Science.gov

Sample records for star formation galaxies

  1. Star Formation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  2. Star Formation in Irregular Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Deidre; Wolff, Sidney

    1985-01-01

    Examines mechanisms of how stars are formed in irregular galaxies. Formation in giant irregular galaxies, formation in dwarf irregular galaxies, and comparisons with larger star-forming regions found in spiral galaxies are considered separately. (JN)

  3. Star formation in distant galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca-Volmerange, B.

    Scenarios of galactic evolution, essentially based on our knowledge of nearby galaxies have been proposed. Star formation laws, initial mass function, metallicity are the main parameters. The author shortly reviews the present status of these parameters in distant galaxies and gives some deductive conclusions from a comparison with the most distant (z ≥ 3) galaxies.

  4. Star Formation for Predictive Primordial Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosavljević, Miloš; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence

    The elegance of inflationary cosmology and cosmological perturbation theory ends with the formation of the first stars and galaxies, the initial sources of light that launched the phenomenologically rich process of cosmic reionization. Here we review the current understanding of early star formation, emphasizing unsolved problems and technical challenges. We begin with the first generation of stars to form after the Big Bang and trace how they influenced subsequent star formation. The onset of chemical enrichment coincided with a sharp increase in the overall physical complexity of star forming systems. Ab-initio computational treatments are just now entering the domain of the predictive and are establishing contact with local observations of the relics of this ancient epoch.

  5. Measuring star formation rates in blue galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Hunter, Deidre A.

    1987-01-01

    The problems associated with measurements of star formation rates in galaxies are briefly reviewed, and specific models are presented for determinations of current star formation rates from H alpha and Far Infrared (FIR) luminosities. The models are applied to a sample of optically blue irregular galaxies, and the results are discussed in terms of star forming histories. It appears likely that typical irregular galaxies are forming stars at nearly constant rates, although a few examples of systems with enhanced star forming activity are found among HII regions and luminous irregular galaxies.

  6. The Star Formation Relation in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schruba, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    I review observational studies of the large-scale star formation process in nearby galaxies. A wealth of new multi-wavelength data provide an unprecedented view on the interplay of the interstellar medium and (young) stellar populations on a few hundred parsec scale in 100+ galaxies of all types. These observations enable us to relate detailed studies of star formation in the Milky Way to the zoo of galaxies in the distant universe. Within the disks of spiral galaxies, recent star formation strongly scales with the local amount of molecular gas (as traced by CO) with a molecular gas depletion time of ˜2 Gyr. This is consistent with the picture that stars form in giant molecular clouds that have about universal properties. Galaxy centers and star-bursting galaxies deviate from this normal trend as they show enhanced star formation per unit gas mass suggesting systematic changes in the molecular gas properties and especially the dense gas fraction. In the outer disks of spirals and in dwarf galaxies, the decreasing availability of atomic gas inevitably limits the amount of star formation, though with large local variations. The critical step for the gas-stars cycle seems therefore to be the formation of a molecular gas phase, a process that shows complex dependencies on various environmental properties and is being investigated by intensive simulational work.

  7. The void galaxy survey: Star formation properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beygu, B.; Kreckel, K.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Peletier, R.; van de Weygaert, R.; van Gorkom, J. H.; Aragon-Calvo, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    We study the star formation properties of 59 void galaxies as part of the Void Galaxy Survey (VGS). Current star formation rates are derived from H α and recent star formation rates from near-UV imaging. In addition, infrared 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 μm Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer emission is used as star formation and mass indicator. Infrared and optical colours show that the VGS sample displays a wide range of dust and metallicity properties. We combine these measurements with stellar and H I masses to measure the specific SFRs (SFR/M*) and star formation efficiencies ({SFR/{M }_H I}). We compare the star formation properties of our sample with galaxies in the more moderate density regions of the cosmic web, `the field'. We find that specific SFRs of the VGS galaxies as a function of stellar and H I mass are similar to those of the galaxies in these field regions. Their SFR α is slightly elevated than the galaxies in the field for a given total H I mass. In the global star formation picture presented by Kennicutt-Schmidt, VGS galaxies fall into the regime of low average star formation and correspondingly low H I surface density. Their mean {SFR α /{M}_{H I} and SFR α/M* are of the order of 10- 9.9 yr- 1. We conclude that while the large-scale underdense environment must play some role in galaxy formation and growth through accretion, we find that even with respect to other galaxies in the more mildly underdense regions, the increase in star formation rate is only marginal.

  8. A Galaxy Blazes With Star Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) are studying the colors of star clusters to determine the age and history of starburst galaxies, a technique somewhat similar to the process of learning the age of a tree by counting its rings. One such galaxy, Galaxy NGC 3310, a hotbed of star formation showcased in this HST photograph, is forming clusters of stars at a prodigious rate. The image shows several hundred star clusters, visible as the bright blue diffuse objects tracing the galaxy's spiral arms. Each of these star clusters represents the formation of up to about a million stars, a process that takes less than 100,000 years. In addition, hundreds of individual young stars can be seen throughout the galaxy. The star clusters become redder with age as the most massive and bluest stars exhaust their fuel and burn out. Measurements in this image of the wide range of cluster colors show their ages range between about one million and more that one hundred million years. This suggests the starburst 'turned on' more than 100 million years ago.

  9. Killing Star Formation in Satellite Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    When a dwarf galaxy falls into the halo of a large galaxy like the Milky Way, how is star formation in the dwarf affected? A collaboration led by Andrew Wetzel (California Institute of Technology and Carnegie Observatories) recently set out to answer this question using observations of nearby galaxies and simulations of the infall process. Observed Quenching: Isolated dwarf galaxies tend to be gas-rich and very actively star-forming. In contrast, most dwarf galaxies within 300 kpc of us (the Milky Way's virial radius) contain little or no cold gas, and they're quiescent: there's not much star formation happening. And this isn't just true of the Milky Way; we observe the same difference in the satellite galaxies surrounding Andromeda galaxy. Once a dwarf galaxy has moved into the gravitational realm of a larger galaxy, the satellite's gas vanishes rapidly and its star formation is shut off — but how, and on what timescale? The known dwarf galaxies in the Local Group (out to 1.6 Mpc) are plotted by their distance from their host vs. their stellar mass. Blue stars indicate actively star-forming dwarfs and red circles indicate quiescent ones. Credit: Wetzel et al. 2015. Timescales for Quiescence: To answer these questions, the authors explored the process of galaxy infall using Exploring the Local Volume in Simulations (ELVIS), a suite of cosmological N-body simulations intended to explore the Local Group. They combined the infall times from the simulations with observational knowledge of the fraction of nearby galaxies that are currently quiescent, in order to determine what timescales are required for different processes to deplete the gas in the dwarf galaxies and quench star formation. Based on their results, two types of quenching culprits are at work: gas consumption (where a galaxy simply uses up its immediate gas supply and doesn't have access to more) and gas stripping (where external forces like ram pressure remove gas from the galaxy). These processes

  10. Induced star formation in interacting galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennicutt, R. C.; Roettiger, K. A.; Keel, W. C.; Vanderhulst, J. M.; Hummel, E.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of H alpha emission line fluxes and FIR fluxes in approx. 100 interacting spirals were used to investigate the effects of close tidal interactions on the disk and nuclear star formation rates in galaxies. Two samples of interacting spirals were studied, a complete sample of close pairs, and a set of strongly perturbed systems from the Arp atlas. Both the integrated H alpha luminosities and FIR luminosities are enhanced in the interacting galaxies, indicating that the encounters indeed trigger massive star formation in many cases. The response of individual galaxies is highly variable, however. A majority of the interacting spirals exhibit normal star formation rates, while a small fraction are undergoing bursts with luminosities which are rarely, if ever, observed in noninteracting systems. Virtually all of the latter are in the Arp sample, indicating that the Arp atlas is heavily biased to the most active star forming systems.

  11. STAR FORMATION IN TWO LUMINOUS SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Ashburn, Allison; Wright, Teresa; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Rubin, Vera C.; Józsa, Gyula I. G.; Struve, Christian

    2013-10-01

    We examined star formation in two very luminous (M{sub V} = –22 to –23) Sc-type spiral galaxies, NGC 801 and UGC 2885, using ultra-deep Hα images. We combine these Hα images with UBV and Two-Micron All-Sky Survey JHK images and H I maps to explore the star formation characteristics of disk galaxies at high luminosity. Hα traces star formation in these galaxies to 4-6 disk scale lengths, but the lack of detection of Hα further out is likely due to the loss of Lyman continuum photons. Considering gravitational instabilities alone, we find that the gas and stars in the outer regions are marginally stable in an average sense, but considering dissipative gas and radial and azimuthal forcing, the outer regions are marginally unstable to forming spiral arms. Star formation is taking place in spiral arms, which are regions of locally higher gas densities. Furthermore, we have traced smooth exponential stellar disks over four magnitudes in V-band surface brightness and 4-6 disk scale lengths, in spite of a highly variable gravitational instability parameter. Thus, gravitational instability thresholds do not seem relevant to the stellar disk. One possibility for creating an exponential disk is that the molecular cloud densities and star formation rates have exponential profiles and this fact forces the stellar disk to build up such a profile. Another possibility is that the stellar disk is continuously adjusted to an exponential shape regardless of the star formation profile, for example, through global dynamical processes that scatter stars. However, such scattering processes are only known to operate in spiral systems, in which case they cannot explain the same dilemma of smooth exponential disks observed in dwarf irregular galaxies.

  12. High mass star formation in the galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoville, N. Z.; Good, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    The Galactic distributions of HI, H2, and HII regions are reviewed in order to elucidate the high mass star formation occurring in galactic spiral arms and in active galactic nuclei. Comparison of the large scale distributions of H2 gas and radio HII regions reveals that the rate of formation of OB stars depends on (n sub H2) sup 1.9 where (n sub H2) is the local mean density of H2 averaged over 300 pc scale lengths. In addition the efficiency of high mass star formation is a decreasing function of cloud mass in the range 200,000 to 3,000,000 solar mass. These results suggest that high mass star formation in the galactic disk is initiated by cloud-cloud collisions which are more frequent in the spiral arms due to orbit crowding. Cloud-cloud collisions may also be responsible for high rates of OB star formation in interacting galaxies and galactic nuclei. Based on analysis of the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) and CO data for selected GMCs in the Galaxy, the ratio L sub IR/M sub H2 can be as high as 30 solar luminosity/solar mass for GMCs associated with HII regions. The L sub IR/M sub H2 ratios and dust temperature obtained in many of the high luminosity IRAS galaxies are similar to those encountered in galactic GMCs with OB star formation. High mass star formation is therefore a viable explanation for the high infrared luminosity of these galaxies.

  13. Star Formation in the First Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromm, V.

    2016-05-01

    The formation of the first stars and galaxies mark the end of the cosmic dark ages, thus transforming the universe from its initial, pristine state into one of increasing complexity. We will review the current understanding, based on numerical simulations, of this crucial transition in early cosmic history. Specifically, the epoch of first light is predicted to be a two-stage process, where predominantly massive Population III stars form out of pure hydrogen-helium gas in small dark-matter minihalos, followed by Population II stars out of already metal-enriched material inside more massive host halos. Observations with upcoming next-generation telescopes promise to test our emerging theoretical picture of star formation in the first galaxies in ever inceasing detail.

  14. Star-forming galaxy models: Blending star formation into TREESPH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihos, J. Christopher; Hernquist, Lars

    1994-01-01

    We have incorporated star-formation algorithms into a hybrid N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics code (TREESPH) in order to describe the star forming properties of disk galaxies over timescales of a few billion years. The models employ a Schmidt law of index n approximately 1.5 to calculate star-formation rates, and explicitly include the energy and metallicity feedback into the Interstellar Medium (ISM). Modeling the newly formed stellar population is achieved through the use of hybrid SPH/young star particles which gradually convert from gaseous to collisionless particles, avoiding the computational difficulties involved in creating new particles. The models are shown to reproduce well the star-forming properties of disk galaxies, such as the morphology, rate of star formation, and evolution of the global star-formation rate and disk gas content. As an example of the technique, we model an encounter between a disk galaxy and a small companion which gives rise to a ring galaxy reminiscent of the Cartwheel (AM 0035-35). The primary galaxy in this encounter experiences two phases of star forming activity: an initial period during the expansion of the ring, and a delayed phase as shocked material in the ring falls back into the central regions.

  15. Quenching star formation in cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranu, Dan S.; Hudson, Michael J.; Balogh, Michael L.; Smith, Russell J.; Power, Chris; Oman, Kyle A.; Krane, Brad

    2014-05-01

    In order to understand the processes that quench star formation in cluster galaxies, we construct a library of subhalo orbits drawn from Λ cold dark matter cosmological N-body simulations of four rich clusters. We combine these orbits with models of star formation followed by environmental quenching, comparing model predictions with observed bulge and disc colours and stellar absorption line-strength indices of luminous cluster galaxies. Models in which the bulge stellar populations depend only on the galaxy subhalo mass while the disc is quenched upon infall are acceptable fits to the data. An exponential disc quenching time-scale of 3-3.5 Gyr is preferred. Quenching in lower mass groups prior to infall (`pre-processing') provides better fits, with similar quenching time-scales. Models with short (≲1 Gyr) quenching time-scales yield excessively steep cluster-centric gradients in disc colours and Balmer line indices, even if quenching is delayed for several Gyr. The data slightly prefer models where quenching occurs only for galaxies falling within ˜0.5r200. These results imply that the environments of rich clusters must impact star formation rates of infalling galaxies on relatively long time-scales, indicative of gentler quenching mechanisms such as slow `strangulation' over more rapid ram-pressure stripping.

  16. Tracking star formation in dwarf cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rude, Cody Millard

    The evolution of galaxies in dense environments can be affected by close encounters with neighboring galaxies and interactions with the intracluster medium (ICM). Dwarf galaxies may be especially susceptible to these effects due to their low mass. The goal of my dissertation research is to look for signs of star formation in cluster dwarf galaxies by measuring and comparing the r- and u-band luminosity functions of 15 low redshift Abell galaxy clusters using archival data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). Luminosity functions, dwarf-to-giant ratios, and blue fractions are measured in four cluster-centric annuli from stacked cluster data. To account for differences in cluster optical richness, each cluster is scaled according to r200, where r200 is the radius of a sphere, centered on the cluster, whose average density is 200 times the critical density of the universe. The outer region of the cluster sample shows an increase in the faint-end slope of the u-band luminosity function relative to the r-band, indicating star formation in dwarf galaxies. The blue fraction for dwarf galaxies steadily rises with increasing cluster-centric radii. The change in the blue fraction of giant galaxies also increases, but at a lower rate. Additionally, the inner regions of clusters ranging from 0.185 < z < 0.7 from the "Cluster Lensing and Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH)" are used to generate blue- and red-band luminosity functions, dwarf-to-giant ratios, and blue fractions. Comparisons of the inner region of the CLASH and CFHT clusters show an increase in the blue fraction of dwarf galaxies with redshift that is not present in giant galaxies.

  17. Galaxy Interactions with FIRE: Mapping Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    We utilize a suite of 75 simulations of galaxies in idealised major mergers (stellar mass ratio ~2.5:1), with a wide range of orbital parameters, to investigate the spatial extent of interaction-induced star formation. Two versions are used, one based on a Kennicult-like subgrid model (Gadget, Springel & Hernquist 2003); the other based on the new Feedback In Realistic Environments model (FIRE, Hopkins et al. 2014). Although the total star formation in galaxy encounters is generally elevated relative to isolated galaxies, we find that this elevation is a combination of intense enhancements within the central kpc and moderately suppressed activity at large galacto-centric radii. This effect appears to be stronger in the older Gadget model. Suppression is the disk is also found in the FIRE runs, but at larger scales. This is because tidal torques are weaker in the newer FIRE model, leading to a more extended nuclear starburt. Our predictions of the radial dependence of triggered star formation, and specifically the suppression of star formation beyond kpc-scales, will be testable with the next generation of integral-field spectroscopic surveys.

  18. HIERARCHICAL STAR FORMATION IN NEARBY LEGUS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Adamo, Angela; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Aloisi, Alessandra; Bright, Stacey N.; Cignoni, Michele; Lee, Janice; Sabbi, Elena; Andrews, Jennifer; Calzetti, Daniela; Annibali, Francesca; Evans, Aaron S.; Johnson, Kelsey; Gallagher III, John S.; Grebel, Eva K.; Hunter, Deidre A.; Kim, Hwihyun; Smith, Linda J.; Thilker, David; and others

    2014-05-20

    Hierarchical structure in ultraviolet images of 12 late-type LEGUS galaxies is studied by determining the numbers and fluxes of nested regions as a function of size from ∼1 to ∼200 pc, and the number as a function of flux. Two starburst dwarfs, NGC 1705 and NGC 5253, have steeper number-size and flux-size distributions than the others, indicating high fractions of the projected areas filled with star formation. Nine subregions in seven galaxies have similarly steep number-size slopes, even when the whole galaxies have shallower slopes. The results suggest that hierarchically structured star-forming regions several hundred parsecs or larger represent common unit structures. Small galaxies dominated by only a few of these units tend to be starbursts. The self-similarity of young stellar structures down to parsec scales suggests that star clusters form in the densest parts of a turbulent medium that also forms loose stellar groupings on larger scales. The presence of super star clusters in two of our starburst dwarfs would follow from the observed structure if cloud and stellar subregions more readily coalesce when self-gravity in the unit cell contributes more to the total gravitational potential.

  19. Hierarchical Star Formation in Nearby LEGUS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Adamo, Angela; Aloisi, Alessandra; Andrews, Jennifer; Annibali, Francesca; Bright, Stacey N.; Calzetti, Daniela; Cignoni, Michele; Evans, Aaron S.; Gallagher, John S., III; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Grebel, Eva K.; Hunter, Deidre A.; Johnson, Kelsey; Kim, Hwihyun; Lee, Janice; Sabbi, Elena; Smith, Linda J.; Thilker, David; Tosi, Monica; Ubeda, Leonardo

    2014-05-01

    Hierarchical structure in ultraviolet images of 12 late-type LEGUS galaxies is studied by determining the numbers and fluxes of nested regions as a function of size from ~1 to ~200 pc, and the number as a function of flux. Two starburst dwarfs, NGC 1705 and NGC 5253, have steeper number-size and flux-size distributions than the others, indicating high fractions of the projected areas filled with star formation. Nine subregions in seven galaxies have similarly steep number-size slopes, even when the whole galaxies have shallower slopes. The results suggest that hierarchically structured star-forming regions several hundred parsecs or larger represent common unit structures. Small galaxies dominated by only a few of these units tend to be starbursts. The self-similarity of young stellar structures down to parsec scales suggests that star clusters form in the densest parts of a turbulent medium that also forms loose stellar groupings on larger scales. The presence of super star clusters in two of our starburst dwarfs would follow from the observed structure if cloud and stellar subregions more readily coalesce when self-gravity in the unit cell contributes more to the total gravitational potential.

  20. Turbulence and Star Formation in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollyday, Gigja; Hunter, Deidre Ann; Little Things Team

    2015-01-01

    We are interested in understanding the nature and role of turbulence in the interstellar medium of dwarf irregular galaxies. Turbulence, resulting from a variety of processes, is a potential source for cloud formation, and thus star formation. We have undertaken an indirect analysis of turbulence via the third (skewness) and fourth (kurtosis) moments of the distribution of atomic hydrogen gas densities using the LITTLE THINGS data for a 40-count sample of nearby (<10.3 Mpc) dwarf galaxies. We followed the formulism used by Burkhart et al. (2010) in a study of the SMC. We found that there is evidence of turbulence in dwarf galaxies at a level comparable to that found in the SMC, but we have found no correlation between integrated star formation rates and integrated kurtosis values nor a clear correlation between kurtosis as a function of radius with gas surface density and star formation profiles. We are grateful for a summer internship provided by the Research Experiences for Undergraduates program at Northern Arizona University, run by Dr. Kathy Eastwood and Dr. David Trilling and funded by the National Science Foundation through grant AST-1004107.

  1. Reconstructing Star Formation Histories of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritze-v. Alvensleben, U.; Lilly, T.

    2007-12-01

    We present a methodological study to find out how far back and to what precision star formation histories of galaxies can be reconstructed from CMDs, from integrated spectra and Lick indices, and from integrated multi-band photometry. Our evolutionary synthesis models GALEV allow to describe the evolution of galaxies in terms of all three approaches and we have assumed typical observational uncertainties for each of them and then investigated to what extent and accuracy different star formation histories can be discriminated. For a field in the LMC bar region with both a deep CMD from HST observations and a trailing slit spectrum across exactly the same field of view we could test our modelling results against real data.

  2. A LAW FOR STAR FORMATION IN GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Escala, Andres

    2011-07-01

    We study the galactic-scale triggering of star formation. We find that the largest mass scale not stabilized by rotation, a well-defined quantity in a rotating system and with clear dynamical meaning, strongly correlates with the star formation rate in a wide range of galaxies. We find that this relation can be understood in terms of self-regulation toward marginal Toomre stability and the amount of turbulence allowed to sustain the system in this self-regulated quasi-stationary state. We test such an interpretation by computing the predicted star formation rates for a galactic interstellar medium characterized by a lognormal probability distribution function and find good agreement with the observed relation.

  3. A GALAXY BLAZES WITH STAR FORMATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Most galaxies form new stars at a fairly slow rate, but members of a rare class known as 'starburst' galaxies blaze with extremely active star formation. Scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope are perfecting a technique to determine the history of starburst activity in galaxies by using the colors of star clusters. Measuring the clusters' colors yields information about stellar temperatures. Since young stars are blue, and older stars redder, the colors can be related to the ages, somewhat similar to counting the rings in a fallen tree trunk in order to determine the tree's age. The galaxy NGC 3310 is forming clusters of new stars at a prodigious rate. Astronomer Gerhardt Meurer of The Johns Hopkins University leads a team of collaborators who are studying several starburst galaxies, including NGC 3310, which is showcased in this month's Hubble Heritage image. There are several hundred star clusters in NGC 3310, visible in the Heritage image as the bright blue diffuse objects that trace the galaxy's spiral arms. Each of these star clusters represents the formation of up to about a million stars, a process that takes less than 100,000 years. In addition, hundreds of individual young, luminous stars can be seen throughout the galaxy. Once formed, the star clusters become redder with age as the most massive and bluest stars exhaust their fuel and burn out. Measurements in this image of the wide range of cluster colors show that they have ages ranging from about one million up to more than one hundred million years. This suggests that the starburst 'turned on' over 100 million years ago. It may have been triggered when a companion galaxy collided with NGC 3310. These observations may change astronomers' view of starbursts. Starbursts were once thought to be brief episodes, resulting from catastrophic events like a galactic collision. However, the wide range of cluster ages in NGC 3310 suggests that the starbursting can continue for an extended interval, once

  4. Hierarchical Star Formation in LEGUS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Debra M.; Elmegreen, Bruce

    2014-06-01

    Star formation generally follows a hierarchical distribution in galaxies from kpc scales in giant star complexes down to sub-pc scales in embedded clusters. This hierarchy corresponds to a power law distribution function for the number of star forming regions as a function of size or luminosity. Using the Legacy ExtraGalactic Ultraviolet Survey (LEGUS), we examine six galaxies, NGC 1566, NGC 1705, NGC 2500, NGC 5253, NGC 5477, and IC 4247, which span types from grand design and flocculent spirals to irregulars and starburst irregulars. Power law size and luminosity distributions were measured from Gaussian-blurred images in the NUV and UV using SExtractor. Slopes ranged from -1 to -1.8, with the steepest slopes corresponding to the starburst galaxies. The slopes did not vary from the NUV to the UV. The fraction of light contained within the largest scales ranged from 85 to 95 percent, independent of galaxy type. We acknowledge support from grant HST-GO-13364.

  5. Star formation and substructure in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Seth A.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Wegner, Gary A.; Einasto, Maret; Vennik, Jaan

    2014-03-10

    We investigate the relationship between star formation (SF) and substructure in a sample of 107 nearby galaxy clusters using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Several past studies of individual galaxy clusters have suggested that cluster mergers enhance cluster SF, while others find no such relationship. The SF fraction in multi-component clusters (0.228 ± 0.007) is higher than that in single-component clusters (0.175 ± 0.016) for galaxies with M{sub r}{sup 0.1}<−20.5. In both single- and multi-component clusters, the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with clustercentric distance and decreases with local galaxy number density, and multi-component clusters show a higher SF fraction than single-component clusters at almost all clustercentric distances and local densities. Comparing the SF fraction in individual clusters to several statistical measures of substructure, we find weak, but in most cases significant at greater than 2σ, correlations between substructure and SF fraction. These results could indicate that cluster mergers may cause weak but significant SF enhancement in clusters, or unrelaxed clusters exhibit slightly stronger SF due to their less evolved states relative to relaxed clusters.

  6. Star Formation from Galaxies to Globules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2002-09-01

    result from turbulence compression in a self-gravitating gas, in which case their mass fraction can be estimated from the density distribution function that results from turbulence. For Wada & Norman's lognormal function that arises in whole-galaxy simulations, the theoretically predicted mass fraction of star-forming material is the same as that observed directly from the galactic Schmidt law and is ~10-4. The unified view explains how independent star formation processes can combine into the empirical laws while preserving the fractal nature of interstellar gas and the pressurized, wind-swept appearance of most small-scale clouds. Likely variations in the relative roles of these processes from region to region should not affect the large-scale average star formation rate. Self-regulation by spiral instabilities and star formation ensures that most regions are in a marginally stable state in which turbulence limits the mass available for star formation and the overall rate is independent of the nature of the energy sources. In this sense, star formation is saturated to its largest possible value given the fractal nature of the interstellar medium. Invited paper, based on the Heineman Prize lecture presented at the 199th meeting of the American Astronomical Society in 2002 January.

  7. Star formation enhancement characteristics in interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaragoza-Cardiel, J.; Beckman, J. E.; Font, J.; Camps-Fariña, A.; García-Lorenzo, B.; Erroz-Ferrer, S.

    2015-02-01

    We have observed 12 interacting galaxies using the Fabry-Perot interferometer GHαFaS (Galaxy Hα Fabry-Perot system) on the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope (La Palma). We have extracted the physical properties (sizes, Hα luminosity and velocity dispersion) of 236 HII regions for the full sample of interacting galaxies. We have derived the physical properties of 664 HII regions for a sample of 28 isolated galaxies observed with the same instrument in order to compare both populations of HII regions, finding that there are brighter and denser star forming regions in the interacting galaxies compared with the isolated galaxies sample.

  8. GAS, STARS, AND STAR FORMATION IN ALFALFA DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shan; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Brinchmann, Jarle; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Neff, Susan G. E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu E-mail: jarle@strw.leidenuniv.nl E-mail: susan.g.neff@nasa.gov

    2012-06-15

    We examine the global properties of the stellar and H I components of 229 low H I mass dwarf galaxies extracted from the ALFALFA survey, including a complete sample of 176 galaxies with H I masses <10{sup 7.7} M{sub Sun} and H I line widths <80 km s{sup -1}. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data are combined with photometric properties derived from Galaxy Evolution Explorer to derive stellar masses (M{sub *}) and star formation rates (SFRs) by fitting their UV-optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). In optical images, many of the ALFALFA dwarfs are faint and of low surface brightness; only 56% of those within the SDSS footprint have a counterpart in the SDSS spectroscopic survey. A large fraction of the dwarfs have high specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and estimates of their SFRs and M{sub *} obtained by SED fitting are systematically smaller than ones derived via standard formulae assuming a constant SFR. The increased dispersion of the SSFR distribution at M{sub *} {approx}< 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} is driven by a set of dwarf galaxies that have low gas fractions and SSFRs; some of these are dE/dSphs in the Virgo Cluster. The imposition of an upper H I mass limit yields the selection of a sample with lower gas fractions for their M{sub *} than found for the overall ALFALFA population. Many of the ALFALFA dwarfs, particularly the Virgo members, have H I depletion timescales shorter than a Hubble time. An examination of the dwarf galaxies within the full ALFALFA population in the context of global star formation (SF) laws is consistent with the general assumptions that gas-rich galaxies have lower SF efficiencies than do optically selected populations and that H I disks are more extended than stellar ones.

  9. Gas, Stars, and Star Formation in Alfalfa Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Shan; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Brinchmann, Jarle; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Neff, Susan G.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the global properties of the stellar and Hi components of 229 low H i mass dwarf galaxies extracted from the ALFALFA survey, including a complete sample of 176 galaxies with H i masses <10(sup 7.7) solar mass and Hi line widths <80 kilometers per second. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data are combined with photometric properties derived from Galaxy Evolution Explorer to derive stellar masses (M*) and star formation rates (SFRs) by fitting their UV-optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). In optical images, many of the ALFALFA dwarfs are faint and of low surface brightness; only 56% of those within the SDSS footprint have a counterpart in the SDSS spectroscopic survey. A large fraction of the dwarfs have high specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and estimates of their SFRs and M* obtained by SED fitting are systematically smaller than ones derived via standard formulae assuming a constant SFR. The increased dispersion of the SSFR distribution at M* approximately less than10(exp 8)M(sub 0) is driven by a set of dwarf galaxies that have low gas fractions and SSFRs; some of these are dE/dSphs in the Virgo Cluster. The imposition of an upper Hi mass limit yields the selection of a sample with lower gas fractions for their M* than found for the overall ALFALFA population. Many of the ALFALFA dwarfs, particularly the Virgo members, have H i depletion timescales shorter than a Hubble time. An examination of the dwarf galaxies within the full ALFALFA population in the context of global star formation (SF) laws is consistent with the general assumptions that gas-rich galaxies have lower SF efficiencies than do optically selected populations and that Hi disks are more extended than stellar ones.

  10. Star Formation in Dwarf Galaxies: Life in a Rough Neighborhood

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, S

    2003-10-16

    Star formation within dwarf galaxies is governed by several factors. Many of these factors are external, including ram-pressure stripping, tidal stripping, and heating by external UV radiation. The latter, in particular, may prevent star formation in the smallest systems. Internal factors include negative feedback in the form of UV radiation, winds and supernovae from massive stars. These act to reduce the star formation efficiency within dwarf systems, which may, in turn, solve several theoretical and observational problems associated with galaxy formation. In this contribution, we discuss our recent work being done to examine the importance of the many factors in the evolution of dwarf galaxies.

  11. Inclination Dependence of Estimated Galaxy Masses and Star Formation Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Betsy; Maller, Ariyeh; McKernan, Barry; Ford, Saavik

    2016-01-01

    We examine the inclination dependence of inferred star formation rates and galaxy mass estimates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey by combining the disk/bulge de-convolved catalog of Simard et al 2011 with stellar mass estimates catalog of Mendel et al 2014 and star formation rates measured from spectra by Brinchmann et al 2004. We know that optical star formation indicators are reddened by dust, but calculated star formation rates and stellar mass estimates should account for this. However, we find that face-on galaxies have a higher calculated average star formation rates than edge-on galaxies. We also find edge-on galaxies have ,on average, slightly smaller but similar estimated masses to face-on galaxies, suggesting that there are issues with the applied dust corrections for both models.

  12. Star Formation and Gas Accretion in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Kijeong; van der Hulst, J. M.

    2016-08-01

    In order to quantify the relationship between gas accretion and star formation, we analyse a sample of 29 nearby galaxies from the WHISP survey which contains galaxies with and without evidence for recent gas accretion. We compare combined radial profiles of FUV (GALEX) and IR 24 μm (Spitzer) characterizing distributions of recent star formation with radial profiles of CO (IRAM, BIMA, or CARMA) and H I (WSRT) tracing molecular and atomic gas contents to examine star formation efficiencies in symmetric (quiescent), asymmetric (accreting), and interacting (tidally disturbed) galaxies. In addition, we investigate the relationship between star formation rate and H I in the outer discs for the three groups of galaxies. We confirm the general relationship between gas surface density and star formation surface density, but do not find a significant difference between the three groups of galaxies.

  13. TESTING HOMOGENEITY WITH GALAXY STAR FORMATION HISTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyle, Ben; Jimenez, Raul; Tojeiro, Rita; Maartens, Roy; Heavens, Alan; Clarkson, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Observationally confirming spatial homogeneity on sufficiently large cosmological scales is of importance to test one of the underpinning assumptions of cosmology, and is also imperative for correctly interpreting dark energy. A challenging aspect of this is that homogeneity must be probed inside our past light cone, while observations take place on the light cone. The star formation history (SFH) in the galaxy fossil record provides a novel way to do this. We calculate the SFH of stacked luminous red galaxy (LRG) spectra obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We divide the LRG sample into 12 equal-area contiguous sky patches and 10 redshift slices (0.2 < z < 0.5), which correspond to 120 blocks of volume {approx}0.04 Gpc{sup 3}. Using the SFH in a time period that samples the history of the universe between look-back times 11.5 and 13.4 Gyr as a proxy for homogeneity, we calculate the posterior distribution for the excess large-scale variance due to inhomogeneity, and find that the most likely solution is no extra variance at all. At 95% credibility, there is no evidence of deviations larger than 5.8%.

  14. Star formation in bulgeless late type spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, M.; Ramya, S.; Sengupta, C.; Mishra, K.

    We present radio and follow-up optical observations of a sample of bulgeless late type spiral galaxies. We searched for signs of nuclear activity and disk star formation in the sample galaxies. Interaction induced star formation can often trigger bulge formation. We found significant radio emission associated with star formation in two sample galaxies, NGC3445 and NGC4027, both of which are tidally interacting with nearby companions. For the others, the star formation was either absent or limited to only localized regions in the disk. Both galaxies also have oval bars that are possibly pseudobulges that may later evolve into bulges. We did follow up optical Hα imaging and nuclear spectroscopy of NGC3445 and NGC4027 using the Himalayan Chandra Telescope (HCT). The Hα emission is mainly associated with strong spiral arms that have been triggered by the tidal interact1ions. The nuclear spectra of both galaxies indicate ongoing nuclear star formation but do not show signs of AGN activity. We thus conclude that star formation in bulgeless galaxies is generally low but is enhanced when the galaxies interact with nearby companions; this activity may ultimately lead to the formation of bulges in these galaxies.

  15. GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano

    2012-08-20

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

  16. The Star Formation Properties of Void Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorman, Crystal; Vogeley, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    We measure the star formation properties of two large samples of galaxies from the SDSS in large-scale cosmic voids on time scales of 10 Myr and 100 Myr, using Ha emission line strengths and GALEX FUV fluxes, respectively. The first sample consists of 109,818 optically selected galaxies. We find that void galaxies in this sample have higher specific star formation rates (SSFRs; star formation rates per unit stellar mass) than similar stellar mass galaxies in denser regions. The second sample is a subset of the optically selected sample containing 8070 galaxies with reliable S/N HI detections from ALFALFA. For the HI detected sample, SSFRs are similar regardless of large-scale environment. Investigating only the HI detected dwarf galaxies reveals a trend towards higher SSFRs in voids. Furthermore, we estimate the star formation rate per unit HI mass, known as the star formation efficiency (SFE) of a galaxy, as a function of environment. For the overall HI detected population, we notice no environmental dependence. Limiting the sample to dwarf galaxies again reveals a trend towards higher SFEs in voids. These results suggest that void environments provide a nurturing environment for dwarf galaxy evolution.

  17. The star formation histories of Hickson compact group galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plauchu-Frayn, I.; Del Olmo, A.; Coziol, R.; Torres-Papaqui, J. P.

    2012-10-01

    Aims: We study the star formation fistory (SFH) of 210 galaxy members of 55 Hickson compact groups (HCG) and 309 galaxies from the Catalog of Isolated Galaxies (CIG). The SFH traces the variation of star formation over the lifetime of a galaxy, and consequently yields a snapshot picture of its formation. Comparing the SFHs in these extremes in galaxy density allows us to determine the main effects of compact groups (CG) on the formation of galaxies. Methods: We fit our spectra using the spectral synthesis code STARLIGHT and obtained the stellar population contents and mean stellar ages of HCG and CIG galaxies in three different morphological classes: early-type galaxies (EtG), early-type spirals (EtS), and late-type spirals (LtS). Results: We find that EtG and EtS galaxies in HCG show higher contents of old and intermediate stellar populations as well as an important deficit of the young stellar population, which clearly implies an older average stellar age in early galaxies in HCG. For LtS galaxies we find similar mean values for the stellar content and age in the two samples. However, we note that LtS can be split into two subclasses, namely old and young LtS. In HCG we find a higher fraction of young LtS than in the CIG sample, in addition, most of these galaxies belong to groups in which most of the galaxies are also young and actively forming stars. The specific star formation rate (SSFR) of spiral galaxies in the two samples differ. The EtS in HCG show lower SSFR values, while LtS peak at higher values compared with their counterparts in isolation. We also measured the shorter star formation time scale (SFTS) in HCG galaxies, which indicates that they have a shorter star formation activity than CIG galaxies. We take these observations as evidence that galaxies in CG have evolved more rapidly than galaxies in isolation, regardless of their morphology. Our observations are consistent with the hierarchical galaxy formation model, which states that CGs are

  18. Star Formation in the Zw1400 + 09 Poor Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, Alyssa

    2015-04-01

    Galaxies in dense clusters are known to have less gas and star formation, likely due to environmental interactions within the clusters. Less is known about the properties of galaxies in lower density poor clusters and group environments. In this project, star formation properties of galaxies in the Zwicky 1400 + 09 (NRGb282, NGC 5416) poor cluster were found by reducing and analyzing narrowband H-alpha and broadband R images taken with the WIYN 0.9m MOSAIC camera at Kitt Peak National Observatory. Surface photometry and total star formation rates and extents are presented for a sample of galaxies within the cluster. This work is supported by NSF AST-0725267 and AST-1211005 and is a part of an Undergraduate ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) Team study of the star forming and gas properties of 16 nearby groups of galaxies. ALFALFA Consortium.

  19. Environmentally driven star formation during a super galaxy group merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroe, Jonathan; Tran, Kim-Vy; Gonzalez, Anthony H.

    2016-01-01

    We find evidence for outside-in growth of galaxies within a merging super galaxy group at a redshift of z~0.37. We utilize Hubble Space Telescope imaging in rest-frame UV and visual to measure color gradients across the super group and internally within 138 individual galaxies that are spectroscopically confirmed members. The group members show enhanced star formation at intermediate environmental densities. The high resolution imaging shows that the group galaxies have bluer disks, i.e. most of the new stars are forming in the disk which supports outside-in growth. These disk-dominated galaxies will likely fade to become S0 members.

  20. Star formation rates of spiral galaxies in the Cosmic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpaslan, Mehmet; Marcum, Pamela M.; Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA)

    2016-01-01

    We look for shifts in stellar mass and star formation rate along filaments in the cosmic web by examining the stellar masses and UV-derived star formation rates of 1,799 ungrouped and unpaired spiral galaxies from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey that reside in filaments. We devise multiple distance metrics to characterise the complex geometry of filaments, and find that galaxies closer to the orthogonal core of a filament have higher stellar masses than their counterparts near the periphery of filaments, on the edges of voids. We also find that these peripheral galaxies have higher specific star formations at a given mass. Our results suggest a model in which gas accretion from voids onto filaments is primarily in an orthogonal direction. While the star formation rates of spiral galaxies in filaments are susceptible to their locations, we find that the global star formation rates of galaxies in different large scale environments are similar to each other. The primary discriminant in star formation rates is therefore the stellar mass of each spiral galaxy, as opposed to its large scale environment.

