also investigated clinical and psychosocial predictors of these trajectories. Method We enrolled 482 inpatients, aged ≥60 years, who were admitted for hip fracture repair at eight St Louis, MO area hospitals between 2008 and 2012. Participants with current depression diagnosis and/or notable cognitive impairment were excluded. Depressive symptoms and functional recovery were assessed with the Montgomery–Asberg Depression Rating Scale and Functional Recovery Score, respectively, for 52 weeks after fracture. Health, cognitive, and psychosocial variables were gathered at baseline. We modeled depressive symptoms using group-based trajectory analysis and subsequently identified correlates of trajectory group membership. Results Three trajectories emerged according to the course of depressive symptoms, which we termed ‘resilient’, ‘distressed’, and ‘depressed’. The depressed trajectory (10% of participants) experienced a persistently high level of depressive symptoms and a slower time to recover mobility than the other trajectory groups. Stressful life events prior to the fracture, current smoking, higher anxiety, less social support, antidepressant use, past depression, and type of implant predicted membership of the depressed trajectory. Conclusions Depressive symptoms arising after hip fracture are associated with poorer functional status. Clinical and psychosocial variables predicted membership of the depression trajectory. Early identification and intervention of patients in a depressive trajectory may improve functional outcomes after hip fracture. PMID:27032698

  7. Cystic lesion around the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Yukata, Kiminori; Nakai, Sho; Goto, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Yuichi; Shimaoka, Yasunori; Yamanaka, Issei; Sairyo, Koichi; Hamawaki, Jun-Ichi

    2015-10-18

    This article presents a narrative review of cystic lesions around the hip and primarily consists of 5 sections: Radiological examination, prevalence, pathogenesis, symptoms, and treatment. Cystic lesions around the hip are usually asymptomatic but may be observed incidentally on imaging examinations, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Some cysts may enlarge because of various pathological factors, such as trauma, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or total hip arthroplasty (THA), and may become symptomatic because of compression of surrounding structures, including the femoral, obturator, or sciatic nerves, external iliac or common femoral artery, femoral or external iliac vein, sigmoid colon, cecum, small bowel, ureters, and bladder. Treatment for symptomatic cystic lesions around the hip joint includes rest, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug administration, needle aspiration, and surgical excision. Furthermore, when these cysts are associated with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and THA, primary or revision THA surgery will be necessary concurrent with cyst excision. Knowledge of the characteristic clinical appearance of cystic masses around the hip will be useful for determining specific diagnoses and treatments. PMID:26495246

  8. Cystic lesion around the hip joint

    PubMed Central

    Yukata, Kiminori; Nakai, Sho; Goto, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Yuichi; Shimaoka, Yasunori; Yamanaka, Issei; Sairyo, Koichi; Hamawaki, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a narrative review of cystic lesions around the hip and primarily consists of 5 sections: Radiological examination, prevalence, pathogenesis, symptoms, and treatment. Cystic lesions around the hip are usually asymptomatic but may be observed incidentally on imaging examinations, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Some cysts may enlarge because of various pathological factors, such as trauma, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or total hip arthroplasty (THA), and may become symptomatic because of compression of surrounding structures, including the femoral, obturator, or sciatic nerves, external iliac or common femoral artery, femoral or external iliac vein, sigmoid colon, cecum, small bowel, ureters, and bladder. Treatment for symptomatic cystic lesions around the hip joint includes rest, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug administration, needle aspiration, and surgical excision. Furthermore, when these cysts are associated with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and THA, primary or revision THA surgery will be necessary concurrent with cyst excision. Knowledge of the characteristic clinical appearance of cystic masses around the hip will be useful for determining specific diagnoses and treatments. PMID:26495246

  9. A Two Phase Treatment of an Infected Hip Endoprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Ciriviri, Jasmin; Talevski, Darko; Nestorovski, Zoran; Vraniskoski, Tode; Mishevska-Perchinkova, Snežana

    2015-01-01

    The revision of the two phase treatment represents a golden standard in the treatment of infected endoprosthesis. Throughout this study, the results of 21 patients with an infected hip endoprosthesis treated in two phases have been processed, with the use of an antibiotic spacer, within the period of 2009 and 2012. Thereby, a unique protocol for diagnosis and treatment of infections has been applied to all the patients, which entails a preoperational x-ray image, laboratory findings (Se, CRP), as well as a puncture aspiration with a microbiological and biochemical examination of the aspirated fragments. The operational treatment consists of: taking a sample for microbiological and histopathological diagnosis, removal of the implanted endoprosthesis, excision of the avascular and necrotic tissue and installing an antibiotic spacer. Postoperatively, the patients are treated with a parenteral application of an antibiotics based on an antibiogram, throughout a period of two weeks, and later on an oral treatment, a combination of two antibiotics, depending on the antibiogram, within the following four to six weeks. After the appeasement of the local findings and the laboratory results, a revision with a removal of the antibiotic spacer and reimplantation of an endoprosthesis - revisional or primary has been conducted on the patients, depending on the bone deficit. The functionality of the joint is graded based on the Haris Hip Score. The patients are being observed postoperatively for a period of 12 to 36 months. A definite reimplantation has been applied to 20 patients, while one patient has been treated with a resection method. The Haris Hip Score was 45 preoperatively, and 80 postoperatively. The applied protocol of the treatment of infected endoprosthesis is effective in the eradication of the infection and the final reimplantation. PMID:27442385

  10. Hip or knee replacement - in the hospital after

    MedlinePlus

    Hip replacement surgery - after - self-care; Knee replacement surgery - after - self-care ... occupational therapist will teach people who have had hip replacement how to safely perform daily activities . All of ...

  11. Hip or knee replacement - before - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... replace all or part of your hip or knee joint with an artificial device (a prosthesis). Below are some questions you may want to ask your health care provider to help you prepare for your hip or knee replacement.

  12. Hip or knee replacement - after - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Below are some questions you may want to ask your health care provider to help you take ... What to ask your doctor after hip or knee replacement; Hip replacement - after - what to ask your doctor; Knee replacement - after - ...

  13. Eastern portal, looking W. Note hipped roof covered with wood ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Eastern portal, looking W. Note hipped roof covered with wood shingles, added in 1993. The hipped roof is unique in U.S. covered bridges. - Doe River Bridge, Spanning Doe River, Third Avenue, Elizabethton, Carter County, TN

  14. Effects of preoperative physiotherapy in hip osteoarthritis patients awaiting total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Czyżewska, Anna; Walesiak, Katarzyna; Krawczak, Karolina; Cabaj, Dominika; Górecki, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The World Health Organization (WHO) claimed osteoarthritis as a civilization-related disease. The effectiveness of preoperative physiotherapy among patients suffering hip osteoarthritis (OA) at the end of their conservative treatment is rarely described in the literature. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of life and musculoskeletal health status of patients who received preoperative physiotherapy before total hip replacement (THR) surgery within a year prior to admission for a scheduled THR and those who did not. Material and methods Forty-five patients, admitted to the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology of Locomotor System for elective total hip replacement surgery, were recruited for this study. The assessment consisted of a detailed interview using various questionnaires: the Harris Hip Score (HHS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), as well as physical examination. Patients were assigned to groups based on their attendance of preoperative physiotherapy within a year prior to surgery. Results Among patients who received preoperative physiotherapy a significant improvement was found for pain, daily functioning, vitality, psychological health, social life, and (active and passive) internal rotation (p < 0.05). Conclusions Patients are not routinely referred to physiotherapy within a year before total hip replacement surgery. This study confirmed that pre-operative physiotherapy may have a positive influence on selected musculoskeletal system status indicators and quality of life in hip osteoarthritis patients awaiting surgery. PMID:25395951

  15. Relative importance of gait vs. joint positioning on hip contact forces after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Foucher, Kharma C; Hurwitz, Debra E; Wimmer, Markus A

    2009-12-01

    Implant loosening is a common indication for total hip replacement (THR) revision. High contact forces and implant twisting moments are thought to be associated with implant loosening. Relationships between joint positioning and hip forces, or outcomes, have been investigated through in vivo and in vitro modalities. Relationships between hip forces and gait are less understood, despite repeated findings that gait following a THR does not fully return to normal. We tested the hypothesis that gait parameters would be better predictors of implant force (peak contact forces and peak twisting moment during walking) than joint positioning parameters. Subjects underwent gait analysis, hip force modeling, and measurement of clinical radiographs 1 year after successful THR surgery. Gait parameters were consistently more influential in determining hip forces. Alone, gait explained as much as 67% of the variation in force, compared to a maximum of 33% by joint geometry. Combinations of gait and joint positioning parameters together explained up to 86% of the variation in hip force parameters. Results suggest that gait may provide a valuable postoperatively modifiable target to improve hip loads and potentially reduce the risk for implant loosening. PMID:19514072

  16. Squeaking hip arthroplasties: a tribological phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Brockett, Claire L; Williams, Sophie; Jin, Zhongmin; Isaac, Graham H; Fisher, John

    2013-01-01

    The clinical incidence of squeaking has been reported with increasing frequency, with ceramic-on-ceramic bearings seemingly most affected. This study investigated potential causes of squeaking in hard-on-hard hip bearings through 2 sets of experimental conditions. Bearing clearance appeared to affect the incidence of squeaking in metal-on-metal surface arthroplasties. The addition of third-body particles to the interface for total hip arthroplasties also affected the incidence of squeaking. In both studies, the incidence of squeaking correlated well with elevated friction. The findings of this study suggest that a likely cause of squeaking in the hip arthroplasty is adverse tribological conditions caused by suboptimal lubrication. There are numerous factors that may cause the suboptimal lubrication, and therefore, it is unlikely that an individual cause for squeaking will be identified. PMID:22480525

  17. Ultrasonographic evaluation of hip morphology in osteochondrodysplasias.

    PubMed

    De Pellegrin, M P; Mackenzie, W G; Harcke, H T

    2000-01-01

    The developing hip in children with osteochondrodysplasias has not been well-described because of delayed ossification and limitations of conventional radiologic techniques. Twenty-four children with various osteochondrodysplasias were evaluated by ultrasonography. Variation in the configuration of the acetabulum included a horizontal acetabular roof owing to delayed iliac development and a notched acetabular roof with lateral bone deficiency. All children had thickened acetabular cartilage except for one child with osteogenesis imperfecta. Coxa vara was a common finding. All neonates displayed a very small beta angle (mean, 42 degrees) because the labrum lay more vertically, secondary to deep engagement of the femoral head in the acetabulum. Proximal femoral ossification was delayed in most children, which allows use of ultrasonography at a later age than is possible in the normal pediatric population. Hip ultrasonography in children with skeletal dysplasias can aid in early diagnosis and is useful in assessing hip morphology and development. PMID:11008737

  18. Total hip arthroplasty after rotational acetabular osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hideya; Takatori, Yoshio; Moro, Toru; Oshima, Hirofumi; Oka, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine whether the outcomes of total hip arthroplasty (THA) after rotational acetabular osteotomy (RAO) are equal to those of primary THA, and to elucidate the characteristics of THA after RAO. The clinical and radiographic findings of THA after RAO (44 hips), with minimum 24 months of follow-up, were compared with a matched control group of 58 hips without prior RAO. We found that the outcomes in terms of functional scores and complication rates did not differ between THA after RAO and THA without previous pelvic osteotomy, indicating that the results of THA after RAO are equivalent to those of primary THA. Although THA after RAO requires technical considerations, similar clinical outcomes to primary THA can be expected. PMID:25456635

  19. Hip replacement by a minimal anterior approach.

    PubMed

    Paillard, P

    2007-08-01

    The mini-incision anterior approach in total hip replacement is not new, but uses a shorter incision than the traditional Hueter approach, typically only 6-8 cm in length. Despite its size, the single anterior incision allows good exposure. It is very atraumatic, preserves muscles and tendons, and allows the patient early mobilisation and fast postoperative recovery. Although, a special table (e.g., a Judet table) and specific tools (e.g., a curved reamer) are needed to perform hip replacement via the mini-anterior approach, any kind of hip prosthesis (cemented or uncemented) can be implanted. As there is a significant learning curve in mastering the mini-incision anterior approach, surgeons are advised to start with a longer incision and then to decrease its length with increasing experience. PMID:17657491

  20. COMPONENT VERSION IN MODULAR TOTAL HIP REVISION

    PubMed Central

    Kopec, Michael A.; Pemberton, Aaron; Milbrandt, Joseph C.; Allan, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    Morphologic changes of the proximal femur make revision total hip arthroplasty challenging. Metaphyseal retroversion and diaphyseal varus are common in this scenario. Twenty-one total hip revisions using a modular femoral prosthesis were examined by obtaining three radiographs (A/P, surgical lateral, and true lateral of the femur) to assemble CAD models for determining the range of modular component positioning. An average of femoral neck anteversion was observed. Seventeen of 21 cases (81%) had retroverted metaphyseal segments (−23.2°+/−17.4°) and/or varus stems (−32.1°+/−13.0°). Neck anteversion averaged 21.4°(+/−10.0°). One of 21 cases (5%) resulted in component orientation similar to a non-modular prosthesis. Modular components provide options to accommodate proximal femoral remodeling not afforded by monobloc stems in total hip revision surgery. PMID:19742077

  1. Septic arthritis of the hip - current concepts.

    PubMed

    Rutz, E; Brunner, R

    2009-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the hip is the commonest septic condition during growth, reaching a distinct peak in frequency during infancy. The aetiology is a haematogenous joint infection. Indicative signs are severe pain when moving the joint, septic appearance and a poor general condition of these small and young patients. The diagnosis often can be difficult in infants since septic temperatures are not always present. An ultrasound scan shows the hip joint effusion and the capsular distension. X-ray investigation helps to exclude defective situations. Therapeutic options are: in patients with short history without radiologically visible complications we recommend repeated arthroscopic irrigation and in patients with long history and a radiologically visible defect of the femoral head or dislocation we recommend arthrotomy and open revision or reduction of the hip joint. PMID:19306242

  2. Reverse-total shoulder arthroplasty cost-effectiveness: A quality-adjusted life years comparison with total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bachman, Daniel; Nyland, John; Krupp, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare reverse-total shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) cost-effectiveness with total hip arthroplasty cost-effectiveness. METHODS: This study used a stochastic model and decision-making algorithm to compare the cost-effectiveness of RSA and total hip arthroplasty. Fifteen patients underwent pre-operative, and 3, 6, and 12 mo post-operative clinical examinations and Short Form-36 Health Survey completion. Short form-36 Health Survey subscale scores were converted to EuroQual Group Five Dimension Health Outcome scores and compared with historical data from age-matched patients who had undergone total hip arthroplasty. Quality-adjusted life year (QALY) improvements based on life expectancies were calculated. RESULTS: The cost/QALY was $3900 for total hip arthroplasty and $11100 for RSA. After adjusting the model to only include shoulder-specific physical function subscale items, the RSA QALY improved to 2.8 years, and its cost/QALY decreased to $8100. CONCLUSION: Based on industry accepted standards, cost/QALY estimates supported both RSA and total hip arthroplasty cost-effectiveness. Although total hip arthroplasty remains the quality of life improvement “gold standard” among arthroplasty procedures, cost/QALY estimates identified in this study support the growing use of RSA to improve patient quality of life. PMID:26925384

  3. [Hip ultrasound evaluation in infancy: comparison with normal results].

    PubMed

    Russo, E M; Lusenti, A

    2003-01-01

    We have reviewed more than a decade of clinical-echographical research in the developmental displasia of the hip (D.D.H.). We have examined 2050 small patients aged less than three months, with normal hips, and evaluated a number of ultrasound parameters that, in our opinion, may be helpful to give a description of hips particularly precise. We clearly underline that a precise definition, as more as possible, is a starting point to study all the pathological hips. PMID:15070268

  4. Lesion of the hip abductor mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Caviglia, Horacio; Cambiaggi, Guillermo; Vattani, Nosrat; Landro, María Eulalia; Galatro, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The disruption of the abductor muscles of the hip after hip revision surgery often causes limping, pain, and instability of the implant. The purpose of our paper is to describe a mesh technique to repair hip abductor mechanism injuries after hip revision. Patients and methods: Forty-six patients with hip abductor damage after prosthetic revision were treated. Inclusion criteria were: patients presenting with prosthetic loosening, complaint of pain, and with a positive Trendelenburg sign due to deficient abductor muscle mechanisms. Thirty-one were women (67.39%) with an average age of 64 years (34–82 years). The number of previous revision surgeries was three (two to seven). The Merle d’Aubigné score and variants before and after treatment were also reported. Results: In the postoperative follow-up after hip revision with the mesh technique, the Merle d’Aubigné score improved and the Trendelenburg sign was negative in 78.3% of the patients (p < 0.001). Also, the Trendelenburg test with the knee flexed was negative in 60.9% (p < 0.001) and the stair-climbing test was negative in 60.9% of cases (p < 0.001). The gluteus medius test in the lateral position was negative in 52.2% of patients, and in the lateral position with the knee flexed it was negative in 47.8% of patients (p < 0.001). Discussion: Repair of the abductor mechanism with the mesh technique has proven effective for both partial and total lesions. PMID:27382925

  5. Evaluation of risk factors for degenerative joint disease associated with hip dysplasia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Smith, G K; Popovitch, C A; Gregor, T P; Shofer, F S

    1995-03-01

    Passive coxofemoral joint laxity of dogs, as quantitated by a distraction-stress radiographic method, may have important prognostic value in determining susceptibility to hip dysplasia. Data from 151 dogs, representing 13 breeds, were included in a logistic regression model to evaluate the contribution of factors such as age, breed, weight, sex, distraction index, and Norberg angle to the risk of developing degenerative joint disease (DJD) of the coxofemoral joint. Of the factors studied, the amount of passive hip laxity, as quantitated by the distraction index, was the most significant (P < 0.0001) determinant of the risk to develop DJD of the coxofemoral joint. In the longitudinal and cross-sectional components of the study, distraction index was a significant (P < 0.001) risk factor for DJD, irrespective of age at evaluation (4, 12, or 24 months). The strength of the hip laxity:DJD correlation increased with the age of dog. In contrast, the Norberg angle, a measure of hip laxity on the standard hip-extended radiograph, was not found to be a significant risk factor for DJD, either in the longitudinal or cross-sectional analyses. Breed-specific probability curves of DJD susceptibility indicated that German Shepherd Dogs had a significantly (P < 0.05) greater risk of developing DJD than did the pool of non-German Shepherd Dogs. The information derived from this statistical model will help to scientifically characterize the role of passive hip laxity as a component in the pathogenesis of DJD of the coxofemoral joint. PMID:7744684

  6. Comparing results of clinical versus ultrasonographic examination in developmental dysplasia of hip

    PubMed Central

    Arti, Hamidreza; Mehdinasab, Seyed Abdoulhossein; Arti, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Background: Developmental dysplasia of hip (DDH) is one of the congenital anomalies in newborns that if not diagnosed and treated on time can lead to a severe disability. Although clinical examination is a very useful way for screening, but in some patients, a confirmatory diagnostic method such as ultrasonography is needed. The aim of the present study is to compare the sensitivity and specificity of clinical examination and ultrasonography in early detecting of DDH. Materials and Methods: A total of 5800 of newborns were examined by orthopedic surgeon as a screening method. The newborns with risk factors or suspicious on clinical examination were introduced to repeat clinical and ultrasonographic examination of hip. The results were collected and recorded by a check list and then the sensitivity and specificity of clinical examination were calculated. Results: Of 5701 newborns (11402 hips) who were studied by two methods of clinical examination and ultrasonography (by Graf method), the overall incidence of DDH was 29 per 1000. Only 94 hips (13.5%) of 694 disordered ones according to clinical examination were involved on ultrasonographic evaluation. A total of 240 hips of 334 (72%) involved hips according to ultrasonography (Graf type IIb or more) were diagnosed normal on clinical examination, considering ultrasonography as a gold standard method of evaluating DDH, the sensitivity and specificity of clinical examination were calculated 28.1% and 94.5%, respectively. Conclusion: According to the present study, ultrasonogeraphic examination has a high valuable in screening of DDH and the clinical examination done by an experienced orthopedic surgeon has an acceptable value in primary screening of DDH in developing countries for detecting of healthy neonates, but if the newborn has a risk factor or is suspicious on clinical examination, it will be necessary to get assistance from ultrasonography by an experienced sonographer. PMID:24523795

  7. Transient osteoporosis of the hip in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Siva, S; Roach, V

    1997-08-01

    Transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH) is an uncommon condition. This painful regional osteoporosis affects previously healthy women in the third trimester of pregnancy. It is characterized by pain in the affected hip and pronounced osteopenia of the femoral head and neck. It has a relatively short clinical course (average 6 months) and a predictably benign prognosis. Complete clinical and radiological recovery is the rule. The diagnosis is one of exclusion. The cause of the osteopenia is not known, although various aetiological factors have been implicated. A case of TOH occurring in the third trimester of pregnancy with complete recovery within 6 months postpartum is presented. PMID:9325501

  8. Nonsurgical Treatment Strategies after Osteoporotic Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kwang-Soon; Bae, Ki-Cheor; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Son, Eun-Suck; Lee, Kyung-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a metabolic disease that is increasing in prevalence as people live longer. Because the orthopedic surgeon is frequently the first and often the only physician to manage patients with osteoporotic hip fractures, every effort should be made to prevent future fractures. A multidisciplinary approach is essential in treatment of osteoporotic fractures. Basic treatment includes calcium and vitamin D supplementation, fall prevention, hip protection, and balance and exercise programs. Currently available pharmacologic agents are divided into antiresorptive and anabolic groups. Antiresorptive agents such as bisphosphonates limit bone resorption through inhibition of osteoclastic activity. Anabolic agents such as parathyroid hormone promote bone formation.

  9. Total Hip Arthroplasty in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IH.

    PubMed

    O'heireamhoin, S; Bayer, T; Mulhall, K J

    2011-01-01

    Children affected by mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type IH (Hurler Syndrome), an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder, are known to experience a range of musculoskeletal manifestations including spinal abnormalities, hand abnormalities, generalised joint stiffness, genu valgum, and hip dysplasia and avascular necrosis. Enzyme therapy, in the form of bone marrow transplantation, significantly increases life expectancy but does not prevent the development of the associated musculoskeletal disorders. We present the case of a 23-year-old woman with a diagnosis of Hurler syndrome with a satisfactory result following uncemented total hip arthroplasty. PMID:23259102

  10. Hip pain is more frequent in severe hip displacement: a population-based study of 77 children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Ramstad, Kjersti; Terjesen, Terje

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether hip pain was associated with radiographic hip displacement (migration percentage, MP) in a population-based cohort of children with cerebral palsy. Seventy-seven children, mean age 9.5 (SD 1.6) years and Gross Motor Function Classification System level III-V, were assessed. Caregivers responded to the Child Health Questionnaire pain questions and located recurrent pain on a body map. Hip pain was reported in 22 children (29%) and 27 hips (18%). Hip pain was significantly more frequent in hips with MP more than or equal to 50%, in children with spastic quadriplegia, and in those with Gross Motor Function Classification System level V. We conclude that severe hip displacement with MP more than or equal to 50% was associated with hip pain, whereas slight or moderate subluxation did not influence the occurrence of such pain. PMID:26895291

  11. Cementless total hip arthroplasty in developmental dysplasia of the hip with end stage osteoarthritis: 2-7 years' clinical results.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Tugrul; Guclu, Berk; Karaguven, Dogac; Kaya, Alper; Akan, Burak; Cetin, Ilker

    2015-01-01

    Between 2006 and 2011, 102 hips of 78 patients with end-stage osteoarthritis secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) underwent cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA). According to the Crowe's classification, 22 hips (21%) were type 1, 19 hips (18%) were type 2, 22 hips (21%) were type 3 and 39 hips (38%) were type 4 respectively. Functional and clinical analyses were performed by Harris Hip Scores (HHS). There were 73 (71%) excellent or good results according to HHS. The postoperative HHS was significantly lower in patients who underwent femoral shortening (p<0.01). We observed 25 (24.5%) complications in total, 15 (14.7%) of which required revision surgery. The authors concluded that THA for DDH is a safe and a reliable procedure with good clinical outcomes. PMID:25907395

  12. [Juvenile hip dislocation and the Vojta neuro-physiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Schütt, B

    1981-09-17

    Partial dislocation of the hip in case of cerebral palsy is a result of the disturbance of the neuromuscular system. Immobilization cannot improve the inadequate function the hip. A case of a girl is reported; stabilization of the hip after 3 years of neurophysio-therapy after Vojta could be achieved. PMID:7274945

  13. Primary hyperparathyroidism: an uncommon cause of hip pain.

    PubMed

    Waseem, Muhammad; Erickson, Evelyn; Agyare, Samuel; Godil, Mushtaq A

    2015-04-01

    Hip pain is a common complaint in a pediatric emergency department. The causes of hip pain are diverse and generally include traumatic and infectious causes. We report a case of hip pain caused by deep soft tissue infection associated with hypercalcemia and primary hyperparathyroidism. Atypical presentation of primary hyperparathyroidism may result in a delay in diagnosis. PMID:25831028

  14. Revolutionizing Environmental Education through Indigenous Hip Hop Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorlewski, Julie; Porfilio, Brad J.

    2012-01-01

    Based upon the life histories of six Indigenous hip hop artists of the Beat Nation artist collective, this essay captures how Indigenous hip hop has the potential to revolutionize environmental education. Hip hop provides Indigenous youth an emancipatory space to raise their opposition to neocolonial controls of Indigenous territories that…

  15. Hip-Hopping across China: Intercultural Formulations of Local Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Catrice

    2012-01-01

    The linguistic dimensions of globalized hip-hop cannot be understood simply as a byproduct of English as an American export. As hip-hop mobilizes, it is common (and arguably necessary) for global hip-hop communities to struggle through purposeful, semiotically rooted dialectics over what constitutes "authentic" and respectable forms of local…

  16. The core and hip in soccer athletes compared by gender.

    PubMed

    Brophy, R H; Chiaia, T A; Maschi, R; Dodson, C C; Oh, L S; Lyman, S; Allen, A A; Williams, R J

    2009-09-01

    Gender differences in hip and core strength and range of motion may contribute to the gender based variance in injury risk. This study was designed to test the primary hypothesis that hip and core strength, flexibility and lower extremity dynamic alignment differ in male and female soccer athletes. Ninety-eight collegiate soccer players (54 male, 44 female) participated in this study. Athletes were evaluated for hip range of motion, and hip and abdominal strength. Both male and female soccer players demonstrated limited hip rotation, with less hip internal rotation in males (p<0.0001), and poor abdominal core control, although the males are stronger (p=0.02). Overall hip ROM is shifted towards internal rotation in females compared to males. Female soccer players also have a significant side-to-side disparity in hip abductor strength (p<0.0001), not present in males. The shift in hip ROM towards internal rotation combined with the hip abductor imbalance may be associated with a position of ACL risk with internally rotated hips and valgus knees in female soccer players. Limitations in hip and core strength and range of motion may play a role in the disparity between the male and female rate of ACL injury. PMID:19585403

  17. Responsiveness and minimal important differences after revision total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is currently weighted more heavily when evaluating health status, particularly regarding medical treatments and interventions. However, it is rarely used by physicians to compare responsiveness. Additionally, responsiveness estimates derived by the Harris Hip Score (HHS) and the Short Form 36 (SF-36) before and after revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) have not been clinically compared. This study compared responsiveness and minimal important differences (MID) between HHS and SF-36. Methods All revision THA patients completed the disease-specific HHS and the generic SF-36 before and 6 months after surgery. Scores using these instruments were interpreted by generalized estimating equation (GEE) before and after revision THA. The bootstrap estimation and modified Jacknife test were used to derive 95% confidence intervals for differences in the responsiveness estimates. Results Comparisons of effect size (ES), standardized response means (SRM), relative efficiency (RE) (>1) and MID indicated that the responsiveness of HHS was superior to that of SF-36. The ES and SRM for pain and physical functions in the HHS were significantly larger than those of the SF-36 (p < 0.001). Conclusion The data in this study indicated that clinicians and health researchers should weight disease-specific measures more heavily than generic measures when evaluating treatment outcomes. PMID:21070675

  18. Hip replacement in femoral head osteonecrosis: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Scaglione, Michelangelo; Fabbri, Luca; Celli, Fabio; Casella, Francesco; Guido, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive disease that usually affects young adults with high functional demands and can have devastating effects on hip joint. The treatment depends on extent and location of the necrosis lesion and on patient’s factors, that suggest disease progression, collapse probability and also implants survival. Non-idiopathic osteonecrosis patients had the worst outcome. There is not a gold standard treatment and frequently it is necessary a multidisciplinary approach. Preservation procedures of the femoral head are the first choice and can be attempted in younger patients without head collapse. Replacement procedure remains the main treatment after failure of preserving procedures and in the late-stage ONFH, involving collapse of the femoral head and degenerative changes to the acetabulum. Resurfacing procedure still has good results but the patient selection is a critical factor. Total hip arthroplasties had historically poor results in patients with osteonecrosis. More recently, reports have shown excellent results, but implant longevity and following revisions are still outstanding problems. PMID:27134633

  19. Mechanical devices to help in PennHIP examination.

    PubMed

    Ginja, M M D; Llorens-Pena, Maria P; Gonzalo-Orden, J M; Ferreira, A J A

    2007-06-01

    A modified PennHIP procedure (MPP), using specific mechanical holding devices, was used on 70 dogs and compared to the standard PennHIP method (SPM) used on 39 dogs, in terms of technical effectiveness and the mean number of essential individuals within the X-ray room (EIXRR). The data using the Chi-squared test were consistent with the null hypothesis that the technical effectiveness was equal in the groups under investigation (P > 0.05). On the contrary, using the two-sample unpaired t-test the null hypothesis, that the mean EIXRR was equal, was rejected (P < 0.001). The estimated EIXRR was 3.4 +/- 0.7 and 5.7 +/- 1.2 (mean +/- SD) for MPP and SPM, respectively. In conclusion, the MPP needs fewer EIXXR than the SPM and complies with the new recommendations in X-ray protection, which introduce the ALARA (as-low-as-reasonably-achievable) idea. PMID:17555284

  20. A Simple Technique for the Positioning of a Patient with an above Knee Amputation for an Ipsilateral Extracapsular Hip Fracture Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Davarinos, N.; Ellanti, P.; McCoy, G.