  1. Galaxies on FIRE: Stellar Feedback Explains Inefficient Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.

    2014-06-01

    Many of the most fundamental unsolved questions in star and galaxy formation revolve around star formation and "feedback" from both massive stars and accretion onto super-massive black holes. I'll present new simulations which attempt to realistically model the diverse physics of the interstellar medium, star formation, and feedback from stellar radiation pressure, supernovae, stellar winds, and photo-ionization. These mechanisms lead to 'self-regulated' galaxy and star formation, in which global correlations such as the Schmidt-Kennicutt law and the global inefficiency of star formation -- the stellar mass function -- emerge naturally. Within galaxies, feedback regulates the structure of the interstellar medium, and many observed properties of the ISM, star formation, and galaxies can be understood as a fundamental consequence of super-sonic turbulence in a rapidly cooling, self-gravitating medium. But feedback also produces galactic super-winds that can dramatically alter the cosmological evolution of galaxies, their behavior in galaxy mergers, and structure of the inter-galactic medium: these winds depend non-linearly on multiple feedback mechanisms in a way that explains why they have been so difficult to model in previous "sub-grid" approaches.

  2. Star formation rates and abundance gradients in disk galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Silk, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    Analytic models for the evolution of disk galaxies are presented, placing special emphasis on the radial properties. These models are straightforward extensions of the original Schmidt (1959, 1963) models, with a dependence of star formation rate on gas density. The models provide successful descriptions of several measures of galactic disk evolution, including solar neighborhood chemical evolution, the presence and amplitude of metallicity and color gradients in disk galaxies, and the global rates of star formation in disk galaxies, and aid in the understanding of the apparent connection between young and old stellar populations in spiral galaxies.

  3. Recent Galaxy Mergers and Residual Star Formation of Red Sequence Galaxies in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Ree, Chang H.; Jaffé, Yara; Demarco, Ricardo; Treister, Ezequiel

    2016-08-01

    This study explored the Galaxy Evolution Explorer ultraviolet (UV) properties of optical red sequence galaxies in four rich Abell clusters at z≤slant 0.1. In particular, we tried to find a hint of merger-induced recent star formation (RSF) in red sequence galaxies. Using the NUV - r\\prime colors of the galaxies, RSF fractions were derived based on various criteria for post-merger galaxies and normal galaxies. Following k-correction, about 36% of the post-merger galaxies were classified as RSF galaxies with a conservative criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5), and that number was doubled (∼72%) when using a generous criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5.4). The trend was the same when we restricted the sample to galaxies within 0.5 × R 200. Post-merger galaxies with strong UV emission showed more violent, asymmetric features in the deep optical images. The RSF fractions did not show any trend along the clustocentric distance within R 200. We performed a Dressler–Shectman test to check whether the RSF galaxies had any correlation with the substructures in the galaxy clusters. Within R 200 of each cluster, the RSF galaxies did not appear to be preferentially related to the clusters’ substructures. Our results suggested that only 30% of RSF red sequence galaxies show morphological hints of recent galaxy mergers. This implies that internal processes (e.g., stellar mass loss or hot gas cooling) for the supply of cold gas to early-type galaxies may play a significant role in the residual star formation of early-type galaxies at a recent epoch.

  4. Recent Galaxy Mergers and Residual Star Formation of Red Sequence Galaxies in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Ree, Chang H.; Jaffé, Yara; Demarco, Ricardo; Treister, Ezequiel

    2016-08-01

    This study explored the Galaxy Evolution Explorer ultraviolet (UV) properties of optical red sequence galaxies in four rich Abell clusters at z≤slant 0.1. In particular, we tried to find a hint of merger-induced recent star formation (RSF) in red sequence galaxies. Using the NUV - r\\prime colors of the galaxies, RSF fractions were derived based on various criteria for post-merger galaxies and normal galaxies. Following k-correction, about 36% of the post-merger galaxies were classified as RSF galaxies with a conservative criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5), and that number was doubled (˜72%) when using a generous criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5.4). The trend was the same when we restricted the sample to galaxies within 0.5 × R 200. Post-merger galaxies with strong UV emission showed more violent, asymmetric features in the deep optical images. The RSF fractions did not show any trend along the clustocentric distance within R 200. We performed a Dressler–Shectman test to check whether the RSF galaxies had any correlation with the substructures in the galaxy clusters. Within R 200 of each cluster, the RSF galaxies did not appear to be preferentially related to the clusters’ substructures. Our results suggested that only 30% of RSF red sequence galaxies show morphological hints of recent galaxy mergers. This implies that internal processes (e.g., stellar mass loss or hot gas cooling) for the supply of cold gas to early-type galaxies may play a significant role in the residual star formation of early-type galaxies at a recent epoch.

  5. Star Formation in The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, A.; Bigiel, F.; Walter, F.; Brinks, E.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Madore, B.

    2008-05-01

    We combine The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS) with our new survey of CO at the IRAM~30m, the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey, and the GALEX Nearby Galaxies Survey to assemble an atlas of "star formation in context" for 24 nearby galaxies. This includes kinematics and estimates of the surface densities of atomic gas, molecular gas, stellar mass, and star formation rate. We use these data to test theories and recipes of star formation on galactic scales. Here we present two basic results for spiral galaxies. First, molecular gas and star formation rate surface density (SFRSD) are well related by a linear relation across most of our sample while atomic gas and SFRSD are essentially uncorrelated. We interpret this as evidence that star formation is proceeding in a more or less universal population of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) across most of the area we survey. Second, while the star formation efficiency (SFE), i.e., the star formation per unit neutral gas, is nearly constant where the ISM is mostly molecular, it drops steadily with increasing galactocentric radius where the ISM is mostly atomic. This drop is well-defined and common to most galaxies. We interpret this as a decreasing efficiency of GMC formation with changing local conditions. At intermediate galactocentric radii, the observed SFE is roughly consistent with several expectations for GMC formation: either formation occuring over the free fall time in the disk or the equilibrium molecular fraction being set by the gas pressure. If GMC formation occurs over a dynamical timescale, a star formation threshold must come into play in the outer disk to match the observed SFE.

  6. A WISE VIEW OF STAR FORMATION IN LOCAL GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sun Mi; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Stern, Daniel; Stanford, Spencer A.; Brodwin, Mark; Jarrett, Thomas

    2011-12-10

    We present results from a systematic study of star formation in local galaxy clusters using 22 {mu}m data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The 69 systems in our sample are drawn from the Cluster Infall Regions Survey, and all have robust mass determinations. The all-sky WISE data enable us to quantify the amount of star formation, as traced by 22 {mu}m, as a function of radius well beyond R{sub 200}, and investigate the dependence of total star formation rate upon cluster mass. We find that the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with cluster radius but remains below the field value even at 3R{sub 200}. We also find that there is no strong correlation between the mass-normalized total specific star formation rate and cluster mass, indicating that the mass of the host cluster does not strongly influence the total star formation rate of cluster members.

  7. ON THE LACK OF EVOLUTION IN GALAXY STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY

    SciTech Connect

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Conroy, Charlie

    2013-01-10

    Using reconstructed galaxy star formation histories, we calculate the instantaneous efficiency of galaxy star formation (i.e., the star formation rate divided by the baryon accretion rate) from z = 8 to the present day. This efficiency exhibits a clear peak near a characteristic halo mass of 10{sup 11.7} M{sub Sun }, which coincides with longstanding theoretical predictions for the mass scale relevant to virial shock heating of accreted gas. Above the characteristic halo mass, the efficiency falls off as the mass to the minus four-thirds power; below the characteristic mass, the efficiency falls off at an average scaling of mass to the two-thirds power. By comparison, the shape and normalization of the efficiency change very little since z = 4. We show that a time-independent star formation efficiency simply explains the shape of the cosmic star formation rate since z = 4 in terms of dark matter accretion rates. The rise in the cosmic star formation from early times until z = 2 is especially sensitive to galaxy formation efficiency. The mass dependence of the efficiency strongly limits where most star formation occurs, with the result that two-thirds of all star formation has occurred inside halos within a factor of three of the characteristic mass, a range that includes the mass of the Milky Way.

  8. New View of Distant Galaxy Reveals Furious Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-12-01

    A furious rate of star formation discovered in a distant galaxy shows that galaxies in the early Universe developed either much faster or in a different way from what astronomers have thought. "This galaxy is forming stars at an incredible rate," said Wei-Hao Wang, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico. The galaxy, Wang said, is forming the equivalent of 4,000 Suns a year. This is a thousand times more violent than our own Milky Way Galaxy. Location of Distant Galaxy Visible-light, left (from HST) and Infrared, right, (from Spitzer) Images: Circles indicate location of GOODS 850-5. CREDIT: Wang et al., STScI, Spitzer, NASA, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for high-resolution file (1 MB) The galaxy, called GOODS 850-5, is 12 billion light-years from Earth, and thus is seen as it was only about 1.5 billion years after the Big Bang. Wang and his colleagues observed it using the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Submillimeter Array (SMA) on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. Young stars in the galaxy were enshrouded in dust that was heated by the stars and radiated infrared light strongly. Because of the galaxy's great distance from Earth, the infrared light waves have been stretched out to submillimeter-length radio waves, which are seen by the SMA. The waves were stretched or "redshifted," as astronomers say, by the ongoing expansion of the Universe. "This evidence for prolific star formation is hidden by the dust from visible-light telescopes," Wang explained. The dust, in turn, was formed from heavy elements that had to be built up in the cores of earlier stars. This indicates, Wang said, that significant numbers of stars already had formed, then spewed those heavy elements into interstellar space through supernova explosions and stellar winds. "Seeing the radiation from this heated dust revealed star formation we could have found in no other way," Wang said. Similar dusty galaxies in the early Universe may contain most of the

  9. Connecting Galaxies, Halos, and Star Formation Rates Across Cosmic Time

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2008-06-02

    A simple, observationally-motivated model is presented for understanding how halo masses, galaxy stellar masses, and star formation rates are related, and how these relations evolve with time. The relation between halo mass and galaxy stellar mass is determined by matching the observed spatial abundance of galaxies to the expected spatial abundance of halos at multiple epochs--i.e. more massive galaxies are assigned to more massive halos at each epoch. This 'abundance matching' technique has been shown previously to reproduce the observed luminosity- and scale-dependence of galaxy clustering over a range of epochs. Halos at different epochs are connected by halo mass accretion histories estimated from N-body simulations. The halo-galaxy connection at fixed epochs in conjunction with the connection between halos across time provides a connection between observed galaxies across time. With approximations for the impact of merging and accretion on the growth of galaxies, one can then directly infer the star formation histories of galaxies as a function of stellar and halo mass. This model is tuned to match both the observed evolution of the stellar mass function and the normalization of the observed star formation rate--stellar mass relation to z {approx} 1. The data demands, for example, that the star formation rate density is dominated by galaxies with M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 10.0-10.5} M{sub {circle_dot}} from 0 < z < 1, and that such galaxies over these epochs reside in halos with M{sub vir} {approx} 10{sup 11.5-12.5} M{sub {circle_dot}}. The star formation rate--halo mass relation is approximately Gaussian over the range 0 < z < 1 with a mildly evolving mean and normalization. This model is then used to shed light on a number of issues, including (1) a clarification of 'downsizing', (2) the lack of a sharp characteristic halo mass at which star formation is truncated, and (3) the dominance of star formation over merging to the stellar build-up of galaxies

  10. Inefficient star formation in extremely metal poor galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yong; Armus, Lee; Helou, George; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Gao, Yu; Wang, Junzhi; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Gu, Qiusheng

    2014-10-01

    The first galaxies contain stars born out of gas with few or no `metals' (that is, elements heavier than helium). The lack of metals is expected to inhibit efficient gas cooling and star formation, but this effect has yet to be observed in galaxies with an oxygen abundance (relative to hydrogen) below a tenth of that of the Sun. Extremely metal poor nearby galaxies may be our best local laboratories for studying in detail the conditions that prevailed in low metallicity galaxies at early epochs. Carbon monoxide emission is unreliable as a tracer of gas at low metallicities, and while dust has been used to trace gas in low-metallicity galaxies, low spatial resolution in the far-infrared has typically led to large uncertainties. Here we report spatially resolved infrared observations of two galaxies with oxygen abundances below ten per cent of the solar value, and show that stars formed very inefficiently in seven star-forming clumps in these galaxies. The efficiencies are less than a tenth of those found in normal, metal rich galaxies today, suggesting that star formation may have been very inefficient in the early Universe.

  11. Inefficient star formation in extremely metal poor galaxies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yong; Armus, Lee; Helou, George; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Gao, Yu; Wang, Junzhi; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Gu, Qiusheng

    2014-10-16

    The first galaxies contain stars born out of gas with few or no 'metals' (that is, elements heavier than helium). The lack of metals is expected to inhibit efficient gas cooling and star formation, but this effect has yet to be observed in galaxies with an oxygen abundance (relative to hydrogen) below a tenth of that of the Sun. Extremely metal poor nearby galaxies may be our best local laboratories for studying in detail the conditions that prevailed in low metallicity galaxies at early epochs. Carbon monoxide emission is unreliable as a tracer of gas at low metallicities, and while dust has been used to trace gas in low-metallicity galaxies, low spatial resolution in the far-infrared has typically led to large uncertainties. Here we report spatially resolved infrared observations of two galaxies with oxygen abundances below ten per cent of the solar value, and show that stars formed very inefficiently in seven star-forming clumps in these galaxies. The efficiencies are less than a tenth of those found in normal, metal rich galaxies today, suggesting that star formation may have been very inefficient in the early Universe. PMID:25318522

  12. Inhibition of star formation in Sa galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Pompea, S.M.; Rieke, G.H. )

    1989-07-01

    Only 4 percent of Sas in the Revised Shapley-Ames Catalog with B(T) less than 12 have an infrared luminosity greater than 10 to the 10th solar. This proportion is about one-sixth of the corresponding one for Sbs and Scs. Although the infrared luminosities of most Sa galaxies are dominated by disk emission, the same trend appears in the incidence of nuclear starbursts. IRAS measurements indicate that no more than three Sas out of the entire RSA sample of 166 galaxies have nuclear starbursts that cannot be associated with interactions or active nuclei. Plots of H I fluxes do not strongly correlate with infrared fluxes. Similarly, for at least the infrared selected Sas, the trend of IR flux with CO flux is similar to that of later type spiral galaxies. This would imply that molecular cloud formation is inhibited in Sas, leading to the lack of infrared activity. 38 refs.

  13. ORIGIN OF THE GALAXY MASS-METALLICITY-STAR FORMATION RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Harwit, Martin; Brisbin, Drew

    2015-02-20

    We describe an equilibrium model that links the metallicity of low-redshift galaxies to stellar evolution models. It enables the testing of different stellar initial mass functions and metal yields against observed galaxy metallicities. We show that the metallicities of more than 80,000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies in the low-redshift range 0.07 ≤ z ≤ 0.3 considerably constrain stellar evolution models that simultaneously relate galaxy stellar mass, metallicity, and star formation rates to the infall rate of low-metallicity extragalactic gas and outflow of enriched matter. A feature of our model is that it encompasses both the active star forming phases of a galaxy and epochs during which the same galaxy may lie fallow. We show that the galaxy mass-metallicity-star formation relation can be traced to infall of extragalactic gas mixing with native gas from host galaxies to form stars of observed metallicities, the most massive of which eject oxygen into extragalactic space. Most consequential among our findings is that, on average, extragalactic infall accounts for one half of the gas required for star formation, a ratio that is remarkably constant across galaxies with stellar masses ranging at least from M* = 2 × 10{sup 9} to 6 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}. This leads us to propose that star formation is initiated when extragalactic infall roughly doubles the mass of marginally stable interstellar clouds. The processes described may also account quantitatively for the metallicity of extragalactic space, though to check this the fraction of extragalactic baryons will need to be more firmly established.

  14. Bursts of star formation in computer simulations of dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Comins, N.F.

    1984-09-01

    A three-dimensional Stochastic Self-Propagating Star Formation (SSPSF) model of compact galacies is presented. Two phases of gas, active and inactive, are present, and permanent depletion of gas in the form of long lived, low mass stars and remnants occurs. Similarly, global infall of gas from a galactic halo or through galactic cannibalism is permitted. We base our parameters on the observed properties of the compact blue galaxy I Zw 36. Our results are that bursts of star formation occur much more frequently in these runs than continuous nonbursting star formation, suggesting that the blue compact galaxies are probably undergoing bursts rather than continuous, nonbursting low-level star formation activity.

  15. CONNECTING GALAXIES, HALOS, AND STAR FORMATION RATES ACROSS COSMIC TIME

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2009-05-01

    A simple, observationally motivated model is presented for understanding how halo masses, galaxy stellar masses, and star formation rates are related, and how these relations evolve with time. The relation between halo mass and galaxy stellar mass is determined by matching the observed spatial abundance of galaxies to the expected spatial abundance of halos at multiple epochs, i.e., more massive galaxies are assigned to more massive halos at each epoch. This 'abundance matching' technique has been shown previously to reproduce the observed luminosity and scale dependence of galaxy clustering over a range of epochs. Halos at different epochs are connected by halo mass accretion histories estimated from N-body simulations. The halo-galaxy connection at fixed epochs in conjunction with the connection between halos across time provides a connection between observed galaxies across time. With approximations for the impact of merging and accretion on the growth of galaxies, one can then directly infer the star formation histories of galaxies as a function of stellar and halo mass. This model is tuned to match both the observed evolution of the stellar mass function and the normalization of the observed star formation rate (SFR)-stellar mass relation to z {approx} 1. The data demands, for example, that the star formation rate density is dominated by galaxies with M {sub star} {approx} 10{sup 10.0-10.5} M {sub sun} from 0 < z < 1, and that such galaxies over these epochs reside in halos with M {sub vir} {approx} 10{sup 11.5-12.5} M {sub sun}. The SFR-halo mass relation is approximately Gaussian over the range 0 < z < 1 with a mildly evolving mean and normalization. This model is then used to shed light on a number of issues, including (1) a clarification of {sup d}ownsizing{sup ,} (2) the lack of a sharp characteristic halo mass at which star formation is truncated, and (3) the dominance of star formation over merging to the stellar buildup of galaxies with M {sub star

  16. FUEL EFFICIENT GALAXIES: SUSTAINING STAR FORMATION WITH STELLAR MASS LOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Samuel N.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2011-06-10

    We examine the importance of secular stellar mass loss for fueling ongoing star formation in disk galaxies during the late stages of their evolution. For a galaxy of a given stellar mass, we calculate the total mass loss rate of its entire stellar population using star formation histories derived from the observed evolution of the M{sub *}-star formation rate (SFR) relation, along with the predictions of standard stellar evolution models for stellar mass loss for a variety of initial stellar mass functions. Our model shows that recycled gas from stellar mass loss can provide most or all of the fuel required to sustain the current level of star formation in late-type galaxies. Stellar mass loss can therefore remove the tension between the low gas infall rates that are derived from observations and the relatively rapid star formation occurring in disk galaxies. For galaxies where cold gas infall rates have been estimated, we demonstrate explicitly that stellar mass loss can account for most of the deficit between their SFR and infall rate.

  17. Star formation bimodality in early-type galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Amblard, A.; Riguccini, L.; Temi, P.; Im, S.; Fanelli, M.; Serra, P.

    2014-03-10

    We compute the properties of a sample of 221 local, early-type galaxies with a spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling software, CIGALEMC. Concentrating on the star-forming (SF) activity and dust contents, we derive parameters such as the specific star formation rate (sSFR), the dust luminosity, dust mass, and temperature. In our sample, 52% is composed of elliptical (E) galaxies and 48% of lenticular (S0) galaxies. We find a larger proportion of S0 galaxies among galaxies with a large sSFR and large specific dust emission. The stronger activity of S0 galaxies is confirmed by larger dust masses. We investigate the relative proportion of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and SF galaxies in our sample using spectroscopic Sloan Digital Sky Survey data and near-infrared selection techniques, and find a larger proportion of AGN-dominated galaxies in the S0 sample than the E one. This could corroborate a scenario where blue galaxies evolve into red ellipticals by passing through an S0 AGN active period while quenching its star formation. Finally, we find a good agreement comparing our estimates with color indicators.

  18. Star Formation Bimodality in Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amblard, A.; Riguccini, L.; Temi, P.; Im, S.; Fanelli, M.; Serra, P.

    2014-03-01

    We compute the properties of a sample of 221 local, early-type galaxies with a spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling software, CIGALEMC. Concentrating on the star-forming (SF) activity and dust contents, we derive parameters such as the specific star formation rate (sSFR), the dust luminosity, dust mass, and temperature. In our sample, 52% is composed of elliptical (E) galaxies and 48% of lenticular (S0) galaxies. We find a larger proportion of S0 galaxies among galaxies with a large sSFR and large specific dust emission. The stronger activity of S0 galaxies is confirmed by larger dust masses. We investigate the relative proportion of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and SF galaxies in our sample using spectroscopic Sloan Digital Sky Survey data and near-infrared selection techniques, and find a larger proportion of AGN-dominated galaxies in the S0 sample than the E one. This could corroborate a scenario where blue galaxies evolve into red ellipticals by passing through an S0 AGN active period while quenching its star formation. Finally, we find a good agreement comparing our estimates with color indicators.

  19. Assessing and understanding diversity in galaxy star formation histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, Louis Evan

    Galaxy star formation histories (SFHs) form a central thread of the cosmological narrative. Assessing and understanding them is therefore a central mission of the study of galaxy evolution. Although an ever-better picture is emerging of the build-up of the stellar mass of the average galaxy over time, the relevance of this track to the growth of individual galaxies is unclear. Largely, this ambiguity is due to the availability of only loose, ensemble-level constraints at any redshift appreciably greater than zero. In this thesis, I outline how these constraints --- principally the cosmic star formation rate density, stellar mass function, and the star formation rate/stellar mass relation --- shape empirically based SFH models, especially in terms of the diversity of paths leading to a given end-state. Along the way, I show that three models propose very different answers to this question, corresponding (largely) to three different interpretations of the scatter in instantaneous galaxy growth rates at fixed stellar mass. I describe how these interpretations affect one's stance on the fundamental importance of so-called galaxy "bimodality" and quenching mechanisms, the influence of environment, and the role starbursts play in galaxy evolution. Ultimately, I conclude that there is insufficient evidence at present to select one interpretation over all others, but suggest that the situation might soon be resolved by upcoming observations that could clearly identify which model (or hybrid) is the most accurate description of galaxy growth.

  20. PRIMUS: Enhanced Specific Star Formation Rates in Close Galaxy Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kenneth C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Burles, Scott M.; Coil, Alison L.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Moustakas, John; Zhu, Guangtun; Arnouts, Stéphane

    2011-02-01

    Tidal interactions between galaxies can trigger star formation, which contributes to the global star formation rate (SFR) density of the universe and could be a factor in the transformation of blue, star-forming galaxies to red, quiescent galaxies over cosmic time. We investigate tidally triggered star formation in isolated close galaxy pairs drawn from the Prism Multi-Object Survey (PRIMUS), a low-dispersion prism redshift survey that has measured ~120,000 robust galaxy redshifts over 9.1 deg2 out to z ~ 1. We select a sample of galaxies in isolated galaxy pairs at redshifts 0.25 <= z <= 0.75, with no other objects within a projected separation of 300 h -1 kpc and Δz/(1 + z) = 0.01, and compare them to a control sample of isolated galaxies to test for systematic differences in their rest-frame FUV - r and NUV - r colors as a proxy for relative specific star formation rates (SSFRs). We find that galaxies in rp <= 50 h -1 kpc pairs have bluer dust-corrected UV - r colors on average than the control galaxies by -0.134 ± 0.045 mag in FUV - r and -0.075 ± 0.038 mag in NUV - r, corresponding to an ~15%-20% increase in SSFR. This indicates an enhancement in SSFR due to tidal interactions. We also find that this relative enhancement is greater for a subset of rp <= 30 h -1 kpc pair galaxies, for which the average color offsets are -0.193 ± 0.065 mag in FUV - r and -0.159 ± 0.048 mag in NUV - r, corresponding to an ~25%-30% increase in SSFR. We test for evolution in the enhancement of tidally triggered star formation with redshift across our sample redshift range and find marginal evidence for a decrease in SSFR enhancement from 0.25 <= z <= 0.5 to 0.5 <= z <= 0.75. This indicates that a change in enhanced star formation triggered by tidal interactions in low-density environments is not a contributor to the decline in the global SFR density across this redshift range.

  1. Star formation in the outer disks of spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Kate Lynn

    I present results from a multi-wavelength study of star formation and the gaseous content in the outer disks of a sample of eight nearby spiral galaxies. In particular, the study focuses on galaxies with typical HI-to-optical sizes of ˜1--2, to provide a comparison to studies of galaxies with star formation occurring in extended gas disks. The study features new, ultra-deep ground-based H-alpha imaging and deep ultraviolet (UV) imaging from the GALEX space telescope to trace the recent star formation. I find that star formation typically extends through most (>85%) of the gas disk, with an outermost star forming regime characterized by low covering fractions and low star formation rate surface densities. The result that star formation extends through most of the gas disk regardless of the HI-to-optical size implies that it is important to further our understanding of the formation of extended gas disks to fully understand the implications of extended star forming disks. I find that the outer gaseous disks are gravitationally stable, which is in agreement with the lower level of star formation. I use ultraviolet and H-alpha colors to probe the recent star formation in the outer disks and find significant variations between colors of young stellar clusters. I run stellar population synthesis models to show how episodic star formation histories (SFHs) with periods of 100--250 Myr could cause similar color variations as are seen in outer disks. An episodic SFH would have implications for the gas depletion time and chemical evolution of spiral galaxies. In addition to an episodic SFH, the observed ultraviolet and H-alpha colors of young stellar clusters in the outer disks of galaxies in our sample are also in agreement with recently published models of a stochastically sampled initial mass function (IMF). Therefore, there remains some uncertainty for the possible cause of this observational result. Finally, we present a pilot study of deep, near infrared (NIR) imaging

  2. Spectroscopic Observations of the Star Formation Regions in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X.; Lin, L.; Li, J. R.; Zhou, X.; Zou, H.; Li, H. Y.; Chen, F. Z.; Du, W.; Fan, Z.; Mao, Y. W.; Wang, J.; Zhu, Y. N.; Zhou, Z. M.

    2014-01-01

    During the late 1990s and the first decade of the 21st century, the 8˜10 m scale ground-based telescopes are helping astronomers learn much more about how galaxies develop. The existing 2˜4 m scale telescopes become less important for astrophysical researches. To use the existing 2˜4 m scale telescopes to address important issues in cosmology and extragalactic and galactic astronomy, we have to consider very carefully which kind of things we can do, and which we can not. For this reason, the Time Allocation Committee (TAC) of the National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC) 2.16 m telescope decides to support some key projects since 2013. Nearby galaxies supply us with the opportunity to study galaxy dynamics and star formation on large scales, yet are close enough to reveal the details. Star formation regions in nearby galaxies provide an excellent laboratory to study the star formation processes, the evolution of massive stars, and the properties of the surrounding interstellar medium. A wealth of information can be obtained from the spectral analysis of the bright emission lines and the stellar continuum. Considering these, we proposed a long-term project ``Spectroscopic Observations of the Star Formation Regions in Nearby Galaxies'', and it becomes the key project of the NAOC 2.16 m telescope since 2013, supported with 30 dark/grey nights per year. The primary goal of this project is to observe the spectroscopy of star formation regions in 20 nearby galaxies, with the NAOC 2.16 m telescope and the Hectospec/MMT (Multiple Mirror Telescope) multifiber spectrograph by Telescope Access Program (TAP). With the spectra of a large sample of star formation regions, combining multi-wavelength data from UV to IR, we can investigate, understand, and quantify the nature of the deviation from the starbursts' IRX-β (the IR/UV ratio ``IRX'' versus the UV color ``β'') correlation. It will be important for a better understanding of the interaction of dust and

  3. Turbulence and Star Formation in a Sample of Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Erin R.; Hunter, Deidre Ann; Chien, Li-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    We investigate turbulent gas motions in spiral galaxies and their importance to star formation in far outer disks, where the column density is typically far below the critical value for spontaneous gravitational collapse. Following the methods of Burkhart et al. (2010) as applied to the Small Magellanic Cloud, we use the third and fourth statistical moments, skewness and kurtosis, which are indicators of structures caused by turbulence, to examine the integrated neutral hydrogen (Hι) column density of a sample of spiral galaxies selected from The Hι Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS, Walter et al. 2008). We examine the kurtosis and skewness values of each galaxy as a whole, as well as their variation as a function of radius and in discrete sub-regions defined by a square, moving 'kernel,' essentially splitting each galaxy into a grid. We then create individual grid maps of kurtosis and skewness for each galaxy. To investigate the relation between these moments and star formation, we compare these maps with maps of each galaxy's far-ultraviolet (FUV) image, taken by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite. We find that the moments are largely uniform across the galaxies: the variation does not appear to trace any star forming regions. This may, however, be due to the spatial resolution of our analysis, which could potentially limit the scale of turbulent motions to at most ~700 pc. From our analysis of the comparison between the two moments themselves, we find that the gas motions in our sample galaxies are largely supersonic. This analysis shows that Burkhart et al. (2010)'s methods may be applied not just to dwarf galaxies but normal spiral galaxies as well.We acknowledge the NSF for their funding of this work through their Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program (Grant No. AST-1461200).

  4. The spatial extent of star formation in interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Jorge

    2015-08-01

    We employ a suite of 75 simulations of galaxies in idealized major mergers (stellar mass ratio ˜2.5:1), with a wide range of orbital parameters, to investigate the spatial extent of interaction-induced star formation. Although the total star formation in galaxy encounters is generally elevated relative to isolated galaxies, we find that this elevation is a combination of intense enhancements within the central kpc and moderately suppressed activity at larger galactocentric radii. The radial dependence of the star formation enhancement is stronger in the less massive galaxy than in the primary, and is also more pronounced in mergers of more closely aligned disc spin orientations. Conversely, these trends are almost entirely independent of the encounter’s impact parameter and orbital eccentricity. Our predictions of the radial dependence of triggered star formation, and specifically the suppression of star formation beyond kpc-scales, will be testable with the next generation of integral-field spectroscopic surveys.Co-authors: Paul Torrey, Sara Ellison, David Patton, Asa Bluck, Gunjan Bansal & Lars Hernquist

  5. Decreased specific star formation rates in AGN host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, T. Taro; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Meléndez, Marcio; Koss, Michael; Rosario, David J.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the location of an ultra-hard X-ray selected sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalogue with respect to the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies using Herschel-based measurements of the star formation rate (SFR) and M*'s from Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry where the AGN contribution has been carefully removed. We construct the MS with galaxies from the Herschel Reference Survey and Herschel Stripe 82 Survey using the exact same methods to measure the SFR and M* as the Swift/BAT AGN. We find that a large fraction of the Swift/BAT AGN lie below the MS indicating decreased specific SFR (sSFR) compared to non-AGN galaxies. The Swift/BAT AGN are then compared to a high-mass galaxy sample (CO Legacy Database for GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey, COLD GASS), where we find a similarity between the AGN in COLD GASS and the Swift/BAT AGN. Both samples of AGN lie firmly between star-forming galaxies on the MS and quiescent galaxies far below the MS. However, we find no relationship between the X-ray luminosity and distance from the MS. While the morphological distribution of the BAT AGN is more similar to star-forming galaxies, the sSFR of each morphology is more similar to the COLD GASS AGN. The merger fraction in the BAT AGN is much higher than the COLD GASS AGN and star-forming galaxies and is related to distance from the MS. These results support a model in which bright AGN tend to be in high-mass star-forming galaxies in the process of quenching which eventually starves the supermassive black hole itself.

  6. STAR FORMATION IN NUCLEAR RINGS OF BARRED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, Woong-Tae E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-06-01

    Nuclear rings in barred galaxies are sites of active star formation. We use hydrodynamic simulations to study the temporal and spatial behavior of star formation occurring in nuclear rings of barred galaxies where radial gas inflows are triggered solely by a bar potential. The star formation recipes include a density threshold, an efficiency, conversion of gas to star particles, and delayed momentum feedback via supernova explosions. We find that the star formation rate (SFR) in a nuclear ring is roughly equal to the mass inflow rate to the ring, while it has a weak dependence on the total gas mass in the ring. The SFR typically exhibits a strong primary burst followed by weak secondary bursts before declining to very small values. The primary burst is associated with the rapid gas infall to the ring due to the bar growth, while the secondary bursts are caused by re-infall of the ejected gas from the primary burst. While star formation in observed rings persists episodically over a few Gyr, the duration of active star formation in our models lasts for only about half of the bar growth time, suggesting that the bar potential alone is unlikely to be responsible for gas supply to the rings. When the SFR is low, most star formation occurs at the contact points between the ring and the dust lanes, leading to an azimuthal age gradient of young star clusters. When the SFR is large, on the other hand, star formation is randomly distributed over the whole circumference of the ring, resulting in no apparent azimuthal age gradient. Since the ring shrinks in size with time, star clusters also exhibit a radial age gradient, with younger clusters found closer to the ring. The cluster mass function is well described by a power law, with a slope depending on the SFR. Giant gas clouds in the rings have supersonic internal velocity dispersions and are gravitationally bound.

  7. Star Formation Histories in CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John; Connor, Thomas; Clash Science Team

    2015-01-01

    The CLASH sample of 25 lensing galaxy clusters contains 11 Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCG) that exhibit significant unobscured (>5 Msol yr-1) star formation activity. The star formation is inferred from UV emission and from evidence for H-alpha filaments as detected in the ACS and WFC3 observations. We use photometry from the 16-band CLASH imaging along with spectra from the SOAR and SDSS telescopes to examine the star formation histories of these galaxies. Using SED fits to synthetic stellar population and nebular emission models, we constrain the burst histories of the two most UV and H-alpha luminous BCGs in our sample, RXJ1532.9+3021 and MACS1931.8-2635. The BCG in both of these clusters have reddening-corrected UV estimates of star formation rates in excess of 100 solar masses per year. We model the timescales and sizes of the starbursts that can account for the photometric and spectroscopic properties in these BCGs and create maps of their stellar properties on scales of ~350 pc. These maps reveal recent bursts occurring in elongated filaments on relatively long (~0.5-1.0 Gyr) timescales. In addition, we constrain the star formation properties of all of the remaining BCGs in the CLASH sample. These results and their implications for BCG formation and evolution will be presented.

  8. THE CURRENT STAR FORMATION RATE OF K+A GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Danielle M.; Ridgway, Susan E.; De Propris, Roberto; Goto, Tomotsugu

    2012-12-20

    We derive the stacked 1.4 GHz flux from the FIRST survey for 811 K+A galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. For these objects we find a mean flux density of 56 {+-} 9 {mu}Jy. A similar stack of radio-quiet white dwarfs yields an upper limit of 43 {mu}Jy at a 5{sigma} significance to the flux in blank regions of the sky. This implies an average star formation rate of 1.6 {+-} 0.3 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} for K+A galaxies. However, the majority of the signal comes from {approx}4% of K+A fields that have aperture fluxes above the 5{sigma} noise level of the FIRST survey. A stack of the remaining galaxies shows little residual flux consistent with an upper limit on star formation of 1.3 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Even for a subset of 456 'young' (spectral ages <250 Myr) K+A galaxies, we find that the stacked 1.4 GHz flux is consistent with no current star formation. Our data suggest that the original starburst has been terminated in the majority of K+A galaxies, but that this may represent part of a duty cycle where a fraction of these galaxies may be active at a given moment with dusty starbursts and active galactic nuclei being present.

  9. Star formation in globular clusters and dwarf galaxies and implications for the early evolution of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Douglas N. C.; Murray, Stephen D.

    1991-01-01

    Based upon the observed properties of globular clusters and dwarf galaxies in the Local Group, we present important theoretical constraints on star formation in these systems. These constraints indicate that protoglobular cluster clouds had long dormant periods and a brief epoch of violent star formation. Collisions between protocluster clouds triggered fragmentation into individual stars. Most protocluster clouds dispersed into the Galactic halo during the star formation epoch. In contrast, the large spread in stellar metallicity in dwarf galaxies suggests that star formation in their pregenitors was self-regulated: we propose the protocluster clouds formed from thermal instability in the protogalactic clouds and show that a population of massive stars is needed to provide sufficient UV flux to prevent the collapsing protogalactic clouds from fragmenting into individual stars. Based upon these constraints, we propose a unified scenario to describe the early epochs of star formation in the Galactic halo as well as the thick and thin components of the Galactic disk.

  10. Star formation along the Hubble sequence. Radial structure of the star formation of CALIFA galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, R. M.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Pérez, E.; García-Benito, R.; López Fernández, R.; Lacerda, E. A. D.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; de Amorim, A. L.; Vale Asari, N.; Sánchez, S. F.; Walcher, C. J.; Wisotzki, L.; Mast, D.; Alves, J.; Ascasibar, Y.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Galbany, L.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Mollá, M.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Vílchez, J. M.

    2016-05-01

    The spatially resolved stellar population content of today's galaxies holds important information for understanding the different processes that contribute to the star formation and mass assembly histories of galaxies. The aim of this paper is to characterize the radial structure of the star formation rate (SFR) in galaxies in the nearby Universe as represented by a uniquely rich and diverse data set drawn from the CALIFA survey. The sample under study contains 416 galaxies observed with integral field spectroscopy, covering a wide range of Hubble types and stellar masses ranging from M⋆ ~ 109 to 7 × 1011 M⊙. Spectral synthesis techniques are applied to the datacubes to derive 2D maps and radial profiles of the intensity of the star formation rate in the recent past (ΣSFR), as well as related properties, such as the local specific star formation rate (sSFR), defined as the ratio between ΣSFR and the stellar mass surface density (μ⋆). To emphasize the behavior of these properties for galaxies that are on and off the main sequence of star formation (MSSF), we stack the individual radial profiles in seven bins of galaxy morphology (E, S0, Sa, Sb, Sbc, Sc, and Sd), and several stellar masses. Our main results are: (a) the intensity of the star formation rate shows declining profiles that exhibit very small differences between spirals with values at R = 1 half light radius (HLR) within a factor two of ΣSFR ~ 20 M⊙Gyr-1pc-2. The dispersion in the ΣSFR(R) profiles is significantly smaller in late type spirals (Sbc, Sc, Sd). This confirms that the MSSF is a sequence of galaxies with nearly constant ΣSFR. (b) sSFR values scale with Hubble type and increase radially outward with a steeper slope in the inner 1 HLR. This behavior suggests that galaxies are quenched inside-out and that this process is faster in the central, bulge-dominated part than in the disks. (c) As a whole and at all radii, E and S0 are off the MSSF with SFR much smaller than spirals of the

  11. Resolved Star Formation Law In Nearby Infrared-bright Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Nurur; Bolatto, A.; Wong, T.; Leroy, A.; Ott, J.; Calzetti, D.; Blitz, L.; Walter, F.; Rosolowsky, E.; West, A.; Vogel, S.; Bigiel, F.; Xue, R.

    2009-05-01

    An accurate knowledge of star formation law is crucial to make progress in understanding galaxy formation and evolution. We are studying this topic using CARMA STING (Survey Toward Infrared-bright Nearby Galaxies), an interferometric CO survey of a sample of 27 star-forming nearby galaxies with a wealth of multi-wavelength data designed to study star formation in environments throughout the blue sequence at sub-kpc scales. We present results for NGC 4254 (M99), one of our sample galaxies. We construct star formation rate surface density (SFRSD) and gas (atomic and molecular) surface density indicators using a combination of high resolution data from CARMA, KPNO, Spitzer, IRAM and VLA. We find a tight correlation between SFRSD and molecular gas surface density (MGSD), whereas the relation between atomic gas surface density and SFRSD shows very large scatter. Within the central 6 kpc (radius) where CARMA is the most sensitive the MGSD derived from CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) shows similar trend, however, in the extended disk the slope, derived from CO(2-1) data alone, gets steeper.

  12. Hubble studies generations of star formation in neighbouring galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-07-01

    N11B Credits: NASA/ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI)/HEIC The iridescent tapestry of star birth The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope captures the iridescent tapestry of star birth in a neighbouring galaxy in this panoramic view of glowing gas, dark dust clouds, and young, hot stars. The star-forming region, catalogued as N11B lies in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), located only 160 000 light-years from Earth. With its high resolution, the Hubble Space Telescope is able to view details of star formation in the LMC as easily as ground-based telescopes are able to observe stellar formation within our own Milky Way galaxy. One neighbouring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), lies in the constellation of Dorado and contains a number of regions harbouring recent and ongoing star formation. One of these star-forming region, N11B, is shown in this Hubble image. It is a subregion within a larger area of star formation called N11. N11 is the second largest star-forming region in LMC. It is only surpassed in the size and activity by ‘the king of stellar nurseries’, 30 Doradus, located at the opposite side of LMC. N11B Credits: NASA/ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI)/HEIC A view of star formation The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope captures the iridescent tapestry of star birth in a neighbouring galaxy in this panoramic view of glowing gas, dark dust clouds, and young, hot stars. The star-forming region, catalogued as N11B lies in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), located only 160 000 light-years from Earth. With its high resolution, the Hubble Space Telescope is able to view details of star formation in the LMC as easily as ground-based telescopes are able to observe stellar formation within our own Milky Way galaxy. One neighbouring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), lies in the constellation of Dorado and contains a number of regions harbouring recent and ongoing star formation. One of these star-forming regions, N11B, is shown in

  13. Morphology, star formation, and nuclear activity in void galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedmann, Sophia; Miller, Brendan; Gallo, Elena; Pazar, Beni; Alfvin, Erik

    2015-01-01

    We report on new Chandra observations of six early-type galaxies located within cosmic voids, from a program examining the influence of Mpc-scale environment upon star formation and low-level supermassive black hole activity. Simple feedback prescriptions are predicted to operate independently of the surrounding density once outside the dark matter halo, and further link star formation quenching to black hole activity. Alternatively, mediation of the cold gas supply by the large-scale environment, for example through increased cold-stream accretion and reduced harassment or stripping within more isolated regions, could mutually enhance star formation and (perhaps indirectly) low-level supermassive black hole activity. The six targeted early-type galaxies have comparable stellar masses of 6-9e10 solar, chosen to be near the predicted "critical value" for efficient feedback, but span a wide range of star-formation rates. Specifically, they have SFRs of 6.5, 1.4, 0.45, 0.10, 0.04, and 0.03 solar masses per year. All galaxies are detected in the Chandra ACIS-S observations with 0.3-8 keV X-ray luminosities ranging from 2e39 to 1e41 erg/s. Specifically, they have log Lx values of 40.4, 41.1, 41.1, 39.3, 39.2, and 39.2, again ordered by decreasing SFR. The three galaxies with moderate-to-high star formation rates have nuclear X-ray luminosities that are significantly greater than those of the three galaxies with low star formation rates. This result is more consistent with a symbiotic relationship between current low-level star formation and supermassive black hole activity than with simple feedback quenching models. We additionally situate these galaxies in the context of void and cluster galaxies in the local universe, model their optical surface brightness profiles and color gradients, discuss caveats including the possibility of X-ray binary contamination, and consider other supermassive black hole activity indicators.

  14. Star Formation in the Central Regions of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Mengchun

    2015-08-01

    The galactic central region connects the galactic nucleus to the host galaxy. If the central black hole co-evolved with the host galaxies, there should be some evidence left in the central region. We use the environmental properties in the central regions such as star-forming activity, stellar population and molecular abundance to figure out a possible scenario of the evolution of galaxies. In this thesis at first we investigated the properties of the central regions in the host galaxies of active and normal galaxies. We used radio emission around the nuclei of the host galaxies to represent activity of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and used infrared ray (IR) emission to represent the star-forming activity and stellar population of the host galaxies. We determined that active galaxies have higher stellar masses (SMs) within the central kiloparsec radius than normal galaxies do independent of the Hubble types of the host galaxies; but both active and normal galaxies exhibit similar specific star formation rates (SSFRs). We also discovered that certain AGNs exhibit substantial inner stellar structures in the IR images; most of the AGNs with inner structures are Seyferts, whereas only a few LINERs exhibit inner structures. We note that the AGNs with inner structures show a positive correlation between the radio activity of the AGNs and the SFRs of the host galaxies, but the sources without inner structures show a negative correlation between the radio power and the SFRs. These results might be explained with a scenario of starburst-AGN evolution. In this scenario, AGN activities are triggered following a nuclear starburst; during the evolution, AGN activities are accompanied by SF activity in the inner regions of the host galaxies; at the final stage of the evolution, the AGNs might transform into LINERs, exhibiting weak SF activity in the central regions of the host galaxies. For further investigation about the inner structure, we choose the most nearby and luminous

  15. Spatial Distribution of Star Formation in High Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunnyngham, Ian; Takamiya, M.; Willmer, C.; Chun, M.; Young, M.

    2011-01-01

    Integral field unit spectroscopy taken of galaxies with redshifts between 0.6 and 0.8 utilizing Gemini Observatory’s GMOS instrument were used to investigate the spatial distribution of star-forming regions by measuring the Hβ and [OII]λ3727 emission line fluxes. These galaxies were selected based on the strength of Hβ and [OII]λ3727 as measured from slit LRIS/Keck spectra. The process of calibrating and reducing data into cubes -- possessing two spatial dimensions, and one for wavelength -- was automated via a custom batch script using the Gemini IRAF routines. Among these galaxies only the bluest sources clearly show [OII] in the IFU regardless of total galaxy luminosity. The brightest galaxies lack [OII] emission and it is posited that two different modes of star formation exist among this seemingly homogeneous group of z=0.7 star-forming galaxies. In order to increase the galaxy sample to include redshifts from 0.3 to 0.9, public Gemini IFU data are being sought. Python scripts were written to mine the Gemini Science Archive for candidate observations, cross-reference the target of these observations with information from the NASA Extragalactic Database, and then present the resultant database in sortable, searchable, cross-linked web-interface using Django to facilitate navigation. By increasing the sample, we expect to characterize these two different modes of star formation which could be high-redshift counterparts of the U/LIRGs and dwarf starburst galaxies like NGC 1569/NGC 4449. The authors acknowledge funds provided by the National Science Foundation (AST 0909240).

  16. The evolution of galaxy star formation activity in massive haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popesso, P.; Biviano, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Wilman, D.; Salvato, M.; Magnelli, B.; Gruppioni, C.; Pozzi, F.; Rodighiero, G.; Ziparo, F.; Berta, S.; Elbaz, D.; Dickinson, M.; Lutz, D.; Altieri, B.; Aussel, H.; Cimatti, A.; Fadda, D.; Ilbert, O.; Le Floch, E.; Nordon, R.; Poglitsch, A.; Xu, C. K.

    2015-02-01

    Context. There is now a large consensus that the current epoch of the cosmic star formation history (CSFH) is dominated by low mass galaxies while the most active phase, between redshifts 1 and 2, is dominated by more massive galaxies, which evolve more quickly. Aims: Massive galaxies tend to inhabit very massive haloes, such as galaxy groups and clusters. We aim to understand whether the observed "galaxy downsizing" could be interpreted as a "halo downsizing", whereas the most massive haloes, and their galaxy populations, evolve more rapidly than the haloes with lower mass. Methods: We studied the contribution to the CSFH of galaxies inhabiting group-sized haloes. This is done through the study of the evolution of the infra-red (IR) luminosity function of group galaxies from redshift 0 to redshift ~1.6. We used a sample of 39 X-ray-selected groups in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS), the Chandra Deep Field North (CDFN), and the COSMOS field, where the deepest available mid- and far-IR surveys have been conducted with Spitzer MIPS and with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) on board the Herschel satellite. Results: Groups at low redshift lack the brightest, rarest, and most star forming IR-emitting galaxies observed in the field. Their IR-emitting galaxies contribute ≤10% of the comoving volume density of the whole IR galaxy population in the local Universe. At redshift ≳1, the most IR-luminous galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) are mainly located in groups, and this is consistent with a reversal of the star formation rate (SFR) vs. density anti-correlation observed in the nearby Universe. At these redshifts, group galaxies contribute 60-80% of the CSFH, i.e. much more than at lower redshifts. Below z ~ 1, the comoving number and SFR densities of IR-emitting galaxies in groups decline significantly faster than those of all IR-emitting galaxies. Conclusions: Our results are consistent with a "halo downsizing" scenario and highlight the

  17. The era of star formation in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Brodwin, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, C. L.; Gettings, D. P.; Zeimann, G. R.; Snyder, G. F.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Pope, A.; Alberts, S.; Eisenhardt, P. R.; Stern, D.; Moustakas, L. A.; Brown, M. J. I.; Chary, R.-R.; Dey, Arjun; Galametz, A.; Jannuzi, B. T.; Miller, E. D.; Moustakas, J.

    2013-12-20

    We analyze the star formation properties of 16 infrared-selected, spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters at 1 < z < 1.5 from the Spitzer/IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). We present new spectroscopic confirmation for six of these high-redshift clusters, five of which are at z > 1.35. Using infrared luminosities measured with deep Spitzer/Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer observations at 24 μm, along with robust optical + IRAC photometric redshifts and spectral-energy-distribution-fitted stellar masses, we present the dust-obscured star-forming fractions, star formation rates, and specific star formation rates in these clusters as functions of redshift and projected clustercentric radius. We find that z ∼ 1.4 represents a transition redshift for the ISCS sample, with clear evidence of an unquenched era of cluster star formation at earlier times. Beyond this redshift, the fraction of star-forming cluster members increases monotonically toward the cluster centers. Indeed, the specific star formation rate in the cores of these distant clusters is consistent with field values at similar redshifts, indicating that at z > 1.4 environment-dependent quenching had not yet been established in ISCS clusters. By combining these observations with complementary studies showing a rapid increase in the active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction, a stochastic star formation history, and a major merging episode at the same epoch in this cluster sample, we suggest that the starburst activity is likely merger-driven and that the subsequent quenching is due to feedback from merger-fueled AGNs. The totality of the evidence suggests we are witnessing the final quenching period that brings an end to the era of star formation in galaxy clusters and initiates the era of passive evolution.

  18. Star formation in the Magellanic irregular galaxy NGC 4449

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley A., Jr.; Hunter, Deidre A.; Telesco, C. M.; Decher, R.; Harper, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    New NIR and FIR maps and J = 1-0 CO spectroscopy of the Magellanic irregular galaxy NGC 4449 are presented. The brighter 150-micron emission is concentrated along the central visual ridge of the galaxy, although there is lower intensity extended emission throughout the visible extent of the object. The maximum FIR emission is coincident, within the uncertainties, with the visual and NIR maxima, identified as the galactic nucleus. It is estimated that the IR luminosity of the 1-kpc-diameter central region in NGC 4449 is comparable to that for a similar-sized region at the center of the Galaxy. A large fraction of the 150-micron emission may arise from warm dust distributed throughout the galaxy and heated by the diffuse radiation field. Active star formation follows the NIR emission in part of the galaxy, but no coincidence is found in another region.

  19. Bimodal star formation - Constraints from galaxy colors at high redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Silk, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    The possibility that at early epochs the light from elliptical galaxies is dominated by stars with an initial mass function (IMF) which is deficient in low-mass stars, relative to the solar neighborhood is investigated. V-R colors for the optical counterparts of 3CR radio sources offer the most severe constraints on the models. Reasonable fits are obtained to both the blue, high-redshift colors and the redder, low-redshift colors with a model galaxy which forms with initially equal star formation rates in each of two IMF modes: one lacking low-mass stars, and one with stars of all masses. The net effect is that the time-integrated IMF has twice as many high-mass stars as the solar neighborhood IMF, relative to low mass stars. A conventional solar neighborhood IMF does not simultaneously account for both the range in colors at high redshift and the redness of nearby ellipticals, with any single star formation epoch. Models with a standard IMF require half the stellar population to be formed in a burst at low redshift z of about 1.

  20. Star Formation Laws, Rates, and Thresholds in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, James

    2015-08-01

    It has been long recognized that stars form out of gas within the interstellar mediums of galaxies. Though earlier treatments focused on the relationship between star formation and the surface densities of available molecular gas in disks (e.g., the Kennicutt-Schmidt law), more recently the relevance of dense molecular gas within galaxies has become better appreciated. In this short review talk, I will provide an overview of how this shift in thinking in the last few years has occurred through observations. For example, strong correlations have been seen between the luminosities of HCN 1-0 (tracing dense gas) and infrared emission (tracing young stars) over nearly ten orders of magnitude. Also, the number of young stellar objects in nearby clouds seems to be related to the amount of mass in a cloud above a column density 'threshold' of Av ≈ 6 (surface density ≈ 120 Msun/pc2). Indeed, recent far-infrared/submillimetre continuum data of nearby molecular clouds from Herschel have shown strong links between star formation and filamentary structures in clouds above a critical mass per unit length of ~16 Msun/pc (Av ≈ 8), providing a possible origin of the observed 'threshold.' Also, the current star formation rate in a dense molecular cloud clump, as traced by the local number of Class 0 objects, appears to be highly correlated with the relative fraction of high column density material in the clump. Prospects for future exploration of star-formation thresholds will also be discussed.

  1. Star Formation in Partially Gas-Depleted Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, James A.; Robertson, Paul; Miner, Jesse; Levy, Lorenza

    2010-02-01

    Broadband B and R and Hα images have been obtained with the 4.1 m SOAR telescope atop Cerro Pachon, Chile, for 29 spiral galaxies in the Pegasus I galaxy cluster and for 18 spirals in non-cluster environments. Pegasus I is a spiral-rich cluster with a low-density intracluster medium and a low galaxy velocity dispersion. When combined with neutral hydrogen (H I) data obtained with the Arecibo 305 m radio telescope, acquired by Levy et al. (2007) and by Springob et al. (2005b), we study the star formation rates in disk galaxies as a function of their H I deficiency. To quantify H I deficiency, we use the usual logarithmic deficiency parameter, DEF. The specific star formation rate (SSFR) is quantified by the logarithmic flux ratio of Hα flux to R-band flux, and thus roughly characterizes the logarithmic SFR per unit stellar mass. We find a clear correlation between the global SFR per unit stellar mass and DEF, such that the SFR is lower in more H I-deficient galaxies. This correlation appears to extend from the most gas-rich to the most gas-poor galaxies. We also find a correlation between the central SFR per unit mass relative to the global values, in the sense that the more H I-deficient galaxies have a higher central SFR per unit mass relative to their global SFR values than do gas-rich galaxies. In fact, approximately half of the H I-depleted galaxies have highly elevated SSFRs in their central regions, indicative of a transient evolutionary state. In addition, we find a correlation between gas depletion and the size of the Hα disk (relative to the R-band disk); H I-poor galaxies have truncated disks. Moreover, aside from the elevated central SSFR in many gas-poor spirals, the SSFR is otherwise lower in the Hα disks of gas-poor galaxies than in gas-rich spirals. Thus, both disk truncation and lowered SSFR levels within the star-forming part of the disks (aside from the enhanced nuclear SSFR) correlate with H I deficiency, and both phenomena are found to

  2. STAR FORMATION IN PARTIALLY GAS-DEPLETED SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, James A.; Miner, Jesse; Levy, Lorenza; Robertson, Paul E-mail: paul@astr.as.utexas.edu E-mail: lorenza.levy@yahoo.com

    2010-02-15

    Broadband B and R and H{alpha} images have been obtained with the 4.1 m SOAR telescope atop Cerro Pachon, Chile, for 29 spiral galaxies in the Pegasus I galaxy cluster and for 18 spirals in non-cluster environments. Pegasus I is a spiral-rich cluster with a low-density intracluster medium and a low galaxy velocity dispersion. When combined with neutral hydrogen (H I) data obtained with the Arecibo 305 m radio telescope, acquired by Levy et al. (2007) and by Springob et al. (2005b), we study the star formation rates in disk galaxies as a function of their H I deficiency. To quantify H I deficiency, we use the usual logarithmic deficiency parameter, DEF. The specific star formation rate (SSFR) is quantified by the logarithmic flux ratio of H{alpha} flux to R-band flux, and thus roughly characterizes the logarithmic SFR per unit stellar mass. We find a clear correlation between the global SFR per unit stellar mass and DEF, such that the SFR is lower in more H I-deficient galaxies. This correlation appears to extend from the most gas-rich to the most gas-poor galaxies. We also find a correlation between the central SFR per unit mass relative to the global values, in the sense that the more H I-deficient galaxies have a higher central SFR per unit mass relative to their global SFR values than do gas-rich galaxies. In fact, approximately half of the H I-depleted galaxies have highly elevated SSFRs in their central regions, indicative of a transient evolutionary state. In addition, we find a correlation between gas depletion and the size of the H{alpha} disk (relative to the R-band disk); H I-poor galaxies have truncated disks. Moreover, aside from the elevated central SSFR in many gas-poor spirals, the SSFR is otherwise lower in the H{alpha} disks of gas-poor galaxies than in gas-rich spirals. Thus, both disk truncation and lowered SSFR levels within the star-forming part of the disks (aside from the enhanced nuclear SSFR) correlate with H I deficiency, and both

  3. Disc galaxies: Molecular hydrogen, star formation and radial migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halle, A.; Combes, F.; Di Matteo, P.; Haywood, M.

    2014-12-01

    We show the importance of molecular hydrogen to simulate the evolution of disc galaxies with improved realistic interstellar medium and stellar formation. The inclusion of H_2 cooling is especially important in the low-metallicity regions such as the outer parts of discs, in which it allows for some slow star formation. We study the evolution of the obtained stellar components of these galaxies and focus on the radial migration that occurs due to the resonances of the bar and transient spiral arms in the disc.

  4. Completing the Census of Isolated Dwarf Galaxy Star Formation Histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    We propose to complete our census of the ancient star formation histories (SFHs) of isolated dwarf galaxies by obtaining deep ACS/WFC optical imaging of WLM and Pegasus Dwarf Irregular Galaxy (PegDIG). They are the only two systems without previous deep HST imaging that are isolated yet close enough to guarantee that their oldest main sequence turnoffs are accessible with HST. We will measure their lifetime SFHs with an age resolution of < 1 Gyr at all epochs to address questions about growth of stellar mass, the effects of reionization, radial population gradients, and variable star populations in WLM and PegDIG. This program is a concerted effort between theorists and observers to obtain the best possible observational constraints on the early epochs of star formation in isolated low-mass galaxies, which are essential to the next generation of galaxy simulations. With these new observations we will have completed our efforts to collect precise lifetime SFHs of all nearby isolated dwarfs that are accessible with HST. In combination with archival data, we will create a legacy sample isolated dwarfs with identically derived SFHs, that will be serve as the baseline for the community's understanding of how low-mass galaxies form and evolve over a Hubble time and in the absence of environmental effects of a massive host (e.g., tides, ram pressure).

  5. THE FIRST GALAXIES: CHEMICAL ENRICHMENT, MIXING, AND STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Greif, Thomas H.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Bromm, Volker

    2010-06-10

    Using three-dimensional cosmological simulations, we study the assembly process of one of the first galaxies, with a total mass of {approx}10{sup 8} M {sub sun}, collapsing at z {approx_equal} 10. Our main goal is to trace the transport of the heavy chemical elements produced and dispersed by a pair-instability supernova exploding in one of the minihalo progenitors. To this extent, we incorporate an efficient algorithm into our smoothed particle hydrodynamics code that approximately models turbulent mixing as a diffusion process. We study this mixing with and without the radiative feedback from Population III (Pop III) stars that subsequently form in neighboring minihalos. Our simulations allow us to constrain the initial conditions for second-generation star formation, within the first galaxy itself, and inside of minihalos that virialize after the supernova explosion. We find that most minihalos remain unscathed by ionizing radiation or the supernova remnant, while some are substantially photoheated and enriched to supercritical levels, likely resulting in the formation of low-mass Pop III or even Population II (Pop II) stars. At the center of the newly formed galaxy, {approx}10{sup 5} M {sub sun} of cold, dense gas uniformly enriched to {approx}10{sup -3} Z {sub sun} is in a state of collapse, suggesting that a cluster of Pop II stars will form. The first galaxies, as may be detected by the James Webb Space Telescope, would therefore already contain stellar populations familiar from lower redshifts.

  6. Star Formation Quenching and Identifying AGN in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, Alexander; Coil, A. L.; Lotz, J. M.; Aird, J.; Diamond-Stanic, A. M.; Moustakas, J.; Salim, S.; Simard, L.; Blanton, M. R.; Eisenstein, D.; Wong, K. C.; Cool, R. J.; Zhu, G.; PRIMUS; AEGIS

    2014-01-01

    I will discuss two observational projects related to galaxy and active galactic nuclei (AGN) evolution at z < 1. First I will present a statistical study of the morphologies of galaxies in which star formation is being shut down or quenched; this has implications for how red, elliptical galaxies are formed. I will discuss the physical processes behind star formation quenching from the morphological transformations that galaxies undergo during this process. Then I will focus on multi-wavelength AGN selection methods and tie together disparate results in the literature. Several IR-AGN selection methods have been developed using Spitzer/IRAC data in order to supplement traditional X-ray AGN selection; I will characterize the uniqueness and complementarity of these methods as a function of both IR and X-ray depth. I will use data from the PRIsm MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS) to compare the efficiency of IR and X-ray AGN selection and discuss the properties of the AGN and host galaxy populations of each. Finally, I will briefly mention ongoing work to compare the clustering of observed IR and X-ray AGN samples relative to stellar mass-matched galaxy samples.

  7. STAR FORMATION IN THE OUTER DISK OF SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Kate L.; Van Zee, Liese; Cote, Stephanie; Schade, David E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: David.Schade@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca

    2012-09-20

    We combine new deep and wide field of view H{alpha} imaging of a sample of eight nearby (d Almost-Equal-To 17 Mpc) spiral galaxies with new and archival H I and CO imaging to study the star formation and the star formation regulation in the outer disk. We find that, in agreement with previous studies, star formation in the outer disk has low covering fractions, and star formation is typically organized into spiral arms. The star formation in the outer disk is at extremely low levels, with typical star formation rate surface densities of {approx}10{sup -5} to 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. We find that the ratio of the radial extent of detected H II regions to the radius of the H I disk is typically {approx}>85%. This implies that in order to further our understanding of the implications of extended star formation, we must further our understanding of the formation of extended H I disks. We measure the gravitational stability of the gas disk, and find that the outer gaseous disk is typically a factor of {approx}2 times more stable than the inner star-forming disk. We measure the surface density of outer disk H I arms, and find that the disk is closer to gravitational instability along these arms. Therefore, it seems that spiral arms are a necessary, but not sufficient, requirement for star formation in the outer disk. We use an estimation of the flaring of the outer gas disk to illustrate the effect of flaring on the Schmidt power-law index; we find that including flaring increases the agreement between the power-law indices of the inner and outer disks.

  8. Fast outflows and star formation quenching in quasar host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniani, S.; Marconi, A.; Maiolino, R.; Balmaverde, B.; Brusa, M.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Cicone, C.; Comastri, A.; Cresci, G.; Fiore, F.; Feruglio, C.; La Franca, F.; Mainieri, V.; Mannucci, F.; Nagao, T.; Netzer, H.; Piconcelli, E.; Risaliti, G.; Schneider, R.; Shemmer, O.

    2016-06-01

    Negative feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is considered a key mechanism in shaping galaxy evolution. Fast, extended outflows are frequently detected in the AGN host galaxies at all redshifts and luminosities, both in ionised and molecular gas. However, these outflows are only potentially able to quench star formation, and we are still lacking decisive evidence of negative feedback in action. Here we present observations obtained with the Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observations in the Near Infrared (SINFONI) H- and K-band integral-field of two quasars at z ~ 2.4 that are characterised by fast, extended outflows detected through the [Oiii]λ5007 line. The high signal-to-noise ratio of our observations allows us to identify faint narrow (FWHM< 500 km s-1) and spatially extended components in [Oiii]λ5007 and Hα emission associated with star formation in the host galaxy. This star formation powered emission is spatially anti-correlated with the fast outflows. The ionised outflows therefore appear to be able to suppress star formation in the region where the outflow is expanding. However, the detection of narrow spatially extended Hα emission indicates star formation rates of at least ~50-90 M⊙ yr-1, suggesting either that AGN feedback does not affect the whole galaxy or that many feedback episodes are required before star formation is completely quenched. On the other hand, the narrow Hα emission extending along the edges of the outflow cone may also lead also to a positive feedback interpretation. Our results highlight the possible double role of galaxy-wide outflows in host galaxy evolution. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, P.ID: 086.B-0579(A) and 091.A-0261(A).The reduced data cubes are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A28

  9. Star formation and chemical abundances in clumpy irregular galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Boesgaard, A.M.; Edwards, S.; Heidmann, J.

    1982-01-15

    Clumpy irregular galaxies consist of several bright clumps which are huge H II complexes (about 100 times brighter and more massive than 30 Doradus) and contain about 10/sup 5/ O and B stars. Image-tube spectrograms with 1--3 A resolution have been obtained of the brightest emission regions of three clumpy galaxies and one candidate clumpy galaxy with the Mauna Kea 2.24 m telescope. The electron temperatures were found to be in the range 7000--9000 K and electron densities a few hundred cm/sup 3/: quite typical for normal H II regions. The abundances of O, N. S in Mrk 432 are comparable to those in Orion, while the three clumpy galaxies are slightly deficient in O and S (by factors of 2 to 4) and N (by factors of 3 to 6). The galaxies appear to be normal (like Sc galaxies) in mass and composition. Supernovae remnants are indicated by the high (S II)/H..cap alpha.. ratio. Possible triggering mechanisms for the exceptional star formation activity are discussed.

  10. Star Formation at Low Metallicity in Local Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Bruce; Hunter, Deidre Ann; Rubio, Monica; Brinks, Elias; Cortés, Juan R.; Cigan, Phil

    2016-01-01

    The radial profiles of star formation rates and surface mass densities for gas and stars have been compiled for 20 local dwarf irregular galaxies and converted into disk scale heights and Toomre Q values. The scale heights are relatively large compared to the galaxy sizes (~0.6 times the local radii) and generally increase with radius in a flare. The gaseous Q values are high, ~4, at most radii and even higher for the stars. Star formation proceeds even with these high Q values in a normal exponential disk as viewed in the far ultraviolet. Such normal star formation suggests that Q is not relevant to star formation in dIrrs. The star formation rate per unit area always equals approximately the gas surface density divided by the midplane free fall time with an efficiency factor of about 1% that decreases systematically with radius in approximate proportion to the gas surface density. We view this efficiency variation as a result of a changing molecular fraction in a disk where atomic gas dominates both stars and molecules. In a related study, CO observations with ALMA of star-forming regions at the low metallicities of these dwarfs, which averages 13% solar, shows, in the case of the WLM galaxy, tiny CO clouds inside much larger molecular and atomic hydrogen envelopes. The CO cloud mass fraction within the molecular region is only one percent or so. Nevertheless, the CO clouds have properties that are similar to solar neighborhood clouds: they satisfy the size-linewidth relation observed in the LMC, SMC, and other local dwarfs where CO has been observed, and the same virial mass versus luminosity relation. This uniforming of CO cloud properties seems to be the result of a confining pressure from the weight of the overlying molecular and atomic shielding layers. Star formation at low metallicity therefore appears to be a three dimensional process independent of 2D instabilities involving Q, in highly atomic gas with relatively small CO cores, activated at a rate

  11. Neutral hydrogen and star formation in irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skillman, Evan D.

    1987-01-01

    The Very Large Array and WSTR H I synthesis observations of seven irregular galaxies are presented. The total H I images of four Local Group dwarf irregular galaxies and three larger more distant irregular galaxies are constructed at the identical resolution of 500 pc. When compared to H II region distributions derived from H alpha images, all galaxies studied show an excellent correlation between the H I surface density and the presence of H II regions. This correlation is most easily interpreted in terms of a requisite threshold H I surface density for massive star formation. This threshold is 1 x 10 to the 21st power H I atoms/sq cm for a resolution of 500 pc. Giant extragalactic H II regions are only found near H I surface densities of a factor of 3 to 5 times this threshold level. The observed threshold implies a Jeans length of 150 pc, which is the same as the size scale at which the structure in the H I complexes correlates well with the H II region distribution. This, combined with the fact that in none of the galaxies observed is there H I above the threshold level with concomitant H II regions, implies an exclusively gravitational origin for the star formation events. That is, there is no need to involve a trigger as in the SSPSF theory (Seiden 1983) or feedback as in Dopita (1985).

  12. Galaxy Star Formation as a function of Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castander, F. J.; Balogh, M. L.; Bernardi, M.; Bower, R. G.; Connolly, A. J.; Gilbank, D. G.; Gómez, P. L.; Goto, T.; Hopkins, A. M.; Miller, C. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Schneider, D. P.; Seth, R.; Zabludoff, A. I.

    We study the galaxy star formation rate (SFR) as a function of environment using the SDSS EDR data. We find that the SFR is depressed in dense environments (clusters and groups) compared to the field. We find that the suppression of the SFR starts to be noticeable at around 4 virial radii. We find no evidence for SF triggering as galaxies fall into the clusters. We also present a project to study these effects in cluster pairs systems where the effects of filaments and large scale structure may be noticeable.

  13. Star Formation Rate in Holmberg IX Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andjelic, M. M.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we use previously determined Hα fluxes for dwarf galaxy Holmberg IX (Arbutina et al. 2009) to calculate star formation rate (SFR) in this galaxy. We discuss possible contaminations of Hα flux and, for the first time, we take into account optical emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) as a possible source of contamination of Hα flux. Derived SFR for Holmberg IX is 3.4×10-4M_{⊙} yr-1. Our value is lower then in previous studies, due to luminous shock-heated source M&H 9-10, possible hypernova remnant, which we excluded from the total Hα flux in our calculation of SFR.

  14. Star formation and mass assembly in high redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, P.; Fontana, A.; Grazian, A.; Salimbeni, S.; Fiore, F.; Fontanot, F.; Boutsia, K.; Castellano, M.; Cristiani, S.; de Santis, C.; Gallozzi, S.; Giallongo, E.; Menci, N.; Nonino, M.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Vanzella, E.

    2009-09-01

    Aims: The goal of this work is to infer the star formation properties and the mass assembly process of high redshift (0.3 ≤ z < 2.5) galaxies from their IR emission using the 24 μm band of MIPS-Spitzer. Methods: We used an updated version of the GOODS-MUSIC catalog, which has multiwavelength coverage from 0.3 to 24 μm and either spectroscopic or accurate photometric redshifts. We describe how the catalog has been extended by the addition of mid-IR fluxes derived from the MIPS 24 μm image. We compared two different estimators of the star formation rate (SFR hereafter). One is the total infrared emission derived from 24 μm, estimated using both synthetic and empirical IR templates. The other one is a multiwavelength fit to the full galaxy SED, which automatically accounts for dust reddening and age-star formation activity degeneracies. For both estimates, we computed the SFR density and the specific SFR. Results: We show that the two SFR indicators are roughly consistent, once the uncertainties involved are taken into account. However, they show a systematic trend, IR-based estimates exceeding the fit-based ones as the star formation rate increases. With this new catalog, we show that: a) at z>0.3, the star formation rate is correlated well with stellar mass, and this relationship seems to steepen with redshift if one relies on IR-based estimates of the SFR; b) the contribution to the global SFRD by massive galaxies increases with redshift up to ≃ 2.5, more rapidly than for galaxies of lower mass, but appears to flatten at higher z; c) despite this increase, the most important contributors to the SFRD at any z are galaxies of about, or immediately lower than, the characteristic stellar mass; d) at z≃ 2, massive galaxies are actively star-forming, with a median {SFR} ≃ 300 M_⊙ yr-1. During this epoch, our targeted galaxies assemble a substantial part of their final stellar mass; e) the specific SFR (SSFR) shows a clear bimodal distribution. Conclusions

  15. Spatially Resolved Star Formation Main Sequence of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano-Díaz, M.; Sánchez, S. F.; Zibetti, S.; Ascaribar, Y.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Ziegler, B.; González-Delgado, R. M.; Walcher, C. J.; García-Benito, R.; Mast, D.; Mendoza-Pérez, M. A.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Galbany, L.; Husemann, B.; Kehring, C.; Marino, R. A.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; López-Cobá, C.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Vilchez, J. M.

    2016-06-01

    The relation known as Star Formation Main Sequence (SFMS) of galaxies is defined in terms of stellar mass and star formation rate. This approximately linear relation has been proven to be tight and holds for several star formation indicators at local and at high redshifts. In this talk I will show recent results about our first attempts to study the Spatially Resolved SFMS, using integral field spectroscopic data, coming primarily from the CALIFA survey. I will present as a main result that a local SFMS is found with a slope and zero point of 0.72 +/ 0.04, and -7.95 +/ 0.29 respectively. I will also discuss the influence of characteristics such as environment and morphology in the relation. Finally I will present some extensions of these results for data com in from the MaNGA survey.

  16. Star formation and evolution in spiral galaxies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, W. J.; Tinsley, B. M.

    1973-01-01

    Evolutionary models for regions of M31 and M33 and the solar neighborhood are based on a stellar birthrate suggested by the dynamics of spiral structure: we assume that stars are formed very efficiently until the gas content reaches equilibrium at its present value, which takes about 1 b.y.; thereafter, the birthrate just equals the rate at which gas enters the system from stellar mass-loss or infall of intergalactic matter. Each model represents an average around a cylindrical-shell-shaped region, which is homogeneous and closed except for possible infall. The disk and spiral-arm populations only are considered. Each star is followed in the H-R diagram from the main sequence to death as an invisible remnant. Integrated magnitudes, colors, mass-to-light ratio (M/L), gas content, helium and metal abundance (Z), are computed in steps of 1 b.y.

  17. VARIABILITY AND STAR FORMATION IN LEO T, THE LOWEST LUMINOSITY STAR-FORMING GALAXY KNOWN TODAY

    SciTech Connect

    Clementini, Gisella; Cignoni, Michele; Ramos, Rodrigo Contreras; Federici, Luciana; Tosi, Monica; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Marconi, Marcella; Musella, Ilaria E-mail: rodrigo.contreras@oabo.inaf.it E-mail: monica.tosi@oabo.inaf.it E-mail: ripepi@na.astro.it E-mail: ilaria@na.astro.it

    2012-09-10

    We present results from the first combined study of variable stars and star formation history (SFH) of the Milky Way 'ultra-faint' dwarf (UFD) galaxy Leo T, based on F606W and F814W multi-epoch archive observations obtained with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We have detected 14 variable stars in the galaxy. They include one fundamental-mode RR Lyrae star and 11 Anomalous Cepheids with periods shorter than 1 day, thus suggesting the occurrence of multiple star formation episodes in this UFD, of which one about 10 Gyr ago produced the RR Lyrae star. A new estimate of the distance to Leo T of 409{sup +29}{sub -27} kpc (distance modulus of 23.06 {+-} 0.15 mag) was derived from the galaxy's RR Lyrae star. Our V, V - I color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of Leo T reaches V {approx} 29 mag and shows features typical of a galaxy in transition between dwarf irregular and dwarf spheroidal types. A quantitative analysis of the SFH, based on the comparison of the observed V, V - I CMD with the expected distribution of stars for different evolutionary scenarios, confirms that Leo T has a complex SFH dominated by two enhanced periods about 1.5 and 9 Gyr ago, respectively. The distribution of stars and gas shows that the galaxy has a fairly asymmetric structure.

  18. Predicting galaxy star formation rates via the co-evolution of galaxies and haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Douglas F.; Hearin, Andrew P.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Becker, Matthew R.; Behroozi, Peter S.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Reyes, Reinabelle; Zentner, Andrew R.; van den Bosch, Frank C.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we test the age matching hypothesis that the star formation rate (SFR) of a galaxy of fixed stellar mass is determined by its dark matter halo formation history, e.g. more quiescent galaxies reside in older haloes. We present new Sloan Digital Sky Survey measurements of the galaxy two-point correlation function and galaxy-galaxy lensing as a function of stellar mass and SFR, separated into quenched and star-forming galaxy samples to test this simple model. We find that our age matching model is in excellent agreement with these new measurements. We also find that our model is able to predict: (1) the relative SFRs of central and satellite galaxies, (2) the SFR dependence of the radial distribution of satellite galaxy populations within galaxy groups, rich groups, and clusters and their surrounding larger scale environments, and (3) the interesting feature that the satellite quenched fraction as a function of projected radial distance from the central galaxy exhibits an ˜r-.15 slope, independent of environment. These accurate predictions are intriguing given that we do not explicitly model satellite-specific processes after infall, and that in our model the virial radius does not mark a special transition region in the evolution of a satellite. The success of the model suggests that present-day galaxy SFR is strongly correlated with halo mass assembly history.

  19. The case against bimodal star formation in elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, B. K.

    1996-02-01

    We consider the present-day photometric and chemical properties of elliptical galaxies, adopting the bimodal star formation scenario of Elbaz, Arnaud & Vangioni-Flam. These models utilize an initial mass function (IMF) biased heavily toward massive stars during the early phases of galactic evolution, leading to early Type II supernovae-driven galactic winds. A subsequent lengthy, milder star formation phase with a normal IMF ensues, supposedly responsible for the stellar population observed today. Based upon chemical evolution arguments alone, this scenario has been invoked to explain the observed metal mass, and their abundance ratios, in the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters. Building upon the recent compilations of metallicity-dependent isochrones for simple stellar populations, we have constructed a coupled photometric and chemical evolution package for composite stellar populations in order to quantify the effects of such a model upon the photochemical properties of the resultant elliptical galaxies. We demonstrate that these predicted properties are incompatible with those observed at the current epoch.

  20. Gravitational star formation thresholds and gas density in three galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oey, M. S.; Kennicutt, R. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    It has long been held that the star formation rate (SFR) may be described as a power law of the gas density, p(exp n), as given by Schmidt (1959). However, this relation has as yet remained poorly defined and is likewise poorly understood. In particular, most studies have been investigations of global gas and star formation properties of galaxies, due to lack of adequate high-resolution data for detailed studies of individual galaxies. The three spiral galaxies in this study have published maps of both H2 (as traced by CO), and HI, thereby enabling the authors to investigate the relationship between total gas surface density and SFR. The purpose of the present investigation is the comparison of spatially-resolved total surface gas density in three galaxies (NGC 6946, M51, and M83) to sigma sub c as given by the above model. CO, HI and H alpha data for NGC 6946 were taken from Tacconi-Garman (1988), and for M51 and M83 from Lord (1987). The authors used a CO-H2 conversion of N(H2)/I sub CO(exp cos i = 2.8 x 10(exp 20) atoms cm(-2)/(K kms(-1), and summed the H2 and HI data for each galaxy to obtain the total hydrogen gas density. This total was then multiplied by a factor of 1.36 to include the contribution of helium to the total surface gas density. The authors assumed distances to NGC 6946, M51, and M83 to be 6.0, 9.6, and 8.9 Mpc respectively, with inclination angles of 30, 20, and 26 degrees. H alpha flux was used as the measure of SFR for NGC 6946, and SFR for the remaining two galaxies was taken directly from Lord as computed from H alpha measurements. The results of these full-disk studies thus show a remarkable correlation between the total gas density and the threshold densities given by the gravitational stability criterion. In particular, the threshold density appears to mark a lower boundary to the range of gas densities in these galaxies, which may have consequence in determining appropriate models for star formation and gas dynamics. More evidence is

  1. The evolution of star formation activity in galaxy groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfanianfar, G.; Popesso, P.; Finoguenov, A.; Wuyts, S.; Wilman, D.; Biviano, A.; Ziparo, F.; Salvato, M.; Nandra, K.; Lutz, D.; Elbaz, D.; Dickinson, M.; Tanaka, M.; Mirkazemi, M.; Balogh, M. L.; Altieri, M. B.; Aussel, H.; Bauer, F.; Berta, S.; Bielby, R. M.; Brandt, N.; Cappelluti, N.; Cimatti, A.; Cooper, M.; Fadda, D.; Ilbert, O.; Le Floch, E.; Magnelli, B.; Mulchaey, J. S.; Nordon, R.; Newman, J. A.; Poglitsch, A.; Pozzi, F.