    2013-01-01

    The positioning of the patient on the fracture table is critical to the successful reduction and operative fixation of hip fractures which are fixed using the dynamic hip screw system (DHS). There is a standard setup which is commonly used with relative ease. Yet the positioning of patients with amputations either above or below knee of the affected side can pose a significant challenge. We describe a novel positioning technique used on a 51-year old patient with a right above knee amputation who sustained an intertrochanteric extracapsular hip fracture. PMID:24416607

  1. Five-year results of a cementless short-hip-stem prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wittenberg, Ralf H.; Steffen, Reinhard; Windhagen, Henning; Bücking, Petra; Wilcke, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Hip prosthesis stems with a short stem length and proximal fixation geometry support a bone-preserving and muscle-sparing implantation and should also allow for revision surgery with a standard hip stem. We present 250 prospectively documented clinical and radiological results from the Metha Short Hip Stem prosthesis (B. Braun-Aesculap, Tuttlingen, Germany) after an average follow-up of 4.9 years. The average patient age at surgery was 60 years. Indication for total hip replacement was primary osteoarthrosis (OA) (78% of patients), OA based on developmental dysplasia of the hip (16%), and other indications (6%). At the last follow-up, the average Harris Hip Score was 97 points. 85% of patients were very satisfied and 14% were satisfied after surgery, whereas 1% were dissatisfied. Pain according to the Visual Analogue Scale improved from 7.4 (min 1.6, max 9.5) pre-operatively to 0.23 (min 0, max 6.6). No joint dislocations occurred when predominantly using 28 mm and 32 mm prosthesis heads. Nine short-stems were revised: three after bacterial infections, two after primary via valsa with penetration of the femoral cortex two and three months after surgery, and three after early aseptic cases of loosening within the first year. A further nine osseously consolidated short-stems had to be replaced due to breakage of the modular titanium cone adapter after an average of 3.1 years (min 1.9, max 4.4). All surgical revisions were performed using primary standard stems. Without taking the material-related adapter failures into account, a five year Kaplan-Meier survival rate of 96.7% (95% confidence interval 93.4–98.3) was determined for the short-stem prostheses. There were no radiological signs of loosening in any of the short-stem prostheses at the last examination. Fine sclerotic lines were detected in Gruen's AP zones 1 (19%) and 2 (10.5%), individual hypertrophies in zone 3 (3.5%), fine seams in zones 4 (5.5%) and 5 (4%), without pedestal formations in zone 4, clear

  2. Microfocus study of metal distribution and speciation in tissue extracted from revised metal on metal hip implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Alister J.; Sandison, Ann; Quinn, Paul; Sampson, Barry; Atkinson, Kirk D.; Skinner, John A.; Goode, Angela; Powell, Jonathan J.; Mosselmans, J. Frederick W.

    2009-11-01

    Unexplained tissue inflammation in metal-on-metal hip replacements is suspected to be caused by implant-derived nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to investigate the nature of the metal particles in tissue surrounding metal-on-metal (MOM) hips that has been extracted during revision. Mapping of tissue surrounding the failed MOM hips was performed using microfocus X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). This revealed mainly Cr which was localized to the cellular regions. There was co-localisation of Co, were present, to areas of high Cr abundance. XANES of the tissue and appropriate standards revealed that the most common species were Cr(III) and Co(II). EXAFS analysis of the tissue and various metal standards revealed that the most abundant implant-related species was Cr(III) phosphate. Different tissue preparation methods, including frozen sectioning, were examined but were found not to affect the distribution or speciation of the metals in the tissue.

  3. The Formation of "Hip-Hop Academicus"--How American Scholars Talk about the Academisation of Hip-Hop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderman, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Social activism and education have been associated with hip-hop since it emerged in New York City 38 years ago. Therefore, it might not be surprising that universities have become interested in hip-hop. This article aims to highlight this "hip-hop academisation" and analyse the discursive mechanisms that manifest in these academisation…

  4. Featherless Dinosaurs and the Hip-Hop Simulacrum: Reconsidering Hip-Hop's Appropriateness for the Music Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruse, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    This article offers considerations for music teachers interested in including hip-hop music in their classrooms but who might feel concerned with or overwhelmed by issues of appropriateness. Two concerns related to hip-hop music are examined: language and negative social themes. Commercial interests in hip-hop music have created a simulacrum (or…

  5. Hip resurfacing after iliofemoral distraction for type IV developmental dysplasia of the hip a case report.

    PubMed

    Sambri, A; Cadossi, M; Mazzotti, A; Faldini, C; Giannini, S

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip is a surgical challenge because of the modified anatomy of the acetabulum which is deficient in its shape with poor bone quality, torsional deformities of the femur and the altered morphology of femoral head. Particularly in Crowe type III and IV, additional surgical challenges are present, such as limb-length discrepancy and adductor muscle contractures. This is a bilateral hip dysplasia case where bilateral hip replacement was indicated, on the left side with a resurfacing one and on the other side a two stage procedure using a iliofemoral external fixator to restore equal leg length with a lower risk of complications. This case report shows both the negative clinical outcome of the left and the excellent one of the right hip where the dysplasia was much more severe. Patient selection and implant positioning are crucial in determining long-term results. PMID:27218252

  6. Combined Anterior and Posterior Approach in Total Hip Arthroplasty for Crowe IV Dysplasia or Ankylosed Hips.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Kyun; Kim, Ki-Choul; Ha, Yong-chan; Koo, Kyung-Hoi

    2015-05-01

    We evaluated 70 patients (71 hips) who underwent complex total hip arthroplasty (THA) through the combined anterior and posterior approach. Sixty-five patients (32 dislocated hips and 34 ankylosed hips) were followed-up at a minimum of 3 years (median, 6 years; range, 3-10 years). Seven patients (10.6%), who had transient paresthesia on the anterior thigh, recovered within 3 months. All patients had a good clinical outcome in terms of range of motion, pain and recovery of walking. At the latest follow-up, all prostheses had bone-ingrown stability without any detectable wear or osteolysis. The combined approach allows an excellent exposure of the acetabulum for accurate cup alignment, leg lengthening and mobilization of joint in complex THA without trochanteric osteotomy, excessive abductor release and femoral shortening osteotomy. PMID:25682205

  7. Fixation method does not affect restoration of rotation center in hip replacements: A single-site retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aseptic loosening is one of the greatest problems in hip replacement surgery. The rotation center of the hip is believed to influence the longevity of fixation. The aim of this study was to compare the influence of cemented and cementless cup fixation techniques on the position of the center of rotation because cemented cup fixation requires the removal of more bone for solid fixation than the cementless technique. Methods We retrospectively compared pre- and post-operative positions of the hip rotation center in 25 and 68 patients who underwent artificial hip replacements in our department in 2007 using cemented or cementless cup fixation, respectively, with digital radiographic image analysis. Results The mean horizontal and vertical distances between the rotation center and the acetabular teardrop were compared in radiographic images taken pre- and post-operatively. The mean horizontal difference was −2.63 mm (range: -11.00 mm to 10.46 mm, standard deviation 4.23 mm) for patients who underwent cementless fixation, and −2.84 mm (range: -10.87 to 5.30 mm, standard deviation 4.59 mm) for patients who underwent cemented fixation. The mean vertical difference was 0.60 mm (range: -20.15 mm to 10.00 mm, standard deviation 3.93 mm) and 0.41 mm (range: -9.26 mm to 6.54 mm, standard deviation 3.58 mm) for the cementless and cemented fixation groups, respectively. The two fixation techniques had no significant difference on the position of the hip rotation center in the 93 patients in this study. Conclusions The hip rotation center was similarly restored using either the cemented or cementless fixation techniques in this patient cohort, indicating that the fixation technique itself does not interfere with the position of the center of rotation. To completely answer this question further studies with more patients are needed. PMID:22686355

  8. Correlation of Hip Fracture with Other Fracture Types: Toward a Rational Composite Hip Fracture Endpoint

    PubMed Central

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen; Pieper, Carl F.; Grubber, Janet; Van Scoyoc, Lynn; Schnell, Merritt L; Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Pearson, Megan; Lafleur, Joanne; Lyles, Kenneth W.; Adler, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose With ethical requirements to the enrollment of lower risk subjects, osteoporosis trials are underpowered to detect reduction in hip fractures. Different skeletal sites have different levels of fracture risk and response to treatment. We sought to identify fracture sites which cluster with hip fracture at higher than expected frequency; if these sites respond to treatment similarly, then a composite fracture endpoint could provide a better estimate of hip fracture reduction. Methods Cohort study using Veterans Affairs and Medicare administrative data. Male Veterans (n=5,036,536) aged 50-99 years receiving VA primary care between1999-2009 were included. Fractures were ascertained using ICD9 and CPT codes and classified by skeletal site. Pearson correlation coefficients, logistic regression and kappa statistics, were used to describe the correlation between each fracture type and hip fracture within individuals, without regards to the timing of the events. Results 595,579 (11.8%) men suffered 1 or more fractures and 179,597 (3.6%) suffered 2 or more fractures during the time under study. Of those with one or more fractures, rib was the most common site (29%), followed by spine (22%), hip (21%) and femur (20%). The fracture types most highly correlated with hip fracture were pelvic/acetabular (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.25, p<0.0001), femur (0.15, p<0.0001), and shoulder (0.11, p<0.0001). Conclusions Pelvic, acetabular, femur, and shoulder fractures cluster with hip fractures within individuals at greater than expected frequency. If we observe similar treatment risk reductions within that cluster, subsequent trials could consider use of a composite endpoint to better estimate hip fracture risk. PMID:26151123

  9. Early attempts at hip arthroplasty--1700s to 1950s.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Pablo F; Morcuende, Jose A

    2005-01-01

    Over the last three centuries, treatment of hip arthritides has evolved from rudimentary surgery to modern total hip arthroplasty (THA), which is considered one of the most successful surgical interventions ever developed. We here review the history of the early hip arthroplasty procedures for hip arthritis that preceded Charley total hip arthroplasty. An evaluation of such past enterprises is relevant, and reminds us of the ephemeral nature of human industriousness, and how medical research and procedures are not isolated developments, but correlate to the social, economical, and cultural framework of their time. PMID:16089067

  10. Hip Replacement - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... List of All Topics All Hip Replacement - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Arabic (العربية) Bosnian (Bosanski) Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Chinese - Traditional ( ...

  11. The Rap on Hip-Hop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piekarski, Bill

    2004-01-01

    From its humble origins some 30 years ago in New York's bombed-out, poverty-ravaged South Bronx, hip-hop has risen to become a dominant cultural force both here and abroad. Strictly defined, the term refers to the entire cultural constellation that accompanies rap music, which in 2001 surpassed country music as the most popular musical genre in…

  12. Three brothers with algodystrophy of the hip.

    PubMed Central

    Albert, J; Ott, H

    1983-01-01

    We describe the clinical features of algodystrophy of the hip in 3 brothers, probably the first familial presentation of this disease to be reported. The symptoms and evolution of the disease are as usually described. The familial presentation suggests a genetic predisposition. HLA typing showed an identity of antigenic formula in the 3 brothers, a rare coincidence. Images PMID:6882038

  13. Injury incidence in hip hop dance.

    PubMed

    Ojofeitimi, S; Bronner, S; Woo, H

    2012-06-01

    Hip hop dance has rapidly become a popular international art form. There is limited information on injury patterns in this population. The purpose of this study was to determine injury incidence and patterns among three groups of hip hop dancers. Three hundred and twelve intermediate, advanced, and expert hip hop dancers were recruited at battles, dance conferences, clubs, and on dance related web sites within the United States and internationally. A Web-based survey was conducted over a 6-month period. Inclusion criteria included intermediate and advanced level dancers over the age of 13. Dancers were divided into three main categories: Breakers, Popper/Lockers, and New Schoolers. Separate analysis of variances were used to compare injury pattern differences between groups. Two hundred and thirty-two dancers reported a total of 738 injuries. Five hundred and six of these (sustained by 205 dancers) were time-loss (TL) injuries. Annual injury incidence was 237% (162% involving TL). Lower extremity injuries were 52% and upper extremity injuries 32% of total injuries. Breakers had a higher injury incidence compared with Popper/Lockers, and New Schoolers. Hip hop dancers report injury rates that are higher than other dance forms but similar to gymnastics. These dancers should be educated concerning injury prevention, biomechanics, and use of protective equipment. PMID:20807386

  14. Multimodal Hip Hop Productions as Media Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, K. C. Nat

    2012-01-01

    This study draws on ethnographic data from a year-long multimodal media production (MMP) course and the experience of an African American female adolescent who used the production of multimodal Hip Hop texts to express her creativity and growing socially conscious view of the world. The study demonstrates how students made meaning multimodally and…

  15. A Bilateral Traumatic Hip Obturator Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Karaarslan, Ahmet Adnan; Acar, Nihat; Karci, Tolga; Sesli, Erhan

    2016-01-01

    A case of a bilateral simultaneous traumatic obturator dislocation of both hip joints in an 18-year-old young man following a traffic accident is presented. We reduced the dislocated femoral heads immediately under general anesthesia followed by passive and active exercises and early full-weight bearing mobilization. After 5 years, the result was excellent. PMID:26977327

  16. Traumatic posterior dislocation of hip in children.

    PubMed

    Kutty, S; Thornes, B; Curtin, W A; Gilmore, M F

    2001-02-01

    Traumatic posterior dislocation of the hip joint in children is an uncommon injury. It constitutes a true orthopedic emergency. It makes up over 80% of pediatric hip dislocations. In children, it can occur as a result of minimal trauma, which is attributed to a soft pliable acetabulum and ligamentous laxity. In skeletally mature adolescents, a greater force is required to dislocate the hip joint. Delay in reduction is associated with long-term complications such as avascular necrosis and degenerative arthritis. Avascular necrosis is related to the duration of dislocation. A poorer prognosis is associated with delay in reduction beyond 6 hours, advanced skeletal maturity, or multiple traumas. Prompt reduction minimizes complications. We report two cases of traumatic posterior dislocation of hip in children aged 3 and 14 years. Both were reduced within 6 hours of dislocation, and review at 6 months revealed normal examination and no evidence of any post-traumatic changes. Post-reduction treatment remains without a consensus. This review highlights the clinical presentation, management, and time-sensitive complications of the injury. PMID:11265904

  17. Acute abdominal complications following hip surgery.

    PubMed

    Deleanu, B; Prejbeanu, R; Vermesan, D; Haragus, H; Icma, I; Predescu, V

    2014-01-01

    Hip surgeries are some of the most common and successful orthopedic procedures. Although rarely, abdominal complications do occur and are associated with unfavorable outcomes.We aimed to identify and describe the severe abdominal complications that appear in patients under-going elective or traumatic hip surgery. A four year retrospective electronic database research identified 408 elective primary hip replacements,51 hip revisions and 1040 intra and extracapsular proximal femur fractures. Out of these, three males and 4 females between 64 - 84 years old were identified to have developed acute abdominal complications: perforated acute ulcer (3),acute cholecystitis (2), volvulus (1), toxic megacolon with peritonitis (1) and acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (1).Complications debuted 3 - 10 days after index orthopedic surgery. Acute perioperative abdominal complications are rarely encountered during orthopedic surgery. When these do occur, they do so almost exclusively in patients with hippathology, comorbidities and most often lead to life threatening situations. We thus emphasize the need for early identification and appropriate management by both orthopedic and general surgery doctors in order to improve patient safety. PMID:24742414

  18. Exploration of Informal Caregiving Following Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Nahm, Eun-Shim; Resnick, Barbara; Orwig, Denise; Magaziner, Jay; DeGrezia, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Hip fracture, a significant health issue for older adults, is an acute event in which older adults can recover their prefracture functional abilities. The recovery phase is often difficult for older adults, and the role of informal caregivers is particularly important. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore informal caregivers' experiences with providing care to older adults over the first 6-month trajectory of hip fracture recovery and their support needs. Participants (N = 10) were interviewed twice at 0–2 and 5–6 months. Analyses of the verbatim transcripts revealed multiple shared themes. Some themes were consistent across phases, such as hip fracture as a turning point toward a frailer state, feeling tired, frustration with communication issues in health care delivery, and lack of information about caregiving-related activities. Certain themes were phase-specific. For instance, in the early phase, management of hospital bills and transitions between care settings were especially burdensome. The caregiving situation, however, was viewed as an opportunity to spend more time with their loved ones. Findings from this study revealed unmet support needs expressed by caregivers of older adult hip fracture patients. Ongoing research and clinical interventions are needed to establish effective methods to empower these caregivers. PMID:20682403

  19. Complications of hip fractures: A review.

    PubMed

    Carpintero, Pedro; Caeiro, Jose Ramón; Carpintero, Rocío; Morales, Angela; Silva, Samuel; Mesa, Manuel

    2014-09-18

    Nowadays, fracture surgery represents a big part of the orthopedic surgeon workload, and usually has associated major clinical and social cost implications. These fractures have several complications. Some of these are medical, and other related to the surgical treatment itself. Medical complications may affect around 20% of patients with hip fracture. Cognitive and neurological alterations, cardiopulmonary affections (alone or combined), venous thromboembolism, gastrointestinal tract bleeding, urinary tract complications, perioperative anemia, electrolytic and metabolic disorders, and pressure scars are the most important medical complications after hip surgery in terms of frequency, increase of length of stay and perioperative mortality. Complications arising from hip fracture surgery are fairly common, and vary depending on whether the fracture is intracapsular or extracapsular. The main problems in intracapsular fractures are biological: vascularization of the femoral head, and lack of periosteum -a major contributor to fracture healing- in the femoral neck. In extracapsular fractures, by contrast, the problem is mechanical, and relates to load-bearing. Early surgical fixation, the role of anti-thromboembolic and anti-infective prophylaxis, good pain control at the perioperative, detection and management of delirium, correct urinary tract management, avoidance of malnutrition, vitamin D supplementation, osteoporosis treatment and advancement of early mobilization to improve functional recovery and falls prevention are basic recommendations for an optimal maintenance of hip fractured patients. PMID:25232517

  20. The Philippine "Hip Hop Stick Dance"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces a dance that blends the traditional cultural heritage of the Philippines with modern music and moves. "Hip Hop Stick Dance" incorporates Tinikling (the Philippine national dance) and Arnis (a Filipino style of martial arts) to create a contemporary combination of rhythm, dance, and fitness. It was designed to introduce…

  1. Preventable mortality in geriatric hip fracture inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Tarrant, S. M.; Hardy, B. M.; Byth, P. L.; Brown, T. L.; Attia, J.; Balogh, Z. J.

    2014-01-01

    There is a high rate of mortality in elderly patients who sustain a fracture of the hip. We aimed to determine the rate of preventable mortality and errors during the management of these patients. A 12 month prospective study was performed on patients aged > 65 years who had sustained a fracture of the hip. This was conducted at a Level 1 Trauma Centre with no orthogeriatric service. A multidisciplinary review of the medical records by four specialists was performed to analyse errors of management and elements of preventable mortality. During 2011, there were 437 patients aged > 65 years admitted with a fracture of the hip (85 years (66 to 99)) and 20 died while in hospital (86.3 years (67 to 96)). A total of 152 errors were identified in the 80 individual reviews of the 20 deaths. A total of 99 errors (65%) were thought to have at least a moderate effect on death; 45 reviews considering death (57%) were thought to have potentially been preventable. Agreement between the panel of reviewers on the preventability of death was fair. A larger-scale assessment of preventable mortality in elderly patients who sustain a fracture of the hip is required. Multidisciplinary review panels could be considered as part of the quality assurance process in the management of these patients. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2014;96-B:1178–84. PMID:25183587

  2. Lateral Hip Pain in an Athletic Population

    PubMed Central

    Grumet, Robert C.; Frank, Rachel M.; Slabaugh, Mark A.; Virkus, Walter W.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Historically, the term greater trochanteric pain syndrome has been used to describe a spectrum of conditions that cause lateral-sided hip pain, including greater trochanteric bursitis, snapping iliotibial band, and/or strains or tendinopathy of the abductor mechanism. Diagnosis of these conditions may be difficult because clinical presentations are variable and sometimes inconclusive. Especially difficult is differentiating intrinsic pain from pain referred to the greater trochanteric region. The purposes of this article are to review the relevant anatomy and pathophysiology of the lateral hip. Evidence Acquisition: Data were collected through a thorough review of the literature conducted through a MEDLINE search of all relevant papers between 1980 and January 2010. Results: Recent advances in imaging and an improved understanding of pathomechanics have helped to guide the evaluation, diagnosis, and appropriate treatment for patients presenting with lateral hip pain. Conclusion: Various diagnostic tools and treatment modalities can be used to effectively manage the athletic patient presenting with lateral hip pain. PMID:23015937

  3. HIP quenching - A heat treating method

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, F.X.; Bergman, C.

    1996-12-31

    Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIPing) has developed since the 1950`s to a major processing method today for defect healing of castings. It also gained importance in forming powders to fully dense near net shapes or post densification of porous compacts. The HIP process applies pressure and temperature simultaneously to eliminate residual porosity resulting in improved mechanical, physical & fatigue properties of components. Materials such as Metals, Ceramics, Composites and other materials mandate HIPing for high performance applications such as for aerospace, medical, and various industrial uses. HIP cycles with conventional furnaces are rather long mainly because of slow cooling rates resulting in low productivity. Demands for higher throughput in the early 1980`s has stirred the need for faster cooling furnaces. Rapid cooling furnace designs were introduced mainly for reducing the cycle time but brought along HIP-Quenching as an added value which offers combined HIPing + solution heat treating. This paper describes the evolution of HIP-Quenching with rates to 1000 C/Minute and illustrates other benefits. An example of cooling rates of a 640 mm diameter turbine disc is also presented.

  4. Soft-tissue balance in short and straight stem total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Windhagen, Henning; Chincisan, Andra; Choi, Hon Fai; Thorey, Fritz

    2015-03-01

    The growing numbers of short stem hip implants have redefined total hip arthroplasty with new stem geometries and possible functional differences. Several systematic reviews have reported good clinical results with this new class of stems, although kinematic alterations are still unclear in many aspects. The good clinical results obtained at the authors' institution led to the current study. The authors hypothesized that the geometric alignment of the prosthetic components may be closer to the anatomy of the healthy hip joint, thus leading to better function and clinical satisfaction. An examination via finite element analysis was chosen to model the hip joint and virtually implant a short and a standard straight stem. Findings indicated that anchoring of the short stem allowed favorable positioning in the proximal femur, with the femoral head already in the center of the cup. This positioning was not possible for the straight stem, which required further reduction of the femur by a significant translation into the cup, leading to abnormal soft-tissue balancing. The results from the simulation showed an absolute average deviation of ligamentous fiber strains of 6% for the short stem in 30° of flexion and extension versus 29% and 36% for the standard straight stem in 30° of flexion and extension, respectively. A femoral neck guided orientation of the short stem implant seems to allow a more anatomical reconstruction and thus a more balanced hip in terms of the modeled soft tissues. In contrast, the straight stem alters the head position and induces nonphysiological capsular strains. PMID:25826627

  5. Ipsilateral Intracapsular Hip Fracture 2 Years after Fixation of Extracapsular Fracture by Dynamic Hip Screw

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Farhan; Nunag, Perrico; Mustafa, Abubakar; Pillai, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sustaining an intracapsular fracture in a hip which was previously fixed with dynamic hip screw for extracapsular fracture, is a very rarely reported occurrence. We present one such case in order to discuss the presentation and management of this fracture. We have also reviewed the literature and pooled the previously reported cases to look at potential cause & risk factors. Case Report: A 92 year old female, presented with new onset hip pain following a trivial injury. Couple of years back, she had sustained an extracapsular fracture on same side which was treated by DHS fixation. Further investigations confirmed a de-novo fracture which was treated by removal of DHS and cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty. Conclusion: This complication might not be as rare as earlier thought to be. All patients, especially elderly females who present with new onset hip pain following DHS fixation of their hip fracture previously must be evaluated for a de-novo intracapsular fracture. On confirmation of diagnosis, they can be treated by removal of dynamic hip screw and hemiarthroplasty as most of these are low demand elderly patients. PMID:27299034

  6. Outcomes of Geriatric Hip Fractures Treated with AFFIXUS Hip Fracture Nail

    PubMed Central

    Mabrouk, Ahmed; Madhusudan, Mysore; Waseem, Mohammed; Kershaw, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Geriatric hip fractures are one of the commonest fractures worldwide. The purpose of this study was to report the outcomes of a series of unstable geriatric hip fractures treated with AFFIXUS hip fracture nail. A retrospective study of 100 unstable geriatric hip fractures treated with AFFIXUS hip fracture nail is presented. The mean follow-up duration was 8 months (range 3–32). Of the patients 83% were female. The average age was 85 years. The fracture was treated by closed reduction and intramedullary fixation. The mean acute hospital stay was 17.6 days. Systemic complications occurred in 29 patients (29%) and local complications in 3 patients (3%) including lag screw cutout in one patient (1%), lag screw backout in one patient (1%), and deep infection in one patient (1%). Mechanical failures and periprosthetic fractures were not observed in our series. Fractures united in all patients. Preinjury activity level was recovered in 78% of the patients. The results of AFFIXUS hip fracture nail were satisfactory in most elderly patients. The unique design of the lag screw and its thread spacing had effectively reduced cut-out rate. PMID:25580303

  7. Hip Rotational Velocities During the Full Golf Swing

    PubMed Central

    Gulgin, Heather; Armstrong, Charles; Gribble, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Since labral pathology in professional golfers has been reported, and such pathology has been associated with internal/external hip rotation, quantifying the rotational velocity of the hips during the golf swing may be helpful in understanding the mechanism involved in labral injury. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the peak internal/external rotational velocities of the thigh relative to the pelvis during the golf swing. Fifteen female, collegiate golfers participated in the study. Data were acquired through high-speed three dimensional (3-D) videography using a multi-segment bilateral marker set to define the segments, while the subjects completed multiple repetitions of a drive. The results indicated that the lead hip peak internal rotational velocity was significantly greater than that of the trail hip external rotational velocity (p = 0.003). It appears that the lead hip of a golfer experiences much higher rotational velocities during the downswing than that of the trail hip. In other structures, such as the shoulder, an increased risk of soft tissue injury has been associated with high levels of rotational velocity. This may indicate that, in golfers, the lead hip may be more susceptible to injury such as labral tears than that of the trailing hip. Key points Lead hip of golfer experiences significantly higher rotational velocities than the trail hip. Golfers may be more susceptible to injuries on the lead hip. Clubhead velocities were consistent with elite female golfers. PMID:24149541

  8. Capsular Plication for Treatment of Iatrogenic Hip Instability

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David M.; Grzybowski, Jeffrey; Salata, Michael J.; Mather, Richard C.; Aoki, Stephen K.; Nho, Shane J.

    2015-01-01

    The most commonly reported reasons for persistent hip pain after hip arthroscopy are residual femoroacetabular impingement, dysplasia and dysplasia variants, or extra-articular impingement. There are some cases in which the underlying osseous pathomorphology has been appropriately treated, and the cause of persistent hip pain can be soft-tissue injuries such as chondrolabral tears or capsular abnormalities. Capsular defects after hip arthroscopy may suggest an alteration of the biomechanical properties of the iliofemoral ligament and lead to iatrogenically induced hip instability. There are a growing number of biomechanical and clinical studies showing the importance of capsular management during hip arthroscopy. We describe the workup, examination under anesthesia, diagnostic arthroscopy, and technique of capsular plication for iatrogenic instability of the hip. PMID:26870636

  9. Volume Matters: Returning Home After Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Gozalo, Pedro; Leland, Natalie E.; Christian, Thomas J.; Mor, Vincent; Teno, Joan M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine the effect of the relationship between volume (number of hip fracture admissions during the 12 months before participant’s fracture) and other facility characteristics on outcomes. DESIGN Prospective observational study. SETTING U.S. skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) admitting individuals discharged from the hospital after treatment for hip fracture between 2000 and 2007 (N = 15,439). PARTICIPANTS Community-dwelling fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries aged 75 and older admitted to U.S. hospitals for their first hip fracture and discharged to a SNF for postacute care from 2000 to 2007 (N = 512,967). MEASUREMENTS Successful discharge from SNF to community, defined as returning to the community within 30 days of hospital discharge to the SNF and remaining in the community without being institutionalized for at least 30 days, was examined using Medicare administrative data, propensity score matching, and instrumental variables. RESULTS The overall rate of successful discharge to the community was 31%. Of the 15,439 facilities, the facility interquartile range varied from 0% (25th percentile) to 42% (75th percentile). An important determinant of variation in discharge rate was SNF volume of hip fracture admissions. Unadjusted successful discharge from SNF to community was 43.7% in high-volume facilities (>24 admissions/year), versus 18.8% in low-volume facilities (1–6 admissions/year). This facility volume effect persisted after adjusting for participant and facility characteristics associated with outcomes (e.g., adjusted odds ratio = 2.06, 95% confidence interval = 1.91–2.21 for volume of 25 vs 3 admissions per year). CONCLUSION In community-dwelling persons with their first hip fracture, successful return to the community varies substantially according to SNF provider volume and staffing characteristics. PMID:26424223

  10. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Osteonecrosis of the Hip.

    PubMed

    Murphey, Mark D; Roberts, Catherine C; Bencardino, Jenny T; Appel, Marc; Arnold, Erin; Chang, Eric Y; Dempsey, Molly E; Fox, Michael G; Fries, Ian Blair; Greenspan, Bennett S; Hochman, Mary G; Jacobson, Jon A; Mintz, Douglas N; Newman, Joel S; Rosenberg, Zehava S; Rubin, David A; Small, Kirstin M; Weissman, Barbara N

    2016-02-01

    Osteonecrosis of the hip (Legg-Calvé-Perthes) is a common disease, with 10,000-20,000 symptomatic cases annually in the United States. The disorder affects both adults and children and is most frequently associated with trauma and corticosteroid usage. The initial imaging evaluation of suspected hip osteonecrosis is done using radiography. MRI is the most sensitive and specific imaging modality for diagnosis of osteonecrosis of the hip. The clinical significance of hip osteonecrosis is dependent on its potential for articular collapse. The likelihood of articular collapse is significantly increased with involvement of greater than 30%-50% of the femoral head area, which is optimally evaluated by MRI, often in the sagittal plane. Contrast-enhanced MRI may be needed to detect early osteonecrosis of the hip in pediatric patients, revealing hypoperfusion. In patients with a contraindication for MRI, use of either CT or bone scintigraphy with SPECT (single-photon emission CT) are alternative radiologic methods of assessment. Imaging helps guide treatment, which may include core decompression, osteotomy, and ultimately, need for joint replacement. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria(®) are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:26846390

  11. Multimodal Analgesia in the Hip Fracture Patient.

    PubMed

    Fabi, David W

    2016-05-01

    Hip fracture is one of the most common injuries among the elderly and, because the population is aging, it is expected to remain a major clinical challenge and public health problem for the foreseeable future. The clinical importance of early mobilization and prompt participation in physical therapy after hip fracture surgery is now widely recognized. Because postoperative pain can impair mobility and delay physical therapy, much attention is now being paid to finding more effective ways of controlling pain after hip fracture. Oversedation with opioid drugs inhibits communication between the patient and the health care team, can delay ambulation and rehabilitation therapy, and may increase the probability of the patient requiring a skilled nursing facility, which adds further cost to the overall health care system. Multiple pain pathways contribute to the perception of postoperative pain, and although opioids are highly effective in blocking nociceptive pain through inhibition of the mu receptors, they do not block other pain pathways. Multimodal analgesia involves the use of several anesthetic and analgesic modalities that are strategically combined to block pain perception at different sites in the peripheral and central nervous systems. This balanced, multifaceted approach provides more effective control of postoperative pain than opioid drugs alone, allows lower doses of opioids to be used as part of the multimodal regimen (thereby reducing the risk of opioid-related adverse events and complications), and may facilitate more rapid recovery and improve certain outcome measures related to recovery time. One prospective randomized study evaluating the clinical value of multimodal pain management in elderly patients undergoing bipolar hip hemiarthroplasty found that a multimodal regimen, including preemptive pain medication and intraoperative periarticular injections, reduced pain on postoperative days 1 and 4, and reduced overall opioid use. This article describes

  12. Hip resurfacing: history, current status, and future.

    PubMed

    Amstutz, Harlan C; Le Duff, Michel J

    2015-01-01

    Hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) presents several advantages over conventional total hip arthroplasty (THA), including conservation and preservation of bone, reduced risk of dislocation, easy replication of hip biomechanics and easy revision if needed. It is a particularly appealing procedure for young patients. HRA has been performed for over 40 years following the same technological advances as THA. The bearing material used by most designs is metal-on-metal (MoM), which has the best compromise between strength and wear properties. However, MoM HRA has a specific set of possible complications. Aseptic femoral failures were initially the most prevalent cause for revision but progress in patient selection and surgical technique seem to have resolved this problem. Wear-related failures (high metal ion levels and adverse local tissue reactions) are now the main concern, and are essentially associated with poor acetabular component design and orientation, to which MoM is more sensitive than other bearing materials. The concept of functional coverage is key to understanding how MoM bearings are affected by edge wear. Only a 3-D assessment of cup position (e.g., the contact patch to rim distance) provides the necessary information to determine the role of cup positioning in relationship with abnormal bearing wear.The concept of hip resurfacing is more valid today than ever as the age of the patients in need of hip arthroplasty keeps getting lower. The recent publication of several excellent long-term survivorship results suggests that selection of a well-designed resurfacing system and accuracy in the placement of the cup can achieve long-term durability. PMID:26109156

  13. Surgical hip dislocation in symptomatic cam femoroacetabular impingement: what matters in early good results?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In order to assess outcome and possible predictors of early good results, a prospective study on 22 patients who were treated with save surgical hip dislocation for symptomatic isolated cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) was performed. After a follow-up of 6 and 12 months, standard clinical and radiographic parameters were recorded. A statistically significant improvement of the clinical status according to the Harris hip score could be assessed at six months (p-value = 0.003) and 12 months (p-value = 0.001) post-surgery. By comparing standard clinical and radiographic preoperative parameters with various follow-up outcomes, we revealed no specific parameter with predictive value. These findings are important for centers that have just started to use this surgical technique and are still identifying their learning curve. PMID:21719395

  14. Surgical hip dislocation in symptomatic cam femoroacetabular impingement: what matters in early good results?

    PubMed

    Jäger, M; Bittersohl, B; Zilkens, Christoph; Hosalkar, H S; Stefanovska, K; Kurth, S; Krauspe, R

    2011-05-12

    In order to assess outcome and possible predictors of early good results, a prospective study on 22 patients who were treated with save surgical hip dislocation for symptomatic isolated cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) was performed. After a follow-up of 6 and 12 months, standard clinical and radiographic parameters were recorded. A statistically significant improvement of the clinical status according to the Harris hip score could be assessed at six months (p-value = 0.003) and 12 months (p-value = 0.001) post-surgery. By comparing standard clinical and radiographic preoperative parameters with various follow-up outcomes, we revealed no specific parameter with predictive value. These findings are important for centers that have just started to use this surgical technique and are still identifying their learning curve. PMID:21719395

  15. Bilateral Femoral Nutrient Foraminal Cement Penetration during Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Coomber, Ross; Bhumbra, Rej S; Marston, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Cement pressurisation is important for the insertion of both the acetabular and femoral components during Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA). Secondary to pressurization the rare phenomenon of unilateral cement incursion into the nutrient foramen has previously been reported. No bilateral case has been reported to date. This has implications both for misdiagnosis of periprosthetic fractures and for medico-legal consequences due to a presumed adverse intra-operative event. Case Report: We present a case report of a 59 year old, caucasian female who underwent staged bilateral cemented Stanmore THA. The post-operative radiographs demonstrate evidence of bilateral nutrient foramen penetration intra-operatively by standard viscosity cement. The patient suffered no adverse consequences. Conclusions: In summary, cement extravasation into the nutrient foramen is an important differential to be considered in presence of posterior-medial cement in the diaphysis of femur following THA. This requires no further intervention and has no effect on the outcome.

  16. Custom Cementless Stem Improves Hip Function in Young Patients at 15-year Followup

    PubMed Central

    Flecher, Xavier; Pearce, Oliver; Parratte, Sebastien; Aubaniac, Jean-Manuel

    2009-01-01

    THA in young patients is challenging regarding restoration and survival because patients are young, active, and tend to have disturbed anatomy. We asked whether a three-dimensional custom cementless stem could restore hip function, decrease osteolysis and wear, and enhance stem survival in young patients. We retrospectively reviewed 212 patients (233 hips) younger than 50 years (mean, 40 years) at a followup of 5 to 16 years (mean, 10 years). The Merle D’Aubigné-Postel and Harris hip scores improved at last followup. No thigh pain was recorded for any of the patients; 187 of the 212 patients (88%) had full activity recovery, 206 had full range of motion, and 151 had a score greater than 80 points for all five categories of the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome score. Five patients had femoral osteolysis not associated with pain. With revision for any reason as an end point, the survivorship was 87% (range, 77%–97%) at 15 years, and considering stem revision only, the survivorship was 93% (confidence interval, 90%–97%) at 15 years. Our data compare favorably with those from series using standard cementless stems at the same followup with a high percentage of patients achieving functional restoration and a low rate of complications. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19690930

  17. Direct anterior total hip arthroplasty: Literature review of variations in surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Keith P; Kamath, Atul F

    2016-01-01

    The direct anterior approach to the hip has been suggested to have several advantages compared to previously popular approaches through its use of an intra-muscular and intra-nervous interval between the tensor fasciae latae and sartorius muscles. Recent increased interest in tissue-sparing and minimally-invasive arthroplasty has given rise to a sharp increase in the utilization of direct anterior total hip arthroplasty. A number of variations of the procedure have been described and several authors have published their experiences and feedback to successfully accomplishing this procedure. Additionally, improved understanding of relevant soft tissue constraints and anatomic variants has provided improved margin of safety for patients. The procedure may be performed using specially-designed instruments and a fracture table, however many authors have also described equally efficacious performance using a regular table and standard arthroplasty tools. The capacity to utilize fluoroscopy intra-operatively for component positioning is a valuable asset to the approach and can be of particular benefit for surgeons gaining familiarity. Proper management of patient and limb positioning are vital to reducing risk of intra-operative complications. An understanding of its limitations and challenges are also critical to safe employment. This review summarizes the key features of the direct anterior approach for total hip arthroplasty as an aid to improving the understanding of this important and effective method for modern hip replacement surgeons. PMID:26807354

  18. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after total hip or knee arthroplasty: a survey of Canadian orthopedic surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Michael; Anderson, David R.; Nagpal, Seema; O’Brien, Bernie

    1999-01-01

    Objective To determine the pharmacologic and physical modalities used by orthopedic surgeons in Canada to prevent venous thromboembolism (deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) after total hip or knee arthroplasty. Design Mail survey sent to all members of the Canadian Orthopaedic Association. Setting A nation-wide study. Methods A total of 828 questionnaires, designed to identify the type and frequency of prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism that were used after hip and knee arthroplasty were mailed to orthopedic surgeons. Outcome measures Demographic data and the frequency and type of thromboprophylaxis. Results Of the 828 surveys mailed 445 (54%) were returned, and 397 were included in this analysis. Of the respondents, 97% used prophylaxis routinely for patients who undergo total hip or knee arthroplasty. Three of the 397 (0.8%) did not use any method of prophylaxis. Warfarin was the most common agent used (46%), followed by low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) (36%). Combination therapy with both mechanical and pharmacologic methods were used in 39% of patients. Objective screening tests were not frequently performed before discharge. Extended prophylaxis beyond the duration of hospitalization was used by 36% of physicians. Conclusion Prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism with warfarin or LMWH has become standard care after total hip or knee arthroplasty in Canada. PMID:10593248

  19. Rehabilitation in Patients with Dementia Following Hip Fracture: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jennifer; Koziak, Adriana; Buddingh, Sarah; Liang, Jieyun; Buckingham, Jeanette

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Best rehabilitation practices after hip fracture for people with dementia have not been established. A systematic review was conducted to determine current evidence for rehabilitation in this population, including residents in continuing care. Methods: Standardized review methodology was used to search eight databases for literature on hip-fracture rehabilitation for people with dementia. Eligible studies included participants with dementia who had a hip fracture; performed a rehabilitation intervention; and evaluated one or more of function, ambulation, discharge location, or falls. The Newcastle–Ottawa Scale was used to assess validity. Results: A total of 13 studies were included: five randomized controlled trials (RCTs), seven prospective cohort series, and one retrospective cohort study. Average quality ratings for RCTs and cohort studies were good and fair respectively. Participants with mild to moderate dementia receiving rehabilitation showed similar relative gains in function to those without dementia. Only one study examined the effect of rehabilitation among residents in continuing care. Conclusions: People with mild or moderate dementia may show improved function and ambulation and decreased fall risk after rehabilitation post hip fracture, similar to gains achieved by those without dementia. More research is required to ascertain the effect of rehabilitation in people with moderate to severe dementia, including those residing in continuing-care settings. PMID:23449813

  20. Direct anterior total hip arthroplasty: Literature review of variations in surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Keith P; Kamath, Atul F

    2016-01-18

    The direct anterior approach to the hip has been suggested to have several advantages compared to previously popular approaches through its use of an intra-muscular and intra-nervous interval between the tensor fasciae latae and sartorius muscles. Recent increased interest in tissue-sparing and minimally-invasive arthroplasty has given rise to a sharp increase in the utilization of direct anterior total hip arthroplasty. A number of variations of the procedure have been described and several authors have published their experiences and feedback to successfully accomplishing this procedure. Additionally, improved understanding of relevant soft tissue constraints and anatomic variants has provided improved margin of safety for patients. The procedure may be performed using specially-designed instruments and a fracture table, however many authors have also described equally efficacious performance using a regular table and standard arthroplasty tools. The capacity to utilize fluoroscopy intra-operatively for component positioning is a valuable asset to the approach and can be of particular benefit for surgeons gaining familiarity. Proper management of patient and limb positioning are vital to reducing risk of intra-operative complications. An understanding of its limitations and challenges are also critical to safe employment. This review summarizes the key features of the direct anterior approach for total hip arthroplasty as an aid to improving the understanding of this important and effective method for modern hip replacement surgeons. PMID:26807354

  1. The Prevention and Treatment of Delirium in Elderly Patients Following Hip Fracture Surgery.

    PubMed

    Martocchia, Antonio; Curto, Martina; Comite, Fabrizia; Scaccianoce, Sergio; Girardi, Paolo; Ferracuti, Stefano; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Falaschi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporotic hip fracture needs a specific approach and treatment, since elderly patients are at high risk for adverse outcomes after surgery. In particular, delirium often occurs in the peri-operative period, and it is associated with death, hospital-acquired complications, persistent cognitive impairments, poor functional recovery after surgery and increased healthcare costs. The pre-operative assessment of the risk factors for delirium improves the preventive measures. The delirium diagnostic tools should be included in the standard of orthogeriatric cure for hip fracture. Given the increasing complexity of the clinical pictures, we present a review of the available treatment options for delirium in patients with hip fracture. The metabolic pre-operative disorders and the management of co-morbid diseases are specific targets of treatment in order to optimize the outcomes after surgery. In particular, elderly patients with Alzheimer's disease are highly vulnerable to hip fracture and delirium, and they are severely frail with reduced physiologic reserves. An integrated approach combining environmental and pharmacological strategies is useful in the delirium treatment, with a close collaboration between the orthopedic and geriatric team. PMID:25687439

  2. Validity and reliability of clinical tests for assessing hip passive stiffness.

    PubMed

    Carvalhais, Viviane Otoni do Carmo; de Araújo, Vanessa Lara; Souza, Thales Rezende; Gonçalves, Gabriela Gomes Pavan; Ocarino, Juliana de Melo; Fonseca, Sérgio Teixeira

    2011-06-01

    Inadequate levels of hip passive joint stiffness have been associated with the occurrence of movement dysfunction, development of pathologies and reduction in performance. Clinical tests, designed to evaluate hip joint stiffness, may allow the identification of improper stiffness levels. The purpose of this study was to determine the concurrent validity as well as the intra- and inter-examiners reliabilities of clinical measures used to assess hip passive stiffness during internal rotation. Fifteen healthy participants were subjected to test-retest evaluations by two examiners. Two clinical measures were performed: 'position of first detectable resistance' and 'change in passive resistance torque'. The results of these tests were compared to the passive stiffness measured with an isokinetic dynamometer (gold standard measure). A significant correlation was found between the stiffness measured with the isokinetic dynamometer and the clinical measures of 'position of first detectable resistance' (r=-0.85 to -0.86, p<0.001) and 'change in passive resistance torque' (r=0.78 to 0.84, p≤0.001). The Intraclass Correlation Coefficients for intra- and inter-examiners reliabilities varied from 0.95 to 0.99. Thus, the results demonstrated that the clinical measures have adequate validity and reliability for obtaining information on hip passive stiffness during internal rotation. PMID:21212014

  3. Greater Hip Extension but Not Hip Abduction Explosive Strength Is Associated With Lesser Hip Adduction and Knee Valgus Motion During a Single-Leg Jump-Cut

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Baker; Johnson, Samuel T.; Chang, Eunwook; Pollard, Christine D.; Norcross, Marc F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationships between hip abductor and extensor strength and frontal plane hip and knee motions that are associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury risk are equivocal. However, previous research on these relationships has evaluated relatively low-level movement tasks and peak torque rather than a time-critical strength measure such as the rate of torque development (RTD). Hypothesis: Females with greater hip abduction and extension RTD would exhibit lesser frontal plane hip and knee motion during a single-leg jump-cutting task. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Forty recreationally active females performed maximal isometric contractions and single-leg jump-cuts. From recorded torque data, hip extension and abduction RTD was calculated from torque onset to 200 ms after onset. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to quantify frontal plane hip and knee kinematics during the movement task. For each RTD measure, jump-cut biomechanics were compared between participants in the highest (high) and lowest (low) RTD tertiles. Results: No differences in frontal plane hip and knee kinematics were identified between high and low hip abduction RTD groups. However, those in the high hip extension RTD group exhibited lower hip adduction (high, 3.8° ± 3.0°; low, 6.5° ± 3.0°; P = .019) and knee valgus (high, –2.5° ± 2.3°; low, –4.4° ± 3.2°; P = .046) displacements during the jump-cut. Conclusion: In movements such as cutting that are performed with the hip in a relatively abducted and flexed position, the ability of the gluteus medius to control hip adduction may be compromised. However, the gluteus maximus, functioning as a hip abductor, may take on a pivotal role in controlling hip adduction and knee valgus motion during these types of tasks. Clinical Relevance: Training with a specific emphasis on increasing explosive strength of the hip extensors may be a means through which to improve frontal plane hip and knee

  4. Usefulness of Arthroscopic Treatment of Painful Hip after Acetabular Fracture or Hip Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jung-Taek; Lee, Woo-Yong; Kang, Chan; Kim, Dong-Yeol; Zheng, Long

    2015-01-01

    Background Painful hip following hip dislocation or acetabular fracture can be an important signal for early degeneration and progression to osteoarthritis due to intraarticular pathology. However, there is limited literature discussing the use of arthroscopy for the treatment of painful hip. The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze the effectiveness and benefit of arthroscopic treatment for patients with a painful hip after major trauma. Methods From July 2003 to February 2013, we reviewed 13 patients who underwent arthroscopic treatment after acetabular fracture or hip dislocation and were followed up for a minimum of 2 postoperative years. The degree of osteoarthritis based on the Tonnis classification pre- and postoperatively at final follow-up was determined. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using visual analogue scale for pain (VAS) and modified Harris hip score (MHHS), and range of motion (ROM) of the hip pre- and postoperatively at final follow-up. Results There were nine male and four female patients with a mean age at surgery of 28 years (range, 20 to 50 years). The mean follow-up period of the patients was 59.8 months (range, 24 to 115 months), and the mean interval between initial trauma and arthroscopic treatment was 40.8 months (range, 1 to 144 months). At the final follow-up, VAS and MHHS improved significantly from 6.3 and 53.4 to 3.0 and 88.3, respectively (p = 0.002 and p < 0.001, respectively). However, there were no significant differences in hip flexion, abduction, adduction, external rotation, and internal rotation as minor improvements from 113.1°, 38.5°, 28.5°, 36.5°, and 22.7° to 118.5°, 39.0°, 29.2°, 38.9°, and 26.5° were observed, respectively (p = 0.070, p = 0.414, p = 0.317, p = 0.084, and p = 0.136, respectively). None of the patients exhibited progression of osteoarthritis of the hip at the final follow-up. Conclusions Arthroscopic treatment after acetabular fracture or hip dislocation is effective and delays

  5. A biomechanical comparison of composite femurs and cadaver femurs used in experiments on operated hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Basso, Trude; Klaksvik, Jomar; Syversen, Unni; Foss, Olav A

    2014-12-18

    Fourth generation composite femurs (4GCFs, models #3406 and #3403) simulate femurs of males <80 years with good bone quality. Since most hip fractures occur in old women with fragile bones, concern is raised regarding the use of standard 4GCFs in biomechanical experiments. In this study the stability of hip fracture fixations in 4GCFs was compared to human cadaver femurs (HCFs) selected to represent patients with hip fractures. Ten 4GCFs (Sawbones, Pacific Research Laboratories, Inc., Vashon, WA, USA) were compared to 24 HCFs from seven females and five males >60 years. Proximal femur anthropometric measurements were noted. Strain gauge rosettes were attached and femurs were mounted in a hip simulator applying a combined subject-specific axial load and torque. Baseline measurements of resistance to deformation were recorded. Standardized femoral neck fractures were surgically stabilized before the constructs were subjected to 20,000 load-cycles. An optical motion tracking system measured relative movements. Median (95% CI) head fragment migration was 0.8mm (0.4 to 1.1) in the 4GCF group versus 2.2mm (1.5 to 4.6) in the cadaver group (p=0.001). This difference in fracture stability could not be explained by observed differences in femoral anthropometry or potential overloading of 4GCFs. 4GCFs failed with fracture-patterns different from those observed in cadavers. To conclude, standard 4GCFs provide unrealistically stable bone-implant constructs and fail with fractures not observed in cadavers. Until a validated osteopenic or osteoporotic composite femur model is provided, standard 4GCFs should only be used when representing the biomechanical properties of young healthy femurs. PMID:25468304

  6. Validation of a computer-assisted method for measurement of radiographic wear in total hip arthroplasty using all polyethylene cemented acetabular components.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Jean; Zaoui, Amine; Scemama, Caroline; Martell, John; Bragdon, Charles; Hamadouche, Moussa

    2015-03-01

    Although cemented all polyethylene (PE) cups have been routinely used in total hip arthroplasty for decades, no computer-assisted method for measurement of radiographic wear has ever been specifically validated for these implants. Using a validated hip phantom model, AP plain hip radiographs were obtained consecutively for eight simulated wear positions. A version of Martell's Hip Analysis Suite software dedicated to all polyethylene sockets was used by three different examiners of varied experience. Bias (mean, standard deviation and 95% confidence interval limit), repeatability (standard deviation and 95% limit) and reproducibility (standard deviation and 95% limit) for two-dimensional wear measurements were assessed, as recommended by the current ASTM guidelines. Using this protocol, the dedicated software showed an overall mean bias of 0.089 ± 0.060 mm (mean ± SD), and 0.118 mm for 95% CI limit. Repeatability (intra examiner) standard deviation and 95% limit were respectively 0.106 mm and 0.292 mm. Reproducibility (inter examiner) standard deviation and 95% limit were respectively 0.112 mm and 0.308 mm. Martell Hip Analysis for all PE cemented cups is a reliable and low-cost instrument in the assessment of wear, despite being less precise than its original version dedicated to cementless components. PMID:25564735

  7. Radiographic Hip Joint Phenotype of the Pembroke Welsh Corgi

    PubMed Central

    Karbe, Georga T.; Biery, Darryl N.; Gregor, Thomas P.; Giger, Urs; Smith, Gail K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the radiographic hip joint phenotype of the Pembroke Welsh Corgi. Study Design Prospective and retrospective cross-sectional study. Animals Pembroke Welsh Corgis (n = 399). Methods Ventrodorsal, hip-extended radiographs were evaluated for subluxation, osteoarthritis (OA), caudolateral curvilinear osteophytes (CCO), and circumferential femoral head osteophytes (CFHO) of PennHIP evaluated Corgis. Joint laxity was measured by distraction index (DI). Results All Corgis had DI > 0.30 (mean, 0.66), 6.8% had OA, 18% had subluxation, 22.3% had CCO, and 74.4% had CFHO. Higher DI increased the odds for subluxation and canine hip dysplasia (CHD) but not for OA, CCO, or CFHO. The presence of CCO increased the odds for OA by 4.6 times (P = .002) and 2.2 times (P = .01) for hip dysplasia. All dogs with OA had CFHO. The presence of CFHO increased the odds for subluxation by 8.7 times (p < .001) and 8.9 times (P < .001) for hip dysplasia. Subluxation increased the odds for OA by 15.4 times (P < .001). Conclusion Corgis had a low frequency of conventional OA despite having hip laxity that has been shown to correlate with hip OA and hip dysplasia in large-breed dogs. The relationship between CCO and OA was similar to published findings in nonchondrodystrophic large-breed dogs and the CFHO was significantly associated with subluxation. Both CCO and CFHO are associated with hip dysplasia in this small chondrodystrophic breed. PMID:23253037

  8. Differential diagnosis of pain around the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Tibor, Lisa M; Sekiya, Jon K

    2008-12-01

    The differential diagnosis of hip pain is broad and includes intra-articular pathology, extra-articular pathology, and mimickers, including the joints of the pelvic ring. With the current advancements in hip arthroscopy, more patients are being evaluated for hip pain. In recent years, our understanding of the functional anatomy around the hip has improved. In addition, because of advancements in magnetic resonance imaging, the diagnosis of soft tissue causes of hip pain has improved. All of these advances have broadened the differential diagnosis of pain around the hip joint and improved the treatment of these problems. In this review, we discuss the causes of intra-articular hip pain that can be addressed arthroscopically: labral tears, loose bodies, femoroacetabular impingement, capsular laxity, tears of the ligamentum teres, and chondral damage. Extra-articular diagnoses that can be managed arthroscopically are also discussed, including: iliopsoas tendonitis, "internal" snapping hip, "external" snapping hip, iliotibial band and greater trochanteric bursitis, and gluteal tendon injury. Finally, we discuss extra-articular causes of hip pain that are often managed nonoperatively or in an open fashion: femoral neck stress fracture, adductor strain, piriformis syndrome, sacroiliac joint pain, athletic pubalgia, "sports hernia," "Gilmore's groin," and osteitis pubis. PMID:19038713

  9. Effect of Posture on Hip Angles and Moments during Gait

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Cara L.; Sahrmann, Shirley A.