    2014-12-01

    We study the evolution of the total star formation (SF) activity, total stellar mass (ΣM*) and halo occupation distribution (HOD) in massive haloes by using one of the largest X-ray selected sample of galaxy groups with secure spectroscopic identification in the major blank field surveys (ECDFS, CDFN, COSMOS, AEGIS). We provide an accurate measurement of star formation rate (SFR) for the bulk of the star-forming galaxies using very deep mid-infrared Spitzer MIPS and far-infrared Herschel PACS observations. For undetected IR sources, we provide a well-calibrated SFR from spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. We observe a clear evolution in the level of SF activity in galaxy groups. The total SF activity in the high-redshift groups (0.5 < z < 1.1) is higher with respect to the low-redshift (0.15 < z < 0.5) sample at any mass by 0.8 ± 0.12 dex. A milder difference (0.35 ± 0.1 dex) is observed between the low-redshift bin and the groups at z ˜ 0. We show that the level of SF activity is declining more rapidly in the more massive haloes than in the more common lower mass haloes. We do not observe any evolution in the HOD and total stellar mass-halo mass relations in groups. The picture emerging from our findings suggests that the galaxy population in the most massive systems is evolving faster than galaxies in lower mass haloes, consistently with a `halo downsizing' scenario.

  2. Far-infrared emission and star formation in spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinchieri, G.; Fabbiano, G.; Bandiera, R.

    1989-01-01

    The correlations between the emission in the far-IR, H-alpha, and blue in a sample of normal spiral galaxies are investigated. It is found that the luminosities in these three bands are all tightly correlated, although both the strength of the correlations and their functional dependencies are a function of the galaxies' morphological types. The best-fit power laws to these correlations are different for the comparison of different quantities and deviate significantly from linearity in some cases, implying the presence of additional emission mechanisms not related to the general increase of luminosity with galactic mass. Clear evidence is found of two independent effects in the incidence of warm far-IR emission in late-type spirals. One is a luminosity effect shown by the presence of excess far-IR relative to H-alpha or optical emission in the more luminous galaxies. The other is a dependence on widespread star-formation activity.

  3. Galaxy Structure as a Driver of the Star Formation Sequence Slope and Scatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, Katherine E.; Franx, Marijn; Bezanson, Rachel; Brammer, Gabriel B.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Kriek, Mariska T.; Labbé, Ivo; Leja, Joel; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Nelson, Erica J.; Rigby, Jane R.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind E.; van der Wel, Arjen; Wuyts, Stijn

    2015-09-01

    It is well established that (1) star-forming galaxies follow a relation between their star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass ({M}\\star ), the “star formation sequence,” and (2) the SFRs of galaxies correlate with their structure, where star-forming galaxies are less concentrated than quiescent galaxies at fixed mass. Here, we consider whether the scatter and slope of the star formation sequence is correlated with systematic variations in the Sérsic indices, n, of galaxies across the SFR-{M}\\star plane. We use a mass-complete sample of 23,848 galaxies at 0.5 < z < 2.5 selected from the 3D-HST photometric catalogs. Galaxy light profiles parameterized by n are based on Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey near-infrared imaging. We use a single SFR indicator empirically calibrated from stacks of Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm imaging, adding the unobscured and obscured star formation. We find that the scatter of the star formation sequence is related in part to galaxy structure; the scatter due to variations in n at fixed mass for star-forming galaxies ranges from 0.14 ± 0.02 dex at z ˜ 2 to 0.30 ± 0.04 dex at z < 1. While the slope of the {log} {SFR}-{log} {M}\\star relation is of order unity for disk-like galaxies, galaxies with n > 2 (implying more dominant bulges) have significantly lower {SFR}/{M}\\star than the main ridgeline of the star formation sequence. These results suggest that bulges in massive z ˜ 2 galaxies are actively building up, where the stars in the central concentration are relatively young. At z < 1, the presence of older bulges within star-forming galaxies lowers global {SFR}/{M}\\star , decreasing the slope and contributing significantly to the scatter of the star formation sequence.

  4. STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY IN THE COOL CORES OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Mushotzky, Richard; Reynolds, Christopher; Rupke, David S. N. E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.edu

    2011-06-20

    We have assembled a sample of high spatial resolution far-UV (Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/Solar Blind Channel) and H{alpha} (Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter) imaging for 15 cool core galaxy clusters. These data provide a detailed view of the thin, extended filaments in the cores of these clusters. Based on the ratio of the far-UV to H{alpha} luminosity, the UV spectral energy distribution, and the far-UV and H{alpha} morphology, we conclude that the warm, ionized gas in the cluster cores is photoionized by massive, young stars in all but a few (A1991, A2052, A2580) systems. We show that the extended filaments, when considered separately, appear to be star forming in the majority of cases, while the nuclei tend to have slightly lower far-UV luminosity for a given H{alpha} luminosity, suggesting a harder ionization source or higher extinction. We observe a slight offset in the UV/H{alpha} ratio from the expected value for continuous star formation which can be modeled by assuming intrinsic extinction by modest amounts of dust (E(B - V) {approx} 0.2) or a top-heavy initial mass function in the extended filaments. The measured star formation rates vary from {approx}0.05 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} in the nuclei of non-cooling systems, consistent with passive, red ellipticals, to {approx}5 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} in systems with complex, extended, optical filaments. Comparing the estimates of the star formation rate based on UV, H{alpha}, and infrared luminosities to the spectroscopically determined X-ray cooling rate suggests a star formation efficiency of 14{sup +18}{sub -8}%. This value represents the time-averaged fraction, by mass, of gas cooling out of the intracluster medium, which turns into stars and agrees well with the global fraction of baryons in stars required by simulations to reproduce the stellar mass function for galaxies. This result provides a new constraint on the efficiency of star formation in accreting systems.

  5. Low-Metallicity Star Formation: From the First Stars to Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Leslie K.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Schneider, Raffaella

    2008-12-01

    Preface; SOC and LOC; Participants; Life at the conference; Conference photo; Session I. Population III and Metal-Free Star Formation: 1. Open questions in the study of population III star formation S. C. O. Glover, P. C. Clark, T. H. Greif, J. L. Johnson, V. Bromm, R. S. Klessen and A. Stacy; 2. Protostar formation in the early universe Naoki Yoshida; 3. Population III.1 stars: formation, feedback and evolution of the IMF Jonathan C. Tan; 4. The formation of the first galaxies and the transition to low-mass star formation T. H. Greif, D. R. G. Schleicher, J. L. Johnson, A.-K. Jappsen, R. S. Klessen, P. C. Clark, S. C. O. Glover, A. Stacy and V. Bromm; 5. Low-metallicity star formation: the characteristic mass and upper mass limit Kazuyuki Omukai; 6. Dark stars: dark matter in the first stars leads to a new phase of stellar evolution Katherine Freese, Douglas Spolyar, Anthony Aguirre, Peter Bodenheimer, Paolo Gondolo, J. A. Sellwood and Naoki Yoshida; 7. Effects of dark matter annihilation on the first stars F. Iocco, A. Bressan, E. Ripamonti, R. Schneider, A. Ferrara and P. Marigo; 8. Searching for Pop III stars and galaxies at high redshift Daniel Schaerer; 9. The search for population III stars Sperello di Serego Alighieri, Jaron Kurk, Benedetta Ciardi, Andrea Cimatti, Emanuele Daddi and Andrea Ferrara; 10. Observational search for population III stars in high-redshift galaxies Tohru Nagao; Session II. Metal Enrichment, Chemical Evolution, and Feedback: 11. Cosmic metal enrichment Andrea Ferrara; 12. Insights into the origin of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation Henry Lee, Eric F. Bell and Rachel S. Somerville; 13. LSD and AMAZE: the mass-metallicity relation at z > 3 F. Mannucci and R. Maiolino; 14. Three modes of metal-enriched star formation at high redshift Britton D. Smith, Matthew J. Turk, Steinn Sigurdsson, Brian W. O'Shea and Michael L. Norman; 15. Primordial supernovae and the assembly of the first galaxies Daniel Whalen, Bob Van Veelen, Brian W. O

  6. The star formation rates of active galactic nuclei host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Sara L.; Teimoorinia, Hossen; Rosario, David J.; Mendel, J. Trevor

    2016-05-01

    Using artificial neural network predictions of total infrared luminosities (LIR), we compare the host galaxy star formation rates (SFRs) of ˜21 000 optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGN), 466 low-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) and 721 mid-IR-selected AGN. SFR offsets (ΔSFR) relative to a sample of star-forming `main-sequence' galaxies (matched in M⋆, z and local environment) are computed for the AGN hosts. Optically selected AGN exhibit a wide range of ΔSFR, with a distribution skewed to low SFRs and a median ΔSFR = -0.06 dex. The LERGs have SFRs that are shifted to even lower values with a median ΔSFR = -0.5 dex. In contrast, mid-IR-selected AGN have, on average, SFRs enhanced by a factor of ˜1.5. We interpret the different distributions of ΔSFR amongst the different AGN classes in the context of the relative contribution of triggering by galaxy mergers. Whereas the LERGs are predominantly fuelled through low accretion rate secular processes which are not accompanied by enhancements in SFR, mergers, which can simultaneously boost SFRs, most frequently lead to powerful, obscured AGN.

  7. Predicting Galaxy Star Formation Rates via the Co-evolution of Galaxies and Halos

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Douglas F.; Hearin, Andrew P.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Becker, Matthew R.; Behroozi, Peter S.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Reyes, Reinabelle; Zentner, Andrew R.

    2014-03-06

    In this paper, we test the age matching hypothesis that the star formation rate (SFR) of a galaxy is determined by its dark matter halo formation history, and as such, that more quiescent galaxies reside in older halos. This simple model has been remarkably successful at predicting color-based galaxy statistics at low redshift as measured in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). To further test this method with observations, we present new SDSS measurements of the galaxy two-point correlation function and galaxy-galaxy lensing as a function of stellar mass and SFR, separated into quenched and star forming galaxy samples. We find that our age matching model is in excellent agreement with these new measurements. We also employ a galaxy group finder and show that our model is able to predict: (1) the relative SFRs of central and satellite galaxies, (2) the SFR-dependence of the radial distribution of satellite galaxy populations within galaxy groups, rich groups, and clusters and their surrounding larger scale environments, and (3) the interesting feature that the satellite quenched fraction as a function of projected radial distance from the central galaxy exhibits an approx r-.15 slope, independent of environment. The accurate prediction for the spatial distribution of satellites is intriguing given the fact that we do not explicitly model satellite-specific processes after infall, and that in our model the virial radius does not mark a special transition region in the evolution of a satellite, contrary to most galaxy evolution models. The success of the model suggests that present-day galaxy SFR is strongly correlated with halo mass assembly history.

  8. The evolution of galaxies. III - Metal-enhanced star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, R. J., Jr.; Arnett, W. D.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of the paucity of low-metal-abundance low-mass stars is discussed. One alternative to the variable-initial-mass-function (VIMF) solution is proposed. It is shown that this solution - metal-enhanced star formation - satisfies the classical test which prompted the VIMF hypothesis. Furthermore, with no additional parameters it provides improved fits to other tests - e.g., inhomogeneities in the abundances in young stars, concordance of all nucleo-cosmochronologies, and a required yield of heavy-element production which is consistent with current stellar evolution theory. In this model the age of the Galaxy is 18.6 plus or minus 5.7 b.y.

  9. Multiwavelength Study of Massive Galaxies at z~2. I. Star Formation and Galaxy Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daddi, E.; Dickinson, M.; Morrison, G.; Chary, R.; Cimatti, A.; Elbaz, D.; Frayer, D.; Renzini, A.; Pope, A.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Giavalisco, M.; Huynh, M.; Kurk, J.; Mignoli, M.

    2007-11-01

    Examining a sample of massive galaxies at 1.4star formation rates (SFRs) and to explore the implications for galaxy assembly. For z~2 galaxies with moderate luminosities (L8μm<1011 Lsolar), we find that the SFR can be estimated consistently from the multiwavelength data based on local luminosity correlations. However, 20%-30% of massive galaxies, and nearly all those with L8μm>1011 Lsolar, show a mid-IR excess that is likely due to the presence of obscured active nuclei, as shown in a companion paper. There is a tight and roughly linear correlation between stellar mass and SFR for 24 μm-detected galaxies. For a given mass, the SFR at z=2 was larger by a factor of ~4 and ~30 relative to that in star-forming galaxies at z=1 and 0, respectively. Typical ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at z=2 are relatively ``transparent'' to ultraviolet light, and their activity is long lived (>~400 Myr), unlike that in local ULIRGs and high-redshift submillimeter-selected galaxies. ULIRGs are the common mode of star formation in massive galaxies at z=2, and the high duty cycle suggests that major mergers are not the dominant trigger for this activity. Current galaxy formation models underpredict the normalization of the mass-SFR correlation by about a factor of 4 and the space density of ULIRGs by an order of magnitude but give better agreement for z>1.4 quiescent galaxies.

  10. BURST OF STAR FORMATION DRIVES BUBBLE IN GALAXY'S CORE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These NASA Hubble Space Telescope snapshots reveal dramatic activities within the core of the galaxy NGC 3079, where a lumpy bubble of hot gas is rising from a cauldron of glowing matter. The picture at left shows the bubble in the center of the galaxy's disk. The structure is more than 3,000 light-years wide and rises 3,500 light-years above the galaxy's disk. The smaller photo at right is a close-up view of the bubble. Astronomers suspect that the bubble is being blown by 'winds' (high-speed streams of particles) released during a burst of star formation. Gaseous filaments at the top of the bubble are whirling around in a vortex and are being expelled into space. Eventually, this gas will rain down upon the galaxy's disk where it may collide with gas clouds, compress them, and form a new generation of stars. The two white dots just above the bubble are probably stars in the galaxy. The close-up reveals that the bubble's surface is lumpy, consisting of four columns of gaseous filaments that tower above the galaxy's disk. The filaments disperse at a height of 2,000 light-years. Each filament is about 75 light-years wide. Velocity measurements taken by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope in Hawaii show that the gaseous filaments are ascending at more than 4 million miles an hour (6 million kilometers an hour). According to theoretical models, the bubble formed when ongoing winds from hot stars mixed with small bubbles of very hot gas from supernova explosions. Observations of the core's structure by radio telescopes indicate that those processes are still active. The models suggest that this outflow began about a million years ago. They occur about every 10 million years. Eventually, the hot stars will die, and the bubble's energy source will fade away. Astronomers have seen evidence of previous outbursts from radio and X-ray observations. Those studies show rings of dust and gas and long plumes of material, all of which are larger than the bubble. NGC 3079 is 50

  11. The history of star formation in nearby dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel Ray

    2010-11-01

    We present detailed analysis of color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of resolved stellar populations in nearby dwarf galaxies based on observations taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). From the positions of individual stars on a CMD, we are able to derive the star formation histories (SFHs), i.e., the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of time and metallicity, of the observed stellar populations. Specifically, we apply this technique to a number of nearby dwarf galaxies to better understand the mechanisms driving their evolution. The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury program (ANGST) provides multi-color photometry of resolved stars in ˜ 60 nearby dwarf galaxies from images taken with HST. This sample contains 12 dSph, 5 dwarf spiral, 28 dIrr, 12 dSph/dIrr (transition), and 3 tidal dwarf galaxies. The sample spans a range of ˜ 10 in MB and covers a wide range of environments, from highly interacting to truly isolated. From the best fit lifetime SFHs we find three significant results: (1) the average dwarf galaxy formed ˜ 60% of its stars by z ˜ 2 and 70% of its stars by z ˜ 1, regardless of morphological type, (2) the only statistically significant difference between the SFHs of different morphological types is within the most recent 1 Gyr (excluding tidal dwarf galaxies), and (3) the SFHs are complex and the mean values are inconsistent with simple SFH models, e.g., single epoch SF or constant SFH. We then present the recent ( ≲ 1 Gyr) SFHs of nine M81 Group Dwarf Galaxies. Comparing the SFHs, birthrate parameters, fraction of stars formed per time interval, and spatial distribution of stellar components as a function of luminosity, we find only minor differences in SF characteristics among the M81 Group dIs despite a wide range of physical properties. We extend our comparison to select dIs in the Local Group (LG), with similar quality photometry, and again find only minor differences in SF parameters. The lack of a clear trend in SF parameters over

  12. Are We Correctly Measuring the Star Formation in Galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, K. B. W.; Skillman, E. D.; Dolphin, A. E.; Mitchell, N. P.

    2016-06-01

    Integrating our knowledge of star formation (SF) traced by observations at different wavelengths is essential for correctly interpreting and comparing SF activity in a variety of systems and environments. This study compares extinction corrected integrated ultraviolet (UV) emission from resolved galaxies with color-magnitude diagram (CMD) based star formation rates (SFRs) derived from resolved stellar populations and CMD fitting techniques in 19 nearby starburst and post-starburst dwarf galaxies. The data sets are from the panchromatic Starburst Irregular Dwarf Survey and include deep legacy GALEX UV imaging, Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging, and Spitzer MIPS imaging. For the majority of the sample, the integrated near-UV fluxes predicted from the CMD-based SFRs—using four different models—agree with the measured, extinction corrected, integrated near-UV fluxes from GALEX images, but the far-UV (FUV) predicted fluxes do not. Furthermore, we find a systematic deviation between the SFRs based on integrated FUV luminosities and existing scaling relations, and the SFRs based on the resolved stellar populations. This offset is not driven by different SF timescales, variations in SFRs, UV attenuation, nor stochastic effects. This first comparison between CMD-based SFRs and an integrated FUV emission SFR indicator suggests that the most likely cause of the discrepancy is the theoretical FUV-SFR calibration from stellar evolutionary libraries and/or stellar atmospheric models. We present an empirical calibration of the FUV-based SFR relation for dwarf galaxies, with uncertainties, which is 53% larger than previous relations.

  13. StarPy: Quenched star formation history parameters of a galaxy using MCMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smethurst, R. J.; Lintott, C. J.; Simmons, B. D.; Schawinski, K.; Marshall, P. J.; Bamford, S.; Fortson, L.; Kaviraj, S.; Masters, K. L.; Melvin, T.; Nichol, R. C.; Skibba, R. A.; Willett, K. W.

    2016-09-01

    StarPy derives the quenching star formation history (SFH) of a single galaxy through the Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method code emcee (ascl:1303.002). The sample function implements the emcee EnsembleSampler function for the galaxy colors input. Burn-in is run and calculated for the length specified before the sampler is reset and then run for the length of steps specified. StarPy provides the ability to use the look-up tables provided or creating your own.

  14. Galaxy Zoo and ALFALFA: atomic gas and the regulation of star formation in barred disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert C.; Haynes, Martha P.; Keel, William C.; Lintott, Chris; Simmons, Brooke; Skibba, Ramin; Bamford, Steven; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Schawinski, Kevin

    2012-08-01

    We study the observed correlation between atomic gas content and the likelihood of hosting a large-scale bar in a sample of 2090 disc galaxies. Such a test has never been done before on this scale. We use data on morphologies from the Galaxy Zoo project and information on the galaxies' H I content from the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFALFA) blind H I survey. Our main result is that the bar fraction is significantly lower among gas-rich disc galaxies than gas-poor ones. This is not explained by known trends for more massive (stellar) and redder disc galaxies to host more bars and have lower gas fractions: we still see at fixed stellar mass a residual correlation between gas content and bar fraction. We discuss three possible causal explanations: (1) bars in disc galaxies cause atomic gas to be used up more quickly, (2) increasing the atomic gas content in a disc galaxy inhibits bar formation and (3) bar fraction and gas content are both driven by correlation with environmental effects (e.g. tidal triggering of bars, combined with strangulation removing gas). All three explanations are consistent with the observed correlations. In addition our observations suggest bars may reduce or halt star formation in the outer parts of discs by holding back the infall of external gas beyond bar co-rotation, reddening the global colours of barred disc galaxies. This suggests that secular evolution driven by the exchange of angular momentum between stars in the bar, and gas in the disc, acts as a feedback mechanism to regulate star formation in intermediate-mass disc galaxies. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 200 000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at South East Physics Network, E-mail: karen.masters@port.ac.ukEinstein fellow.

  15. ON STAR FORMATION RATES AND STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF GALAXIES OUT TO z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Wuyts, Stijn; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Lutz, Dieter; Nordon, Raanan; Berta, Stefano; Genzel, Reinhard; Magnelli, Benjamin; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Altieri, Bruno; Andreani, Paola; Aussel, Herve; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Cimatti, Andrea; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Maiolino, Roberto; McGrath, Elizabeth J.

    2011-09-01

    We compare multi-wavelength star formation rate (SFR) indicators out to z {approx} 3 in the GOODS-South field. Our analysis uniquely combines U to 8 {mu}m photometry from FIREWORKS, MIPS 24 {mu}m and PACS 70, 100, and 160 {mu}m photometry from the PEP, and H{alpha} spectroscopy from the SINS survey. We describe a set of conversions that lead to a continuity across SFR indicators. A luminosity-independent conversion from 24 {mu}m to total infrared luminosity yields estimates of L{sub IR} that are in the median consistent with the L{sub IR} derived from PACS photometry, albeit with significant scatter. Dust correction methods perform well at low-to-intermediate levels of star formation. They fail to recover the total amount of star formation in systems with large SFR{sub IR}/SFR{sub UV} ratios, typically occuring at the highest SFRs (SFR{sub UV+IR} {approx}> 100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) and redshifts (z {approx}> 2.5) probed. Finally, we confirm that H{alpha}-based SFRs at 1.5 < z < 2.6 are consistent with SFR{sub SED} and SFR{sub UV+IR} provided extra attenuation toward H II regions is taken into account (A{sub V,neb} = A{sub V,continuum}/0.44). With the cross-calibrated SFR indicators in hand, we perform a consistency check on the star formation histories inferred from spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling. We compare the observed SFR-M relations and mass functions at a range of redshifts to equivalents that are computed by evolving lower redshift galaxies backward in time. We find evidence for underestimated stellar ages when no stringent constraints on formation epoch are applied in SED modeling. We demonstrate how resolved SED modeling, or alternatively deep UV data, may help to overcome this bias. The age bias is most severe for galaxies with young stellar populations and reduces toward older systems. Finally, our analysis suggests that SFHs typically vary on timescales that are long (at least several 100 Myr) compared to the galaxies' dynamical time.

  16. Delayed star formation in isolated dwarf galaxies: Hubble space telescope star formation history of the Aquarius dwarf irregular

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Andrew A.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Brooks, Alyson M.; Leaman, Ryan E-mail: drw@ucsc.edu E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu E-mail: abrooks@physics.rutgers.edu

    2014-11-01

    We have obtained deep images of the highly isolated (d = 1 Mpc) Aquarius dwarf irregular galaxy (DDO 210) with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys. The resulting color-magnitude diagram (CMD) reaches more than a magnitude below the oldest main-sequence turnoff, allowing us to derive the star formation history (SFH) over the entire lifetime of the galaxy with a timing precision of ≈10% of the lookback time. Using a maximum likelihood fit to the CMD we find that only ≈10% of all star formation in Aquarius took place more than 10 Gyr ago (lookback time equivalent to redshift z ≈ 2). The star formation rate increased dramatically ≈6-8 Gyr ago (z ≈ 0.7-1.1) and then declined until the present time. The only known galaxy with a more extreme confirmed delay in star formation is Leo A, a galaxy of similar M {sub H} {sub I}/M {sub *}, dynamical mass, mean metallicity, and degree of isolation. The delayed stellar mass growth in these galaxies does not track the mean dark matter accretion rate from CDM simulations. The similarities between Leo A and Aquarius suggest that if gas is not removed from dwarf galaxies by interactions or feedback, it can linger for several gigayears without cooling in sufficient quantity to form stars efficiently. We discuss possible causes for the delay in star formation including suppression by reionization and late-time mergers. We find reasonable agreement between our measured SFHs and select cosmological simulations of isolated dwarfs. Because star formation and merger processes are both stochastic in nature, delayed star formation in various degrees is predicted to be a characteristic (but not a universal) feature of isolated small galaxies.

  17. Gas and star formation in the Circinus galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    For, B.-Q.; Koribalski, B. S.; Jarrett, T. H.

    2012-09-01

    We present a detailed study of the Circinus galaxy, investigating its star formation, dust and gas properties, both in the inner and outer disc. To achieve this, we obtained high-resolution Spitzer mid-infrared images with the IRAC (3.6, 5.8, 4.5 and 8.0 μm) and MIPS (24 and 70 μm) instruments and sensitive H I data from the Australia Telescope Compact Array and the 64-m Parkes telescope. These were supplemented by CO maps from the Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope. Because Circinus is hidden behind the Galactic plane, we demonstrate the careful removal of foreground stars as well as large- and small-scale Galactic emission from the Spitzer images. We derive a visual extinction of AV = 2.1 mag from the spectral energy distribution of the Circinus galaxy and total stellar and gas masses of 9.5 × 1010 and 9 × 109 M⊙, respectively. Using various wavelength calibrations, we find obscured global star formation rates between 3 and 8 M⊙ yr-1. Star-forming regions in the inner spiral arms of Circinus, which are rich in H I, are beautifully unveiled in the Spitzer 8 μm image. The latter is dominated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission from heated interstellar dust. We find a good correlation between the 8 μm emission in the arms and regions of dense H I gas. The (PAH 8 μm)/24 μm surface brightness ratio shows significant variations across the disc of Circinus.

  18. Star Formation Activity in CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-01

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M⊙ yr-1. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ˜350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ˜0.5-1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel

  19. A study of star formation in the disks of Sa galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, N.; Kennicutt, R.; Phillips, A.C.; Schommer, R.A. Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ Washington Univ., Seattle Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ )

    1991-04-01

    This paper compares the luminosity functions of the H II regions in several Sa galaxies with those of later-type galaxies. Broad UV measurements confirm expectations that the knots associated with the regions are very blue; the converse is also true. The H II region luminosity functions are very steep. The total H-alpha luminosities for the galaxies are computed and used to derive the current star-formation rates. It is found that, in contrast to the late-type galaxies, the current star-formation rates in Sa disks are less than one-tenth of the average rate over the last 15 Gyr. The formal depletion times of gas through star formation are longer than a Hubble time. If the star formation in late-type galaxies takes on the character of that currently seen in the Sas, star formation in such galaxies could continue for much longer than the usual estimate of 5 Gyr. 35 refs.

  20. Star-formation histories of local luminous infrared galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Colina, Luis; Miralles-Caballero, Daniel; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Arribas, Santiago; Bellocchi, Enrica; Cazzoli, Sara; Díaz-Santos, Tanio; Piqueras López, Javier

    2015-05-01

    We present analysis of the integrated spectral energy distribution (SED) from the ultraviolet (UV) to the far-infrared and Hα of a sample of 29 local systems and individual galaxies with infrared (IR) luminosities between 1011L⊙ and 1011.8L⊙. We combined new narrow-band Hα + [N ii] and broad-band g, r optical imaging taken with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), with archival GALEX, 2MASS, Spitzer, and Herschel data. Their SEDs(photometry and integrated Hα flux) were fitted simultaneously with a modified version of the magphys code using stellar population synthesis models for the UV-near-IR range and thermal emission models for the IR emission taking the energy balance between the absorbed and re-emitted radiation into account. From the SED fits, we derive the star-formation histories (SFH) of these galaxies. For nearly half of them, the star-formation rate appears to be approximately constant during the last few Gyr. In the other half, the current star-formation rate seems to be enhanced by a factor of 3-20 with respect to what occurred ~1 Gyr ago. Objects with constant SFH tend to be more massive than starbursts, and they are compatible with the expected properties of a main-sequence (M-S) galaxy. Likewise, the derived SFHs show that all our objects were M-S galaxies ~1 Gyr ago with stellar masses between 1010.1 and 1011.5 M⊙. We also derived the average extinction (Av = 0.6-3 mag) and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon luminosity to LIR ratio (0.03-0.16) from our fits. We combined the Av with the total IR and Hα luminosities into a diagramthat can be used to identify objects with rapidly changing (increasing or decreasing) SFR during the past 100 Myr. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgFITS files for all the reduced images are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/577/A78

  1. Calibrating UV Star Formation Rates for Dwarf Galaxies from STARBIRDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Mitchell, Noah P.

    2015-08-01

    Integrating our knowledge of star formation (SF) traced by observations at different wavelengths is essential for correctly interpreting and comparing SF activity in a variety of systems and environments. This study compares extinction corrected integrated ultraviolet (UV) emission from resolved galaxies with color-magnitude diagram (CMD) based star formation rates (SFRs) derived from resolved stellar populations and CMD fitting techniques in 19 nearby starburst and post-starburst dwarf galaxies. The data sets are from the panchromatic Starburst Irregular Dwarf Survey and include deep legacy GALEX UV imaging, Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging, and Spitzer MIPS imaging. For the majority of the sample, the integrated near-UV fluxes predicted from the CMD-based SFRs—using four different models—agree with the measured, extinction corrected, integrated near-UV fluxes from GALEX images, but the far-UV (FUV) predicted fluxes do not. Furthermore, we find a systematic deviation between the SFRs based on integrated FUV luminosities and existing scaling relations, and the SFRs based on the resolved stellar populations. This offset is not driven by different SF timescales, variations in SFRs, UV attenuation, nor stochastic effects. This first comparison between CMD-based SFRs and an integrated FUV emission SFR indicator suggests that the most likely cause of the discrepancy is the theoretical FUV-SFR calibration from stellar evolutionary libraries and/or stellar atmospheric models. We present an empirical calibration of the FUV-based SFR relation for dwarf galaxies, with uncertainties, which is ˜53% larger than previous relations. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, and obtained from the Hubble Legacy Archive, which is a collaboration between the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI/NASA), the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF/ESA), and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC/NRC/CSA).

  2. Star Formation in Galaxy Clusters Over the Past 10 Billion Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Kim-Vy

    2012-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound systems in the universe and include the most massive galaxies in the universe; this makes galaxy clusters ideal laboratories for disentangling the nature versus nurture aspect of how galaxies evolve. Understanding how galaxies form and evolve in clusters continues to be a fundamental question in astronomy. The ages and assembly histories of galaxies in rich clusters test both stellar population models and hierarchical formation scenarios. Is star formation in cluster galaxies simply accelerated relative to their counterparts in the lower density field, or do cluster galaxies assemble their stars in a fundamentally different manner? To answer this question, I review multi-wavelength results on star formation in galaxy clusters from Coma to the most distant clusters yet discovered at look-back times of 10 billion years (z 2).

  3. The formation of cluster elliptical galaxies as revealed by extensive star formation.

    PubMed

    Stevens, J A; Ivison, R J; Dunlop, J S; Smail, Ian R; Percival, W J; Hughes, D H; Röttgering, H J A; Van Breugel, W J M; Reuland, M

    2003-09-18

    The most massive galaxies in the present-day Universe are found to lie in the centres of rich clusters. They have old, coeval stellar populations suggesting that the bulk of their stars must have formed at early epochs in spectacular starbursts, which should be luminous phenomena when observed at submillimetre wavelengths. The most popular model of galaxy formation predicts that these galaxies form in proto-clusters at high-density peaks in the early Universe. Such peaks are indicated by massive high-redshift radio galaxies. Here we report deep submillimetre mapping of seven high-redshift radio galaxies and their environments. These data confirm not only the presence of spatially extended regions of massive star-formation activity in the radio galaxies themselves, but also in companion objects previously undetected at any wavelength. The prevalence, orientation, and inferred masses of these submillimetre companion galaxies suggest that we are witnessing the synchronous formation of the most luminous elliptical galaxies found today at the centres of rich clusters of galaxies. PMID:13679908

  4. Star formation rates in isolated galaxies selected from the Two-Micron All-Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnyk, O.; Karachentseva, V.; Karachentsev, I.

    2015-08-01

    We have considered the star formation properties of 1616 isolated galaxies from the 2MASS XSC (Extended Source Catalog) selected sample (2MIG) with the far-ultraviolet GALEX magnitudes. This sample was then compared with corresponding properties of isolated galaxies from the Local Orphan Galaxies (LOG) catalogue and paired galaxies. We found that different selection algorithms define different populations of isolated galaxies. The population of the LOG catalogue, selected from non-clustered galaxies in the Local Supercluster volume, mostly consists of low-mass spiral and late-type galaxies. The specific star formation rate (SSFR) upper limit in isolated and paired galaxies does not exceed the value of ˜dex(-9.4). This is probably common for galaxies of differing activity and environment (at least at z < 0.06). The fractions of quenched galaxies are nearly twice as high in the paired galaxy sample as in the 2MIG isolated galaxy sample. From the behaviour of (S)SFR versus M* relations we deduced that the characteristic value influencing evolutionary processes is the galaxy mass. However, the environmental influence is notable: paired massive galaxies with logM* > 11.5 have higher (S)SFR than isolated galaxies. Our results suggest that the environment helps to trigger the star formation in the highest mass galaxies. We found that the fraction of AGN in the paired sample is only a little higher than in our isolated galaxy sample. We assume that AGN phenomenon is probably defined by secular galaxy evolution.

  5. Star formation histories across the interacting galaxy NGC 6872, the largest-known spiral

    SciTech Connect

    Eufrasio, Rafael T.; De Mello, Duilia F.; Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G.; Benford, Dominic J.; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Urrutia-Viscarra, Fernanda; De Oliveira, Claudia Mendes

    2014-11-01

    NGC 6872, hereafter the Condor, is a large spiral galaxy that is interacting with its closest companion, the S0 galaxy IC 4970. The extent of the Condor provides an opportunity for detailed investigation of the impact of the interaction on the current star formation rate and its history across the galaxy, on the age and spatial distribution of its stellar population, and on the mechanism that drives the star formation activity. To address these issues we analyzed the far-ultraviolet (FUV) to near-infrared (near-IR) spectral energy distribution of seventeen 10 kpc diameter regions across the galaxy, and derived their star formation history, current star formation rate, and stellar population and mass. We find that most of the star formation takes place in the extended arms, with very little star formation in the central 5 kpc of the galaxy, in contrast to what was predicted from previous numerical simulations. There is a trend of increasing star formation activity with distance from the nucleus of the galaxy, and no evidence for a recent increase in the current star formation rate due to the interaction. The nucleus itself shows no significant current star formation activity. The extent of the Condor also provides an opportunity to test the applicability of a single standard prescription for conversion of the FUV + IR (22 μm) intensities to a star formation rate for all regions. We find that the conversion factor differs from region to region, arising from regional differences in the stellar populations.

  6. STAR Formation Histories Across the Interacting Galaxy NGC 6872, the Largest-Known Spiral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eufrasio, Rafael T.; Dwek, E.; Arendt, RIchard G.; deMello, Duilia F.; Gadotti, DImitri A.; Urrutia-Viscarra, Fernanda; deOliveira, CLaudia Mendes; Benford, Dominic J.

    2014-01-01

    NGC6872, hereafter the Condor, is a large spiral galaxy that is interacting with its closest companion, the S0 galaxy IC 4970. The extent of the Condor provides an opportunity for detailed investigation of the impact of the interaction on the current star formation rate and its history across the galaxy, on the age and spatial distribution of its stellar population, and on the mechanism that drives the star formation activity. To address these issues we analyzed the far-ultraviolet (FUV) to near-infrared (near-IR) spectral energy distribution of seventeen 10 kpc diameter regions across the galaxy, and derived their star formation history, current star formation rate, and stellar population and mass. We find that most of the star formation takes place in the extended arms, with very little star formation in the central 5 kpc of the galaxy, in contrast to what was predicted from previous numerical simulations. There is a trend of increasing star formation activity with distance from the nucleus of the galaxy, and no evidence for a recent increase in the current star formation rate due to the interaction. The nucleus itself shows no significant current star formation activity. The extent of the Condor also provides an opportunity to test the applicability of a single standard prescription for conversion of the FUV + IR (22 micrometer) intensities to a star formation rate for all regions. We find that the conversion factor differs from region to region, arising from regional differences in the stellar populations.

  7. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES IN THE NEARBY UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-Papaqui, J. P.; Coziol, R.; Ortega-Minakata, R. A.; Neri-Larios, D. M. E-mail: rcoziol@astro.ugto.mx E-mail: daniel@astro.ugto.mx

    2012-08-01

    We have determined the metallicity (O/H) and nitrogen abundance (N/O) of a sample of 122,751 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from the Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. For all these galaxies we have also determined their morphology and obtained a comprehensive picture of their star formation history (SFH) using the spectral synthesis code STARLIGHT. The comparison of the chemical abundance with the SFH allows us to describe the chemical evolution of the SFGs in the nearby universe (z {<=} 0.25) in a manner consistent with the formation of their stellar populations and morphologies. A high fraction (45%) of the SFGs in our sample show an excess abundance of nitrogen relative to their metallicity. We also find this excess to be accompanied by a deficiency of oxygen, which suggests that this could be the result of effective starburst winds. However, we find no difference in the mode of star formation of the nitrogen-rich and nitrogen-poor SFGs. Our analysis suggests that they all form their stars through a succession of bursts of star formation extended over a period of few Gyr. What produces the chemical differences between these galaxies seems therefore to be the intensity of the bursts: the galaxies with an excess of nitrogen are those that are presently experiencing more intense bursts or have experienced more intense bursts in their past. We also find evidence relating the chemical evolution process to the formation of the galaxies: the galaxies with an excess of nitrogen are more massive, and have more massive bulges and earlier morphologies than those showing no excess. Contrary to expectation, we find no evidence that the starburst wind efficiency decreases with the mass of the galaxies. As a possible explanation we propose that the loss of metals consistent with starburst winds took place during the formation of the galaxies, when their potential wells were still building up, and consequently were weaker than today, making starburst winds more

  8. Galaxy Structure as a Driver of the Star Formation Sequence Slope and Scatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, Katherine E.; 3D-HST Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that (1) star-forming galaxies follow a relation between their star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass (M*), the "star formation sequence," and (2) the SFRs of galaxies correlate with their structure, where star-forming galaxies are less concentrated than quiescent galaxies at fixed mass. In this talk, we consider whether the scatter and slope of the star formation sequence is correlated with systematic variations in the Sérsic indices, n, of galaxies across the SFR-M* plane. Using a mass-complete sample of 23,848 galaxies at 0.5 < z < 2.5 selected from the 3D-HST photometric catalogs, we find that the scatter of the star formation sequence is related in part to galaxy structure; the scatter due to variations in n at fixed mass for star-forming galaxies ranges from 0.14 ± 0.02 dex at z ˜ 2 to 0.30 ± 0.04 dex at z < 1. While the slope of the log(SFR)-log(M*) relation is of order unity for disk-like galaxies, galaxies with n > 2 (implying more dominant bulges) have significantly lower SFR/M* than the main ridgeline of the star formation sequence. These results suggest that bulges in massive z ˜ 2 galaxies are actively building up, where the stars in the central concentration are relatively young. At z < 1, the presence of older bulges within star-forming galaxies lowers global SFR/M*, decreasing the slope and contributing significantly to the scatter of the star formation sequence.

  9. Environmental effects on star formation in dwarf galaxies and star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, S.; Cropper, M.; Fujita, Y.; Chiosi, C.; Grebel, E. K.