    2014-01-01

    Anterior hip pain is common in young, active adults. Clinically, we have noted that patients with anterior hip pain often walk in a swayback posture, and that their pain is reduced when the posture is corrected. The purpose of this study was to investigate a potential mechanism for the reduction in pain by testing the effect of posture on movement patterns and internal moments during gait in healthy subjects. Fifteen subjects were instructed to walk while maintaining three postures: 1) natural, 2) swayback, and 3) forward flexed. Kinematic and force data were collected using a motion capture system and a force plate. Walking in the swayback posture resulted in a higher peak hip extension angle, hip flexor moment and hip flexion angular impulse compared to natural posture. In contrast, walking in a forward flexed posture resulted in a decreased hip extension angle and decreased hip flexion angular impulse. Based on these results, walking in a swayback posture may result in increased forces required of the anterior hip structures, potentially contributing to anterior hip pain. This study provides a potential biomechanical mechanism for clinical observations that posture correction in patients with hip pain is beneficial. PMID:25262565

  10. Quantitative local topological texture properties obtained from radiographs of the proximal femur in patients with pertrochanteric and transcervical hip fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, H. F.; Lutz, J.; Koerner, M.; Notohamiprodjo, M.; Reiser, M.

    2009-02-01

    The incidence of osteoporosis and associated fractures becomes an increasingly relevant issue for the public health institutions of industrialized nations. Fractures of the hip represent the worst complication of osteoporosis with a significantly elevated rate of mortality. Prediction of fracture risk is a major focus of osteoporosis research and, over the years, has been approched from different angles. There exist two distinct subtypes of transcervical and pertrochanteric hip fracture that can be distinguished on the basis of the anatomical location of the injury. While the epidemiology of hip fractures has been well described, typically, little or no distinction is made between the subtypes. The object of this study was to determine whether local topological texture properties based on the Minkowski Functionals (MF) obtained from standard radiographs of the proximal femur in patients with hip fracture can be used to differentiate between the two types of fracture pattern. The texture features were extracted from standardized regions of interest (femoral head, neck, and pertrochanteric region) in clinical radiographs of the hip obtained from 90 post-menopausal women (69.8 +/- 7.9 yrs). 30 of the women had sustained pertrochanteric fractures, 30 had transcervical hip fractures and 30 were age-matched controls. We determined an optimized topological parameter MF2Dloc using an integrative filtering procedure based on a sliding-windows algorithm. Statistical relationship between the fracture type (pertrochanteric/transcervical) and the value of MF2Dloc was assessed by receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis. Depending on the anatomical location of the region of interest for texture analysis correct classification of tanscervial and pertrochanteric fractures ranged from AUC = 0.79 to 0.98. In conclusion, quantitative texture properties of trabecular bone extracted from radiographs of the hip can be used to identify patients with hip fracture and to distinguish

  11. Rethinking Pedagogy in Urban Spaces: Implementing Hip-Hop Pedagogy in the Urban Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adjapong, Edmund S.; Emdin, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    A significant amount of research regarding Hip-Hop Based Education (HHBE) fails to provide insight on how to incorporate elements of Hip-Hop into daily teaching practices; rather Hip-Hop based educators focus mainly on incorporating Hip-Hop culture into curricula. This study explores the benefits of using two specific Hip-Hop pedagogical practices…

  12. Use of the talon hip compression screw in intertrochanteric fractures of the hip.

    PubMed

    Bramlet, Dale G

    2004-08-01

    A retrospective analysis of a compression hip screw with four reversibly deployable talons was done. Fifty-four patients had sufficient radiographs to be included in this analysis. One-year mortality was 17% and increased to 41% by 2 years. No lag screws cut out, and postoperative slide was reduced compared with that in many published series. Three patients had revision of a failed alternate-type hip pin with the Talon hip compression screw. Previous studies showed the talons provide the definitive difference in allowing enhanced compression at the time of surgery, preventing cut-out by enhanced rotational stability, and allowing immediate postoperative weightbearing without excessive limb shortening. The failure mode of the Talon compression hip screw seems to be side-plate loosening rather than varus deformity and lag screw cut-out. The Talon compression hip screw especially is effective with weak, osteoporotic bone and in unstable, three-part and four-part fractures. A previous study showed that Talon deployment notably improved interfragment compression and torsional strength, and that engagement or penetration into or through the cortical bone at the base of the femoral head-neck junction in the inferior lag screw position was the critical technical step to maximize the talon lag screw purchase. PMID:15292793

  13. Influence of bone mineral density and hip geometry on the different types of hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yizhong; Lin, Jinkuang; Cai, Siqing; Yan, Lisheng; Pan, Yuancheng; Yao, Xuedong; Zhuang, Huafeng; Wang, Peiwen; Zeng, Yanjun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of bone mineral density and hip geometry on the fragility fracture of femoral neck and trochanteric region. There were 95 menopausal females of age ≥ 50 years with fragility fracture of hip, including 55 cases of femoral neck fracture and 40 cases of trochanteric fracture. Another 63 non-fractured females with normal bone mineral density (BMD) were chosen as control. BMD, hip axis length, neck-shaft angle and structural parameters including cross surface area, cortical thickness and buckling ratio were detected and compared. Compared with control group, the patients with femoral neck fracture or trochanteric fractures had significantly lower BMD of femoral neck, as well as lower cross surface area and cortical thickness and higher buckling ratio in femoral neck and trochanteric region. There were no significant differences of BMD and structural parameters in the femoral neck fracture group and intertrochanteric fracture group. Hip axis length and neck-shaft angle were not significantly different among three groups. The significant changes of BMD and proximal femur geometry were present in the fragility fracture of femoral neck and trochanteric region. The different types of hip fractures cannot be explained by these changes. PMID:26773177

  14. Bilateral Total Hip Arthroplasty in 20 Years Old Female with Neglected Developmental Dysplasia of Hip

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Saurabh; Jain, Jitesh K; Sharma, Rajeev K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Management of developmental dysplasia of hip in adult is challenging problem. Management protocols are not well defined in terms of operative technique. Patient may present very late. Usually they consult orthopaedic surgeons when osteoarthritic changes set in, leading to pain. Operative management is difficult because of difficult exposure, altered anatomy of soft tissue structures, hypoplastic femoral medullary canal and shallow and atypical acetabulum filled with soft tissues. Femoral head is up-ridden with contracted Abductors which resists reduction of femoral head into acetabulum. Altered anatomy of neurovascular structures also pose a risk of being injured during surgery. Case Report Here we are presenting a case of bilateral total hip arthroplasty in 20 years old female with developmental dysplasia of hip and sharing our experience of its operative management. Conclusion We concluded from this case study that total hip arthroplasty in developmental dysplasia of hip is technically demanding but gives good functional and clinical result. For getting functionally good result contracted soft tissues around joint need special attention. PMID:27298952

  15. Modes of lubrication in human hip joints.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, B J; Unsworth, A; Mian, N

    1982-01-01

    Cadaveric hip joints were tested in a hip function simulator which subjected the femoral head to a cycle of loading and oscillation similar to that experienced during walking and measured the frictional torque transmitted to the acetabulum. Silicone fluids with viscosities from 10-2 Pa s (pascal second) to 30 Pa s were used as lubricants and the transition from mixed to full fluid film lubrication was observed around 5 x 10(-2) Pa s. Sodium carboxymethylcellulose solutions were also tested at the lower viscosities. Hyaluronidase digestion of samples of synovial fluid caused a significant increase in friction over the control samples. Trypsin digestion had no significant effect. No correlation between compliance of the cartilage and the frictional values was observed. PMID:7092334

  16. Hip fractures in extremely old patients

    PubMed Central

    Kapicioglu, Mehmet; Ersen, Ali; Saglam, Yavuz; Akgul, Turgut; Kizilkurt, Taha; Yazicioglu, Onder

    2014-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this study was to report a less seen age-group (>90) of hip fractures and to assess the predictors of functional loss, complications and mortality. Methods Thirty-two patients at a mean age of 92.8 (±2.7) were treated in a single institution and reported at a mean follow-up of 2.02 (±1.35) years. Results Mortality was similar between proximal femoral nailing (PFN) and bipolar cemented hemiarthroplasty (BCH) in first year (p = 0.17) but significantly high in following years in BCH (p = 0.035) and patients with cardiac disease (p = 0.054). Conclusion Hip fractures are challenging in extremely old patients and associated with increased mortality and disability. PMID:25264408

  17. Discrepancies in ultrasonography of the infant hip.

    PubMed

    Joseph, K N; Meyer, S

    1996-01-01

    A total of 4,984 ultrasonographic (US) examinations of infant hips were done for the diagnosis or management of congenital/developmental dislocation/ dysplasia of the hip; 48 instances of lack of correlation (0.96%) between the US and radiographic images were noted. Analysis of these cases permitted classification into two groups: (a) apparent discrepancy (44 cases, 0.88%) for which faulty technique or interpretation of the sonogram/radiograph, hyperlaxity, inadvertent stress views, and lateral ossification defects led to disparity in the imaging modalities; and (b) true discrepancy (4 cases, 0.08%) where no explanation was possible for the dissimilarity. The relevance of this study is that the majority of discrepancies can be eliminated by (a) avoiding the common causes of apparent discrepancies mentioned in this article and by (b) the use of the Graf and Harcke techniques as complementary methods of US examination. PMID:8897261

  18. An unusual pain in the hip

    PubMed Central

    Bangera, Sachin; Dunkow, Paul; Weerasinghe, Suboda; Murugesan, Senthil V.

    2016-01-01

    A 68-year-old previously healthy man presented with increasing right hip pain of 6 months duration. On examination he was found to have a hard mass in the right hip arising from the pelvic bone. Imaging studies were in keeping with a sarcoma arising from the right iliac bone. However, biopsy of this bony lesion confirmed this to be a metastatic adenocarcinoma rather than a primary bone malignancy. Further imaging and a subsequent colonoscopy revealed the primary to be a colonic adenocarcinoma. The unique and unusual nature of this case was the presentation as a solitary bony metastasis from a colonic primary. There is no previously documented report in the literature of such a rare presentation of a colonic adenocarcinoma as a solitary bony lesion mimicking a primary sarcoma in the absence of other signs or symptoms. PMID:27617105

  19. An unusual pain in the hip.

    PubMed

    Bangera, Sachin; Dunkow, Paul; Weerasinghe, Suboda; Murugesan, Senthil V

    2016-09-01

    A 68-year-old previously healthy man presented with increasing right hip pain of 6 months duration. On examination he was found to have a hard mass in the right hip arising from the pelvic bone. Imaging studies were in keeping with a sarcoma arising from the right iliac bone. However, biopsy of this bony lesion confirmed this to be a metastatic adenocarcinoma rather than a primary bone malignancy. Further imaging and a subsequent colonoscopy revealed the primary to be a colonic adenocarcinoma. The unique and unusual nature of this case was the presentation as a solitary bony metastasis from a colonic primary. There is no previously documented report in the literature of such a rare presentation of a colonic adenocarcinoma as a solitary bony lesion mimicking a primary sarcoma in the absence of other signs or symptoms. PMID:27617105

  20. European experience with cementless total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Morscher, E W

    1983-01-01

    The differences between prostheses fixed with and without cement consist mainly of the design and the nature of the surface of the implant. The shapes of the sockets to be implanted without cement show a wide variety--cylinder, square, conus, ellipsoid with and without threads. The hemispherical shape, which was chosen for the acetabular component of the isoelastic hip joint, does not disturb the natural form and function of the hip joint since the outer surface is closely adapted to the original subchondral bone layer. Undesired stress concentrations therefore are eliminated. The fixation of the noncemented cup is secured by threads, pegs, screws, etc. and by ingrowth of bony tissue in the grooves of the surfaces. Except for some special forms, most of the stems are based on the self-locking principle. All prosthesis models show preparations that increase the surface area (ribs, wings, corrugations, or rims). PMID:6368478

  1. Painful Spastic Hip Dislocation: Proximal Femoral Resection

    PubMed Central

    Albiñana, Javier; Gonzalez-Moran, Gaspar

    2002-01-01

    The dislocated hip in a non-ambulatory child with spastic paresis tends to be a painful interference to sleep, sitting upright, and perineal care. Proximal femoral resection-interposition arthroplasty is one method of treatment for this condition. We reviewed eight hips, two bilateral cases, with a mean follow-up of 30 months. Clinical improvement was observed in all except one case, with respect to pain relief and sitting tolerance. Some proximal migration was observed in three cases, despite routine post-operative skeletal traction in all cases and careful soft tissue interposition. One case showed significant heterotopic ossification which restricted prolonged sitting. This patient needed some occasional medication for pain. PMID:12180614

  2. Adhesive capsulitis of the hip: a review.

    PubMed

    Looney, Colin G; Raynor, Brett; Lowe, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Adhesive capsulitis of the hip (ACH) is a rare clinical entity. Similar to adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder, ACH is characterized by a painful decrease in active and passive range of motion as synovial inflammation in the acute stages of the disease progresses to capsular fibrosis in the chronic stages. Once other diagnoses have been ruled out, management of ACH is tailored to reduce inflammation in the acute stages with NSAIDs, intra-articular steroid injections, and targeted physical therapy while biomechanical dysfunction in the spine, hip, sacroiliac joint, or lower limb joints is addressed. In chronic stages of the disease, intervention should focus on decreasing the progression of fibrotic changes and regaining range of motion through aggressive physical therapy. Interventions described for chronic ACH include manipulation under anesthesia; pressure dilatation; and open or arthroscopic synovectomy, lysis of adhesions, and capsular release. Surgical intervention should be considered only after failure of a minimum 3-month course of nonsurgical treatment. PMID:24292931

  3. Current concept in dysplastic hip arthroplasty: Techniques for acetabular and femoral reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bicanic, Goran; Barbaric, Katarina; Bohacek, Ivan; Aljinovic, Ana; Delimar, Domagoj

    2014-01-01

    Adult patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip develop secondary osteoarthritis and eventually end up with total hip arthroplasty (THA) at younger age. Because of altered anatomy of dysplastic hips, THA in these patients represents technically demanding procedure. Distorted anatomy of the acetabulum and proximal femur together with conjoined leg length discrepancy present major challenges during performing THA in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip. In addition, most patients are at younger age, therefore, soft tissue balance is of great importance (especially the need to preserve the continuity of abductors) to maximise postoperative functional result. In this paper we present a variety of surgical techniques available for THA in dysplastic hips, their advantages and disadvantages. For acetabular reconstruction following techniques are described: Standard metal augments (prefabricated), Custom made acetabular augments (3D printing), Roof reconstruction with vascularized fibula, Roof reconstruction with pedicled iliac graft, Roof reconstruction with autologous bone graft, Roof reconstruction with homologous bone graft, Roof reconstruction with auto/homologous spongious bone, Reinforcement ring with the hook in combination with autologous graft augmentation, Cranial positioning of the acetabulum, Medial protrusion technique (cotyloplasty) with chisel, Medial protrusion technique (cotyloplasty) with reaming, Cotyloplasty without spongioplasty. For femoral reconstruction following techniques were described: Distraction with external fixator, Femoral shortening through a modified lateral approach, Transtrochanteric osteotomies, Paavilainen osteotomy, Lesser trochanter osteotomy, Double-chevron osteotomy, Subtrochanteric osteotomies, Diaphyseal osteotomies, Distal femoral osteotomies. At the end we present author’s treatment method of choice: for acetabulum we perform cotyloplasty leaving only paper-thin medial wall, which we break during

  4. A Community-Based Hip Fracture Registry: Population, Methods, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Inacio, Maria C S; Weiss, Jennifer M; Miric, Alex; Hunt, Jessica J; Zohman, Gary L; Paxton, Elizabeth W

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Hip fracture is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. A large integrated health care system developed a registry to characterize its current patient population with hip fractures. This report describes the population, methods used, and outcomes of patients registered during the initial three years (2009–2011). Methods: Cases of hip fracture recorded from January 2009 through December 2011 were ascertained using the Kaiser Permanente Hip Fracture Registry. The registry collects information on patient, procedure, surgeon, facility, and surgical outcomes. Outcomes monitored included length of stay, readmissions, mortality, revisions, surgical site infections, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, pressure ulcers, dislocations, and myocardial infarction. Results: The population (N = 12,562) was predominantly white (77.8%), women (68.6%), and older (71.6% aged ≥ 75 years), and 32% had at least 5 comorbidities. The average length of follow-up was 1.1 years (standard deviation = 0.9). The most prevalent comorbidities were hypertension (70.8%) and anemia (29.4%). Femoral neck fractures (54.6%) were the most common fracture type. Hemiarthroplasty was the most common procedure (33.1%). Most fractures were treated by medium-volume (10 to 29 cases per year) surgeons (68.4%) at high-volume (≥ 130 cases per year) facilities (63.0%). The 90-day readmission rate was 22.1%, and the mortality rate was 12.3%. The most common postoperative complications were pneumonia (11.4%) and pressure ulcers (2.9%). There were 2.2 revisions per 100 observation years. Conclusion: A hip fracture registry provides important information regarding patient characteristics, intraoperative practices, and postoperative outcomes, which can be analyzed, interpreted, and used to reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:26057682

  5. Arthroscopy provides symptom relief and good functional outcomes in patients with hip synovial chondromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Fernando P.; Philippon, Marc J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical presentation, associated pathology and clinical outcomes after arthroscopic treatment of hip synovial chondromatosis (SC). A prospective data registry was queried for patients with SC diagnosis from 2005 to 2012. Surgical indications were intra-articular pain after failure of conservative treatment, labral pathology, chondral damage or loose bodies. All patients had femoroacetabular impingement based on radiographic findings. Patient-centered outcomes were collected before and after surgery. Standard hip arthroscopy techniques were used to address associated pathology. Twenty-three patients met the inclusion criteria. Eleven were males. Mean age was 43.7 years. Mean center-edge angle was 33.7 and alpha angle 73. Radiographs were diagnostic in five patients (23.8%). Magnetic resonance imaging identified loose bodies in 14 (66%). Most patients had an uncountable amount of loose bodies in the central and peripheral compartments. The most common associated pathology was a labral tear (100%) and acetabular cartilage injury (85%). All patients had improvement in range of motion. The average Modified Harris Hip score improved from 62 (pre-op) to 84.8 (post-op). Short-Form 12-PCS improved from 41 to 53. Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index improved from 27.1 to 7.2. Median overall satisfaction was 9.5 (out of 10). Hip arthroscopy with thorough removal of loose bodies and subtotal synovectomy, coupled with an aggressive and early rehabilitation program, was effective in ameliorating symptoms associated with from hip SC, yielding high levels of patient satisfaction and functional outcomes, in a 2.5 year follow-up time. Level of evidence: IV (case series) PMID:27011848

  6. Type II Intertrochanteric Fractures: Proximal Femoral Nailing (PFN) Versus Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS)

    PubMed Central

    Jonnes, Cyril; SM, Shishir; Najimudeen, Syed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intertrochanteric fracture is one of the most common fractures of the hip especially in the elderly with osteoporotic bones, usually due to low-energy trauma like simple falls. Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS) is still considered the gold standard for treating intertrochanteric fractures by many. Not many studies compare the DHS with Proximal femoral nail (PFN), in Type II intertrochanteric fractures (Boyd and Griffin classification). This study was done to compare the functional and radiological outcome of PFN with DHS in treatment of Type II intertrochanteric fractures. Methods: From October 2012 to March 2015, a prospective comparative study was done where 30 alternative cases of type II intertrochanteric fractures of hip were operated using PFN or DHS. Intraoperative complications were noted. Functional outcome was assessed using Harris Hip Score and radiological findings were compared at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Results: The average age of the patients was 60 years. In our series we found that patients with DHS had increased intraoperative blood loss (159ml), longer duration of surgery (105min), and required longer time for mobilization while patients who underwent PFN had lower intraoperative blood loss (73ml), shorter duration of surgery (91min), and allowed early mobilization. The average limb shortening in DHS group was 9.33 mm as compared with PFN group which was only 4.72 mm. The patients treated with PFN started early ambulation as they had better Harris Hip Score in the early post-op period. At the end of 12th month, there was not much difference in the functional outcome between the two groups. Conclusion: PFN is better than DHS in type II intertrochanteric fractures in terms of decreased blood loss, reduced duration of surgery, early weight bearing and mobilization, reduced hospital stay, decreased risk of infection and decreased complications. PMID:26894214

  7. Current concept in dysplastic hip arthroplasty: Techniques for acetabular and femoral reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bicanic, Goran; Barbaric, Katarina; Bohacek, Ivan; Aljinovic, Ana; Delimar, Domagoj

    2014-09-18

    Adult patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip develop secondary osteoarthritis and eventually end up with total hip arthroplasty (THA) at younger age. Because of altered anatomy of dysplastic hips, THA in these patients represents technically demanding procedure. Distorted anatomy of the acetabulum and proximal femur together with conjoined leg length discrepancy present major challenges during performing THA in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip. In addition, most patients are at younger age, therefore, soft tissue balance is of great importance (especially the need to preserve the continuity of abductors) to maximise postoperative functional result. In this paper we present a variety of surgical techniques available for THA in dysplastic hips, their advantages and disadvantages. For acetabular reconstruction following techniques are described: Standard metal augments (prefabricated), Custom made acetabular augments (3D printing), Roof reconstruction with vascularized fibula, Roof reconstruction with pedicled iliac graft, Roof reconstruction with autologous bone graft, Roof reconstruction with homologous bone graft, Roof reconstruction with auto/homologous spongious bone, Reinforcement ring with the hook in combination with autologous graft augmentation, Cranial positioning of the acetabulum, Medial protrusion technique (cotyloplasty) with chisel, Medial protrusion technique (cotyloplasty) with reaming, Cotyloplasty without spongioplasty. For femoral reconstruction following techniques were described: Distraction with external fixator, Femoral shortening through a modified lateral approach, Transtrochanteric osteotomies, Paavilainen osteotomy, Lesser trochanter osteotomy, Double-chevron osteotomy, Subtrochanteric osteotomies, Diaphyseal osteotomies, Distal femoral osteotomies. At the end we present author's treatment method of choice: for acetabulum we perform cotyloplasty leaving only paper-thin medial wall, which we break during acetabular

  8. Adherence to guidelines regarding total hip replacement for fractured neck of femur.

    PubMed

    Fishlock, A; Scarsbrook, C; Marsh, R

    2016-07-01

    Introduction In 2011 the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) published guidelines suggesting that clinicians offer total hip replacement (THR) to patients with displaced intracapsular hip fractures who could walk independently outside with no aids or one stick, who are not cognitively impaired and are ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) grade ≤2. They also stated that best practice is operating within 36 hours of presentation. This audit aimed to determine whether Scarborough Hospital was following these guidelines and compared the results with the national average. Methods Two years of data (January 2012 - December 2013) were collected retrospectively from Scarborough Hospital's hip fracture database on all patients presenting with an intracapsular hip fracture. Data were analysed to determine whether patients who had a THR fulfilled NICE criteria. Furthermore, patients with hemiarthroplasties who were eligible for THRs were identified. Finally, the time to surgery was calculated to examine whether patients receiving THRs waited longer than patients receiving hemiarthroplasties. Results In 2012, 48.6% of all eligible patients received a THR while in 2013 the figure was 55.9%. These percentages are much higher than the national average. However, 36 (53.7%) of the 67 patients who received a THR did not fulfil all the NICE criteria, mainly owing to high ASA grade. The mean time from presentation to theatre for THR was 8 hours and 37 minutes longer for THR patients than for hemiarthroplasty in 2012. This difference was reduced to 2 hours and 12 minutes in 2013. Conclusions Small general hospitals can meet and even exceed the standards regarding treatment strategies for hip factures. However, there is still room for improvement. Departmental training may be useful in achieving this aim. The anaesthetic team should be involved at the earliest opportunity, to help optimise patients preoperatively and determine whether patients listed for

  9. Accuracy of femoral templating in reproducing anatomical femoral offset in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Davies, H; Foote, J; Spencer, R F

    2007-01-01

    Restoration of hip biomechanics is a crucial component of successful total hip replacement. Preoperative templating is recommended to ensure that the size and orientation of implants is optimised. We studied how closely natural femoral offset could be reproduced using the manufacturers' templates for 10 femoral stems in common use in the UK. A series of 23 consecutive preoperative radiographs from patients who had undergone unilateral total hip replacement for unilateral osteoarthritis of the hip was employed. The change in offset between the templated position of the best-fitting template and the anatomical centre of the hip was measured. The templates were then ranked according to their ability to reproduce the normal anatomical offset. The most accurate was the CPS-Plus (Root Mean Square Error 2.0 mm) followed in rank order by: C stem (2.16), CPT (2.40), Exeter (3.23), Stanmore (3.28), Charnley (3.65), Corail (3.72), ABG II (4.30), Furlong HAC (5.08) and Furlong modular (7.14). A similar pattern of results was achieved when the standard error of variability of offset was analysed. We observed a wide variation in the ability of the femoral prosthesis templates to reproduce normal femoral offset. This variation was independent of the seniority of the observer. The templates of modern polished tapered stems with high modularity were best able to reproduce femoral offset. The current move towards digitisation of X-rays may offer manufacturers an opportunity to improve template designs in certain instances, and to develop appropriate computer software. PMID:19197861

  10. Sex effects on short-term complications after hip fracture: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ekström, Wilhelmina; Samuelsson, Bodil; Ponzer, Sari; Cederholm, Tommy; Thorngren, Karl-Göran; Hedström, Margareta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate potential sex differences and other factors associated with complications within 4 months after a hip fracture. Methods A total of 1,915 patients ≥65 years (480 men) with hip fracture were consecutively included in a prospective multicenter cohort study. A review of medical records and patient interviews according to a study protocol based on the Standardized Audit of Hip Fractures in Europe (SAHFE, RIKSHÖFT) was performed. Sex differences in comorbidity according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists score and complications 4 months after a hip fracture were registered. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors related to complications. Results Male sex was associated with worse general health according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists classification (P=0.005) and with more comorbidities (P<0.001). Male sex emerged as a risk factor for developing pneumonia (P<0.001), and additionally, 18% of the men suffered from cardiac complications compared with 13% of the females (P=0.018). Female sex was predisposed for urinary tract infections, 30% vs 23% in males (P=0.001). Mortality was higher in the male vs female group, both within 30 days (15% vs 10%, P=0.001) and at 4 months (24% vs 14%, P=0.001). Conditions associated with pneumonia were male sex, pulmonary disease, and cognitive impairment. Cardiac complications were associated with delayed surgery and cardiovascular and pulmonary disease. Conclusion Before surgery, men with hip fracture already have a poorer health status and higher comorbidity rate than women, thus resulting in a twofold increased risk of pneumonia. Cognitive dysfunction and pulmonary disease contributed to pneumonia in men. Delayed surgery seems to increase the risk for cardiac complications. It is important to consider the sex perspective early on together with cardiopulmonary comorbidity and cognitive dysfunction to be able to counteract serious complications that may

  11. Renal function after elective total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Perregaard, Helene; Damholt, Mette B; Solgaard, Søren; Petersen, Morten B

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with increased short-term and long-term mortality in intensive care populations and in several surgical specialties, but there are very few data concerning orthopedic populations. We have studied the incidence of AKI and the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in an elective population of orthopedic patients undergoing primary total hip replacement, hypothesizing that chronic kidney disease predisposes to AKI. Patients and methods - This was a single-center, population-based, retrospective, registry-based cohort study involving all primary elective total hip replacements performed from January 2003 through December 2012. Patient demographics and creatinine values were registered. We evaluated the presence of CKD and AKI according to the international guidelines for kidney disease (KDIGO Acute Kidney Injury Workgroup 2013 ). Results - 3,416 patients were included (2,064 females (60%)). AKI (according to KDIGO criteria) was seen in 75 patients (2.2%, 95% CI: 1.7-2.7) in the course of primary total hip replacement. Of these, 26 had pre-existing CKD of class 3-5. Pre-existing CKD of class 3-5, indicating moderately to severely reduced kidney function, was seen in 374 individuals (11%). Interpretation - Development of acute kidney injury appears to be a substantial problem compared to other complications related to elective total hip arthroplasty, i.e. luxation and infection. Patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease may be especially vulnerable. The clinical impact of acute kidney injury in an elective orthopedic population remains to be elucidated. PMID:26937782

  12. The Anterior Approach for Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Hochfelder, Jason P; Davidovitch, Roy I

    2016-03-01

    The anterior approach for total hip replacements has recently gained popularity. Some authors report faster recoveries and decreased dislocation rated with no increased risk of complications. However others claim no difference in outcomes when compared to other approaches yet an increase in complication rates. This paper provides a brief history of the approach, discusses various indications and contraindications, preoperative considerations, surgical techniques, and postoperative protocols. PMID:26977549

  13. Ultrasonography of nondevelopmental dysplasia of the hips.

    PubMed

    Grissom, L E; Harcke, H T

    1997-01-01

    We examined 45 infants with nondevelopmental dysplasia of the hip (non-DDH), including congenital deficiency of the femur (CDF) (20 infants), neuromuscular syndrome (five infants), skeletal dysplasia (15 infants), and infection (five infants), and present the sonographic findings. Dysmorphic proximal femora, coxa vara, and abnormal echogenicity of the soft tissue and cartilage are features which differentiate patients with non-DDH from those with typical DDH. PMID:8995174

  14. The Epidemiology and Demographics of Hip Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Loder, Randall T.; Skopelja, Elaine N.