    2015-01-01

    Context. The role of the environment in the formation of a stellar population is a difficult problem in astrophysics. The reason is that similar properties of a stellar population are found in star systems embedded in different environments or, vice versa, similar environments contain stellar systems with stellar populations having different properties. Aims: In this paper, we develop a simple analytical criterion to investigate the role of the environment on the onset of star formation. We will consider the main external agents that influence star formation (i.e. ram pressure, tidal interaction, Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities) in a spherical galaxy moving through an external environment. The theoretical framework developed here has direct applications to the cases of dwarf galaxies in galaxy clusters and dwarf galaxies orbiting our Milky Way system, as well as any primordial gas-rich cluster of stars orbiting within its host galaxy. Methods: We develop an analytic formalism to solve the fluid dynamics equations in a non-inertial reference frame mapped with spherical coordinates. The two-fluids instability at the interface between a stellar system and its surrounding hotter and less dense environment is related to the star formation processes through a set of differential equations. The solution presented here is quite general, allowing us to investigate most kinds of orbits allowed in a gravitationally bound system of stars in interaction with a major massive companion. Results: We present an analytical criterion to elucidate the dependence of star formation in a spherical stellar system (as a dwarf galaxy or a globular cluster) on its surrounding environment useful in theoretical interpretations of numerical results as well as observational applications. We show how spherical coordinates naturally enlighten the interpretation of two-fluids instability in a geometry that directly applies to an astrophysical case. This criterion predicts the

  10. On the Interplay between Star Formation and Feedback in Galaxy Formation Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agertz, Oscar; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the star formation-feedback cycle in cosmological galaxy formation simulations, focusing on the progenitors of Milky Way (MW)-sized galaxies. We find that in order to reproduce key properties of the MW progenitors, such as semi-empirically derived star formation histories (SFHs) and the shape of rotation curves, our implementation of star formation and stellar feedback requires (1) a combination of local early momentum feedback via radiation pressure and stellar winds, and subsequent efficient supernovae feedback, and (2) an efficacy of feedback that results in the self-regulation of the global star formation rate on kiloparsec scales. We show that such feedback-driven self-regulation is achieved globally for a local star formation efficiency per free fall time of {{ɛ }ff}≈ 10%. Although this value is larger that the {{ɛ }ff}˜ 1% value usually inferred from the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) relation, we show that it is consistent with direct observational estimates of {{ɛ }ff} in molecular clouds. Moreover, we show that simulations with local efficiency of {{ɛ }ff}≈ 10% reproduce the global observed KS relation. Such simulations also reproduce the cosmic SFH of the MW-sized galaxies and satisfy a number of other observational constraints. Conversely, we find that simulations that a priori assume an inefficient mode of star formation, instead of achieving it via stellar feedback regulation, fail to produce sufficiently vigorous outflows and do not reproduce observations. This illustrates the importance of understanding the complex interplay between star formation and feedback, and the detailed processes that contribute to the feedback-regulated formation of galaxies.

  11. Berkeley Prize: Mapping the Fuel for Star Formation in Early Universe Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacconi, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Stars form from cold molecular interstellar gas, which is relatively rare in galaxies like the Milky Way, which form only a few new stars per year. Massive galaxies in the distant universe formed stars much more rapidly. Was star formation more efficient in the past, and/or were early galaxies richer in molecular gas? The answer was elusive when our instruments could probe molecules only in the most luminous and rare objects such as mergers and quasars. But a new survey of molecular gas in typical massive star-forming galaxies at redshifts from about 1.2 to 2.3 (corresponding to when the universe was 24% to 40% of its current age) reveals that distant star-forming galaxies were indeed molecular-gas rich and that the star-formation efficiency is not strongly dependent on cosmic epoch.

  12. DUST-OBSCURED STAR FORMATION IN INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFT GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, Rose A.; Desai, Vandana; Rudnick, Gregory; Poggianti, Bianca; Bell, Eric F.; Hinz, Joannah; Zaritsky, Dennis; Jablonka, Pascale; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Moustakas, John; Rines, Kenneth E-mail: jmoustakas@ucsd.ed

    2010-09-01

    We present Spitzer MIPS 24 {mu}m observations of sixteen 0.4 < z < 0.8 galaxy clusters drawn from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey. This is the first large 24 {mu}m survey of clusters at intermediate redshift. The depth of our imaging corresponds to a total IR luminosity of 8 x 10{sup 10} L{sub sun}, just below the luminosity of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs), and 6{sup +1}{sub -1}% of M{sub V} < -19 cluster members show 24 {mu}m emission at or above this level. We compare with a large sample of coeval field galaxies and find that while the fraction of cluster LIRGs lies significantly below that of the field, the IR luminosities of the field and cluster galaxies are consistent. However, the stellar masses of the EDisCS LIRGs are systematically higher than those of the field LIRGs. A comparison with optical data reveals that {approx}80% of cluster LIRGs are blue and the remaining 20% lie on the red sequence. Of LIRGs with optical spectra, 88{sup +4} {sub -5}% show [O II] emission with EW([O II]) > 5 A, and {approx}75% exhibit optical signatures of dusty starbursts. On average, the fraction of cluster LIRGs increases with projected clustercentric radius but remains systematically lower than the field fraction over the area probed (<1.5x R {sub 200}). The amount of obscured star formation declines significantly over the 2.4 Gyr interval spanned by the EDisCS sample, and the rate of decline is the same for the cluster and field populations. Our results are consistent with an exponentially declining LIRG fraction, with the decline in the field delayed by {approx}1 Gyr relative to the clusters.

  13. Star formation in blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethuram, Ramya

    I present the optical photometry, spectroscopy using HCT of Blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies. The BCDs are observed through UBVRI filters. The colour-colour diagram (CCD) of U-B vs V-I and U-B vs B-V are created from integrated magnitudes. We have for the first time employed the mixed population technique using CCDs to find out ages of the underlying population intermixed with the starburst regions. A combination of few Gyr population, few hundred million years population and an young burst of age 5-15 Myr is detected for most of these galaxies. The structure of BCDs is a smooth background of low surface brightness (LSB) old stellar population and intermixed with the clumps of H II regions. The spectra of BCDs are typical H II region kind of spectra. The electron densities are < 100 cm^{-3} and temperatures are in the range 6000-15000 K. The oxygen abundance is calculated using the standard bright line methods. The oxygen abundance (log[O/H] + 12) of the sample of BCDs varies from as low as 7.9 to as high as 8.5. So these galaxies are (1/5 - 1/2.5) times metal poor when compared to solar. The BCDs are observed through H_α filters installed in the HFOSC system. The H_α fluxes and luminosities are used to calculate star formation rates (SFR) that are in the range 0.01 to 0.1 M_⊙/yr for individual H II regions and ranges between 0.1 to 1.0 M_⊙/yr for the whole galaxy. The archival data from 2MASS is used to obtain the integrated colour-colour diagrams of (J-H) vs (V-K). NIR colours are less affected by reddening and are better signatures of old stellar population. The results are compared with optical CCD, the interesting dichotomy are presented.

  14. The star formation main sequence and stellar mass assembly of galaxies in the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparre, Martin; Hayward, Christopher C.; Springel, Volker; Vogelsberger, Mark; Genel, Shy; Torrey, Paul; Nelson, Dylan; Sijacki, Debora; Hernquist, Lars

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the physical processes that drive star formation is a key challenge for galaxy formation models. In this paper, we study the tight correlation between the star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass of galaxies at a given redshift, how halo growth influences star formation, and star formation histories of individual galaxies. We study these topics using Illustris, a state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamical simulation of galaxy formation. Illustris reproduces the observed relation (the star formation main sequence, SFMS) between SFR and stellar mass at redshifts z = 0 and 4, but at intermediate redshifts of z ≃ 1-2, the simulated SFMS has a significantly lower normalization than reported by observations. The scatter in the relation is consistent with the observed scatter. However, the fraction of outliers above the SFR-stellar mass relation in Illustris is less than that observed. Galaxies with halo masses of ˜1012 M⊙ dominate the SFR density of the Universe, in agreement with the results of abundance matching. Furthermore, more-massive galaxies tend to form the bulk of their stars at high redshift, which indicates that `downsizing' occurs in Illustris. We also studied the star formation histories of individual galaxies, including the use of a principal component analysis decomposition. We find that for fixed stellar mass, galaxies that form earlier have more-massive black holes at z = 0, indicating that star formation and black hole growth are tightly linked processes in Illustris. While many of the properties of normal star-forming galaxies are well reproduced in the Illustris simulation, forming a realistic population of starbursts will likely require higher resolution and probably a more sophisticated treatment of star formation and feedback from stars and black holes.

  15. Star formation in semi-analytic galaxy formation models with multiphase gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerville, Rachel S.; Popping, Gergö; Trager, Scott C.

    2015-11-01

    We implement physically motivated recipes for partitioning cold gas into different phases (atomic, molecular, and ionized) in galaxies within semi-analytic models of galaxy formation based on cosmological merger trees. We then model the conversion of molecular gas into stars using empirical recipes motivated by recent observations. We explore the impact of these new recipes on the evolution of fundamental galaxy properties such as stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and gas and stellar phase metallicity. We present predictions for stellar mass functions, stellar mass versus SFR relations, and cold gas phase and stellar mass-metallicity relations for our fiducial models, from redshift z ˜ 6 to the present day. In addition we present predictions for the global SFR, mass assembly history, and cosmic enrichment history. We find that the predicted stellar properties of galaxies (stellar mass, SFR, metallicity) are remarkably insensitive to the details of the recipes used for partitioning gas into H I and H2. We see significant sensitivity to the recipes for H2 formation only in very low mass haloes (M_h ≲ 10^{10.5} M_{⊙}), which host galaxies with stellar masses m_* ≲ 10^8 M_{⊙}. The properties of low-mass galaxies are also quite insensitive to the details of the recipe used for converting H2 into stars, while the formation epoch of massive galaxies does depend on this significantly. We argue that this behaviour can be interpreted within the framework of a simple equilibrium model for galaxy evolution, in which the conversion of cold gas into stars is balanced on average by inflows and outflows.

  16. Linking the structural properties of galaxies and their star formation histories with STAGES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyos, Carlos; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Gray, Meghan E.; Wolf, Christian; Maltby, David T.; Bell, Eric F.; Böhm, Asmus; Jogee, Shardha

    2016-01-01

    We study the links between star formation history and structure for a large mass-selected galaxy sample at 0.05 ≤ zphot ≤ 0.30. The galaxies inhabit a very broad range of environments, from cluster cores to the field. Using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images, we quantify their structure following Hoyos et al., and divide them into disturbed and undisturbed. We also visually identify mergers. Additionally, we provide a quantitative measure of the degree of disturbance for each galaxy (`roughness'). The majority of elliptical and lenticular galaxies have relaxed structure, showing no signs of ongoing star formation. Structurally disturbed galaxies, which tend to avoid the lowest density regions, have higher star formation activity and younger stellar populations than undisturbed systems. Cluster spirals with reduced/quenched star formation have somewhat less disturbed morphologies than spirals with `normal' star formation activity, suggesting that these `passive' spirals have started their morphological transformation into S0s. Visually identified mergers and galaxies not identified as mergers but with similar roughness have similar specific star formation rates and stellar ages. The degree of enhanced star formation is thus linked to the degree of structural disturbance, regardless of whether it is caused by major mergers or not. This suggests that merging galaxies are not special in terms of their higher-than-normal star formation activity. Any physical process that produces `roughness', or regions of enhanced luminosity density, will increase the star formation activity in a galaxy with similar efficiency. An alternative explanation is that star formation episodes increase the galaxies' roughness similarly, regardless of whether they are merger induced or not.

  17. Star formation laws in the Andromeda galaxy: gas, stars, metals and the surface density of star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, S.; Lianou, S.; Barmby, P.

    2016-03-01

    We use hierarchical Bayesian regression analysis to investigate star formation laws in the Andromeda galaxy (M31) in both local (30, 155 and 750 pc) and global cases. We study and compare the well-known Kennicutt-Schmidt law, the extended Schmidt law and the metallicity/star formation correlation. Using a combination of Hα and 24 μm emission, a combination of far-ultraviolet and 24 μm, and the total infrared emission, we estimate the total star formation rate (SFR) in M31 to be between 0.35 ± 0.04 and 0.4 ± 0.04 M⊙ yr-1. We produce a stellar mass surface density map using IRAC 3.6 μm emission and measured the total stellar mass to be 6.9 × 1010 M⊙. For the Kennicutt-Schmidt law in M31, we find the power-law index N to be between 0.49 and 1.18; for all the laws, the power-law index varies more with changing gas tracer than with SFR tracer. The power-law index also changes with distance from the centre of the galaxy. We also applied the commonly used ordinary least-squares fitting method and showed that using different fitting methods leads to different power-law indices. There is a correlation between the surface density of SFR and the stellar mass surface density, which confirms that the Kennicutt-Schmidt law needs to be extended to consider the other physical properties of galaxies. We found a weak correlation between metallicity, the SFR and the stellar mass surface density.

  18. Stellar velocity dispersion in dissipative galaxy mergers with star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Stickley, Nathaniel R.; Canalizo, Gabriela

    2014-05-01

    In order to better understand stellar dynamics in merging systems, such as NGC 6240, we examine the evolution of central stellar velocity dispersion (σ{sub *}) in dissipative galaxy mergers using a suite of binary disk merger simulations that include feedback from stellar formation and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We find that σ{sub *} undergoes the same general stages of evolution that were observed in our previous dissipationless simulations: coherent oscillation, then phase mixing, followed by dynamical equilibrium. We also find that measurements of σ{sub *} that are based only upon the youngest stars in simulations consistently yield lower values than measurements based upon the total stellar population. This finding appears to be consistent with the so-called 'σ{sub *} discrepancy', observed in real galaxies. We note that quasar-level AGN activity is much more likely to occur when σ{sub *} is near its equilibrium value rather than during periods of extreme σ{sub *}. Finally, we provide estimates of the scatter inherent in measuring σ{sub *} in ongoing mergers.

  19. Feedback Regulated Star Formation in Cool Core Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Grant Russell

    2011-07-01

    The classical "cooling flow" model historically associated with "cool core" clusters of galaxies fails in the absence of an external, non-gravitational heating mechanism needed to offset catastrophic radiative losses of the X-ray bright intracluster medium (ICM). Numerous proposed solutions exist, including feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN), which may elegantly calibrate fundamental relationships such as the coupled co-evolution of black holes and the stellar component of their host galaxies. AGN feedback cannot completely offset cooling at all times, however, as the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in cool core clusters harbor extensive warm (˜104 K) and cold (10 < T < 104 K) gas reservoirs whose physical properties are regulated by ongoing star formation and an unknown, non-stellar heating mechanism. We present a doctoral thesis broadly related to these issues, particularly as they pertain to cooling flows, the triggering of AGN activity, and the associated energetic feedback that may play a critical role in heating the ambient environment on tens to hundreds of kiloparsec scales. We begin with a summary of the relevant background material, and in Chapter 2 we present a multiwavelength study of effervescent AGN heating in the cool core cluster Abell 2597. Previously unpublished Chandra X-ray data show the central regions of the hot intracluster medium (ICM) to be highly anisotropic on the scale of the BCG, permeated by a network of kpc-scale X-ray cavities, the largest of which is cospatial in projection with extended 330 MHz radio emission. We present spectral maps of projected, modeled gas properties fit to the X-ray data. The X-ray temperature map reveals two discrete, "hard-edged'' structures, including a ˜15 kpc "cold filament'' and an arc of hot gas which in projection borders the inner edge of the large X-ray cavity. We interpret the latter in the context of the effervescent AGN heating model, in which cavity enthalpy is thermalized as the

  20. Gas infall and stochastic star formation in galaxies in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Guinevere; Heckman, Timothy M.; De Lucia, Gabriella; Brinchmann, Jarle; Charlot, Stéphane; Tremonti, Christy; White, Simon D. M.; Brinkmann, Jon

    2006-04-01

    We study the recent star formation histories of local galaxies by analysing the scatter in their colours and spectral properties. We present evidence that the distribution of star formation histories changes qualitatively above a characteristic stellar surface mass density of 3 × 108Msolarkpc-2, corresponding to the transition between disc-dominated (late-type) galaxies and bulge-dominated (early-type) systems. When we average over subpopulations of galaxies with densities below this value, we find that subpopulations of all masses and densities form their stars at the same average rate per unit stellar mass. However, the scatter in galaxy colours, stellar absorption-line indices and emission-line strengths is larger for more compact galaxies of a given mass. This suggests that star formation occurs in shorter, higher amplitude events in galaxies with smaller sizes. Above the characteristic density, galaxy growth through star formation shuts down and the scatter in galaxy colours and spectral properties decreases. We propose that in low-density galaxies, star formation events are triggered when cold gas is accreted on to a galaxy. We have used a new high-resolution numerical simulation of structure formation in a `concordance' Lambda cold dark matter (ΛCDM) universe to quantify the incidence of these accretion events, and we show that the observational data are well fitted by a model in which the consumption time of accreted gas decreases with the surface density of the galaxy as tcons~μ-1*. The dark matter haloes that host massive galaxies with high stellar surface mass densities are also expected to grow through accretion, but the observations indicate that in bulge-dominated galaxies, star formation is no longer coupled to the hierarchical build-up of these systems.

  1. A CORRELATION BETWEEN STAR FORMATION RATE AND AVERAGE BLACK HOLE ACCRETION IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chien-Ting J.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Alberts, Stacey; Pope, Alexandra; Brodwin, Mark; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Goulding, Andrew D.; Murray, Stephen S.; Alexander, David M.; Mullaney, James R.; Assef, Roberto J.; Gorjian, Varoujan; Brown, Michael J. I.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Le Floc'h, Emeric

    2013-08-10

    We present a measurement of the average supermassive black hole accretion rate (BHAR) as a function of the star formation rate (SFR) for galaxies in the redshift range 0.25 < z < 0.8. We study a sample of 1767 far-IR-selected star-forming galaxies in the 9 deg{sup 2} Booetes multi-wavelength survey field. The SFR is estimated using 250 {mu}m observations from the Herschel Space Observatory, for which the contribution from the active galactic nucleus (AGN) is minimal. In this sample, 121 AGNs are directly identified using X-ray or mid-IR selection criteria. We combined these detected AGNs and an X-ray stacking analysis for undetected sources to study the average BHAR for all of the star-forming galaxies in our sample. We find an almost linear relation between the average BHAR (in M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}) and the SFR (in M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}) for galaxies across a wide SFR range 0.85 < log SFR < 2.56: log BHAR = (- 3.72 {+-} 0.52) + (1.05 {+-} 0.33)log SFR. This global correlation between SFR and average BHAR is consistent with a simple picture in which SFR and AGN activity are tightly linked over galaxy evolution timescales.

  2. The star formation rate intensity distribution function—. Comparison of observations with hierarchical galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkana, Rennan

    2002-09-01

    Recently, Lanzetta et al. [ApJ (2002) in press] have measured the distribution of star formation rate intensity in galaxies at various redshifts. This data set has a number of advantages relative to galaxy luminosity functions; the effect of surface-brightness dimming on the selection function is simpler to understand, and this data set also probes the size distribution of galactic disks. We predict this function using semi-analytic models of hierarchical galaxy formation in a ΛCDM cosmology. We show that the basic trends found in the data follow naturally from the redshift evolution of dark matter halos. The data are consistent with a constant efficiency of turning gas into stars in galaxies, with a best-fit value of 2%, where dust obscuration is neglected; equivalently, the data are consistent with a cosmic star formation rate which is constant to within a factor of two at all redshifts above two. However, the practical ability to use this kind of distribution to measure the total cosmic star formation rate is limited by the predicted shape of an approximate power law with a smoothly varying power, without a sharp break.

  3. CEPHEID VARIABLE STARS IN THE PEGASUS DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY: CONSTRAINTS ON THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Meschin, I.; Gallart, C.; Aparicio, A.; Rosenberg, A.; Cassisi, S. E-mail: carme@iac.es E-mail: alf@iac.es

    2009-03-15

    Observations of the resolved stars obtained over a period of 11 years in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy Pegasus have been used to search for Cepheid variable stars. Images were obtained in 55 epochs in the V band and in 24 epochs in the I band. We have identified 26 Cepheids and have obtained their light curves and periods. On the basis of their position in the period-luminosity (PL) diagram, we have classified them as 18 fundamental modes and eight first overtone Cepheids. Two PL relations for Cepheids have been used to derive the distance, resulting in 1.07 {+-} 0.05 Mpc. We present the VARFINDER code which finds the variable stars and their predicted periods in a given synthetic color-magnitude diagram computed with IAC-star and we propose the use of the Cepheid population as a constraint of the star formation history of Pegasus.

  4. Towards Understanding the Star Formation-Feedback Loop in Galaxy Formation and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Andrey

    We propose to carry out a comprehensive study of how star formation and feedback loop influences evolution of galaxies using a suite of ultra-high resolution cosmological simulations of galaxy formation using the Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) approach implemented in the Adaptive Refinement Tree (ART) code. The simulations will result in the numerical models of galaxy evolution of unprecedented resolution and sophistication of the processes included. Our code includes treatment of a wide spectrum of processes critical for realistic modeling of galaxy formation from the primordial chemistry of hydrogen and helium species, radiative transfer of ionizing radiation, to the metallicity- dependent cooling, chemistry of molecular hydrogen on dust and treatment of radiative transfer of dissociating far ultraviolet radiation. The latter allows us to tie star formation with dense, molecular regions capable of self-shielding from heating radiation and avoid adopting arbitrary density and temperature thresholds for star formation. Simulations will also employ a new model for momentum injection due to radiation pressure exerted by young massive stars onto surrounding dust and gas. This early, pre-supernova feedback is critical to prompt dispersal of natal molecular clouds and regulating star formation efficiency and increasing efficiency of energy release by supernovae. The simulations proposed in this project will therefore treat the most important process to understanding the efficiency of baryon conversion to stars - the star formation - in the way most closely resembling the actual star formation observed in galaxies and stellar feedback model that is firmly rooted in observational evidence on how feedback operates in real molecular clouds. The simulations we propose will provide models of galaxy evolution during three important epochs in the history of the universe: (1) early evolution prior to and during the reionization of the universe (the first billion years of

  5. Mapping galaxy encounters in numerical simulations: the spatial extent of induced star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Jorge; Torrey, Paul; Ellison, Sara L.; Patton, David R.; Bluck, Asa F. L.; Bansal, Gunjan; Hernquist, Lars

    2015-04-01

    We employ a suite of 75 simulations of galaxies in idealized major mergers (stellar mass ratio ˜2.5:1), with a wide range of orbital parameters, to investigate the spatial extent of interaction-induced star formation. Although the total star formation in galaxy encounters is generally elevated relative to isolated galaxies, we find that this elevation is a combination of intense enhancements within the central kpc and moderately suppressed activity at larger galactocentric radii. The radial dependence of the star formation enhancement is stronger in the less massive galaxy than in the primary, and is also more pronounced in mergers of more closely aligned disc spin orientations. Conversely, these trends are almost entirely independent of the encounter's impact parameter and orbital eccentricity. Our predictions of the radial dependence of triggered star formation, and specifically the suppression of star formation beyond kpc-scales, will be testable with the next generation of integral-field spectroscopic surveys.

  6. Detection of Molecular Gas in Void Galaxies : Implications for Star Formation in Isolated Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, M.; Saito, T.; Iono, D.; Honey, M.; Ramya, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present the detection of molecular gas from galaxies located in nearby voids using the CO(1-0) line emission as a tracer. The observations were performed using the 45 m single dish radio telescope of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory. Void galaxies lie in the most underdense parts of our universe and a significant fraction of them are gas rich, late-type spiral galaxies. Although isolated, they have ongoing star formation but appear to be slowly evolving compared to galaxies in denser environments. Not much is known about their star formation properties or cold gas content. In this study, we searched for molecular gas in five void galaxies. The galaxies were selected based on their relatively high IRAS fluxes or Hα line luminosities, both of which signify ongoing star formation. All five galaxies appear to be isolated and two lie within the Bootes void. We detected CO(1-0) emission from four of the five galaxies in our sample and their molecular gas masses lie between 108 and 109 M⊙. We conducted follow-up Hα imaging observations of three detected galaxies using the Himalayan Chandra Telescope and determined their star formation rates (SFRs) from their Hα fluxes. The SFR varies from 0.2 to 1 M⊙ yr-1 which is similar to that observed in local galaxies. Our study indicates that although void galaxies reside in underdense regions, their disks contain molecular gas and have SFRs similar to galaxies in denser environments. We discuss the implications of our results.

  7. Delayed Star Formation in Isolated Dwarf galaxies: Hubble Space Telescope Star Formation History of the Aquarius Dwarf Irregular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Andrew A.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Brooks, Alyson M.; Leaman, Ryan

    2014-11-01

    We have obtained deep images of the highly isolated (d = 1 Mpc) Aquarius dwarf irregular galaxy (DDO 210) with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys. The resulting color-magnitude diagram (CMD) reaches more than a magnitude below the oldest main-sequence turnoff, allowing us to derive the star formation history (SFH) over the entire lifetime of the galaxy with a timing precision of ≈10% of the lookback time. Using a maximum likelihood fit to the CMD we find that only ≈10% of all star formation in Aquarius took place more than 10 Gyr ago (lookback time equivalent to redshift z ≈ 2). The star formation rate increased dramatically ≈6-8 Gyr ago (z ≈ 0.7-1.1) and then declined until the present time. The only known galaxy with a more extreme confirmed delay in star formation is Leo A, a galaxy of similar M H I /M sstarf, dynamical mass, mean metallicity, and degree of isolation. The delayed stellar mass growth in these galaxies does not track the mean dark matter accretion rate from CDM simulations. The similarities between Leo A and Aquarius suggest that if gas is not removed from dwarf galaxies by interactions or feedback, it can linger for several gigayears without cooling in sufficient quantity to form stars efficiently. We discuss possible causes for the delay in star formation including suppression by reionization and late-time mergers. We find reasonable agreement between our measured SFHs and select cosmological simulations of isolated dwarfs. Because star formation and merger processes are both stochastic in nature, delayed star formation in various degrees is predicted to be a characteristic (but not a universal) feature of isolated small galaxies. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations were obtained under program GO

  8. Properties of Outflows from Dwarf Galaxies: Insights into the Evolution of the Star Formation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, C. L.

    1997-12-01

    Stellar winds and supernovae from massive stars have a strong impact on the interstellar medium. In dwarf galaxies, for example, the supernova explosions following a burst of star formation are predicted to drive any remaining interstellar gas out of the galaxy (Larson 1974; Dekel & Silk 1986). Uncertainties about the role of this feedback process -- and related but less violent activity -- in regulating the star formation rate in a galaxy pose a critical problem for theories of galaxy formation and evolution. I will present measurements of disk mass-loss rates in 15 nearby dwarf galaxies, examine the efficiency of mass ejection relative to the star formation rate, and discuss the effect of the halo potential on the fate of the outflowing gas.

  9. MOLECULAR GAS AND STAR FORMATION IN NEARBY DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, Adam K.; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Walter, Fabian; Sandstrom, Karin; Meidt, Sharon; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva; Schruba, Andreas; Bigiel, Frank; Bolatto, Alberto; Brinks, Elias; De Blok, W. J. G.; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schuster, Karl-Friedrich; Usero, Antonio

    2013-08-01

    We compare molecular gas traced by {sup 12}CO (2-1) maps from the HERACLES survey, with tracers of the recent star formation rate (SFR) across 30 nearby disk galaxies. We demonstrate a first-order linear correspondence between {Sigma}{sub mol} and {Sigma}{sub SFR} but also find important second-order systematic variations in the apparent molecular gas depletion time, {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol}={Sigma}{sub mol}/{Sigma}{sub SFR}. At the 1 kpc common resolution of HERACLES, CO emission correlates closely with many tracers of the recent SFR. Weighting each line of sight equally, using a fixed {alpha}{sub CO} equivalent to the Milky Way value, our data yield a molecular gas depletion time, {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol}={Sigma}{sub mol}/{Sigma}{sub SFR}{approx}2.2 Gyr with 0.3 dex 1{sigma} scatter, in very good agreement with recent literature data. We apply a forward-modeling approach to constrain the power-law index, N, that relates the SFR surface density and the molecular gas surface density, {Sigma}{sub SFR}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub mol}{sup N}. We find N = 1 {+-} 0.15 for our full data set with some scatter from galaxy to galaxy. This also agrees with recent work, but we caution that a power-law treatment oversimplifies the topic given that we observe correlations between {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} and other local and global quantities. The strongest of these are a decreased {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} in low-mass, low-metallicity galaxies and a correlation of the kpc-scale {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} with dust-to-gas ratio, D/G. These correlations can be explained by a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor ({alpha}{sub CO}) that depends on dust shielding, and thus D/G, in the theoretically expected way. This is not a unique interpretation, but external evidence of conversion factor variations makes this the most conservative explanation of the strongest observed {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} trends. After applying a D/G-dependent {alpha}{sub CO}, some weak correlations between {tau}{sub dep

  10. Star Formation and Gas Densities in the Dwarf Irregular Galaxy Sextans A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, Julia D.; Hunter, Deidre A.

    1995-12-01

    As a step in understanding the process of star formation in irregular galaxies, we have analysed the irregular galaxy Sextans A. Irregular galaxies provide star-forming systems that are unperturbed by spiral density waves. Sextans A is a tiny galaxy, 1.3 Mpc distant, just beyond the dynamic boundary of the Local Group. We studied the star formation properties of this galaxy using UBV and Hα images. Stars are not currently forming in the center of this galaxy, though they have in the past. The current star formation is in clumps in the outer parts of the galaxy and is not evenly distributed. The total Hα luminosity found for Sextans A is 9 x 10(38) erg/s, which corresponds to a star formation rate of 6 x 10(-3) Mmathordsun /yr for standard assumptions. The rate per unit area, within the Holmberg radius, is 6 x 10(-10) Mmathordsun /yr/pc(2) . Skillman et al. (1988) derived a total HI mass of 6 x 10(7) Mmathordsun . At its present rate, Sextans A will use up all of its gas in 12 x 10(9) yr, including the He contribution. We have also compared the star formation and gas density in Sextans A to critical gas surface density models (Toomre 1964, Quirk 1972, Kennicutt 1988). We used a published rotation curve to calculate the critical gas density necessary for the instabilities that produce star-forming clouds (Skillman et al. 1988). The ratio of observed to critical gas density is low in Sextans A, at the low end of values found by Kennicutt (1988) for spiral galaxies. The current star formation is located in the region of the galaxy with higher radially averaged observed gas densities relative to the critical density. This suggests that Sextans A has a difficult time forming gas clouds, resulting in an observed low star formation rate. This research was funded by the REU program at Northern Arizona University.

  11. Star formation triggering and its influence on ISM: multiwavelength view on the nearby galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, O. V.; Lozinskaya, T. A.; Moiseev, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    We report the results of our study of the ionized and neutral gas morphology and kinematics in the regions of triggered star formation in nearby galaxies. The main goal of our study was to answer the questions: which processes are responsible for the triggering of star formation at global scale and how the feedback from new regions of star formation influences on ISM for each individual galaxy studied. In this poster we mostly focus on our recent findings about two galaxies: IC 2574 and Holmberg II.

  12. SUSTAINING STAR FORMATION RATES IN SPIRAL GALAXIES: SUPERNOVA-DRIVEN TURBULENT ACCRETION DISK MODELS APPLIED TO THINGS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Vollmer, Bernd; Leroy, Adam K.

    2011-01-15

    Gas disks of spiral galaxies can be described as clumpy accretion disks without a coupling of viscosity to the actual thermal state of the gas. The model description of a turbulent disk consisting of emerging and spreading clumps contains free parameters, which can be constrained by observations of molecular gas, atomic gas, and the star formation rate for individual galaxies. Radial profiles of 18 nearby spiral galaxies from THINGS, HERACLES, SINGS, and GALEX data are used to compare the observed star formation efficiency, molecular fraction, and velocity dispersion to the model. The observed radially decreasing velocity dispersion can be reproduced by the model. In the framework of this model, the decrease in the inner disk is due to the stellar mass distribution which dominates the gravitational potential. Introducing a radial break in the star formation efficiency into the model improves the fits significantly. This change in the star formation regime is realized by replacing the free-fall time in the prescription of the star formation rate with the molecule formation timescale. Depending on the star formation prescription, the break radius is located near the transition region between the molecular-gas-dominated and atomic-gas-dominated parts of the galactic disk or closer to the optical radius. It is found that only less massive galaxies (log M(M{sub sun}) {approx}< 10) can balance gas loss via star formation by radial gas accretion within the disk. These galaxies can thus access their gas reservoirs with large angular momentum. On the other hand, the star formation of massive galaxies is determined by the external gas mass accretion rate from a putative spherical halo of ionized gas or from satellite accretion. In the absence of this external accretion, star formation slowly exhausts the gas within the optical disk within the star formation timescale.

  13. Star formation and feedback from radio galaxies: Insights from large multiwavelength surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Cameron J.

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are believed to play an important role in the evolution of their host galaxies by influencing the galaxy's gas reservoirs. This may affect the growth of the galaxy's massive black hole and star formation in the host galaxy. I address two unanswered questions central to our understanding of AGN: what triggers AGN, and how and to what extent do they affect their host and neighboring galaxies? I study radio galaxies, which are a subset of AGN, because their radio jets may provide a natural feedback mechanism between the AGN and the host and neighboring galaxies. Previous studies, which were limited to small samples, produce conflicting results as to whether mergers or environmental effects lead to triggering. It is also uncertain whether radio galaxies have a net positive (via gas cloud collapse) or negative (via gas heating) effect on star formation. I use a large (˜7,200), statistically significant sample of radio galaxies, for which I extract photometric information from several large-scale, multiwavelength surveys. The radio galaxies are compared to a sample of control galaxies whose properties match those of the radio galaxies, except for their lack of radio activity. This approach allows me to determine the frequency of feedback events and whether radio galaxies are responsible. I derive and compare composite spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the radio galaxies and control sample, and find a deficit of ultraviolet and infrared emission for slow accreting radio galaxies, suggesting that they may suppress star formation in their hosts. Fast accreting radio galaxies are found to have an infrared excess, which is characteristic of their high accretion rate and not a result of AGN feedback on star formation. I compare the populations of neighbor galaxies of the two samples and find that radio galaxies have an excess of neighbors within 100 kpc, which must play a role in triggering. My results also show that radio galaxies rarely

  14. The evolution of the star-forming sequence in hierarchical galaxy formation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Peter D.; Lacey, Cedric G.; Cole, Shaun; Baugh, Carlton M.

    2014-11-01

    It has been argued that the specific star formation rates of star-forming galaxies inferred from observational data decline more rapidly below z = 2 than is predicted by hierarchical galaxy formation models. We present a detailed analysis of this problem by comparing predictions from the GALFORM semi-analytic model with an extensive compilation of data on the average star formation rates of star-forming galaxies. We also use this data to infer the form of the stellar mass assembly histories of star-forming galaxies. Our analysis reveals that the currently available data favour a scenario where the stellar mass assembly histories of star-forming galaxies rise at early times and then fall towards the present day. In contrast, our model predicts stellar mass assembly histories that are almost flat below z = 2 for star-forming galaxies, such that the predicted star formation rates can be offset with respect to the observational data by factors of up to 2-3. This disagreement can be explained by the level of coevolution between stellar and halo mass assembly that exists in contemporary galaxy formation models. In turn, this arises because the standard implementations of star formation and supernova feedback used in the models result in the efficiencies of these process remaining approximately constant over the lifetime of a given star-forming galaxy. We demonstrate how a modification to the time-scale for gas ejected by feedback to be reincorporated into galaxy haloes can help to reconcile the model predictions with the data.

  15. The Mass Dependence of Star Formation Histories in Barred Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carles, Christian; Martel, Hugo; Ellison, Sara L.; Kawata, Daisuke

    2016-08-01

    We performed a series of 29 gasdynamical simulations of disc galaxies, barred and unbarred, with various stellar masses, to study the impact of the bar on star formation history. Unbarred galaxies evolve very smoothly, with a star formation rate (SFR) that varies by at most a factor of three over a period of 2 Gyr. The evolution of barred galaxies is much more irregular, especially at high stellar masses. In these galaxies, the bar drives a substantial amount of gas toward the centre, resulting in a high SFR, and producing a starburst in the most massive galaxies. Most of the gas is converted into stars, and gas exhaustion leads to a rapid drop of star formation after the starburst. In massive barred galaxies (stellar mass M★ > 2 × 1010 M⊙) the large amount of gas funnelled toward the centre is completely consumed by the starburst, while in lower-mass barred galaxies it is only partially consumed. Gas concentration is thus higher in lower-mass barred galaxies than it is in higher-mass ones. Even though unbarred galaxies funnelled less gas toward their centre, the lower SFR allows this gas to accumulate. At late times, the star formation efficiency is higher in barred galaxies than unbarred ones, enabling these galaxies to maintain a higher SFR with a smaller gas supply. Several properties, such as the global SFR, central SFR, or central gas concentration, vary monotonically with time for unbarred galaxies, but not for barred galaxies. Therefore one must be careful when comparing barred and unbarred galaxies that share one observational property, since these galaxies might be at very different stages of their respective evolution.

  16. Ghostly Halos in Dwarf Galaxies: a probe of star formation in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hoyoung; Ricotti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    We carry out numerical simulations to characterize the size, stellar mass, and stellar mass surface density of extended stellar halos in dwarf galaxies as a function of dark matter halo mass. We expect that for galaxies smaller than a critical value, these ghostly halos will not exist because the smaller galactic subunits that build it up, do not form any stars. The detection of ghostly halos around isolated dwarf galaxies is a sensitive test of the efficiency of star formation in the first galaxies and of whether ultra-faint dwarf satellites of the Milky Way are fossils of the first galaxies.

  17. A Comparative Study of Knots of Star Formation in Interacting versus Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Beverly J.; Zaragoza-Cardiel, Javier; Struck, Curtis; Olmsted, Susan; Jones, Keith

    2016-03-01

    Interacting galaxies are known to have higher global rates of star formation on average than normal galaxies, relative to their stellar masses. Using UV and IR photometry combined with new and published Hα images, we have compared the star formation rates (SFRs) of ∼700 star forming complexes in 46 nearby interacting galaxy pairs with those of regions in 39 normal spiral galaxies. The interacting galaxies have proportionally more regions with high SFRs than the spirals. The most extreme regions in the interacting systems lie at the intersections of spiral/tidal structures, where gas is expected to pile up and trigger star formation. Published Hubble Space Telescope images show unusually large and luminous star clusters in the highest luminosity regions. The SFRs of the clumps correlate with measures of the dust attenuation, consistent with the idea that regions with more interstellar gas have more star formation. For the clumps with the highest SFRs, the apparent dust attenuation is consistent with the Calzetti starburst dust attenuation law. This suggests that the high luminosity regions are dominated by a central group of young stars surrounded by a shell of clumpy interstellar gas. In contrast, the lower luminosity clumps are bright in the UV relative to Hα, suggesting either a high differential attenuation between the ionized gas and the stars, or a post-starburst population bright in the UV but faded in Hα. The fraction of the global light of the galaxies in the clumps is higher on average for the interacting galaxies than for the spirals. Thus either star formation in interacting galaxies is “clumpier” on average, or the star forming regions in interacting galaxies are more luminous, dustier, or younger on average.

  18. DWARF GALAXY FORMATION WITH H{sub 2}-REGULATED STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlen, Michael; Krumholz, Mark R.; Madau, Piero; Smith, Britton D.; Wise, John

    2012-04-10

    We describe cosmological galaxy formation simulations with the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo that incorporate a star formation prescription regulated by the local abundance of molecular hydrogen. We show that this H{sub 2}-regulated prescription leads to a suppression of star formation in low-mass halos (M{sub h} {approx}< 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }) at z > 4, alleviating some of the dwarf galaxy problems faced by theoretical galaxy formation models. H{sub 2} regulation modifies the efficiency of star formation of cold gas directly, rather than indirectly reducing the cold gas content with 'supernova feedback'. We determine the local H{sub 2} abundance in our most refined grid cells (76 proper parsec in size at z = 4) by applying the model of Krumholz, McKee, and Tumlinson, which is based on idealized one-dimensional radiative transfer calculations of H{sub 2} formation-dissociation balance in {approx}100 pc atomic-molecular complexes. Our H{sub 2}-regulated simulations are able to reproduce the empirical (albeit lower z) Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, including the low {Sigma}{sub gas} cutoff due to the transition from atomic to molecular phase and the metallicity dependence thereof, without the use of an explicit density threshold in our star formation prescription. We compare the evolution of the luminosity function, stellar mass density, and star formation rate density from our simulations to recent observational determinations of the same at z = 4-8 and find reasonable agreement between the two.