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is unknown. There are many insights, however, from epidemiologic/demographic information. A systematic medical literature review regarding DDH was performed. There is a predominance of left-sided (64.0%) and unilateral disease (63.4%). The incidence per 1000 live births ranges from 0.06 in Africans in Africa to 76.1 in Native Americans. There is significant variability in incidence within each racial group by geographic location. The incidence of clinical neonatal hip instability at birth ranges from 0.4 in Africans to 61.7 in Polish Caucasians. Predictors of DDH are breech presentation, positive family history, and gender (female). Children born premature, with low birth weights, or to multifetal pregnancies are somewhat protected from DDH. Certain HLA A, B, and D types demonstrate an increase in DDH. Chromosome 17q21 is strongly associated with DDH. Ligamentous laxity and abnormalities in collagen metabolism, estrogen metabolism, and pregnancy-associated pelvic instability are well-described associations with DDH. Many studies demonstrate an increase of DDH in the winter, both in the northern and southern hemispheres. Swaddling is strongly associated with DDH. Amniocentesis, premature labor, and massive radiation exposure may increase the risk of DDH. Associated conditions are congenital muscular torticollis and congenital foot deformities. The opposite hip is frequently abnormal when using rigorous radiographic assessments. The role of acetabular dysplasia and adult hip osteoarthritis is complex. Archeological studies demonstrate that the epidemiology of DDH may be changing. PMID:24977057

  15. Hip Replacement - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Portuguese (português) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) Tagalog ( ... 한국어 (Korean) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Portuguese (português) Total Hip Replacement Substituição total de quadril - português ( ...

  16. Renal function after elective total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Perregaard, Helene; Damholt, Mette B; Solgaard, Søren; Petersen, Morten B

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with increased short-term and long-term mortality in intensive care populations and in several surgical specialties, but there are very few data concerning orthopedic populations. We have studied the incidence of AKI and the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in an elective population of orthopedic patients undergoing primary total hip replacement, hypothesizing that chronic kidney disease predisposes to AKI. Patients and methods This was a single-center, population-based, retrospective, registry-based cohort study involving all primary elective total hip replacements performed from January 2003 through December 2012. Patient demographics and creatinine values were registered. We evaluated the presence of CKD and AKI according to the international guidelines for kidney disease (KDIGO Acute Kidney Injury Workgroup 2013). Results 3,416 patients were included (2,064 females (60%)). AKI (according to KDIGO criteria) was seen in 75 patients (2.2%, 95% CI: 1.7–2.7) in the course of primary total hip replacement. Of these, 26 had pre-existing CKD of class 3–5. Pre-existing CKD of class 3–5, indicating moderately to severely reduced kidney function, was seen in 374 individuals (11%). Interpretation Development of acute kidney injury appears to be a substantial problem compared to other complications related to elective total hip arthroplasty, i.e. luxation and infection. Patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease may be especially vulnerable. The clinical impact of acute kidney injury in an elective orthopedic population remains to be elucidated. PMID:26937782

  17. Uncoupling of bone turnover following hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Whitson, H; DeMarco, D; Reilly, D; Murphy, S; Yett, H S; Mattingly, D; Greenspan, S L

    2002-07-01

    Studies using total hip replacement surgery as a model for acute hip injury have shown that bone mineral density of the proximal femur decreases 6-18% in the 6 months following surgery. To examine the acute biochemical mechanism associated with bone loss, we measured two indicators of bone formation [serum osteocalcin (OC), serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP)], as well as two markers for bone resorption [urine and serum N-telopeptide cross-linked collagen type 1 (NTx)], in 20 patients (10 men, 10 women, mean age 59.4 years) prior to hip replacement and 1-2 days postsurgery. The average OC value (ng/ml) decreased by 57.3% following surgery (7.5 +/- 4.3 to 3.2 +/- 1.1, P <0.001), and the average BSAP level (U/L) decreased by 27.6% (19.9 +/- 5.6 to 14.4 +/- 3.7, P <0.001). In contrast, levels of urine NTx (nmol BCE/mmol Cr) did not change significantly after the surgery (73.9 +/- 47.2 to 70.1 +/- 29.7). In addition, there was no change in serum NTx (nmol BCE) after surgery (11.8 +/- 2.3 to 11.8 +/- 3.0). Six months after surgery, bone mass had not changed significantly from baseline. These findings suggest that there is an uncoupling of bone turnover following hip replacement surgery which is characterized by significant reductions in bone formation without compensatory decreases in bone resorption, potentially leading to bone loss. Longer periods of follow-up are needed to assess long-term bone mass changes. PMID:12200656

  18. Total Hip Joint Replacement Biotelemetry System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreham, J. F.; Postal, R. B.; Luntz, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a biotelemetry system that is hermetically sealed within a total hip replacement implant is reported. The telemetry system transmits six channels of stress data to reconstruct the major forces acting on the neck of the prosthesis and uses an induction power coupling technique to eliminate the need for internal batteries. The activities associated with the telemetry microminiaturization, data recovery console, hardware fabrications, power induction systems, electrical and mechanical testing and hermetic sealing test results are discussed.

  19. Femoroacetabular impingement and osteoarthritis of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Charlie; Li, Linda; Forster, Bruce B.; Kopec, Jacek A.; Ratzlaff, Charles; Halai, Lalji; Cibere, Jolanda; Esdaile, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To outline the clinical presentation, physical examination findings, diagnostic criteria, and management options of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Sources of information PubMed was searched for relevant articles regarding the pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of FAI. Main message In recent years, FAI has been increasingly recognized as a potential precursor and an important contributor to hip pain in the adult population and idiopathic hip osteoarthritis later in life. Femoroacetabular impingement is a collection of bony morphologic abnormalities of the hip joint that result in abnormal contact during motion. Cam-type FAI relates to a non-spherical osseous prominence of the proximal femoral neck or head-neck junction. Pincer-type FAI relates to excessive acetabular coverage over the femoral head, which can occur owing to several morphologic variants. Patients with FAI present with chronic, deep, or aching anterior groin pain most commonly in the sitting position, or during or after activity. Patients might also experience occasional sharp pains during activity. A thorough history should be taken that includes incidence of trauma and exercise frequency. A physical examination should be performed that includes a full hip, low back, and abdominal examination to assess for alternate causes of anterior groin pain. Diagnosis of FAI should be confirmed with radiography. Femoroacetabular impingement can be managed conservatively with rest, modification of activities, medications, and physiotherapy, or it can be treated surgically. Conclusion Femoroacetabular impingement is an important cause of anterior groin pain. Early recognition and intervention by the primary care provider might be critical to alleviating morbidity and preventing FAI progression. PMID:26668284

  20. The anatomy of the hip abductor muscles.

    PubMed

    Flack, N A M S; Nicholson, H D; Woodley, S J

    2014-03-01

    The anatomy of the hip abductors has not been comprehensively examined, yet is important to understanding function and pathology in the gluteal region. For example, pathology of the hip abductor muscle-tendon complexes can cause greater trochanteric pain syndrome, and may be associated with gluteal atrophy and fatty infiltration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed morphology of gluteus medius (GMed), gluteus minimus (GMin), and tensor fascia lata (TFL), and determine whether the muscles comprised anatomical compartments. The gluteal region from 12 cadavers was dissected and data collected on attachment sites, volume, fascicular and tendinous anatomy, and innervation. Three sites of GMed origin were identified (gluteal fossa, gluteal aponeurosis, and posteroinferior edge of the iliac crest) and the distal tendon had lateral and posterior parts. GMed was the largest in volume (27.6 ± 11.6 cm(3); GMin 14.1 ± 11.1 cm(3); TFL 1.8 ± 0.8 cm(3)). Fascicles of GMin originated from the gluteal fossa, inserting onto the deep surface of its distal tendon and the hip joint capsule. TFL was encapsulated in the fascia lata, having no bony attachment. Primary innervation patterns varied for GMed, with three or four branches supplying different regions of muscle. Distinct secondary nerve branches entered four regions of GMin; no differential innervation was observed for TFL. On the basis of architectural parameters and innervation, GMed, and GMin each comprise of four compartments but TFL is a homogenous muscle. It is anticipated that these data will be useful for future clinical and functional studies of the hip abductors. PMID:23625344

  1. Uncemented total hip arthroplasty in osteoarthritis of hip secondary to low and high dislocated hips: A mid-term follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Munigangaiah, Sudarshan; O’Dwyer, Sinead; Masterson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: Performing successful total hip replacement (THR) in dysplastic, subluxed, and dislocated hip is a challenging task. Here, we assessed midterm clinical and radiological outcomes of uncemented total hip arthroplasty in osteoarthritis (OA) of hip secondary to Hartofilakidis low and high-dislocated hips with a mean follow-up of 8.8 years. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of prospectively collected data was designed involving all consecutive patients who underwent uncemented THR for OA of hip secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip and Grade II or Grade III Hartofilakidis classification. Results: Thirty-two patients underwent 45 THR, with 23 Grade II (low dislocation) and 22 Grade III (high-dislocation) of Hartofilakidis classification. Thirteen patients had bilateral hip replacements, 19 patients had unilateral THR. There was highly statistically significant difference between preoperative and postoperative HHS and SF-36v2™ at each follow-up. Survivorship of original implant was 98.88% at a mean follow-up of 8.8 years. The mean improvement in leg length in this series was 3.6 cm (1.8-4.5, 95% confidence interval). No sciatic nerve or femoral nerve palsies were observed. Conclusions: Uncemented THR provides better function and quality of life. However, longer follow-up studies are needed to assess survivorship of uncemented THR in Hartofilakidis low and high-dislocations. PMID:27433063

  2. The hip joint as a conchoid shape.

    PubMed

    Menschik, F

    1997-09-01

    The hip joint is not an exact ball and socket joint. In a meridian section, the mean deviation from a conchoid shape is quite small, so that this shape might better describe the joint's shape. This conclusion was reached by measuring the cartilaginous and osseous shapes of eight normal hip joints (multiorgan donors with average of age 33 yr, range 19-46 yr) using a CNC coordinate measuring machine (CMM). On two additional hip joints, only the osseous shape was determined. A rotational axis was first determined by finding parallels of latitude at the femoral head and acetabulum. At the meridian sections, the best-fitting circle or conchoid was determined from the scanned measuring points, using least-squares regression. Two perpendicular meridians were then measured for each sample and used to evaluate the three-dimensional shape. The medium squared deviation showed a better fit for a conchoid shape compared to a sphere for all samples tested. Furthermore, the equation of the conchoid for the femoral head (r = a + b cos phi) and that for the acetabulum (r' = a' + b' cos phi) were related in that a = b' and b = a' within mean deviation factors of 4%. Their special shape makes the joint less likely to sublux compared to a ball and socket joint. In addition, the rolling and gliding mechanisms between the two shapes may result in less wear. PMID:9302622

  3. Total hip arthroplasty revision in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Gasbarra, Elena; Perrone, Fabio Luigi; Celi, Monica; Rao, Cecilia; Feola, Maurizio; Cuozzo, Nicola; Tarantino, Umberto

    2013-10-01

    In the last years, the number of total hip arthroplasty is increased both in young patients and elderly with a poor bone quality due to extension of surgical indications. According to this trend, also revision surgery showed a growth of its number, especially in elderly patients, because of implant loosening, failed osseointegration of prosthetic components, errors in biomechanical restoration and infections. The aim of this study is to analyze life quality improvement through evaluation of articular functionality and postoperative pain, and to examine osseointegration of implant components with periprosthetic bone. During total hip arthroplasty revision, the orthopedic surgeon often has to face complex cases, especially in elderly patients with a preexisting status of poor bone quality and sarcopenia. In these cases, a correct planning and a surgical procedure well-executed are able to ensure a good outcome that led to pain relief and functional recovery. Furthermore anti-osteoporotic therapy surely represents a useful resource both in primary total hip arthroplasty and in revisions, mainly for elderly patients with a poor bone quality. PMID:24046034

  4. Acetabular Reconstruction in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Siva Swaminathan; Choi, Jung Woo

    2016-01-01

    The difficulties encountered in dealing with the bone deficient acetabulum are amongst the greatest challenges in hip surgery. Acetabular reconstruction in revision total hip arthroplasty can successfully be achieved with hemispherical components featuring a porous or roughened ingrowth surface and options for placement of multiple screws for minor acetabular defect. Acetabular component selection is mostly based on the amount of bone loss present. In the presence of combined cavitary and segmental defects without superior acetabular coverage, reconstructions with a structural acetabular allograft protected by a cage or a custom-made triflange cage have been one of preferred surgical options. The use of a cage or ring over structural allograft bone for massive uncontained defects in acetabular revision can restore host bone stock and facilitate subsequent rerevision surgery to a certain extent. But high complication rates have been reported including aseptic loosening, infection, dislocation and metal failure. On the other hand, recent literature is reporting satisfactory outcomes with the use of modular augments combined with a hemispherical shell for major acetabular defect. Highly porous metals have been introduced for clinical use in arthroplasty surgery over the last decade. Their higher porosity and surface friction are ideal for acetabular revision, optimizing biological fixation. The use of trabecular metal cups in acetabular revision has yielded excellent clinical results. This article summarizes author's experience regarding revision acetabular reconstruction options following failed hip surgery including arthroplasty. PMID:27536638

  5. Friction measurement in a hip wear simulator.

    PubMed

    Saikko, Vesa

    2016-05-01

    A torque measurement system was added to a widely used hip wear simulator, the biaxial rocking motion device. With the rotary transducer, the frictional torque about the drive axis of the biaxial rocking motion mechanism was measured. The principle of measuring the torque about the vertical axis above the prosthetic joint, used earlier in commercial biaxial rocking motion simulators, was shown to sense only a minor part of the total frictional torque. With the present method, the total frictional torque of the prosthetic hip was measured. This was shown to consist of the torques about the vertical axis above the joint and about the leaning axis. Femoral heads made from different materials were run against conventional and crosslinked polyethylene acetabular cups in serum lubrication. Regarding the femoral head material and the type of polyethylene, there were no categorical differences in frictional torque with the exception of zirconia heads, with which the lowest values were obtained. Diamond-like carbon coating of the CoCr femoral head did not reduce friction. The friction factor was found to always decrease with increasing load. High wear could increase the frictional torque by 75%. With the present system, friction can be continuously recorded during long wear tests, so the effect of wear on friction with different prosthetic hips can be evaluated. PMID:27160557

  6. Ceramic/ceramic total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bizot, P; Nizard, R; Lerouge, S; Prudhommeaux, F; Sedel, L

    2000-01-01

    Alumina-on-alumina total hip arthroplasty has been used for 30 years, mainly in Europe. The theoretical advantages of this combination are represented by its remarkable sliding characteristics, its very low wear debris generation, and its sufficient fracture toughness. These advantages are achieved if the material is properly controlled with high density, high purity, and small grains. The authors summarize the results obtained with ceramic/ceramic total hip arthroplasty. Information is provided about in vivo behavior regarding wear debris characterization and quantification, and histological tissue examinations for inflammatory reactions, which were not encountered except when alumina debris was mixed with metal or cement. Modification of socket fixation resulted in improved clinical outcomes. With a press-fit metal shell and an alumina liner utilized for 10 years, the results are excellent especially in a young and active population. Alumina-on-alumina seems at the moment to be one of the best choices when a total hip arthroplasty has to be performed in young and active patients. PMID:11180930

  7. Routine functional assessment for hip fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Tonny J; Lauritsen, Jens M

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - Pre-fracture functional level has been shown to be a consistent predictor of rehabilitation outcomes in older hip fracture patients. We validated 4 overall pre-fracture functional level assessment instruments in patients aged 65 or more, used the prediction of outcome at 4 months post-fracture, and assessed cutoff values for decision making in treatment and rehabilitation. Patients and methods - 165 consecutive patients with acute primary hip fracture were prospectively included in the study. Pre-fracture Barthel-20, Barthel-100, cumulated ambulation score, and new mobility score were scored immediately after admission. Outcome defined as mortality, residential status, and independent walking ability was assessed at 4 months. Results - 3 of the assessment instruments, namely Barthel-20, Barthel-100, and new mobility score, correlated with outcome at 4 months post-fracture and were valid predictors. Thresholds were estimated. We found no evidence that Barthel-100, with its finer granularity, performs better than Barthel-20 as a predictor. Interpretation - Our findings indicate that pre-fracture scores of Barthel-20 and new mobility score have predictive ability, and further investigation of usage for guidance of clinical and rehabilitation decisions concerning hip fracture patients is warranted. PMID:27329799

  8. Acetabular Reconstruction in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Shon, Won Yong; Santhanam, Siva Swaminathan; Choi, Jung Woo

    2016-03-01

    The difficulties encountered in dealing with the bone deficient acetabulum are amongst the greatest challenges in hip surgery. Acetabular reconstruction in revision total hip arthroplasty can successfully be achieved with hemispherical components featuring a porous or roughened ingrowth surface and options for placement of multiple screws for minor acetabular defect. Acetabular component selection is mostly based on the amount of bone loss present. In the presence of combined cavitary and segmental defects without superior acetabular coverage, reconstructions with a structural acetabular allograft protected by a cage or a custom-made triflange cage have been one of preferred surgical options. The use of a cage or ring over structural allograft bone for massive uncontained defects in acetabular revision can restore host bone stock and facilitate subsequent rerevision surgery to a certain extent. But high complication rates have been reported including aseptic loosening, infection, dislocation and metal failure. On the other hand, recent literature is reporting satisfactory outcomes with the use of modular augments combined with a hemispherical shell for major acetabular defect. Highly porous metals have been introduced for clinical use in arthroplasty surgery over the last decade. Their higher porosity and surface friction are ideal for acetabular revision, optimizing biological fixation. The use of trabecular metal cups in acetabular revision has yielded excellent clinical results. This article summarizes author's experience regarding revision acetabular reconstruction options following failed hip surgery including arthroplasty. PMID:27536638

  9. Mortality after total hip replacement surgery

    PubMed Central

    Berstock, J. R.; Beswick, A. D.; Lenguerrand, E.; Whitehouse, M. R.; Blom, A. W.

    2014-01-01

    Total hip replacement causes a short-term increase in the risk of mortality. It is important to quantify this and to identify modifiable risk factors so that the risk of post-operative mortality can be minimised. We performed a systematic review and critical evaluation of the current literature on the topic. We identified 32 studies published over the last 10 years which provide either 30-day or 90-day mortality data. We estimate the pooled incidence of mortality during the first 30 and 90 days following hip replacement to be 0.30% (95% CI 0.22 to 0.38) and 0.65% (95% CI 0.50 to 0.81), respectively. We found strong evidence of a temporal trend towards reducing mortality rates despite increasingly co-morbid patients. The risk factors for early mortality most commonly identified are increasing age, male gender and co-morbid conditions, particularly cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular complications appear to have overtaken fatal pulmonary emboli as the leading cause of death after hip replacement. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:175–82. PMID:24894596

  10. Imaging of neuropathies about the hip.

    PubMed

    Martinoli, Carlo; Miguel-Perez, Maribel; Padua, Luca; Gandolfo, Nicola; Zicca, Anna; Tagliafico, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathies about the hip may be cause of chronic pain and disability. In most cases, these conditions derive from mechanical or dynamic compression of a segment of a nerve within a narrow osteofibrous tunnel, an opening in a fibrous structure, or a passageway close to a ligament or a muscle. Although the evaluation of nerve disorders primarily relies on neurological examination and electrophysiology, diagnostic imaging is currently used as a complement to help define the site and aetiology of nerve compression and exclude other disease possibly underlying the patient' symptoms. Diagnosis of entrapment neuropathies about the hip with US and MR imaging requires an in-depth knowledge of the normal imaging anatomy and awareness of the anatomic and pathologic factors that may predispose or cause a nerve injury. Accordingly, the aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of hip neuropathies with an emphasis on the relevant anatomy, aetiology, clinical presentation, and their imaging appearance. The lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy (meiralgia paresthetica), femoral neuropathy, sciatic neuropathy, obturator neuropathy, superior and inferior gluteal neuropathies and pudendal neuropathy will be discussed. PMID:21549536

  11. Repeat validation of a method to measure in vivo three dimensional hip kinematics using computed tomography and fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Mowrin; Alam, Md Jahangir; Pickering, Mark R; Ward, Thomas; Perriman, Diana; Scarvell, Jennie M; Smith, Paul N

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty or THA is a surgical procedure for the relief of significant disabling pain caused by osteoarthritis or hip fracture. Knowledge of the 3D kinematics of the hip during specific functional activities is important for THA component design. In this paper we compare kinematic measurements obtained by a new 2D-3D registration algorithm with measurements provided by the gold standard roentgen stereo analysis (RSA). The study validates a promising method for investigating the kinematics of some pathologies, which involves fitting three dimensional patient specific 3D CT scans to dynamic fluoroscopic images of the hip during functional activities. This is the first study in which single plane fluoroscopy has been used for kinematic measurements of natural hip bones. The main focus of the study is on the out-of-plane translation and rotation movements which are difficult to measure precisely using a single plane approach. From our experimental results we found that the precision of our proposed approach compares favourably with that of the most recent dual plane fluoroscopy approach. PMID:25571375

  12. Plastazote abduction orthosis in the management of neonatal hip instability.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Charles F

    2003-01-01

    Since 1987, 113 consecutive newborns with either Ortolani-positive or provocative-positive hip examinations in the newborn nursery have been treated with a Plastazote hip abduction orthosis when diagnosed and followed to determine if the method was safe, effective, and easy to use. Ortolani-positive hips often had bilateral abnormalities in the hip examination, were frequently associated with breech position, and were anatomically more dysplastic than those hips that were unstable by provocative testing. No patient developed ischemic necrosis during follow-up. Only two had additional treatment of their unstable hips. The rest had excellent results. Parents and caregivers found the device easy to use. The orthosis is recommended as the primary method for managing newborns with clinical instability to either the provocative or Ortolani test as being safe, effective, and easy to use across all skill levels. PMID:12960623

  13. Hip arthroscopy for the management of trauma: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Justin T.; Saroki, Adriana J.; Philippon, Marc J.

    2015-01-01

    The first descriptions of the use of hip arthroscopy for traumatic injuries were presented in 1980. One paper described arthroscopy for the removal of a bullet fragment while others reported using hip arthroscopy to remove fragments following total hip arthroplasty. With the application of traction and modification of arthroscopic instruments, hip arthroscopy has become a useful tool in treating trauma to the hip. Most of the literature describes traumatic hip dislocation. Several studies have documented the successful use of arthroscopy for removal of loose bodies, but it has also been used to treat labral tears, chondral defects and acetabular rim fractures. Complications reported include fluid extravasation, the lowering of the patient's body temperature using cool saline irrigation and further injury due to unrecognized concomitant pathology. PMID:27011845

  14. Review for the generalist: evaluation of pediatric hip pain

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, Kristin M

    2009-01-01

    Hip pathology may cause groin pain, referred thigh or knee pain, refusal to bear weight or altered gait in the absence of pain. A young child with an irritable hip poses a diagnostic challenge. Transient synovitis, one of the most common causes of hip pain in children, must be differentiated from septic arthritis. Hip pain may be caused by conditions unique to the growing pediatric skeleton including Perthes disease, slipped capital femoral epiphysis and apophyseal avulsion fractures of the pelvis. Hip pain may also be referred from low back or pelvic pathology. Evaluation and management requires a thorough history and physical exam, and understanding of the pediatric skeleton. This article will review common causes of hip and pelvic musculoskeletal pain in the pediatric population. PMID:19450281

  15. Recent Patents and Designs on Hip Replacement Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Derar, H; Shahinpoor, M

    2015-01-01

    Hip replacement surgery has gone through tremendous evolution since the first procedure in 1840. In the past five decades the advances that have been made in technology, advanced and smart materials innovations, surgical techniques, robotic surgery and methods of fixations and sterilization, facilitated hip implants that undergo multiple design revolutions seeking the least problematic implants and a longer survivorship. Hip surgery has become a solution for many in need of hip joint remedy and replacement across the globe. Nevertheless, there are still long-term problems that are essential to search and resolve to find the optimum implant. This paper reviews several recent patents on hip replacement surgery. The patents present various designs of prostheses, different materials as well as methods of fixation. Each of the patents presents a new design as a solution to different issues ranging from the longevity of the hip prostheses to discomfort and inconvenience experienced by patients in the long-term. PMID:25893020

  16. Recent patents and designs on hip replacement prostheses.

    PubMed

    Derar, H; Shahinpoor, M

    2015-01-01

    Hip replacement surgery has gone through tremendous evolution since the first procedure in 1840. In the past five decades the advances that have been made in technology, advanced and smart materials innovations, surgical techniques, robotic surgery and methods of fixations and sterilization, facilitated hip implants that undergo multiple design revolutions seeking the least problematic implants and a longer survivorship. Hip surgery has become a solution for many in need of hip joint remedy and replacement across the globe. Nevertheless, there are still long-term problems that are essential to search and resolve to find the optimum implant. This paper reviews several recent patents on hip replacement surgery. The patents present various designs of prostheses, different materials as well as methods of fixation. Each of the patents presents a new design as a solution to different issues ranging from the longevity of the hip prostheses to discomfort and inconvenience experienced by patients in the long-term. PMID:25893020

  17. Perioperative Pain Management in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Korean Hip Society Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeesuk; Cho, Hong-Man; Park, Kyung-Soon; Yoon, Pil Whan; Nho, Jae-Hwi; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Kyung-Jae; Moon, Kyong-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Effective perioperative pain management techniques and accelerated rehabilitation programs can improve health-related quality of life and functional status of patients after total hip arthroplasty. Traditionally, postoperative analgesia following arthroplasty was provided by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia or epidural analgesia. Recently, peripheral nerve blockade has emerged alternative analgesic approach. Multimodal analgesia strategy combines analgesics with different mechanisms of action to improve pain management. Intraoperative periarticular injection of multimodal drugs is one of the most important procedures in perioperative pain control for total hip arthroplasty. The goal of this review article is to provide a concise overview of the principles of multimodal pain management regimens as a practical guide for the perioperative pain management for total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27536639