  19. Environmental Effects on the ISM and Star Formation Properties of Nearby Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, Angus; Wilson, Christine

    2015-08-01

    We present the results from a sample of HI flux-selected spiral galaxies within 25 Mpc from the JCMT Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey (NGLS), subdivided into isolated, group, and Virgo cluster samples. The CO J=3-2 line was observed with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), a tracer for the dense molecular gas linked to star formation. We combine the CO data with integrated star formation rates using H-alpha measurements and stellar masses from the S4G Survey in order to study the link between the gas and stars inside these galaxies. We find that while the mean atomic gas mass is lower for the Virgo galaxies compared to the isolated galaxies, the distributions of molecular gas masses are not significantly different between the three samples. The specific star formation rate is also lower for the Virgo sample, followed by the group and isolated galaxies. Finally, the molecular gas depletion time is longer for the Virgo galaxies compared to the group and isolated galaxies, which suggests the possible effects of environment on the galaxy's star formation properties.

  20. A comparison of star formation characteristics in different types of irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, S. S.; Hunter, D. A.; Gallagher, J. S. I.

    1986-01-01

    Two regions of recent star formation in blue irregular galaxies were observed with the IUE in the short wavelength, low dispersion mode. The spectra indicates that the massive star content is similar in these regions and is best fit by massive stars formed in a burst and now are approximately 2.5 to 3.0 million years old.

  1. Tidally triggered star formation in gravitationally interacting galaxies and selected work in optical instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Deborah Freedman

    In the first part of this thesis I present studies of tidally triggered star formation in pairs of gravitationally interacting galaxies. I use spectroscopic and photometric observations of local systems to demonstrate that triggered star formation depends both on intrinsic galaxy properties and on relative properties of the system. Minor galaxy interactions, where the luminosity ratio of the galaxies exceeds about six, produce triggered star formation only in the lower luminosity companion. In interactions between galaxies of similar luminosity, the blue galaxies exhibit tidally triggered star formation, but the red galaxies do not. I measure the strength, frequency, and timescale of gravitational tidal interactions between galaxy pairs in a complete spectroscopic survey at redshifts 0.08 to 0.38. A third of the galaxies with young stellar populations interacting with a companion of similar luminosity experience enhanced star formation activity. However, the most extreme bursts of triggered star formation are rare and short lived. The typical duration for enhanced star formation in interacting galaxies is of order 300 Myr. In the second part of this thesis I describe the development of optical instrumentation in support of large spectroscopic surveys. I analyze the effects of flexure in the Binospec spectrograph, a multi-object spectrograph for the 6.5-meter MMT telescope at Mt. Hopkins, AZ. I design the active flexure control system and the calibration system, two physically distinct systems that together will enable accurate and stable spectro-photometric calibration. Improvements to telescope collimation and mirror support provide additional benefit to spectroscopic surveys through superior image quality and spectrograph efficiency. I design and build a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for the 1.5-meter Tillinghast telescope at Mount Hopkins, AZ. The wavefront sensor and accompanying software serve as valuable tools for measuring and correcting for optical

  2. The rarity of star formation in brightest cluster galaxies as measured by WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser-McKelvie, Amelia; Brown, Michael J. I.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.

    2014-10-01

    We present the mid-infrared star formation rates of 245 X-ray selected, nearby (z < 0.1) brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). A homogeneous and volume limited sample of BCGs was created by X-ray selecting clusters with Lx > 1 × 1044 erg s- 1. The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) All WISE Data Release provides the first measurement of the 12 μm star formation indicator for all BCGs in the nearby Universe. Perseus A and Cygnus A are the only galaxies in our sample to have star formation rates of > 40 M⊙ yr- 1, indicating that these two galaxies are highly unusual at current times. Stellar populations of 99 ± 0.6 per cent of local BCGs are (approximately) passively evolving, with star formation rates of < 10 M⊙ yr- 1. We find that in general, star formation produces only modest BCG growth at the current epoch.

  3. Dynamical Properties of z ~ 2 Star-forming Galaxies and a Universal Star Formation Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouché, N.; Cresci, G.; Davies, R.; Eisenhauer, F.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Gillessen, S.; Lehnert, M.; Lutz, D.; Nesvadba, N.; Shapiro, K. L.; Sternberg, A.; Tacconi, L. J.; Verma, A.; Cimatti, A.; Daddi, E.; Renzini, A.; Erb, D. K.; Shapley, A.; Steidel, C. C.

    2007-12-01

    We present the first comparison of the dynamical properties of different samples of z~1.4-3.4 star-forming galaxies from spatially resolved imaging spectroscopy from SINFONI/VLT integral field spectroscopy and IRAM CO millimeter interferometry. Our samples include 16 rest-frame UV-selected, 16 rest-frame optically selected, and 13 submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). We find that rest-frame UV and optically bright (K<20) z~2 star forming galaxies are dynamically similar, and follow the same velocity-size relation as disk galaxies at z~0. In the theoretical framework of rotating disks forming from dissipative collapse in dark matter halos, the two samples require a spin parameter <λ> ranging from 0.06 to 0.2. In contrast, bright SMGs (S850μm>=5 mJy) have larger velocity widths and are much more compact. Hence, SMGs have lower angular momenta and higher matter densities than either the UV or optically selected populations. This indicates that dissipative major mergers may dominate the SMGs population, resulting in early spheroids, and that a significant fraction of the UV/optically bright galaxies have evolved less violently, either in a series of minor mergers, or in rapid dissipative collapse from the halo, given that either process may leads to the formation of early disks. These early disks may later evolve into spheroids via disk instabilities or mergers. Because of their small sizes and large densities, SMGs lie at the high surface density end of a universal (out to z=2.5) ``Schmidt-Kennicutt'' relation between gas surface density and star formation rate surface density. The best-fit relation suggests that the star formation rate per unit area scales as the surface gas density to a power of ~1.7, and that the star formation efficiency increases by a factor of 4 between non-starbursts and strong starbursts. Based on observations at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO), Paranal, Chile, under programs GTO 073.B-9018, 074.A-9011

  4. Galaxy pairs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - X. Does gas content alter star formation rate enhancement in galaxy interactions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudder, Jillian M.; Ellison, Sara L.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Rosenberg, Jessica L.; Torrey, Paul; Patton, David R.; Fertig, Derek; Mendel, J. Trevor

    2015-06-01

    New spectral line observations, obtained with the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), of a sample of 34 galaxies in 17 close pairs are presented in this paper. The sample of galaxy pairs is selected to contain galaxies in close, major interactions (i.e. projected separations <30 h_{70}^{-1} kpc, and mass ratios less extreme than 4:1), while still having a sufficiently large angular separation that the VLA can spatially resolve both galaxies in the pair. Of the 34 galaxies, 17 are detected at >3σ. We compare the H I gas fraction of the galaxies with the triggered star formation present in that galaxy. When compared to the star formation rates (SFRs) of non-pair galaxies matched in mass, redshift, and local environment, we find that the star formation enhancement is weakly positively correlated (˜2.5σ) with H I gas fraction. In order to help understand the physical mechanisms driving this weak correlation, we also present results from a small suite of binary galaxy merger simulations with varying gas fractions. The simulated galaxies indicate that larger initial gas fractions are associated with lower levels of interaction-triggered star formation (relative to an identical galaxy in isolation), but also show that high gas fraction galaxies have higher absolute SFRs prior to an interaction. We show that when interaction-driven SFR enhancements are calculated relative to a galaxy with an average gas fraction for its stellar mass, the relationship between SFR and initial gas fraction dominates over the SFR enhancements driven by the interaction. Simulated galaxy interactions that are matched in stellar mass but not in gas fraction, like our VLA sample, yield the same general positive correlation between SFR enhancement and gas fraction that we observe.

  5. Galactic Scale Flows and the Triggering of Star Formation in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramón-Fox, F. G.; Bonnell, I. A.

    2016-06-01

    Galactic scale gas flows feed the growth of molecular clouds where stars form in high-density cores. Large scale flows also play a role in injecting the energy that drives the internal dynamics of these clouds, which affects their overall stability and star formation activity. The triggering of star formation involves a connection between large and small-scale dynamical processes in galaxies, which can be explored using high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations. We present results of current work in high-resolution N-body and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics simulations of a model spiral galaxy with a realistic spiral arm morphology. These simulations allow to study gas flows in a self-consistent galaxy and their role on molecular cloud formation and growth. They also provide a ground for studying molecular cloud properties in different environments of a galaxy, the effects of spiral arms on large scale flows and for understanding global star formation relations.

  6. star formation rates of z > 1 galaxy clusters in the IRAC shallow cluster survey

    SciTech Connect

    Zeimann, Gregory R.; Stanford, S. A.; Brodwin, Mark; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, Conor; Snyder, Gregory F.; Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, Peter; Dey, Arjun; Moustakas, John

    2013-12-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope near-IR spectroscopy for 18 galaxy clusters at 1.0 galaxy clusters as well as in field galaxies. We find a large cluster-to-cluster scatter in the star formation rates within a projected radius of 500 kpc, and many of our clusters (∼60%) have significant levels of star formation within a projected radius of 200 kpc. A stacking analysis reveals that dust reddening in these star-forming galaxies is positively correlated with stellar mass and may be higher in the field than the cluster at a fixed stellar mass. This may indicate a lower amount of gas in star-forming cluster galaxies than in the field population. Also, Hα equivalent widths of star-forming galaxies in the cluster environment are still suppressed below the level of the field. This suppression is most significant for lower mass galaxies (log M {sub *} < 10.0 M {sub ☉}). We therefore conclude that environmental effects are still important at 1.0 star-forming galaxies in galaxy clusters with log M {sub *} ≲ 10.0 M {sub ☉}.

  7. What do the star formation histories of galaxies tell us about the Starburst-AGN connection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Papaqui, J. P.; Coziol, R.; Plauchu-Frayn, I.; Andernach, H.; Ortega-Minakata, R. A.

    2013-10-01

    We have determined the normal star formation histories (SFHs) for narrow emission line galaxies classified as star forming galaxies (SFGs), transition type objects (TOs), Seyfert 2s (Sy2s) and LINERs. The SFH varied with the activity type, following the mass of the galaxies and the importance of their bulge: LINERs reside in massive early-type galaxies, Sy2s and TOs in intermediate mass galaxies with intermediate morphological types, and SFGs are hosted in lower mass late-type spirals. Also, the maximum star formation rate in the past was found to increase with the virial mass within the aperture (VMA). This correlation suggests that the bulges and the supermassive black holes at the center of galaxies grow in parallel, in good agreement with the M_{BH}-σ_* relation.

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF OTHER GALAXY PROPERTIES FOR THE SAME STAR FORMATION ACTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa; Bei Yang; He Jizhou; Tang Xiaoxun

    2010-01-01

    Using two volume-limited Main galaxy samples of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 above and below the value of M*, we have investigated the environmental dependence of other galaxy properties for the same star formation activities. Only in the luminous passive class, a strong environmental dependence of the g - r color is observed, but the environmental dependence of other properties in this class is very weak. In other classes, we can conclude that the local density dependence of luminosity, g - r color, concentration index ci, and morphologies for star-forming galaxies and passive ones is much weaker than that obtained in the volume-limited Main galaxy samples. This suggests that star formation activity is a galaxy property very predictive of the local environment. In addition, we also note that passive galaxies are more luminous, redder, highly concentrated, and preferentially 'early type'.

  9. Star Formation in Galaxies vs Galaxy Environment from the Joint GALEX - CFHTLS - VVDS - SWIRE Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollo, A.; Arnouts, S.; Heinis, S.; Milliard, B.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate the dependence of galaxy star-formation history on environment, using colors - in particular UV colors - as star-formation history indicators and the distance to the 3-rd projected neighbor as an environment indicator. Here we present the first attempt to analyze how this dependence changed with redshift from z ˜ 1 till the present epoch. To address this issue we use a multi-wavelength catalog, based on the joint GALEX, CFHLTLS, VVDS and SWIRE data. The photometric redshifts derived from this catalog, covering an area close to ˜ 1.0 square degree and containing more than 100 000 galaxies, are accurate enough for these studies and possibly allow for a homogeneous approach from the local Universe to z ˜ 1. We find that in the contemporary Universe the most luminous and reddest in UV (i.e. most recently star-forming) populate the densest regions, which is in agreement with other studies. At z closer to 1 this tendency seems to disappear. However, systematic effects, not easy to quantify, have to be taken into account when interpreting our results.

  10. Radio constraints on heavily obscured star formation within dark gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, D. A.; Perley, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Highly dust-obscured starbursting galaxies (submillimeter galaxies and their ilk) represent the most extreme sites of star formation in the distant universe and contribute significantly to overall cosmic star formation beyond z > 1.5. Some stars formed in these environments may also explode as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and contribute to the population of 'dark' bursts. Here we present Very Large Array wideband radio-continuum observations of 15 heavily dust-obscured Swift GRBs to search for radio synchrotron emission associated with intense star formation in their host galaxies. Most of these targets (11) are not detected. Of the remaining four objects, one detection is marginal, and for two others we cannot yet rule out the contribution of a long-lived radio afterglow. The final detection is secure, but indicates a star formation rate (SFR) roughly consistent with the dust-corrected UV-inferred value. Most galaxies hosting obscured GRBs are therefore not forming stars at extreme rates, and the amount of optical extinction seen along a GRB afterglow sightline does not clearly correlate with the likelihood that the host has a sufficiently high SFR to be radio-detectable. While some submillimeter galaxies do readily produce GRBs, these GRBs are often not heavily obscured—suggesting that the outer (modestly obscured) parts of these galaxies overproduce GRBs and the inner (heavily obscured) parts underproduce GRBs relative to their respective contributions to star formation, hinting at strong chemical or initial mass function gradients within these systems.

  11. Radio Constraints on Heavily Obscured Star Formation within Dark Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perley, D. A.; Perley, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Highly dust-obscured starbursting galaxies (submillimeter galaxies and their ilk) represent the most extreme sites of star formation in the distant universe and contribute significantly to overall cosmic star formation beyond z > 1.5. Some stars formed in these environments may also explode as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and contribute to the population of "dark" bursts. Here we present Very Large Array wideband radio-continuum observations of 15 heavily dust-obscured Swift GRBs to search for radio synchrotron emission associated with intense star formation in their host galaxies. Most of these targets (11) are not detected. Of the remaining four objects, one detection is marginal, and for two others we cannot yet rule out the contribution of a long-lived radio afterglow. The final detection is secure, but indicates a star formation rate (SFR) roughly consistent with the dust-corrected UV-inferred value. Most galaxies hosting obscured GRBs are therefore not forming stars at extreme rates, and the amount of optical extinction seen along a GRB afterglow sightline does not clearly correlate with the likelihood that the host has a sufficiently high SFR to be radio-detectable. While some submillimeter galaxies do readily produce GRBs, these GRBs are often not heavily obscured—suggesting that the outer (modestly obscured) parts of these galaxies overproduce GRBs and the inner (heavily obscured) parts underproduce GRBs relative to their respective contributions to star formation, hinting at strong chemical or initial mass function gradients within these systems.

  12. Astronomers Discover Most Distant Galaxy Showing Key Evidence For Furious Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-12-01

    Astronomers have discovered a key signpost of rapid star formation in a galaxy 11 billion light-years from Earth, seen as it was when the Universe was only 20 percent of its current age. Using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope, the scientists found a huge quantity of dense interstellar gas -- the environment required for active star formation -- at the greatest distance yet detected. A furious spawning of the equivalent of 1,000 Suns per year in a distant galaxy dubbed the Cloverleaf may be typical of galaxies in the early Universe, the scientists say. Cloverleaf galaxy VLA image (green) of radio emission from HCN gas, superimposed on Hubble Space Telescope image of the Cloverleaf galaxy. The four images of the Cloverleaf are the result of gravitational lensing. CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF, STScI (Click on Image for Larger Version) "This is a rate of star formation more than 300 times greater than that in our own Milky Way and similar spiral galaxies, and our discovery may provide important information about the formation and evolution of galaxies throughout the Universe," said Philip Solomon, of Stony Brook University in New York. While the raw material for star formation has been found in galaxies at even greater distances, the Cloverleaf is by far the most distant galaxy showing this essential signature of star formation. That essential signature comes in the form of a specific frequency of radio waves emitted by molecules of the gas hydrogen cyanide (HCN). "If you see HCN, you are seeing gas with the high density required to form stars," said Paul Vanden Bout of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). Solomon and Vanden Bout worked with Chris Carilli of NRAO and Michel Guelin of the Institute for Millimeter Astronomy in France. They reported their results in the December 11 issue of the scientific journal Nature. In galaxies like the Milky Way, dense gas traced by HCN but composed mainly of hydrogen molecules is always

  13. Intense star formation within resolved compact regions in a galaxy at z = 2.3.

    PubMed

    Swinbank, A M; Smail, I; Longmore, S; Harris, A I; Baker, A J; De Breuck, C; Richard, J; Edge, A C; Ivison, R J; Blundell, R; Coppin, K E K; Cox, P; Gurwell, M; Hainline, L J; Krips, M; Lundgren, A; Neri, R; Siana, B; Siringo, G; Stark, D P; Wilner, D; Younger, J D

    2010-04-01

    Massive galaxies in the early Universe have been shown to be forming stars at surprisingly high rates. Prominent examples are dust-obscured galaxies which are luminous when observed at sub-millimetre wavelengths and which may be forming stars at a rate of 1,000 solar masses (M(middle dot in circle)) per year. These intense bursts of star formation are believed to be driven by mergers between gas-rich galaxies. Probing the properties of individual star-forming regions within these galaxies, however, is beyond the spatial resolution and sensitivity of even the largest telescopes at present. Here we report observations of the sub-millimetre galaxy SMMJ2135-0102 at redshift z = 2.3259, which has been gravitationally magnified by a factor of 32 by a massive foreground galaxy cluster lens. This magnification, when combined with high-resolution sub-millimetre imaging, resolves the star-forming regions at a linear scale of only 100 parsecs. We find that the luminosity densities of these star-forming regions are comparable to the dense cores of giant molecular clouds in the local Universe, but they are about a hundred times larger and 10(7) times more luminous. Although vigorously star-forming, the underlying physics of the star-formation processes at z approximately 2 appears to be similar to that seen in local galaxies, although the energetics are unlike anything found in the present-day Universe. PMID:20305639

  14. Unveiling the Effects of Environment on Star Formation in Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, George; Bai, Lei; Marcillac, Delphine; Momcheva, Ivelina; Mulchaey, John; Rieke, Marcia; Tyler, Krystal; Zabludoff, Ann

    2008-03-01

    As galaxies evolve, they are subject to a menagerie of violent events that can disrupt or entirely subdue ongoing star formation. Nowhere is this more apparent than in high-density environments. Clustering due to hierarchical formation results in interactions between galaxies and the intracluster medium, leading to the demise of star formation and the rise of red sequence galaxies. However, correlations between local density and galaxy properties like morphology, star formation rate, and color exist from the largest clusters down to the poorest groups. It is likely, since the majority of galaxies lie in groups, that global trends in fundamental properties are driven by this environment. That is, the strong observed decline in star formation rate from z ~ 1 is likely to be directly related to processes affecting group galaxies. Despite this, groups are rarely studied, especially compared to the massive amounts of data available for clusters. Indeed, if we wish to study the effect of density on galaxy evolution, we need to focus on all densities. We propose to observe 48 groups of galaxies at intermediate redshifts (0.12 < z < 0.82), the era where strong evolution and transformation are expected for groups, with MIPS at 24-microns. This waveband is ideal for studying obscured star formation in galaxies, which is especially useful for our intermediate redshift range, where other star formation indicators, such as H-alpha and [OII] emission lines, become difficult to acquire and/or correct for obscuration. We will combine our groups with additional data for nearby groups and those at z ~ 1, as well as data for clusters at similar redshifts, to study the effects of a wide variety of densities on galaxy evolution from z ~ 1 to the present.

  15. Star formation and dust extinction properties of local galaxies as seen from AKARI and GALEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Yuan, F.-T.; Buat, V.; Burgarella, D.

    2013-03-01

    An accurate estimation of the star formation-related properties of galaxies is crucial for understanding the evolution of galaxies. In galaxies, ultraviolet (UV) light emitted by recently formed massive stars is attenuated by dust, which is also produced by star formation (SF) activity, and is re-emitted at mid- and far- infrared (IR) wavelengths. In this study, we investigate the star formation rate (SFR) and dust extinction using UV and IR data. We selected local galaxies which are detected at AKARI FIS 90 μm and matched the IRAS IIFSC z 60 μm select catalog. We measured FUV and NUV flux densities from GALEX images. We examined the SF and extinction of Local galaxies using four bands of AKARI. Then, we calculated FUV and total IR luminosities, and obtained the SF luminosity, L SF, the total luminosity related to star formation activity, and the SFR. We find that in most galaxies, L SF is dominated by L dust. We also find that galaxies with higher SF activity have a higher fraction of their SF hidden by dust. In fact, the SF of galaxies with SFRs > 20 M⊙ yr-1 is almost completely hidden by dust. Our results boast a significantly higher precision with respect to previously published works, due to the use of much larger object samples from the AKARI and GALEX all sky surveys.

  16. Star formation in cooling flows in clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnamara, Brian R.; O'Connell, Robert W.

    1989-01-01

    Spectrophotometry (wavelength = 3400-5100 A) has been obtained for the nuclei of 13 cD galaxies in cooling flows. Spectral anomalies are found in 8 of the objects, consisting of abnormally strong forbidden O II emission or excess flux effects. Consideration is given to metallicity effects, the relationship between UV excesses and the presence of massive OB stars formed from the cooling flows, and low-level effects related to accretion.

  17. Molecular gas, the interstellar medium, and star formation in S0 and Sa galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley A., Jr.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Tacconi, Linda; Kenney, Jeffrey; Margulis, Michael

    1989-01-01

    The results are presented of a survey for CO J = 1 - 0 emission from S0 and S0/a galaxies. The results show that molecular gas is abundant within some early-type disk galaxies, and that the range in the ratio of molecular gas to atomic gas mass is similar to those in other disk galaxies. In the S0 and S0/a galaxies studied, estimated rates of star formation are substantially smaller than, but efficiencies of star formation are roughly the same as, those in Sb or Sc galaxies. Although the rate of cooling of the hot, X-ray emitting gas may be close to the estimated stellar mass return rate in the sample, the star formation rate probably exceeds both by a significant factor.

  18. The Hα Line Emission Contribution to Star Formation History Determination in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durán, E.; Magris, G.; Mateu, J.

    2009-05-01

    Recently, Mateu, Bruzual, & Magris (2006) developed a non parametric algorithm called GASPEX (GAlaxy Spectrum Parameter EXtraction) to recover a galaxy star formation history (SFH) and chemical evolution from its spectral energy distribution (SED). Nevertheless, in late type galaxies the youngest population contribution to the SED could be hidden in the optical continuum, which is mainly dominated by old and evolved stars; therefore the SFH obtained from an optical SED may not include an important fraction of the recent star formation events in the galaxy. In this work we show that imposing restrictions on the calculations, based on the H α line emission as a tracer of recent star formation events, we improve the determination of the SFR in the last 100 Myr.

  19. Galaxy Mergers with Adaptive Mesh Refinement: Star Formation and Hot Gas Outflow

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ji-hoon; Wise, John H.; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-06-22

    In hierarchical structure formation, merging of galaxies is frequent and known to dramatically affect their properties. To comprehend these interactions high-resolution simulations are indispensable because of the nonlinear coupling between pc and Mpc scales. To this end, we present the first adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulation of two merging, low mass, initially gas-rich galaxies (1.8 x 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} each), including star formation and feedback. With galaxies resolved by {approx} 2 x 10{sup 7} total computational elements, we achieve unprecedented resolution of the multiphase interstellar medium, finding a widespread starburst in the merging galaxies via shock-induced star formation. The high dynamic range of AMR also allows us to follow the interplay between the galaxies and their embedding medium depicting how galactic outflows and a hot metal-rich halo form. These results demonstrate that AMR provides a powerful tool in understanding interacting galaxies.

  20. Spatially resolved star-formation in nearby analogues of Lyman break galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, Sabrina; Baker, Andrew J.; Hall, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    At redshifts of z > 1.5, UV-selected galaxy populations (such as z ~ 3 Lyman break galaxies = LBGs) have the largest number of spectroscopic redshifts. As a result, LBGs have an important role in our understanding of the history of galaxy formation. However, LBGs are rather poorly understood at longer wavelengths, and thus our understanding of the total star formation rates and (especially) gas masses in such galaxies is incomplete. A common strategy is to assume that the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation between star formation rate (SFR) surface density and gas mass surface density holds, even in these high redshift galaxies where testing the relation directly is not feasible. To help assess the validity of this assumption, we examine the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation in selected nearby (z ~ 0.2) starburst galaxies in the hope of better understanding key questions regarding star formation processes in UV-selected galaxies. Several nearby galaxies with high UV luminosities and surface brightnesses, reminiscent of those found in LBGs, were identified and used for this project. We have obtained new, spatially resolved observations of these nearby analogues in Paschen alpha emission and carbon monoxide emission, from the ESO Very Large Telescope and the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer, respectively. We examine whether the galaxies follow the expected Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, and investigate any implied variation in gas depletion times between and within galaxies. This research has been supported by National Science Foundation grant AST-0955810.

  1. Surface Brightness Profiles and Star Formation Rates of Galaxies in NRGb054

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Ellen; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Miller, Brendan; Durbala, Adriana; Fitzgerald, Garrett

    2016-01-01

    We present new optical R and H-alpha images of the galaxy group NRGb054, obtained with the WIYN 0.9m telescope at KPNO using the MOSAIC camera. This group was studied as part of the larger Undergraduate ALFALFA Team project investigating the effects of a group environment on star formation. The stacked H-alpha image was continuum subtracted by the removal of a scaled and stacked R image. Surface photometry was performed on R and continuum-subtracted H-alpha cutouts of 20 covered galaxies to determine the surface brightness as a function of radius. Integrating the continuum-subtracted H-alpha surface brightness profile provides the total star formation within that galaxy, while the shape of the profile illustrates how star formation is spread throughout the galaxy. We provide a catalog of surface brightness profiles and integrated star formation rates for NRGb054. We consider star formation as a function of galaxy-galaxy separation and galaxy location within the group, and discuss our findings in the context of the wider study. This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005.

  2. Slow Quenching of Star Formation in OMEGAWINGS Clusters: Galaxies in Transition in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paccagnella, A.; Vulcani, B.; Poggianti, B. M.; Moretti, A.; Fritz, J.; Gullieuszik, M.; Couch, W.; Bettoni, D.; Cava, A.; D'Onofrio, M.; Fasano, G.

    2016-01-01

    The star formation quenching depends on environment, but a full understanding of what mechanisms drive it is still missing. Exploiting a sample of galaxies with masses {M}*\\gt {10}9.8{M}⊙ , drawn from the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) and its recent extension OMEGAWINGS, we investigate the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of stellar mass (M{}*) in galaxy clusters at 0.04\\lt z\\lt 0.07. We use non-member galaxies at 0.02 < z < 0.09 as a field control sample. Overall, we find agreement between the SFR-M{}* relation in the two environments, but detect a population of cluster galaxies with reduced SFRs, which is rare in the field. These transition galaxies are mainly found within the cluster virial radius (R200), but they impact on the SFR-M{}* relation only within 0.6R200. The ratio of transition to pure star-forming galaxies strongly depends on environment, being larger than 0.6 within 0.3R200 and rapidly decreasing with distance, while it is almost flat with M*. As galaxies move downward from the SFR-M{}* main sequence, they become redder and present older luminosity- and mass-weighted ages. These trends, together with the analysis of the star formation histories, suggest that transition galaxies have had a reduced SFR for the past 2-5 Gyr. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the interaction of galaxies with the intracluster medium via strangulation causes a gradual shut down of star formation, giving birth to an evolved population of galaxies in transition from being star forming to becoming passive.

  3. Hα imaging survey of Wolf-Rayet galaxies: morphologies and star formation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, S.; Omar, A.

    2016-06-01

    The Hα and optical broadband images of 25 nearby Wolf-Rayet (WR) galaxies are presented. The WR galaxies are known to have the presence of a recent (≤10 Myr) and massive star formation episode. The photometric Hα fluxes are estimated, and corrected for extinction and line contamination in the filter pass-bands. The star formation rates (SFRs) are estimated using Hα images and from the archival data in the far-ultraviolet (FUV), far-infrared (FIR) and 1.4 GHz radio continuum wave-bands. A comparison of SFRs estimated from different wavebands is made after including similar data available in literature for other WR galaxies. The Hα based SFRs are found to be tightly correlated with SFRs estimated from the FUV data. The correlations also exist with SFRs estimates based on the radio and FIR data. The WR galaxies also follow the radio-FIR correlation known for normal star forming galaxies, although it is seen here that majority of dwarf WR galaxies have radio deficiency. An analysis using ratio of non-thermal to thermal radio continuum and ratio of FUV to Hα SFR indicates that WR galaxies have lesser non-thermal radio emission compared to normal galaxies, most likely due to lack of supernova from the very young star formation episode in the WR galaxies. The morphologies of 16 galaxies in our sample are highly suggestive of an ongoing tidal interaction or a past merger in these galaxies. This survey strengthens the conclusions obtained from previous similar studies indicating the importance of tidal interactions in triggering star-formation in WR galaxies.

  4. Tracing recent star formation of red early-type galaxies out to z ∼ 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Jongwan; Lee, Jong Chul; Hwang, Ho Seong; Im, Myungshin; Le Borgne, Damien; Elbaz, David

    2014-08-20

    We study the mid-infrared (IR) excess emission of early-type galaxies (ETGs) on the red sequence at z < 1 using a spectroscopic sample of galaxies in the fields of Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS). In the mass-limited sample of 1025 galaxies with M {sub star} > 10{sup 10.5} M {sub ☉} and 0.4 < z < 1.05, we identify 696 Spitzer 24 μm detected (above the 5σ) galaxies and find them to have a wide range of NUV-r and r-[12 μm] colors despite their red optical u – r colors. Even in the sample of very massive ETGs on the red sequence with M {sub star} > 10{sup 11.2} M {sub ☉}, more than 18% show excess emission over the photospheric emission in the mid-IR. The combination with the results of red ETGs in the local universe suggests that the recent star formation is not rare among quiescent, red ETGs at least out to z ∼ 1 if the mid-IR excess emission results from intermediate-age stars or/and from low-level ongoing star formation. Our color-color diagram including near-UV and mid-IR emissions are efficient not only for identifying ETGs with recent star formation, but also for distinguishing quiescent galaxies from dusty star-forming galaxies.

  5. Star Formation and Tidal Encounters with the Low Surface Brightness Galaxy UGC 12695 and Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neil, K.; Verheijen, M. A. W.; McGaugh, S. S.

    2000-05-01

    We present VLA H I observations of the low surface brightness (LSB) galaxy UGC 12695 and its two companions, UGC 12687 and a newly discovered dwarf galaxy 2333+1234. UGC 12695 shows solid-body rotation but has a very lopsided morphology of the H I disk, with the majority of the H I lying in the southern arm of the galaxy. The H I column density distribution of this very blue LSB galaxy coincides in detail with its light distribution. Comparing the H I column density of UGC 12695 with the empirical (but not well-understood) value of Σc=1021 atoms cm-2 found in, e.g., Skillman's 1987 paper shows the star formation to be a local affair, occurring only in those regions where the column density is above this star formation threshold. The low surface brightness nature of this galaxy could thus be attributed to an insufficient gas surface density, inhibiting star formation on a more global scale. Significantly, however, the Toomre criterion places a much lower critical density on the galaxy (~1020 atoms cm-2), which is shown by the galaxy's low star formation rate not to be applicable. Within a projected distance of 300 kpc/30 km s-1 of UGC 12695 lie two companion galaxies-UGC 12687, a high surface brightness barred spiral galaxy, and 2333+1234, a dwarf galaxy discovered during this investigation. The close proximity of the three galaxies, combined with UGC 12695's extremely blue color and regions of localized starburst and UGC 12687's UV, excess bring to mind mutually induced star formation through tidal activity.

  6. Star Formation as a Function of Neutral Hydrogen Gas Density in Local Group Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Erika K.; Madore, Barry F.; Freedman, Wendy L.

    2016-06-01

    We present a study of the efficiency and timescales of star formation as a function of local neutral hydrogen gas density in four Local Group galaxies: M33, NGC 6822, the LMC, and the SMC. In this work, we conceptualize the process of star formation as a cycle of two major phases – (1) a gas dynamics phase in which neutral hydrogen gas coalesces into clouds, and (2) a stellar phase in which stars have formed and interrupt further gas coalescence during their active lifetimes. By examining the spatial distribution and number densities of stars on maps of neutral hydrogen, we estimate the timescale of the gas coalescence phase relative to the timescale of the stellar phase and infer an efficiency of star formation as a function of neutral hydrogen gas density. From these timescales and efficiencies, we will calculate star formation rates as a function of neutral hydrogen gas density in these galaxies.

  7. Global and radial variations in the efficiency of massive star formation among galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Lori E.; Young, Judith S.

    1990-01-01

    In order to determine the regions within galaxies which give rise to the most efficient star formation and to test the hypothesis that galaxies with high infrared luminosities per unit molecular mass are efficiently producing high mass stars, researchers have undertaken an H alpha imaging survey in galaxies whose CO distributions have been measured as part of the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory (FCRAO) Extragalactic CO Survey. From these images researchers have derived global H alpha fluxes and distributions for comparison with far infrared radiation (FIR) fluxes and CO fluxes and distributions. Here, researchers present results on the global massive star formation efficiency (SFE = L sub H sub alpha/M(H2)) as a function of morphological type and environment, and on the radial distribution of the SFE within both peculiar and isolated galaxies. On the basis of comparison of the global L sub H sub alpha/M(H2) and L sub FIR/M(H2) for 111 galaxies, researchers conclude that environment rather than morphological type has the strongest effect on the global efficiency of massive star formation. Based on their study of a small sample, they find that the largest radial gradients are observed in the interacting/peculiar galaxies, indicating that environment affects the star formation efficiency within galaxies as well.

  8. The influence of the cluster environment on the star formation efficiency of 12 Virgo spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, B.; Wong, O. I.; Braine, J.; Chung, A.; Kenney, J. D. P.

    2012-07-01

    The influence of the environment on gas surface density and star formation efficiency of cluster spiral galaxies is investigated. We extend previous work on radial profiles by a pixel-to pixel analysis looking for asymmetries due to environmental interactions. The star formation rate is derived from GALEX UV and Spitzer total infrared data based on the 8, 24, 70, and 160 μm data. As in field galaxies, the star formation rate for most Virgo galaxies is approximately proportional to the molecular gas mass. Except for NGC 4438, the cluster environment does not affect the star formation efficiency with respect to the molecular gas. Gas truncation is not associated with major changes in the total gas surface density distribution of the inner disk of Virgo spiral galaxies. In three galaxies (NGC 4430, NGC 4501, and NGC 4522), possible increases in the molecular fraction and the star formation efficiency with respect to the total gas, of factors of 1.5 to 2, are observed on the windward side of the galactic disk. A significant increase of the star formation efficiency with respect to the molecular gas content on the windward side of ram pressure-stripped galaxies is not observed. The ram-pressure stripped extraplanar gas of 3 highly inclined spiral galaxies (NGC 4330, NGC 4438, and NGC 4522) shows a depressed star formation efficiency with respect to the total gas, and one of them (NGC 4438) shows a depressed rate even with respect to the molecular gas. The interpretation is that stripped gas loses the gravitational confinement and associated pressure of the galactic disk, and the gas flow is diverging, so the gas density decreases and the star formation rate drops. We found two such regions of low star formation efficiency in the more face-on galaxies NGC 4501 and NGC 4654 which are both undergoing ram pressure stripping. These regions show low radio continuum emission or unusually steep radio spectral index. However, the stripped extraplanar gas in one highly inclined

  9. The JCMT nearby galaxies legacy survey - X. Environmental effects on the molecular gas and star formation properties of spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, Angus; Wilson, C. D.; Golding, J.; Warren, B. E.; Israel, F. P.; Serjeant, S.; Knapen, J. H.; Sánchez-Gallego, J. R.; Barmby, P.; Bendo, G. J.; Rosolowsky, E.; van der Werf, P.

    2016-03-01

    We present a study of the molecular gas properties in a sample of 98 H I - flux selected spiral galaxies within ˜25 Mpc, using the CO J = 3 - 2 line observed with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. We use the technique of survival analysis to incorporate galaxies with CO upper limits into our results. Comparing the group and Virgo samples, we find a larger mean H2 mass in the Virgo galaxies, despite their lower mean H I mass. This leads to a significantly higher H2 to H I ratio for Virgo galaxies. Combining our data with complementary Hα star formation rate measurements, Virgo galaxies have longer molecular gas depletion times compared to group galaxies, due to their higher H2 masses and lower star formation rates. We suggest that the longer depletion times may be a result of heating processes in the cluster environment or differences in the turbulent pressure. From the full sample, we find that the molecular gas depletion time has a positive correlation with the stellar mass, indicative of differences in the star formation process between low- and high-mass galaxies, and a negative correlation between the molecular gas depletion time and the specific star formation rate.

  10. Dwarf galaxies in the coma cluster: Star formation properties and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Derek M.

    The infall regions of galaxy clusters are unique laboratories for studying the impact of environment on galaxy evolution. This intermediate region links the low-density field environment and the dense core of the cluster, and is thought to host recently accreted galaxies whose star formation is being quenched by external processes associated with the cluster. In this dissertation, we measure the star formation properties of galaxies at the infall region of the nearby rich cluster of galaxies, Coma. We rely primarily on Ultraviolet (UV) data owing to its sensitivity to recent star formation and we place more emphasis on the properties of dwarf galaxies. Dwarf galaxies are good tracers of external processes in clusters but their evolution is poorly constrained as they are intrinsically faint and hence more challenging to detect. We make use of deep GALEX far-UV and near-UV observations at the infall region of the Coma cluster. This area of the cluster has supporting photometric coverage at optical and IR wavelengths in addition to optical spectroscopic data that includes deep redshift coverage of dwarf galaxies in Coma. Our GALEX observations were the deepest exposures taken for a local galaxy cluster. The depth of these images required alternative data analysis techniques to overcome systematic effects that limit the default GALEX pipeline analysis. Specifically, we used a deblending method that improved detection efficiency by a factor of ˜2 and allowed reliable photometry a few magnitudes deeper than the pipeline catalog. We performed deep measurements of the total UV galaxy counts in our field that were used to measure the source confusion limit for crowded GALEX fields. The star formation properties of Coma members were studied for galaxies that span from starbursts to passive galaxies. Star-forming galaxies in Coma tend to have lower specific star formation rates, on average, as compared to field galaxies. We show that the majority of these galaxies are likely

  11. The Star Formation History of the Leo I Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.; Marsteller, B.; Cole, A.; Bullock, J.; Gallagher, J. S.

    2009-01-01

    We report on results of new deep imaging obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advance Camera for Surveys (ACS) that show the Leo I dwarf Spheroidal (dSph) galaxy has a much larger population of ancient (>10 Gyr old) stars than previously determined with shallower WFPC2 imaging (Gallart et al. 1999, Dolphin 2003), as well as the previously identified component of intermediate-aged stars. Our new imaging is much deeper, which allows us to unambiguously identify the main sequence turnoffs of the ancient population and constrain the star formation rate at the epoch of the formation of the "first stars” in this galaxy. We will determine the galaxy's star formation rate as a function of time from the observed density of stars in the color-magnitude diagram by comparing with Padova stellar evolutionary models (Girardi et al. 2000). We compare and contrast the star formation histories of the Leo I dSph, which is currently devoid of any gas, with that of the gas-rich Leo A dIrr galaxy. The two are very different in that the dSph formed most of its stars early and the dIrr formed most of its stars later, however both have been actively forming stars over most of the age of the universe.

  12. Galaxy formation

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, J.