  18. A Useful Anatomical Reference Guide for Stem Anteversion during Total Hip Arthroplasty in the Dysplastic Hip.

    PubMed

    Tsukeoka, Tadashi; Tsuneizumi, Yoshikazu; Lee, Tae Hyun

    2015-08-01

    Computed tomography scans of 50 dysplastic hips were obtained and reconstructed using preoperative planning software for total hip arthroplasty. The anteversion of the stem implanted parallel to the line connecting the trochanteric fossa and the middle of the medial cortex of the femoral neck (T line) was measured. The cutting heights of 5mm and 10mm above the lesser trochanter were simulated. The mean difference of the anteversion of the stem using the T line and the native femoral anteversion was 2.7° (95% CI: 1.0°-4.5°) and 3.5° (95% CI: 1.5°-5.5°) at cutting heights of 5mm and 10mm respectively. An anteversion using a T line is compatible with native femoral anteversion even in developmental dysplasia of the hip. PMID:25873282

  19. Perioperative Pain Management in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Korean Hip Society Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Min, Byung-Woo; Kim, Yeesuk; Cho, Hong-Man; Park, Kyung-Soon; Yoon, Pil Whan; Nho, Jae-Hwi; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Kyung-Jae; Moon, Kyong-Ho

    2016-03-01

    Effective perioperative pain management techniques and accelerated rehabilitation programs can improve health-related quality of life and functional status of patients after total hip arthroplasty. Traditionally, postoperative analgesia following arthroplasty was provided by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia or epidural analgesia. Recently, peripheral nerve blockade has emerged alternative analgesic approach. Multimodal analgesia strategy combines analgesics with different mechanisms of action to improve pain management. Intraoperative periarticular injection of multimodal drugs is one of the most important procedures in perioperative pain control for total hip arthroplasty. The goal of this review article is to provide a concise overview of the principles of multimodal pain management regimens as a practical guide for the perioperative pain management for total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27536639

  20. Assessment of outcome after hip fracture: development of a universal assessment system for hip fractures

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Thomas M.; Parker, Martyn J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to refine current evaluation systems used to assess outcome after a hip fracture and to devise a simple and practical system to assess all hip fracture patients. Methods: Three continuous scales were defined for pain, mobility and functional independence. These were all found to have an acceptable degree of inter-observer agreement. The pre-fracture mobility and independence scores were related to the one-year mortality for a consecutive series of 381 patients. Results: Scores for mobility and functional independence were highly predictive of mortality (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: It is recommended that the outcome after hip fracture should be standardised to these principle outcomes of pain, regain of mobility and independence and mortality. These scores can be use to assess progress and identify those who may require additional assessment or intervention. PMID:27259572

  1. Successful staged hip replacement in septic hip osteoarthritis in osteopetrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteopetrosis is a rare, inherited, bone disorder, characterized by osteosclerosis, obliteration of the medullary cavity and calcified cartilage. The autosomal dominant form is compatible with a normal life span, although fractures often result from minimal trauma, due to the pathologic nature of bone. Osteomyelitis is common in patients with osteopetrosis because of a reduced resistance to infection, attributed to the lack of marrow vascularity and impairment of white cell function. Only one case of osteomyelitis of the proximal third of the femur has been previously reported, treated with several repeated debridements and finally with femoral head resection. Here we present for the first time a case of a staged implant of a cementless total hip prosthesis for the treatment of a septic hip in femoral neck nonunion in osteopetrosis. Case presentation A 36-years-old woman, affected by autosomal dominant osteopetrosis was referred to our department because of a septic hip arthritis associated with femoral neck septic non-union, with draining fistulas. The infection occurred early after a plate osteosynthesis for a closed perthrocanteric fracture of the femur and persisted in spite of osteosynthesis removal, surgical debridement and external fixation. In our hospital the patient underwent accurate debridement, femoral head and greater trochanter resection, preparation of the diaphyseal intramedullary canal and implant of an antibiotic-loaded cement spacer. The spacer was exchanged after one month, due to infection recurrence and four months later, a cementless total hip arthroplasty was implanted, with no clinical and laboratory signs of infection recurrence at two years follow-up. Conclusions In case of hip septic arthritis and proximal femur septic non-union, femoral head resection may not be the only option available and staged total hip arthroplasty can be considered. PMID:22472060

  2. A Water Rehabilitation Program in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis Before and After Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Łyp, Marek; Kaczor, Ryszard; Cabak, Anna; Tederko, Piotr; Włostowska, Ewa; Stanisławska, Iwona; Szypuła, Jan; Tomaszewski, Wiesław

    2016-01-01

    Background Pain associated with coxarthrosis, typically occurring in middle-aged and elderly patients, very commonly causes considerable limitation of motor fitness and dependence on pharmacotherapy. This article provides an assessment of a rehabilitation program with tailored water exercises in patients with osteoarthritis before and after total hip replacement. Material/Methods A total of 192 patients (the mean age 61.03±10.89) suffering from hip osteoarthritis (OA) were evaluated before and after total hip replacement (THR). The clinical study covered measurements of hip active ranges of motion (HAROM) and the forces generated by pelvis stabilizer muscles. Pain intensity was assessed according to analogue-visual scale of pain (VAS) and according to the Modified Laitinen Questionnaire. The patients were divided into 6 groups (4 treatment and 2 control). We compared 2 rehabilitation programs using kinesitherapy and low-frequency magnetic field. One of them also had specially designed exercises in the water. Statistical analysis was carried out at the significance level α=0.05. This was a cross-sectional study. Results A positive effect of water exercises on a number of parameters was found in patients with OA both before and after total hip replacement surgery. We noted a significant reduction of pain (p<0.001), increased ranges of motion and muscle strength, and reduced use of medicines (NASAIDs) (p<0.001). A correlation was found between the degree of degenerative deforming lesions and the effects of the treatment process (p<0.01). Conclusions 1. The rehabilitation program including water exercises most significantly reduced pain in patients with OA before and after total hip replacement surgery. 2. Inclusion of water exercises in a rehabilitation program can reduce the use of medicines in patient with OA and after THR. PMID:27455419

  3. Articular capsule repair in initial artificial hip replacement via anterolateral approach to the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B L; Wang, F; Tian, M B; Yin, W L; You, X Y; Li, D; Ma, L G; Xing, L Q

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to explore articular capsule repair in first artificial hip replacement (AHR) via anterolateral approach and its influence on postoperative dislocation. A total of 292 patients who received AHR via anterolateral approach and had the articular capsule repaired in People’s Hospital of Zhengzhou (Henan, China) from February 2008 to February 2014 were selected and divided into total hip replacement (THR) group (group A1) and artificial femoral head replacement (AFHR) group (group A2). Five hundred and five cases in the control group treated using the same approach but receiving no articular capsule repair were divided into THR group (group B1) and AFHR group (group B2). Condition of postoperative dislocation was compared between the two groups. All cases were followed up for 6 months to 5 years (average: 3.75 years); it was noted that the difference in average age, gender, disease constitution and follow-up time in the two groups was not significant (P>0.05). Moreover, groups A1 and B1 were found with 1 case of early hip joint dislocation (0.73%) and 13 cases of hip joint dislocation (5.24%) respectively post-operatively, and the comparison between the two groups was statistically significant (P less than 0.05). One case of hip joint dislocation (0.65%) was found in group A2 and 5 cases (1.95%) in group B2 in early post operation and the difference between two groups had no statistical significance (P>0.05). Neither the repair group nor the control group developed late-onset dislocation after the operation. Thus, we can state that articular capsule repair is feasible during the first AHR via anterolateral approach, which decreases the occurrence of early hip joint dislocation after operation and proves that repairing articular capsule during AFHR via anterolateral approach is unnecessary. PMID:27358130

  4. A Water Rehabilitation Program in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis Before and After Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Łyp, Marek; Kaczor, Ryszard; Cabak, Anna; Tederko, Piotr; Włostowska, Ewa; Stanisławska, Iwona; Szypuła, Jan; Tomaszewski, Wiesław

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pain associated with coxarthrosis, typically occurring in middle-aged and elderly patients, very commonly causes considerable limitation of motor fitness and dependence on pharmacotherapy. This article provides an assessment of a rehabilitation program with tailored water exercises in patients with osteoarthritis before and after total hip replacement. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 192 patients (the mean age 61.03±10.89) suffering from hip osteoarthritis (OA) were evaluated before and after total hip replacement (THR). The clinical study covered measurements of hip active ranges of motion (HAROM) and the forces generated by pelvis stabilizer muscles. Pain intensity was assessed according to analogue-visual scale of pain (VAS) and according to the Modified Laitinen Questionnaire. The patients were divided into 6 groups (4 treatment and 2 control). We compared 2 rehabilitation programs using kinesitherapy and low-frequency magnetic field. One of them also had specially designed exercises in the water. Statistical analysis was carried out at the significance level α=0.05. This was a cross-sectional study. RESULTS A positive effect of water exercises on a number of parameters was found in patients with OA both before and after total hip replacement surgery. We noted a significant reduction of pain (p<0.001), increased ranges of motion and muscle strength, and reduced use of medicines (NASAIDs) (p<0.001). A correlation was found between the degree of degenerative deforming lesions and the effects of the treatment process (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS 1. The rehabilitation program including water exercises most significantly reduced pain in patients with OA before and after total hip replacement surgery. 2. Inclusion of water exercises in a rehabilitation program can reduce the use of medicines in patient with OA and after THR. PMID:27455419

  5. Protrusio After Medial Acetabular Wall Breach in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Christopher T.; Heiner, Anneliese D.; Baer, Thomas E.; Pugely, Andrew J.; Noiseux, Nicolas O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Medial protrusio is a recognized complication of total hip arthroplasty, but it is not known if a medial wall breach during cup implantation increases the risk. We thus investigated the effect of up to a 2 cm defect in the medial acetabular wall in a cadaveric model. Separately, we investigated the ability of acetabular screws to rescue the construct. Methods Nine human fresh-frozen hemipelves were reamed medially to create the defect, implanted with acetabular cups, and then loaded to failure. The nine contralateral hemipelves were reamed in a standard fashion and served as controls. Separately, nine hemipelves with a medial defect were augmented with two acetabular screws each, then loaded to failure, with the contralateral side as a control. Load-to-failure, stiffness, and energy were recorded. Findings The presence of a medial wall defect decreased the load-to-failure by a mean of 26% (5710 v. 4221 N, p=0.024). The addition of two acetabular screws did not rescue the construct (mean 27% decrease, 4082 v. 2985 N, p=0.024). The majority of specimens failed in a supra-physiologic range of force. Bone density correlated with failure loads (R2 range of 0.54-0.78), and osteoporotic specimens were more likely to fail at a physiologic range, consistent with forces experienced during minor stumbles or falls. Interpretation Osteoporotic patients with a medial wall defect after hip arthroplasty may be susceptible to fracture during activities of daily living. Protected weight bearing with an assistive device may be reasonable in order to minimize fall risk until cup ingrowth is achieved. PMID:26361450

  6. Contact mechanics of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement under adverse edge loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John

    2014-10-17

    Edge loading can negatively impact the biomechanics and long-term performance of hip replacements. Although edge loading has been widely investigated for hard-on-hard articulations, limited work has been conducted for hard-on-soft combinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate edge loading and its effect on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR). A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing. Different cup inclination angles and head lateral microseparation were modelled and their effect on the contact mechanics of the modular MoP hip replacement were examined. The results showed that lateral microseparation caused loading of the head on the rim of the cup, which produced substantial increases in the maximum von Mises stress in the polyethylene liner and the maximum contact pressure on both the articulating surface and backside surface of the liner. Plastic deformation of the liner was observed under both standard conditions and microseparation conditions, however, the maximum equivalent plastic strain in the liner under microseparation conditions of 2000 µm was predicted to be approximately six times that under standard conditions. The study has indicated that correct positioning the components to avoid edge loading is likely to be important clinically even for hard-on-soft bearings for THR. PMID:25218504

  7. Quantitative measurement and analysis for detection and treatment planning of developmental dysplasia of the hip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Lu, Hongbing; Chen, Hanyong; Zhao, Li; Shi, Zhengxing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2009-02-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip is a congenital hip joint malformation affecting the proximal femurs and acetabulum that are subluxatable, dislocatable, and dislocated. Conventionally, physicians made diagnoses and treatments only based on findings from two-dimensional (2D) images by manually calculating clinic parameters. However, anatomical complexity of the disease and the limitation of current standard procedures make accurate diagnosis quite difficultly. In this study, we developed a system that provides quantitative measurement of 3D clinical indexes based on computed tomography (CT) images. To extract bone structure from surrounding tissues more accurately, the system firstly segments the bone using a knowledge-based fuzzy clustering method, which is formulated by modifying the objective function of the standard fuzzy c-means algorithm with additive adaptation penalty. The second part of the system calculates automatically the clinical indexes, which are extended from 2D to 3D for accurate description of spatial relationship between femurs and acetabulum. To evaluate the system performance, experimental study based on 22 patients with unilateral or bilateral affected hip was performed. The results of 3D acetabulum index (AI) automatically provided by the system were validated by comparison with 2D results measured by surgeons manually. The correlation between the two results was found to be 0.622 (p<0.01).

  8. Contact mechanics of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement under adverse edge loading conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John

    2014-01-01

    Edge loading can negatively impact the biomechanics and long-term performance of hip replacements. Although edge loading has been widely investigated for hard-on-hard articulations, limited work has been conducted for hard-on-soft combinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate edge loading and its effect on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR). A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing. Different cup inclination angles and head lateral microseparation were modelled and their effect on the contact mechanics of the modular MoP hip replacement were examined. The results showed that lateral microseparation caused loading of the head on the rim of the cup, which produced substantial increases in the maximum von Mises stress in the polyethylene liner and the maximum contact pressure on both the articulating surface and backside surface of the liner. Plastic deformation of the liner was observed under both standard conditions and microseparation conditions, however, the maximum equivalent plastic strain in the liner under microseparation conditions of 2000 µm was predicted to be approximately six times that under standard conditions. The study has indicated that correct positioning the components to avoid edge loading is likely to be important clinically even for hard-on-soft bearings for THR. PMID:25218504

  9. [Hip Fracture--Epidemiology, Management and Liaison Service. Risk factor for hip fracture].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Saeko

    2015-04-01

    Many risk factors have been identified for hip fracture, including female, advanced age, osteoporosis, previous fractures, low body weight or low body mass index, alcohol drinking, smoking, family history of fractures, use of glucocorticoid, factors related to falls, and bone strength. The factors related to falls are number of fall, frail, post stroke, paralysis, muscle weakness, anti-anxiety drugs, anti-depression drugs, and sedatives. Dementia and respiratory disease and others have been reported to be risk factors for secondary hip fracture. PMID:25814010

  10. Contemporary Concepts in the Young Adult Hip Patient: Periacetabular Osteotomy for Hip Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Coobs, Benjamin R; Xiong, Ao; Clohisy, John C

    2015-07-01

    The Bernese periacetabular osteotomy, as originally described by Dr. Reinhold Ganz, is an effective treatment for symptomatic acetabular dysplasia in the pre-arthritic young adult hip. This technique has experienced several recent modifications in an attempt to optimize the clinical outcomes of these patients. We will review the clinical presentation of acetabular dysplasia, indications for surgery, contemporary refinements in technique and clinical results following periacetabular osteotomy. In well-selected patients, this reconstructive osteotomy should be considered safe and effective in alleviating pain and improving hip function. PMID:25865812

  11. Avoiding Hip Instability and Limb Length Discrepancy After Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sculco, Peter K; Cottino, Umberto; Abdel, Matthew P; Sierra, Rafael J

    2016-04-01

    Two complications after total hip arthroplasty (THA) are hip instability and limb length discrepancy; instability is a common indication for revision THA. The goal of a successful THA is to maximize impingement-free range of motion, recreate appropriate offset, and equalize limb length discrepancies to produce a pain-free and dynamically stable THA. In this article, the patient risk factors for dislocation and limb length discrepancy, key elements of the preoperative template, the anatomic landmarks for accurate component placement, the leg positions for soft tissue stability testing, and the management of postoperative instability are reviewed. PMID:26772941

  12. Bilateral traumatic hip dislocation with sciatic nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ka Yuk; Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral hip dislocation is a rare condition. We report a case of traumatic bilateral hip dislocation and unilateral sciatic nerve palsy in a young woman with known idiopathic scoliosis. With prompt reduction of the dislocated hips, there was reasonable neurological recovery. There was no avascular necrosis of the femoral head or post-traumatic arthritis up to 3-year follow-up. The gender difference in incidence, as well as the predisposition of hip dislocation in scoliosis is discussed. In our case, the decreased femoral anteversion was the culprit. PMID:25809426

  13. Risk Factors for Severity and Type of the Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cauley, Jane A.; Lui, Li-Yung; Genant, Harry K.; Salamone, Loran; Browner, Warren; Fink, Howard A.; Cohen, Peter; Hillier, Teresa; Bauer, Doug C.; Cummings, Steven R.

    2009-01-01

    More severe hip fractures such as displaced femoral neck (FN) fractures and unstable intertrochanteric (IT) fractures lead to poorer outcomes, but risk factors for severe fractures have not been studied. To identify risk factors for severe types of hip fracture, we performed a prospective cohort study and obtained preoperative hip radiographs from women who sustained an incident hip fracture (excluding traumatic fractures). A single radiologist scored the severity of FN fractures by the Garden System: grades I and II, undisplaced; grades III and IV, displaced. The severity of IT hip fractures was rated by the Kyle System: grades I and II, stable; grades III and IV, unstable. A total of 249 women had FN fractures: 75 (30%) were undisplaced. A total of 213 women had IT fractures: 59 (28%) were stable. Both types of hip fracture increased with age, but older age was even more strongly associated with more severe hip fractures. Low BMD was more strongly related to undisplaced FN fractures (p interaction BMD × FN type, p = 0.0008) and stable IT fractures (p interaction BMD × IT type, p = 0.04). Similar findings were observed for estimated volumetric BMD and hip geometric parameters. Corticosteroid use was only associated with displaced FN fractures, and Parkinson's disease was only associated with stable IT fractures. Little difference was reported in the self-reported circumstances surrounding each type of fracture. In conclusion, the lower the BMD, the greater the likelihood of experiencing a hip fracture that is less displaced and more stable. PMID:19113930

  14. Investigation of association between hip morphology and prevalence of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wei-Nan; Wang, Fu-You; Chen, Cheng; Zhang, Ying; Gong, Xiao-Yuan; Zhou, Kai; Chen, Zhi; Wang, Duan; Zhou, Zong-Ke; Yang, Liu

    2016-01-01

    The cause of hip osteoarthritis (OA) remains unclear, morphologic abnormality of hip was thought to be a contributing factor to hip OA. The hypothesis was that there were subtle anatomical morphology differences of the hip between normal and OA subjects; the objective of this study was to explore these anatomical differences which are predisposing to hip OA based on CT 3D reconstruction. Ninety-three normal subjects (186 hips) and 66 mild-to-moderate hip OA subjects (132 hips) were recruited in this study. Three parameters of the head-neck relationship were assessed: translation, rotation and concavity. Translation was the potential translational movements of femoral head related to the neck’s axis. Rotation was described by the physeal scar to evaluate the rotation tendency of femoral head related to the neck at the head-neck junction. Concavity was used to assess the sphericity of the head as it joins the neck. The femoral neck anteversion angle and some parameters of the acetabulum: anteversion, inclination and CE angle were measured too. By comparison, it was found that OA subjects had less femoral head sphericity, head-neck junction concavity, acetabular and femoral neck anteversion angle; but greater acetabular coverage. These characteristics increased the risk of hip OA in OA subjects. PMID:27002423

  15. Evaluation of the Hip: History and Physical Examination

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Examination of a painful hip is fairly concise and reliable at detecting the presence of a hip joint problem. Hip joint disorders often go undetected, leading to the development of secondary disorders. Using a thoughtful approach and methodical examination techniques, most hip joint problems can be detected and a proper treatment strategy can then be implemented based on an accurate diagnosis. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to present a systematic examination process that outlines important components in each of the evaluation areas of history and physical examination (including inspection, measurements, symptom localization, muscle strength, and special tests). PMID:21509142

  16. Characteristics of children with hip displacement in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Hägglund, Gunnar; Lauge-Pedersen, Henrik; Wagner, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Background Hip dislocation in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is a common and severe problem. The dislocation can be avoided, by screening and preventive treatment of children with hips at risk. The aim of this study was to analyse the characteristics of children with CP who develop hip displacement, in order to optimise a hip surveillance programme. Methods In a total population of children with CP a standardised clinical and radiological follow-up of the hips was carried out as a part of a hip prevention programme. The present study is based on 212 children followed until 9–16 years of age. Results Of the 212 children, 38 (18%) developed displacement with Migration Percentage (MP) >40% and further 19 (9%) MP between 33 and 39%. Mean age at first registration of hip displacement was 4 years, but some hips showed MP > 40% already at two years of age. The passive range of hip motion at the time of first registration of hip displacement did not differ significantly from the findings in hips without displacement. The risk of hip displacement varied according to CP-subtype, from 0% in children with pure ataxia to 79% in children with spastic tetraplegia. The risk of displacement (MP > 40%) was directly related to the level of gross motor function, classified according to the gross motor function classification system, GMFCS, from 0% in children in GMFCS level I to 64% in GMFCS level V. Conclusion Hip displacement in CP often occurs already at 2–3 years of age. Range of motion is a poor indicator of hips at risk. Thus early identification and early radiographic examination of children at risk is of great importance. The risk of hip displacement varies according to both CP-subtype and GMFCS. It is sometimes not possible to determine subtype before 4 years of age, and at present several definitions and classification systems are used. GMFCS is valid and reliable from 2 years of age, and it is internationally accepted. We recommend a hip surveillance programme for

  17. [Hip dislocation. Organization of screening and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Abuamara, S; Dacher, J N; Gaucher, S; Lechevallier, J; Brossard, V; Delhaye, L; Durand, C; Levasseur, F; Henocq, A

    1999-06-01

    Early detection and low-risk treatment are the two main objectives of the management of developmental dislocation of the hip. The best way to evaluate neonatal hips is to perform clinical and ultrasound examinations at the same time, and to confront their results. Early diagnosis allows to restrict treatment to infants with neonatal dislocation who do not improve by 4 weeks of age. On the other hand, neonates with reductible dislocated hips must be treated at birth and followed at the joint consultation. Early diagnosis and management must not decrease later efforts to detect dislocated hip until walking age. PMID:10394462

  18. Traumatic Hip Dislocation with Associated Femoral Head Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Dortaj, H.; Emamifar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Dislocation of the hip is a critical injury that results from high-energy trauma. This paper describes a case of posterior dislocation of the right hip in a 35-year-old woman with associated ipsilateral femoral head fracture. Initial treatment included reduction of the right hip through posterior approach and fixation of the femoral head fracture with three absorbable screws. After 15-month follow-up, a full range of motion has been achieved and there are no signs of avascular necrosis, hip instability, or limping. The authors describe their method of surgery. PMID:25874147

  19. Stochastic impulsive pressure calculations for time dependent human hip joint lubrication.

    PubMed

    Wierzcholski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with the calculation of the stochastic unsteady, impulsive pressure distributions and load carrying capacities in human hip joint for unsteady stochastic conditions, various standard deviations and Gaussian probability density function. The total changes of hydrodynamic pressure caused by viscoelastic synovial fluid properties are completely estimated. Calculations are performed in a super thin layer of biological synovial fluid inside the slide hip joint gap limited by a spherical bone head. Using a new unified operator of summation (UOS) method, the numerical topology of pressure calculation for a difference method is applied. From numerical standpoint the proposed method of solving modified hydrodynamic equations reduces this problem to resolving the partial recurrence non-homogeneous equation of second order with variable coefficients. PMID:23394099

  20. Incorporating corrosion measurement in hip wear simulators: An added complication or a necessity?

    PubMed

    Neville, Anne; Hesketh, James; Beadling, Andrew R; Bryant, Michael G; Dowson, Duncan

    2016-05-01

    Corrosion is not routinely considered in the assessment of the degradation or the lifetime of total hip replacement bearing surfaces. Biomechanical simulations are becoming ever more complex and are taking into account motion cycles that represent activities beyond a simple walking gait at 1 Hz, marking a departure from the standard ISO BS 14242. However, the degradation is still very often referred to as wear, even though the material loss occurs due to a combination of tribological and corrosion processes and their interactions. This article evaluates how, by incorporating real-time corrosion measurements in total hip replacement simulations, pre-clinical evaluations and research studies can both yield much more information and accelerate the process towards improved implants. PMID:27160560

  1. [Research progress in strategy of lateral femoral offset reconstruction in total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiu-ping; Wang, Bo; Ji, Wei-ping

    2016-02-01

    As an important indicator of total hip arthroplasty (THA) the rate and degree of offset reconstruction play an important role in improving the prognosis and life quality of patients. The reconstruction of femoral offset is closely related to reserved length of calcar femorale, the head and neck length of prosthesis, angle degree of neck shaft and whether lower limb is isometric. Reconstruction strategy includes making a meticulous and standard measurement before the surgery, predicting the reserved length of calcar femorale, selecting a prosthesis with approximate anatomical neck-shaft angle and reconstructing offset by adjusting the head and neck length of the prosthetic during the operation. The aim of this article was to introduce the research progress and influence of offset on hip function, prosthetic wear and postoperative complications such as pain, limp and unequal leg length, and to discuss the reconstruction strategy. PMID:27141794

  2. Percutaneous compression plating versus gamma nail for the treatment of pertrochanteric hip fractures

    PubMed Central

    Antonini, Guido; Delle Rose, Giacomo; Crippa, Cornelio

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study is to compare percutaneous compression plating (PCCP) device with standard gamma nail (GN). A sample was prospectively followed and compared to a historical cohort: 82 intertrochanteric hip fractures in 81 patients treated with PCCP in 2004 versus 51 hip fractures treated with GN in 2003 (AO type 31A1, 31 A2). The main outcome measures were: surgery times, blood loss (Hb serum level and transfusions), complication, costs, for a 1-year follow-up. The minimally invasive PCCP technique resulted in a lower blood loss and consequently lower transfusion need (statistically significant), fewer implant-related complications and comparable surgery times. Overall surgical costs were lower for a comparable outcome in terms of healing and surgical time. PMID:18427918

  3. Effects of intramuscular administration of glycosaminoglycan polysulfates on signs of incipient hip dysplasia in growing pups.

    PubMed

    Lust, G; Williams, A J; Burton-Wurster, N; Beck, K A; Rubin, G

    1992-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that treatment of growing, susceptible (to hip dysplasia) pups by IM administration of glycosaminoglycan polysulfates would mitigate the signs of incipient hip dysplasia. In 1 experiment, 7 pups, selected at random from 2 litters, were administered glycosaminoglycan polysulfates (2.5 mg/kg of body weight, IM) twice weekly, and 7 control pups from the same litters were given sterile buffered 0.9% saline solution from the age of 6 weeks to 8 months. Hip joints were examined by radiography, with pups in the standard, limbs-extended position. At 8 months of age, all pups in this experiment did not manifest femoral head subluxation radiographically. The Norberg angle, a measure of coxofemoral congruity, improved from a mean +/- SEM value of 102 degrees +/- 1 degrees in controls to 106 degrees +/- 1 degrees in treated pups (P = 0.008). Pups were not subjected to necropsy. In the second experiment, 8 pups were selected at random from 2 litters and were administered 5 mg of glycosaminoglycan polysulfates/kg, IM, twice weekly from 6 weeks to 8 months of age. Similarly, 8 control pups were administered saline solution. At 8 months of age, hip joints were examined by radiography with pups in the standard position; at necropsy, intra-articular tissues were evaluated macroscopically and biochemically. Of 8 treated pups, none had subluxation radiographically, whereas 4 of 8 control dogs had femoral head subluxation. Mean Norberg angle on the radiographs was 109.7 degrees +/- 1.6 degrees for the treated group and was 101.5 degrees +/- 1.6 degrees for controls, representing a mean improvement in coxofemoral congruity of 8.2 degrees in the treated pups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1456530

  4. "Early Trigger" Intravenous Vitamin K: Optimizing Target-Driven Care in Warfarinised Patients With Hip Fracture.

    PubMed

    Diament, Marina; MacLeod, Kirsty; O'Hare, Jonathan; Tate, Anne; Eardley, Will

    2015-12-01

    Best practice tariff (BPT) was introduced as a financial incentive model to improve compliance with evidence-based care, such as operation for hip fracture within 36 hours of admission. We previously evaluated the impact of warfarin on patients with hip fracture, revealing significant delay to operation and subsequent loss of revenue. As a result of this, an "early trigger" intravenous vitamin K (IVK) pathway was introduced and the service reaudited a year later. The first cycle was a retrospective audit of all cases with hip fracture against BPT standards over a 32-month period. Subsequent protocol change resulted in all warfarinised cases being given 2 mg IVK in the emergency department prior to blood testing. This protocol was reaudited against the same BPT standards 12 months later. An intention-to-treat approach was used, despite breaches of protocol and other reasons for patients not progressing to theater. The data were analyzed with parametric tools to establish true clinical and statistical impact of the introduction of the protocol. In the first cycle, 80 patients were admitted on warfarin with a mean time to theater of 53.71 hours. Of these patients, 79% breached BPT due to anticoagulation. Twelve months following protocol introduction, 42 patients had a mean time to theater of 37.61 hours. Of these patients, 34% breached BPT due to anticoagulation. These data are both clinically and statistically significant (P < .001). No adverse events occurred. We have shown for the first time that "early-trigger" IVK can reduce delay to theater and maximize tariff payments in warfarinised patients with hip fracture. This is in addition to other established benefits associated with early surgery such as decreasing risk of pressure lesions and pneumonia. It affords high-quality patient-centered care while ensuring trauma units achieve maximal financial reimbursement through pay for improved performance and supports a culture of change behavior. PMID:26623160

  5. Do we need hip-ankle radiographs to assess the coronal alignment and implant position after total knee replacement?

    PubMed Central

    Dargel, Jens; Oppermann, Johannes; Eysel, Peer; Penning, Lenhard

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Restoration of the coronal alignment of the knee is known to be one of the major criteria of a successful total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It therefore appears to be mandatory to routinely assess the postoperative limb alignment using hip-ankle radiographs and to identify implants that may be at risk of premature failure. However, there is no clear consensus whether weight-bearing hip-ankle radiographs or rather standardized a-p knee-radiographs should be used to assess implant position and coronal alignment after TKA. It is the aim of the present study to investigate if implant position and the mechanical alignment after TKA can reproducibly be assessed using standardized a-p knee-radiographs or rather if weight-bearing hip-ankle radiographs are needed. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on 100 postoperative weight-bearing hip-ankle radiographs after conventional primary TKA. The true mechanical and anatomical femorotibial angle as well as coronal implant position (MPTA, LDFA) was assessed using the MediCAD software, which served as a control. The hip-ankle radiographs were then digitally cropped to 80%, 60% and 40% of the leg-length. In each cropped radiograph, tibial coronal implant position was assessed by referencing against the visible mid-shaft, whereas femoral implant position was referenced against the visible mid-shaft (anatomical axis) or against a surrogate mechanical axis, which was drawn perpendicular to the distal tangent of the femoral component. Each measurement was performed by three independent observers. The difference between the alignment parameters in the hip-ankle radiographs were statistically compared with the cropped radiographs and the inter-observer correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated for each parameter. Results: The ICC for inter-observer agreement of measurement of the mechanical femorotibial angle was significantly higher in hip-ankle radiographs (.95) when compared with a radiograph cropped

  6. The pathogenesis and diagnosis of canine hip dysplasia: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Fries, C L; Remedios, A M

    1995-01-01

    Hip dysplasia is a common developmental problem affecting the canine population. Despite extensive research into the condition, many questions remain unanswered and numerous misconceptions are present among the general public. The purpose of this paper is to review the current knowledge on the development of hip dysplasia, factors modifying its development, and current diagnostic techniques. A computerized literature search was conducted for the period of January 1983 to April 1985 using the MEDLINE and CAB databases, and the keywords hip dysplasia, hip, dog, and canine. Other articles, wherever possible original research articles, published before 1983 were also reviewed. Animals affected by hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but quickly develop subluxation of the femoral head. Degenerative joint disease follows. Hip dysplasia is a complex, inherited, polygenic trait. Selective breeding of only normal dogs with normal littermates, parents, and grandparents is the recommended method of reducing the incidence in the general population. Gene expression in affected individuals may be modified by a number of environmental factors. These factors do not cause hip dysplasia, but they alter manifestations of the trait and its severity. Nutrition is a major environmental factor. Excess energy consumption increases the frequency and severity of hip dysplasia in genetically predisposed dogs. Food intake should be regulated to maintain a slender figure with the ribs and dorsal vertebral spines easily palpable, but not visible. Excess dietary calcium and vitamin D contribute to hip dysplasia in genetically predisposed individuals and should be avoided. High dose vitamin C supplementation in growing puppies does not prevent hip dysplasia, and this practice should be discontinued.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:7585436

  7. Surgical hip dislocation for treatment of cam femoroacetabular impingement

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Milind M; Chaudhary, Ishani M; Vikas, KN; KoKo, Aung; Zaw, Than; Siddhartha, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cam femoroacetabular impingement is caused by a misshapen femoral head with a reduced head neck offset, commonly in the anterolateral quadrant. Friction in flexion, adduction and internal rotation causes limitation of the hip movements and pain progressively leading to labral and chondral damage and osteoarthritis. Surgical hip dislocation described by Ganz permits full exposure of the hip without damaging its blood supply. An osteochondroplasty removes the bump at the femoral head neck junction to recreate the offset for impingement free movement. Materials and Methods: Sixteen patients underwent surgery with surgical hip dislocation for the treatment of cam femoroacetabular impingement by open osteochondroplasty over last 6 years. Eight patients suffered from sequelae of avascular necrosis (AVN). Three had a painful dysplastic hip. Two had sequelae of Perthes disease. Three had combined cam and pincer impingement caused by retroversion of acetabulum. All patients were operated by the trochanteric flip osteotomy with attachments of gluteus medius and vastus lateralis, dissection was between the piriformis and gluteus minimus preserving the external rotators. Z-shaped capsular incision and dislocation of the hip was done in external rotation. Three cases also had subtrochanteric osteotomy. Two cases of AVN also had an intraarticular femoral head reshaping osteotomy. Results: Goals of treatment were achieved in all patients. No AVN was detected after a 6 month followup. There were no trochanteric nonunions. Hip range of motion improved in all and Harris hip score improved significantly in 15 of 16 cases. Mean alpha angle reduced from 86.13° (range 66°–108°) to 46.35° (range 39°–58°). Conclusion: Cam femoroacetabular Impingement causing pain and limitation of hip movements was treated by open osteochondroplasty after surgical hip dislocation. This reduced pain, improved hip motion and gave good to excellent results in the short term. PMID

  8. A Biomechanical Approach to Assessing Hip Fracture Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellman, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Bone loss in microgravity is well documented, but it is difficult to quantify how declines in bone mineral density (BMD) contribute to an astronaut's overall risk of fracture upon return. This study uses a biomechanical approach to assessing hip fracture risk, or Factor of Risk (Phi), which is defined as the ratio of applied load to bone strength. All long-duration NASA astronauts from Expeditions 1-18 were included in this study (n=25), while crewmembers who flew twice (n=2) were treated as separate subjects. Bone strength was estimated based on an empirical relationship between areal BMD at the hip, as measured by DXA, and failure load, as determined by mechanical testing of cadaver femora. Fall load during a sideways fall was calculated from a previously developed biomechanical model, which takes into account body weight, height, gender, and soft tissue thickness overlying the lateral aspect of the hip that serves to attenuate the impact force. While no statistical analyses have been performed yet, preliminary results show that males in this population have a higher FOR than females, with a post- flight Phi of 0.87 and 0.36, respectively. FOR increases 5.1% from preflight to postflight, while only one subject crossed the fracture "threshold" of Phi = 1, for a total of 2 subjects with a postflight Phi > 1. These results suggest that men may be at greater risk for hip fracture due largely in part to their relatively thin soft tissue padding as compared to women, since soft tissue thickness has the highest correlation (R(exp 2)= .53) with FOR of all subject-specific parameters. Future work will investigate changes in FOR during recovery to see if baseline risk levels are restored upon return to 1-g activity. While dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the most commonly used clinical measure of bone health, it fails to provide compartment-specific information that is useful in assessing changes to bone quality as a result of microgravity exposure. Peripheral

  9. Capsular Management in Hip Arthroscopy: An Anatomic, Biomechanical, and Technical Review

    PubMed Central

    Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Weber, Alexander E.; Levy, David M.; Bedi, Asheesh; Mather, Richard C.; Salata, Michael J.; Nho, Shane J.

    2016-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy has become an increasingly utilized surgical technique for the treatment of the young, active patients with hip pain. The clinical outcomes of hip arthroscopy in this patient population have been largely successful; however, there is increasing interest in the contribution of hip capsule in postoperative clinical and functional outcomes. The structure and function of the normal hip capsule will be reviewed. Capsular contributions to hip stability will be discussed in the setting of hip arthroscopy with an emphasis on diagnosis-based considerations. Lastly, clinical outcomes following hip arthroscopy will be discussed as they relate to capsular management. PMID:26973840

  10. The Epidemiology of Hip and Major Osteoporotic Fractures in a Dutch Population of Community-Dwelling Elderly: Implications for the Dutch FRAX® Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Klop, Corinne; Welsing, Paco M. J.; Leufkens, Hubert G. M.; Elders, Petra J. M.; Overbeek, Jetty A.; van den Bergh, Joop P.; Bijlsma, Johannes W. J.; de Vries, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Background Incidence rates of non-hip major osteoporotic fractures (MOF) remain poorly characterized in the Netherlands. The Dutch FRAX® algorithm, which predicts 10-year probabilities of hip fracture and MOF (first of hip, humerus, forearm, clinical vertebral), therefore incorporates imputed MOF rates. Swedish incidence rate ratios for hip fracture to MOF (Malmo 1987–1996) were used to perform this imputation. However, equality of these ratios between countries is uncertain and recent evidence is scarce. Aims were to estimate incidence rates of hip fracture and MOF and to compare observed MOF rates to those predicted by the imputation method for the Netherlands. Methods Using hospitalisation and general practitioner records from the Dutch PHARMO Database Network (2002–2011) we calculated age-and-sex-specific and age-standardized incidence rates (IRs) of hip and other MOFs (humerus, forearm, clinical vertebral) and as used in FRAX®. Observed MOF rates were compared to those predicted among community-dwelling individuals ≥50 years by the standardized incidence ratio (SIR; 95% CI). Results Age-standardized IRs (per 10,000 person-years) of MOF among men and women ≥50 years were 25.9 and 77.0, respectively. These numbers were 9.3 and 24.0 for hip fracture. Among women 55–84 years, observed MOF rates were significantly higher than predicted (SIR ranged between 1.12–1.50, depending on age). In men, the imputation method performed reasonable. Conclusion Observed MOF incidence was higher than predicted for community-dwelling women over a wide age-range, while it agreed reasonable for men. As miscalibration may influence treatment decisions, there is a need for confirmation of results in another data source. Until then, the Dutch FRAX® output should be interpreted with caution. PMID:26633011

  11. Semi-automated CT-based analysis of regional bone-density in contra lateral total hip replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbu-McInnis, Monica; Tamez-Pena, Jose; Crilly, Therese; Looney, John R.; O'Keefe, R.; Campbell, Debbie; Totterman, Saara M.

    2004-04-01

    Methods for quantifying hip prosthesis induced changes in the adjacent bone are of great interest to orthopedics. In this work, we present a semi-automated technique for measuring the differences in bone density between the prosthetic and contra lateral hips within a CT volumetric data set. In order to reliably compare the bone-density measurements between the prosthetic and the contra laterals hips, a standardized zoning was developed. Using a spherical model of the outer surface of the prosthetic cup, the superior volume of the acetabular region was subdivided into four distance zones: 0-1mm, 1-6mm, 6-11mm, and 11-16mm, respectively. Furthermore, these regions were divided into four positional zones: medial, lateral, anterior, and posterior. At the same time, the positional zones were divided into four angular regions 15, 30, 45, and 60 degrees from the apex of the acetabular cup. The bone density is computed as the average density in Hounsfield unit (HU) measured from the CT scan using all the voxels within each of the 64 zones. Preliminary analysis has been completed on 3 subjects with total hip replacement. The zonal densities on the prosthetic hip and the contra lateral hip were computed and compared. Contrary to initial expectations, a paired t-test showed no statistical significance between the prosthetic and contra lateral bone-densities at any of the four distance zones. Further analysis with a larger sample subject is needed to detect differences in bone-density between the hips in the stress/weight bearing areas in the 15 to 30 degree regions. A method for reliably and consistently measuring the bone-density within standardized zones has been developed and applied on prosthetic and contra lateral hips. The average bone-density for each of the zones takes into account the entire volumetric data set within that region, which is a considerable improvement over the subjective, user driven region of interest estimate selected within one slice practiced in

  12. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... for use with bone cement (§ 888.3027). (b) Classification. Class III. (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the... metal (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis shall have an approved PMA or a declared...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... for use with bone cement (§ 888.3027). (b) Classification. Class III. (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the... metal (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis shall have an approved PMA or a declared...

  14. The Impact of Race/Ethnicity on Preoperative Time to Hip Stabilization Procedure after Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Oghalai, Tracy U.; Kuo, Yong-fang; Wu, Helen; Shokar, Navkiran K.; Grecula, Michael; Tincher, Steven; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.

    2010-01-01

    Background We sought to examine the preoperative time for hip stabilization procedure among Hispanics, non-Hispanic blacks (blacks) and non-Hispanic whites (whites). Methods This was a secondary data analysis using Medicare claims data. Our analysis included 40,321 patients admitted for hip fracture hospitalization from 2001-2005. Our primary analysis was generalized linear modeling, and our dependent variable was preoperative time. Our independent variable was race/ethnicity (Hispanics, blacks versus whites), and covariates were age, gender, income, type of hip fracture and comorbidities. Results Bivariate analyses showed that both Hispanics and blacks experienced a longer preoperative time (P<0.01). The average (mean) of days to surgery was 1.2 for whites, 1.6 for blacks and 1.7 for Hispanics. The delayed preoperative time among Hispanics and blacks persisted after adjusting for covariates. Conclusions The delayed preoperative time among minorities suggests the need to closely monitor care among minorities with hip fracture to determine how to best address their developing needs. PMID:20375948

  15. Hip-Hop Is the Healer: Sense of Belonging and Diversity among Hip-Hop Collegians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulé, V. Thandi

    2016-01-01

    Sense of belonging is recognized as a factor contributing to persistence to graduation. Furthermore, interactional diversity is associated with learning and civic outcomes--touted higher education goals. Hip-hop culture, one of the most influential cultural creations of the mid-20th century, has succeeded in attracting devotees from diverse…

  16. Inequalities in use of total hip arthroplasty for hip fracture: population based study

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, David; Griffin, Xavier L; Costa, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether the use of total hip arthroplasty (THA) among individuals with a displaced intracapsular fracture of the femoral neck is based on national guidelines or if there are systematic inequalities. Design Observational cohort study using the National Hip Fracture Database (NHFD). Setting All hospitals that treat adults with hip fractures in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland. Participants Patients within the national database (all aged ≥60) who received operative treatment for a non-pathological displaced intracapsular hip fracture from 1 July 2011 to 31 April 2015. Main outcome measures Provision of THA to patients considered eligible under criteria published by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). Results 114 119 patients with hip fracture were included, 11 683 (10.2%) of whom underwent THA. Of those who satisfied the NICE criteria, 32% (6780)received a THA. Of patients who underwent THA, 42% (4903) did not satisfy the NICE criteria. A recursive partitioning algorithm found that the NICE eligibility criteria did not optimally explain which patients underwent THA. A model with superior explanatory power drew distinctions that are not supported by NICE, which were an age cut off at 76 and a different ambulation cut off. Among patients who satisfied the NICE eligibility, the use of THA was less likely with higher age (odds ratio 0.88, 95% confidence interval 0.87 to 0.88), worsening abbreviated mental test scores (0.49 (0.41 to 0.58) for normal cognition v borderline cognitive impairment)), worsening American Society of Anesthesiologists score (0.74, 0.66 to 0.84), male sex (0.85, 0.77 to 0.93), worsening ambulatory status (0.32, 0.28 to 0.35 for walking with a stick v independent ambulation), and fifths of worsening socioeconomic area deprivation (0.76 (0.66 to 0.88) for least v most deprived fifth). Patients receiving treatment during the working week were more likely to receive THA than at the

  17. Prevalence of hip symptoms and radiographic and symptomatic hip osteoarthritis in African-Americans and Caucasians: The Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Joanne M.; Helmick, Charles G.; Renner, Jordan B.; Luta, Gheorghe; Dragomir, Anca D.; Woodard, Janice; Fang, Fang; Schwartz, Todd A.; Nelson, Amanda E.; Abbate, Lauren M.; Callahan, Leigh F.; Kalsbeek, William D.; Hochberg, Marc C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To report contemporary estimates of the prevalence of hip-related osteoarthritis (OA) outcomes in African-Americans and Caucasians aged ≥ 45 years. Methods Weighted prevalence estimates and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals for hip symptoms, radiographic hip OA, symptomatic hip OA, and severe radiographic hip OA were calculated using SUDAAN® for age, race, and sex subgroups among 3,068 participants (33% African-Americans, 38% men) in the baseline examination (1991–1997) of The Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project, a population-based study of OA in North Carolina. Radiographic hip OA was defined as Kellgren-Lawrence radiographic grade ≥ 2, moderate/severe radiographic hip OA as grades 3 and 4, and symptomatic hip OA as hip symptoms in a hip with radiographic OA. Results Hip symptoms were present in 36%; 28% had radiographic hip OA; nearly 10% had symptomatic hip OA; and 2.5% had moderate/severe radiographic hip OA. Prevalence of all 4 outcomes was higher in older individuals; most outcomes were higher for women and African-Americans. Conclusion These hip-related outcomes were common in this population, and African-Americans did not have a lower prevalence as previous studies have suggested. Increasing public and health system awareness of the relatively high prevalence of these outcomes, which can be disabling, may help to decrease their impact and ultimately prevent them. PMID:19286855

  18. Return to Play Following Hip Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Simon; Kuhn, Andrew; Draovitch, Pete; Bedi, Asheesh

    2016-10-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement may be particularly disabling to the high-demand athlete, especially those with significant cutting and pivoting requirements. If nonoperative treatment fails to adequately alleviate symptoms or sufficiently restore function in the athlete, hip arthroscopy can lead to improved pain, improved range of motion, and high rates of return to play with proper postoperative rehabilitation. The rate of return to previous level of competition is also high with accurate diagnosis and well-executed correction of deformity. A clear understanding of the etiology, diagnosis, management, and outcomes is essential for clinicians to optimally help patients to return to play. PMID:27543404

  19. Hip labral cyst caused by psoas impingement.

    PubMed

    Tey, Marc; Alvarez, Sonia; Ríos, Jose L

    2012-08-01

    Hip labral impingement can cause labral tears and secondary paralabral cyst formation. Femoroacetabular impingement is the main cause of labral impingement, but other conditions such as iliopsoas tendon impingement are described. There is no description of labral cyst resulting from psoas impingement treated arthroscopically in the literature. We present the case of a young sportsman with groin pain caused by psoas impingement with a labral tear and secondary paralabral cyst who was treated arthroscopically by cyst debridement, psoas tenotomy, and labral repair. PMID:22840990

  20. [An endoapparatus for restoration of hip joint].

    PubMed

    Lapinskaia, V S; Gatiatulin, R R; Trubnikov, V I; Velichko, M V; Froliakin, T V; Kovalenko, A E; Froliakina, L A

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of prolonging the anatomic and functional longevity of joints in young patients with coxarthrosis deformans under conditions of long-term unloading using a submersible distraction device is considered. A submersible endoapparatus for restoration of hip joint is described. Its functional capabilities as an unloading device were corroborated by experimental testing. Clinical examples illustrated with X-ray photographs demonstrate the possibility of long-term unloading of the injured joint and postponement of endoprosthesis replacement in young patients by 20-25 years. It is suggested to use the developed method for organ-sparing surgery in young working-age patients. PMID:18688939

  1. Hip Instability: Current Concepts and Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Guillaume D

    2016-07-01

    Instability of the hip can manifest in a wide range of settings, with presenting symptoms including subtle discomfort at end range of motion or more dramatic dislocation of the joint. It can result from traumatic injury with dislocation or subluxation; atraumatic capsular laxity; structural bony abnormality, such as acetabular dysplasia; and iatrogenic injury. Initial treatment of the concentrically reduced joint often begins with physical therapy to strengthen dynamic stabilizers and to allow time for resolution of acute symptoms. Surgical treatment is aimed at repairing injured soft tissue structures, including static stabilizers, and addressing underlying bony structural deficiencies. PMID:27343395

  2. Dual mobility in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Darren R; Haughom, Bryan D; Della Valle, Craig J

    2014-01-01

    Dual-mobility articulations have shown promising results. Postoperative instability remains the most common reason for revision of a total hip arthroplasty (THA). Dual-mobility cups have been shown to decrease the rate of dislocation in primary THA and have been used to treat and prevent instability in revision THA. Greater range of motion and a greater head-to-neck ratio and a greater jump distance are achieved, resulting in a lower risk of instability. Concerns with dual-mobility cups include wear and intraprosthetic dislocation. Specific design modifications have aimed to improve cup fixation and decrease polyethylene wear and the risks of intraprosthetic dislocation. PMID:24267202

  3. Standardization versus Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Deborah

    2002-01-01

    Examines differences between old state-designed norm-referenced tests and new tests aligned with the curriculum. Concludes that new state tests are very similar to old ones. Discusses impact of new high-stakes standardized tests on students and teachers. Argues the new wave of standardized testing is not the answer to improving student…

  4. Chicano Hip-Hop as Interethnic Contact Zone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, Pancho

    2008-01-01

    The critical study of rap music and hip-hop culture has the potential to expand Americans understanding of race and culture in the United States. Hip-hop culture as a multiracial, multiethnic phenomenon reveals the ways in which race relations over the past thirty years have become increasingly complex. The theories and concepts that they use to…

  5. Hip-Hop, the "Obama Effect," and Urban Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emdin, Christopher; Lee, Okhee

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: With the ever increasing diversity of schools, and the persistent need to develop teaching strategies for the students who attend today's urban schools, hip-hop culture has been proposed to be a means through which urban youth can find success in school. As a result, studies of the role of hip-hop in urban education have grown…

  6. Hip Hop as Empowerment: Voices in El Alto, Bolivia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarifa, Ariana

    2012-01-01

    In response to neoliberal policies that have been in place since 1985, Bolivian young people have increasingly used hip hop music as a means of protest and to reclaim social and political participation. Hip hop in Latin America tells the story of the struggles that marginalized people have suffered, and speaks to the effects of international…

  7. Towards a Pedagogy of Hip Hop in Urban Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Thurman

    2011-01-01

    This article draws from a qualitative study often Black male K-12 teachers from the Hip Hop Generation who are closely connected to Hip Hop culture and have been effective in addressing the academic and social needs of Black boys. Through an analysis of their social, educational and cultural experiences, this article highlights three organizing…

  8. Hip Hop Is Now: An Evolving Youth Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Carl; Taylor, Virgil

    2007-01-01

    Emerging from Rap music, Hip Hop has become a lifestyle to many modern youth around the world. Embodying both creativity and controversy, Hip Hop mirrors the values, violence, and hypocrisy of modern culture. The authors dispel some of the simplistic views that surround this evolving youth movement embraced by millions of young people who are…

  9. Framing and Reviewing Hip-Hop Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petchauer, Emery

    2009-01-01

    Hip-hop has become relevant to the field of education because of its implications for understanding language, learning, identity, curriculum, and other areas. This integrative review provides historical context and cohesion for the burgeoning and discursive body of hip-hop scholarship by framing it according to three heuristic categories and…

  10. Christian Hip Hop as Pedagogy: A South African Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on interviews with creators of Christian hip hop music in South Africa, this article demonstrates that this genre of popular music and youth culture is utilised as a form of pedagogy to transmit religious beliefs and values to contemporary youth. The pedagogical aspects of hip hop have been recognised in research on the topic, but the…

  11. Toward Hip-Hop Pedagogies for Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruse, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Music education scholarship in the areas of popular, vernacular, and participatory musicianship has grown in the past decades; however, music education research concerned specifically with hip-hop has been relatively scarce. Because hip-hop music can differ tremendously from the traditional western genres with which many music educators are most…

  12. Surgical Management of Hip Problems in Myelomeningocele: A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Baghdadi, Taghi; abdi, Reza; Bashi, Ramin Zargar; Aslani, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Children with myelomeningocele (MMC) develop a wide variety of hip deformities such as muscle imbalance, contracture, subluxation, and dislocation. Various methods and indications have been introduced for treatment of muscle imbalances and other hip problems in patients with MMC but there is no study or meta-analysis to compare the results and complications. This review aims to find the most acceptable approach to hip problems in patients with MMC. Methods: MEDLINE was searched up to April 2015. All study designs that reported on the outcomes of hip problems in MMC were included. From 270 screened citations, 55 were strictly focused on hip problem in MMC were selected and reviewed. Results: Complex osseous and soft tissue reconstructive procedures to correct hip dysplasia and muscle balancing around the hip are rarely indicated for MMC patients without good quadriceps power. Conclusion: Over the years a consensus on the best algorithm for treatment of hip dislocation in myelomeningocele has been missing, however, muscular balancing with/out osseous procedure seems a reasonable approach especially in unilateral mid-lumbar MMC. PMID:27517062

  13. Framing Hip Hop: New Methodologies for New Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitriadis, Greg

    2015-01-01

    This article revisits the central impulse behind early advocacy for ethnographic approaches to hip hop--that critics should try as much as possible to limit their own certainties around what hip hop can and might mean. While ethnographic approaches can engender the kinds of personal dislocations that allow for this negotiation, they do not…

  14. [An older man with a painful hip after a fall].

    PubMed

    Wijers, O; Post, I C J H; Heetveld, M J

    2016-01-01

    A 94-year-old man presented to the Emergency Room after falling on his right hip. This hip was painful and a fracture was suspected. The X-rays showed an abnormal structure of the right femur but no fracture. The images were typical for Paget's disease. The patient was treated with bisphosphonates. PMID:27581865

  15. One step HIP canning of powder metallurgy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhas, John J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A single step is relied on in the canning process for hot isostatic pressing (HIP) powder metallurgy composites. The binders are totally removed while the HIP can of compatible refractory metal is sealed at high vacuum and temperature. This eliminates outgassing during hot isostatic pressing.

  16. Osteoarthritis of the hip: an occupational disease in farmers.

    PubMed Central

    Croft, P.; Coggon, D.; Cruddas, M.; Cooper, C.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To test the hypothesis that farmers are at high risk of hip osteoarthritis and to investigate possible causes for such a hazard. DESIGN--Cross sectional survey. SETTING--Five rural general practices. SUBJECTS--167 male farmers aged 60-76 and 83 controls from mainly sedentary jobs. All those without previous hip replacement underwent radiography of the hip. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Hip replacement for osteoarthritis or radiological evidence of hip osteoarthritis. RESULTS--Prevalence of hip osteoarthritis was higher in farmers than controls and especially in those who had farmed for over 10 years (odds ratio 9.3, 95% confidence interval 1.9 to 44.5). The excess could not be attributed to any one type of farming, and heavy lifting seems the likely explanation. CONCLUSIONS--Manual handling in agriculture should be limited where possible. Consideration should be given to making hip osteoarthritis a prescribed industrial disease in farmers. There may be wider implications for the prevention of hip osteoarthritis in the general population. PMID:1606427

  17. Non-Operative Care for Hip Fracture in the Elderly: The Influence of Race, Income, and Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Mark D.; Fleisher, Lee A.; Even-Shoshan, Orit; Mi, Lanyu; Silber, Jeffrey H.