    1984-11-01

    Implications of the isotropy of the cosmic microwave background on large and small angular scales for galaxy formation are reviewed. In primeval adiabatic fluctuations, a universe dominated by cold, weakly interacting nonbaryonic matter, e.g., the massive photino is postulated. A possible signature of photino annihilation in our galactic halo involves production of cosmic ray antiprotons. If the density is near its closure value, it is necessary to invoke a biasing mechanism for suppressing galaxy formation throughout most of the universe in order to reconcile the dark matter density with the lower astronomical determinations of the mean cosmological density. A mechanism utilizing the onset of primordial massive star formation to strip gaseous protogalaxies is described. Only the densest, early collapsing systems form luminous galaxies. (ESA)

  13. Star Formation Models for the Dwarf Galaxies NGC 2915 and NGC 1705

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elson, E. C.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Kraan-Korteweg, R. C.

    2012-01-01

    Crucial to a quantitative understanding of galaxy evolution are the properties of the interstellar medium that regulate galactic-scale star formation activity. We present here the results of a suite of star formation models applied to the nearby blue compact dwarf galaxies NGC 2915 and NGC 1705. Each of these galaxies has a stellar disk embedded in a much larger, essentially starless H I disk. These atypical stellar morphologies allow for rigorous tests of star formation models that examine the effects on star formation of the H I, stellar, and dark matter mass components, as well as the kinematics of the gaseous and stellar disks. We use far-ultraviolet and 24 μm images from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey, respectively, to map the spatial distribution of the total star formation rate surface density within each galaxy. New high-resolution H I line observations obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array are used to study the distribution and dynamics of each galaxy's neutral interstellar medium. The standard Toomre Q parameter is unable to distinguish between active and non-active star-forming regions, predicting the H I disks of the dwarfs to be sub-critical. Two-fluid instability models incorporating the stellar and dark matter components of each galaxy, in addition to the gaseous component, yield unstable portions of the inner disk. Finally, a formalization in which the H I kinematics are characterized by the rotational shear of the gas produces models that very accurately match the observations. This suggests the time available for perturbations to collapse in the presence of rotational shear to be an important factor governing galactic-scale star formation.

  14. STAR FORMATION MODELS FOR THE DWARF GALAXIES NGC 2915 AND NGC 1705

    SciTech Connect

    Elson, E. C.; De Blok, W. J. G.; Kraan-Korteweg, R. C.

    2012-01-15

    Crucial to a quantitative understanding of galaxy evolution are the properties of the interstellar medium that regulate galactic-scale star formation activity. We present here the results of a suite of star formation models applied to the nearby blue compact dwarf galaxies NGC 2915 and NGC 1705. Each of these galaxies has a stellar disk embedded in a much larger, essentially starless H I disk. These atypical stellar morphologies allow for rigorous tests of star formation models that examine the effects on star formation of the H I, stellar, and dark matter mass components, as well as the kinematics of the gaseous and stellar disks. We use far-ultraviolet and 24 {mu}m images from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey, respectively, to map the spatial distribution of the total star formation rate surface density within each galaxy. New high-resolution H I line observations obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array are used to study the distribution and dynamics of each galaxy's neutral interstellar medium. The standard Toomre Q parameter is unable to distinguish between active and non-active star-forming regions, predicting the H I disks of the dwarfs to be sub-critical. Two-fluid instability models incorporating the stellar and dark matter components of each galaxy, in addition to the gaseous component, yield unstable portions of the inner disk. Finally, a formalization in which the H I kinematics are characterized by the rotational shear of the gas produces models that very accurately match the observations. This suggests the time available for perturbations to collapse in the presence of rotational shear to be an important factor governing galactic-scale star formation.

  15. Panel Discussion I. Star Formation in Galaxies: How Do We Continue?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapen, J. H.

    2008-06-01

    This is the written account of the first of two panel discussions, on Star formation in galaxies: how do we continue? The chair of the panel was Phil James, and panel members were John Beckman, Torsten Böker, Daniela Calzetti, Angeles Díaz, and Rob Kennicutt. The panel and audience discussed the following four questions: 1) What are the most critically needed techniques to give accurate measurements of total rates and efficiencies of star formation? 2) Do we understand the form of the initial mass function and its variation as a function of redshift and environment? 3) Are there multiple modes of star formation in galaxies (bulge vs disk, burst vs continuous) or does the Schmidt law explain everything? 4) How do we bring together our understanding of star formation in our Galaxy and in external systems?

  16. A CENSUS OF OXYGEN IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES: AN EMPIRICAL MODEL LINKING METALLICITIES, STAR FORMATION RATES, AND OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Zahid, H. J.; Dima, G. I.; Kewley, L. J.; Erb, D. K.; Dave, R.

    2012-09-20

    In this contribution, we present the first census of oxygen in star-forming galaxies in the local universe. We examine three samples of galaxies with metallicities and star formation rates (SFRs) at z = 0.07, 0.8, and 2.26, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and DEEP2 survey. We infer the total mass of oxygen produced and mass of oxygen found in the gas-phase from our local SDSS sample. The star formation history is determined by requiring that galaxies evolve along the relation between stellar mass and SFR observed in our three samples. We show that the observed relation between stellar mass and SFR for our three samples is consistent with other samples in the literature. The mass-metallicity relation is well established for our three samples, and from this we empirically determine the chemical evolution of star-forming galaxies. Thus, we are able to simultaneously constrain the SFRs and metallicities of galaxies over cosmic time, allowing us to estimate the mass of oxygen locked up in stars. Combining this work with independent measurements reported in the literature, we conclude that the loss of oxygen from the interstellar medium of local star-forming galaxies is likely to be a ubiquitous process with the oxygen mass loss scaling (almost) linearly with stellar mass. We estimate the total baryonic mass loss and argue that only a small fraction of the baryons inferred from cosmological observations accrete onto galaxies.

  17. Feedback in the local Universe: Relation between star formation and AGN activity in early type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaddi, Sravani; O'Dea, Christopher; Baum, Stefi; Jones, Christine; Forman, William; Whitmore, Samantha; Ahmed, Rabeea; Pierce, Katherine; Leary, Sara

    2015-08-01

    Aim: We address the relation between star formation and AGN activity in a large sample of nearby early type (E and S0) galaxies. The redshift range of the galaxies is 0.0002star formation and thus the process of galaxy evolution and formation. Evidence of AGN feedback is found in massive galaxies in galaxy clusters. However, how common AGN feedback is in the local universe and in small scale systems is still not evident.Methods: To answer this question, we carried out a multiple wavelength study of a sample of 231 early type galaxies which were selected to have an apparent K-band magnitude brighter than 13.5 and whose positions correlate with Chandra ACIS-I and ACIS-S sources. The galaxies in the sample are unbiased regarding their star formation and radio source properties. Using the archival observations at radio, IR and UV from VLA, WISE and GALEX respectively, we obtained the radio power, estimate FUV star formation rate (SFR) and other galaxy properties to study AGN activity and ongoing star formation.Results: The relationship between radio power and stellar mass shows that there is an upper envelope of radio power that is a steep function of stellar luminosity. This suggests that less massive galaxies have low radio power while massive galaxies are capable of hosting powerful radio sources. The Radio-MIR relation shows that galaxies with P>=1022 WHz-1 are potential candidates for being AGN. About ~ 7% of the sample show evidence of ongoing star formation with SFR ranging from 10-3 to 1 M⊙yr-1. These are also less massive and radio faint suggesting the absence of active accretion. There is nearly equal fraction of star forming galaxies in radio faint (P<1022 WHz-1) and radio bright galaxies (P>=1022 WHz-1) . Only ~ 5% of the galaxies in our sample have P>=1022 WHz-1 and most of them do not show evidence of bright accretion disks. We see a weak correlation and a dispersion of

  18. The link between galaxy structure and star formation across cosmic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jerome Joseph

    The processes that fuel and quench star formation in galaxies are expected to leave imprints on their structure. Moreover, these imprints can serve as signposts to identify galaxies at various stages of their evolution. In this dissertation, we describe our efforts to characterize changes in galaxy structure (1) as star formation is going out, (2) after star formation has ostensibly quenched, and (3) during active star formation, with the goal of elucidating the relevant processes that regulate star formation in each case. In Chapter 2, we use a local (z ˜ 0) sample of galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to investigate the first two cases. We find that, as galaxies quench, their outer stellar mass density profiles remain essentially constant. However, their inner stellar mass density (within 1 kpc) increases, even while galaxies are still star-forming, until it reaches a mass-dependent threshold, at which point quenching can occur. The existence of this threshold indicates that quenching is connected with processes that grow bulges. In Chapter 3, we then study the morphologies and color profiles of 19 z ˜ 0 early-type galaxies located in the green valley. Combining high-resolution Hubble ultraviolet images with SDSS optical photometry, we find that these objects harbor low-level star formation that is clearly detectable in the ultraviolet. Moreover, the recently formed stars are distributed in symmetric rings that often span the entire optical extent of the galaxy. The presence of an old underlying population in their outer parts suggests that star formation in these galaxies is either gradually fading out or possibly rejuvenated by smooth accretion from the intergalactic medium. Such galaxies comprise ≈13% of green valley galaxies of similar mass and color, and they may linger in the green valley for several Gyr. Finally, in Chapter 4, we focus on the evolution of star-forming galaxies since z = 2.5, leveraging the rich multi

  19. Three-Dimensional Spectroscopy and Star Formation Histories of Field E+A Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Charles T.; Wolf, Marsha; Hooper, Eric J.; Bather, Joshua

    2015-02-01

    We present the initial results of an integral field spectroscopic survey of E+A galaxies in the field, which combined with radio continuum measurements and multi-wavelength photometry and imaging provides significant insight into the dynamical and star formation histories of these transitioning post-starburst systems. We focus on the E+A galaxy known as G515 (z = 0.088), a massive merger remnant that began its star formation quenching process ~ 1.0 Gyr ago. Its relatively young stellar population contrasts with its light profile and kinematics, which are more consistent with a slowly-rotating, early-type galaxy.

  20. CO observations of nearby galaxies and the efficiency of star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Judith S.

    1987-01-01

    The CO distributions and total molecular content of 160 galaxies were observed using the 14 meter millimeter telescope of the FCRAO. For the luminous, relatively face-on Sc galaxies, the azimuthally averaged CO distributions are centrally peaked, while for the Sb and Sa galaxies the Co distributions often exhibit central CO holes up to 5 kpc across. None of the Sc galaxies have CO distributions which resemble the Milky Way. A general correlation was found between total CO and IR luminosities in galaxies. The scatter in this relation is highly correlated with dust temperature. No strong correlation of IR luminosities was found with HI masses, and it was thereby concluded that the infrared emission is more directly tied to the molecular content of galaxies. It is suggested that galaxies which have high Star Formation Effiencies (SFEs) produce more stars per unit molecular mass, thereby increasing the average temperature of the dust in the star forming regions. Irregular galaxies and galaxies previously identified as mergers have the highest observed star formation efficiencies. For the mergers, evidence was found that the IR/CO luminosity ratio increases with the merger age estimated by Joseph and Wright (1985).

  1. STELLAR POPULATIONS AND THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES. II. H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Schombert, James; McGaugh, Stacy; Maciel, Tamela E-mail: stacy.mcgaugh@case.edu

    2013-08-01

    The luminosities, colors, and H{alpha} emission for 429 H II regions in 54 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies are presented. While the number of H II regions per galaxy is lower in LSB galaxies compared to star-forming irregulars and spirals, there is no indication that the size or luminosity function of H II regions differs from other galaxy types. The lower number of H II regions per galaxy is consistent with their lower total star formation rates. The fraction of the total L{sub H{alpha}} contributed by H II regions varies from 10% to 90% in LSB galaxies (the rest of the H{alpha} emission being associated with a diffuse component) with no correlation with galaxy stellar or gas mass. Bright H II regions have bluer colors, similar to the trend in spirals; their number and luminosities are consistent with the hypothesis that they are produced by the same H II luminosity function as spirals. Comparison with stellar population models indicates that the brightest H II regions in LSB galaxies range in cluster mass from a few 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} (e.g., {rho} Oph) to globular-cluster-sized systems (e.g., 30 Dor) and that their ages are consistent with clusters from 2 to 15 Myr old. The faintest H II regions are comparable to those in the LMC powered by a single O or B star. Thus, star formation in LSB galaxies covers the full range of stellar cluster mass.

  2. Gas Content and Star Formation Efficiency of Massive Main Sequence Galaxies at z~3-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinnerer, Eva; Groves, Brent; Karim, Alexander; Sargent, Mark T.; Oesch, Pascal; Le Fevre, Olivier; Tasca, Lidia; Magnelli, Benjamin; Cassata, Paolo; Smolcic, Vernesa

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations have shown that the neutral gas content and star formation efficiency of massive (with log(stellar masses) > 10), normal star forming galaxies, i.e. they reside on the main sequence of star forming galaxies, are steadily decreasing from the peak of star formation activity (at redshifts of z~2) till today. This decrease is coincident with the observed decline in the cosmic star formation rate density over this time range. However, only few observations have probed the evolution of the gas content and star formation efficiency beyond this peak epoch when the cosmic star formation rate density has been increasing, i.e. at redshifts of z~3-4.We will present new ALMA rest-frame 250um continuum detections of 45 massive, normal star forming galaxies in this critical redshift interval selected in the COSMOS deep field. Using the sub-mm continnum as proxy for the cold neutral gas content, we find gas mass fractions and depletions similar to those reported during the peak epoch of star formation. We will discuss our findings in the context of results from lower redshift observations and model expectations.

  3. Suppression of star formation in dwarf galaxies by photoelectric grain heating feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, John C.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Goldbaum, Nathan J.; Dekel, Avishai

    2016-07-01

    Photoelectric heating—heating of dust grains by far-ultraviolet photons—has long been recognized as the primary source of heating for the neutral interstellar medium. Simulations of spiral galaxies have shown some indication that photoelectric heating could suppress star formation; however, simulations that include photoelectric heating have typically shown that it has little effect on the rate of star formation in either spiral galaxies or dwarf galaxies, which suggests that supernovae are responsible for setting the gas depletion time in galaxies. This result is in contrast with recent work indicating that a star formation law that depends on galaxy metallicity—as is expected with photoelectric heating, but not with supernovae—reproduces the present-day galaxy population better than does a metallicity-independent one. Here we report a series of simulations of dwarf galaxies, the class of galaxy in which the effects of both photoelectric heating and supernovae are expected to be strongest. We simultaneously include space- and time-dependent photoelectric heating in our simulations, and we resolve the energy-conserving phase of every supernova blast wave, which allows us to directly measure the relative importance of feedback by supernovae and photoelectric heating in suppressing star formation. We find that supernovae are unable to account for the observed large gas depletion times in dwarf galaxies. Instead, photoelectric heating is the dominant means by which dwarf galaxies regulate their star formation rate at any given time, suppressing the rate by more than an order of magnitude relative to simulations with only supernovae.

  4. Suppression of star formation in dwarf galaxies by photoelectric grain heating feedback.

    PubMed

    Forbes, John C; Krumholz, Mark R; Goldbaum, Nathan J; Dekel, Avishai

    2016-07-28

    Photoelectric heating--heating of dust grains by far-ultraviolet photons--has long been recognized as the primary source of heating for the neutral interstellar medium. Simulations of spiral galaxies have shown some indication that photoelectric heating could suppress star formation; however, simulations that include photoelectric heating have typically shown that it has little effect on the rate of star formation in either spiral galaxies or dwarf galaxies, which suggests that supernovae are responsible for setting the gas depletion time in galaxies. This result is in contrast with recent work indicating that a star formation law that depends on galaxy metallicity--as is expected with photoelectric heating,but not with supernovae--reproduces the present-day galaxy population better than does a metallicity-independent one. Here we report a series of simulations of dwarf galaxies, the class of galaxy in which the effects of both photoelectric heating and supernovae are expected to be strongest. We simultaneously include space and time-dependent photoelectric heating in our simulations, and we resolve the energy-conserving phase of every supernova blast wave, which allows us to directly measure the relative importance of feedback by supernovae and photoelectric heating in suppressing star formation. We find that supernovae are unable to account for the observed large gas depletion times in dwarf galaxies. Instead, photoelectric heating is the dominant means by which dwarf galaxies regulate their star formation rate at any given time,suppressing the rate by more than an order of magnitude relative to simulations with only supernovae. PMID:27350244

  5. The Star Formation & Chemical Evolution Timescales of Two Nearby Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Thomas; Tolstoy, E.; Hill, V.; Saha, A.; Olsen, K.; Starkenburg, E.; Irwin, M.; Battaglia, G.

    2012-01-01

    We present wide-field photometry of resolved stars in the nearby Sculptor and Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxies, going down to the oldest Main Sequence Turn-Off. The accurately flux calibrated wide-field Colour-Magnitude Diagrams are used directly in combination with spectroscopic metallicities of individual RGB stars to constrain the ages of different stellar populations, and derive the Star Formation History with particular accuracy. The Sculptor dSph contains a predominantly ancient stellar population (>10 Gyr old), which can easily be resolved into individual stars. A galaxy dominated by an old population provides a clear view of ancient processes of galaxy formation unimpeded by overlying younger populations. The Fornax dSph is dominated by stellar populations of intermediate and young ages, which can be used to study the processes of galaxy formation in a more complex mix of stellar populations We find that the known metallicity gradients are well matched to an age gradient. This is the first time that this link with age has been directly quantified. The detailed Star Formation History shows the distribution of age with regards to the metallicity for different radii out from the centre of the galaxy. By linking the obtained SFH to observed spectroscopic abundances (alpha-elements, r- and s-process elements) of RGB stars it is possible to put ages on the chemical evolution patterns observed in this galaxy. In this way we can study the timescale of chemical evolution in these two dwarf galaxies. By comparing both dwarfs we determine whether the chemical abundance patterns seen in galaxies with recent episodes of star formation are a direct continuation of those with only old populations.

  6. The formation of the first stars and galaxies.

    PubMed

    Bromm, Volker; Yoshida, Naoki; Hernquist, Lars; McKee, Christopher F

    2009-05-01

    Observations made using large ground-based and space-borne telescopes have probed cosmic history from the present day to a time when the Universe was less than one-tenth of its present age. Earlier still lies the remaining frontier, where the first stars, galaxies and massive black holes formed. They fundamentally transformed the early Universe by endowing it with the first sources of light and chemical elements beyond the primordial hydrogen and helium produced in the Big Bang. The interplay of theory and upcoming observations promises to answer the key open questions in this emerging field. PMID:19424148

  7. Are passive red spirals truly passive?. The current star formation activity of optically red disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.

    2012-07-01

    We used GALEX ultraviolet and WISE 22 μm observations to investigate the current star formation activity of the optically red spirals recently identified as part of the Galaxy Zoo project. These galaxies were accurately selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as pure discs with low or no current star formation activity, representing one of the best optically selected samples of candidate passive spirals. However, we show that these galaxies are not only still forming stars at a significant rate (≳1 M⊙ yr-1) but, more importantly, their star formation activity is not different from that of normal star-forming discs of the same stellar mass (M∗ ≳ 1010.2 M⊙). Indeed, these systems lie on the UV-optical blue sequence, even without any corrections for internal dust attenuation, and they follow the same specific star formation rate vs. stellar mass relation of star-forming galaxies. Our findings clearly show that at high stellar masses, optical colours do not allow to distinguish between actively star-forming and truly quiescent systems.

  8. Star formation and environmental quenching of GEEC2 group galaxies at z ˜ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, Angus; Balogh, Michael L.; McGee, Sean L.; Wilman, David J.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Tanaka, Masayuki; Bower, Richard G.; Hou, Annie; Mulchaey, John S.; Parker, Laura C.

    2014-03-01

    We present new analysis from the Group Environment Evolution Collaboration 2 (GEEC2) spectroscopic survey of galaxy groups at 0.8 < z < 1. Our previous work revealed an intermediate population between the star-forming and quiescent sequences and a strong environmental dependence in the fraction of quiescent galaxies. Only ˜5 per cent of star-forming galaxies in both the group and field sample show a significant enhancement in star formation, which suggests that quenching is the primary process in the transition from the star-forming to the quiescent state. To model the environmental quenching scenario, we have tested the use of different exponential quenching time-scales and delays between satellite accretion and the onset of quenching. We find that with no delay, the quenching time-scale needs to be long in order to match the observed quiescent fraction, but then this model produces too many intermediate galaxies. Fixing a delay time of 3 Gyr, as suggested from the local Universe, produces too few quiescent galaxies. The observed fractions are best matched with a model that includes a delay that is proportional to the dynamical time and a rapid quenching time-scale (˜0.25 Gyr), but this model also predicts intermediate galaxies Hδ strength higher than that observed. Using stellar synthesis models, we have tested other scenarios, such as the rejuvenation of star formation in early-type galaxies and a portion of quenched galaxies possessing residual star formation. If environment quenching plays a role in the GEEC2 sample, then our work suggests that only a fraction of intermediate galaxies may be undergoing this transition and that quenching occurs quite rapidly in satellite galaxies (≲0.25 Gyr).

  9. Probing dust-obscured star formation in the most massive gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Jochen; Michałowski, Michał J.; Klose, Sylvio; Hunt, Leslie K.; Gentile, Gianfranco; Kamphuis, Peter; Herrero-Illana, Rubén; Wieringa, Mark; Krühler, Thomas; Schady, Patricia; Elliott, Jonathan; Graham, John F.; Ibar, Eduardo; Knust, Fabian; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, Ana; Palazzi, Eliana; Rossi, Andrea; Savaglio, Sandra

    2016-08-01

    Context. As a result of their relation to massive stars, long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) allow the pinpointing of star formation in galaxies independent of redshift, dust obscuration, or galaxy mass/size, thus providing a unique tool to investigate star formation history over cosmic time. Aims: About half of the optical afterglows of long-duration GRBs are missed owing to dust extinction and are primarily located in the most massive GRB hosts. It is important to investigate the amount of obscured star formation in these GRB host galaxies to understand this bias. Methods: Radio emission of galaxies correlates with star formation, but does not suffer extinction as do the optical star formation estimators. We selected 11 GRB host galaxies with either large stellar mass or large UV-based and optical-based star formation rates (SFRs) and obtained radio observations of these with the Australia Telescope Compact Array and the Karl Jansky Very Large Array. Results: Despite intentionally selecting GRB hosts with expected high SFRs, we do not find any radio emission related to star formation in any of our targets. Our upper limit for GRB 100621A implies that the earlier reported radio detection was due to afterglow emission. We detect radio emission from the position of GRB 020819B, but argue that it is in large part, if not completely, due to afterglow contamination. Conclusions: Half of our sample has radio-derived SFR limits, which are only a factor 2-3 above the optically measured SFRs. This supports other recent studies that the majority of star formation in GRB hosts is not obscured by dust. Based on observations collected with ATCA under ID C2718, and at VLA under ID 13B-017.

  10. Star Formation Properties in the Local Volume Galaxies via Hα and Far-ultraviolet Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kaisina, Elena I.

    2013-09-01

    A distance-limited sample of 869 objects from the Updated Nearby Galaxy Catalog is used to characterize the star formation status of the Local Volume population. We present a compiled list of 1217 star formation rate (SFR) estimates for 802 galaxies within 11 Mpc, derived from the Hα imaging surveys and the GALEX far-ultraviolet survey. We briefly discuss some basic scaling relations between SFR and luminosity, morphology, H I mass, surface brightness, and the environment of the galaxies. About 3/4 of our sample consist of dwarf galaxies, for which we offer a more refined classification. We note that the specific SFR of nearly all luminous and dwarf galaxies does not exceed the maximum value: log (SFR/LK ) = -9.4 [yr-1]. Most spiral and blue dwarf galaxies have enough time to generate their stellar mass during the cosmological time, T 0, with the observed SFRs. They dispose of a sufficient amount of gas to support their present SFRs over the next T 0 term. We note that only a small fraction of BCD, Im, and Ir galaxies (about 1/20) proceed in a mode of vigorous starburst activity. In general, the star formation history of spiral and blue dwarf galaxies is mainly driven by their internal processes. The present SFRs of E, S0, and dSph galaxies typically have 1/30-1/300 of their former activity.

  11. The formation and assembly of a typical star-forming galaxy at redshift z approximately 3.

    PubMed

    Stark, Daniel P; Swinbank, A Mark; Ellis, Richard S; Dye, Simon; Smail, Ian R; Richard, Johan

    2008-10-01

    Recent studies of galaxies approximately 2-3 Gyr after the Big Bang have revealed large, rotating disks, similar to those of galaxies today. The existence of well-ordered rotation in galaxies during this peak epoch of cosmic star formation indicates that gas accretion is likely to be the dominant mode by which galaxies grow, because major mergers of galaxies would completely disrupt the observed velocity fields. But poor spatial resolution and sensitivity have hampered this interpretation; such studies have been limited to the largest and most luminous galaxies, which may have fundamentally different modes of assembly from those of more typical galaxies (which are thought to grow into the spheroidal components at the centres of galaxies similar to the Milky Way). Here we report observations of a typical star-forming galaxy at z = 3.07, with a linear resolution of approximately 100 parsecs. We find a well-ordered compact source in which molecular gas is being converted efficiently into stars, likely to be assembling a spheroidal bulge similar to those seen in spiral galaxies at the present day. The presence of undisrupted rotation may indicate that galaxies such as the Milky Way gain much of their mass by accretion rather than major mergers. PMID:18843363

  12. Star Formation in Dwarf Galaxies as a Function of Cluster-Centric Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rude, Cody; Barkhouse, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy clusters form the largest structures in the universe. The cluster galaxy population differs both by morphology and star formation histories relative to the field population. Several physical mechanisms have been proposed to account for these differences, including ram pressure stripping due to the intracluster medium, and harassment from close encounters with other galaxies. Dwarf galaxies could prove to be particularly important as their low mass makes them more susceptible to external influences. This study looks for evidence of enhanced/quenching of star formation in dwarf galaxies using photometric u- and r-band data of several Abell clusters taken with the CFHT. From the combined sample, scaled by r200, composite luminosity functions (LFs) and histograms of galaxy color at various cluster-centric radii are constructed. An increase in the faint-end slope of the u-band LF relative to the r-band is a possible indicator of enhanced star formation. Comparisons of the inner and outer regions of the cluster sample may yield insights into the physical mechanisms that affect star formation of infalling cluster dwarf galaxies.

  13. The double galaxy cluster Abell 2465 - II. Star formation in the cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, Gary A.; Chu, Devin S.; Hwang, Ho Seong

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the star formation rate and its location in the major merger cluster Abell 2465 at z = 0.245. Optical properties of the cluster are described in Paper I. Measurements of the Hα and infrared dust emission of galaxies in the cluster were made with an interference filter centred on the redshifted line at a wavelength of 817 nm and utilized data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer satellite 12 μm band. Imaging in the Johnson U and B bands was obtained, and along with Sloan Digital Sky Survey u and r was used to study the blue fraction, which appears enhanced, as a further signature of star formation in the cluster. Star formation rates were calculated using standard calibrations. The total star formation rate normalized by the cluster mass, ΣSFR/Mcl compared to compilations for other clusters indicate that the components of Abell 2465 lie above the mean z and Mcl relations, suggestive that interacting galaxy clusters have enhanced star formation. The projected radial distribution of the star-forming galaxies does not follow an NFW profile and is relatively flat indicating that fewer star-forming galaxies are in the cluster centre. The morphologies of the Hα sources within R200 for the cluster as a whole indicate that many are disturbed or merging, suggesting that a combination of merging or harassment is working.

  14. Astrochemistry and star formation in nearby galaxies: from galaxy disks to hot nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, S.

    2016-05-01

    Studying the molecular phase of the interstellar medium in galaxies is fundamental for the understanding of the onset and evolution of compact and extended star formation, and of the growth of supermassive black holes. Molecular line emission is an excellent tracer of chemical, physical and dynamical conditions in the cold neutral gas. Key molecules in extragalactic studies are e.g. HCN, HCO+, HC3N, SiO, CH3OH, H2O. Furthermore, we can use IR excited molecular emission to probe the very inner regions of luminous infrared galaxies allowing us to get past the optically thick dust barrier of the compact obscured nuclei where lines of CO, HCN and HCO+ in their vibrational ground state (ν=0) may be self-absorbed. Finally, molecular outflows and their chemistry are briefly discussed - including new ALMA results on for example the outflow of the lenticular galaxy NGC1377 and a study of the chemistry of the outflow of the quasar Mrk231.

  15. Consequences of bursty star formation on galaxy observables at high redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez, Alberto; Siana, Brian; Brooks, Alyson M.; Christensen, Charlotte R.; Bruzual, Gustavo; Stark, Daniel P.; Alavi, Anahita

    2015-07-01

    The star formation histories (SFHs) of dwarf galaxies are thought to be bursty, with large - order of magnitude - changes in the star formation rate on time-scales similar to O-star lifetimes. As a result, the standard interpretations of many galaxy observables (which assume a slowly varying SFH) are often incorrect. Here, we use the SFHs from hydrodynamical simulations to investigate the effects of bursty SFHs on sample selection and interpretation of observables and make predictions to confirm such SFHs in future surveys. First, because dwarf galaxies' star formation rates change rapidly, the mass-to-light ratio is also changing rapidly in both the ionizing continuum and, to a lesser extent, the non-ionizing ultraviolet continuum. Therefore, flux limited surveys are highly biased towards selecting galaxies in the burst phase and very deep observations are required to detect all dwarf galaxies at a given stellar mass. Second, we show that a log10[νLν(1500 Å)/LHα] > 2.5 implies a very recent quenching of star formation and can be used as evidence of stellar feedback regulating star formation. Third, we show that the ionizing continuum can be significantly higher than when assuming a constant SFH, which can affect the interpretation of nebular emission line equivalent widths and direct ionizing continuum detections. Finally, we show that a star formation rate estimate based on continuum measurements only (and not on nebular tracers such as the hydrogen Balmer lines) will not trace the rapid changes in star formation and will give the false impression of a star-forming main sequence with low dispersion.

  16. Cosmic Evolution of Star Formation Enhancement in Close Major-merger Galaxy Pairs Since z = 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C. K.; Shupe, D. L.; Béthermin, M.; Aussel, H.; Berta, S.; Bock, J.; Bridge, C.; Conley, A.; Cooray, A.; Elbaz, D.; Franceschini, A.; Le Floc'h, E.; Lu, N.; Lutz, D.; Magnelli, B.; Marsden, G.; Oliver, S. J.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Schulz, B.; Scoville, N.; Vaccari, M.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, L.; Zemcov, M.

    2012-11-01

    The infrared (IR) emission of "M * galaxies" (1010.4 <= M star <= 1011.0 M ⊙) in galaxy pairs, derived using data obtained in Herschel (PEP/HerMES) and Spitzer (S-COSMOS) surveys, is compared to that of single-disk galaxies in well-matched control samples to study the cosmic evolution of the star formation enhancement induced by galaxy-galaxy interaction. Both the mean IR spectral energy distribution and mean IR luminosity of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) in SFG+SFG (S+S) pairs in the redshift bin of 0.6 < z < 1 are consistent with no star formation enhancement. SFGs in S+S pairs in a lower redshift bin of 0.2 < z < 0.6 show marginal evidence for a weak star formation enhancement. Together with the significant and strong sSFR enhancement shown by SFGs in a local sample of S+S pairs (obtained using previously published Spitzer observations), our results reveal a trend for the star formation enhancement in S+S pairs to decrease with increasing redshift. Between z = 0 and z = 1, this decline of interaction-induced star formation enhancement occurs in parallel with the dramatic increase (by a factor of ~10) of the sSFR of single SFGs, both of which can be explained by the higher gas fraction in higher-z disks. SFGs in mixed pairs (S+E pairs) do not show any significant star formation enhancement at any redshift. The difference between SFGs in S+S pairs and in S+E pairs suggests a modulation of the sSFR by the intergalactic medium (IGM) in the dark matter halos hosting these pairs. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  17. COSMIC EVOLUTION OF STAR FORMATION ENHANCEMENT IN CLOSE MAJOR-MERGER GALAXY PAIRS SINCE z = 1

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C. K.; Shupe, D. L.; Bock, J.; Bridge, C.; Cooray, A.; Lu, N.; Schulz, B.; Bethermin, M.; Aussel, H.; Elbaz, D.; Le Floc'h, E.; Riguccini, L.; Conley, A.; Franceschini, A.; Marsden, G.; Oliver, S. J.; Pozzi, F.; and others

    2012-11-20

    The infrared (IR) emission of 'M {sub *} galaxies' (10{sup 10.4} {<=} M {sub star} {<=} 10{sup 11.0} M {sub Sun }) in galaxy pairs, derived using data obtained in Herschel (PEP/HerMES) and Spitzer (S-COSMOS) surveys, is compared to that of single-disk galaxies in well-matched control samples to study the cosmic evolution of the star formation enhancement induced by galaxy-galaxy interaction. Both the mean IR spectral energy distribution and mean IR luminosity of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) in SFG+SFG (S+S) pairs in the redshift bin of 0.6 < z < 1 are consistent with no star formation enhancement. SFGs in S+S pairs in a lower redshift bin of 0.2 < z < 0.6 show marginal evidence for a weak star formation enhancement. Together with the significant and strong sSFR enhancement shown by SFGs in a local sample of S+S pairs (obtained using previously published Spitzer observations), our results reveal a trend for the star formation enhancement in S+S pairs to decrease with increasing redshift. Between z = 0 and z = 1, this decline of interaction-induced star formation enhancement occurs in parallel with the dramatic increase (by a factor of {approx}10) of the sSFR of single SFGs, both of which can be explained by the higher gas fraction in higher-z disks. SFGs in mixed pairs (S+E pairs) do not show any significant star formation enhancement at any redshift. The difference between SFGs in S+S pairs and in S+E pairs suggests a modulation of the sSFR by the intergalactic medium (IGM) in the dark matter halos hosting these pairs.

  18. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: extraplanar gas, galactic winds and their association with star formation history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, I.-Ting; Medling, Anne M.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Groves, Brent; Kewley, Lisa J.; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Dopita, Michael A.; Leslie, Sarah K.; Sharp, Rob; Allen, James T.; Bourne, Nathan; Bryant, Julia J.; Cortese, Luca; Croom, Scott M.; Dunne, Loretta; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Goodwin, Michael; Green, Andy W.; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S.; Lawrence, Jon S.; Lorente, Nuria P. F.; Owers, Matt S.; Richards, Samuel; Sweet, Sarah M.; Tescari, Edoardo; Valiante, Elisabetta

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a sample of 40 local, main-sequence, edge-on disc galaxies using integral field spectroscopy with the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey to understand the link between properties of the extraplanar gas and their host galaxies. The kinematics properties of the extraplanar gas, including velocity asymmetries and increased dispersion, are used to differentiate galaxies hosting large-scale galactic winds from those dominated by the extended diffuse ionized gas. We find rather that a spectrum of diffuse gas-dominated to wind-dominated galaxies exist. The wind-dominated galaxies span a wide range of star formation rates (SFRs; -1 ≲ log (SFR/M⊙ yr-1) ≲ 0.5) across the whole stellar mass range of the sample (8.5 ≲ log (M*/M⊙) ≲ 11). The wind galaxies also span a wide range in SFR surface densities (10- 3-10- 1.5 M⊙ yr- 1 kpc- 2) that is much lower than the canonical threshold of 0.1 M⊙ yr- 1 kpc- 2. The wind galaxies on average have higher SFR surface densities and higher HδA values than those without strong wind signatures. The enhanced HδA indicates that bursts of star formation in the recent past are necessary for driving large-scale galactic winds. We demonstrate with Sloan Digital Sky Survey data that galaxies with high SFR surface density have experienced bursts of star formation in the recent past. Our results imply that the galactic winds revealed in our study are indeed driven by bursts of star formation, and thus probing star formation in the time domain is crucial for finding and understanding galactic winds.

  19. The dynamical masses, densities, and star formation scaling relations of Lyα galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Richardson, Mark L. A.; McLinden, Emily M.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Tilvi, Vithal S.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first dynamical mass measurements for Lyα galaxies at high redshift, based on velocity dispersion measurements from rest-frame optical emission lines and size measurements from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, for nine galaxies drawn from four surveys. We use these measurements to study Lyα galaxies in the context of galaxy scaling relations. The resulting dynamical masses range from 10{sup 9} to 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}. We also fit stellar population models to our sample and use them to place the Lyα sample on a stellar mass versus line width relation. The Lyα galaxies generally follow the same scaling relation as star-forming galaxies at lower redshift, although, lower stellar mass fits are also acceptable in ∼1/3 of the Lyα galaxies. Using the dynamical masses as an upper limit on gas mass, we show that Lyα galaxies have unusually active star formation for their gas mass surface density. This behavior is consistent with what is observed in starburst galaxies, despite the typically smaller masses and sizes of the Lyα galaxy population. Finally, we examine the mass densities of these galaxies and show that their future evolution likely requires dissipational ('wet') merging. In short, we find that Lyα galaxies are low-mass cousins of larger starbursts.

  20. A WISE Survey of Star Formation in the Milky Way: New Insight into Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Xavier

    We propose to measure the recent star formation rate (SFR) in the Perseus Arm of the Milky Way galaxy and its relation to the surface density of gas, whether molecular or atomic on a range of scales from star forming clusters through large star forming complexes to the full scale of the Galactic Arm. We will test the connection between the SFR-gas relationship in the Galaxy and comparable measurements made in external galaxies in order to probe its origin and better understand the role and contribution of star formation to cosmological galaxy evolution. We also propose to study star formation that has been triggered by the recent formation of massive star clusters in order to discern the mechanisms of triggering that may be operating on super bubble size scales of more than 100 parsecs. This study will allow us to understand one of the key factors that sets the efficiency with which gas becomes stars as galaxies evolve with time. In order to achieve these goals, we will carry out a census of young stellar objects in the outer Milky Way Perseus Arm, using data gathered by the WISE and 2MASS all-sky surveys, with additional use of archival data from the Spitzer Space Telescope. We will develop and refine a young star finding algorithm that uses WISE and 2MASS photometry to identify and classify young stars and filters out contaminating objects such as background galaxies. We will measure the gas content with extinction maps made with data from 2MASS. We will test the triggered star formation models by analyzing the spatial distributions of young stars in super-bubbles and massive star forming regions in the Perseus Arm. This study will produce a key, like-for-like comparison between the extragalactic star formation rate-molecular gas relation and the Galactic relation and will advance the progress in linking Galactic and extragalactic studies of star formation, studying massive star forming regions that are representative of the major mode of star formation. The

  1. Star formation and black hole accretion activity in rich local clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Matteo; Marleau, Francine R.; Fadda, Dario

    2016-04-01

    Context. We present a study of star formation and central black hole accretion activity of galaxies that are hosted in the two nearby (z ~ 0.2) rich galaxy clusters Abell 983 and 1731. Aims: We aim to quantify both the obscured and unobscured star formation rates, as well as the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a function of the environment in which the galaxy is located. Methods: We targeted the clusters with unprecedented deep infrared Spitzer observations (0.2 mJy at 24 micron), near-IR Palomar imaging and optical WIYN spectroscopy. The extent of our observations (~3 virial radii) covers the vast range of possible environments, from the very dense cluster centre to the very rarefied cluster outskirts and accretion regions. Results: The star-forming members of the two clusters present star formation rates that are comparable with those measured in coeval field galaxies. Analysis of the spatial arrangement of the spectroscopically confirmed members reveals an elongated distribution for A1731 with respect to the more uniform distribution of A983. The emerging picture is compatible with A983 being a fully evolved cluster, in contrast with the still actively accreting A1731. Conclusions: Analysis of the specific star formation rate reveals evidence of ongoing galaxy pre-processing along A1731's filament-like structure. Furthermore, the decrease in the number of star-forming galaxies and AGN towards the cluster cores suggests that the cluster environment is accelerating the ageing process of the galaxies and blocking further accretion of the cold gas that fuels both star formation and black hole accretion activity. The catalogue and the reduced images (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/588/A105

  2. Star formation and galaxy evolution since z˜2: Results from multiwavelength surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisbin, Drew

    Our recent studies in galaxy evolution have revealed a surprising new paradigm of star formation. Contrary to the notion that major mergers play an increasingly dominant role going backwards in cosmic history, we find that over the last ˜10 Gyr, much of star formation has been fueled by accreting cold gas from the cosmic web. Accretion rates were presumably larger in the past, so star forming systems may have very different properties in the early Universe and today. Large scale astronomical surveys, such as the Herschel Multi-Tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES), and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) have provided a wealth of extragalactic data covering a statistically large number of sources. Targeted, niche surveys, like our fine structure line survey of star forming galaxies in the early Universe observed with the redshift (z) Early Universe Spectrometer (ZEUS) have provided detailed observations of high interest sources. We have made use of this diverse set of data to study galaxy evolution from the epoch of peak star formation at z=1-2 up to the present. Data from HerMES is a reliable probe of infrared emission, particularly useful for characterizing the far infrared dust peak, and therefore determining star formation rates out to redshifts of a few. Deep integrations with the Herschel SPIRE photometer rapidly reach the confusion limit, tempering its utility in studying faint high redshift galaxies. With appropriate care taken to identify blended sources, however, HerMES data is useful in identifying bright, redshifted, star forming sources. We have compiled spectral energy distributions from HerMES and ancillary data and found that, even sources at high redshift are well fit by local star forming galaxy templates. In the local Universe, spectroscopic SDSS data has allowed us to estimate crucial galaxy properties on ˜105 sources, providing an opportunity to observe general statistical trends, and constrain theories of galaxy evolution. A toy model of cold

  3. Star formation rates and chemical abundances of emission-line galaxies in intermediate-redshift clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouhcine, M.; Bamford, S. P.; Aragón-Salamanca, A.; Nakamura, O.; Milvang-Jensen, B.