    2016-01-01

    Context Hip fracture occurs in 340,000 older adults each year. Operative repair is the standard of care, maximizing the chances of functional recovery. Not receiving operative care may condemn patients to a lifetime of pain and potential immobility. Objective To measure the incidence of non-operative treatment for first-time hip fracture in a population-based cohort and to measure the odds of non-operative treatment of hip fracture among patients of differing race and income. Design, Setting, and Participants Retrospective cohort study of 165,861 Medicare beneficiaries admitted for hip fracture between March 31, 2002 and December 31, 2006 to hospitals in New York, Illinois, and Texas. Main Outcome Measures Odds of non-operative management of hip fracture, adjusted for fracture characteristics, comorbidities, source of admission, age, sex, race, income, and individual hospital effects. Results Non-operative management occurred in 6.2% of patients (N=10,283). After adjustment, black patients had a 79% increase in the odds of non-operative management as compared to whites (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.64-1.95). Low income itself was not associated with a change in the odds of non-operative care. Among patients not receiving operative repair, blacks demonstrated lower mortality than whites at 7 days (7.96% vs. 20.17%, p < 0.0001) and 30 days (24.14% vs. 38.22%, p<0.0001). Conclusions Black race predicts an increased odds of non-operative care for hip fracture. Among patients receiving non-operative care, black patients demonstrated increased survival compared to whites. These results are consistent with differential selection of operative candidates by patient race. PMID:20355262

  18. Treatment efficacy of etanercept and MTX combination therapy for ankylosing spondylitis hip joint lesion in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Lian, Fan; Yang, Xiuyan; Liang, Liuqin; Xu, Hanshi; Zhan, Zhongping; Qiu, Qian; Ye, Yujin

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the efficacy of etanercept and MTX (methotrexate) combination therapy in Chinese patients with ankylosing spondylitis hip joint lesion, the possible courses and maintenance protocol, altogether 97 ankylosing spondylitis patients fulfilling the modified New York criteria with hip joint lesion were enrolled in a 12-month trial treated with combined etanercept and MTX. All these patients were required to be poor responders to SSZ (Sulfasalazine) or MTX therapy for 6 consecutive months or the longer. Etanercept was administered subcutaneously twice a week at a fixed dosage of 25 mg for the first six months, followed by 25 mg once a week in patients with good control of both symptoms and radiological progression, or twice a week for another six months in patients with BASDAI > or = 4. Combined MTX was administered intravenously once a week at the dosage of 15 mg. Demographics, clinical and laboratory features, physical function and quality of life using the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Harris hip score, and radiological assessment using the BASRI-hip index were recorded. Most patients achieved pain release at the end point of assessment. Significant improvement in Bath AS Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) (P < 0.05), Bath AS Functional Activity Index (BASFI) (P < 0.05), and Harris hip score (P < 0.05) was demonstrated. Radiographic progression was recorded as no exacerbation or alleviated. Larger interval between two etanercept administrations would provide similar advantages to standard method and possibly less adverse events if MTX was combined. Etanercept and MTX combination therapy was beneficial to ankylosing spondylitis patients with hip joint lesion, and staged dosage deduction in the long term proved to be effective as well as adverse event preventing. PMID:21387110

  19. Influence of hip joint simulator design and mechanics on the wear and creep of metal-on-polyethylene bearings.

    PubMed

    Ali, Murat; Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Partridge, Susan; Williams, Sophie; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-05-01

    Hip joint simulators are used extensively for preclinical testing of hip replacements. The variation in simulator design and test conditions used worldwide can affect the tribological performance of polyethylene. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of simulator mechanics and design on the wear and creep of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene. In the first part of this study, an electromechanical simulator and pneumatic simulator were used to compare the wear and creep of metal-on-polyethylene components under the same standard gait conditions. In the second part of the study, the same electromechanical hip joint simulator was used to investigate the influence of kinematics on wear. Higher wear rates and penetration depths were observed from the electromechanical simulator compared with the pneumatic simulator. When adduction/abduction was introduced to the gait cycle, there was no significant difference in wear with that obtained under the gait cycle condition without adduction/abduction. This study confirmed the influence of hip simulator design and loading conditions on the wear of polyethylene, and therefore direct comparisons of absolute wear rates between different hip joint simulators should be avoided. This study also confirmed that the resulting wear path was the governing factor in obtaining clinically relevant wear rates, and this can be achieved with either two axes or three axes of rotations. However, three axes of rotation (with the inclusion of adduction/abduction) more closely replicate clinical conditions and should therefore be the design approach for newly developed hip joint simulators used for preclinical testing. PMID:27160559

  20. Long-duration metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties with low wear of the articulating surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schmalzried, T P; Peters, P C; Maurer, B T; Bragdon, C R; Harris, W H

    1996-04-01

    The 20-year performance of metal-on-metal hip articulations has not been reported. Five McKee-Farrar total hip prostheses and one Sivash prosthesis were obtained at revision surgery after a mean implantation time of 21.3 years. A radiographic, histologic, implant, and wear analysis was performed on these total hip implants with cobalt-chrome metal-on-metal articulations. All cases were associated with femoral component loosening, but the bearing surfaces performed remarkably well. The worst case estimate of combined femoral and acetabular linear wear was 4.2 microns per year, about 25 times less than that typically seen with polyethylene. Metal particles and foreign-body inflammation were seen in all cases, but the volume of reactive tissue was small compared with what is generally seen at revision of hips with a polyethylene acetabular bearing. This may be due to a reduced particle burden or a decreased inflammatory reaction to particulate metal, or both. In addition to articular wear, other sources of metal particles included femoral neck impingement on the acetabular rim, stem burnishing, and corrosion. Prosthetic hip reconstructions can fail for many reasons, including suboptimal femoral stem and/or acetabular cup design and/or fixation. By today's standards, the McKee-Farrar and Sivash stem and acetabular component designs are suboptimal; however, after more than 20 years of use, the metal-on-metal bearing surfaces in these cases demonstrated low wear and do not appear to be the cause of failure. Recent advances in total hip arthroplasty, which include improved implant design, materials, manufacturing, and fixation, combined with a better understanding of the mechanisms of implant loosening and failure, suggest that the cobalt-chrome metal-on-metal bearing be reexamined as an alternative to polyethylene when exceptional durability is required. PMID:8713913

  1. Influence of hip joint simulator design and mechanics on the wear and creep of metal-on-polyethylene bearings

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Murat; Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Partridge, Susan; Williams, Sophie; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-01-01

    Hip joint simulators are used extensively for preclinical testing of hip replacements. The variation in simulator design and test conditions used worldwide can affect the tribological performance of polyethylene. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of simulator mechanics and design on the wear and creep of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene. In the first part of this study, an electromechanical simulator and pneumatic simulator were used to compare the wear and creep of metal-on-polyethylene components under the same standard gait conditions. In the second part of the study, the same electromechanical hip joint simulator was used to investigate the influence of kinematics on wear. Higher wear rates and penetration depths were observed from the electromechanical simulator compared with the pneumatic simulator. When adduction/abduction was introduced to the gait cycle, there was no significant difference in wear with that obtained under the gait cycle condition without adduction/abduction. This study confirmed the influence of hip simulator design and loading conditions on the wear of polyethylene, and therefore direct comparisons of absolute wear rates between different hip joint simulators should be avoided. This study also confirmed that the resulting wear path was the governing factor in obtaining clinically relevant wear rates, and this can be achieved with either two axes or three axes of rotations. However, three axes of rotation (with the inclusion of adduction/abduction) more closely replicate clinical conditions and should therefore be the design approach for newly developed hip joint simulators used for preclinical testing. PMID:27160559

  2. What do we tell patients about elective total hip replacement in the UK? An analysis of patient literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although hip information literature is given to people following total hip replacement (THR) almost routinely, little evaluation has been conducted on it to date. Our aim was therefore to analyse and evaluate the literature provided to patients by occupational therapists concerning elective hip surgery in the UK. Methods This was a pragmatic, descriptive analysis of information leaflets routinely given to patients undergoing primary total hip replacement (THR). The literature was collected as part of a national survey of occupational therapy practice. In the absence of a suitable evaluation tool, the patient leaflets were compared using a checklist devised by the researchers. The three areas of interest were: accessibility including presentation of information, breadth of information covered and specific activities of daily living described. Results 111 information leaflets and booklets were examined. These ranged from hospital publications which were professionally printed to those produced by individual departments. There was a variation in the readability of the leaflets ranging from 13% to 83%; the mean was 45% (SD 15). There was also variation in the content ranging from those covering surgery and possible complications, to those including diet and hip exercises. The most commonly covered activity of daily living was advice on sitting (99; 89%); the least commonly covered was work (26; 23%). Only 3 (2.7%) booklets had involved patients in their production and only 22 (20%) signposted obtaining information in another language or in Braille. Conclusions There was a range of literature in terms of presentation and content given to people who had a total hip replacement (THR). Although some booklets and leaflets scored highly, some did not meet basic standards such as providing contact details for help, using good quality diagrams, suggesting further reading or involving patients in their design. These results highlight important and fundamental

  3. Cementless porous-coated anatomic medullary locking total hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y H; Kim, V E

    1994-06-01

    The authors studied 50 consecutive and nonselected patients (52 hips) who were followed for a minimum of 7 years (range, 84-89 months) after they had a primary total hip arthroplasty with an uncemented Anatomic Medullary Locking (DePuy, Warsaw, IN) hip system. The average age of the patients at operation was 47.6 years (range, 19-88 years). The operative diagnoses were: avascular necrosis of the femoral head in 18 hips (34%), osteoarthritis in 16 (31%), fracture of the femoral neck in 14 (27%), and miscellaneous in 4 (8%). The average preoperative Harris hip score was 59 points (range, 6-67 points) that improved to 91 points (range, 69-100 points) at the 7-year follow-up examination. To assess the adequacy of intramedullary fit, the fit of the stem at the proximal canal and isthmus level was evaluated. Forty-one hips (79%) had a good press-fit at both the proximal canal and isthmus level, five hips (10%) had a good press-fit at the proximal canal only, and the remaining six hips (11%) had a poor fit at both the proximal canal and isthmus level. Of the 46 hips that had a good press-fit at the proximal canal and/or isthmus level or proximal canal only, 32 (70%) had bone ingrowth and 14 (30%) had stable fibrous tissue ingrowth. Of the remaining six hips with a poor press-fit at both the proximal canal and isthmus level, three (6%) had stable fibrous tissue ingrowth and another three (6%) were unstable. Of the three hips (6%) with femoral component loosening, one was revised and the other two were asymptomatic. There was an alarmingly high incidence of perioprosthetic osteolysis in our series: 16 hips (31%) had acetabular and femoral osteolysis and 13 hips (25%) had femoral osteolysis only. Also, there was a strikingly high incidence of polyethylene-liner wear (12 hips or 23%). Although the incidence of component loosening was low, a high incidence of periprosthetic osteolysis and excessive wear in the polyethylene linear remain challenging problems after insertion of

  4. [Clinical and ultrasonic diagnosis of congenital hip dislocation (dynamics of changes in early therapy)].

    PubMed

    Poul, J; Procházka, J; Klimsová, J; Janovec, M; Bajerová, J; Jíra, I; Straka, M; Sommernitz, M

    1990-08-01

    The authors present part of their prospective epidemiological study of congenital dysplasia of hip joints within which newborns were examined by ultrasonogram prior to the beginning of the therapy. Apart from the standard examination in the frontal plane after Graf they examined on principle also the ultrasonographic stability by the dynamic test after Schuler as well as by the application of the probe anteriorly with the simultaneous provocation according to Palmén. The authors have processed pathological ultrasonographic findings in 53 newborns (64 hip joints). The technique of the examination by ultrasound from the anterior approach is explained in detail. The comparison of both dynamic tests has shown that the examination from the anterior approach is considerably more sensitive than Schuler's dynamic test and also fully correlates with the clinical finding. It is a fact that the shift of the head in the flexion dorsally represents the most important component of the movement in unstable hip joint during provocation, it is far more noticeable than the lateralization of the head or the shift in the cranial direction. After achieving ultrasonographic stability the classical Graf method is sufficient for the registration of residual changes on the acetabular rim. The follow-up of patients until their complete healing has shown a surprisingly rapid remodellation of hip joints. The whole complex of clinically unstable hip joints has been divided into subgroups according to Graf classification. In type IIc or IId on the basis of ultrasonographic examination from the anterior approach the stable joints from the ultrasonographic viewpoint have been distinguished from unstable ones. The follow-up carried out in short intervals has shown that of longest duration is the remodellation of total dislocation and, on the contrary, of shortest duration is the healing of joints in the IIc or IId type. An absolute majority of affected hip joints have become normal until 3rd

  5. Patient-adapted treatment for prosthetic hip joint infection.

    PubMed

    Baker, Richard P; Furustrand Tafin, Ulrika; Borens, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Hip joint replacement is 1 of the most successful surgical procedures of the last century and the number of replacements implanted is steadily growing. An infected hip arthroplasty is a disaster, it leads to patient suffering, surgeon's frustration and significant costs to the health system. The treatment of an infected hip replacement is challenging, healing rates can be low, functional results poor with decreased patient satisfaction. However, if a patient-adapted treatment of infected hip joints is used a success rate of above 90% can be obtained.Patient-adapted treatment is based on 5 important concepts: teamwork; understanding the biofilm; diagnostic accuracy; correct definition and classification of PJI; and patient-tailored treatment.This review presents a patient-adapted treatment strategy to prosthetic hip infection. It incorporates the best aspects of the single and staged surgical strategies and promotes the short interval philosophy for the 2-stage approach. PMID:26044528

  6. Current Challenges in Pain Management in Hip Fracture Patients.

    PubMed

    Sanzone, Anthony G

    2016-05-01

    The high incidence of hip fracture, together with considerable associated morbidity, mortality, and cost of care, makes this injury a major clinical challenge. Of particular importance is the pain associated with hip fracture, which can have potentially severe consequences and may lead to delayed recovery. The prevailing opioid-dependent model of analgesia, however, presents multiple drawbacks and risks that can compromise outcomes in the hip fracture population. The pain management process has essential preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative components, yet data on the comparative effectiveness of different pain management interventions in patients undergoing surgery for hip fracture are not clear cut. A Cochrane database review that included 83 different pain management studies indicated that there are not enough well-designed studies to show unequivocally which pain management approaches work well after hip fracture surgery. Yet a growing body of data on certain interventions, such as nerve blocks and multimodal analgesia, supports consideration of these options. PMID:27101319

  7. Evolution of the human hip. Part 1: the osseous framework

    PubMed Central

    Hogervorst, Tom; Vereecke, Evie E.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive osseous adaptations of the lumbar spine, pelvis, hip and femur characterize the emergence of the human bipedal gait with its ‘double extension’ of the lumbar spine and hip. To accommodate lumbar lordosis, the pelvis was ‘compacted’, becoming wider and shorter, as compared with the non-human apes. The hip joint acquired a much more extended position, which can be seen in a broader evolutionary context of verticalization of limbs. When loaded in a predominantly vertical position, the femur can be built lighter and longer than when it is loaded more horizontally because bending moments are smaller. Extension of the hip joint together with elongation of the femur increases effective leg length, and hence stride length, which improves energy efficiency. At the hip joint itself, the shift of the hip’s default working range to a more extended position influences concavity at the head–neck junction and femoral neck anteversion. PMID:27011802

  8. The innervation of canine hip joint capsule: an anatomic study.

    PubMed

    Huang, C H; Hou, S M; Yeh, L S

    2013-12-01

    To clarify the contributions of the nerves supplying the canine hip joint capsule for clinical application, cadaver study of six healthy mongrel dogs was performed. The pelvises and hindlimbs of cadavers were dissected and fixed in formaldehyde. Innervation of the joint capsule was investigated with the aid of an operative microscope. As a result, the canine hip joint capsule receives multiple innervations from articular branches of four nerves. They are articular nerve fibres of femoral, obturator, cranial gluteal and sciatic nerves from the cranioventral, caudoventral, craniolateral and dorsolateral directions of the joint, respectively. No branch originating from the caudal gluteal nerve was observed innervating the hip joint capsule. Our data provides useful information for research on the canine hip joint, including pain analysis with hip disorders and surgical nerve blockade to relieve pain. PMID:23410229

  9. Bernese periacetabular osteotomy for hip dysplasia: Surgical technique and indications

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Atul F

    2016-01-01

    For young, active patients with healthy hip cartilage, pelvic osteotomy is a surgical option in to address hip pain and to improve mechanical loading conditions related to dysplasia. Hip dysplasia may lead to arthrosis at an early age due to poor coverage of the femoral head and abnormal loading of the joint articulation. In patients with symptomatic dysplasia and closed triradiate cartilage (generally over age 10), including adolescents and young adults (generally up to around age 40), the Bernese periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) is a durable technique for addressing underlying structural deformity. The PAO involves a modified Smith-Petersen approach. Advantages of the Bernese osteotomy include preservation of the weight-bearing posterior column of the hemi-pelvis, preservation of the acetabular blood supply, maintenance of the hip abductor musculature, and the ability to effect powerful deformity correction about an ideal center of rotation. There is an increasing body of evidence that preservation of the native hip can be improved through pelvic osteotomy. In contrast to hip osteotomy and joint preservation, the role of total hip arthroplasty in young, active patients with correctable hip deformity remains controversial. Moreover, the durability of hip replacement in young patients is inherently limited. Pelvic osteotomy should be considered the preferred method to address correctable structural deformity of the hip in the young, active patient with developmental dysplasia. The Bernese PAO is technically demanding, yet offers reproducible results with good long-term survivorship in carefully selected patients with preserved cartilage and the ability to meet the demands of rehabilitation. PMID:27190755

  10. Total Hip Arthroplasty in Patient with Aplastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Young Wook; Kim, Seung Chan; Kwon, Soon Yong; Park, Do Joon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with aplastic anemia (AA) are now living longer and therefore are at increased risk for the development of osteonecrosis of the hip. However, studies on the results of total hip arthroplasty (THA) are lacking. The purpose of this study is to present the result of THA in patients with AA. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the data for a group of 29 patients (45 hips) with AA who presented to our institution for THA between May 2008 and May 2012. All hips were replaced because of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. A specific prospective protocol was followed for the perioperative transfusion of platelets and blood. The clinical and radiographic evaluations were done, and the minimum follow-up period was 3 years (mean, 49.2 months; range, 36 to 84 months). Results Three hips had excessive perioperative bleeding and hematoma formation, and then hematoma evacuations were done; one hip was finally revised because of infection of acetabular component. One patient with poorly controlled AA died due to delayed infection on the hip joint. All hips showed stable fixation, and the mean Harris hip score was improved from 54.2 points (range, 42 to 69 points) preoperatively to 90.8 points (range, 73 to 97 points) at the time of the latest follow-up. Conclusion In the present study, the durability of implant fixation was maintained and the clinical results demonstrated a sustained increase in function of the hip. Postoperatively, paying attention to bleeding and infection should be needed. PMID:27536640

  11. Bernese periacetabular osteotomy for hip dysplasia: Surgical technique and indications.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Atul F

    2016-05-18

    For young, active patients with healthy hip cartilage, pelvic osteotomy is a surgical option in to address hip pain and to improve mechanical loading conditions related to dysplasia. Hip dysplasia may lead to arthrosis at an early age due to poor coverage of the femoral head and abnormal loading of the joint articulation. In patients with symptomatic dysplasia and closed triradiate cartilage (generally over age 10), including adolescents and young adults (generally up to around age 40), the Bernese periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) is a durable technique for addressing underlying structural deformity. The PAO involves a modified Smith-Petersen approach. Advantages of the Bernese osteotomy include preservation of the weight-bearing posterior column of the hemi-pelvis, preservation of the acetabular blood supply, maintenance of the hip abductor musculature, and the ability to effect powerful deformity correction about an ideal center of rotation. There is an increasing body of evidence that preservation of the native hip can be improved through pelvic osteotomy. In contrast to hip osteotomy and joint preservation, the role of total hip arthroplasty in young, active patients with correctable hip deformity remains controversial. Moreover, the durability of hip replacement in young patients is inherently limited. Pelvic osteotomy should be considered the preferred method to address correctable structural deformity of the hip in the young, active patient with developmental dysplasia. The Bernese PAO is technically demanding, yet offers reproducible results with good long-term survivorship in carefully selected patients with preserved cartilage and the ability to meet the demands of rehabilitation. PMID:27190755

  12. Common questions about developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jonathan C; Runge, Melissa M; Nye, Nathaniel S

    2014-12-15

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip is a common musculoskeletal condition in newborns. Infants with developmental dysplasia of the hip, whether treated or untreated, have a higher incidence of early-onset hip osteoarthritis in adulthood. Evidence to support universal screening by physical examination or ultrasonography is limited and often conflicting. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence that screening for developmental dysplasia of the hip prevents adverse outcomes. Physical examination screening is recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America. These organizations recommend use of the Ortolani and Barlow maneuvers to screen infants up to three months of age. Several recent studies support starting assessment for limited hip abduction at eight weeks of age, which is the most sensitive test for developmental dysplasia of the hip from this age on. Infants with overtly dislocated or dislocatable hips should be referred to an orthopedist on a priority basis at the time of diagnosis. Infants with equivocal hip examination findings at birth can be reexamined in two weeks. If there is subluxation or dislocation at the follow-up examination, referral should be made at that time. If the examination findings are still equivocal, the infant can undergo ultrasonography of the hips or be reexamined every few weeks through the first six weeks of life. Although equivocal findings commonly resolve spontaneously, infants with persistent equivocal findings of developmental dysplasia of the hip longer than six weeks should be evaluated by an orthopedist. Treatment generally involves flexion-abduction splinting. The benefits of treatment are unclear, and there are risks to treatment, most notably an increased occurrence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. PMID:25591184

  13. [Are the cobalt hip prosthesis dangerous?].

    PubMed

    Mistretta, Virginie; Kurth, William; Charlier, Corinne

    The placement of a hip prosthesis is one of the most common orthopedic surgical procedures. Some implants contain metal and are therefore capable of releasing metal particles like cobalt in patients who wear metal prostheses. Cobalt can be responsible of local toxicity (including metallosis, hypersensitivity reaction, and benign tumor) or systemic toxicity (including cardiomyopathy, polycythemia, hypothyroidism, and neurological disorders). To monitor potential toxicity of metal hip prostheses, an annual monitoring of patients implanted is recommended and includes clinical examination, radiological examination and blood cobalt determination. The cobalt concentration in blood allows to estimate the risk of toxicity and to evaluate the performance of the implant. The currently recommended threshold value is equal to 7 µg of cobalt per liter of blood. Our study, conducted on 251 patients over a period of 4 years, has shown that the cobalt concentration average was 2.51 µg/l in blood, with 51 patients having a cobaltemia higher than the threshold of 7 µg/l. PMID:27615181

  14. Metal-on-Metal Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sehatzadeh, S; Kaulback, K; Levin, L

    2012-01-01

    Background Metal-on-metal (MOM) hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) is in clinical use as an appropriate alternative to total hip arthroplasty in young patients. In this technique, a metal cap is placed on the femoral head to cover the damaged surface of the bone and a metal cup is placed in the acetabulum. Objectives The primary objective of this analysis was to compare the revision rates of MOM HRA using different implants with the benchmark set by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE). The secondary objective of this analysis was to review the literature regarding adverse biological effects associated with implant material. Review Methods A literature search was performed on February 13, 2012, to identify studies published from January 1, 2009, to February 13, 2012. Results The revision rates for MOM HRA using 6 different implants were reviewed. The revision rates for MOM HRA with 3 implants met the NICE criteria, i.e., a revision rate of 10% or less at 10 years. Two implants had short-term follow-ups and MOM HRA with one of the implants failed to meet the NICE criteria. Adverse tissue reactions resulting in failure of the implants have been reported by several studies. With a better understanding of the factors that influence the wear rate of the implants, adverse tissue reactions and subsequent implant failure can be minimized. Many authors have suggested that patient selection and surgical technique affect the wear rate and the risk of tissue reactions. The biological effects of high metal ion levels in the blood and urine of patients with MOM HRA implants are not known. Studies have shown an increase in chromosomal aberrations in patients with MOM articulations, but the clinical implications and long-term consequences of this increase are still unknown. Epidemiological studies have shown that patients with MOM HRA implants did not have an overall increase in mortality or risk of cancer. There is insufficient clinical data to confirm the

  15. Robot-assisted total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Cherian, Jeffery J; Elmallah, Randa K; Pierce, Todd P; Jauregui, Julio J; Mont, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Precise and accurate biomechanical reconstruction during total hip arthroplasty (THA) is essential for durable long-term survivorship. Accurate fit of cementless hip implants is also crucial to reduce micromotion between the bone-implant interfaces to allow for stable osseointegration. Robotic technology aims to minimize potential human errors and improve implant alignment and fit, and address persisting concerns with modern-day cementless THA. Although robotic THA dates back to the early 1990s, concerns with increased operating times, costs, and complications led to its withdrawal. However, semi-active systems have renewed interest in robot-assisted joint arthroplasty. We reviewed the current technology, its potential benefits, and the reported clinical and radiographic outcomes. Early evidence suggests that robotic use may lead to more accurate reconstruction of radiographic parameters, such as implant positioning, fit, center-of-rotation, and leg-length discrepancy. Further research is needed to determine if these will translate into better outcomes and improved implant longevity to justify increased costs. PMID:26592900

  16. Hip injuries in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Craig, C L

    1980-10-01

    Hip injuries in children present a wide spectrum of problems. Frequently because of the severity of the trauma involved, other injuries may take precedence and may require modification of the usual approaches to treatment. However, certain precepts are essential to the successful treatment of these injuries and should be kept in mind regardless of the milieu in which they are found. In the child with a hip dislocation, the potential presence of an acetabular, femoral head, femoral shaft, patellar or tibial plateau fracture must always be considered. Specialized x-ray views are necessary for this evaluation. Laminography and arthrography may also be required. The essential feature of successful subsequent treatment is a gentle closed reduction performed within 24 hours of injury. Treatment of displaced fractures of the femoral neck remains an unresolved issue. Accurate reduction held with adequate internal fixation would appear to offer the best chance for a successful result. The possible complications of avascular necrosis, delayed union and non-union, coxa vara, premature closure of the epiphyseal plate, and shortening should be appreciated. Early institution of appropriate treatment may mitigate the ultimate effect of these potentially devastating problems. PMID:7454245

  17. Medical problems in hip fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Chong, Carol Pei Wei; Savige, Judith A; Lim, Wen Kwang

    2010-11-01

    Increasing number of older patients are admitted to hospital with hip fractures. This review evaluates the common medical problems that arise as a consequence of having a hip fracture. Older patients with fractures commonly have co-morbidities that require evaluation prior to and after surgery. Joint acute orthopaedic-geriatric units have been established to provide comprehensive orthopaedic and medical care with some studies showing a reduction in postoperative complications and mortality. Recommendations surrounding the care of the older orthopaedic patient include early surgical fixation, the use of prophylactic antibiotics and thromboembolic prophylaxis, good perioperative pain control to improve ambulation, delirium detection and management to decrease the risk complications, such as institutionalisation, the avoidance of malnutrition, urinary tract management, osteoporosis management and the promotion of early mobilisation to improve functional recovery. Physicians are well placed to manage these patients with orthopaedic surgeons during the perioperative period. Sufficient evidence exists for most recommendations for fracture patients, but further research is needed in most areas. PMID:20049603

  18. Standards not that standard.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, Cristina; Tanner, Kristie; Dorado-Morales, Pedro; Villaescusa, Paula; Chugani, Divya; Frías, Alba; Segredo, Ernesto; Molero, Xavier; Fritschi, Marco; Morales, Lucas; Ramón, Daniel; Peña, Carlos; Peretó, Juli; Porcar, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    There is a general assent on the key role of standards in Synthetic Biology. In two consecutive letters to this journal, suggestions on the assembly methods for the Registry of standard biological parts have been described. We fully agree with those authors on the need of a more flexible building strategy and we highlight in the present work two major functional challenges standardization efforts have to deal with: the need of both universal and orthogonal behaviors. We provide experimental data that clearly indicate that such engineering requirements should not be taken for granted in Synthetic Biology. PMID:26435739

  19. Red Flags Are Missed in the Prevention of Hip Fractures: Baseline Results of the Zurich Hip Fracture Trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    From January 2005 to December 2007, we recruited 173 patients age 65 and older with acute hip fracture and a Folstein mini mental score of at least 15 into an ongoing double-blind RCT with vitamin D. 69% of hip fracture patients were admitted from home and 31% from institutions, 79% were women. Mean...

  20. Hip Hop Culture's OGs: A Narrative Inquiry into the Intersection of Hip Hop Culture, Black Males and Their Schooling Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Ian P.

    2013-01-01

    Using a critical race lens, this narrative study employs a focus group design to explore the intersections between black males, hip hop culture and schooling experiences. To provide a sociocultural grounding, this study first reviews the research literature around hip hop culture.s sociocultural development and its impact as a culture force that…