    2006-06-01

    We examine the evolutionary status of luminous, star-forming galaxies in intermediate-redshift clusters by considering their star formation rates (SFRs) and the chemical and ionization properties of their interstellar emitting gas. Our sample consists of 17 massive, star-forming, mostly disc galaxies with MB<~-20, in clusters with redshifts in the range 0.31 <~z<~ 0.59, with a median of = 0.42. We compare these galaxies with the identically selected and analysed intermediate-redshift field sample of Mouhcine et al., and with local galaxies from the Nearby Field Galaxy Survey of Jansen et al. From our optical spectra, we measure the equivalent widths of [OII]λ3727, Hβ and [OIII]λ5007 emission lines to determine diagnostic line ratios, oxygen abundances and extinction-corrected SFRs. The star-forming galaxies in intermediate-redshift clusters display emission-line equivalent widths which are, on average, significantly smaller than measured for field galaxies at comparable redshifts. However, a contrasting fraction of our cluster galaxies have equivalent widths similar to the highest observed in the field. This tentatively suggests a bimodality in the SFRs per unit luminosity for galaxies in distant clusters. We find no evidence for further bimodalities, or differences between our cluster and field samples, when examining additional diagnostics and the oxygen abundances of our galaxies. This maybe because no such differences exist, perhaps because the cluster galaxies which still display signs of star formation have recently arrived from the field. In order to examine this topic with more certainty, and to further investigate the way in which any disparity varies as a function of cluster properties, larger spectroscopic samples are needed.

  4. The Modes of Star Formation in Luminous and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Candels Team

    2015-01-01

    In the local universe, Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs, LIR>1012 Lsun) are all interacting and merging systems. To date, studies of ULIRGs at high redshift have found a variety of results due to their varying selection effects and small sample sizes. Some studies have found that mergers still dominate the galaxy morphology while others have found a high fraction of morphologically normal or clumpy star forming disks. Near-infrared imaging is crucial for interpreting galaxy structure at high redshift since it probes the rest frame optical light of a galaxy and thus we can compare directly to studies in the local universe. We explore the evolution of the morphological properties of (U)LIRGs over cosmic time using a large sample of galaxies from Herschel observations of the CANDELS fields (including GOODS, COSMOS, and UDS). In particular, we investigate whether the role of galaxy mergers has changed between z~2 and now using the extensive visual classification catalogs produced by the CANDELS team. The combination of a selection from Herschel, near the peak of IR emission, and rest-frame optical morphologies from CANDELS, provides the ideal comparison to nearby (U)LIRGs. We then study the how role of galaxy mergers and the presence of AGN activity correspond to the galaxy's position in the star formation rate - stellar mass plane. Are galaxies that have specific star formation rates elevated above the main sequence more likely to be mergers?

  5. Cosmic web and star formation activity in galaxies at z ∼ 1

    SciTech Connect

    Darvish, B.; Mobasher, B.; Sales, L. V.; Sobral, D.; Scoville, N. Z.; Best, P.; Smail, I.

    2014-11-20

    We investigate the role of the delineated cosmic web/filaments on star formation activity by exploring a sample of 425 narrow-band selected Hα emitters, as well as 2846 color-color selected underlying star-forming galaxies for a large-scale structure at z = 0.84 in the COSMOS field from the HiZELS survey. Using the scale-independent Multi-scale Morphology Filter algorithm, we are able to quantitatively describe the density field and disentangle it into its major components: fields, filaments, and clusters. We show that the observed median star formation rate (SFR), stellar mass, specific SFR, the mean SFR-mass relation, and its scatter for both Hα emitters and underlying star-forming galaxies do not strongly depend on different classes of environment, in agreement with previous studies. However, the fraction of Hα emitters varies with environment and is enhanced in filamentary structures at z ∼ 1. We propose mild galaxy-galaxy interactions as the possible physical agent for the elevation of the fraction of Hα star-forming galaxies in filaments. Our results show that filaments are the likely physical environments that are often classed as the 'intermediate' densities and that the cosmic web likely plays a major role in galaxy formation and evolution which has so far been poorly investigated.

  6. Galaxy formation in the Planck cosmology - II. Star-formation histories and post-processing magnitude reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamshiri, Sorour; Thomas, Peter A.; Henriques, Bruno M.; Tojeiro, Rita; Lemson, Gerard; Oliver, Seb J.; Wilkins, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    We adapt the L-GALAXIES semi-analytic model to follow the star formation histories (SFHs) of galaxies - by which we mean a record of the formation time and metallicities of the stars that are present in each galaxy at a given time. We use these to construct stellar spectra in post-processing, which offers large efficiency savings and allows user-defined spectral bands and dust models to be applied to data stored in the Millennium data repository. We contrast model SFHs from the Millennium Simulation with observed ones from the VESPA algorithm as applied to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey 7 (SDSS-7) catalogue. The overall agreement is good, with both simulated and SDSS galaxies showing a steeper SFH with increased stellar mass. The SFHs of blue and red galaxies, however, show poor agreement between data and simulations, which may indicate that the termination of star formation is too abrupt in the models. The mean star formation rate (SFR) of model galaxies is well defined and is accurately modelled by a double power law at all redshifts: SFR ∝ 1/(x-1.39 + x1.33), where x = (ta - t)/3.0 Gyr, t is the age of the stars and ta is the lookback time to the onset of galaxy formation; above a redshift of unity, this is well approximated by a gamma function: SFR ∝ x1.5e-x, where x = (ta - t)/2.0 Gyr. Individual galaxies, however, show a wide dispersion about this mean. When split by mass, the SFR peaks earlier for high-mass galaxies than for lower mass ones, and we interpret this downsizing as a mass-dependence in the evolution of the quenched fraction: the SFHs of star-forming galaxies show only a weak mass-dependence.

  7. THE IMACS CLUSTER BUILDING SURVEY. IV. THE LOG-NORMAL STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Gladders, Michael D.; Abramson, Louis; Oemler, Augustus; Dressler, Alan; Poggianti, Bianca; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2013-06-10

    We present here a simple model for the star formation history (SFH) of galaxies that is successful in describing both the star formation rate density (SFRD) over cosmic time, as well as the distribution of specific star formation rates (sSFRs) of galaxies at the current epoch, and the evolution of this quantity in galaxy populations to a redshift of z = 1. We show first that the cosmic SFRD is remarkably well described by a simple log-normal in time. We next postulate that this functional form for the ensemble is also a reasonable description for the SFHs of individual galaxies. Using the measured sSFRs for galaxies at z {approx} 0 from Paper III in this series, we then construct a realization of a universe populated by such galaxies in which the parameters of the log-normal SFH of each galaxy are adjusted to match the sSFRs at z {approx} 0 as well as fitting, in ensemble, the cosmic SFRD from z = 0 to z = 8. This model predicts, with striking fidelity, the distribution of sSFRs in mass-limited galaxy samples to z = 1; this match is not achieved by other models with a different functional form for the SFHs of individual galaxies, but with the same number of degrees of freedom, suggesting that the log-normal form is well matched to the likely actual histories of individual galaxies. We also impose the sSFR versus mass distributions at higher redshifts from Paper III as constraints on the model, and show that, as previously suggested, some galaxies in the field, particularly low mass galaxies, are quite young at intermediate redshifts. As emphasized in Paper III, starbursts are insufficient to explain the enhanced sSFRs in intermediate redshift galaxies; we show here that a model using only smoothly varying log-normal SFHs for galaxies, which allows for some fraction of the population to have peak star formation at late times, does however fully explain the observations. Finally, we show that this model, constrained in detail only at redshifts z < 1, also produces

  8. Episodic Model For Star Formation History and Chemical Abundances in Giant and Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debsarma, Suma; Chattopadhyay, Tanuka; Das, Sukanta; Pfenniger, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    In search for a synthetic understanding, a scenario for the evolution of the star formation rate and the chemical abundances in galaxies is proposed, combining gas infall from galactic halos, outflow of gas by supernova explosions, and an oscillatory star formation process. The oscillatory star formation model is a consequence of the modelling of the fractional masses changes of the hot, warm and cold components of the interstellar medium. The observed periods of oscillation vary in the range (0.1 - 3.0) × 107 yr depending on various parameters existing from giant to dwarf galaxies. The evolution of metallicity varies in giant and dwarf galaxies and depends on the outflow process. Observed abundances in dwarf galaxies can be reproduced under fast outflow together with slow evaporation of cold gases into hot gas whereas slow outflow and fast evaporation is preferred for giant galaxies. The variation of metallicities in dwarf galaxies supports the fact that low rate of SNII production in dwarf galaxies is responsible for variation in metallicity in dwarf galaxies of similar masses as suggested by various authors.

  9. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BLACK HOLE GROWTH AND STAR FORMATION IN SEYFERT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Rieke, George H.

    2012-02-20

    We present estimates of black hole accretion rates (BHARs) and nuclear, extended, and total star formation rates for a complete sample of Seyfert galaxies. Using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we measure the active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosity using the [O IV] {lambda}25.89 {mu}m emission line and the star-forming luminosity using the 11.3 {mu}m aromatic feature and extended 24 {mu}m continuum emission. We find that black hole growth is strongly correlated with nuclear (r < 1 kpc) star formation, but only weakly correlated with extended (r > 1 kpc) star formation in the host galaxy. In particular, the nuclear star formation rate (SFR) traced by the 11.3 {mu}m aromatic feature follows a relationship with the BHAR of the form SFR{proportional_to} M-dot{sub BH}{sup 0.8}, with an observed scatter of 0.5 dex. This SFR-BHAR relationship persists when additional star formation in physically matched r = 1 kpc apertures is included, taking the form SFR{proportional_to} M-dot{sub BH}{sup 0.6}. However, the relationship becomes almost indiscernible when total SFRs are considered. This suggests a physical connection between the gas on sub-kiloparsec and sub-parsec scales in local Seyfert galaxies that is not related to external processes in the host galaxy. It also suggests that the observed scaling between star formation and black hole growth for samples of AGNs will depend on whether the star formation is dominated by a nuclear or an extended component. We estimate the integrated black hole and bulge growth that occurs in these galaxies and find that an AGN duty cycle of 5%-10% would maintain the ratio between black hole and bulge masses seen in the local universe.

  10. Star Formation and Dense Gas in Galaxy Mergers from the VIXENS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiderman, Amanda L.; VIXENS Team

    2016-01-01

    We present our λ= 3 mm IRAM and NRO single dish line survey for a sample of 15 interacting galaxies in the VIRUS-P Investigation of the eXtreme ENvironments of Starbursts (VIXENS) survey. Our sample of merging galaxies range from early to late interaction stages (close pairs to merger remnants, respectively). A variety of molecular lines are detected including dense gas tracers HCN, HCO+, HNC, CS, CN (and others) as well as 12CO and 13CO. We compare the dense gas fractions with 12CO and 13CO as well as star formation efficiencies defined by infrared-to-dense gas tracer luminosity ratio and discuss trends with interaction stage. We also investigate relations between star formation and dense gas content in our merger sample and compare them to non-interacting star forming galaxies and Galactic star forming regions in the Milky Way.

  11. Fireworks of Star Formation Light Up a Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Located some 13 million light-years from Earth, NGC 4214 is currently forming clusters of new stars from its interstellar gas and dust. In this Hubble image, we can see a sequence of steps in the formation and evolution of stars and star clusters. The picture was created from exposures taken in several color filters with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. NGC 4214 contains a multitude of faint stars covering most of the frame, but the picture is dominated by filigreed clouds of glowing gas surrounding bright stellar clusters. The youngest of these star clusters are located at the lower right of the picture, where they appear as about half a dozen bright clumps of glowing gas. Young, hot stars have a whitish to bluish color in the Hubble image, because of their high surface temperatures, ranging from 10,000 up to about 50,000 degrees Celsius. The radiation and wind forces from the young stars literally blow bubbles in the gas. Over millions of years, the bubbles increase in size as the stars inside them grow older. Moving to the lower left from the youngest clusters, we find an older star cluster, around which a gas bubble has inflated to the point that there is an obvious cavity around the central cluster. The most spectacular feature in the Hubble picture lies near the center of NGC 4214. This object is a cluster of hundreds of massive blue stars, each of them more than 10,000 times brighter than our own Sun. A vast heart-shaped bubble, inflated by the combined stellar winds and radiation pressure, surrounds the cluster. The expansion of the bubble is augmented as the most massive stars in the center reach the ends of their lives and explode as supernovae. The principal astronomers are: John MacKenty, Jesus Maiz-Apellaniz (Space Telescope Science Institute), Colin Norman (Johns Hopkins University), Nolan Walborn (Space Telescope Science Institute), Richard Burg (Johns Hopkins University), Richard Griffiths (Carnegie Mellon University), and Rosemary Wyse

  12. Constraints on the Star Formation Efficiency of Galaxies During Cosmic Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guochao; Furlanetto, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic reionization is thought to have occurred in the redshift range of 6 < z < 9, which is now being probed by both deep galaxy surveys and CMB observations. Using halo abundance matching over the redshift range 5 < z < 8 and an analytic prescription of gas accretion, we develop a model for the star formation efficiency f* of dark matter halos at z > 6 that matches the measured galaxy luminosity functions at these redshifts. We find that the star formation efficiency peaks near ˜ 10% at halo masses M ˜ 1011-1012 M⊙, in qualitative agreement with its behavior at lower redshifts. Recent lensing observations of z ˜ 7 galaxies suggest that the efficiency declines toward smaller masses, with f* proportional to M1/2 down to M ˜ 1010 M⊙ as expected by models of stellar feedback, albeit with large uncertainties. We then investigate the cosmic star formation histories and the corresponding models of cosmic reionization for a range of extrapolations to small halo masses. We compare these to a variety of observations, using them to further constrain the characteristics of the galaxy populations. Our approach provides an empirically-calibrated, physically-motivated model for the properties of star-forming galaxies sourcing the epoch of reionization. By modeling the redshift evolution of f*, we find a generally slower evolution of the cosmic star formation rate density compared to that predicted by f* fixed in time. In the case where star formation in low-mass halos is maximally efficient, an average escape fraction ˜ 0.1 can reproduce the CMB optical depth observed by Planck, whereas less efficient star formation in these halos requires about twice as many UV photons to escape, or an escape fraction that increases towards higher redshifts. Our models also predict how future observations with JWST can improve our understanding of these galaxy populations.

  13. Star Formation and AGN Activity in Luminous and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartaltepe, Jeyhan

    2015-08-01

    In the local universe, Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs, L_IR > 10^12 L⊙) are all interacting and merging systems. We explore the evolution of the morphological and nuclear properties of (U)LIRGs over cosmic time using a large sample of galaxies from Her- schel observations of the CANDELS fields (including GOODS, COSMOS, and UDS). In particular, we investigate whether the role of galaxy mergers has changed between z ˜ 2 and now using the extensive visual classification catalogs produced by the CANDELS team. The combination of a selection from Herschel, near the peak of IR emission, and rest-frame optical morphologies from CANDELS, provides the ideal comparison to nearby (U)LIRGs. We also use rest-frame optical emission line diagnostics, X-ray luminosity, and MIR colors to separate AGN from star-formation dominated galaxies. We then study the how role of galaxy mergers and the presence of AGN activity correspond to the galaxy’s position in the star formation rate - stellar mass plane. Are galaxies that have specific star formation rates elevated above the main sequence more likely to be mergers? We investigate how AGN identified with different methods correspond to different morphologies and merger stages as well as position on the star formation rate - stellar mass plane.

  14. The interstellar medium and star formation in nearby galaxies. Ludwig Biermann Award Lecture 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigiel, F.; Cormier, D.; Schmidt, T.

    In this overview article we present some of the key projects we pursue in our Emmy Noether group. Our work is focused on nearby galaxies, where we use multi-wavelength, state-of-the-art survey data to probe distribution, abundance and properties of gas and dust in the interstellar medium (ISM) on [Si II] kpc scales. We study the average, radial distributions of atomic (H I) and molecular hydrogen (H2) across the disks of spiral galaxies and assess local (on 1 kpc scales) correlations between H I, H2 and star formation rate (SFR) surface densities across the inner, optical disks of our sample of [Si II] 30 spiral galaxies. The short H2 depletion times ([Si II] 2 Gyr) we find raises the question of if and how star formation is refueled in galactic disks. We look for such signatures of radial gas flows in our H I data and find compelling evidence at least in one case. We extend and compare our gas-SFR studies to the outer disks of galaxies, where conditions change significantly in the ISM, e.g., low metallicity and dust abundance. We focus on star formation at low-metallicity further with detailed ISM studies in dwarf galaxies, where we combine spectroscopic observations in the infrared with detailed modelling to learn about composition and detailed physical properties of the ISM. Of particular interest is the question of what drives large scale star formation in galaxies at low metallicity.

  15. Multicolor Photometry of the Merging Galaxy Cluster A2319: Dynamics and Star Formation Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qi-Rong; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xu

    2014-05-01

    Asymmetric X-ray emission and a powerful cluster-scale radio halo indicate that A2319 is a merging cluster of galaxies. This paper presents our multicolor photometry for A2319 with 15 optical intermediate filters in the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system. There are 142 galaxies with known spectroscopic redshifts within the viewing field of 58' × 58' centered on this rich cluster, including 128 member galaxies (called sample I). A large velocity dispersion in the rest frame, 1622^{+91}_{-70} km s-1, suggests merger dynamics in A2319. The contour map of projected density and localized velocity structure confirm the so-called A2319B substructure, at ~10' northwest to the main concentration A2319A. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of more than 30,000 sources are obtained in our BATC photometry down to V ~ 20 mag. A u-band (~3551 Å) image with better seeing and spatial resolution, obtained with the Bok 2.3 m telescope at Kitt Peak, is taken to make star-galaxy separation and distinguish the overlapping contamination in the BATC aperture photometry. With color-color diagrams and photometric redshift technique, 233 galaxies brighter than h BATC = 19.0 are newly selected as member candidates after an exclusion of false candidates with contaminated BATC SEDs by eyeball-checking the u-band Bok image. The early-type galaxies are found to follow a tight color-magnitude correlation. Based on sample I and the enlarged sample of member galaxies (called sample II), subcluster A2319B is confirmed. The star formation properties of cluster galaxies are derived with the evolutionary synthesis model, PEGASE, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function and an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR). A strong environmental effect on star formation histories is found in the manner that galaxies in the sparse regions have various star formation histories, while galaxies in the dense regions are found to have shorter SFR time scales, older stellar ages, and

  16. Multicolor photometry of the merging galaxy cluster A2319: Dynamics and star formation properties

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qi-Rong; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xu E-mail: yuanqirong@njnu.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    Asymmetric X-ray emission and a powerful cluster-scale radio halo indicate that A2319 is a merging cluster of galaxies. This paper presents our multicolor photometry for A2319 with 15 optical intermediate filters in the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system. There are 142 galaxies with known spectroscopic redshifts within the viewing field of 58' × 58' centered on this rich cluster, including 128 member galaxies (called sample I). A large velocity dispersion in the rest frame, 1622{sub −70}{sup +91} km s{sup –1}, suggests merger dynamics in A2319. The contour map of projected density and localized velocity structure confirm the so-called A2319B substructure, at ∼10' northwest to the main concentration A2319A. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of more than 30,000 sources are obtained in our BATC photometry down to V ∼ 20 mag. A u-band (∼3551 Å) image with better seeing and spatial resolution, obtained with the Bok 2.3 m telescope at Kitt Peak, is taken to make star-galaxy separation and distinguish the overlapping contamination in the BATC aperture photometry. With color-color diagrams and photometric redshift technique, 233 galaxies brighter than h {sub BATC} = 19.0 are newly selected as member candidates after an exclusion of false candidates with contaminated BATC SEDs by eyeball-checking the u-band Bok image. The early-type galaxies are found to follow a tight color-magnitude correlation. Based on sample I and the enlarged sample of member galaxies (called sample II), subcluster A2319B is confirmed. The star formation properties of cluster galaxies are derived with the evolutionary synthesis model, PEGASE, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function and an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR). A strong environmental effect on star formation histories is found in the manner that galaxies in the sparse regions have various star formation histories, while galaxies in the dense regions are found to have shorter SFR time

  17. The bursting nature of star formation in compact star-forming galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izotov, Y. I.; Guseva, N. G.; Fricke, K. J.; Henkel, C.

    2016-08-01

    We study integrated characteristics of ˜ 14000 low-redshift (0 < z < 1) compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) selected from the Data Release 12 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. It is found that emission of these galaxies is dominated by strong young bursts of star formation, implying that their luminosities experience rapid variations on a time scale of a few Myr. Reducing integrated characteristics of these galaxies to zero burst age would result in a considerably tighter and almost linear relation between stellar mass and star formation rate (SFR). The same correction implies that the specific star formation rate (the ratio of SFR and stellar mass) is not dependent on the galaxy stellar mass. We conclude that the correction for rapid luminosity evolution must be taken into account in a similar way when comparing different samples of low- and high-redshift SFGs. If the bursting nature of star formation and young burst ages are characteristics of the galaxies selected at high redshifts, the age correction of observed SFRs derived from the Hβ emission line or UV continua would modify the derived SFR densities in the early universe.

  18. Mechanisms for quenching star formation activities in green valley galaxies and its depends on morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xu; Pan, Zhizheng; Lian, Jianhui

    2015-08-01

    Galaxies are categorized into two main populations, red quiescent galaxies and blue star-forming galaxies. One of the key questions is which physical mechanisms are responsible for quenching star formation activities in blue galaxies and the resulting transformation? In this talk, we present research on the morphologies, spectra, and environments of "green valley" galaxies in the COSMOS field and low redshift "green valley" galaxies in SDSS. Our findings suggest that environmental conditions, most likely starvation and harassment, significantly affect the transformation of M* < 10^10.0 Msun blue galaxies into red galaxies, especially at z < 0.5. Using image from SDSS and GALEX, we analyze the radial ultraviolet-optical color distributions in a sample of low redshift green valley galaxies, and investigate how quenching is processing in a galaxy. The early-type "green valley" galaxies (ETGs) have dramatically different radial NUV-r color distributions compared to late-type "green valley" galaxies (LTGs), most of ETGs have blue cores, nearly all LTGs have uniform color profiles that can be well-interpreted as red bulges plus blue disk components. These results suggest that the LTGs follow a general model by which quenching first occurs in the core regions, and then finally extend to the rest of the galaxy; for ETGs, their star formations are centrally concentrated. Our results can be re-examined and have important implications for the IFU surveys, such as MaNGA and SAMI (2013ApJ...776...14P, 2014ApJ...792L...4P, 2015MNRAS.446.1449L).

  19. Multiwavelength Measures of Star Formation: Galaxies observed by GALEX, SDSS, and Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. D.; Schiminovich, D.; GALEX Science Team

    2006-06-01

    We combine data from SDSS and the GALEX and Spitzer observatories to create a sample of galaxies observed homogeneously from the UV to the Far-IR. This sample, consisting of ˜ 1000 galaxies observed spectroscopically by SDSS, provides a multiwavelength (presently 0.15-70 micron) view of star formation in nearby (z<0.3) galaxies with SFRs ranging from 0.01 to 100 M⊙/year. We present first results on the dust-age-color relation,showing that long wavelength-baseline colors (e.g. NUV-3.6 micron) can be cleanly decomposed into contributions from dust (measured with the infrared to UV ratio) and star formation history (measured with the relatively dust-insensitive D4000). We also show the relation of 8 micron PAH emission to other indicators of star formation and 8/24 micron vs. 24/70 micron color-color diagrams for the sample galaxies. Finally, we present initial empirical SEDs, split by relevant galaxy properties. The SEDs combined with many global measures of stellar, gas and dust properties will provide a useful local reference for models of galaxy formation and will also help guide interpretations of observations of higher redshift galaxies. We gratefully acknowledge NASA's support for construction, operation, and science analysis for the GALEX mission, developed in cooperation with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiale of France and the Korean Ministry of Science and Technology. BDJ was supported by NASA GSRP Grant NNG05GO43H.

  20. Molecular Gas and Star Formation in Tidal Dwarf Galaxies (Oral Contribution)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenfeld, U.; Braine, J.; Duc, P.-A.; Charmandaris, V.; Vallejo, O.; Leon, S.; Brinks, E.

    Tidal Dwarf Galaxies (TDGs) are objects presently forming from gas which has been expelled from their parent galaxies during an interaction. We observed CO emission of a sample of 11 TDGs, of which 8 were detected. The CO is found at the peak of the HI observations and has and has the same line velocity and with, indicating that the molecular gas is forming in situ instead of being torn from the parent galaxies. The presence of Ha emission furthermore shows that stars are forming from this molecular gas. In order too investigate star formation in TDGs further, we compared their molecular gas content and star formation rate (SFR), traced by Ha, to those of spiral galaxies and classical dwarfs. The major difference between TDGs and classical dwarfs is the lower metallicity of the later. The star formation efficiency (SFR per molecular gas mass) of TDGs lies in the range typical of spiral galaxies indicating that star formation is proceeding in a normal fashion from molecular gas.

  1. Constraints on the Star Formation Efficiency of Galaxies During the Epoch of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, G.; Furlanetto, S. R.

    2016-04-01

    Reionization is thought to have occurred in the redshift range of 6 < z < 9, which is now being probed by both deep galaxy surveys and CMB observations. Using halo abundance matching over the redshift range 5 < z < 8 and assuming smooth, continuous gas accretion, we develop a model for the star formation efficiency f⋆ of dark matter halos at z > 6 that matches the measured galaxy luminosity functions at these redshifts. We find that f⋆ peaks at ˜30% at halo masses M ˜ 1011-1012 M⊙, in qualitative agreement with its behavior at lower redshifts. We then investigate the cosmic star formation histories and the corresponding models of reionization for a range of extrapolations to small halo masses. We use a variety of observations to further constrain the characteristics of the galaxy populations, including the escape fraction of UV photons. Our approach provides an empirically-calibrated, physically-motivated model for the properties of star-forming galaxies sourcing the epoch of reionization. In the case where star formation in low-mass halos is maximally efficient, an average escape fraction ˜0.1 can reproduce the optical depth reported by Planck, whereas inefficient star formation in these halos requires either about twice as many UV photons to escape, or an escape fraction that increases towards higher redshifts. Our models also predict how future observations with JWST can improve our understanding of these galaxy populations.

  2. Constraints on the star formation efficiency of galaxies during the epoch of reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, G.; Furlanetto, S. R.

    2016-07-01

    Reionization is thought to have occurred in the redshift range of 6 < z < 9, which is now being probed by both deep galaxy surveys and CMB observations. Using halo abundance matching over the redshift range 5 < z < 8 and assuming smooth, continuous gas accretion, we develop a model for the star formation efficiency f⋆ of dark matter haloes at z > 6 that matches the measured galaxy luminosity functions at these redshifts. We find that f⋆ peaks at ˜30 per cent at halo masses M ˜ 1011-1012 M⊙, in qualitative agreement with its behaviour at lower redshifts. We then investigate the cosmic star formation histories and the corresponding models of reionization for a range of extrapolations to small halo masses. We use a variety of observations to further constrain the characteristics of the galaxy populations, including the escape fraction of UV photons. Our approach provides an empirically calibrated, physically motivated model for the properties of star-forming galaxies sourcing the epoch of reionization. In the case where star formation in low-mass haloes is maximally efficient, an average escape fraction ˜0.1 can reproduce the optical depth reported by Planck, whereas inefficient star formation in these haloes requires either about twice as many UV photons to escape, or an escape fraction that increases towards higher redshifts. Our models also predict how future observations with James Webb Space Telescope can improve our understanding of these galaxy populations.

  3. ARM AND INTERARM STAR FORMATION IN SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Foyle, K.; Rix, H.-W.; Walter, F.; Leroy, A. K.

    2010-12-10

    We investigate the relationship between spiral arms and star formation in the grand-design spirals NGC 5194 and NGC 628 and in the flocculent spiral NGC 6946. Filtered maps of near-IR (3.6 {mu}m) emission allow us to identify 'arm regions' that should correspond to regions of stellar mass density enhancements. The two grand-design spirals show a clear two-armed structure, while NGC 6946 is more complex. We examine these arm and interarm regions, looking at maps that trace recent star formation-far-ultraviolet (GALEX NGS) and 24 {mu}m emission (Spitzer SINGS)-and cold gas-CO (HERACLES) and H I (THINGS). We find the star formation tracers and CO more concentrated in the spiral arms than the stellar 3.6 {mu}m flux. If we define the spiral arms as the 25% highest pixels in the filtered 3.6 {mu}m images, we find that the majority (60%) of star formation tracers occur in the interarm regions; this result persists qualitatively even when considering the potential impact of finite data resolution and diffuse interarm 24 {mu}m emission. Even with a generous definition of the arms (45% highest pixels), interarm regions still contribute at least 30% to the integrated star formation rate (SFR) tracers. We look for evidence that spiral arms trigger star or cloud formation using the ratios of SFR (traced by a combination of FUV and 24 {mu}m emission) to H{sub 2} (traced by CO) and H{sub 2} to H I. Any enhancement of SFR/M(H{sub 2}) in the arm region is very small (less than 10%) and the grand-design spirals show no enhancement compared to the flocculent target. Arm regions do show a weak enhancement in H{sub 2}/H I compared to the interarm regions, but at a fixed gas surface density there is little clear enhancement in the H{sub 2}/H I ratio in the arm regions. Thus, it seems that spiral arms may only act to concentrate the gas to higher densities in the arms.

  4. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. X. QUANTIFYING THE STAR CLUSTER FORMATION EFFICIENCY OF NEARBY DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, David O.; Dale, Daniel A.; Seth, Anil C.; Johnson, L. Clifton; Weisz, Daniel R.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Olsen, Knut A. G.; Engelbracht, Charles W.

    2012-06-01

    We study the relationship between the field star formation and cluster formation properties in a large sample of nearby dwarf galaxies. We use optical data from the Hubble Space Telescope and from ground-based telescopes to derive the ages and masses of the young (t{sub age} {approx}< 100 Myr) cluster sample. Our data provide the first constraints on two proposed relationships between the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies and the properties of their cluster systems in the low SFR regime. The data show broad agreement with these relationships, but significant galaxy-to-galaxy scatter exists. In part, this scatter can be accounted for by simulating the small number of clusters detected from stochastically sampling the cluster mass function. However, this stochasticity does not fully account for the observed scatter in our data, suggesting that there may be true variations in the fraction of stars formed in clusters in dwarf galaxies. Comparison of the cluster formation and the brightest cluster in our sample galaxies also provide constraints on cluster destruction models.

  5. Suppressing star formation in quiescent galaxies with supermassive black hole winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Edmond; Bundy, Kevin; SDSS-IV/MaNGA

    2016-01-01

    In the last 10 billion years (i.e., since redshift z ~2) the number of quiescent galaxies with little to no ongoing star formation has grown by a factor ~25. This is challenging to understand since galaxy formation models predict that these galaxies will continue to accrete fresh gas over their lifetimes, relatively little of which is required to reignite measurable star formation. It is thought that feedback from fresh gas accreting onto a central active galactic nucleus (AGN) might help such galaxies maintain their quiescence, but observational evidence for such ``maintenance mode feedback'' remains sparse. Using novel imaging spectroscopy from the SDSS-IV MaNGA Survey (Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV: Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory), we present evidence for a new maintenance mode phenomenon we term ``red geysers,'' a potentially episodic but relatively low-power AGN driven wind present in typical quiescent field galaxies of moderate mass and spheroidal morphology. We examine an archetypal red geyser that appears to be accreting gas from a low-mass companion but has no corresponding star formation. Instead, we find evidence for a galaxy-scale ionized wind with outflow velocities reaching more than 300 km/s and high velocity dispersions. We also detect a narrow biconical pattern of strong emission line equivalent widths consistent with fast shocks. Given additional confirmation of a radio AGN present in the galaxy, we propose that red geysers such as this may be a common mode in which gas accretion activates an ionized wind feedback mechanism that prevents star formation and helps moderate luminosity quiescent galaxies maintain their quiescence.

  6. GMC evolution in a barred spiral galaxy with star formation and thermal feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Yusuke; Bryan, Greg L.; Tasker, Elizabeth J.; Habe, Asao; Simpson, Christine M.

    2016-09-01

    We explore the impact of star formation and thermal stellar feedback on the giant molecular cloud population forming in a M83-type barred spiral galaxy. We compare three high-resolution simulations (1.5 pc cell size) with different star formation/feedback models: one with no star formation, one with star formation but no feedback, and one with star formation and thermal energy injection. We analyse the resulting population of clouds, finding that we can identify the same population of massive, virialized clouds and transient, low-surface density clouds found in our previous work (that did not include star formation or feedback). Star formation and feedback can affect the mix of clouds we identify. In particular, star formation alone simply converts dense cloud gas into stars with only a small change to the cloud populations, principally resulting in a slight decrease in the transient population. Feedback, however, has a stronger impact: while it is not generally sufficient to entirely destroy the clouds, it does eject gas out of them, increasing the gas density in the intercloud region. This decreases the number of massive clouds, but substantially increases the transient cloud population. We also find that feedback tends to drive a net radial inflow of massive clouds, leading to an increase in the star formation rate in the bar region. We examine a number of possible reasons for this and conclude that it is possible that the drag force from the enhanced intercloud density could be responsible.

  7. Mass Transport and Turbulence in Gravitationally Unstable Disk Galaxies. II: The Effects of Star Formation Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbaum, Nathan J.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Forbes, John C.

    2016-08-01

    Self-gravity and stellar feedback are capable of driving turbulence and transporting mass and angular momentum in disk galaxies, but the balance between them is not well understood. In the previous paper in this series, we showed that gravity alone can drive turbulence in galactic disks, regulate their Toomre Q parameters to ∼1, and transport mass inwards at a rate sufficient to fuel star formation in the centers of present-day galaxies. In this paper we extend our models to include the effects of star formation feedback. We show that feedback suppresses galaxies’ star formation rates by a factor of ∼5 and leads to the formation of a multi-phase atomic and molecular interstellar medium. Both the star formation rate and the phase balance produced in our simulations agree well with observations of nearby spirals. After our galaxies reach steady state, we find that the inclusion of feedback actually lowers the gas velocity dispersion slightly compared to the case of pure self-gravity, and also slightly reduces the rate of inward mass transport. Nevertheless, we find that, even with feedback included, our galactic disks self-regulate to Q ∼ 1, and transport mass inwards at a rate sufficient to supply a substantial fraction of the inner disk star formation. We argue that gravitational instability is therefore likely to be the dominant source of turbulence and transport in galactic disks, and that it is responsible for fueling star formation in the inner parts of galactic disks over cosmological times.

  8. Discrete X-Ray Source Populations and Star Formation History in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zezas, Andreas; Hasan, Hashima (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    This program aims in understanding the connection between the discrete X-ray source populations observed in nearby galaxies and the history of star-formation in these galaxies. The ultimate goal is to use this knowledge in order to constrain X-ray binary evolution channels. For this reason although the program is primarily observational it has a significant modeling component. During the second year of this study we focused on detailed studies of the Antennae galaxies and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We also performed the initial analysis of the 5 galaxies forming a starburst-age sequence.

  9. The interstellar medium and star formation in local galaxies: Variations of the star formation law in simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Becerra, Fernando; Escala, Andrés

    2014-05-01

    We use the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo to model the interstellar medium (ISM) in isolated local disk galaxies. The simulation includes a treatment for star formation and stellar feedback. We get a highly supersonic turbulent disk, which is fragmented at multiple scales and characterized by a multi-phase ISM. We show that a Kennicutt-Schmidt relation only holds when averaging over large scales. However, values of star formation rates and gas surface densities lie close in the plot for any averaging size. This suggests an intrinsic relation between stars and gas at cell-size scales, which dominates over the global dynamical evolution. To investigate this effect, we develop a method to simulate the creation of stars based on the density field from the snapshots, without running the code again. We also investigate how the star formation law is affected by the characteristic star formation timescale, the density threshold, and the efficiency considered in the recipe. We find that the slope of the law varies from ∼1.4 for a free-fall timescale, to ∼1.0 for a constant depletion timescale. We further demonstrate that a power law is recovered just by assuming that the mass of the new stars is a fraction of the mass of the cell m {sub *} = ερ{sub gas}Δx {sup 3}, with no other physical criteria required. We show that both efficiency and density threshold do not affect the slope, but the right combination of them can adjust the normalization of the relation, which in turn could explain a possible bi-modality in the law.

  10. THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: CLUSTERING DEPENDENCE ON GALAXY STELLAR MASS AND STAR FORMATION RATE AT z {approx} 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mostek, Nick; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael; Davis, Marc; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2013-04-10

    We present DEEP2 galaxy clustering measurements at z {approx} 1 as a function of stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and specific SFR (sSFR). We find a strong positive correlation between stellar mass and clustering amplitude on 1-10 h {sup -1} Mpc scales for blue, star-forming galaxies with 9.5 < log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) < 11 and no dependence for red, quiescent galaxies with 10.5 < log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) < 11.5. Using recently re-calibrated DEEP2 SFRs from restframe B-band magnitude and optical colors, we find that within the blue galaxy population at z {approx} 1 the clustering amplitude increases strongly with increasing SFR and decreasing sSFR. For red galaxies there is no significant correlation between clustering amplitude and either SFR or sSFR. Blue galaxies with high SFR or low sSFR are as clustered on large scales as red galaxies. We find that the clustering trend observed with SFR can be explained mostly, but not entirely, by the correlation between stellar mass and clustering amplitude for blue galaxies. We also show that galaxies above the star-forming 'main sequence' are less clustered than galaxies below the main sequence, at a given stellar mass. These results are not consistent with the high-sSFR population being dominated by major mergers. We also measure the clustering amplitude on small scales ({<=}0.3 h {sup -1} Mpc) and find an enhanced clustering signal relative to the best-fit large-scale power law for red galaxies with high stellar mass, blue galaxies with high SFR, and both red and blue galaxies with high sSFR. The increased small-scale clustering for galaxies with high sSFRs is likely linked to triggered star formation in interacting galaxies. These measurements provide strong constraints on galaxy evolution and halo occupation distribution models at z {approx} 1.